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Sample records for starburst molecular structure

  1. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  2. Dense circumnuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C.-E.; Cunningham, M. R.; Green, J. A.; Dawson, J. R.; Jones, P. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Henkel, C.; Baan, W. A.; Martín, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from a study of the dense circumnuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterize the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO+ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circumnuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in seven of the nine galaxies and HNC (1-0) in four. Approximately 7 arcsec resolution maps of the circumnuclear molecular gas are presented. The velocity-integrated intensity ratios, HCO+ (1-0)/HCN (1-0) and HNC (1-0)/HCN (1-0), are calculated. Using these integrated intensity ratios and spatial intensity ratio maps, we identify photon-dominated regions (PDRs) in NGC 1097, NGC 1365 and NGC 1808. We find no galaxy which shows the PDR signature in only one part of the observed nuclear region. We also observe unusually strong HNC emission in NGC 5236, but it is not strong enough to be consistent with X-ray-dominated region chemistry. Rotation curves are derived for five of the galaxies and dynamical mass estimates of the inner regions of three of the galaxies are made.

  3. HIGH-DENSITY MOLECULAR GAS PROPERTIES OF THE STARBURST GALAXY NGC 1614 REVEALED WITH ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2013-09-15

    We present the results of HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 4-3 transition line observations of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 1614, obtained with ALMA Cycle 0. We find that high density molecular gas traced with these lines shows a velocity structure such that the northern (southern) side of the nucleus is redshifted (blueshifted) with respect to the nuclear velocity of this galaxy. The redshifted and blueshifted emission peaks are offset by {approx}0.''6 at the northern and southern sides of the nucleus, respectively. At these offset positions, observations at infrared >3 {mu}m indicate the presence of active dusty starbursts, supporting the picture that high-density molecular gas is the site of active starbursts. The enclosed dynamical mass within the central {approx}2'' in radius, derived from the dynamics of the high-density molecular gas, is {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, which is similar to previous estimates. Finally, the HCN emission is weaker than HCO{sup +} but stronger than HNC for J = 4-3 for all starburst regions of NGC 1614, as seen for J = 1-0 transition lines in starburst-dominated galaxies.

  4. Starburst at the Expanding Molecular Superbubble in M82: Self-induced Starburst at the Inner Edge of the Superbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsuru, Takeshi G.; Vila-Vilaró, Baltasar

    2005-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution (2.3"×1.9" or 43pc×36pc at D=3.9 Mpc) 100 GHz millimeter-wave continuum emission observations with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array toward an expanding molecular superbubble in the central region of M82. The 100 GHz continuum image, which is dominated by free-free emission, revealed that the four strongest peaks are concentrated at the inner edge of the superbubble along the galactic disk. The production rates of Lyman continuum photons calculated from 100 GHz continuum flux at these peaks are an order of magnitude higher than those from the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. At these regions, high-velocity ionized gas (traced by H41α and [Ne II]) can be seen, and H2O and OH masers are also concentrated. The center of the superbubble, on the other hand, is weak in molecular and free-free emissions and strong in diffuse hard X-ray emission. These observations suggest that a strong starburst produced energetic explosions and the resulting plasma and superbubble expansions and induced the present starburst regions traced by our 100 GHz continuum observations at the inner edge of the molecular superbubble. These results, therefore, provide the first clear evidence of self-induced starburst in external galaxies. The starburst at the center of the superbubble, on the other hand, is beginning to cease because of a lack of molecular gas. This kind of intense starburst seems to have occurred several times within 106-107 yr in the central region of M82.

  5. Stellar feedback as the origin of an extended molecular outflow in a starburst galaxy.

    PubMed

    Geach, J E; Hickox, R C; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Krips, M; Rudnick, G H; Tremonti, C A; Sell, P H; Coil, A L; Moustakas, J

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations have revealed that starburst galaxies can drive molecular gas outflows through stellar radiation pressure. Molecular gas is the phase of the interstellar medium from which stars form, so these outflows curtail stellar mass growth in galaxies. Previously known outflows, however, involve small fractions of the total molecular gas content and have typical scales of less than a kiloparsec. In at least some cases, input from active galactic nuclei is dynamically important, so pure stellar feedback (the momentum return into the interstellar medium) has been considered incapable of rapidly terminating star formation on galactic scales. Molecular gas has been detected outside the galactic plane of the archetypal starburst galaxy M82 (refs 4 and 5), but so far there has been no evidence that starbursts can propel substantial quantities of cold molecular gas to the same galactocentric radius (about 10 kiloparsecs) as the warmer gas that has been traced by metal ion absorbers in the circumgalactic medium. Here we report observations of molecular gas in a compact (effective radius 100 parsecs) massive starburst galaxy at redshift 0.7, which is known to drive a fast outflow of ionized gas. We find that 35 per cent of the total molecular gas extends approximately 10 kiloparsecs, and one-third of this extended gas has a velocity of up to 1,000 kilometres per second. The kinetic energy associated with this high-velocity component is consistent with the momentum flux available from stellar radiation pressure. This demonstrates that nuclear bursts of star formation are capable of ejecting large amounts of cold gas from the central regions of galaxies, thereby strongly affecting their evolution by truncating star formation and redistributing matter. PMID:25471881

  6. Suppression of star formation in the galaxy NGC 253 by a starburst-driven molecular wind.

    PubMed

    Bolatto, Alberto D; Warren, Steven R; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Veilleux, Sylvain; Ostriker, Eve C; Ott, Jürgen; Zwaan, Martin; Fisher, David B; Weiss, Axel; Rosolowsky, Erik; Hodge, Jacqueline

    2013-07-25

    The under-abundance of very massive galaxies in the Universe is frequently attributed to the effect of galactic winds. Although ionized galactic winds are readily observable, most of the expelled mass (that is, the total mass flowing out from the nuclear region) is likely to be in atomic and molecular phases that are cooler than the ionized phases. Expanding molecular shells observed in starburst systems such as NGC 253 (ref. 12) and M 82 (refs 13, 14) may facilitate the entrainment of molecular gas in the wind. Although shell properties are well constrained, determining the amount of outflowing gas emerging from such shells and the connection between this gas and the ionized wind requires spatial resolution better than 100 parsecs coupled with sensitivity to a wide range of spatial scales, a combination hitherto not available. Here we report observations of NGC 253, a nearby starburst galaxy (distance ∼ 3.4 megaparsecs) known to possess a wind, that trace the cool molecular wind at 50-parsec resolution. At this resolution, the extraplanar molecular gas closely tracks the Hα filaments, and it appears to be connected to expanding molecular shells located in the starburst region. These observations allow us to determine that the molecular outflow rate is greater than 3 solar masses per year and probably about 9 solar masses per year. This implies a ratio of mass-outflow rate to star-formation rate of at least 1, and probably ∼3, indicating that the starburst-driven wind limits the star-formation activity and the final stellar content. PMID:23887428

  7. The Vertical Structure of Nuclear Starburst Disks: Testing a Model of AGN Obscuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.; Gohil, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear starburst disks are Eddington-limited, radiation pressure supported disks that may be active in the nuclear environment of active galaxies (ULIRGS and AGNs). Earlier analytical models suggested that, under certain conditions, these disks may be geometrically thick on pc-scales, and thus could be a viable source for AGN obscuration, partcularly at z≤1, when gas factions in galaxies are still significant. Here, we present early results from numerical 2D models of nuclear starburst disks where the vertical structure is calculated explicitly from solving the hydrostatic balance and radiative transfer equations. We quantitatively assess under which conditions the starburst disk may present substantial obscuring columns for AGN observations.

  8. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Cannon, John M.; Holtzman, Jon

    2012-06-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  9. Suppression of star formation in the galaxy NGC 253 by a starburst-driven molecular wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Steven R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Leroy, A. K.; Walter, F.; Veilleux, S.; Ostriker, E. C.; Ott, J.; Zwaan, M.; Fisher, D. B.; Weiss, A.; Rosolowsky, E.; Hodge, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present Atacama Large (Sub)Millimeter Array (ALMA) CO (J=1-0) observations of the nearby, nuclear starburst galaxy NGC 253. NGC 253 is host to a "superwind" emanating from the central ~200 pc. Galaxy superwinds are thought to help shape the galactic mass function, play a critical role in galaxy evolution, and pollute the intergalactic medium with heavy metals. Detailed studies of nearby systems frequently focus on the warm or hot phases of the wind, visible in X-ray or Halpha emission. However, most of the mass in the outflowing material is thought to be in the form of neutral atomic and molecular gas. We use the observed CO luminosities and velocities to estimate the mass, mass loss rate, and energetics of the molecular wind. We compute an outflow mass of M_mo 6.6x10^6 Msun. The observed projected velocities of the CO filaments range from ~30-60 km s^-1 resulting in a mass loss rate of ~9 Msun yr^-1. The nuclear region of NGC 253 has a star formation rate of ~3 Msun yr^-1 resulting in a mass loading parameter 1-3. It is not immediately clear if the outflowing gas will escape the halo or eventually rain back onto the disk. What is clear is that NGC 253 will exhaust its nuclear star forming gas in ~60-120 Myr at its current mass loss rate, cementing the superwind as an important contributor in the evolution of NGC 253.

  10. Molecular Gas Heating Mechanisms, and Star Formation Feedback in Merger/Starbursts: NGC 6240 and Arp 193 as Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Xilouris, E. M.; Weiss, Axel; van der Werf, Paul; Israel, F. P.; Greve, T. R.; Isaak, Kate G.; Gao, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We used the SPIRE/FTS instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory to obtain the Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of CO from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12 of Arp 193 and NGC 6240, two classical merger/starbursts selected from our molecular line survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L IR >= 1011 L ⊙). The high-J CO SLEDs are then combined with ground-based low-J CO, 13CO, HCN, HCO+, CS line data and used to probe the thermal and dynamical states of their large molecular gas reservoirs. We find the two CO SLEDs strongly diverging from J = 4-3 onward, with NGC 6240 having a much higher CO line excitation than Arp 193, despite their similar low-J CO SLEDs and L FIR/L CO, 1 - 0, L HCN/L CO (J = 1-0) ratios (proxies of star formation efficiency and dense gas mass fraction). In Arp 193, one of the three most extreme starbursts in the local universe, the molecular SLEDs indicate a small amount (~5%-15%) of dense gas (n >= 104 cm-3) unlike NGC 6240 where most of the molecular gas (~60%-70%) is dense (n ~ (104-105) cm-3). Strong star-formation feedback can drive this disparity in their dense gas mass fractions, and also induce extreme thermal and dynamical states for the molecular gas. In NGC 6240, and to a lesser degree in Arp 193, we find large molecular gas masses whose thermal states cannot be maintained by FUV photons from Photon-Dominated Regions. We argue that this may happen often in metal-rich merger/starbursts, strongly altering the initial conditions of star formation. ALMA can now directly probe these conditions across cosmic epoch, and even probe their deeply dust-enshrouded outcome, the stellar initial mass function averaged over galactic evolution.

  11. Molecular gas heating mechanisms, and star formation feedback in merger/starbursts: NGC 6240 and Arp 193 as case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Weiss, Axel; Van der Werf, Paul; Israel, F. P.; Greve, T. R.; Isaak, Kate G.; Gao, Y. E-mail: zyzhang@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: aweiss@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: israel@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: kisaak@rssd.esa.int

    2014-06-20

    We used the SPIRE/FTS instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory to obtain the Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of CO from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12 of Arp 193 and NGC 6240, two classical merger/starbursts selected from our molecular line survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L {sub IR} ≥ 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}). The high-J CO SLEDs are then combined with ground-based low-J CO, {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, CS line data and used to probe the thermal and dynamical states of their large molecular gas reservoirs. We find the two CO SLEDs strongly diverging from J = 4-3 onward, with NGC 6240 having a much higher CO line excitation than Arp 193, despite their similar low-J CO SLEDs and L {sub FIR}/L {sub CO,} {sub 1} {sub –0}, L {sub HCN}/L {sub CO} (J = 1-0) ratios (proxies of star formation efficiency and dense gas mass fraction). In Arp 193, one of the three most extreme starbursts in the local universe, the molecular SLEDs indicate a small amount (∼5%-15%) of dense gas (n ≥ 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) unlike NGC 6240 where most of the molecular gas (∼60%-70%) is dense (n ∼ (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5}) cm{sup –3}). Strong star-formation feedback can drive this disparity in their dense gas mass fractions, and also induce extreme thermal and dynamical states for the molecular gas. In NGC 6240, and to a lesser degree in Arp 193, we find large molecular gas masses whose thermal states cannot be maintained by FUV photons from Photon-Dominated Regions. We argue that this may happen often in metal-rich merger/starbursts, strongly altering the initial conditions of star formation. ALMA can now directly probe these conditions across cosmic epoch, and even probe their deeply dust-enshrouded outcome, the stellar initial mass function averaged over galactic evolution.

  12. The Role of Radiation Feedback in Starburst Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry; Matzner, C. D.; Seaquist, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Massive bursts of stellar activity in starburst environments feed prodigious amount of energy and momentum into the surrounding neutral clouds. With sufficiently intense irradiation from starbursts, the structure of an HII region will be dominated by radiation pressure rather than ionized gas pressure, and radiative energy input in photodissociation regions (PDRs) becomes more important. This state is of considerable interest because of its role in the formation of massive stars, the disruption of giant molecular clouds, and the evolution of starburst galaxies. We study the role of radiation feedback in starburst environments via both theoretical and observational approaches. We argue that radiation pressure is the underlying mechanism for the remarkable constancy of ionization parameters in starburst environments. We also point out that clumping in the neutral material and compression by stellar wind pressure can act to reduce ionization parameters. We use the Cloudy code to determine effective ionization parameters for a population of static dusty HII regions compressed by both radiation pressure and stellar winds. We conclude that the inner starburst region of M82 and the Antennae Galaxies HII regions are both dominated by a combination of radiation pressure and shocked winds. We investigate radiative energy feedback in starburst environments by observing the nearest starburst region 30 Doradus in the LMC. We observe 30 Doradus using NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) with H2 1-0 S(1), Brγ, and [FeII] lines. While H2 can be either radiative or shock excited, the near infrared [FeII] emission line traces shock activities, and the hydrogen recombination line Brγ arises from regions ionized by UV radiation. Therefore ratios of the three emission lines form very useful diagnostics to assess the fraction of radiative and shock feedback. We preliminarily suggest that radiative energy input in the 30 Doradus PDRs is non-negligible.

  13. Molecular gas in low-metallicity starburst galaxies:. Scaling relations and the CO-to-H2 conversion factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorín, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Planesas, P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Tracing the molecular gas-phase in low-mass star-forming galaxies becomes extremely challenging due to significant UV photo-dissociation of CO molecules in their low-dust, low-metallicity ISM environments. Aims: We aim to study the molecular content and the star-formation efficiency of a representative sample of 21 blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), previously characterized on the basis of their spectrophotometric properties. Methods: We present CO (1-0) and (2-1) observations conducted at the IRAM-30m telescope. These data are further supplemented with additional CO measurements and multiwavelength ancillary data from the literature. We explore correlations between the derived CO luminosities and several galaxy-averaged properties. Results: We detect CO emission in seven out of ten BCDs observed. For two galaxies these are the first CO detections reported so far. We find the molecular content traced by CO to be correlated with the stellar and Hi masses, star formation rate (SFR) tracers, the projected size of the starburst, and its gas-phase metallicity. BCDs appear to be systematically offset from the Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law, showing lower average gas surface densities for a given ΣSFR, and therefore showing extremely low (≲0.1 Gyr) H2 and H2 +Hi depletion timescales. The departure from the SK law is smaller when considering H2 +Hi rather than H2 only, and is larger for BCDs with lower metallicity and higher specific SFR. Thus, the molecular fraction (ΣH2/ ΣHI) and CO depletion timescale (ΣH2/ ΣSFR) of BCDs is found to be strongly correlated with metallicity. Using this, and assuming that the empirical correlation found between the specific SFR and galaxy-averaged H2 depletion timescale of more metal-rich galaxies extends to lower masses, we derive a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor αCO,Z ∝ (Z/Z⊙)- y, with y = 1.5(±0.3)in qualitative agreement with previous determinations, dust-based measurements, and recent model

  14. Starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared properties of star-forming galaxies, primarily as determined by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), are compared to X-ray, optical, and radio properties. Luminosity functions are reviewed and combined with those derived from optically discovered samples using 487 Markarian galaxies with redshifts and published IRAS 60 micron fluxes, and 1074 such galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. It is found that the majority of infrared galaxies which could be detected are low luminosity sources already known from the optical samples, but non-infrared surveys have found only a very small fraction of the highest luminosity sources. Distributions of infrared to optical fluxes and available spectra indicate that the majority of IRAS-selected galaxies are starburst galaxies. Having a census of starburst galaxies and associated dust allow severl important global calculations. The source counts are predicted as a function of flux limits for both infrared and radio fluxes. These galaxies are found to be important radio sources at faint flux limits. Taking the integrated flux to z = 3 indicates that such galaxies are a significant component of the diffuse X-ray background, and could be the the dominant component depending on the nature of the X-ray spectra and source evolution.

  15. The Molecular Clouds Fueling A 1/5 Solar Metallicity Starburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Leroy, Adam K.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Sandstrom, Karin; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2016-09-01

    Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have made the first high spatial and spectral resolution observations of the molecular gas and dust in the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. The {}12{CO}(2-1) and {}12{CO}(3-2) emission is clumpy and distributed throughout the central star-forming region. Only one of eight molecular clouds has associated star formation. The continuum spectral energy distribution is dominated by free–free and synchrotron; at 870 μm, only 50% of the emission is from dust. We derive a CO-to-H2 conversion factor using several methods, including a new method that uses simple photodissocation models and resolved CO line intensity measurements to derive a relationship that uniquely predicts {α }{co} for a given metallicity. We find that the CO-to-H2 conversion factor is 4–35 times that of the Milky Way (18.1–150.5 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1). The star formation efficiency of the molecular gas is at least 10 times higher than that found in normal spiral galaxies, which is likely due to the burst-dominated star formation history of II Zw 40 rather than an intrinsically higher efficiency. The molecular clouds within II Zw 40 resemble those in other strongly interacting systems like the Antennae: overall they have high size–linewidth coefficients and molecular gas surface densities. These properties appear to be due to the high molecular gas surface densities produced in this merging system rather than to increased external pressure. Overall, these results paint a picture of II Zw 40 as a complex, rapidly evolving system whose molecular gas properties are dominated by the large-scale gas shocks from its ongoing merger.

  16. A molecular Einstein ring: imaging a starburst disk surrounding a quasi-stellar object.

    PubMed

    Carilli, C L; Lewis, G F; Djorgovski, S G; Mahabal, A; Cox, P; Bertoldi, F; Omont, A

    2003-05-01

    Images of the molecular CO 2-1 line emission and the radio continuum emission from the redshift 4.12 gravitationally lensed quasi-stellar object (QSO) PSS J2322+1944 reveal an Einstein ring with a diameter of 1.5". These observations are modeled as a star-forming disk surrounding the QSO nucleus with a radius of 2 kiloparsecs. The implied massive star formation rate is 900 solar masses per year. At this rate, a substantial fraction of the stars in a large elliptical galaxy could form on a dynamical time scale of 108 years. The observation of active star formation in the host galaxy of a high-redshift QSO supports the hypothesis of coeval formation of supermassive black holes and stars in spheroidal galaxies. PMID:12677071

  17. THE OPTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STARBURST GALAXY M82. II. NEBULAR PROPERTIES OF THE DISK AND INNER WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, J. S.; Trancho, G.

    2009-12-01

    and wind sources provides an ideal environment for broad line emission, and explains the large observed broad/narrow-line flux ratios. We have examined in more detail the discrete outflow channel identified within the inner wind in Paper I. The channel appears as a coherent, expanding cylindrical structure of length >120 pc and width 35-50 pc. The walls maintain an approximately constant (but subsonic) expansion velocity of approx60 km s{sup -1}, and are defined by peaks and troughs in the densities of the different line components. We hypothesize that as the hot wind fluid flows down the channel cavity, it interacts with the cooler, denser walls of the channel and with entrained material within the flow to produce broad-line emission, while the walls themselves emit primarily the narrow lines. We use the channel to examine further the relationship between the narrow and broad component emitting gas within the inner wind. Within the starburst energy injection zone, we find that turbulent motions (as traced by the broad component) appear to play an increasing role with height. Finally, we have argued that a point-like knot identified in GMOS position 4, exhibiting blueshifted (by approx140 km s{sup -1}), broad (approx<350 km s{sup -1}) Halpha emission and enhanced [S II]/Halpha and [N II]/Halpha ratios, is most likely an ejected luminous blue variable-type object.

  18. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  19. Starbursts and their dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin

    1987-01-01

    Detailed mechanisms associated with dynamical process occurring in starburst galaxies are considered including the role of bars, waves, mergers, sinking satellites, self gravitating gas and bulge heating. The current understanding of starburst galaxies both observational and theoretical is placed in the context of theories of galaxy formations, Hubble sequence evolution, starbursts and activity, and the nature of quasar absorption lines.

  20. A dust-obscured massive maximum-starburst galaxy at a redshift of 6.34.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Dominik A; Bradford, C M; Clements, D L; Dowell, C D; Pérez-Fournon, I; Ivison, R J; Bridge, C; Conley, A; Fu, Hai; Vieira, J D; Wardlow, J; Calanog, J; Cooray, A; Hurley, P; Neri, R; Kamenetzky, J; Aguirre, J E; Altieri, B; Arumugam, V; Benford, D J; Béthermin, M; Bock, J; Burgarella, D; Cabrera-Lavers, A; Chapman, S C; Cox, P; Dunlop, J S; Earle, L; Farrah, D; Ferrero, P; Franceschini, A; Gavazzi, R; Glenn, J; Solares, E A Gonzalez; Gurwell, M A; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Hyde, A; Ibar, E; Kovács, A; Krips, M; Lupu, R E; Maloney, P R; Martinez-Navajas, P; Matsuhara, H; Murphy, E J; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H T; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Petitpas, G; Rangwala, N; Roseboom, I G; Scott, D; Smith, A J; Staguhn, J G; Streblyanska, A; Thomson, A P; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Wang, L; Zemcov, M; Zmuidzinas, J

    2013-04-18

    Massive present-day early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies probably gained the bulk of their stellar mass and heavy elements through intense, dust-enshrouded starbursts--that is, increased rates of star formation--in the most massive dark-matter haloes at early epochs. However, it remains unknown how soon after the Big Bang massive starburst progenitors exist. The measured redshift (z) distribution of dusty, massive starbursts has long been suspected to be biased low in z owing to selection effects, as confirmed by recent findings of systems with redshifts as high as ~5 (refs 2-4). Here we report the identification of a massive starburst galaxy at z = 6.34 through a submillimetre colour-selection technique. We unambiguously determined the redshift from a suite of molecular and atomic fine-structure cooling lines. These measurements reveal a hundred billion solar masses of highly excited, chemically evolved interstellar medium in this galaxy, which constitutes at least 40 per cent of the baryonic mass. A 'maximum starburst' converts the gas into stars at a rate more than 2,000 times that of the Milky Way, a rate among the highest observed at any epoch. Despite the overall downturn in cosmic star formation towards the highest redshifts, it seems that environments mature enough to form the most massive, intense starbursts existed at least as early as 880 million years after the Big Bang. PMID:23598341

  1. EVOLVING STARBURST MODELING OF FAR-INFRARED/SUBMILLIMETER/MILLIMETER LINE EMISSION. II. APPLICATION TO M 82

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Lihong

    2009-11-01

    We present starburst models for far-infrared/sub-millimeter/millimeter line emission of molecular and atomic gas in an evolving starburst region, which is treated as an ensemble of noninteracting hot bubbles that drive spherical shells of swept-up gas into a surrounding uniform gas medium. These bubbles and shells are driven by stellar winds and supernovae within massive star clusters formed during an instantaneous starburst. The underlying stellar radiation from the evolving clusters affects the properties and structure of photodissociation regions (PDRs) in the shells, and hence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the molecular and atomic line emission from these swept-up shells and the associated parent giant molecular clouds contain a signature of the stage of evolution of the starburst. The physical and chemical properties of the shells and their structure are computed using a simple, well-known similarity solution for the shell expansion, a stellar population synthesis code, and a time-dependent PDR chemistry model. The SEDs for several molecular and atomic lines ({sup 12}CO and its isotope {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, C, O, and C{sup +}) are computed using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line radiative transfer model. By comparing our models with the available observed data of nearby infrared bright galaxies, especially M 82, we constrain the models and in the case of M 82, we provide estimates for the ages (5-6 Myr, 10 Myr) of recent starburst activity. We also derive a total H{sub 2} gas mass of approx(2-3.4) x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun} for the observed regions of the central 1 kpc starburst disk of M 82.

  2. Star Formation Quenching in High-redshift Large-scale Structure: Post-starburst Galaxies in the Cl 1604 Supercluster at z ~ 0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Gal, Roy R.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lubin, Lori M.; Rumbaugh, Nicholas; Squires, Gordon K.

    2014-09-01

    The Cl 1604 supercluster at z ~ 0.9 is one of the most extensively studied high-redshift large-scale structures, with more than 500 spectroscopically confirmed members. It consists of eight clusters and groups, with members numbering from a dozen to nearly a hundred, providing a broad range of environments for investigating the large-scale environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Here we examine the properties of 48 post-starburst galaxies in Cl 1604, comparing them to other galaxy populations in the same supercluster. Incorporating photometry from ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, along with Spitzer mid-infrared observations, we derive stellar masses for all Cl 1604 members. The colors and stellar masses of the K+A galaxies support the idea that they are progenitors of red sequence galaxies. Their morphologies, residual star formation rates, and spatial distributions suggest that galaxy mergers may be the principal mechanism producing post-starburst galaxies. Interaction between galaxies and the dense intracluster medium (ICM) is also effective, but only in the cores of dynamically evolved clusters. The prevalence of post-starburst galaxies in clusters correlates with the dynamical state of the host cluster, as both galaxy mergers and the dense ICM produce post-starburst galaxies. We also investigate the incompleteness and contamination of K+A samples selected by means of Hδ and [O II] equivalent widths. K+A samples may be up to ~50% incomplete due to the presence of LINERs/Seyferts, and up to ~30% of K+A galaxies could have substantial star formation activity.

  3. Star formation quenching in high-redshift large-scale structure: post-starburst galaxies in the Cl 1604 supercluster at z ∼ 0.9

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Po-Feng; Gal, Roy R.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lubin, Lori M.; Rumbaugh, Nicholas; Squires, Gordon K.

    2014-09-01

    The Cl 1604 supercluster at z ∼ 0.9 is one of the most extensively studied high-redshift large-scale structures, with more than 500 spectroscopically confirmed members. It consists of eight clusters and groups, with members numbering from a dozen to nearly a hundred, providing a broad range of environments for investigating the large-scale environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Here we examine the properties of 48 post-starburst galaxies in Cl 1604, comparing them to other galaxy populations in the same supercluster. Incorporating photometry from ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, along with Spitzer mid-infrared observations, we derive stellar masses for all Cl 1604 members. The colors and stellar masses of the K+A galaxies support the idea that they are progenitors of red sequence galaxies. Their morphologies, residual star formation rates, and spatial distributions suggest that galaxy mergers may be the principal mechanism producing post-starburst galaxies. Interaction between galaxies and the dense intracluster medium (ICM) is also effective, but only in the cores of dynamically evolved clusters. The prevalence of post-starburst galaxies in clusters correlates with the dynamical state of the host cluster, as both galaxy mergers and the dense ICM produce post-starburst galaxies. We also investigate the incompleteness and contamination of K+A samples selected by means of Hδ and [O II] equivalent widths. K+A samples may be up to ∼50% incomplete due to the presence of LINERs/Seyferts, and up to ∼30% of K+A galaxies could have substantial star formation activity.

  4. High mass stars: starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments. b) The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. c) The role of starbursts in AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media. e) The contribution of starbursts to the reionization of the universe. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution long-slit spectrograph with high spatial resolution and high UV sensitivity is required to further progress in the study of starburst galaxies and their impact on the evolution of galaxies.

  5. THE OPTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STARBURST GALAXY M82. I. DYNAMICS OF THE DISK AND INNER-WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, J. S.; Trancho, G.

    2009-05-01

    We present Gemini-North GMOS-IFU observations of the central starburst clumps and inner wind of M82, together with WIYN DensePak IFU observations of the inner 2 x 0.9 kpc of the disk. These cover the emission lines of H{alpha}, [N II], [S II], and [S III] at a spectral resolution of 45-80 km s{sup -1}. The high signal-to-noise of the data is sufficient to accurately decompose the emission line profiles into multiple narrow components (FWHM {approx} 30-130 km s{sup -1}) superimposed on a broad (FWHM {approx} 150-350 km s{sup -1}) feature. This paper is the first of a series examining the optical structure of M82's disk and inner wind; here we focus on the ionized gaseous and stellar dynamics and present maps of the relevant emission line properties. Our observations show that ionized gas in the starburst core of M82 is dynamically complex with many overlapping expanding structures located at different radii. Localised line splitting of up to 100 km s{sup -1} in the narrow component is associated with expanding shells of compressed, cool, photoionized gas at the roots of the superwind outflow. We have been able to associate some of this inner-wind gas with a distinct outflow channel characterised by its dynamics and gas density patterns, and we discuss the consequences of this discovery in terms of the developing wind outflow. The broad optical emission line component is observed to become increasingly important moving outward along the outflow channel, and in general with increasing height above/below the plane. Following our recent work on the origins of this component, we associate it with turbulent gas in wind-clump interface layers and hence sites of mass loading, meaning that the turbulent mixing of cooler gas into the outflowing hot gas must become increasingly important with height, and provides powerful direct evidence for the existence of mass-loading over a large, spatially extended area reaching far into the inner wind. We discuss the consequences and

  6. Starbursts in colliding galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, I. F.; Duc, P. A.

    Global starbursts are a consequence of rapid changes in the dynamics of the interstellar gas. The most violent starbursts take place in the nuclear regions of galaxies, when galaxy-galaxy encounters cause a sudden reduction of angular momentum, with the subsequent infall to the central regions of a large fraction of the overall interstellar gas. Although starbursts are also observed in the central regions of isolated barred spiral galaxies, most of the starbursts with bolometric luminosities above 1012Lsun occur in mergers. Super-starbursts in galactic nuclei seem to require high infall rates of interstellar gas that can only be produced during mergers. The authors discuss the phenomenon of extranuclear starbursts in relation to the formation of dwarf galaxies during galaxy-galaxy collisions. As a consequence of tidal interactions a fraction of the less gravitationally bound atomic hydrogen that populates the outskirts of disk galaxies may escape into the intergalactic medium. It is found that the ejected gas may assemble again and collapse, leading to the formation of intergalactic starbursts, namely, tidal dwarf galaxies.

  7. Massive stars: Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa María

    2007-07-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. b) Stellar clusters are an important mode of star formation in starbursts. c) The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar medium: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s%u22121 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. High-spatial resolution spectra are also needed to isolate the light from the center to the disk in UV luminous galaxies found by GALEX. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution spectrograph with high spatial

  8. NGC 1614: A Laboratory for Starburst Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Rieke, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Quillen, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    The modest extinction and reasonably face-on viewing geometry make the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 1614 an ideal laboratory for study of a powerful starburst. HST/NICMOS observations show: (1) deep CO stellar absorption, tracing a starburst nucleus about 45 pc in diameter; (2) surrounded by an approx. 600 pc diameter ring of supergiant H II regions revealed in Pa-alpha line emission; (3) lying within a molecular ring indicated by its extinction shadow in H - K; and (4) all at the center of a disturbed spiral galaxy. The luminosities of the giant H II regions in the ring axe extremely high, an order of magnitude brighter than 30 Doradus; very luminous H II regions, comparable with 30 Dor, are also found in the spiral arms of the galaxy. Luminous stellar clusters surround the nucleus and lie in the spiral arms, similar to clusters observed in other infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxies. The star forming activity may have been initiated by a merger between a disk galaxy and a companion satellite, whose nucleus appears in projection about 300 pc to the NE of the nucleus of the primary galaxy. The relation of deep stellar CO bands to surrounding ionized gas ring to molecular gas indicates that the luminous starburst started in the nucleus and is propagating outward into the surrounding molecular ring. This hypothesis is supported by evolutionary starburst modeling that shows that the properties of NGC 1614 can be fitted with two short-lived bursts of star formation separated by 5 Myr (and by inference by a variety of models with a similar duration of star formation). The total dynamical mass of the starburst region of 1.3 x 10(exp 9) solar masses is mostly accounted for by the old pre-starburst stellar population. Although our starburst models use a modified Salpeter initial mass function (turning over near one solar mass), the tight mass budget suggests that the IMF may contain relatively more 10 - 30 solar masses stars and fewer low mass stars than the

  9. Neutral carbon and CO in 76 (U)LIRGs and starburst galaxy centers. A method to determine molecular gas properties in luminous galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, F. P.; Rosenberg, M. J. F.; van der Werf, P.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present fluxes in the [ CI ] lines of neutral carbon at the centers of some 76 galaxies with far-infrared luminosities ranging from 109 to 1012L⊙, as obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory and ground-based facilities, along with the line fluxes of the J = 7-6, J = 4-3, J = 2-112CO, and J = 2-113CO transitions. With this dataset, we determine the behavior of the observed lines with respect to each other and then investigate whether they can be used to characterize the molecular interstellar medium (ISM) of the parent galaxies in simple ways and how the molecular gas properties define the model results. In most starburst galaxies, the [ CI ] to 13CO line flux ratio is much higher than in Galactic star-forming regions, and it is correlated to the total far-infrared luminosity. The [ CI ] (1-0)/12CO (4-3), the [ CI ] (2-1)/12CO (7-6), and the [ CI ] (2-1)/(1-0) flux ratios are correlated, and they trace the excitation of the molecular gas. In the most luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), the ISM is fully dominated by dense (n( H2) = 104-105 cm-3) and moderately warm (Tkin ≈ 30 K) gas clouds that appear to have low [C°]/[CO] and [13CO]/[12CO] abundances. In less luminous galaxies, emission from gas clouds at lower densities becomes progressively more important, and a multiple-phase analysis is required to determine consistent physical characteristics. Neither the 12CO nor the [ CI ] velocity-integrated line fluxes are good predictors of molecular hydrogen column densities in individual galaxies. In particular, so-called X( [ CI ]) conversion factors are not superior to X( 12CO) factors. The methods and diagnostic diagrams outlined in this paper also provide a new and relatively straightforward means of deriving the physical characteristics of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies up to z = 5, which are otherwise hard to determine.

  10. Karl G. Jansky very large array observations of cold dust and molecular gas in starbursting quasar host galaxies at z ∼ 4.5

    SciTech Connect

    Wagg, J.; Carilli, C. L.; Lentati, L.; Maiolino, R.; Hills, R.; Aravena, M.; Cox, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Riechers, D.; Walter, F.; Andreani, P.; Wolfe, A.

    2014-03-10

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 44 GHz continuum and CO J = 2-1 line emission in BRI 1202–0725 at z = 4.7 (a starburst galaxy and quasar pair) and BRI 1335–0417 at z = 4.4 (also hosting a quasar). With the full 8 GHz bandwidth capabilities of the upgraded VLA, we study the (rest-frame) 250 GHz thermal dust continuum emission for the first time along with the cold molecular gas traced by the low-J CO line emission. The measured CO J = 2-1 line luminosities of BRI 1202–0725 are L{sub CO}{sup ′}=(8.7±0.8)×10{sup 10} K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2} and L{sub CO}{sup ′}=(6.0 ± 0.5)×10{sup 10} K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2} for the submillimeter galaxy (SMG) and quasar, respectively, which are equal to previous measurements of the CO J = 5-4 line luminosities implying thermalized line emission, and we estimate a combined cold molecular gas mass of ∼9×10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. In BRI 1335–0417 we measure L{sub CO}{sup ′}=(7.3±0.6)×10{sup 10} K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2}. We detect continuum emission in the SMG BRI 1202–0725 North (S {sub 44} {sub GHz} = 51 ± 6 μJy), while the quasar is detected with S {sub 44} {sub GHz} = 24 ± 6 μJy and in BRI 1335–0417 we measure S {sub 44} {sub GHz} = 40 ± 7 μJy. Combining our continuum observations with previous data at (rest-frame) far-infrared and centimeter wavelengths, we fit three-component models in order to estimate the star formation rates. This spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that the dominant contribution to the observed 44 GHz continuum is thermal dust emission, while either thermal free-free or synchrotron emission contributes less than 30%.

  11. THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. V. FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR STARBURST RECYCLING FROM QUANTITATIVE GALAXY MORPHOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Louis E.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dressler, Alan; Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Monson, Andrew; Persson, Eric; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-11-10

    Using J- and K{sub s}-band imaging obtained as part of the IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS), we measure Sérsic indices for 2160 field and cluster galaxies at 0.31 < z < 0.54. Using both mass- and magnitude-limited samples, we compare the distributions for spectroscopically determined passive, continuously star-forming, starburst, and post-starburst systems and show that previously established spatial and statistical connections between these types extend to their gross morphologies. Outside of cluster cores, we find close structural ties between starburst and continuously star-forming, as well as post-starburst and passive types, but not between starbursts and post-starbursts. These results independently support two conclusions presented in Paper II of this series: (1) most starbursts are the product of a non-disruptive triggering mechanism that is insensitive to global environment, such as minor mergers; (2) starbursts and post-starbursts generally represent transient phases in the lives of 'normal' star-forming and quiescent galaxies, respectively, originating from and returning to these systems in closed 'recycling' loops. In this picture, spectroscopically identified post-starbursts constitute a minority of all recently terminated starbursts, largely ruling out the typical starburst as a quenching event in all but the densest environments.

  12. Cosmic ray interactions in starbursting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.

    High quality gamma-ray and radio observations of nearby galaxies offer an unprecedented opportunity to quantitatively study the properties of their cosmic ray populations. Accounting for various interactions and energy losses, I developed a multi-component, single-zone model of the cosmic ray populations in the central molecular zones of star-forming galaxies. Using observational knowledge of the interstellar medium and star formation, I successfully predicted the radio, gamma-ray, and neutrino spectra for nearby starbursts. Using chi-squared tests to compare the models with observational radio and gamma-ray data, I placed constraints on magnetic field strengths, cosmic ray energy densities, and galactic wind (advection) speeds. The initial models were applied to and tested on the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. To further test the model and to explore the differences in environment between starbursts and active galactic nuclei, I studied NGC 253 and NGC 1068, both nearby giant spiral galaxies which have been detected in gamma-rays. Additionally, I demonstrated that the excess GeV energy gamma-ray emission in the Galactic Center is likely not diffuse emission from an additional population of cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants. Lastly, I investigated cosmic ray populations in the starburst nuclei of Arp 220, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy which displays a high-intensity mode of star formation more common in young galaxies, and I showed that the nuclei are efficient cosmic-ray proton calorimeters.

  13. A Spitzer High-resolution Mid-Infrared Spectral Atlas of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard-Salas, J.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Charmandaris, V.; Lebouteiller, V.; Farrah, D.; Devost, D.; Brandl, B. R.; Wu, Yanling; Armus, L.; Hao, L.; Sloan, G. C.; Weedman, D.; Houck, J. R.

    2009-10-01

    We present an atlas of Spitzer/IRS high-resolution (R ~ 600) 10-37 μm spectra for 24 well known starburst galaxies. The spectra are dominated by fine-structure lines, molecular hydrogen lines, and emission bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six out of the eight objects with a known active galactic nucleus (AGN) component show emission of the high excitation [Ne V] line. This line is also seen in one other object (NGC 4194) with, a priori, no known AGN component. In addition to strong PAH emission features in this wavelength range (11.3, 12.7, 16.4 μm), the spectra reveal other weak hydrocarbon features at 10.6, 13.5, 14.2 μm, and a previously unreported emission feature at 10.75 μm. An unidentified absorption feature at 13.7 μm is detected in many of the starbursts. We use the fine-structure lines to derive the abundance of neon and sulfur for 14 objects where the H I 7-6 line is detected. We further use the molecular hydrogen lines to sample the properties of the warm molecular gas. Several basic diagrams characterizing the properties of the sample are also shown. We have combined the spectra of all the pure starburst objects to create a high signal-to-noise ratio template, which is available to the community.

  14. A SPITZER HIGH-RESOLUTION MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL ATLAS OF STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard-Salas, J.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Lebouteiller, V.; Farrah, D.; Wu, Yanling; Hao, L.; Sloan, G. C.; Weedman, D.; Houck, J. R.; Charmandaris, V.; Devost, D.; Brandl, B. R.; Armus, L.

    2009-10-01

    We present an atlas of Spitzer/IRS high-resolution (R {approx} 600) 10-37 {mu}m spectra for 24 well known starburst galaxies. The spectra are dominated by fine-structure lines, molecular hydrogen lines, and emission bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six out of the eight objects with a known active galactic nucleus (AGN) component show emission of the high excitation [Ne V] line. This line is also seen in one other object (NGC 4194) with, a priori, no known AGN component. In addition to strong PAH emission features in this wavelength range (11.3, 12.7, 16.4 {mu}m), the spectra reveal other weak hydrocarbon features at 10.6, 13.5, 14.2 {mu}m, and a previously unreported emission feature at 10.75 {mu}m. An unidentified absorption feature at 13.7 {mu}m is detected in many of the starbursts. We use the fine-structure lines to derive the abundance of neon and sulfur for 14 objects where the H I 7-6 line is detected. We further use the molecular hydrogen lines to sample the properties of the warm molecular gas. Several basic diagrams characterizing the properties of the sample are also shown. We have combined the spectra of all the pure starburst objects to create a high signal-to-noise ratio template, which is available to the community.

  15. Starburst Galaxy NGC 3310

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are studying the colors of star clusters to determine the age and history of starburst galaxies, a technique somewhat similar to the process of learning the age of a tree by counting its rings.

    This month's Hubble Heritage image showcases the galaxy NGC 3310. It is one of several starburst galaxies, which are hotbeds of star formation, being studied by Dr. Gerhardt Meurer and a team of scientists at Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Md.

    The picture, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/26 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but starburst galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue and older stars redder, the colors relate to their ages.

    NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. The new image shows several hundred star clusters, visible as the bright blue, diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy.

    The star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show their ages range between about one million and more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' more than 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when NGC 3310 collided with a companion galaxy.

    These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once

  16. The evolution of the cold interstellar medium in galaxies following a starburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Wild, V.; Nesvadba, N.; Sibthorpe, B.; Mortier, A.; Lehnert, M.; da Cunha, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present the evolution of dust and molecular gas properties in a sample of 11 z ˜ 0.03 starburst to post-starburst (PSB) galaxies selected to span an age sequence from ongoing starburst to 1 Gyr after the starburst ended. All PSBs harbour significant molecular gas and dust reservoirs and residual star formation, indicating that complete quenching of the starburst due to exhaustion or expulsion of gas has not occurred during this timespan. As the starburst ages, we observe a clear decrease in the star formation efficiency, molecular gas and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, and effective dust temperature, from levels coincident with starburst galaxies to those of normal star-forming galaxies. These trends are consistent with a natural decrease in the SFR following consumption of molecular gas by the starburst, and corresponding decrease in the interstellar radiation field strength as the starburst ages. The gas and dust contents of the PSBs are coincident with those of star-forming galaxies and molecular gas-rich early-type galaxies, and are not consistent with galaxies on the red sequence. We find no evidence that the global gas reservoir is expelled by stellar winds or active galactic nuclei feedback. Our results show that although a strong starburst in a low-redshift galaxy may cause the galaxy to ultimately have a lower specific SFR and be of an earlier morphological type, the galaxy will remain in the `green valley' for an extended time. Multiple such episodes may be needed to complete migration of the galaxy from the blue- to red sequence.

  17. Ionized Gas Observation Toward a Nearby Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, K.; Sorai, K.; Nakai, N.; Kuno, N.; Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Takano, S.; Kohno, K.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-12-01

    ALMA observation of a hydrogen recombination emission line toward NGC 253 was performed. NGC 253 is a prototypical starburst galaxy in the nearby universe. The recombination line was clearly detected in the central region of NGC 253 with a spatial resolution of few dozens of parsecs at the galaxy. The line and thermal free-free continuum emission show quite similar spatial distribution, and this fact shows the recombination line certainly traces ionized gas formed by young massive stars. Estimated electron temperature (6500-9000K) from the data are similar to those of Galactic HII regions. The recombination line has large velocity width at the center of the galaxy, and the velocity structure is quite different from that of molecular emission line.

  18. Starbursts at space ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2006-06-01

    Starbursts are systems with very high star formation rate per unit area. They are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. The similarities between the physical properties of local starbursts and high-z star-forming galaxies, highlight the cosmological relevance of starbursts. On the other hand, nearby starbursts are laboratories where to study violent star formation processes and their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic media, in detail and deeply. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, as they are in the far-infrared, due to the ‘picket-fence’ interstellar dust distribution. After the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. Super-stellar clusters have properties similar to globular clusters. The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV

  19. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  20. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  1. Imaging the most extreme starbursts in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Alexander; Bremer, Malcolm; Bock, Jamie; Oliver, Sebastien; Ivison, Rob; Farrah, Duncan; Cooray, Asantha; Clements, Dave; Schulz, Bernhard; Riechers, Dominik; Ibar, Edo; Vaccari, Mattia; Glenn, Jason; Omont, Alain; Valiente, Elisabetta; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    The HerMES and H-ATLAS projects, using Herschel/SPIRE data, have discovered a population of ultra-red (hence high-z), faint (hence unlensed), dusty extreme star forming galaxies, which are likely among the most distant, luminous and massive known. Follow up of the first few sources has confirmed that they predominantly lie above z > 4, including one souce at z=6.3. However, current observations of these sources can only probe their young, starbursting stellar populations. In order to form a complete picture of their stellar content, as well as place the starburst within the context of the history of these systems, we request Spitzer observations of 20 such sources. In addition, this data will be sensitive to un-obscured starbursts (LBGs) associated with the same overdensity, allowing us to test whether our targets serve as signposts to high-z protoclusters as suggested by structure formation models.

  2. PHOTODISSOCIATION CHEMISTRY FOOTPRINTS IN THE STARBURST GALAXY NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    MartIn, Sergio; MartIn-Pintado, J.; Viti, S.

    2009-12-01

    UV radiation from massive stars is thought to be the dominant heating mechanism of the nuclear interstellar medium (ISM) in the late stages of evolution of starburst galaxies, creating large photodissociation regions (PDRs) and driving a very specific chemistry. We report the first detection of PDR molecular tracers, namely HOC{sup +} and CO{sup +}, and also confirm the detection of the PDR tracer HCO toward the starburst galaxy NGC 253, claimed to be mainly dominated by shock heating and in an earlier stage of evolution than M 82, the prototypical extragalactic PDR. Our CO{sup +} detection suffers from significant blending to a group of transitions of {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH, tentatively detected for the first time in the extragalactic ISM. These species are efficiently formed in the highly UV-irradiated outer layers of molecular clouds, as observed in the late stage nuclear starburst in M 82. The molecular abundance ratios we derive for these molecules are very similar to those found in M 82. This strongly supports the idea that these molecules are tracing the PDR component associated with the starburst in the nuclear region of NGC 253. The presence of large abundances of PDR molecules in the ISM of NGC 253, which is dominated by shock chemistry, clearly illustrates the potential of chemical complexity studies to establish the evolutionary state of starbursts in galaxies. A comparison with the predictions of chemical models for PDRs shows that the observed molecular ratios are tracing the outer layers of UV-illuminated clouds up to two magnitudes of visual extinction. We combine the column densities of PDR tracers reported in this paper with those of easily photodissociated species, such as HNCO, to derive the fraction of material in the well-shielded core relative to the UV-pervaded envelopes. Chemical models, which include grain formation and photodissociation of HNCO, support the scenario of a photo-dominated chemistry as an explanation to the abundances of the

  3. Probing a Starburst Galaxy's Superwind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocke, John

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph Science Team for IGM studies proposes to observe the bright QSO/starburst galaxy pair, SBS1108+560/M108 for the following purposes: 1. To measure the FUV brightness of the QSO to determine whether an HST/COS observation is viable and to set its exposure times. 2. To determine the locations of the brighter star forming regions in the disk of M108 to compare wth high resolution HI 21cm, H alpha and soft X-ray continuum maps which show supershells, line-emitting loops and extra-planar clumps of hot gas. 3. To use the relative extinctions of near-side and far-side star forming regions to determine the orientation of M108 in space. This determination is required in order to correctly interpret the kinematics of any QSO absorption line system(s) found in our COS spectrum of SBS1108+560. M108 (NGC3556) is a moderate starburst from the IRAS-selected sample of Lehnert & Heckman, moderately inclined on the sky (75 deg.) and very nearby (14 Mpc). The proximity of SBS1108+560 to M108 (25 kpc) and its location quite close to the minor-axis of M108 make this pairing quite unusual (one of only 3 to be observed by COS) and an important opportunity for understanding the nature and dynamics of starburst superwinds. An important question we hope to answer with this set of GALEX and HST data is whether starburst winds from massive spiral galaxies actually escape the gaalxy's gravitational potential and so enrich the IGM with metals."

  4. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  5. Detection of the 158 Micrometers[CII] Transition at z=1.3: Evidence for a Galaxy-Wide Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of 158 micron [C II] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J142824.0+352619, a hyperluminous ( L(sub IR) approximates 10(exp 13) L (sub solar)) starburst galaxy at z = 1.3. The line is bright, corresponding to a fraction L(sub [Cu II] L(sub Fir) approximates 2 x 10(exp -3) of the far-IR (FIR) continuum. The [C II], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n approximates 10(exp 4.2) /cm(exp 3) , and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field approximately 10(exp 3.2) times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) ratio is higher than observed in local ultralummous infrared galaxies or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [C II], but the L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) and L(sub CO)/L(sub FIR) ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies. This suggests that MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a scaled-up version of a starburst nucleus, with the burst extended over several kiloparsecs.

  6. CO Line Emission from Compact Nuclear Starburst Disks around Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, J. N.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2012-06-01

    There is substantial evidence for a connection between star formation in the nuclear region of a galaxy and growth of the central supermassive black hole. Furthermore, starburst activity in the region around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) may provide the obscuration required by the unified model of AGNs. Molecular line emission is one of the best observational avenues to detect and characterize dense, star-forming gas in galactic nuclei over a range of redshift. This paper presents predictions for the carbon monoxide (CO) line features from models of nuclear starburst disks around AGNs. These small-scale (lsim 100 pc), dense and hot starbursts have CO luminosities similar to scaled-down ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and quasar host galaxies. Nuclear starburst disks that exhibit a pc-scale starburst and could potentially act as the obscuring torus show more efficient CO excitation and higher brightness temperature ratios than those without such a compact starburst. In addition, the compact starburst models predict strong absorption when J Upper >~ 10, a unique observational signature of these objects. These findings allow for the possibility that CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) could be used to determine if starburst disks are responsible for the obscuration in z <~ 1 AGNs. Directly isolating the nuclear CO line emission of such compact regions around AGNs from galactic-scale emission will require high-resolution imaging or selecting AGN host galaxies with weak galactic-scale star formation. Stacking individual CO SLEDs will also be useful in detecting the predicted high-J features.

  7. Structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Li, Wei; Zhao, Song-Feng

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory (so called MO-ADK theory) for 22 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model.

  8. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  9. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    The chemical structure of penicillin was determined between 1942 and 1945 under conditions of secrecy established by the U.S. and U.K. governments. The evidence was not published in the open literature but as a monograph. This complex volume does not present a structure proof that can be readily comprehended by a student. In this article, a basic structural proof for the penicillin molecule is provided, emphasizing the chemical work. The stereochemistry of penicillin is also described, and various rearrangements are considered on the basis of the accepted β-lactam structure.

  10. Starburst outflows from nearby galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Starburst outflows from NGC 5461, 1569 and M82 are discussed. The Sc I galaxy, M101, is reknowned for the kpc-size superassociations of star clusters and HII regions that dominate its spiral arms. NGC 5461 is one of the brightest of these superassociations, rivaling the Large Magellanic Cloud in H alpha luminosity. The NGC 5461 superassociation is dominated by a single unresolved HII region of outstanding luminosity (approx. 1000 Orion nebulae). Detailed examination of corresponding continuum images indicates that only the southern plume has any sort of stellar counterpart. The other plumes are clearly diffuse with no underlying hot stars. An image of NGC 1569 is discussed. Besides showing the peculiar arm noted by Zwicky (1971) and the filamentary extensions to the North and South (as noted by Hodge 1974), this image also reveals two arc-like features of diffuse ionized gas to the South. Both arcs are concentric with the bright center of the galaxy - where the super star clusters, A and B are located. The inner arc (Arc 1) appears to follow the same curve as the SW arm thus suggesting that the two features represent limb-brightened fragments of vast superbubble that was blown out by a central starburst sometime in the past. As the classic starburst galaxy, M82 displays all the luminous hallmarks of intense high-mass star formation and outflow activity. The diffuse H alpha and x ray emitting gas along the minor axis provides especially good evidence for a bipolar outflow of hot gas which is shock heating the swept-up interstellar medium (ISM) to temperatures of approx. 10(exp 4) K. An image shows the H alpha emission within the disk and along the minor axis. Another image shows the same field in the light of near-infrared. Both figures are based on charge coupled device images taken with the McGraw-Hill 1.3 m telescope (Waller 1989). The longer wavelength emission clearly shows a more extended morphology along the major axis. The morphological discrepancy is most

  11. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  12. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  13. Densitometry and Thermometry of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangum, J. G.; Darling, J.; Menten, K. M.; Henkel, C.; Aalto, S.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P.; Ginsburg, A.; Fomalont, E.; Cotton, B.; Kent, B.

    2016-05-01

    With a goal toward deriving the physical conditions in external galaxies, we have conducted a survey and subsequent high spatial resolution imaging of formaldehyde (H2CO) and ammonia (NH3) emission and absorption in a sample of starburst galaxies. In this article we present the results from a subset of this survey which focuses on high spatial resolution measurements of volume density- and kinetic temperature-sensitive transitions of the H2CO molecule. The volume density structure toward the nuclear region of NGC 253 has been derived from θ ≃ 4 arcsec NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) measurements of the 110 - 111 and 211 - 212 K-doublet transitions of H2CO. The kinetic temperature structure toward NGC 253 and NGC 4945 has been derived from θ ≃ 0.5 - 1.0 arcsec measurements of the H2CO 3K-1K+1 - 2K-1K+1 (near 218 GHz) and 5K-1K+1 - 4K-1K+1 (near 365 GHz) transitions acquired using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These measurements have allowed us to characterize the dense gas and kinetic temperature structure within these star forming galaxies, which is a first step toward associating dense star-forming gas and the heating processes at work within galaxies.

  14. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  15. X-ray Properties of the Central kpc of AGN and Starbursts: The Latest News from Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray properties of 15 nearby (v less than 3,000 km/s) galaxies that possess AGN (active galactic nuclei) and/or starbursts are discussed. Two-thirds have nuclear extended emission on scales from approx. 0.5 to approx. 1.5 kpc that is either clearly associated with a nuclear outflow or morphologically resembles an outflow. Galaxies that are AGN-dominated tend to have linear structures while starburst-dominated galaxies tend to have plume-like structures. Significant X-ray absorption is present in the starburst regions, indicating that a circumnuclear starburst is sufficient to block an AGN at optical wavelengths. Galaxies with starburst activity possess more X-ray point sources within their central kpc than non-starbursts. Many of these sources are more luminous than typical X-ray binaries. The Chandra results are discussed in terms of the starburst-AGN connection, a revised unified model for AGN, and possible evolutionary scenarios.

  16. On the emergence of molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matyus, Edit; Reiher, Markus; Hutter, Juerg; Mueller-Herold, Ulrich

    2011-05-15

    The structure of (a{sup {+-}},a{sup {+-}},b{sup {+-}})-type Coulombic systems is characterized by the effective ground-state density of the a-type particles, computed via nonrelativistic quantum mechanics without introduction of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A structural transition is observed when varying the relative mass of the a- and b-type particles, e.g., between atomic H{sup -} and molecular H{sub 2}{sup +}. The particle-density profile indicates a molecular-type behavior for the positronium ion, Ps{sup -}.

  17. DETECTION OF THE 158 {mu}m [C II] TRANSITION AT z = 1.3: EVIDENCE FOR A GALAXY-WIDE STARBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C. E.

    2010-05-01

    We report the detection of 158 {mu}m [C II] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J142824.0+352619, a hyperluminous (L {sub IR} {approx} 10{sup 13} L {sub sun}) starburst galaxy at z = 1.3. The line is bright, corresponding to a fraction L {sub [CII]}/L {sub FIR} {approx} 2 x 10{sup -3} of the far-IR (FIR) continuum. The [C II], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n {approx} 10{sup 4.2} cm{sup -3}, and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field {approx}10{sup 3.2} times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L {sub [CII]}/L {sub FIR} ratio is higher than observed in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [C II], but the L {sub [CII]}/L {sub FIR} and L {sub CO}/L {sub FIR} ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies. This suggests that MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a scaled-up version of a starburst nucleus, with the burst extended over several kiloparsecs.

  18. From Starburst to Quiescence: Testing Active Galactic Nucleus feedback in Rapidly Quenching Post-starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-01

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M ⊙) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies "transiting" post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ~0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ~0.1% are QPSBs, and ~0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (gsim 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of >~ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as "dust-obscured galaxies" (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of >~ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post-starburst phase.

  19. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post-starburst

  20. PROPERTIES OF NEARBY STARBURST GALAXIES BASED ON THEIR DIFFUSE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Paglione, Timothy A. D.; Abrahams, Ryan D.

    2012-08-20

    The physical relationship between the far-infrared and radio fluxes of star-forming galaxies has yet to be definitively determined. The favored interpretation, the 'calorimeter model', requires that supernova generated cosmic-ray (CR) electrons cool rapidly via synchrotron radiation. However, this cooling should steepen their radio spectra beyond what is observed, and so enhanced ionization losses at low energies from high gas densities are also required. Further, evaluating the minimum energy magnetic field strength with the traditional scaling of the synchrotron flux may underestimate the true value in massive starbursts if their magnetic energy density is comparable to the hydrostatic pressure of their disks. Gamma-ray spectra of starburst galaxies, combined with radio data, provide a less ambiguous estimate of these physical properties in starburst nuclei. While the radio flux is most sensitive to the magnetic field, the GeV gamma-ray spectrum normalization depends primarily on gas density. To this end, spectra above 100 MeV were constructed for two nearby starburst galaxies, NGC 253 and M82, using Fermi data. Their nuclear radio and far-infrared spectra from the literature are compared to new models of the steady-state CR distributions expected from starburst galaxies. Models with high magnetic fields, favoring galaxy calorimetry, are overall better fits to the observations. These solutions also imply relatively high densities and CR ionization rates, consistent with molecular cloud studies.

  1. Extended HCN and HCO+ Emission in the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G.; Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Kepley, A.

    2014-12-01

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO+, HNC, CS, and HC3N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO+ emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO+ observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO+ J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 106 M ⊙ and 21 × 106 M ⊙, or >~ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is >=0.3 M ⊙ yr-1, which would lower the starburst lifetime by >=5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 1052 erg.

  2. EXTENDED HCN AND HCO{sup +} EMISSION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G.; Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Kepley, A.

    2014-12-20

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, and HC{sub 3}N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO{sup +} emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO{sup +} observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO{sup +} J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 21 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, or ≳ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is ≥0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which would lower the starburst lifetime by ≥5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 10{sup 52} erg.

  3. Search for AN Intermediate Mass Black Hole in the Starburst Galaxy NGC2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Hironori

    2001-09-01

    We discovered an Intermediate Mass Black Hole (IMBH) of 10(3) - 10(6) M_⊙ in the starburst galaxy M82 with Chandra HRC. Our follow-up ground-based observations found a near-infrared star cluster in the vicinity of the IMBH as well as an Expanding Molecular Super Bubble (EMSB) which surrounds the IMBH and has a kinematic energy of 10(55) erg. Based on these results, we propose a scenario that an IMBH is produced by starburst activity and it grows to become a Super Massive Black Hole (SMBH). We believe this scenario can explain the formation of SMBHs in other galaxies universally. We propose a CXO monitoring observation of another starburst galaxy NGC2146 to examine our scenario.

  4. How We Teach Molecular Structure to Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Michael O.

    2002-01-01

    Currently molecular structure is taught in general chemistry using three theories, this being based more on historical development rather than logical pedagogy. Electronegativity is taught with a confusing mixture of definitions that do not correspond to modern practice. Valence bond theory and VSEPR are used together in a way that often confuses…

  5. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  6. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  7. Chandra Images the Seething Cauldron of Starburst Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged the core of the nearest starburst galaxy, Messier 82 (M82). The observatory has revealed a seething cauldron of exploding stars, neutron stars, black holes, 100 million degree gas, and a powerful galactic wind. The discovery will be presented by a team of scientists from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Penn., Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, on January 14 at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society. "In the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, stars form and die in a relatively calm fashion like burning embers in a campfire," said Richard Griffiths, Professor of Astrophysics at Carnegie Mellon University. "But in a starburst galaxy, star birth and death are more like explosions in a fireworks factory." Short-lived massive stars in a starburst galaxy produce supernova explosions, which heat the interstellar gas to millions of degrees, and leave behind neutron stars and black holes. These explosions emit light in the X rays rather than in visible light. Because the superhot components inside starburst galaxies are complex and sometimes confusing, astronomers need an X-ray-detecting telescope with the highest focusing power (spatial resolution) to clearly discriminate the various structures. "NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is the perfect tool for studying starburst galaxies since it has the critical combination of high-resolution optics and good sensitivity to penetrating X rays," said Gordon Garmire, the Evan Pugh Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University, and head of the team that conceived and built Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrograph (ACIS) X-ray camera, which acquired the data. Many intricate structures missed by earlier satellite observatories are now visible in the ACIS image, including more than twenty powerful X-ray binary systems that contain a normal star in a close orbit around a neutron star

  8. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. I. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF EIGHTEEN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-RodrIguez, Sebastian

    2010-09-20

    We use archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper, we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only the currently bursting galaxies but also 'fossil' bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D < 8 Mpc) universe. Thirteen of the eighteen galaxies are experiencing ongoing bursts and five galaxies show fossil bursts. From our reconstructed SFHs, it is evident that the elevated SFRs of a burst are sustained for hundreds of Myr with variations on small timescales. A long >100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid 'self-quenching' of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find that the strength of the H{alpha} emission usually correlates with the CMD-based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the H{alpha} emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the H{alpha} emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy.

  9. Starbursts in Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.; Cid Fernandes, Roberto

    2005-05-01

    Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (LLAGN), which comprise low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and transition-type objects (TOs), represent the most common type of nuclear activity. Here, we search for spectroscopic signatures of starbursts and post-starbursts in LLAGN, and investigate their relationship to the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the circumnuclear optical continuum of these galaxies. We have found that intermediate-age populations (108-109 yr) are very common in weak-[O I] LLAGN, but that very young stars (≤107 yr) contribute very little to the central optical continuum of these objects. However, ˜ 1 Gyr ago these nuclei harboured starbursts of size ˜ 100 pc and masses 107-108 M⊙. Meanwhile, most of the strong-[O I] LLAGN have predominantly old stellar populations.

  10. Star formation and dynamics in starburst nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A.

    1987-01-01

    A simple model is presented for gas inflow through a disk galaxy driven by interacting galaxies through the action of a non-axisymmetric disturbance acting on the disk whose gas is modelled as an ensemble of gas clouds. Cloud collisions, as well as being a vital process in forcing gas inflow to the center of the disk, are also assumed to generate massive stars. This ever increasing rate of gas flow toward the center of the galaxy and the associated rapid increase in cloud collisions lead to a centrally concentrated starburst. Starbursts have important consequences for the immediate environment of galaxies. Mildly collimated outflows can be driven by a combination of multiple supernovae and OB star winds. Jets associated with activity in the galactic nucleus can interact strongly with a starburst environment.

  11. Giant Hα Nebula Surrounding the Starburst Merger NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yagi, Masafumi; Ohyama, Youichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Tanaka, Hisashi; Okamura, Sadanori

    2016-03-01

    We revealed the detailed structure of a vastly extended Hα-emitting nebula (“Hα nebula”) surrounding the starburst/merging galaxy NGC 6240 by deep narrow-band imaging observations with the Subaru Suprime-Cam. The extent of the nebula is ˜90 kpc in diameter and the total Hα luminosity amounts to LHα ≈ 1.6 × 1042 erg s-1. The volume filling factor and the mass of the warm ionized gas are ˜10-4-10-5 and ˜5 × 108 M⊙, respectively. The nebula has a complicated structure, which includes numerous filaments, loops, bubbles, and knots. We found that there is a tight spatial correlation between the Hα nebula and the extended soft-X-ray-emitting gas, both in large and small scales. The overall morphology of the nebula is dominated by filamentary structures radially extending from the center of the galaxy. A large-scale bipolar bubble extends along the minor axis of the main stellar disk. The morphology strongly suggests that the nebula was formed by intense outflows—superwinds—driven by starbursts. We also found three bright knots embedded in a looped filament of ionized gas that show head-tail morphologies in both emission-line and continuum, suggesting close interactions between the outflows and star-forming regions. Based on the morphology and surface brightness distribution of the Hα nebula, we propose the scenario that three major episodes of starburst/superwind activities, which were initiated ˜102 Myr ago, formed the extended ionized gas nebula of NGC 6240. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  12. Students' understanding of molecular structure representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferk, Vesna; Vrtacnik, Margareta; Blejec, Andrej; Gril, Alenka

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the meanings attached by students to the different kinds of molecular structure representations used in chemistry teaching. The students (n = 124) were from primary (aged 13-14 years) and secondary (aged 17-18 years) schools and a university (aged 21-25 years). A computerised 'Chemical Visualisation Test' was developed and applied. The research indicates that students' appreciation of three-dimensional molecular structures differs according to the kind of representation used. The best results were achieved with the use of concrete, and pseudo-concrete types of representations (e.g. three-dimensional models, their photographs, computer-generated models). However, the use of more abstract types (e.g. schematic representations, stereochemical formula) was less effective. A correlation between students' results on the Chemical Visualisation Test and their educational level, spatial visualisation, and spatial relations skills was shown statistically, but no statistically significant gender differences were observed.

  13. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  14. What powers the starburst activity of NGC 1068? Star-driven gravitational instabilities caught in the act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Alessandro B.; Fathi, Kambiz

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role that gravitational instability plays in NGC 1068, a nearby Seyfert galaxy that exhibits unusually vigorous starburst activity. For this purpose, we use the Romeo-Falstad disc instability diagnostics and data from the BIMA Survey of Nearby Galaxies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae. Our analysis illustrates that NGC 1068 is a gravitationally unstable `monster'. Its starburst disc is subject to unusually powerful instabilities. Several processes, including feedback from the active galactic nucleus and starburst activity, try to quench such instabilities from inside out by depressing the surface density of molecular gas across the central kpc, but they do not succeed. Gravitational instability `wins' because it is driven by the stars via their much higher surface density. In this process, stars and molecular gas are strongly coupled, and it is such a coupling that ultimately triggers local gravitational collapse/fragmentation in the molecular gas.

  15. 8B structure in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, K. R.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.

    2015-04-01

    The structure of the light exotic nucleus 8B is investigated in the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model. The decay of 8B is responsible for almost the entire high- energy solar-neutrino flux, making structure calculations of 8B important for determining the solar core temperature. 8B is a proton halo candidate thought to exhibit clustering. FMD uses a wave-packet basis and is well-suited for modelling clustering and halos. For a multiconfiguration treatment we construct the many-body Hilbert space from antisymmetrised angular-momentum projected 8-particle states. First results show formation of a proton halo.

  16. Detection of the 158 Micrometers[CII] Transition at z=1.3: Evidence for a Galaxy-Wide Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of 158 micrometer [C II] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J 142824.0+3526l9, a hyperluminous (L(sub IR) approx. 10(exp 13) Solar Luminosity starburst galaxy at z = 1.3. The line is bright, corresponding to a fraction L[C II]/L(sub FIR) approx. equals 2 x l0(exp -3) of the far-IR(FIR) continuum. The [C II], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n approx. 10(exp 4.2)/cu cm., and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field approx. 10(exp 3.2) times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L[C II]/L(sub F1R) ratio is higher than observed in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [C II], but the L[CII]/L(sub FIR) and L(sub CO)/L(sub FIR) ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies

  17. Star-formation in the central kpc of the starburst/LINER galaxy NGC 1614

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, E.; Aalto, S.; Thomasson, M.; Beswick, R.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: The aim is to investigate the star-formation and LINER (low ionization nuclear emission line region) activity within the central kiloparsec of the galaxy NGC 1614. In this paper the radio continuum morphology, which provides a tracer of both nuclear and star-formation activity, and the distribution and dynamics of the cold molecular and atomic gas feeding this activity, are studied. In particular, the nature of an R ≈ 300 pc nuclear ring of star-formation and its relationship to the LINER activity in NGC 1614 is addressed. Methods: A high angular resolution, multi-wavelength study of the LINER galaxy NGC 1614 has been performed. Deep observations of the CO 1-0 spectral line were performed using the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). These data have been complemented by extensive multi-frequency radio continuum and Hi absorption observations using the Very Large Array (VLA) and Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN). Results: Toward the center of NGC 1614, we have detected a ring of radio continuum emission with a radius of 300 pc. This ring is coincident with previous radio and Paα observations. The dynamical mass of the ring based on Hi absorption is 3.1 × 109 M⊙. The peak of the integrated CO 1-0 emission is shifted by 1” to the north-west of the ring center. An upper limit to the molecular gas mass in the ring region is ~1.7 × 109 M⊙. Inside the ring, there is a north to south elongated 1.4 GHz radio continuum feature, with a nuclear peak. This peak is also seen in the 5 GHz radio continuum and in the CO. Conclusions: We suggest that the R = 300 pc star forming ring represents the radius of a dynamical resonance - as an alternative to the scenario that the starburst is propagating outwards from the center into a molecular ring. The ring-like appearance is probably part of a spiral structure. Substantial amounts of molecular gas have passed the radius of the ring and reached the nuclear region. The nuclear peak seen in 5

  18. Observations of CO J=3-2 in the Outflow of the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.; Clark, Jason

    2001-05-01

    Observations are presented of the distribution of 12CO J=3-2 emission in the starburst galaxy M82 covering a region 3''×3'' (2.8×2.8 kpc). This area includes the halo region involved in the superwind outflow. More limited coverage is presented for 13CO J=3-2 and C18O J=3-2. The mass of molecular gas in the halo is about 5×108 Msolar, with a dynamical timescale of the order of 107 yr. The results show the region of the outflow at higher CO excitation than previous published observations. Comparison with recently made observations of 12CO J=2-1 shows that the CO gas becomes progressively de-excited at larger distances from the starburst disk, and the isotopic ratio 13CO/12CO J=3-2 also becomes smaller outside the starburst disk. These effects are interpreted as differences in excitation and optical depth between the starburst region and the outflow and outer disk. A comparison between the 12CO J=3-2 emission with a published 850 μm continuum map shows that CO makes a significant contribution to the continuum in this band and that the fractional contribution is greatest near +/-30" from the nucleus approximately along the major axis. The progressively slower rotation of the halo gas with distance above and below the disk, coupled with consideration of the conservation of angular momentum, is analyzed to reveal the pattern of the outflow. The flow appears to diverge more strongly below the disk, with a cone angle of about 90°, which compares to about 40° above the disk. The mass and energetics of the halo molecular gas suggest the possibility that the molecular material and dust in the halo will not escape from M82 but are instead being recycled through the halo after injection as supershells by one or more transient starburst events.

  19. Observations of the CO J=6-5 transition in starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. I.; Hills, R. E.; Stutzki, J.; Graf, U. U.; Russell, A. P. G.; Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, short-submillimeter observations of carbon monoxide's (CO) mid-J rotational levels have revealed the presence of a large amount of excited molecular gas in luminous giant molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Submillimeter lines are specific probes of excited material: collisional excitation of the level energy of 116 K above ground, and 6-5 transition's critical density is approximately 10(exp 6) cm(exp -3) in optically thin gas. Radiative trapping effects reduce the excitation requirements to some extent, but detection of the CO J=6-5 line is nearly indisputable proof of the existence of gas that is both warm and dense. The excitation conditions also imply that cool (T less than 20 K) molecular clouds within the beam neither emit nor absorb in the short-submillimeter lines; in our Galaxy, clouds with active massive star formation emit the strongest short-submillimeter CO rotational lines. We used these properties to explore the distribution of excited molecular material and physical conditions within the star formation regions of several classical starburst nuclei: NGC253, M82, and IC342. We have used the 6-5 transition as a thermometer of warm molecular gas in starburst nuclei, unambiguously finding that the nuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies is substantially warmer than in typical disk clouds.

  20. Evolutionary paths in starbursting transition dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellenbusch, Kate Erika

    2008-10-01

    In this thesis we present an observational optical study of a subgroup of dwarf galaxies which have characteristics of a possible evolutionary transition between actively star-forming systems and inactive dwarf galaxies. The goal of this thesis is to assess the transition nature of these systems and gain insight into their evolutionary histories. Data for the investigation consist primarily of broad-band and narrow-band Ha images taken with the WIYN 0.9m telescope. We find that these galaxies contain central starbursts embedded in older, smooth, elliptical outer stellar envelopes. They also have small HI contents and apparently lack sufficient amounts of ISM to sustain high star formation rates over a significant cosmic timescale; gas exhaustion timescales are < 1 Gyr. We also find these objects have surprisingly high HII region oxygen abundances with values near solar. This suggests the starburst came from internal gas that was previously enriched and that a significant fraction of the synthesized metals are retained. Additionally, these systems are located in loose groups and are not currently interacting with any nearby galaxies. Thus their origins are not immediately clear. We explore possible evolutionary histories for such starburst "transition" dwarf galaxies based on this puzzling set of characteristics and results from moderately deep optical imaging. We consider mechanisms where the starbursts are tied either to interactions with other galaxies or to the state of the interstellar medium.

  1. Explorations of molecular structure-property relationships.

    PubMed

    Seybold, P G

    1999-01-01

    The problem of the relationship between the structure of a molecule and its physical, chemical, and biological properties is one of the most fundamental in chemistry. Three molecular structure-property studies are discussed as illustrations of different approaches to this problem. In the first study the carcinogenic activities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives are examined. Molecular orbital calculations of the presumptive activation steps and species for these compounds (based on the "bay region" theory of activation) are seen to yield a surprisingly good guide to the observed carcinogenic activities. Both activation and deactivation steps are considered. The second study reviews structure-property work on the tissue solubilities of halogenated hydrocarbons. Relatively simple structural descriptors give a good account of the solubilities of these compounds in blood, muscle, fat, and liver tissue. With the aid of principal components analysis it is shown that there are two dominant dimensions to this problem, which can be interpreted in terms of solubilities of the compounds in lipid and saline environments. The final study, which examines the boiling points of aliphatic alcohols, illustrates the value of using more than one descriptor set. The (perhaps surprising) conclusion is that a theoretical model can sometimes be more accurate than the data upon which it is based. Moreover, two models are better than one. PMID:10491848

  2. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Langer, William D.; Stark, Antony A.; Wilson, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    A large-scale (C-13)O map (containing 33,000 spectra on a 1-arcmin grid) is presented for the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Ori which contains the Ori Nebula, NGC 1977, and the L1641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. The northern portion of the cloud is compressed, dynamically relaxed, and supports massive star formation. In contrast, the southern part of the Ori A cloud is diffuse, exhibits chaotic spatial and velocity structure, and supports only intermediate- to low-mass star formation. This morphology may be the consequence of the formation and evolution of the Ori OB I association centered north of the molecular cloud. The entire cloud, in addition to the 5000-solar-mass filament containing both OMC-1 and OMC-2, exhibits a north-south velocity gradient. Implications of the observed cloud morphology for theories of molecular cloud evolution are discussed.

  3. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Bally, J.; Stark, A.A.; Wilson, R.W.; Langer, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    A large-scale (C-13)O map (containing 33,000 spectra on a 1-arcmin grid) is presented for the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Ori which contains the Ori Nebula, NGC 1977, and the L1641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. The northern portion of the cloud is compressed, dynamically relaxed, and supports massive star formation. In contrast, the southern part of the Ori A cloud is diffuse, exhibits chaotic spatial and velocity structure, and supports only intermediate- to low-mass star formation. This morphology may be the consequence of the formation and evolution of the Ori OB I association centered north of the molecular cloud. The entire cloud, in addition to the 5000-solar-mass filament containing both OMC-1 and OMC-2, exhibits a north-south velocity gradient. Implications of the observed cloud morphology for theories of molecular cloud evolution are discussed. 14 references.

  4. The Molecular Structure of cis-FONO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Rice, Julia E.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The molecular structure of cis-FONO has been determined with the CCSD(T) correlation method using an spdf quality basis set. In agreement with previous coupled-cluster calculations but in disagreement with density functional theory, cis-FONO is found to exhibit normal bond distances. The quadratic and cubic force fields of cis-FONO have also been determined in order to evaluate the effect of vibrational averaging on the molecular geometry. Vibrational averaging is found to increase bond distances, as expected, but it does not affect the qualitative nature of the bonding. The CCSD(T)/spdf harmonic frequencies of cis-FONO support our previous assertion that a band observed at 1200 /cm is a combination band (upsilon(sub 3) + upsilon(sub 4)), and not a fundamental.

  5. The Nature of Starbursts. I. The Star Formation Histories of Eighteen Nearby Starburst Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Sebastian; Holtzman, Jon; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin

    2010-09-01

    We use archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper, we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only the currently bursting galaxies but also "fossil" bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D < 8 Mpc) universe. Thirteen of the eighteen galaxies are experiencing ongoing bursts and five galaxies show fossil bursts. From our reconstructed SFHs, it is evident that the elevated SFRs of a burst are sustained for hundreds of Myr with variations on small timescales. A long >100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid "self-quenching" of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find that the strength of the Hα emission usually correlates with the CMD-based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the Hα emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the Hα emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  6. Galactic Center Shells and a Recurrent Starburst Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2003-04-01

    By applying filtering techniques to remove straight filaments in the 20-cm VLA radio image of the Galactic Center Arc region, we have shown that numerous concentric radio shells of radii 5 to 20pc are surrounding the Pistol and Sickle region, which we call Galactic Center Shells (GCS).Each shell has thermal energy of the order of1049-50erg.Several CO-line shells are associated, whose kinetic energies are of the order of 1049-50erg. Summing up the energies of recognized GCSs, the total energy amounts to ˜ 1051erg.The GCSs show an excellent correlation with the FIR shells observed at 16-26μm with the MSX.We propose a model in which GCSs were produced by recurrent and/or intermittent starbursts in the Pistol area during the last million years.The most recent burst occurred some 105 years ago, producing an inner round-shaped shell (GCS I);earlier ones a million years ago produced outer shells (GCS II and III), which a re more deformed by interactions with the surrounding ISM and Sgr A halo.We argue that recurrent starbursts had also occurred in the past, which produced larger scale hyper-shell structures as well.A burst some million years ago produced the Galactic Center Lobe, and a much stronger one 15 million years ago produced the North Polar Spur.

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  8. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation—a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation. PMID:18715062

  9. Computing stoichiometric molecular composition from crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Gražulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas; Okulič-Kazarinas, Mykolas

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic investigations deliver high-accuracy information about positions of atoms in crystal unit cells. For chemists, however, the structure of a molecule is most often of interest. The structure must thus be reconstructed from crystallographic files using symmetry information and chemical properties of atoms. Most existing algorithms faithfully reconstruct separate molecules but not the overall stoichiometry of the complex present in a crystal. Here, an algorithm that can reconstruct stoichiometrically correct multimolecular ensembles is described. This algorithm uses only the crystal symmetry information for determining molecule numbers and their stoichiometric ratios. The algorithm can be used by chemists and crystallographers as a standalone implementation for investigating above-molecular ensembles or as a function implemented in graphical crystal analysis software. The greatest envisaged benefit of the algorithm, however, is for the users of large crystallographic and chemical databases, since it will permit database maintainers to generate stoichiometrically correct chemical representations of crystal structures automatically and to match them against chemical databases, enabling multidisciplinary searches across multiple databases. PMID:26089747

  10. Structural disorder in molecular framework materials.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Andrew B; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2013-06-21

    It is increasingly apparent that many important classes of molecular framework material exhibit a variety of interesting and useful types of structural disorder. This tutorial review summarises a number of recent efforts to understand better both the complex microscopic nature of this disorder and also how it might be implicated in useful functionalities of these materials. We draw on a number of topical examples including topologically-disordered zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs), the phenomena of temperature-, pressure- and desorption-induced amorphisation, partial interpenetration, ferroelectric transition-metal formates, negative thermal expansion in cyanide frameworks, and the mechanics and processing of layered frameworks. We outline the various uses of pair distribution function (PDF) analysis, dielectric spectroscopy, peak-shape analysis of powder diffraction data and single-crystal diffuse scattering measurements as means of characterising disorder in these systems, and we suggest a number of opportunities for future research in the field. PMID:23471316

  11. Plant sex chromosomes: molecular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jamilena, M; Mariotti, B; Manzano, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent molecular and genomic studies carried out in a number of model dioecious plant species, including Asparagus officinalis, Carica papaya, Silene latifolia, Rumex acetosa and Marchantia polymorpha, have shed light on the molecular structure of both homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and also on the gene functions they have maintained since their evolution from a pair of autosomes. The molecular structure of sex chromosomes in species from different plant families represents the evolutionary pathway followed by sex chromosomes during their evolution. The degree of Y chromosome degeneration that accompanies the suppression of recombination between the Xs and Ys differs among species. The primitive Ys of A. officinalis and C. papaya have only diverged from their homomorphic Xs in a short male-specific and non-recombining region (MSY), while the heteromorphic Ys of S. latifolia, R. acetosa and M. polymorpha have diverged from their respective Xs. As in the Y chromosomes of mammals and Drosophila, the accumulation of repetitive DNA, including both transposable elements and satellite DNA, has played an important role in the divergence and size enlargement of plant Ys, and consequently in reducing gene density. Nevertheless, the degeneration process in plants does not appear to have reached the Y-linked genes. Although a low gene density has been found in the sequenced Y chromosome of M. polymorpha, most of its genes are essential and are expressed in the vegetative and reproductive organs in both male and females. Similarly, most of the Y-linked genes that have been isolated and characterized up to now in S. latifolia are housekeeping genes that have X-linked homologues, and are therefore expressed in both males and females. Only one of them seems to be degenerate with respect to its homologous region in the X. Sequence analysis of larger regions in the homomorphic X and Y chromosomes of papaya and asparagus, and also in the heteromorphic sex chromosomes

  12. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. II. THE DURATION OF STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-RodrIguez, Sebastian

    2010-11-20

    The starburst phenomenon can shape the evolution of the host galaxy and the surrounding intergalactic medium. The extent of the evolutionary impact is partly determined by the duration of the starburst, which has a direct correlation with both the amount of stellar feedback and the development of galactic winds, particularly for smaller mass dwarf systems. We measure the duration of starbursts in twenty nearby, ongoing, and 'fossil' starbursts in dwarf galaxies based on the recent star formation histories derived from resolved stellar population data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Contrary to the shorter times of 3-10 Myr often cited, the starburst durations we measure range from 450to650 Myr in fifteen of the dwarf galaxies and up to 1.3 Gyr in four galaxies; these longer durations are comparable to or longer than the dynamical timescales for each system. The same feedback from massive stars that may quench the flickering star formation does not disrupt the overall burst event in our sample of galaxies. While five galaxies present fossil bursts, fifteen galaxies show ongoing bursts and thus the final durations may be longer than we report here for these systems. One galaxy shows a burst that has been ongoing for only 20 Myr; we are likely seeing the beginning of a burst event in this system. Using the duration of the starbursts, we calculate that the bursts deposited 10{sup 53.9}-10{sup 57.2} erg of energy into the interstellar medium through stellar winds and supernovae, and produced 3%-26% of the host galaxy's mass.

  13. The formation of NGC 3603 young starburst cluster: `prompt' hierarchical assembly or monolithic starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The formation of very young massive clusters or `starburst' clusters is currently one of the most widely debated topic in astronomy. The classical notion dictates that a star cluster is formed in situ in a dense molecular gas clump. The stellar radiative and mechanical feedback to the residual gas energizes the latter until it escapes the system. The newly born gas-free young cluster eventually readjusts with the corresponding mass-loss. Based on the observed substructured morphologies of many young stellar associations, it is alternatively suggested that even the smooth-profiled massive clusters are also assembled from migrating less massive subclusters. A very young (age ≈ 1 Myr), massive (>104 M⊙) star cluster like the Galactic NGC 3603 young cluster (HD 97950) is an appropriate testbed for distinguishing between the above `monolithic' and `hierarchical' formation scenarios. A recent study by Banerjee & Kroupa demonstrates that the monolithic scenario remarkably reproduces the HD 97950 cluster. In particular, its shape, internal motion and the mass distribution of stars are found to follow naturally and consistently from a single model calculation undergoing ≈70 per cent by mass gas dispersal. In this work, we explore the possibility of the formation of the above cluster via hierarchical assembly of subclusters. These subclusters are initially distributed over a wide range of spatial volumes and have various modes of subclustering in both absence and presence of a background gas potential. Unlike the above monolithic initial system that reproduces HD 97950 very well, the same is found to be prohibitive with hierarchical assembly alone (with/without a gas potential). Only those systems which assemble promptly into a single cluster (in ≲1 Myr) from a close separation (all within ≲2 pc) could match the observed density profile of HD 97950 after a similar gas removal. These results therefore suggest that the NGC 3603 young cluster has formed essentially

  14. [Molecular structure of luminal diuretic receptors].

    PubMed

    Gamba, G

    1995-01-01

    Since day to day sodium and water intake is more or less constant, the output by urinary sodium excretion is the key to maintain extracellular fluid volume within physiologic ranges. To achieve this goal, the kidneys ensure that most of the large quantities of filtered sodium are reabsorbed, a function that takes place in the proximal tubule, the loop of Henle and the distal tubule, and then the kidneys adjust the small amount of sodium that is excreted in urine in such a way that sodium balance is maintained. This adjustment occurs in the collecting duct. Three groups of diuretic-sensitive sodium transport mechanisms have been identified in the apical membranes of the distal nephron based on their different sensitivities to diuretics and requirements for chloride and potassium: 1) the sulfamoylbenzoic (or bumetanide)-sensitive Na+:K+:2CI- and Na+:CI- symporters in the thick ascending loop of Henle; 2) the benzothiadiazine (or thiazide)-sensitive Na+:CI- cotransporter in the distal tubule; and 3) the amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel in the collecting tubule. The inhibition of any one of these proteins by diuretics results in increased sodium urinary excretion. Recently, the use of molecular biology techniques, specially the functional expression cloning in Xenopus laevis oocytes, has led to the identification of cDNA's encoding members of the three groups of diuretic-sensitive transport proteins. The present paper reviews the primary structure and some aspects of the relationship between structure and function of these transporters as well as the new protein families emerging from these sequences. It also discusses the future implications of these discoveries on the physiology and pathophysiology of kidney disease and sodium retaining states. PMID:7569367

  15. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.; Dragovan, M.; Langer, W. D.; Stark, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.

    1986-10-01

    A large scale 13CO map (containing 33,000 spectra) of the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Orion is presented which contains the Orion Nebula, NGC1977, and the LI641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. This morphology may result from the effects of star formation in the region or embedded magnetic fields in the cloud. We suggest a simple picture for the evolution of the Orion-A cloud and the formation of the major filament. A rotating proto-cloud (counter rotating with respect to the galaxy) contians a b-field aligned with the galaxtic plane. The northern portion of this cloud collapsed first, perhaps triggered by the pressure of the Ori I OB association. The magnetic field combined with the anisotropic pressure produced by the OB-association breaks the symmetry of the pancake instability, a filament rather than a disc is produced. The growth of instabilities in the filament formed sub-condensations which are recent sites of star formation.

  16. Molecular structure of brown-dwarf disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, D. S.; Semenov, D. A.; Henning, T.

    2008-11-01

    We describe typical features of the chemical composition of proto-planetary disks around brown dwarfs. We model the chemical evolution in the disks around a low-mass T Tauri star and a cooler brown dwarf over a time span of 1 Myr using a model for the physical structure of an accretion disk with a vertical temperature gradient and an extensive set of gas-phase chemical reactions. We find that the disks of T Tauri stars are, in general, hotter and denser than the disks of lower-luminosity substellar objects. In addition, they have more pronounced vertical temperature gradients. The atmospheres of the disks around low-mass stars are more strongly ionized by UV and X-ray radiation, while less dense brown-dwarf disks have higher fractional ionizations in their midplanes. Nevertheless, in both cases, most molecules are concentrated in the so-called warm molecular layer between the ionized atmosphere and cold midplane, where grains with ice mantles are abundant.

  17. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale 13CO map (containing 33,000 spectra) of the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Orion is presented which contains the Orion Nebula, NGC1977, and the LI641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. This morphology may result from the effects of star formation in the region or embedded magnetic fields in the cloud. We suggest a simple picture for the evolution of the Orion-A cloud and the formation of the major filament. A rotating proto-cloud (counter rotating with respect to the galaxy) contians a b-field aligned with the galaxtic plane. The northern protion of this cloud collapsed first, perhaps triggered by the pressure of the Ori I OB association. The magnetic field combined with the anisotropic pressure produced by the OB-association breaks the symmetry of the pancake instability, a filament rather than a disc is produced. The growth of instabilities in the filament formed sub-condensations which are recent sites of star formation.

  18. The Determination of Molecular Structure from Rotational Spectra

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laurie, V. W.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-07-01

    An analysis is presented concerning the average molecular configuration variations and their effects on molecular structure determinations. It is noted that the isotopic dependence of the zero-point is often primarily governed by the isotopic variation of the average molecular configuration. (J.R.D.)

  19. Starburst Driven Superbubbles Radiating to 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, Gerald; Heitsch, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Starburst driven superbubbles can produce large scale galactic outflows. Whether any given starburst can create an outflow depends on several variables including the rate at which energy and mass are injected into the interstellar medium (ISM), the radiative cooling prescription used, and the overall density distribution of the ISM. We investigate the effect that two different temperature floors in our radiative cooling prescription have on wind kinematics and content. We find that cooling to 10 K instead of to 104 K increases the mass fraction of cold neutral and hot X-ray gas in the galactic wind while halving that in warm Hα. For sufficiently powerful starbursts our cooling prescription does not affect the terminal velocity of gas within the superbubble. Filaments embedded in the hot galactic wind contain warm and cold gas which moves slower than the surrounding wind, with the coldest gas hardly moving with respect to the galaxy. Optically bright filaments form at the edge of merging superbubbles and if anchored to a star forming complex will persist and grow to > 400 pc in length. These filaments are the main source of warm and cold gas being transported into the galactic halo. Using synthetic absorption profiles we measure the velocity of the warm and hot gas phases and find vwarm ∝ vhot0.5. We also find that vhot ∝ SFR0.5, which implies vwarm ∝ SFR0.25. Warm and cold gas embedded in the galactic wind show asymmetric absorption profiles consistent with observations and theoretical predictions. These asymmetries can be used to infer the kinematics of the filaments and associated dense cores.

  20. Stellar-Nebular Feedback in Galaxian Starbursts: IR Spectral Imaging of HII Regions in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William; Boulanger, Francois; Brandl, Bernhard; Garnett, Donald; Gehrz, Robert; Gehrz and other GTO Team Members; Hodge, Paul; Humphreys, Roberta; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Murphy, Eric; Polomski, Elisha; Willner, Steven

    2004-09-01

    We propose a spectrophotometric investigation of starburst activity in the Local Group galaxy, Messier 33. By observing 7 selected giant HII regions that span a decade in metallicity, we will test the generic relationships between the ionizing stellar populations (previously observed with HST), the photo-dissociation regions (PDRs), and their associated dust content. We are especially interested in determining whether the observed variations in the stellar IMFs correlate with variations in the PDRs. We will use the IRS to obtain fully-sampled spectral maps of the 7 selected HII regions at 5.2 ==> 14.5 microns. The resulting datacubes will contain abundant spatial and spectral information on the molecular and dust content in the PDRs. This research program -- in close coordination with complementary GTO programs #5 and #63 -- will provide important benchmarks for interpreting starburst activity on many scales and over many epochs.

  1. An infrared study of starbursts in the interacting galaxy pair Arp 299 (NGC 3690+IC 694)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Takao; Nagata, Tetsuya; Geballe, T.R.; Okuda, Haruyuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Tokyo Univ.; Kyoto Univ.; Joint Astronomy Center, Hilo, HI; Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara )

    1989-05-01

    Extensive infrared observations have been obtained of the three active regions in Arp 299. Multiaperture JHK photometry reveals that the colors of the three regions are totally different from each other, and that there are very red nuclei smaller than 4 arcsec in two of them. Multiaperture spectroscopy of the Br-gamma and the shock-excited H2 lines shows that both the atomic and molecular lines are spatially extended, indicating that Arp 299 is undergoing an active episode of star formation not only in its nuclei but also well outside of them. Although there is some evidence that suggests the presence of a compact, active galactic nucleus, a simple starburst model can explain the bolometric luminosities, production rates of ionizing photons, and H24 line luminosities of each active region in Arp 299. However, each starburst cannot last longer than 10 to the 8th yr. 56 refs.

  2. High resolution sub-millimetre mapping of starburst galaxies: Comparison with CO emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Puxley, Phil J.; Mountain, C. M.; Nakai, Naomasa

    1990-01-01

    Researchers present first results from a program of submillimeter continuum mapping of starburst galaxies, and comparison of their dust and CO emission. This project was prompted by surprising results from the first target, the nearby starburst M82, which shows in the dust continuum a morphology quite unlike that of its CO emission, in contrast to what might be expected if both CO and dust are accurately tracing the molecular hydrogen. Possible explanations for this striking difference are discussed. In the light of these results, the program has been extended to include sub-mm mapping of the nearby, vigorously star forming spirals, M83 and Maffei 2. The latter were also observed extensively in CO, in order to study excitation conditions in its central regions. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope was used in these studies.

  3. Stellar Rotation Curves of Starbursting Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D.; Salzer, John J.

    2001-02-01

    A year ago, we successfully completed a pilot project to obtain stellar rotation curves of starbursting dwarf galaxies. These observations provided the first spatially resolved stellar rotation curves of gas-rich dwarf galaxies. We now propose to expand our sample (by a factor of 2) by observing 4 additional dwarf galaxies with the CTIO 4m. The fundamental question to be addressed is whether the gas and stars are kinematically coupled in these small galaxies. These observations will place the first kinematic constraints on evolutionary models for dwarf galaxies.

  4. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  5. Near-IR spectral evolution of dusty starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançon, Ariane; Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    1996-11-01

    We propose a multicomponent analysis of starburst galaxies, based on a model that takes into account the young and evolved stellar components and the gas emission, with their respective extinction, in the frame of a coherent dust distribution pattern. Near-IR signatures are preferentially investigated, in order to penetrate as deep as possible into the dusty starburst cores. We computed the 1.4-2.5 μm spectra of synthetic stellar populations evolving through strong, short timescale bursts of star formation (continuum and lines, R ≃ 500). The evolution model is specifically sensitive to cool stellar populations (AGB and red supergiant stars). It takes advantage of the stellar library of Lançon & Rocca-Volmerange (1992) [A&ASS, 96, 593], observed with the same instrument (FTS/CFHT) as the analysed galaxy sample, so that the instrumental effects are minimised. The main near-IR observable constraints are the molecular signatures of CO and H2O and the slope of the continuum, observed over a range exceptionally broad for spectroscopic data. The H - K colour determined from the spectra measures the intrinsic stellar energy distribution but also differential extinction, which is further constrained by optical emission line ratios. Other observational constraints are the near-IR emission lines (Brγ, He I 2.06 μm, [Fe II] 1.64 μm, H2 2.12 μm) and the far-IR luminosity. The coherence of the results relies on the interpretation in terms of stellar populations from which all observable properties are derived, so that the link between the various wavelength ranges is secured. The luminosity LK is used for the absolute calibration. We apply this approach to the typical spectrum of the core of NGC 1614. Consistent solutions for the starburst characteristics (star-formation rate, IMF, burst age, morphology) are found and the role of each observational constraint in deriving satisfactory models is extensively discussed. The acceptable contamination of the K band light by the

  6. What Do Star Clusters in Nearby Starburst Galaxies Tell Us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsoon; Lee, M.; Hwang, N.

    2014-01-01

    Nearby starburst galaxies are a good laboratory for the study of starburst processes. M82, one of the most famous starburst galaxies, has been a target for numerous studies of starburst events. Especially, many studies have used star clusters as starburst tracers in M82, but they usually investigated a only small central region. We present a photometric study of star clusters in M82 using wide-field UBVI, YJ, and H band images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. We find ˜1100 star clusters in 12’x8’ field, and estimate ages and masses of about 630 star clusters using spectral energy distribution fitting method. Young star clusters are located in the disk region, while old star clusters are found in both disk and halo regions. Age distribution of star clusters shows three distinguished populations: young (≦ 5 Myr), intermediate-age (about 500 Myr), and old (≧10 Gyr) star clusters. Several massive young star clusters (≥˜105M⊙) are found in the nuclear region, which are regarded as a result of recent starburst. Interestingly, we also find very massive star clusters (≥˜106M⊙) with intermediate-age in the nuclear region, which indicates another starburst event at about 500 Myr ago. This suggests that there are at least two starburst events: 5 Myr and 500 Myr ago, and that the earlier starburst at about 500 Myr ago may be more violent than the recent one. We also find about 30 star clusters in the halo region of M82. They are probably metal-poor old globular clusters belonging to M82 halo. It suggests that starburst galaxies may also be enshrouded by old stellar populations.

  7. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  8. ACA [CI] observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krips, M.; Martín, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Aalto, S.; Bisbas, T. G.; Bolatto, A. D.; Downes, D.; Eckart, A.; Feruglio, Ch.; García-Burillo, S.; Geach, J.; Greve, T. R.; König, S.; Matsushita, S.; Neri, R.; Offner, S.; Peck, A. B.; Viti, S.; Wagg, J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Carbon monoxide (CO) is widely used as a tracer of the molecular gas in almost all types of environments. However, several shortcomings of CO complicate usaging it as H2 tracer, such as its optical depth effects, the dependence of its abundance on metallicity, or its susceptibility to dissociation in highly irradiated regions. Neutral carbon emission has been proposed to overcome some of these shortcomings and hence to help revealing the limits of CO as a measure of the molecular gas. Aims: We aim to study the general characteristics of the spatially and spectrally resolved carbon line emission in a variety of extragalactic sources and evaluate its potential as complementary H2 tracer to CO. Methods: We used the Atacama Compact Array to map the [CI](3P1-3P0) line emission in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 at unprecedented angular resolution (~3''). This is the first well-resolved interferometric [CI] map of an extragalactic source. Results: We have detected the [CI] line emission at high significance levels along the central disk of NGC 253 and its edges where expanding shells have previously been found in CO. Globally, the distribution of the [CI] line emission strongly resembles that of CO, confirming the results of previous Galactic surveys that [CI] traces the same molecular gas as CO. However, we also identify a significant increase of [CI] line emission with respect to CO in (some of) the outflow or shocked regions of NGC 253, namely the bipolar outflow emerging from the nucleus. A first-order estimate of the [CI] column densities indicates abundances of [CI] that are very similar to the abundance of CO in NGC 253. Interestingly, we find that the [CI] line is marginally optically thick within the disk. Conclusions: The enhancement of the [CI]/CO line ratios (~0.4-0.6) with respect to Galactic values (≤0.1), especially in the shocked regions of NGC 253, clearly indicates that mechanical perturbation such as shocks and the strong radiation

  9. NuSTAR Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Andrew; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Yukita, Mihoko; Lehmer, Bret; Zezas, Andreas; Maccarone, Tom; Venters, Tonia M.; Antoniou, Vallia; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Starburst Team

    2016-01-01

    NuSTAR, the first satellite with hard X-ray focusing optics, opens up the possibility to not only detect starburstn galaxies above 10 keV for the first time but also characterize their hard X-ray properties. Here we present an overview of a NuSTAR program to survey seven normal/starburst galaxies: NGC 253, M82, M83, NGC 3256, NGC 3310, Arp 299, and M31. We also discuss data analysis strategies. All galaxies have been observed coordinated with either Chandra or XMM-Newton or both. The main results of these observations were: we characterized the typical starburst spectrum above 10 keV and showed that the spectrum is soft (photon index ~ 3) above 7 keV and determined that individually detected sources are generally black holes in a "transition" accretion state or neutron star systems accreting near the Eddington rate, and variability on time scales of weeks to months is typically detected. In the case of NGC 253 we decomposed the unresolved hard X-ray emission between background, unresolved binaries and truly diffuse flux and found that the diffuse flux upper limit is marginally above model predictions for inverse-Compton scattering of IR photons by cosmic rays.

  10. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  11. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; Rank, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short times. Many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extintion is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in the active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micron emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and a half after the explosion. Since dust extintion is much less at 6.63 pm than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the NiII line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micron using ISOCAM to search for the NiII emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any NiII line emission brighter than a 5sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled to the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a NiII with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a NiII line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  12. Green Pea Galaxies: Extreme, Optically-Thin Starbursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne

    2013-10-01

    The high UV luminosities, compact sizes, and enormous ionization parameters of the Green Pea galaxies make them some of the most extreme starburst galaxies known. Most importantly, due to their unusual emission line ratios and high specific star formation rates, the Green Peas are the best candidates for escaping ionizing radiation in the nearby Universe. We propose to study four Green Peas with COS FUV spectra and ACS emission line imaging to constrain the Lyman continuum {LyC} escape fraction and determine the origin of high ionization emission in these galaxies. COS spectra will set strong limits on the LyC optical depth via the residual intensity in the CII 1335 line, while the NV 1240 line will constrain the stellar population's age and ionizing flux. We will also observe the starbursts with ACS ramp filters in [OII], [OIII], HeII, and H-beta to determine whether the nebular emission is consistent with a low LyC optical depth. The [OIII]/[OII] ratio map will reveal the ionization structure of the emitting gas. If the [OIII] emission is found to be more spatially extended than the [OII] in any regions, it will imply that the regions are most likely optically thin. If HeII is found to be spatially offset from the dominant nebular emission, then we infer the presence of shocks. Correcting for this shock contribution to the observed emission is critical to accurately evaluate the LyC optical depth. These observations will either reveal the Green Peas as a class of galaxies having substantial LyC escape fractions or demonstrate that even some of the most extreme galaxies in the nearby Universe are optically thick.

  13. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    Galactic CO line emission at 115 GHz was surveyed in order to study the distribution of molecular clouds in the inner galaxy. Comparison of this survey with similar H1 data reveals a detailed correlation with the most intense 21 cm features. To each of the classical 21 cm H1 spiral arms of the inner galaxy there corresponds a CO molecular arm which is generally more clearly defined and of higher contrast. A simple model is devised for the galactic distribution of molecular clouds. The modeling results suggest that molecular clouds are essentially transient objects, existing for 15 to 40 million years after their formation in a spiral arm, and are largely confined to spiral features about 300 pc wide.

  14. Unraveling the Molecular Structures of Asphaltenes by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Bruno; Meyer, Gerhard; Peña, Diego; Mullins, Oliver C; Gross, Leo

    2015-08-12

    Petroleum is one of the most precious and complex molecular mixtures existing. Because of its chemical complexity, the solid component of crude oil, the asphaltenes, poses an exceptional challenge for structure analysis, with tremendous economic relevance. Here, we combine atomic-resolution imaging using atomic force microscopy and molecular orbital imaging using scanning tunnelling microscopy to study more than 100 asphaltene molecules. The complexity and range of asphaltene polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are established in detail. Identifying molecular structures provides a foundation to understand all aspects of petroleum science from colloidal structure and interfacial interactions to petroleum thermodynamics, enabling a first-principles approach to optimize resource utilization. Particularly, the findings contribute to a long-standing debate about asphaltene molecular architecture. Our technique constitutes a paradigm shift for the analysis of complex molecular mixtures, with possible applications in molecular electronics, organic light emitting diodes, and photovoltaic devices. PMID:26170086

  15. Uncovering the Beast: The Galactic Starburst Region W49A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, N.; Alves, J.

    2002-12-01

    We present J, H, and Ks images of an unbiased 5‧ x 5‧ (16 pc x 16 pc) survey of the densest region of the W49 giant molecular cloud. The observations reveal a massive stellar cluster (Cluster 1) about 3 pc East of the well-known Welch ring of ultra-compact H II regions, as well as three smaller clusters associated with compact sources of radio emission. Cluster 1 powers a 6 pc diameter giant H II region seen at both the NIR and radio continuum, and has more than 30 visual magnitudes of internal imhomogeneous extinction, implying that it is still deeply embedded in its parent molecular cloud. The census of massive stars in W49A agrees or slightly overabundant when compared with the number of Lyman continuum photons derived from radio observations. We argue that although the formation of the Welch ring could have been triggered by Cluster 1, the entire W49A starburst region seems to have been multi-seeded instead of resulting from a coherent trigger.

  16. A Survey of Quantitative Descriptions of Molecular Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi; Willighagen, Egon

    2013-01-01

    Numerical characterization of molecular structure is a first step in many computational analysis of chemical structure data. These numerical representations, termed descriptors, come in many forms, ranging from simple atom counts and invariants of the molecular graph to distribution of properties, such as charge, across a molecular surface. In this article we first present a broad categorization of descriptors and then describe applications and toolkits that can be employed to evaluate them. We highlight a number of issues surrounding molecular descriptor calculations such as versioning and reproducibility and describe how some toolkits have attempted to address these problems. PMID:23110530

  17. Molecular structural studies of human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    McKee, P A; Andersen, J C; Switzer, M E

    1975-01-20

    Neither normal nor hemophilic factor VIII protein enters a 5% sosium dodecyl sulfate gel; on reduction, however, a single 195 000-molecular-weight peptide is observed. Hemophilic and normal factor VIII contain carbohydrate and appear identical in subunit molecular weight, electrical charge, and major antigenic determinants. Thrombin activation and inactivation of factor VIII does not detectably change the subunit molecular weight. Trypsin causes similar activity changes and obviously cleaves the factor VIII subunit. Human plasmin destroys factor VIII procoagulant activity and degrades the factor VIII subunit to 103 000-, 88 000-, and 17 000-molecular-weight peptides. Both normal and hemophilic factor VIII as well as thrombin-inactivated factor VIII support ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Purified factor VIII chromatographed on 4% agarose in 1.0 M sodium chloride shows no dissociation of the procoagulant activity from the void volume protein. Gel chromatography on 4% agarose in 0.25 M calcium chloride results in a procoagulant activity peak removed from the void volume protein; both peaks contain protein which does not enter a 5% SDS gel, but on reduction a 195 000-molecular-weight subunit band is observed for each. Both the void volume protein peak and the procoagulant activity peak from the 0.25 M calcium chloride-agarose gel column support ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. After removal of calcium, a small amount of procoagulant activity is present only in the void volume peak. These data suggest that both the procoagulant and von Willebrand activities are on the same molecule. Thus our previous conclusion remains the same: human factor VIII is a large glycoprotein composed of identical 195 000-molecular-weight subunits jointed by disulfide bonds and is responsible for both antihemophilic and von Willebrand activities in human plasma. PMID:122889

  18. What powers the starburst activity of NGC 1068? Star-driven gravitational instabilities caught in the act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Alessandro B.; Fathi, Kambiz

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role that gravitational instability plays in NGC 1068, a nearby Seyfert galaxy that exhibits unusually vigorous starburst activity. For this purpose, we use the Romeo-Falstad disc instability diagnostics and data from BIMA SONG, SDSS and SAURON. Our analysis illustrates that NGC 1068 is a gravitationally unstable "monster". Its starburst disc is subject to unusually powerful instabilities. Several processes, including AGN/stellar feedback, try to quench such instabilities from inside out by depressing the surface density of molecular gas across the central kpc, but they do not succeed. Gravitational instability "wins" because it is driven by the stars via their much higher surface density. In this process, stars and molecular gas are strongly coupled, and it is such a coupling that ultimately triggers local gravitational collapse/fragmentation in the molecular gas.

  19. X-ray emission from starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rephaeli, Yoel; Gruber, Duane; Macdonald, Dan; Persic, Massimo

    1991-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation of X-ray emission from a sample of 53 IRAS-selected candidate starburst galaxies. Superposed soft and hard X-ray emission from these galaxies in the Einstein-IPC and HEAO-1 A-2 and A-4 energy bands, which span 0.5 to 160 keV, is detected at the 99.6 percent confidence level, after allowing for confusion noise in the HEAO-1 data. Above 15 keV the confidence level is 97 percent. The combined spectrum is flat, with a (photon) power-law index of 1.0 +/- 0.3. The contribution of the population of sources represented by this sample to the 3-50 keV residual cosmic X-ray background is estimated to be at least about 4 percent assuming no evolution. Moderate evolution, for which there is some observational evidence, increases this fractional contribution to about 26 percent.

  20. ROSAT PSPC observations of two starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkes, N.; Pietsch, W.; Hensler, G.

    1993-12-01

    We present results from ROSAT observations of NGC 1808 and NGC 2903. Exposures of 10 ksec each with the Position-Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) detector show X-ray sources at the central positions of both galaxies which are classified as nuclear starburst galaxies. Both targets, NGC 1808 and NGC 2903 appear slightly extended in X-ray maps in the energy band 0.1-2.4 keV. The X-ray spectrum of NGC 1808 shows almost complete absorption below 0.5 keV, indicating an extremely high hydrogen column density towards that source (NH approx. = 8 x 1021/sq cm resulting from model fits on the PSPC spectrum). In the case of NGC 2903, the number of counts in the ROSAT band is significantly lower than expected from a previous EINSTEIN (HEAO 2) investigation of the source.

  1. Bright Submillimeter Galaxies: Evidence for Maximal Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretxaga, I.

    2014-09-01

    AzTEC is a sensitive bolometer camera that, coupled with 10 - 15m-class sub-mm telescopes, has mapped more than 3 sq. deg of the extragalactic sky to depths between 0.7 and 1.1 mJy at 1.1mm, prior to its current installation and operation on the 32m Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). These extragalactic surveys targeted towards blank-fields and biased high-z environments alike have allowed us to identify a few thousands of submillimeter galaxies, powerful obscured starbursts at high-redshifts (z > 1), some of which have intrinsic Star Formation Rates SFR > 1000 Msun/yr and furthermore are extremely compact (~ 1 kpc). Our results imply that these extraordinary systems are forming stars in a gravitationally bound regime in which gravity prohibits the formation of superwinds, leading to matter accumulation within the galaxy and further generations of star formation.

  2. Far-infrared activity and starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belfort, P.; Mochkovitch, R.; Dennefeld, M.

    1987-01-01

    After the IRAS discovery of galaxies with large far-infrared to blue luminosity ratio, it has been proposed that an enhanced star formation could be the origin of the far-infrared emission through dust heating. Whether a simple photometric model is able to account for the FIR and optical properties of IRAS galaxies was investigated. The L sub IR/L sub B ratio, (B-V) color and H sub alpha equivalent width of normal spirals are well reproduced with smooth star formation histories. In the case of starburst galaxies, several theoretical diagrams allow us to estimate the burst strength and extinction. L sub IR/L sub B ratio up to 100 can be rather easily reached, whereas extreme values probably require IMF truncated at the low end.

  3. Properties of Dust Extinction in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, D.; Kinney, A. L.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Panagia, N.

    1993-05-01

    We have studied the extinction properties of 38 starburst and Blue Compact galaxies covering the metallicity range 8.3<=log (O/H)<=9.2, by analyzing their UV+optical spectra. The UV spectra come from the compilation of IUE spectra by Kinney et al. (Kinney, Bohlin, Calzetti, Panagia, & Wyse, 1993, ApJS, to appear on the May issue). The optical spectra, spanning the wavelength range 3200-7500 Angstroms, have been observed in a IUE-matched aperture. Following standard techniques, we have derived the selective extinction E(B-V) from the Balmer decrement and the metallicity from the [OII] and [OIII] lines. In order to clarify the properties of dust extinction in the UV for starburst galaxies, we have fitted the observed UV fluxes of our galaxies in the wavelength range 1250-2600 Angstroms according to the power law F(lambda )~lambda (beta ) and studied the behaviour of beta as function of the selective extinction E(B-V). We find that these two quantities are correlated and that there is no difference between the loci occupied by the low and high metallicity galaxies in the plane beta -vs-E(B-V). The correlation indicates that a higher metallicity does not change the characteristics of individual grains, but merely increases their number. On this ground, our conclusion is that the shape of the extinction law in the UV does not depend on metallicity, for extinctions E(B-V)>0.2. Although the low metallicity galaxies in our sample follow neither the Large Magellanic Cloud nor the Small Magellanic Cloud extinction laws, the absence in our spectra of prominent 2200 Angstroms dust features illustrates that a simple application of a galactic extinction law may be inadequate to properly correct the UV spectra. Models of clumpy dust layers and of dust mixed with the ionized gas are currently under analysis.

  4. Mapping the HI Neighborhood Around Starburst Dwarf Galaxies NGC 1569, NGC 4214 and NGC 4163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Megan C.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2013-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies are believed to be the building blocks of larger galaxies. However, there are some studies that indicate the dwarf galaxies observed in the nearby universe may have formed later, after the most massive galaxies coalesced. Dwarf galaxy formation and evolution is important for our understanding of cosmology. If dwarf galaxies mimic their more massive counterparts, then starburst dwarfs may be present day merger remnants and provide information on the building block hypothesis. The origins of starburst dwarf irregular galaxies of the Magellanic type (dIm) are not well known. The role of interactions and mergers as mechanisms to create these systems has been hypothesized, but not well studied. We present deep HI maps around three starburst dwarf galaxies NGC 1569, NGC 4214 and NGC 4163. The purpose of these maps is to determine if there are tenuous HI structures around these objects that would indicate a recent interaction or merger. We detect HI filamentary structures that may be connected with NGC 1569 thereby indicating a recent interaction with nearby dwarf irregular UGCA 92. However, our map of NGC 4163 and NGC 4214 does not show any tenuous HI at our 5σ sensitivity limit of 1 x 10^18 for a 25 km/s line width.

  5. Colour Chemistry, Part I, Principles, Colour, and Molecular Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallas, G.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses various topics in color chemistry, including the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorption and reflection of light, additive and subtractive color mixing, and the molecular structure of simple colored substances. (MLH)

  6. Modeling Polymorphic Molecular Crystals with Electronic Structure Theory.

    PubMed

    Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-05-11

    Interest in molecular crystals has grown thanks to their relevance to pharmaceuticals, organic semiconductor materials, foods, and many other applications. Electronic structure methods have become an increasingly important tool for modeling molecular crystals and polymorphism. This article reviews electronic structure techniques used to model molecular crystals, including periodic density functional theory, periodic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, fragment-based electronic structure methods, and diffusion Monte Carlo. It also discusses the use of these models for predicting a variety of crystal properties that are relevant to the study of polymorphism, including lattice energies, structures, crystal structure prediction, polymorphism, phase diagrams, vibrational spectroscopies, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Finally, tools for analyzing crystal structures and intermolecular interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:27008426

  7. FISICA observations of the starburst galaxy, NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Raines, S. N.; Gruel, N.; Elston, R.; Guzman, R.; Julian, J.; Boreman, G.; Glenn, P. E.; Hull-Allen, C. G.; Hoffman, J.; Rodgers, M.; Thompson, K.; Flint, S.; Comstock, L.; Myrick, B.

    2006-06-01

    Using the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA) we obtained observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1569. We present our JH band spectra, particularly noting the existence of extended emission in Paschen β and He I.

  8. Adaptive modelling of structured molecular representations for toxicity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of modelling structure-toxicity relationships by direct treatment of the molecular structure (without using descriptors) through an adaptive model able to retain the appropriate structural information. With respect to traditional descriptor-based approaches, this provides a more general and flexible way to tackle prediction problems that is particularly suitable when little or no background knowledge is available. Our method employs a tree-structured molecular representation, which is processed by a recursive neural network (RNN). To explore the realization of RNN modelling in toxicological problems, we employed a data set containing growth impairment concentrations (IGC50) for Tetrahymena pyriformis.

  9. The Ubiquity of Coeval Starbursts in Massive Galaxy Cluster Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Caitlin M.

    2016-06-01

    The universe’s largest galaxy clusters likely built the majority of their massive >1011 M {}ȯ galaxies in simultaneous, short-lived bursts of activity well before virialization. This conclusion is reached based on emerging data sets for z\\gt 2 proto-clusters and the characteristics of their member galaxies, in particular, rare starbursts and ultraluminous active galactic nuclei (AGN). The most challenging observational hurdle in identifying such structures is their very large volumes, ∼104 comoving Mpc3 at z\\gt 2, subtending areas of approximately half a degree on the sky. Thus, the contrast afforded by an overabundance of very rare galaxies in comparison to the background can more easily distinguish overdense structures from the surrounding, normal density field. Five 2≲ z≲ 3 proto-clusters from the literature are discussed in detail and are found to contain up to 12 dusty starbursts or luminous AGN galaxies each, a phenomenon that is unlikely to occur by chance even in overdense environments. These are contrasted with three higher-redshift (4≲ z≲ 5.5) dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) groups, whose evolutionary fate is less clear. Measurements of DSFGs’ gas depletion times suggest that they are indeed short-lived on ∼100 Myr timescales, and accordingly the probability of finding a structure containing more than 8 such systems is ∼0.2%, unless their “triggering” is correlated on very large spatial scales, ∼10 Mpc across. The volume density of DSFG-rich proto-clusters is found to be comparable to all of the >1015 M {}ȯ galaxy clusters in the nearby universe, which is a factor of five larger than expected in some simulations. Some tension still exists between measurements of the volume density of DSFG-rich proto-clusters and the expectation that they are generated via short-lived episodes, as the latter suggests that only a fraction (\\lt \\tfrac{1}{2}) of all proto-clusters should be rich with DSFGs. However, improved observations of

  10. Do Tidal Interactions Trigger Starbursts in Dwarf Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkus, Charlotte; Cannon, John M.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Johnson, Megan C.; Skillman, Evan D.; Bailin, Jeremy; Ford, Alyson; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2015-01-01

    Starburst dwarf galaxies are extensively studied systems, though the mechanism that triggers starbursts is poorly understood. Tidal interactions and gas accretion are thought to be potential starburst trigger mechanisms, although internal, secular drivers have not been ruled out. If starbursts are a result of external perturbations, then one would expect to see signatures of interaction in the gaseous disk of the galaxy. To examine this hypothesis, we analyze both archival and newly-obtained deep, wide-field HI maps from the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of a sample of nineteen well-studied nearby starburst dwarf galaxies to search for such signs of interactions. Our sample is unique in that we have previously derived the star formation histories from Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the resolved stellar populations for all galaxies. In this work we focus on NGC 784 and NGC 672, which both may lie on a filament of dark matter isolated in space. We evaluate methods to determine the presence and properties of low surface-brightness neutral gas in the outer disk regions. This work serves as a prototype for forthcoming analysis of the full sample. With our results we hope to not only establish an effective data analysis procedure, but to also confirm or rule-out tidal interactions as a triggering mechanism of starbursts in this sample of dwarf galaxies.

  11. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  12. Synthesis and molecular structure of gold triarylcorroles.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kolle E; Alemayehu, Abraham B; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine; Ghosh, Abhik

    2011-12-19

    A number of third-row transition-metal corroles have remained elusive as synthetic targets until now, notably osmium, platinum, and gold corroles. Against this backdrop, we present a simple and general synthesis of β-unsubstituted gold(III) triarylcorroles and the first X-ray crystal structure of such a complex. Comparison with analogous copper and silver corrole structures, supplemented by extensive scalar-relativistic, dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations, suggests that "inherent saddling" may occur for of all coinage metal corroles. The degree of saddling, however, varies considerably among the three metals, decreasing conspicuously along the series Cu > Ag > Au. The structural differences reflect significant differences in metal-corrole bonding, which are also reflected in the electrochemistry and electronic absorption spectra of the complexes. From Cu to Au, the electronic structure changes from noninnocent metal(II)-corrole(•2-) to relatively innocent metal(III)-corrole(3-). PMID:22111600

  13. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RING IN THE BARRED GALAXY NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Matsushita, Satoki; Ho, Paul T. P.; Wu, Ya-Lin; Liu, Guilin; Oi, Nagisa

    2011-08-01

    We report high-resolution {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1), {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1), and {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) imaging of the Seyfert 1/starburst ring galaxy NGC 1097 with the Submillimeter Array for the purpose of studying the physical and kinematic properties of the 1 kpc circumnuclear starburst ring. Individual star clusters as detected in the Hubble Space Telescope map of Pa{alpha} line emission have been used to determine the star formation rate (SFR), and are compared with the properties of the molecular gas. The molecular ring has been resolved into individual clumps at the giant molecular cloud association (GMA) scale of 200-300 pc in all three CO lines. The intersection between the dust lanes and the starburst ring, which is associated with the orbit-crowding region, is resolved into two physically/kinematically distinct features in the 1.''5 x 1.''0 (105 x 70 pc) {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1) map. The clumps associated with the dust lanes have broader line widths, higher surface gas densities, and lower SFRs, while the narrow line clumps associated with the starburst ring have opposite characteristics. A Toomre-Q value lower than unity at the radius of the ring suggests that the molecular ring is gravitationally unstable to fragmentation at GMA scale. The line widths and surface density of the gas mass of the clumps show an azimuthal variation related to the large-scale dynamics. The SFR, on the other hand, is not significantly affected by the dynamics, but has a correlation with the intensity ratio of {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2) and {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1), which traces the denser gas associated with star formation. Our resolved CO map, especially in the orbit-crowding region, observationally demonstrates for the first time that the physical/kinematic properties of GMAs are affected by the large-scale bar-potential dynamics in NGC 1097.

  14. Molecular gymnastics: serpin structure, folding and misfolding.

    PubMed

    Whisstock, James C; Bottomley, Stephen P

    2006-12-01

    The native state of serpins represents a long-lived intermediate or metastable structure on the serpin folding pathway. Upon interaction with a protease, the serpin trap is sprung and the molecule continues to fold into a more stable conformation. However, thermodynamic stability can also be achieved through alternative, unproductive folding pathways that result in the formation of inactive conformations. Our increasing understanding of the mechanism of protease inhibition and the dynamics of native serpin structures has begun to reveal how evolution has harnessed the actual process of protein folding (rather than the final folded outcome) to elegantly achieve function. The cost of using metastability for function, however, is an increased propensity for misfolding. PMID:17079131

  15. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  16. Complementary molecular information changes our perception of food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Wirta, Helena K.; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Kaartinen, Riikka; Prosser, Sean W.; Várkonyi, Gergely; Roslin, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    How networks of ecological interactions are structured has a major impact on their functioning. However, accurately resolving both the nodes of the webs and the links between them is fraught with difficulties. We ask whether the new resolution conferred by molecular information changes perceptions of network structure. To probe a network of antagonistic interactions in the High Arctic, we use two complementary sources of molecular data: parasitoid DNA sequenced from the tissues of their hosts and host DNA sequenced from the gut of adult parasitoids. The information added by molecular analysis radically changes the properties of interaction structure. Overall, three times as many interaction types were revealed by combining molecular information from parasitoids and hosts with rearing data, versus rearing data alone. At the species level, our results alter the perceived host specificity of parasitoids, the parasitoid load of host species, and the web-wide role of predators with a cryptic lifestyle. As the northernmost network of host–parasitoid interactions quantified, our data point exerts high leverage on global comparisons of food web structure. However, how we view its structure will depend on what information we use: compared with variation among networks quantified at other sites, the properties of our web vary as much or much more depending on the techniques used to reconstruct it. We thus urge ecologists to combine multiple pieces of evidence in assessing the structure of interaction webs, and suggest that current perceptions of interaction structure may be strongly affected by the methods used to construct them. PMID:24449902

  17. A High-Resolution Map of 12CO J = 6-5 Emission in the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.; Lee, S. W.; Moriarty-Schieven, G. H.

    2006-02-01

    We present a map of 12CO J=6-5 emission of the nuclear region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 at resolution 7" taken with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). This is the highest resolution map yet available at this transition. A detailed quantitative comparison is made with emission at 12CO J=1-0 at the same resolution, yielding new insights into the excitation of molecular gas in this galaxy. The excitation is found to be highest in the central area of the starburst region where the ratio r61=12CO J=6-5/12CO J=1-0 is as high as 0.5, compared to the mean value over the starburst region of 0.24. The excitation ratio peaks along the inner edge of the molecular ring outlined by atomic and molecular gas at lower excitation, and also in two spurs extending northward from the disk toward the outflow associated with the superwind. Emission with higher than average excitation is also found to be associated with the supershell surrounding the luminous SNR candidate 41.9+58, and possibly on a larger scale in gas whose orbits are strongly influenced by the stellar bar. The higher excitation in M82 is likely to be caused predominantly by local increases in kinetic temperature and/or in the geometric filling factor of a preexisting higher excitation component and less likely to be caused by local increases in gas density.

  18. Giant Molecular Cloud Structure and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David (Technical Monitor); Bodenheimer, P. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bodenheimer and Burkert extended earlier calculations of cloud core models to study collapse and fragmentation. The initial condition for an SPH collapse calculation is the density distribution of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere, with near balance between turbulent plus thermal energy and gravitational energy. The main parameter is the turbulent Mach number. For each Mach number several runs are made, each with a different random realization of the initial turbulent velocity field. The turbulence decays on a dynamical time scale, leading the cloud into collapse. The collapse proceeds isothermally until the density has increased to about 10(exp 13) g cm(exp -3). Then heating is included in the dense regions. The nature of the fragmentation is investigated. About 15 different runs have been performed with Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 3.5 (the typical value observed in molecular cloud cores is 0.7). The results show a definite trend of increasing multiplicity with increasing Mach number (M), with the number of fragments approximately proportional to (1 + M). In general, this result agrees with that of Fisher, Klein, and McKee who published three cases with an AMR grid code. However our results show that there is a large spread about this curve. For example, for M=0.3 one case resulted in no fragmentation while a second produced three fragments. Thus it is not only the value of M but also the details of the superposition of the various velocity modes that play a critical role in the formation of binaries. Also, the simulations produce a wide range of separations (10-1000 AU) for the multiple systems, in rough agreement with observations. These results are discussed in two conference proceedings.

  19. Modeling Small Stellar Populations Using Starburst99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gerardo Arturo; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Stellar populations synthesis models have proven to be excellent tools to learn about galaxy evolution. However, modeling small stellar populations (lower than 105 M⊙) has been an intriguing and continuous to be a field of intensive research. In this work, we have developed a new approach to form stars from clusters first, where massive stars are formed from fractions of mass of small stellar clusters. This new approximation is based on the empirical power law (mc-2) for the mass function of clusters between 20-1100 M⊙ found in recent years and the maximum stellar mass that can be formed in a cluster. Incorporating this new approach to form clusters has made us upgrade the way we integrate the stellar properties and the way that the isochrone is produced with a new technique. To produce the new models we have used the most recent version of Starburst99 that incorporates the most recent stellar evolution models with rotation. On the verge of solving nearby stellar populations and observing small stellar populations across the universe, this new approach brings a new scope on trying to disentangle the nature of hyper and supermassive stars in small stellar populations. In this work we present this new approach and the results when these models are applied to very energetic stellar populations such as the cluster in NGC 3603. Our most important result is that we have modeled the ionizing power of this cluster and some others by forming enough supermassive stars in a cluster of ~104 M⊙.

  20. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  1. A far-IR view of the starburst-driven superwind in NGC 2146

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, K.; Groves, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Meidt, S.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Appleton, P.; Croxall, K. V.; Dale, D. A.; Hunt, L. K.; Beirão, P.; Bolatto, A. D.; Calzetti, D.; Donovan Meyer, J.; Draine, B. T.; Hinz, J.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Murphy, E. J.; Smith, J. D. T.; and others

    2014-07-20

    NGC 2146, a nearby luminous infrared galaxy, presents evidence for outflows along the disk minor axis in all gas phases (ionized, neutral atomic, and molecular). We present an analysis of the multi-phase, starburst-driven superwind in the central 5 kpc as traced in spatially resolved spectral line observations, using far-IR Herschel PACS spectroscopy, to probe the effects on the atomic and ionized gas, and optical integral field spectroscopy to examine the ionized gas through diagnostic line ratios. We observe an increased ∼250 km s{sup –1} velocity dispersion in the [O I] 63 μm, [O III] 88 μm, [N II] 122 μm, and [C II] 158 μm fine-structure lines that is spatially coincident with high excitation gas above and below the disk. We model this with a slow ∼200 km s{sup –1} shock and trace the superwind to the edge of our field of view 2.5 kpc above the disk. We present new SOFIA 37 μm observations to explore the warm dust distribution, and detect no clear dust entrainment in the outflow. The stellar kinematics appear decoupled from the regular disk rotation seen in all gas phases, consistent with a recent merger event disrupting the system. We consider the role of the superwind in the evolution of NGC 2146 and speculate on the evolutionary future of the system. Our observations of NGC 2146 in the far-IR allow an unobscured view of the wind, crucial for tracing the superwind to the launching region at the disk center, and provide a local analog for future ALMA observations of outflows in high-redshift systems.

  2. Reverse engineering chemical structures from molecular descriptors : how many solutions?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-06-01

    Physical, chemical and biological properties are the ultimate information of interest for chemical compounds. Molecular descriptors that map structural information to activities and properties are obvious candidates for information sharing. In this paper, we consider the feasibility of using molecular descriptors to safely exchange chemical information in such a way that the original chemical structures cannot be reverse engineered. To investigate the safety of sharing such descriptors, we compute the degeneracy (the number of structure matching a descriptor value) of several 2D descriptors, and use various methods to search for and reverse engineer structures. We examine degeneracy in the entire chemical space taking descriptors values from the alkane isomer series and the PubChem database. We further use a stochastic search to retrieve structures matching specific topological index values. Finally, we investigate the safety of exchanging of fragmental descriptors using deterministic enumeration.

  3. Comprehensive Molecular Structure of the Eukaryotic Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Derek J.; Devkota, Batsal; Huang, Andrew D.; Topf, Maya; Narayanan, Eswar; Sali, Andrej; Harvey, Stephen C.; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Despite the emergence of a large number of X-ray crystallographic models of the bacterial 70S ribosome over the past decade, an accurate atomic model of the eukaryotic 80S ribosome is still not available. Eukaryotic ribosomes possess more ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA than bacterial ribosomes, which are implicated in extra-ribosomal functions in the eukaryotic cells. By combining cryo-EM with RNA and protein homology modeling, we obtained an atomic model of the yeast 80S ribosome complete with all ribosomal RNA expansion segments and all ribosomal proteins for which a structural homolog can be identified. Mutation or deletion of 80S ribosomal proteins can abrogate maturation of the ribosome, leading to several human diseases. We have localized one such protein unique to eukaryotes, rpS19e, whose mutations are associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia in humans. Additionally, we characterize crucial and novel interactions between the dynamic stalk base of the ribosome with eukaryotic elongation factor 2. PMID:20004163

  4. Filaments, ridges and a mini-starburst - HOBYS' view of high mass star formation with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T.; Motte, F.; Didelon, P.

    2012-03-01

    With its unprecedented spatial resolution and high sensitivity, Herschel is revolutionising our understanding of high mass star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM). In particular, Herschel is unveiling the filamentary structure and molecular cloud constituents of the ISM where star formation takes place. The Herschel Imaging Survey of OB Young Stellar objects (HOBYS; Motte, Zavagno, Bontemps, see http://www.herschel.fr/cea/hobys/en/index.php) key program targets burgeoning young stellar objects with the aim of characterising them and the environments in which they form. HOBYS has already proven fruitful with many clear examples of high-mass star formation in nearby molecular cloud complexes (e.g. Motte et al., 2010). Through multi-wavelength Herschel observations I will introduce select regions of the HOBYS program, including Vela C, M16 and W48 to start. These data are rich with filamentary structures and a wealth of sources which span a large mass range including, low, intermediate and high-mass objects in the pre-collapse or protostellar phase of formation, many of which will proceed to form stars. The natal filaments themselves come in many shapes and sizes, they can form thick ridge-like structures, be dispersed in low column density regions or cluster in higher density regions. In Vela C, high-mass star formation proceeds preferentially in high column density supercritical filaments, called ridges, which may result from the constructive convergence of flows (Hill et al., 2011). I will present other examples of ridges identified in HOBYS regions. In addition, I will present the latest results on the Eagle Nebula (M16). This region was made iconic by Hubble, but only Herschel can trace the cold, dense early prestellar phases of star formation, and their natal interstellar filaments, in this infamous star-forming complex. The cavity ionised by the nearby OB cluster in M16 serves to heat the Pillars of Creation and the surrounding interstellar filaments

  5. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: Integrated molecular dynamics—Statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capar, M. Ilk; Nar, A.; Ferrarini, A.; Frezza, E.; Greco, C.; Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio.

  6. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    PubMed

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio

  7. Connecting the density structure of molecular clouds and star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    2015-08-01

    In the current paradigm of turbulence-regulated interstellar medium (ISM), star formation rates of entire galaxies are intricately linked to the density structure of the individual molecular clouds in the ISM. This density structure is essentially encapsulated in the probability distribution function of volume densities (rho-PDF), which directly affects the star formation rates predicted by analytic models. Contrasting its fundamental role, the rho-PDF function and its evolution have remained virtually unconstrained by observations. I describe in this contribution our recent progress in attaining observational constraints for the rho-PDFs of molecular clouds. Specifically, I review our first systematic determination of the rho-PDFs in Solar neighborhood molecular clouds. I will also present new evidence of the time evolution of the projected rho-PDFs, i.e., column density PDFs. These results together enable us to build the first observationally constrained link between the evolving density structure of molecular clouds and the star formation within. Finally, I discuss our work to expand the analysis into a Galactic context and to observationally connect the physical processes acting at the scale of molecular clouds with star formation at the scale of galaxies.

  8. Determination of structure parameters in molecular tunnelling ionisation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in a molecular tunnelling ionisation model (the so-called MO-ADK model) for 23 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behaviour are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. We show that the orientation-dependent ionisation rate reflects the shape of the ionising orbitals in general. The influences of the Stark shifts of the energy levels on the orientation-dependent ionisation rates of the polar molecules are studied. We also examine the angle-dependent ionisation rates (or probabilities) based on the MO-ADK model by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation calculations and with recent experimental measurements.

  9. From non-random molecular structure to life and mind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    The evolutionary hierarchy molecular structure-->macromolecular structure-->protobiological structure-->biological structure-->biological functions has been traced by experiments. The sequence always moves through protein. Extension of the experiments traces the formation of nucleic acids instructed by proteins. The proteins themselves were, in this picture, instructed by the self-sequencing of precursor amino acids. While the sequence indicated explains the thread of the emergence of life, protein in cellular membrane also provides the only known material basis for the emergence of mind in the context of emergence of life.

  10. [Structure and molecular mechanisms of infection and replication of HIV].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hironori; Ode, Hirotaka; Motomura, Kazushi; Yokoyama, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Studies on molecular structure and mechanisms of replication of a pathogen are important from both scientific and clinical viewpoints. The replication study allows us to identify key molecules to regulate life cycle of the pathogen and to screen rationally anti-pathogen drugs. The structural study helps understand how the key molecules work at atomic levels and to design adequately the drugs. In this article, we review important findings on structural and replication studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We also summarize the latest methods for the structural study, mainly focusing on computational simulation technology (in silico analysis). Finally, we summarize briefly standard methods to study replication of viruses. PMID:19177750

  11. Feedback from starbursts: 30 Dorado as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; lim, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    Stellar feedback remains a key uncertain aspect in galaxy formation and evolution theories. In addition to the mechanical energy injection from fast stellar winds and supernovae of massive stars, their radiative transfer feedback (via direct and indirect/dust-processed radiation pressures and photo-ionization) has also been proposed to play a significant role in dispersing dense dusty gas and possibly in driving outflows from starburst regions. To test the relative efficiency of these two forms of the stellar feedback, we study the energetics of the Tarantula Nebula (30 Doradus) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The nebula consists of various blisters of diffuse hot plasma enveloped by cool gas. Based on the X-ray spectroscopy of the nebula, using a 100 ks Suzaku X-ray observation, we estimate the thermal energy of the enclosed plasma, accounting for its temperature distribution and foreground absorption variation. The estimated thermal energy is far short of the expected fraction of the mechanical energy input from the central young stellar association (NGC 2070) of the nebula, according to the classic superbubble solution, indicating a substantial loss of energy via probably hot electron-dust interaction and cosmic-ray acceleration, as well as the cool shell formation. We further characterize the kinetic energy of dense dusty gas, using a recently published dust mass map and the velocity dispersion inferred from molecular and HI gases in the nebula. However, this component of the kinetic energy appears to be dominated by the turbulent and bulk motions of HII gas. The total kinetic energy of the nebula is consistent with the expected fraction of the mechanical energy input. Therefore, the radiation transfer feedback does not seem to play a significant role in the expansion of 30 Doradus.

  12. Detection of gamma rays from a starburst galaxy.

    PubMed

    Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L-M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füssling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Paz Arribas, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2009-11-20

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of approximately 10(15) electron volts. We report the detection of gamma rays--tracers of such cosmic rays--from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 billion electron volts is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0(stat) +/- 2.8(sys)) x 10(-13) cm(-2) s(-1), implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is five times as large as that in our Galaxy. PMID:19779150

  13. A spectroscopic analysis of the starburst galaxies NGC 3395 and NGC 3396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaks, Kenneth

    2003-11-01

    We have obtained ultraviolet and visible wavelength spectra of 31 bright star forming knots in the interacting galaxies NGC 3395 and NGC 3396 using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The knots are possible super star clusters on the order of ˜100 pc diameter with measured metallicities on the order of 0.5 0.6 Z⊙ . The spectra are consistent with a massive production of hot young stars in a starburst. Ages of the starburst knots were calculated using several diagnostics from the Leitherer et al. Starburst 99 code (SB99) using an Initial Mass Function (IMF) with a power law coefficient α = 2.35 and an upper mass limit of 100 M⊙ . We modeled our star forming knots as instantaneous starbursts with the measured metallicity and we obtained consistent and reasonable estimates of the starburst age. The UV-brightest knots are ˜5 Myr old in both galaxies. We found no age gradient in the galaxies implying the starburst does not propagate across the galaxy but rather occurs simultaneously everywhere. The data are also consistent with the interpretation that the starburst is not only happening more or less simultaneously within each galaxy, it is also occurring simultaneously in both galaxies. If true, the fact that it is occurring simultaneously in both galaxies gives credence to the interaction being the source of the star formation in line with current theory. While our starforming knots were spatially resolved, at high redshift one cannot resolve individual knots and instead has to rely on spatially unresolved spectra. To assess the representativeness of these spectra of the underlying structure, we simulated the spectra one would observe by defining the entire portion of each galaxy observed as an unresolved knot. We found the metallicities for the unresolved knots were very representative of the resolved knots that made them up. We also found that the ages we derived for the unresolved knots were representative of the

  14. Molecular structure of DNA by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cricenti, A; Selci, S; Felici, A C; Generosi, R; Gori, E; Djaczenko, W; Chiarotti, G

    1989-09-15

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris(l-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with the use of a high-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Constant-current and gap-modulated STM images show clear evidence of the helicity of the DNA structure: pitch periodicity ranges from 25 to 35 angstroms, whereas the average diameter is 20 angstroms. Molecular structure within a single helix turn was also observed. PMID:2781279

  15. Molecular Structure of DNA by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cricenti, A.; Selci, S.; Felici, A. C.; Generosi, R.; Gori, E.; Djaczenko, W.; Chiarotti, G.

    1989-09-01

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris(1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with the use of a high-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Constant-current and gap-modulated STM images show clear evidence of the helicity of the DNA structure: pitch periodicity ranges from 25 and 35 angstroms, whereas the average diameter is 20 angstroms. Molecular structure within a single helix turn was also observed.

  16. Relating Soil Organic Matter Dynamics to its Molecular Structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our understanding of the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) must be integrated with a sound knowledge of it biochemical complexity. The molecular structure of SOM was determined in 98% sand soils to eliminate the known protective effects of clay on the amount and turnover rate of the SOM constitu...

  17. Class I methanol megamasers: a potential probe of starburst activity and feedback in active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Zhang, J.-S.; Wang, J.-Z.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Wu, Q.-W.; Wu, Z.-Z.

    2016-06-01

    Previous observations have shown that the distribution of 36.2-GHz class I methanol megamaser (MM) emission in Arp 220 is highly correlated with the diffuse X-rays. On this basis it was suggested that methanol MM may be produced either by the effects of galactic-outflow-driven shocks and/or cosmic rays. Here we report the results of a single-dish survey undertaken with the Greenbank Telescope (GBT) to improve our understanding of the pumping conditions of extragalactic class I methanol masers and their relationship to starburst and feedback processes within the host galaxies, towards a sample which includes 16 galaxies which show both extended soft X-ray emission, and either OH or H2O MM emission. Large baseline ripples in the GBT spectra limited our results to tentative detections towards 11 of the target galaxies. Analysis of these tentative detections shows that there are significant correlations between the methanol intensity and the host-galaxy infrared, radio and OH MM emission, but no correlation with the X-ray and H2O MM emission. Some sources show methanol emission significantly offset from the systemic velocity of the galaxy (by up to 1000 km s-1) and we propose that these are associated with galactic-scale outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback. The combined observational properties suggest that class I methanol MMs are related to significant starburst and molecular outflow activity and hence may provide a potential probe of AGN feedback and starburst processes in the host galaxies.

  18. Formaldehyde Densitometry of Starburst Galaxies: Density-independent Global Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Darling, Jeremy; Henkel, Christian; Menten, Karl M.

    2013-04-01

    Accurate techniques that allow for the derivation of the spatial density in star formation regions are rare. A technique that has found application for the derivation of spatial densities in Galactic star formation regions utilizes the density-sensitive properties of the K-doublet transitions of formaldehyde (H2CO). In this paper, we present an extension of our survey of the formaldehyde 110-111 (λ = 6.2 cm) and 211-212 (λ = 2.1 cm) K-doublet transitions of H2CO in a sample of 56 starburst systems. We have extended the number of galaxies in which both transitions have been detected from 5 to 13. We have improved our spatial density measurements by incorporating kinetic temperatures based upon NH3 measurements of 11 of the galaxies with a total of 14 velocity components in our sample. Our spatial density measurements lie in a relatively narrow range from 104.5 to 105.5 cm-3. This implies that the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation between L IR and M dense (1) is an indication of the dense gas mass reservoir available to form stars and (2) is not directly dependent upon a higher average density driving the star formation process in the most luminous starburst galaxies. We have also used our H2CO measurements to derive two separate measures of the dense gas mass which are generally smaller, in many cases by a factor of 102-103, than those derived using HCN. This disparity suggests that H2CO traces a denser, more compact component of the giant molecular clouds in our starburst galaxy sample. We also report measurements of the rotationally excited λ = 6.3 cm 2Π1/2 J = 1/2 state of OH and the H111α radio recombination line taken concurrently with our H2CO 110-111 measurements.

  19. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  20. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song-Feng, Zhao; Fang, Huang; Guo-Li, Wang; Xiao-Xin, Zhou

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov–Popov–Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  1. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Huang, Fang; Wang, Guo-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  2. Molecular solids of actinide hexacyanoferrate: Structure and bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupouy, G.; Dumas, T.; Fillaux, C.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Den Auwer, C.; Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E.; Fuster, E. G.; Papalardo, R.; Sanchez Marcos, E.; Hennig, C.; Scheinost, A.; Conradson, S. D.; Shuh, D. K.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2010-03-01

    The hexacyanometallate family is well known in transition metal chemistry because the remarkable electronic delocalization along the metal-cyano-metal bond can be tuned in order to design systems that undergo a reversible and controlled change of their physical properties. We have been working for few years on the description of the molecular and electronic structure of materials formed with [Fe(CN)6]n- building blocks and actinide ions (An = Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) and have compared these new materials to those obtained with lanthanide cations at oxidation state +III. In order to evaluate the influence of the actinide coordination polyhedron on the three-dimensional molecular structure, both atomic number and formal oxidation state have been varied : oxidation states +III, +IV. EXAFS at both iron K edge and actinide LIII edge is the dedicated structural probe to obtain structural information on these systems. Data at both edges have been combined to obtain a three-dimensional model. In addition, qualitative electronic information has been gathered with two spectroscopic tools : UV-Near IR spectrophotometry and low energy XANES data that can probe each atom of the structural unit : Fe, C, N and An. Coupling these spectroscopic tools to theoretical calculations will lead in the future to a better description of bonding in these molecular solids. Of primary interest is the actinide cation ability to form ionic — covalent bonding as 5f orbitals are being filled by modification of oxidation state and/or atomic number.

  3. Molecular design for growth of supramolecular membranes with hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Zha, R Helen; Velichko, Yuri S; Bitton, Ronit; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-02-01

    Membranes with hierarchical structure exist in biological systems, and bio-inspired building blocks have been used to grow synthetic analogues in the laboratory through self-assembly. The formation of these synthetic membranes is initiated at the interface of two aqueous solutions, one containing cationic peptide amphiphiles (PA) and the other containing the anionic biopolymer hyaluronic acid (HA). The membrane growth process starts within milliseconds of interface formation and continues over much longer timescales to generate robust membranes with supramolecular PA-HA nanofibers oriented orthogonal to the interface. Computer simulation indicates that formation of these hierarchically structured membranes requires strong interactions between molecular components at early time points in order to generate a diffusion barrier between both solutions. Experimental studies using structurally designed PAs confirm simulation results by showing that only PAs with high ζ potential are able to yield hierarchically structured membranes. Furthermore, the chemical structure of such PAs must incorporate residues that form β-sheets, which facilitates self-assembly of long nanofibers. In contrast, PAs that form low aspect ratio nanostructures interact weakly with HA and yield membranes that exhibit non-fibrous fingering protrusions. Furthermore, experimental results show that increasing HA molecular weight decreases the growth rate of orthogonal nanofibers. This result is supported by simulation results suggesting that the thickness of the interfacial contact layer generated immediately after initiation of self-assembly increases with polymer molecular weight. PMID:26649980

  4. Photoelectron Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in Multiply Charged Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2009-02-12

    Photoelectrons emitted from multiply charged anions (MCAs) carry information of the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion (ICR), which is dependent on molecular structures. Using photoelectron imaging, we observed the effects of ICR on photoelectron angular distributions (PAD) of the three isomers of benzene dicarboxylate dianions C6H4(CO2)22– (o-, m- and p-BDC2–). Photoelectrons were observed to peak along the laser polarization due to the ICR, but the anisotropy was the largest for p-BDC2–, followed by the m- and o-isomer. The observed anisotropy is related to the direction of the ICR or the detailed molecular structures, suggesting that photoelectron imaging may allow structural information to be obtained for complex multiply charged anions.

  5. Structure factor and rheology of chain molecules from molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejón-González, Omar; Castillo-Tejas, Jorge; Manero, Octavio; Alvarado, Juan F. J.

    2013-05-01

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics were performed to determine the relationship between the static structure factor, the molecular conformation, and the rheological properties of chain molecules. A spring-monomer model with Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic and Lennard-Jones force field potentials was used to describe chain molecules. The equations of motion were solved for shear flow with SLLOD equations of motion integrated with Verlet's algorithm. A multiple time scale algorithm extended to non-equilibrium situations was used as the integration method. Concentric circular patterns in the structure factor were obtained, indicating an isotropic Newtonian behavior. Under simple shear flow, some peaks in the structure factor were emerged corresponding to an anisotropic pattern as chains aligned along the flow direction. Pure chain molecules and chain molecules in solution displayed shear-thinning regions. Power-law and Carreau-Yasuda models were used to adjust the generated data. Results are in qualitative agreement with rheological and light scattering experiments.

  6. Consequences of Starbursts for the Interstellar and Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschwerdt, Dieter; de Avillez, Miguel; Dorfi, Ernst

    Star formation in general, and starbursts in particular, drive the evolution of galaxies. To understand the process of galactic matter cycle quantitatively, it is absolutely necessary to follow the evolution of the components of the interstellar medium, such as gas, magnetic fields, cosmic rays in detail over sufficiently long time scales. Due to the non-linearity of the interactions between the various components, and the turbulent nature of the plasma, high resolution numerical simulations offer the best strategy to further our understanding. The results of our numerical studies can be summarized as follows: (i) Supernova explosions are the most important energy input sources in the ISM and lead to a high level of turbulence in the plasma, coupling structures on all scales, (ii) more than half of the disk mass resides in classically thermally unstable temperature regimes, (iii) turbulent mixing is the dominant energy transport process over a wide range of scales, (iv) proportionality between magnetic field and density is generally weak, except for the densest regions, (v) magnetic fields, even if they are parallel to the galactic disk, cannot prevent outflow into the halo, (vi) the ionization structure of the plasma depends on its thermal history, and is in general not in collisional ionization equilibrium, (vii) the cooling function varies in space and time, (viii) X-rays can be emitted even at plasma temperatures of the order of 104K due to delayed recombination, both in the disk and the halo, (ix) cosmic rays can help driving a galactic wind, (x) cosmic rays can be accelerated to high energies beyond 1015eV (the "knee") in long lived shocks propagating into the galactic halo, because of time-dependent star formation.

  7. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  8. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  9. Witnessing the Birth of the Red Sequence: ALMA High-resolution Imaging of [C II] and Dust in Two Interacting Ultra-red Starbursts at z = 4.425

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunne, L.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Lewis, A.; Maddox, S.; Riechers, D.; Serjeant, S.; Van der Werf, P.; Biggs, A. D.; Bremer, M.; Cigan, P.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Eales, S.; Ibar, E.; Messias, H.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; van Kampen, E.

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have studied the morphology and the physical scale of the interstellar medium—both gas and dust—in SGP 38326, an unlensed pair of interacting starbursts at z = 4.425. SGP 38326 is the most luminous star bursting system known at z > 4, with a total IR luminosity of L IR ˜ 2.5 × 1013 L ⊙ and a star formation rate of ˜ 4500 M ⊙ yr‑1. SGP 38326 also contains a molecular gas reservoir among the most massive yet found in the early universe, and it is the likely progenitor of a massive, red-and-dead elliptical galaxy at z ˜ 3. Probing scales of ˜0.″1 or ˜800 pc we find that the smooth distribution of the continuum emission from cool dust grains contrasts with the more irregular morphology of the gas, as traced by the [C ii] fine structure emission. The gas is also extended over larger physical scales than the dust. The velocity information provided by the resolved [C ii] emission reveals that the dynamics of the two interacting components of SGP 38326 are each compatible with disk-like, ordered rotation, but also reveals an ISM which is turbulent and unstable. Our observations support a scenario where at least a subset of the most distant extreme starbursts are highly dissipative mergers of gas-rich galaxies.

  10. Witnessing the Birth of the Red Sequence: ALMA High-resolution Imaging of [C II] and Dust in Two Interacting Ultra-red Starbursts at z = 4.425

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunne, L.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Lewis, A.; Maddox, S.; Riechers, D.; Serjeant, S.; Van der Werf, P.; Biggs, A. D.; Bremer, M.; Cigan, P.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Eales, S.; Ibar, E.; Messias, H.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; van Kampen, E.

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have studied the morphology and the physical scale of the interstellar medium—both gas and dust—in SGP 38326, an unlensed pair of interacting starbursts at z = 4.425. SGP 38326 is the most luminous star bursting system known at z > 4, with a total IR luminosity of L IR ∼ 2.5 × 1013 L ⊙ and a star formation rate of ∼ 4500 M ⊙ yr‑1. SGP 38326 also contains a molecular gas reservoir among the most massive yet found in the early universe, and it is the likely progenitor of a massive, red-and-dead elliptical galaxy at z ∼ 3. Probing scales of ∼0.″1 or ∼800 pc we find that the smooth distribution of the continuum emission from cool dust grains contrasts with the more irregular morphology of the gas, as traced by the [C ii] fine structure emission. The gas is also extended over larger physical scales than the dust. The velocity information provided by the resolved [C ii] emission reveals that the dynamics of the two interacting components of SGP 38326 are each compatible with disk-like, ordered rotation, but also reveals an ISM which is turbulent and unstable. Our observations support a scenario where at least a subset of the most distant extreme starbursts are highly dissipative mergers of gas-rich galaxies.

  11. Accurate prediction of lattice energies and structures of molecular crystals with molecular quantum chemistry methods.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Li, Wei; Gu, Fangwei; Li, Shuhua

    2015-01-13

    We extend the generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach to molecular crystals under periodic boundary conditions (PBC), and we demonstrate the performance of the method for a variety of molecular crystals. With this approach, the lattice energy of a molecular crystal can be obtained from the energies of a series of embedded subsystems, which can be computed with existing advanced molecular quantum chemistry methods. The use of the field compensation method allows the method to take long-range electrostatic interaction of the infinite crystal environment into account and make the method almost translationally invariant. The computational cost of the present method scales linearly with the number of molecules in the unit cell. Illustrative applications demonstrate that the PBC-GEBF method with explicitly correlated quantum chemistry methods is capable of providing accurate descriptions on the lattice energies and structures for various types of molecular crystals. In addition, this approach can be employed to quantify the contributions of various intermolecular interactions to the theoretical lattice energy. Such qualitative understanding is very useful for rational design of molecular crystals. PMID:26574207

  12. MOLVIE: an interactive visualization environment for molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huandong; Li, Ming; Xu, Ying

    2003-05-01

    A Molecular visualization interactive environment (MOLVIE), is designed to display three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecules and support the structural analysis and research on proteins. The paper presents the features, design considerations and applications of MOLVIE, especially the new functions used to compare the structures of two molecules and view the partial fragment of a molecule. Being developed in JAVA, MOLVIE is platform-independent. Moreover, it may run on a webpage as an applet for remote users. MOLVIE is available at http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~mli/Bioinf/software/index.html. PMID:12725967

  13. Molecular spectroscopy and molecular structure - Selected communications presented at the 1st International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, James R.; Fausto, Rui; Ünsalan, Ozan; Bayarı, Sevgi; Kuş, Nihal; Ildız, Gülce Ö.

    2016-01-01

    The First International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013) took place at the Harbiye Cultural Center & Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, September 15-20, 2013. The main aim of the congress was to encourage the exchange of scientific ideas and collaborations all around the world, introduce new techniques and instruments, and discuss recent developments in the field of molecular spectroscopy. Among the different subjects covered, particular emphasis was given to the relevance of spectroscopy to elucidate details of the molecular structure and the chemical and physical behavior of systems ranging from simple molecules to complex biochemical molecules. Besides experimental spectroscopic approaches, related computational and theoretical methods were also considered. In this volume, selected contributions presented at the congress were put together.

  14. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic analysis, thermodynamic parameters and molecular modeling studies of (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Zarife Sibel; Kantar, Günay Kaya; Şaşmaz, Selami; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the molecular characteristic and structural parameters that govern the chemical behavior of a new (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate compound and to compare predictions made from theory with experimental observations. The title compound, (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate, (I), (C16H14O6), has been synthesized. The compound has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopies and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Optimized molecular structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been investigated by B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method using density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results show that the predicted geometry can well reproduce structural parameters. In addition, global chemical reactivity descriptors, molecular electrostatic potential map (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), Mulliken population method and natural population analysis (NPA) and thermodynamic properties have also been studied. The energetic behavior of title compound has been examined in solvent media using polarizable continuum model (PCM).

  15. ANATOMY OF A POST-STARBURST MINOR MERGER: A MULTI-WAVELENGTH WFC3 STUDY OF NGC 4150

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, R. Mark; Kaviraj, Sugata; Silk, Joseph I.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Trauger, John T.

    2011-02-01

    We present a spatially resolved near-UV/optical study, using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope, of NGC 4150, a sub-L{sub *}, early-type galaxy (ETG) of around 6 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}, which has been observed as part of the WFC3 Early-Release Science Programme. Previous work indicates that this galaxy has a large reservoir of molecular hydrogen gas, exhibits a kinematically decoupled core (a likely indication of recent merging) and strong, central H{beta} absorption (indicative of young stars). While relatively uninspiring in its optical image, the core of NGC 4150 shows ubiquitous near-UV emission and remarkable dusty substructure. Our analysis shows this galaxy to lie in the near-UV green valley, and its pixel-by-pixel photometry exhibits a narrow range of near-UV/optical colors that are similar to those of nearby E+A (post-starburst) galaxies and lie between those of M83 (an actively star-forming spiral) and the local quiescent ETG population. We parameterize the properties of the recent star formation (RSF; age, mass fraction, metallicity, and internal dust content) in the NGC 4150 pixels by comparing the observed near-UV/optical photometry to stellar models. The typical age of the RSF is around 0.9 Gyr, consistent with the similarity of the near-UV colors to post-starburst systems, while the morphological structure of the young component supports the proposed merger scenario. The typical RSF metallicity, representative of the metallicity of the gas fuelling star formation, is {approx}0.3-0.5 Z{sub sun}. Assuming that this galaxy is a merger and that the gas is sourced mainly from the infalling companion, these metallicities plausibly indicate the gas-phase metallicity (GPM) of the accreted satellite. Comparison to the local mass-GPM relation suggests (crudely) that the mass of the accreted system is {approx}3 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, making NGC 4150 a 1:20 minor merger. A summation of the pixel RSF mass fractions indicates that

  16. Anatomy of a Post-starburst Minor Merger: A Multi-wavelength WFC3 Study of NGC 4150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, R. Mark; Kaviraj, Sugata; Silk, Joseph I.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Mutchler, Max; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick T.; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2011-02-01

    We present a spatially resolved near-UV/optical study, using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope, of NGC 4150, a sub-L *, early-type galaxy (ETG) of around 6 × 109 M sun, which has been observed as part of the WFC3 Early-Release Science Programme. Previous work indicates that this galaxy has a large reservoir of molecular hydrogen gas, exhibits a kinematically decoupled core (a likely indication of recent merging) and strong, central Hβ absorption (indicative of young stars). While relatively uninspiring in its optical image, the core of NGC 4150 shows ubiquitous near-UV emission and remarkable dusty substructure. Our analysis shows this galaxy to lie in the near-UV green valley, and its pixel-by-pixel photometry exhibits a narrow range of near-UV/optical colors that are similar to those of nearby E+A (post-starburst) galaxies and lie between those of M83 (an actively star-forming spiral) and the local quiescent ETG population. We parameterize the properties of the recent star formation (RSF; age, mass fraction, metallicity, and internal dust content) in the NGC 4150 pixels by comparing the observed near-UV/optical photometry to stellar models. The typical age of the RSF is around 0.9 Gyr, consistent with the similarity of the near-UV colors to post-starburst systems, while the morphological structure of the young component supports the proposed merger scenario. The typical RSF metallicity, representative of the metallicity of the gas fuelling star formation, is ~0.3-0.5 Z sun. Assuming that this galaxy is a merger and that the gas is sourced mainly from the infalling companion, these metallicities plausibly indicate the gas-phase metallicity (GPM) of the accreted satellite. Comparison to the local mass-GPM relation suggests (crudely) that the mass of the accreted system is ~3 × 108 M sun, making NGC 4150 a 1:20 minor merger. A summation of the pixel RSF mass fractions indicates that the RSF contributes ~2%-3% of the stellar mass

  17. A dynamic data structure for flexible molecular maintenance and informatics

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Chowdhury, Rezaul Alam; Rasheed, Muhibur

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: We present the ‘Dynamic Packing Grid’ (DPG), a neighborhood data structure for maintaining and manipulating flexible molecules and assemblies, for efficient computation of binding affinities in drug design or in molecular dynamics calculations. Results: DPG can efficiently maintain the molecular surface using only linear space and supports quasi-constant time insertion, deletion and movement (i.e. updates) of atoms or groups of atoms. DPG also supports constant time neighborhood queries from arbitrary points. Our results for maintenance of molecular surface and polarization energy computations using DPG exhibit marked improvement in time and space requirements. Availability: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~bajaj/cvc/software/DPG.shtml Contact: bajaj@cs.utexas.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21115440

  18. Ab initio molecular crystal structures, spectra, and phase diagrams.

    PubMed

    Hirata, So; Gilliard, Kandis; He, Xiao; Li, Jinjin; Sode, Olaseni

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular crystals are chemists' solids in the sense that their structures and properties can be understood in terms of those of the constituent molecules merely perturbed by a crystalline environment. They form a large and important class of solids including ices of atmospheric species, drugs, explosives, and even some organic optoelectronic materials and supramolecular assemblies. Recently, surprisingly simple yet extremely efficient, versatile, easily implemented, and systematically accurate electronic structure methods for molecular crystals have been developed. The methods, collectively referred to as the embedded-fragment scheme, divide a crystal into monomers and overlapping dimers and apply modern molecular electronic structure methods and software to these fragments of the crystal that are embedded in a self-consistently determined crystalline electrostatic field. They enable facile applications of accurate but otherwise prohibitively expensive ab initio molecular orbital theories such as Møller-Plesset perturbation and coupled-cluster theories to a broad range of properties of solids such as internal energies, enthalpies, structures, equation of state, phonon dispersion curves and density of states, infrared and Raman spectra (including band intensities and sometimes anharmonic effects), inelastic neutron scattering spectra, heat capacities, Gibbs energies, and phase diagrams, while accounting for many-body electrostatic (namely, induction or polarization) effects as well as two-body exchange and dispersion interactions from first principles. They can fundamentally alter the role of computing in the studies of molecular crystals in the same way ab initio molecular orbital theories have transformed research practices in gas-phase physical chemistry and synthetic chemistry in the last half century. In this Account, after a brief summary of formalisms and algorithms, we discuss applications of these methods performed in our group as compelling

  19. Molecular structure in soil humic substances: The new view

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison

    2005-04-21

    A critical examination of published data obtained primarily from recent nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and pyrolysis studies reveals an evolving new view of the molecular structure of soil humic substances. According to the new view, humic substances are collections of diverse, relatively low molecular mass components forming dynamic associations stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. These associations are capable of organizing into micellar structures in suitable aqueous environments. Humic components display contrasting molecular motional behavior and may be spatially segregated on a scale of nanometers. Within this new structural context, these components comprise any molecules intimately associated with a humic substance, such that they cannot be separated effectively by chemical or physical methods. Thus biomolecules strongly bound within humic fractions are by definition humic components, a conclusion that necessarily calls into question key biogeochemical pathways traditionally thought to be required for the formation of humic substances. Further research is needed to elucidate the intermolecular interactions that link humic components into supramolecular associations and to establish the pathways by which these associations emerge from the degradation of organic litter.

  20. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz Anastacio; da Silva, João Herminio Martins; Ferreira, Dinarte Neto Moreira; Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl; de Freitas, Mônica Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors. PMID:24637936

  1. Application of machine learning to structural molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, M J; King, R D; Lewis, R A; Muggleton, S

    1994-06-29

    A technique of machine learning, inductive logic programming implemented in the program GOLEM, has been applied to three problems in structural molecular biology. These problems are: the prediction of protein secondary structure; the identification of rules governing the arrangement of beta-sheets strands in the tertiary folding of proteins; and the modelling of a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) of a series of drugs. For secondary structure prediction and the QSAR, GOLEM yielded predictions comparable with contemporary approaches including neural networks. Rules for beta-strand arrangement are derived and it is planned to contrast their accuracy with those obtained by human inspection. In all three studies GOLEM discovered rules that provided insight into the stereochemistry of the system. We conclude machine learning used together with human intervention will provide a powerful tool to discover patterns in biological sequences and structures. PMID:7800706

  2. Starburst in the Intragroup Medium of Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.; Tuffs, R.

    1998-01-01

    Based on new ISO mid-infrared observations and ground based H(alpha) and near-infrared observations, we report the detection of a bright starburst in the intragroup medium (IGM) of the famous compact group of galaxies Stephan's Quintet.

  3. The Implications of Extreme Outflows from Extreme Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-05-01

    Interstellar ultraviolet absorption lines provide crucial information about the properties of galactic outflows. In this paper, we augment our previous analysis of the systematic properties of starburst-driven galactic outflows by expanding our sample to include a rare population of starbursts with exceptionally high outflow velocities. In principle, these could be a qualitatively different phenomenon from more typical outflows. However, we find that instead these starbursts lie on, or along the extrapolation of, the trends defined by the more typical systems studied previously by us. We exploit the wide dynamic range provided by this new sample to determine scaling relations of outflow velocity with galaxy stellar mass (M *), circular velocity, star formation rate (SFR), SFR/M *, and SFR/area. We argue that these results can be accommodated within the general interpretational framework we previously advocated, in which a population of ambient interstellar or circumgalactic clouds is accelerated by the combined forces of gravity and the momentum flux from the starburst. We show that this simple physical picture is consistent with both the strong cosmological evolution of galactic outflows in typical star-forming galaxies and the paucity of such galaxies with spectra showing inflows. We also present simple parameterizations of these results that can be implemented in theoretical models and numerical simulations of galaxy evolution.

  4. The Fermi bubbles as starburst wind termination shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.

    2014-10-01

    The enhanced star formation in the inner 100 pc of the Galaxy launches a superwind at ˜1600 km s-1 for M82-like parameters. The ram pressure of the wind is very low compared to more powerful starburst winds. I show that halo gas stops the wind a few kpc from the Galactic Centre. I suggest that the termination shock accelerates cosmic rays, and that the resulting inverse Compton γ-rays are visible as the Fermi bubbles. The bubbles are then wind bubbles, which the starburst can inflate within 10 Myr. They can remain in steady state as long as the starburst lasts. The shock may accelerate PeV electrons and EeV protons. The bubbles may be analogues of galactic wind termination shocks in the intergalactic medium. I discuss the advantages and problems of this model. I note that any jets from Sgr A* must burrow through the starburst wind bubble before reaching the halo gas, which could affect the early evolution of such jets.

  5. The Starburst-AGN Connection under the Multiwavelength Limelight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of a tight relation between supermassive black hole masses, the bulge luminosity, and the stellar velocity dispersion in the local universe galaxies, mounting experimental evidence has been collected pointing to a connection between nuclear activity and star formation over a wide range of redshifts. Although a growing number of galaxies from different samples exhibit simultaneous starburst and AGN phenomenology, it is still a matter of debate whether this is the smoking gun of a causal relation between them, and, if so, with which trend. Basic issues in modern astrophysics, such as the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes, AGN feeding and feedback to the interstellar and intergalactic medium, as well as the role played by the environment on the star formation history are related to this "Starburst-AGN Connection". This Workshop aims at gathering observational and theoretical astronomers so as to answer the following questions: * The "Starburst-AGN Connection": A causal relation? * "Starburst-AGN Connection" at low and high redshift: any evidence for evolution? * Is there a connection between AGN obscuration and star formation? * In which way are the star formation and AGN phenomena affected by the environment? * Do stars contribute to AGN fueling? Multiwavelength observations in the last decade have given a paramount contribution to improve our understanding in this field. The Workshop will build on this panoptic view, and aims at contributing to the scientific case of future ground-based and space large observatories.

  6. Unveil the Nature of Post-Starburst Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhaohui; Brotherton, Michael; Cales, Sabrina; Canalizo, Gabriella; Dale, Daniel; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean

    2006-05-01

    We propose to obtain mid-IR spectra of 16 spectroscopically selected post-starburst quasars in order to fully characterize the properties of this new class. Post-starburst quasars are broad-lined AGN that also posses the spectral signatures of massive, moderate-aged stellar populations (in excess of ten billion solar masses and ages of hundreds of Myrs). This class represents several percent of the quasar population and may explicitly reveal how black hole/bulge correlations arise. We will compare their mid-IR SED and possible PAH features with other classes. The current project, which will also incorporate HST, SDSS, IRTF, KPNO and Keck data, will for the first time determine reliably for a sample of objects the properties of the massive starbursts (ages, masses), their black holes mass, accretion rate, morphologies, environments, and the relationships among these. Beyond just characterizing the properties of these populations, we plan to investigate the hypothesis that post-starburst quasars are an evolutionary phase in the lifetime of most quasars.

  7. Starburst galaxies as seen by gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohm, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Starburst galaxies have a highly increased star-formation rate compared to regular galaxies and inject huge amounts of kinetic power into the interstellar medium via supersonic stellar winds, and supernova explosions. Supernova remnants, which are considered to be the main source of cosmic rays (CRs), form an additional, significant energy and pressure component and might influence the star-formation process in a major way. Observations of starburst galaxies at γ-ray energies give us the unique opportunity to study non-thermal phenomena associated with hadronic CRs and their relation to the star-formation process. In this work, recent observations of starburst galaxies with space and ground-based γ-ray telescopes are being reviewed, and the current state of theoretical work on the γ-ray emission is discussed. A special emphasis is put on the prospects of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array for the study of starburst galaxies in particular and star-forming galaxies in general. xml:lang="fr"

  8. AN IONIZATION CONE IN THE DWARF STARBURST GALAXY NGC 5253

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael; Martin, Crystal L.

    2011-11-01

    There are few observational constraints on how the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies depends on galactic parameters. Here we report on the first major detection of an ionization cone in NGC 5253, a nearby starburst galaxy. This high-excitation feature is identified by mapping the emission-line ratios in the galaxy using [S III] {lambda}9069, [S II] {lambda}6716, and H{alpha} narrowband images from the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. The ionization cone appears optically thin, which suggests the escape of ionizing photons. The cone morphology is narrow with an estimated solid angle covering just 3% of 4{pi} steradians, and the young, massive clusters of the nuclear starburst can easily generate the radiation required to ionize the cone. Although less likely, we cannot rule out the possibility of an obscured active galactic nucleus source. An echelle spectrum along the minor axis shows complex kinematics that are consistent with outflow activity. The narrow morphology of the ionization cone supports the scenario that an orientation bias contributes to the difficulty in detecting Lyman continuum emission from starbursts and Lyman break galaxies.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Diagnostics of Starbirth in Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William

    2005-07-01

    From the Orion Nebula to the Hubble Deep Field, starburst activity can be seen transforming galaxian clouds of gas into populous clusters of stars. The pyrotechnics and chemical enrichment associated with this activity have led to outcomes as ubiquitous as interstellar dust and as exquisite as life on Earth. In this talk, I will focus on the circumstances of star formation in the environmental context of ongoing starburst activity. I begin with the premises that (1) the formation of a single star takes time, (2) the formation of a populous cluster takes even more time, and (3) ``stuff'' happens in the interim. Hubble images of the Orion Nebula and Eagle Nebula show how hot stars can excavate neighboring clouds of gas and photoevaporate the star-forming cores that are exposed. Hubble observations of giant HII regions in M33 reveal a significant variation in the stellar populations, such that the most metal-rich HII regions contain the greatest proportions of the most massive stars. ISO and Spitzer observations of these same HII regions reveal corresponding variations in the nebular response. These multi-wavelength diagnostics of the stellar-nebular feedback in galaxian starbursts suggest a star-forming mechanism which is subject to photo-evaporative ablation -- an erosive process that is mediated by the metal abundance and corresponding amounts of protective dust in the starbursting environment.

  10. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  11. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Electrostatics and Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as means to sample conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. From this discussion, the major limitations with modeling, in general, were highlighted. These are the difficult issues in sampling conformational space effectively—the multiple minima or conformational sampling problems—and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:18428877

  12. Dense gas in nearby galaxies. XIII. CO submillimeter line emission from the starburst galaxy M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, R. Q.; Henkel, C.; Schulz, A.; Zielinsky, M.; Mauersberger, R.; Störzer, H.; Wilson, T. L.; Gensheimer, P.

    2000-06-01

    12CO J = 1-0, 2-1, 4-3, 7-6, and 13CO 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 line emission was mapped with angular resolutions of 13'' - 22'' toward the nuclear region of the archetypical starburst galaxy M 82. There are two hotspots on either side of the dynamical center, with the south-western lobe being slightly more prominent. Lobe spacings are not identical for all transitions: For the submillimeter CO lines, the spacing is ~ 15''; for the millimeter lines (CO J = 2-1 and 1-0) the spacing is ~ 26'', indicating the presence of a `low' and a `high' CO excitation component. A Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) excitation analysis of the submillimeter lines leads to inconsistencies, since area and volume filling factors are almost the same, resulting in cloud sizes along the lines-of-sight that match the entire size of the M 82 starburst region. Nevertheless, LVG column densities agree with estimates derived from the dust emission in the far infrared and at submillimeter wavelengths. 22'' beam averaged total column densities are N(CO) ~ 5 1018 and N(H_2) ~ 1023 \\cmsq; the total molecular mass is a few 108 \\solmass. Accounting for high UV fluxes and variations in kinetic temperature and assuming that the observed emission arises from photon dominated regions (PDRs) resolves the problems related to an LVG treatment of the radiative transfer. Spatial densities are as in the LVG case (\

  13. Molecular solutes in ionic liquids: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Agílio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Canongia Lopes, José N A

    2007-11-01

    Understanding physicochemical properties of ionic liquids is important for their rational use in extractions, reactions, and other applications. Ionic liquids are not simple fluids: their ions are generally asymetric, flexible, with delocalized electrostatic charges, and available in a wide variety. It is difficult to capture their subtle properties with models that are too simplistic. Molecular simulation using atomistic force fields, which describe structures and interactions in detail, is an excellent tool to gain insights into their liquid-state organization, how they solvate different compounds, and what molecular factors determine their properties. The identification of certain ionic liquids as self-organized phases, with aggregated nonpolar and charged domains, provides a new way to interpret the solvation and structure of their mixtures. Many advances are the result of a successful interplay between experiment and modeling, possible in this field where none of the two methodologies had a previous advance. PMID:17661440

  14. Molecular structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, R.

    Two examples are presented of the use of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to solve molecular structure problems. The first is called correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and it allows us to disentangle a complex network of spin-spin couplings. By dispersing the NMR information in two frequency dimensions, it facilitates the analysis of very complex spectra of organic and biochemical molecules, normally too crowded to be tractable. The second application exploits the special properties of multiple-quantum coherence to explore the molecular framework one CC linkage at a time. The natural product panamine is used as a test example; with some supplementary evidence, the structure of this six-ringed heterocyclic molecule is elucidated from the double-quantum filtered two-dimensional spectrum.

  15. Prediction of reactive hazards based on molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Saraf, S R; Rogers, W J; Mannan, M S

    2003-03-17

    There is considerable interest in prediction of reactive hazards based on chemical structure. Calorimetric measurements to determine reactivity can be resource consuming, so computational methods to predict reactivity hazards present an attractive option. This paper reviews some of the commonly employed theoretical hazard evaluation techniques, including the oxygen-balance method, ASTM CHETAH, and calculated adiabatic reaction temperature (CART). It also discusses the development of a study table to correlate and predict calorimetric properties of pure compounds. Quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) based on quantum mechanical calculations can be employed to correlate calorimetrically measured onset temperatures, T(o), and energies of reaction, -deltaH, with molecular properties. To test the feasibility of this approach, the QSPR technique is used to correlate differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) data, T(o) and -deltaH, with molecular properties for 19 nitro compounds. PMID:12628775

  16. Molecular modelling of miraculin: Structural analyses and functional hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Paladino, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Facchiano, Angelo M

    2008-02-29

    Miraculin is a plant protein that displays the peculiar property of modifying taste by swiching sour into a sweet taste. Its monomer is flavourless at all pH as well as at high concentration; the dimer form elicits its taste-modifying activity at acidic pH; a tetrameric form is also reported as active. Two histidine residues, located in exposed regions, are the main responsible of miraculin activity, as demonstrated by mutagenesis studies. Since structural data of miraculin are not available, we have predicted its three-dimensional structure and simulated both its dimer and tetramer forms by comparative modelling and molecular docking techniques. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations at different pH conditions have indicated that at acidic pH the dimer assumes a widely open conformation, in agreement with the hypotheses coming from other studies. PMID:18158914

  17. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging of bone structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The skeleton is important to the body as a source of minerals and blood cells and provides a structural framework for strength, mobility and the protection of organs. Bone diseases and disorders can have deteriorating effects on the skeleton, but the biological processes underlying anatomical changes in bone diseases occurring in vivo are not well understood, mostly due to the lack of appropriate analysis techniques. Therefore, there is ongoing research in the development of novel in vivo imaging techniques and molecular markers that might help to gain more knowledge of these pathological pathways in animal models and patients. This perspective provides an overview of the latest developments in molecular imaging applied to bone. It emphasizes that multimodality imaging, the combination of multiple imaging techniques encompassing different image modalities, enhances the interpretability of data, and is imperative for the understanding of the biological processes and the associated changes in bone structure and function relationships in vivo. PMID:27127622

  18. Toxicological implications of esterases-From molecular structures to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tetsuo . E-mail: satohbri@peach.ifnet.or.jp

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on a keynote lecture at the 10th International Congress of Toxicology sponsored by the International Union of Toxicology and held on July 2004. Current developments in molecular-based studies into the structure and function of cholinesterases, carboxylesterases, and paraoxonases are described. This article covers mechanisms of regulation of gene expression of the various esterases by developmental factors and xenobiotics, as well as the interplay between physiological and chemical regulation of the enzyme activity.

  19. FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2016-08-01

    FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

  20. Optimization techniques in molecular structure and function elucidation.

    PubMed

    Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses recent optimization approaches to the protein side-chain prediction problem, protein structural alignment, and molecular structure determination from X-ray diffraction measurements. The machinery employed to solve these problems has included algorithms from linear programming, dynamic programming, combinatorial optimization, and mixed-integer nonlinear programming. Many of these problems are purely continuous in nature. Yet, to this date, they have been approached mostly via combinatorial optimization algorithms that are applied to discrete approximations. The main purpose of the paper is to offer an introduction and motivate further systems approaches to these problems. PMID:20160866

  1. Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haobin; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development. PMID:26609534

  2. The crystal and molecular structure of triethanol-ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracuti, A. J.

    1992-12-01

    The liquid propellant used in the 155-mm regenerative liquid propellant gun is XM46. XM46 is a solution of 60 percent hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN), 20 percent triethanolammonium nitrate (TEAN), and 20 percent water. This material exhibits rather unusual liquid properties that have been attributed to its being a 'molten eutectic' of fused salts rather than a normal aqueous solution of two different nitrate salts. A hydrogen-bonded liquid structure for eutectic LP1946 was proposed previously based on the known structures of neat HAN and water and a best-guess estimate of the TEAN structure. To verify this estimate, the molecular structure of neat TEAN was recently determined. This investigation revealed TEAN has very unusual and interesting bifurcated intermolecular and trifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bonding configurations within the crystal. If these hydrogen bonding configurations are retained in aqueous solution, they could be responsible in some part to the observed unusual liquid properties of liquid propellant XM46.

  3. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  4. Molecular structures of amyloid and prion fibrils: consensus versus controversy.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-07-16

    Many peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils. Examples include mammalian and fungal prion proteins, polypeptides associated with human amyloid diseases, and proteins that may have biologically functional amyloid states. To understand the propensity for polypeptides to form amyloid fibrils and to facilitate rational design of amyloid inhibitors and imaging agents, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular structures of these fibrils. Although fibril structures were largely mysterious 15 years ago, a considerable body of reliable structural information about amyloid fibril structures now exists, with essential contributions from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. This Account reviews results from our laboratories and discusses several structural issues that have been controversial. In many cases, the amino acid sequences of amyloid fibrils do not uniquely determine their molecular structures. Self-propagating, molecular-level polymorphism complicates the structure determination problem and can lead to apparent disagreements between results from different laboratories, particularly when different laboratories study different polymorphs. For 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ₁₋₄₀) fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, we have developed detailed structural models from solid state NMR and electron microscopy data for two polymorphs. These polymorphs have similar peptide conformations, identical in-register parallel β-sheet organizations, but different overall symmetry. Other polymorphs have also been partially characterized by solid state NMR and appear to have similar structures. In contrast, cryo-electron microscopy studies that use significantly different fibril growth conditions have identified structures that appear (at low resolution) to be different from those examined by solid state NMR. Based on solid state NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, the in-register parallel β-sheet organization

  5. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE MAPS THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS IN THE NEARBY STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Frayer, David; Leroy, Adam K.; Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies show that dense molecular gas correlates with recent star formation, suggesting that the formation of this gas phase may help regulate star formation. A key test of this idea requires wide-area, high-resolution maps of dense molecular gas in galaxies to explore how local physical conditions drive dense gas formation, but these observations have been limited because of the faintness of dense gas tracers like HCN and HCO{sup +}. Here we demonstrate the power of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT)—the largest single-dish millimeter radio telescope—for mapping dense gas in galaxies by presenting the most sensitive maps yet of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the starburst galaxy M82. The HCN and HCO{sup +} in the disk of this galaxy correlates with both recent star formation and more diffuse molecular gas and shows kinematics consistent with a rotating torus. The HCO{sup +} emission extending to the north and south of the disk is coincident with the outflow previously identified in CO and traces the eastern edge of the hot outflowing gas. The central starburst region has a higher ratio of star formation to dense gas than the outer regions, pointing to the starburst as a key driver of this relationship. These results establish that the GBT can efficiently map the dense molecular gas at 90 GHz in nearby galaxies, a capability that will increase further with the 16 element feed array under construction.

  6. Efficient Transfer of Genetic Material into Mammalian Cells Using Starburst Polyamidoamine Dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Bielinska, Anna U.; Johnson, Jennifer; Spindler, Ralph; Tomalia, Donald A.; Baker, James R.

    1996-05-01

    Starburst polyamidoamine dendrimers are a new class of synthetic polymers with unique structural and physical characteristics. These polymers were investigated for the ability to bind DNA and enhance DNA transfer and expression in a variety of mammalian cell lines. Twenty different types of polyamidoamine dendrimers were synthesized, and the polymer structure was confirmed using well-defined analytical techniques. The efficiency of plasmid DNA transfection using dendrimers was examined using two reporter gene systems: firefly luciferase and bacterial β -galactosidase. The transfections were performed using various dendrimers, and levels of expression of the reporter protein were determined. Highly efficient transfection of a broad range of eukaryotic cells and cell lines was achieved with minimal cytotoxicity using the DNA/dendrimer complexes. However, the ability to transfect cells was restricted to certain types of dendrimers and in some situations required the presence of additional compounds, such as DEAE-dextran, that appeared to alter the nature of the complex. A few cell lines demonstrated enhanced transfection with the addition of chloroquine, indicating endosomal localization of the complexes. The capability of a dendrimer to transfect cells appeared to depend on the size, shape, and number of primary amino groups on the surface of the polymer. However, the specific dendrimer most efficient in achieving transfection varied between different types of cells. These studies demonstrate that Starburst dendrimers can transfect a wide variety of cell types in vitro and offer an efficient method for producing permanently transfected cell lines.

  7. Triggering and Feedback: The Relation between the H I Gas and the Starburst in the Dwarf Galaxy NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, S.; Klein, U.; Wilcots, E. M.; Hüttemeister, S.

    2005-08-01

    As part of our study on the impact of violent star formation on the interstellar medium (ISM) of dwarf galaxies, we report observations of neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) in the starburst dwarf galaxy NGC 1569. High-resolution measurements with the Very Large Array (B, C, and D configuration) are aimed at identifying morphological and kinematical signatures in H I caused by the starburst. Our kinematical data suggest a huge hole in the H I distribution, probably due to the large number of supernovae explosions in the center of the galaxy over the past 20 Myr. Investigating the large-scale H I structure, we confirm the existence of a possible H I companion and a so-called H I bridge east of NGC 1569. Furthermore, we report the detection of additional low-intensity H I halo emission, which leads us to suggest a revised halo structure. On the basis of our new picture, we discuss the origin of the halo gas and possible implications for the evolution of the starburst in NGC 1569.

  8. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  9. Filamentary Structure in Orion and Monoceros Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaise, W. H.; Bhavsar, S. P.

    1994-05-01

    The filamentary structure in 13CO radio maps of the Orion A, Orion B and Monoceros R2 molecular clouds was analyzed using the Minimal Spanning Tree. This represents the first time the MST has been applied to an extended region such as maps of molecular clouds. The method of preparing and analyzing the data is presented. Integrated maps over a range of velocities were examined as well as a velocity cube constructed from individual 0.5 km s-1 wide channel maps. The results show that there is overwhelming objective and statistical evidence that the filamentary structure does exist in all three of these regions. Previous techniques to identify filaments were generally visual, and therefore subjective. The major filaments in Orion A show linear features extending throughout the entire length. The structure in the velocity cube clearly shows the continuous velocity gradient. Orion B cloud shows distinct regions with north to south orientations. The velocity cube contains a number of filaments at greatly differing velocities, with little evidence of large scale velocity gradients. Mon R2 cloud exhibits two main filamentary components, one of which is associated with both bright condensed regions. The velocity structure reveals an overall velocity gradient.

  10. SYNCHRONIZED FORMATION OF STARBURST AND POST-STARBURST GALAXIES IN MERGING CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji; Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2010-07-20

    We propose that synchronized triggering of star formation in gas-rich galaxies is possible during major mergers of cluster of galaxies, based on new numerical simulations of the time evolution of the physical properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) during such a merger event. Our numerical simulations show that the external pressure of the ICM, in which cluster member galaxies are embedded, can increase significantly during cluster merging. As such, efficient star formation can be triggered in gas-rich members as a result of the strong compression of their cold gas by the increased pressure. We also suggest that these star-forming galaxies can subsequently be transformed into post-starburst galaxies, with their spatial distribution within the cluster being different than that of the rest of the population. We discuss whether this possible merger-induced enhancement in the number of star-forming and post-star-forming cluster galaxies is consistent with the observed evolution of galaxies in merging clusters.

  11. Heat-induced changes to lipid molecular structure in Vimy flaxseed: Spectral intensity and molecular clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav

    2011-06-01

    Autoclaving was used to manipulate nutrient utilization and availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize any changes of the functional groups mainly associated with lipid structure in flaxseed ( Linum usitatissimum, cv. Vimy), that occurred on a molecular level during the treatment process using infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH 3 asymmetric (ca. 2959 cm -1), CH 2 asymmetric (ca. 2928 cm -1), CH 3 symmetric (ca. 2871 cm -1) and CH 2 symmetric (ca. 2954 cm -1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group (ca. 1745 cm -1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (ca. 3010 cm -1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Flaxseed samples were kept raw for the control or autoclaved in batches at 120 °C for 20, 40 or 60 min for treatments 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios showed a significant decrease ( P < 0.05) in the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for the flaxseed. There were linear and quadratic effects ( P < 0.05) of the treatment time from 0, 20, 40 and 60 min on the ratios of the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching vibration intensity. Autoclaving had no significant effect ( P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (with average spectral peak area intensities of 138.3 and 68.8 IR intensity units, respectively). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH 3 and CH 2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2988-2790 cm -1). The results indicated that autoclaving had an impact to the mid-infrared molecular spectrum of flaxseed to identify heat-induced changes in lipid conformation. A future study

  12. Discovering structural alerts for mutagenicity using stable emerging molecular patterns.

    PubMed

    Métivier, Jean-Philippe; Lepailleur, Alban; Buzmakov, Aleksey; Poezevara, Guillaume; Crémilleux, Bruno; Kuznetsov, Sergei O; Le Goff, Jérémie; Napoli, Amedeo; Bureau, Ronan; Cuissart, Bertrand

    2015-05-26

    This study is dedicated to the introduction of a novel method that automatically extracts potential structural alerts from a data set of molecules. These triggering structures can be further used for knowledge discovery and classification purposes. Computation of the structural alerts results from an implementation of a sophisticated workflow that integrates a graph mining tool guided by growth rate and stability. The growth rate is a well-established measurement of contrast between classes. Moreover, the extracted patterns correspond to formal concepts; the most robust patterns, named the stable emerging patterns (SEPs), can then be identified thanks to their stability, a new notion originating from the domain of formal concept analysis. All of these elements are explained in the paper from the point of view of computation. The method was applied to a molecular data set on mutagenicity. The experimental results demonstrate its efficiency: it automatically outputs a manageable number of structural patterns that are strongly related to mutagenicity. Moreover, a part of the resulting structures corresponds to already known structural alerts. Finally, an in-depth chemical analysis relying on these structures demonstrates how the method can initiate promising processes of chemical knowledge discovery. PMID:25871768

  13. The molecular structure of the left-handed supra-molecular helix of eukaryotic polyribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Afonina, Zhanna A.; Ménétret, Jean-François; Shirokov, Vladimir A.; Spirin, Alexander S.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2014-11-01

    During protein synthesis, several ribosomes bind to a single messenger RNA (mRNA) forming large macromolecular assemblies called polyribosomes. Here we report the detailed molecular structure of a 100 MDa eukaryotic poly-ribosome complex derived from cryo electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging and pseudo-atomic modelling by crystal structure fitting. The structure allowed the visualization of the three functional parts of the polysome assembly, the central core region that forms a rather compact left-handed supra-molecular helix, and the more open regions that harbour the initiation and termination sites at either ends. The helical region forms a continuous mRNA channel where the mRNA strand bridges neighbouring exit and entry sites of the ribosomes and prevents mRNA looping between ribosomes. This structure provides unprecedented insights into protein- and RNA-mediated inter-ribosome contacts that involve conserved sites through 40S subunits and long protruding RNA expansion segments, suggesting a role in stabilizing the overall polyribosomal assembly.

  14. The Nature of Starburst Activity in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Sternberg, A.

    2003-12-01

    We present new evolutionary synthesis models of M82 based mainly on observations consisting of near-infrared integral field spectroscopy and mid-infrared spectroscopy. The models incorporate stellar evolution, spectral synthesis, and photoionization modeling and are optimized forλ=1-45 μm observations of starburst galaxies. The data allow us to model the starburst regions on scales as small as 25 pc. We investigate the initial mass function (IMF) of the stars and constrain quantitatively the spatial and temporal evolution of starburst activity in M82. We find a typical decay timescale for individual burst sites of a few million years. The data are consistent with the formation of very massive stars (>~50-100 Msolar) and require a flattening of the starburst IMF below a few solar masses, assuming a Salpeter slope dN/dm~m-2.35 at higher masses. Our results are well matched by a scenario in which the global starburst activity in M82 occurred in two successive episodes each lasting a few million years, peaking about 107 yr and 5×106yr ago. The first episode took place throughout the central regions of M82 and was particularly intense at the nucleus, while the second episode occurred predominantly in a circumnuclear ring and along the stellar bar. We interpret this sequence as resulting from the gravitational interaction between M82 and its neighbor M81, and subsequent bar-driven evolution. The short burst duration on all spatial scales indicates strong negative feedback effects of starburst activity, both locally and globally. Simple energetics considerations suggest that the collective mechanical energy released by massive stars was able to rapidly inhibit star formation after the onset of each episode. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA. The SWS is a joint project of SRON and

  15. The Filamentary Structure of the Lupus 3 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, Milena

    We present the column density map of the Lupus 3 molecular cloud derived from the Herschel photometric maps. We compared the Herschel continuum maps, tracing the dense and cold dust emission, with the CS (2-1) map observed with the Mopra 22-m antenna, tracing the dense gas. Both the continuum and the CS maps show a well defined filamentary structure, with most of the dense cores being on the filaments. The CS (2-1) line shows a double peak in the central part of the longest filament due to the presence of two distinct gas components along this line of sight. Therefore, what seems a single filament in the Herschel map is actually the overlap of two kinematically distinct filaments. This case clearly shows that kinematical information is essential for the correct interpretation of filaments in molecular clouds.

  16. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  17. Molecular structure and pathophysiological roles of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter.

    PubMed

    Mammucari, Cristina; Raffaello, Anna; Vecellio Reane, Denis; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake regulates a wide array of cell functions, from stimulation of aerobic metabolism and ATP production in physiological settings, to induction of cell death in pathological conditions. The molecular identity of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU), the highly selective channel responsible for Ca(2+) entry through the IMM, has been described less than five years ago. Since then, research has been conducted to clarify the modulation of its activity, which relies on the dynamic interaction with regulatory proteins, and its contribution to the pathophysiology of organs and tissues. Particular attention has been placed on characterizing the role of MCU in cardiac and skeletal muscles. In this review we summarize the molecular structure and regulation of the MCU complex in addition to its pathophysiological role, with particular attention to striated muscle tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26968367

  18. Molecular structures of carotenoids as predicted by MNDO-AM1 molecular orbital calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Young, Andrew J.

    2002-02-01

    Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations using AM1 Hamiltonian (MNDO-AM1 method) were performed for a number of biologically important carotenoid molecules, namely all- trans-β-carotene, all- trans-zeaxanthin, and all- trans-violaxanthin (found in higher plants and algae) together with all- trans-canthaxanthin, all- trans-astaxanthin, and all- trans-tunaxanthin in order to predict their stable structures. The molecular structures of all- trans-β-carotene, all- trans-canthaxanthin, and all- trans-astaxanthin predicted based on molecular orbital calculations were compared with those determined by X-ray crystallography. Predicted bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles showed an excellent agreement with those determined experimentally, a fact that validated the present theoretical calculations. Comparison of the bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of the most stable conformer among all the carotenoid molecules showed that the displacements are localized around the substituent groups and hence around the cyclohexene rings. The most stable conformers of all- trans-zeaxanthin and all- trans-violaxanthin gave rise to a torsion angle around the C6-C7 bond to be ±48.7 and -84.8°, respectively. This difference is a key factor in relation to the biological function of these two carotenoids in plants and algae (the xanthophyll cycle). Further analyses by calculating the atomic charges and using enpartment calculations (division of bond energies between component atoms) were performed to ascribe the cause of the different observed torsion angles.

  19. Structural and molecular modeling studies of quinazolinone anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Duke, N E; Codding, P W

    1993-08-01

    Studies of derivatives of the anticonvulsant methaqualone led to the discovery that unsaturation in the 2-substituent produced active but less toxic compounds; accordingly, 2-arylethanone derivatives have been developed. The crystal structures of five 2-arylethanone derivatives of methaqualone were determined to probe structure-activity relationships. Although these compounds display different activities, the solid-state and calculated structures are similar: each compound is observed as the neamine tautomer containing an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the ethanone and the amine N atom and the molecular conformations are the same. These studies conclude that recognition of the anticonvulsants arises from specific binding of an ortho substituent on the N(3) phenyl substituent, rather than from binding of a particular conformation or tautomeric form adopted by the compound containing an ortho substituent, and that such recognition is characteristic of a broad range of anticonvulsant drugs. Crystal data: [see text]. PMID:8397980

  20. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structure of the isoquercitrin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornard, J. P.; Boudet, A. C.; Merlin, J. C.

    1999-09-01

    Isoquercitrin is a glycosilated flavonoid that has received a great deal of attention because of its numerous biological effects. We present a theoretical study on isoquercitrin using both empirical (Molecular Mechanics (MM), with MMX force field) and quantum chemical (AM1 semiempirical method) techniques. The most stable structures of the molecule obtained by MM calculations have been used as input data for the semiempirical treatment. The position and orientation of the glucose moiety with regard to the remainder of the molecule have been investigated. The flexibility of isoquercitrin principally lies in rotations around the inter-ring bond and the sugar link. In order to know the structural modifications generated by the substitution by a sugar, geometrical parameters of quercetin (aglycon) and isoquercitrin have been compared. The good accordance between theoretical and experimental electronic spectra permits to confirm the reliability of the structural model.

  1. The molecular scale structure of water at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmeron, Miquel

    2004-03-01

    The molecular scale structure of water at surfaces and interfaces is an unresolved and fundamental topic in many areas of science and technology, and determines its wetting properties. In our studies of this very interesting topic we used scanning probes (STM, AFM), and electron and vibrational spectroscopies. STM studies on Pd(111) reveal that at low temperature (below 130K) water adsorbs as an intact molecule, forming clusters of dimers, trimers, etc. and finally H-bonded hexagonal structures with a V3xV3R30º periodicity. When the temperature is below 100K the O-H bonds in this structure are nearly parallel to the substrate except at the island edges where they point down towards the substrate or up leaving dangling bonds. Above 130K other structures form with molecules having unsaturated H bonds that point outwards from the surface and forming a superstructure of the V3xV3 structure. We have also studied the formation of dangling bonds in other water interfaces, including ice-vapor and on insulating substrates. On the ice surface, a thin layer exists that contains many H-dangling bonds near 0ºC. The thickness of this layer is less than a nanometer below -1ºC. On the basal plane of mica (an alumino silicate) water forms hexagonal structures with no unsaturated H-bonds and with the molecular dipole pointing on average towards the surface. On subsequent layers below 0ºC, the dipolar orientation persist and gives rise to ferroelectric ice. Above 0ºC however water layers above the first have free, unsaturated H-bonds pointing outwards from the surface as in the liquid form. On alkali halide surfaces water adsorbs preferentially at step edges at low humidity solvating the cations first. At higher humidity both cations and anions are solvated and finally, at deliquescence, when the salt dissolves, the anions segregate preferentially at the surface.

  2. Roles in Modulation of Molecular Structures on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.-J.

    2007-03-01

    We studied the adsorption of organic molecules, their growth behavior, and their physical properties on silver and gold surfaces at the single molecule or sub-molecular scale by using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopes. Combined with low energy electron diffraction and first-principles density functional theory calculations, the key parameters in modulating molecular structures on metals are analyzed. It is found that the alkyl chains of quinacridone derivatives (QA) determine the orientation of molecular overlayers on an Ag(110) substrate. The interaction of QA and the Ag substrate is primarily due to chemical bonding of oxygen to specific positions at the silver substrate, determining the molecular orientation and preferred adsorption site. However, the intermolecular arrangement can be adjusted via the length of attached alkyl chains. We are thus able to fabricate uniform QA films with very well controlled physical properties. Furthermore, by thermal and chemical control, we are able to self-assemble three dimensional molecular nanostructures, e.g. ordered PTCDA structures exclusively on flat Ag(111) facets, or DMe-DCNQI structures exclusively on stepped Ag(221) facets. It is demonstrated that bonding, the key factor for selectivity, occurs via the end-atoms, while the molecule's mid-region arches away from the substrate. Theoretical results, obtained by high-level theory, are consistent with the experimental observations, which have previously been interpreted in terms of bonding through the mid-region. In collaboration with D.X. Shi, S.X. Du, W. Ji, Z.T. Deng, L. Gao, Institute of Physics, and X. Lin, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; C. Seidel and H. Fuchs, Universit"at M"unster, Germany; W.A. Hofer, The University of Liverpool, Britain; and S. T. Pantelides, Vanderbilt University, USA. [1] D.X. Shi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 226101(2006). [2] S.X. Du et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 226101(2006). [3] L. Gao et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 075424(2006).

  3. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  4. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  5. Kinetic Effects of Aromatic Molecular Structures on Diffusion Flame Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Sang Hee; Dooley, S.; Dryer, F. L.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic effects of aromatic molecular structures for jet fuel surrogates on the extinction of diffusion flames have been investigated experimentally and numerically in the counterflow configuration for toluene, n-propylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. Quantitative measurement of OH concentration for aromatic fuels was conducted by directly measuring the quenching rate from the emission lifetimes of OH planar laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The kinetic models for toluene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were validated against the measurements of extinction strain rates and LIF measurements. A semi-detailed n-propylbenzene kinetic model was developed and tested. The experimental results showed that the extinction limits are ranked from highest to lowest as n-propylbenzene, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. The present models for toluene and n-propylbenzene agree reasonably well with the measurements, whereas the model for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene under-estimates extinction limits. Kinetic pathways of OH production and consumption were analyzed to investigate the impact of fuel fragmentation on OH formation. It was found that, for fuels with different molecular structures, the fuel decomposition pathways and their propagation into the formation of radical pool play an important role to determine the extinction limits of diffusion flames. Furthermore, OH concentrations were found to be representative of the entire radical pool concentration, the balance between chain branching and propagation/termination reactions and the balance between heat production from the reaction zone and heat losses to the fuel and oxidizer sides. Finally, a proposed “OH index,” was defined to demonstrate a linear correlation between extinction strain rate and OH index and fuel mole fraction, suggesting that the diffusion flame extinctions for the tested aromatic fuels can be determined by the capability of a fuel to establish a radical pool

  6. A perfect starburst cluster made in one go: The NGC 3603 young cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Understanding how distinct, near-spherical gas-free clusters of very young, massive stars shape out of vast, complex clouds of molecular hydrogen is one of the biggest challenges in astrophysics. A popular thought dictates that a single gas cloud fragments into many newborn stars which, in turn, energize and rapidly expel the residual gas to form a gas-free cluster. This study demonstrates that the above classical paradigm remarkably reproduces the well-observed central, young cluster (HD 97950) of the Galactic NGC 3603 star-forming region, in particular, its shape, internal motion, and mass distribution of stars naturally and consistently follow from a single model calculation. Remarkably, the same parameters (star formation efficiency, gas expulsion timescale, and delay) reproduce HD 97950, as were found to reproduce the Orion Nebula Cluster, Pleiades, and R136. The present results therefore provide intriguing evidence of formation of star clusters through single-starburst events followed by significant residual gas expulsion.

  7. NGC1266: Compton-thick AGN or Ultra-compact Starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Alatalo, Katherine A.; Brightman, Murray; Ogle, Patrick M.; Appleton, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    NGC1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy hosting a massive molecular outflow driven by its active galactic nucleus (AGN). The turbulence injected into its ISM by the outflow may account for the suppression of its star formation by a factor of 50-150. ALMA and CARMA measurements of dense gas tracers had shown that its nuclear region lies behind a column of N(H2) = 3 x 10^24 cm^-2, and ALMA barely resolved a region of continuum FIR emission contained within 30pc of the nucleus emitting L(IR)>10^10 solar luminosities. With out recent NuSTAR observation of this galaxies, we determine whether the dust is heated by a Compton-thick AGN or an ultra-compact central starburst.

  8. Bohm's Quantum Potential and the Visualization of Molecular Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    David Bohm's ontological interpretation of quantum theory can shed light on otherwise counter-intuitive quantum mechanical phenomena including chemical bonding. In the field of quantum chemistry, Richard Bader has shown that the topology of the Laplacian of the electronic charge density characterizes many features of molecular structure and reactivity. Visual and computational examination suggests that the Laplacian of Bader and the quantum potential of Bohm are morphologically equivalent. It appears that Bohmian mechanics and the quantum potential can make chemistry as clear as they makes physics.

  9. Structurally Defined Molecular Hypervalent Iodine Catalysts for Intermolecular Enantioselective Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Haubenreisser, Stefan; Wöste, Thorsten H.; Martínez, Claudio; Ishihara, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Molecular structures of the most prominent chiral non‐racemic hypervalent iodine(III) reagents to date have been elucidated for the first time. The formation of a chirally induced supramolecular scaffold based on a selective hydrogen‐bonding arrangement provides an explanation for the consistently high asymmetric induction with these reagents. As an exploratory example, their scope as chiral catalysts was extended to the enantioselective dioxygenation of alkenes. A series of terminal styrenes are converted into the corresponding vicinal diacetoxylation products under mild conditions and provide the proof of principle for a truly intermolecular asymmetric alkene oxidation under iodine(I/III) catalysis. PMID:26596513

  10. [Cardiac potassium channels: molecular structure, physiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Mironov, N Iu; Golitsyn, S P

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels and currents play essential roles in cardiac repolarization. Potassium channel blockade by class III antiarrhythmic drugs prolongs cardiac repolarization and results in termination and prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. Excessive inhomogeneous repolarization prolongation may lead to electrical instability and proarrhythmia (Torsade de Pointes tachycardia). This review focuses on molecular structure, physiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic potential of potassium channels of cardiac conduction system and myocardium providing information on recent findings in pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias, including inherited genetic abnormalities, and future perspectives. PMID:24654438

  11. Structural Assembly of Molecular Complexes Based on Residual Dipolar Couplings

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Konstantin; O’Leary, Dianne P.; Fushman, David

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a rigid-body molecular docking method, called PATIDOCK, that relies solely on the three-dimensional structure of the individual components and the experimentally derived residual dipolar couplings (RDC) for the complex. We show that, given an accurate ab initio predictor of the alignment tensor from a protein structure, it is possible to accurately assemble a protein-protein complex by utilizing the RDC’s sensitivity to molecular shape to guide the docking. The proposed docking method is robust against experimental errors in the RDCs and computationally efficient. We analyze the accuracy and efficiency of this method using experimental or synthetic RDC data for several proteins, as well as synthetic data for a large variety of protein-protein complexes. We also test our method on two protein systems for which the structure of the complex and steric-alignment data are available (Lys48-linked diubiquitin and a complex of ubiquitin and a ubiquitin-associated domain) and analyze the effect of flexible unstructured tails on the outcome of docking. The results demonstrate that it is fundamentally possible to assemble a protein-protein complex based solely on experimental RDC data and the prediction of the alignment tensor from three-dimensional structures. Thus, despite the purely angular nature of residual dipolar couplings, they can be converted into intermolecular distance/translational constraints. Additionally we show a method for combining RDCs with other experimental data, such as ambiguous constraints from interface mapping, to further improve structure characterization of the protein complexes. PMID:20550109

  12. Starbursts and Wispy Drops : Surfactants Spreading on Gel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Daniels, Karen; Behringer, Robert

    2005-11-01

    We report a phase diagram for a novel instability seen in drops of nonionic surfactant solution (Triton X-305) spreading on viscoelastic agar gel substrate . This system allows us to examine the effect of varying the effective fluidity/stiffness of aqueous substrates. The morphology is strongly affected by the substrate fluidity, ranging from spreading starbursts of arms on weak gels, to wispy drops on intermediate strength gels, to circular drops on stiff gels. We analyze the dynamics of spreading in the starburst phase, where the arm length grows as t ^3/4 at early times, independent of the gel strength and surfactant concentration. The number of arms is proportional to the surfactant concentration and inversely proportional to the gel strength. Ongoing work is exploring the effects of changing the drop volume.

  13. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  14. Starburst or AGN dominance in submm-luminous candidate AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Alexander, Dave; Aretxaga, Itziar; Blain, Andrew; Chapman, Scott; Clements, Dave; Dunlop, James; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Farrah, Duncan; Hughes, David; Ivison, Rob; Kim, Sungeun; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Pope, Alexandra; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Scott, Douglas; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Vaccari, Mattia; van Kampen, Eelco

    2008-03-01

    It is widely believed that starbursts/ULIRGs and AGN activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging; and sub-mm selected galaxies (SMGs) seem to be simply high redshift ULIRGs, observed near the peak of activity. In this evolutionary picture every SMG would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. In order to probe this evolutionary sequence, a crucial sub-sample to focus on would be the 'missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst and AGN signatures and to determine if the starburst is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look in the mid-IR for their signatures, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We have selected a sample of SMGs which are good candidates for harboring powerful AGN on the basis of their IRAC colours (S8um/S4.5um>2). Once we confirm these SMGs are AGN-dominated, we can then perform an audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission. The proposed observations with IRS will probe the physics of how SMGs evolve from a cold-dust starburst-dominated ULIRG to an AGN/QSO by measuring the level of the mid-IR continuum, PAH luminosity, and Si absorption in these intermediate `transitory' AGN/SMGs.

  15. The stellar populations in the earliest dusty starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardlow, Julie; Conley, Alexander; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Cooray, Asantha; Riechers, Dominik; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Farrah, Duncan; Omont, Alain

    2014-12-01

    We propose Spitzer IRAC imaging of the two brightest spectroscopically confirmed dusty starburst galaxies at z>4 that do not yet have mid-IR observations. The targeted galaxies are members of a rare class of Herschel sources that provide some of the most stringent constraints on galaxy formation theories. The two targets already have complementary optical and far-IR observations, and the proposed short IRAC data are all that is missing to ~double the number of confirmed z>4 dusty starbursts with well-sampled stellar SEDs. The IRAC data are critical for deriving accurate measurements of physical conditions such as dust extinction and stellar mass to ~30% accuracy (~10x better than otherwise). The proposed data complete the IRAC coverage of the four most luminous confirmed z>4 dusty starburst galaxies, which will be observed with HST in cycle 22. The targets already have CO observations and their [CII] 158 micron emission is being mapped with ALMA in cycle 2; with the addition of the proposed IRAC data we will be able to probe the dust-to-gas and stellar-to-gas mass ratios at the highest redshifts and in the most active galaxies. The IRAC data are also key to determining whether these highest redshift dusty starbursts are markers of overdensities in the early Universe via photometric dropout searches. By probing the details of star-formation in the most extreme sources in the first 1.5 Gyr of the Universe the proposed observations will critically test theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. Molecular structural order and anomalies in liquid silica.

    PubMed

    Shell, M Scott; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2002-07-01

    The present investigation examines the relationship between structural order, diffusivity anomalies, and density anomalies in liquid silica by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We use previously defined orientational and translational order parameters to quantify local structural order in atomic configurations. Extensive simulations are performed at different state points to measure structural order, diffusivity, and thermodynamic properties. It is found that silica shares many trends recently reported for water [J. R. Errington and P. G. Debenedetti, Nature 409, 318 (2001)]. At intermediate densities, the distribution of local orientational order is bimodal. At fixed temperature, order parameter extrema occur upon compression: a maximum in orientational order followed by a minimum in translational order. Unlike water, however, silica's translational order parameter minimum is broad, and there is no range of thermodynamic conditions where both parameters are strictly coupled. Furthermore, the temperature-density regime where both structural order parameters decrease upon isothermal compression (the structurally anomalous regime) does not encompass the region of diffusivity anomalies, as was the case for water. PMID:12241346

  17. Searching for Tidal Disruption Events in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevel, David; Arcavi, Iair

    2016-06-01

    Tidal Disruption Events (TDEs) are a class of transient phenomena that occur when a star passes sufficiently close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) to be destroyed by tidal forces. Increasing the number of known TDEs will facilitate the study of SMBHs and black hole accretion physics. Recently it has been shown that TDEs occur most often in quiescent post-starburst galaxies (identified by strong Balmer absorption), some of which are know as "E+A" galaxies. These galaxies may have undergone a merger possibly contributing to the likelihood of TDEs. Using Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) we are conducting a transient survey, called SEATiDE (Searching E+A Galaxies for Tidal Disruption Events), of 100 E+A galaxies. We experiment with different image subtraction techniques to improve our ability of detecting TDE flares in the centers of these galaxies. A future survey will cover an order of magnitude more post-starburst galaxies to measure their TDE rates in more detail with the aim of understanding why TDEs so strongly prefer post-starburst environments.

  18. Starburst galaxies in the COSMOS field: clumpy star-formation at redshift 0 < z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Goñi, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2016-08-01

    -forming knots in our sample follows the same L(Hα) vs. size scaling relation as local giant HII regions. However, they slightly differ from the one provided using samples at high redshift. This result highlights the importance of spatially resolving the star-forming regions for this kind of study. Star-forming clumps in the central regions of Mknots galaxies are more massive, and present higher star formation rates, than those in the outskirts. This trend is less clear when we consider either the mass surface density or surface star formation rate. Sknot galaxies do show properties similar to both dwarf elliptical and irregulars in the surface brightness (μ) versus Mhost diagram in the B-band, and to spheroidals and ellipticals in the μ versus Mhost diagram in the V-band. Conclusions: The properties of our star-forming knots in Sknot+diffuse and Mknots/clumpy galaxies support the predictions of recent numerical simulations claiming that they have been produced by violent disk instabilities. We suggest that the evolution of these knots means that large and massive clumps at the galaxy centers represent the end product of the coalescence of surviving smaller clumps from the outskirts. Our results support this mechanism and make it unlikely that mergers are the reason behind the observed starburst knots. Sknot galaxies might be transitional phases of the Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCD) class, with their properties consistent with spheroidal-like, but blue structures. Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A122

  19. Structure-Directed Exciton Dynamics in Templated Molecular Nanorings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated polymers with cyclic structures are interesting because their symmetry leads to unique electronic properties. Recent advances in Vernier templating now allow large shape-persistent fully conjugated porphyrin nanorings to be synthesized, exhibiting unique electronic properties. We examine the impact of different conformations on exciton delocalization and emission depolarization in a range of different porphyrin nanoring topologies with comparable spatial extent. Low photoluminescence anisotropy values are found to occur within the first few hundred femtoseconds after pulsed excitation, suggesting ultrafast delocalization of excitons across the nanoring structures. Molecular dynamics simulations show that further polarization memory loss is caused by out-of-plane distortions associated with twisting and bending of the templated nanoring topologies. PMID:25960822

  20. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  1. Molecular structure of uranium carbides: isomers of UC3.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Rayón, Víctor M; Largo, Antonio

    2013-03-21

    In this article, the most relevant isomers of uranium tricarbide are studied through quantum chemical methods. It is found that the most stable isomer has a fan geometry in which the uranium atom is bonded to a quasilinear C3 unit. Both, a rhombic and a ring CU(C2) structures are found about 104-125 kJ/mol higher in energy. Other possible isomers including linear geometries are located even higher. For each structure, we provide predictions for those molecular properties (vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, dipole moments) that could eventually help in their experimental detection. We also discuss the possible routes for the formation of the different UC3 isomers as well as the bonding situation by means of a topological analysis of the electron density. PMID:23534639

  2. Molecular structure of uranium carbides: Isomers of UC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalazar, M. Fernanda; Rayón, Víctor M.; Largo, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the most relevant isomers of uranium tricarbide are studied through quantum chemical methods. It is found that the most stable isomer has a fan geometry in which the uranium atom is bonded to a quasilinear C3 unit. Both, a rhombic and a ring CU(C2) structures are found about 104-125 kJ/mol higher in energy. Other possible isomers including linear geometries are located even higher. For each structure, we provide predictions for those molecular properties (vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, dipole moments) that could eventually help in their experimental detection. We also discuss the possible routes for the formation of the different UC3 isomers as well as the bonding situation by means of a topological analysis of the electron density.

  3. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  4. Structure, molecular evolution, and hydrolytic specificities of largemouth bass pepsins.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoko; Suzuki-Matsubara, Mieko; Kageyama, Takashi; Moriyama, Akihiko

    2016-02-01

    The nucleotide sequences of largemouth bass pepsinogens (PG1, 2 and 3) were determined after molecular cloning of the respective cDNAs. Encoded PG1, 2 and 3 were classified as fish pepsinogens A1, A2 and C, respectively. Molecular evolutionary analyses show that vertebrate pepsinogens are classified into seven monophyletic groups, i.e. pepsinogens A, F, Y (prochymosins), C, B, and fish pepsinogens A and C. Regarding the primary structures, extensive deletion was obvious in S'1 loop residues in fish pepsin A as well as tetrapod pepsin Y. This deletion resulted in a decrease in hydrophobic residues in the S'1 site. Hydrolytic specificities of bass pepsins A1 and A2 were investigated with a pepsin substrate and its variants. Bass pepsins preferred both hydrophobic/aromatic residues and charged residues at the P'1 sites of substrates, showing the dual character of S'1 sites. Thermodynamic analyses of bass pepsin A2 showed that its activation Gibbs energy change (∆G(‡)) was lower than that of porcine pepsin A. Several sites of bass pepsin A2 moiety were found to be under positive selection, and most of them are located on the surface of the molecule, where they are involved in conformational flexibility. The broad S'1 specificity and flexible structure of bass pepsin A2 are thought to cause its high proteolytic activity. PMID:26627128

  5. Molecular studies of the structural ecology of natural occlusal caries.

    PubMed

    Dige, Irene; Grønkjær, Lene; Nyvad, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological studies of occlusal dental biofilms have hitherto been hampered by inaccessibility to the sampling site and demolition of the original biofilm architecture. This study shows for the first time the spatial distribution of bacterial taxa in vivo at various stages of occlusal caries, applying a molecular methodology involving preparation of embedded hard dental tissue slices for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal microscopy. Eleven freshly extracted teeth were classified according to their occlusal caries status. The teeth were fixed, embedded, sectioned and decalcified before FISH was performed using oligonucleotide probes for selected abundant species/genera associated with occlusal caries including Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Veillonella, Fusobacterium, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. The sites showed distinct differences in the bacterial composition between different ecological niches in occlusal caries. Biofilm observed along the entrance of fissures showed an inner layer of microorganisms organized in palisades often identified as Actinomyces, covered by a more loosely structured bacterial layer consisting of diverse genera, similar to supragingival biofilm. Biofilm within the fissure proper seemed less metabolically active, as judged by low fluorescence signal intensity and presence of material of non-bacterial origin. Bacterial invasion (often Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp.) into the dentinal tubules was seen only at advanced stages of caries with manifest cavity formation. It is concluded that the molecular methodology represents a valuable supplement to previous methods for the study of microbial ecology in caries by allowing analysis of the structural composition of the undisturbed biofilm in caries lesions in vivo. PMID:24852305

  6. The molecular structure of waxy maize starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Angellier-Coussy, Hélène; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Molina-Boisseau, Sonia; Dufresne, Alain; Bertoft, Eric; Perez, Serge

    2009-08-17

    The insoluble residues obtained by submitting amylopectin-rich native starch granules from waxy maize to a mild acid hydrolysis consist of polydisperse platelet nanocrystals that have retained the allomorphic type of the parent granules. The present investigation is a detailed characterization of their molecular composition. Two major groups of dextrins were found in the nanocrystals and were isolated. Each group was then structurally characterized using beta-amylase and debranching enzymes (isoamylase and pullulanase) in combination with anion-exchange chromatography. The chain lengths of the dextrins in both groups corresponded with the thickness of the crystalline lamellae in the starch granules. Only approximately 62 mol% of the group of smaller dextrins with an average degree of polymerization (DP) 12.2 was linear, whereas the rest consisted of branched dextrins. The group of larger dextrins (DP 31.7) apparently only consisted of branched dextrins, several of which were multiply branched molecules. It was shown that many of the branch linkages were resistant to the action of the debranching enzymes. The distribution of branched molecules in the two populations of dextrins suggested that the nanocrystals possessed a regular and principally homogeneous molecular structure. PMID:19414173

  7. Drug Repositioning by Kernel-Based Integration of Molecular Structure, Molecular Activity, and Phenotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems. PMID:24244318

  8. Distribution of Molecules in the Circumnuclear Disk and Surrounding Starburst Ring in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068 Observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, S.; Nakajima, T.; Kohno, K.; Harada, N.; Herbst, E.; Tamura, Y.; Izumi, T.; Taniguchi, A.; Tosaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    We report distributions of several molecular transitions including shock and dust related species (13CO and C18O J = 1-0, 13CN N = 1-0, CS J = 2-1, SO JN = 32-21, HNCO JKa,Kc = 50,5-40,4, HC3N J = 11-10, 12-11, CH3OH JK = 2K-1K, and CH3CN JK = 6K-5K) in the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 observed with ALMA. The central ˜1' (˜4.3 kpc) of this galaxy was observed in the 100 GHz region with an angular resolution of ˜4" x 2" (290 pc x 140 pc) to study the effects of an active galactic nucleus and its surrounding starburst ring on molecular abundances. We report a classification of molecular distributions into three main categories. Organic molecules such as CH3CN are found to be concentrated in the circumnuclear disk. In the starburst ring, the intensity of methanol at each clumpy region is not consistent with that of 13CO.

  9. Teaching Structure-Property Relationships: Investigating Molecular Structure and Boiling Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    A concise, well-organized table of the boiling points of 392 organic compounds has facilitated inquiry-based instruction in multiple scientific principles. Many individual or group learning activities can be derived from the tabulated data of molecular structure and boiling point based on the instructor's education objectives and the students'…

  10. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2012-10-01

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any Cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.