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Sample records for starr-edwards prosthetic aortic

  1. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  2. Valve Replacement with the Starr-Edwards and Hancock Prostheses: Comparative Analysis of Late Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Oyer, Philip E.; Stinson, Edward B.; Griepp, Randall B.; Shumway, Norman E.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Starr-Edwards caged-ball valve remains a standard of comparison for more recently introduced prostheses, a substantial incidence of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications prompted our evaluation of the Hancock glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine xenograft. We have compared the results of 435 aortic valve replacements using the Starr- Edwards valve (SE-AVR), 515 mitral valve replacements (SE-MVR), and 121 double-valve replacements (SE-AVRMVR) with 251 aortic valve replacements using the xenograft aortic valve (X-AVR), 338 mitral valve replacements (X-MVR), and 88 double-valve replacements (X-AVR-MVR). The Starr- Edwards valves were used during the period 1963 through 1973 and the xenograft valves between 1971 and 1976. No significant differences in patient age, sex, or preoperative hemodynamic data were noted between comparable groups. All patients with Starr-Edwards valves received long-term anticoagulation while anticoagulants were used only for specific indications in patients with xenograft valves. Total follow up was 3944 patient years for the Starr-Edwards patients and 947 patient years for the xenograft patients. Hospital mortality was not significantly different for comparable groups: SE-AVR 6.9% vs. X-AVR 6.4%, SE-MVR 9.7% vs X-MVR 8.6%, and SE-AVR-MVR 7.5% vs. X-AVR-MVR 10.2%. Linearized mortality and morbidity data expressed as percent per patient- year are tabulated below. Pairs which differ significantly (p < .05) are italicized. PMID:560824

  3. A Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis after 44 years of good performance.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Luca Salvatore; De Feo, Marisa; Della Corte, Alessandro; Cerasuolo, Flavio; Santé, Pasquale; Torella, Michele; Nappi, Gianantonio

    2010-06-01

    The Starr-Edwards caged-ball prosthesis has been widely used to replace cardiac valves. The Model 6120 mitral prosthesis was introduced on the market in 1965 to reduce the high incidence of ball variance and thromboembolism of the previous model. We report the case of a Starr-Edwards Model 6120 which had been in place for 44 years and was still well functioning with no apparent structural damage. PMID:20812436

  4. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  5. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  6. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. PMID:25295408

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Proximal Anastomotic Aneurysms After Aortic Prosthetic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Hausegger, Klaus A.; Tauss, Josef; Amann, Wilfried; Koch, Guenter

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the efficacy and value of endovascular stent-grafts for the treatment of aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms.Methods: Three patients with proximal aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms 8-15 years after prosthetic reconstruction were treated by transfemoral stent-graft implantation. In two patients the pseudoaneurysms were excluded by Talent prostheses [tube graft (n = 1), bifurcated graft (n = 1)]. In one patient an uni iliac Zenith stent-graft was implanted and an extra-anatomic crossover bypass for revascularization of the contralateral lower extremity was performed.Results: All procedures were successful with primary exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms. During the follow-up (mean 16 months) one endoleak occurred due to migration of the tube stent-graft. The endoleak was sealed successfully by implanting an additional bifurcated stent-graft.Conclusion: Stent-graft exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysms offers a minimally invasive and safe alternative to open surgical reconstruction.

  8. Endovascular treatment of proximal arsastomotic aneurysms after aortic prosthetic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Hausegger, Klaus A.; Tauss, Josef; Amann, Wilfried; Koch, Guenter

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the efficacy and value of endovascular stent-grafts for the treatment of aortic anastomotic pseudo-aneurysms.Methods: Three patients with proximal aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms 8-15 years after prosthetic reconstruction were treated by transfemoral stent-graft implantation. In two patients the pseudoaneurysms were excluded by Talent prostheses [tube graft (n=1), bifurcated graft (n=s1)]. In one patient an uniiliac Zenith stent-graft was implanted and an extra-anatomic crossover bypass for revascularization of the contralateral lower extremity was performed.Results: All procedures were successful with primary exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms. During the follow-up (mean 16 months) one endoleak occurred due to migration of the tube stent-graft. The endoleak was sealed successfully by implanting an additional bifurcated stent-graft.Conclusion: Stent-graft exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysms offers a minimally invasive and safe alternative to open surgical reconstruction.

  9. Detection of a prosthetic aortic valvular abscess with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    An unsuspected annular abscess at the base of a prosthetic aortic valve in a patient with endocarditis was identified by indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy alone. This highly sensitive and specific technique expediently demonstrated the surgically proven inflammatory focus.

  10. Functional annulus remodelling using a prosthetic ring in tricuspid aortic valve repair: mid-term results†

    PubMed Central

    Fattouch, Khalil; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Murana, Giacomo; Nasso, Giuseppe; Guccione, Francesco; Dioguardi, Pietro; Salardino, Massimo; Bianco, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The functional aortic valve annulus (FAVA) is a complex unit with proximal (aorto-ventricular junction) and distal (sinotubular junction) components. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the total FAVA remodelling, using a prosthetic ring, on mid-term clinical and echocardiographic results after aortic valve repair. METHODS Since February 2003, 250 patients with tricuspid aortic valve insufficiency (AI) underwent aortic valve repair. FAVA dilatation was treated by prosthetic ring in 52 patients, by isolated subcommissural plasty in 62, by subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement in 57 and by David's reimplantation procedure in 79. Survival rate and freedom from recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate were evaluated by Kaplan–Meier. RESULTS Overall late survival was 90.4%. Late cardiac-related deaths occurred in 15 patients. At follow-up, 36 (16%) patients had recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate because of cusp reprolapse and/or FAVA redilatation. Freedom from recurrent AI was significantly higher for patients who underwent David's procedure or FAVA remodelling by prosthetic ring than those who underwent isolated subcommissural plasty (P < 0.01) or subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement (P = 0.02). There was no statistical difference between David's procedure and prosthetic ring annuloplasty (P = 0.26). CONCLUSION FAVA remodelling using a prosthetic ring is a safe procedure in aortic valve repair surgery thanks to long-term annulus stabilization and it is a pliable alternative to David's procedure in selected patients. This technique may be used in all patients with slight root dilatation to avoid aggressive root reimplantation. We also recommended total FAVA annuloplasty in all patients who underwent aortic valve repair to improve long-term repair results. PMID:24065345

  11. [Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis with aorto-left atrium fistula; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Junji; Naraoka, Shuichi; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Satomi

    2013-12-01

    An 83-year-old man had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR)[CEP Magna 21 mm] and coronary aortic bypass grafting (CABG)[left internal thoracic artery (LITA)-left anterier descending artery( LAD)] 2 years ago in our hospital. He was admitted for fever of unknown origin and developed a stroke to another hospital. The echocardiography and computerized tomography showed an abscessaround the aortic prosthetic valve. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) was diagnosed, and he was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. Three days after admission, acute heart failure developed that led to an emergency operation. When the ascending aorta was dissected, an aorto-left atrium fistula and vegetation were recognized. Aortic valve replacement and patch plasty of the aorto-left atrium fistula were performed successfully. This case was diagnosed as PVE with aorto-left atrium fistula, which is quite a rare complication of PVE. PMID:24322361

  12. [Use of sutureless prosthetic aortic valves in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Santarpino, Giuseppe; Fischlein, Theodor

    2014-03-01

    In the last years, an increasing proportion of high-risk patients undergo surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the risk associated with cross-clamp time or cardioplegic ischemic time, sutureless aortic prostheses have been developed. These bioprosthetic valves are not hand sewn, and this technological advance translates into reduced implantation times, thus improving outcome of patients referred for aortic valve replacement. At present, three sutureless bioprostheses are available on the market: 3f Enable (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA), Perceval (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) and Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California, USA). This article provides an overview of the available literature on sutureless aortic valves with the aim to better define current role and future perspectives of sutureless aortic bioprostheses for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:24770430

  13. Computerized tomographic evaluation of aortic prosthetic graft complications

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, D.; Kalmar, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Computerized tomography has been found to be an accurate and sensitive method of diagnosing complications of synthetic aortic grafts. Complications in this series of four cases included aortoesophageal fistula, aortoduodenal fistula, pseudoaneurysm, and retroperitoneal hematoma. 6 references, 5 figures.

  14. Long-term follow-up of unusual ball-valve aortic substitute.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H; Jolly, W W

    1978-08-01

    On March 19, 1962, prior to the availability of Starr-Edwards ball-valve prostheses for aortic substitution, a mitral valve turned upside down was implanted for marked calcific aortic stenosis. It worked well and the patient was in good health for 15 years. Late annular calcification and loosening of sutures with marked perivalvular regurgitation made valve replacement necessary 16 years after operation. The original valve was perfectly preserved. PMID:682654

  15. Aortic root infection in a prosthetic valve demonstrated by gallium-67 citrate SPECT.

    PubMed

    Thomson, L E J; Goodman, M P; Naqvi, T Z; Feldman, R; Buchbinder, N A; Waxman, A; D'Agnolo, A

    2005-04-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with 6 weeks of worsening low back pain, fever, sweating, and weight loss with known severe lumbosacral osteoarthritis. His history included CABG in 1992, porcine aortic valve replacement, and permanent pacemaker implantation in 2002. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not demonstrate a cause for the symptoms. Blood cultures grew penicillin-sensitive enterococcus and he was referred for evaluation of possible osteodiskitis or epidural abscess. Gallium planar imaging demonstrated increased activity in the lumbar spine, suspicious for the presence of infection, and activity was noted in the mid mediastinum as well. SPECT clearly showed increased Ga-67 activity in the region of the aortic root, suspicious for infection. A perivalvular aortic root abscess was subsequently demonstrated by transesophageal echo. This case illustrates the value of Ga-67 chest SPECT in patients with prosthetic valves for detection of endocarditis. PMID:15764887

  16. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Harish; DeValeria, Patrick A.; Sweeney, John P.; Mookaram, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves. PMID:25849702

  17. In-vitro Measurements of the Synoptic Velocity Generated by a Prosthetic Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellings, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a precise means of evaluating the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic aortic and mitral valves. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to measure the in-plane velocity components in selected planes of the flow, from which the turbulent shear stress is derived. The experimental facility used in this study is made of plexiglas tube, and has a circular cross section with a diameter that matches that of the valve. To ensure optical access the test fluid used matches the refractive index of plexiglas and the test section incorporates a square housing filled with the same fluid. The fluid used in this experiment is a mixture of glycerol, water and sodium iodide. Pulsatile flow is achieved by means of a pump and monitored in real time by means of an electronic flowmeter. Dynamic similarity is ensured in these experiments as the viscosity of the fluid mixture closely approximates that of blood.

  18. Lagrangian coherent structures and turbulence characteristics downstream of prosthetic aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, Marco D.

    2015-11-01

    The flowfield through prosthetic heart valves is investigated by means of direct numerical simulations, considering the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two different aortic valve models are modeled: a bileaflet mechanical and a biological one. In order to reveal fluid flow structures and to better understand the transport mechanics, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are used. LCS are distinguished material surfaces that can be identified as boundaries to regions with dynamically distinct behavior, and are revealed as hypersurfaces that locally maximize the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. Post-processing the flow simulation data, first FTLE fields are calculated integrating dense meshes of Lagrangian particles backward in time, and then attracting LCS are extracted. A three-jet configuration is distinctive of bi-leaflet mechanical valves, with higher turbulent shear stresses immediately distal to the valve leaflets, while a jet-like flow emerges from the central orifice of bio-prosthetic valves, with high turbulent shear stresses occurring at the edge of the jet. Details of the numerical methodology along with a thorough analysis of the different flow structures developing during the cardiac cycle for the two configurations will be provided.

  19. Combination of a Giant Dissected Ascending Aortic Aneurysm with Multiple Fistulae into the Cardiac Chambers Caused by Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a dissected ascending aortic aneurysm (AA) with multiple fistulae to the periaortic root structures is a life-threatening complication that occurs rarely after infective endocarditis of the prosthetic aortic valve. Many risk factors are potentially associated with this complication, including aortic diameter, connective tissue disease of the aortic wall, hypertension and infection. We report a rare case of dissected ascending AA with fistulae to the left atrium and pulmonary artery and a paravalvular leak in a 47-year-old woman with a history of an aortic valve replacement. The patient had presented to the Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, in January 2015 with clinical features of heart failure. After initially being treated for congestive heart failure, she underwent open-heart surgery via a classic Bentall procedure and double fistula closure. She was discharged 23 days after the operation in good condition. A six-month follow-up showed normal functioning of the composite conduit prosthetic valve and no fistulae recurrence. PMID:26909200

  20. Management of anticoagulant therapy during pregnancy in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B. Stephen; Braimbridge, Mark V.

    1971-01-01

    We describe two patients with Starr-Edwards mitral valve replacements who underwent pregnancy on oral anticoagulants and who were successfully delivered of live babies. The literature on pregnancy with prosthetic heart valves is reviewed. It is suggested that properly controlled oral anticoagulation should be continued until the onset of labour; the anticoagulant effect should then be reversed by an intravenous infusion of fresh-frozen plasma and the patient maintained on intravenous heparin injections six-hourly. Oral anticoagulants should be restarted immediately after delivery and the heparin withdrawn only when their effect has been re-established. PMID:5576538

  1. Surgical strategy for aortic prosthetic graft infection with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Matsueda, Takashi; Miyahara, Shunsuke; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Morimoto, Naoto; Inoue, Takeshi; Matsumori, Masamichi; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    A 30-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who underwent Crawford type II extension aneurysm repair about 9 years ago was referred to our hospital with persistent fever. Computed tomography (CT) showed air around the mid-descending aortic prosthetic graft. Because the air did not disappear in spite of intravenous antibiotics, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) was performed. FDG-PET/CT revealed four high-uptake lesions. After dissecting the aortic graft particularly focusing on the high-uptake lesions, this patient underwent in situ graft re-replacement of descending aortic graft with a rifampicin-bonded gelatin-impregnated Dacron graft and omentopexy. The patient remains well without recurrent infection at 3 months after surgery. PMID:25563707

  2. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis with Left Main Coronary Artery Embolism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Inayat, Faisal; Farooq, Salman; Ghani, Ali Raza; Mirrani, Ghazi A.; Athar, Muhammed Waqas

    2016-01-01

    Context: Coronary embolization is potentially a fatal sequela of endocarditis. Although the primary cause of acute coronary syndrome is atherosclerotic disease, it is imperative to consider septic embolism as an etiological factor. Case Report: Herein, we report a case of ventricular fibrillation and ST-segment depression myocardial infarction occurring in a patient who initially presented with fever and increased urinary frequency. Coronary angiography revealed new 99% occlusion of the left main coronary artery (LMCA). Transesophageal echocardiography showed bioprosthetic aortic valve with an abscess and vegetation. Histologic examination of the embolectomy specimen confirmed the presence of thrombus and Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. Subsequently, the patient was discharged to the skilled nursing facility in a stable condition where he completed 6 weeks of intravenous ampicillin. Conclusion: We present a rare case of LMCA embolism due to prosthetic valve endocarditis. The present report also highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with such patients. PMID:27500132

  3. Topography of aortic heart valves. [applied to the development of a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The cooperative effort towards the development of a tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valve is described. The photogrammetric studies were conducted on silicone rubber molds. Information on data acquisition and data reduction phases is given, and certain accuracy aspects of the project are explained. The various outputs which are discussed include digital models, profiles, and contour maps.

  4. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  5. Relapse of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with aortic root abscess following treatment with daptomycin in a patient not fit for surgery.

    PubMed

    Enoch, D A; Phillimore, N; Karas, J A; Horswill, L; Mlangeni, D A

    2010-04-01

    Daptomycin is a novel lipopeptide with activity against Gram-positive organisms including enterococci. It is licensed for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and right-sided endocarditis, but not endocarditis due to Enterococcus spp. We report a case of enterococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis with an aortic root abscess in an elderly patient who was not fit for surgery. The patient's endocarditis relapsed 9 weeks after a 6 week course of daptomycin. PMID:20019148

  6. Mid-term results of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves in elder patients with small aortic annuli: comparison with 19-mm bioprosthetic valves.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Masahiko; Sano, Toshikazu; Tai, Ryuta; Horio, Naohiro; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the mid-term outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) between 17-mm mechanical heart valves (MV) and 19-mm bioprosthetic valves (BV) in elderly patients with small aortic annuli. Between 2000 and 2011, 127 consecutive patients (mean age 79 years; 87 % female) underwent AVR for aortic valve stenosis with a small aortic annulus. 19-mm BV (n = 67) was implanted. When the 19-mm BV did not fit the annulus, 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic mechanical valve (n = 60) was used instead of an aortic root-enlargement procedure. The follow-up rate was 94.0 % in the BV group, and 98.5 % in the MV group. No significant differences in survival rate and valve-related complications were found between the 2 groups. In-hospital mortality rates were 1.5 % (n = 1) in the BV group and 5.0 % (n = 3) in the MV group. Late mortality rates were 3.9 % per patient-years (p-y; n = 8) in the BV group, and 6.0 % per p-y (n = 10) in the MV group. Five-year Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 62 % in the BV group, and 72 % in the MV group (log-rank P = 0.280). Freedom from major adverse valve-related stroke and cerebral bleeding events was 92.5 and 98.5 % in the BV group, and 94.7 and 100 % in the MV group. AVR using 17-mm MV in elder patients with small aortic annuli provided equivalent mid-term clinical results to that with 19-mm BV. PMID:24878870

  7. Recent advances in aortic valve disease: highlights from a bicuspid aortic valve to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Augoustides, John G T; Wolfe, Yanika; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2009-08-01

    There have been major advances in the management of aortic valve disease. Because bicuspid aortic valve is common and predicts an increased risk of adverse aortic events, these patients merit aortic surveillance and consideration for ascending aortic replacement when its diameter exceeds 4.0 cm. Serial quantitative echocardiographic analysis, as compared with traditional clinical markers, can result in better timing of surgical intervention for aortic regurgitation. Furthermore, echocardiographic analysis of aortic regurgitation can classify the mechanism based on cusp mobility to guide aortic valve repair. In aortic root replacement, aortic valve preservation with reimplantation is a mainstream surgical option in Marfan syndrome to offer freedom from valve-related anticoagulation. Prosthetic aortic root replacement has further alternatives with the introduction of the aortic neosinus design and acceptable clinical outcomes with the porcine xenograft. Because aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may adversely affect patient outcome, its perioperative prevention is important. Furthermore, significant functional mitral regurgitation in association with aortic stenosis often resolves after aortic valve replacement. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve must include valve area because the transaortic pressure gradient may be low in severe stenosis. Aortic valve replacement with partial sternotomy is safe and offers a reasonable less invasive alternative. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, whether transfemoral or transapical, has revolutionized aortic valve replacement; it remains a major theme in the specialty for 2009 and beyond. PMID:19497768

  8. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  9. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  10. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    PubMed

    Bavo, Alessandra M; Rocatello, Giorgia; Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  11. Echocardiographic assessment of prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Blauwet, Lori A; Miller, Fletcher A

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is a global health problem. It is estimated that more than 280,000 prosthetic heart valves are implanted worldwide each year. As the world's population is aging, the incidence of prosthetic heart valve implantation and the prevalence of prosthetic heart valves continue to increase. Assessing heart valve prosthesis function remains challenging, as prosthesis malfunction is unpredictable but not uncommon. Transthoracic two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is the preferred method for assessing prosthetic valve function. Clinically useful Doppler-derived measures for assessing prosthetic valve hemodynamic profiles have been reported for aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve prostheses, but echocardiographic data regarding pulmonary valve prostheses remain limited. Complete prosthetic valve evaluation by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is sometimes challenging due to acoustic shadowing and artifacts. In these cases, further imaging with transesophageal echocardiography, fluoroscopy and/or gated CT may be warranted, particularly if prosthetic valve dysfunction is suspected. Being able to differentiate pathologic versus functional obstruction of an individual prosthesis is extremely important, as this distinction affects management decisions. Transprosthetic and periprosthetic regurgitation may be difficult to visualize on TTE, so careful review of Doppler-derived data combined with a high index of suspicion is warranted, particularly in symptomatic patients. A baseline TTE soon after valve implantation is indicated in order to "fingerprint" the prosthesis hemodynamic profile. It remains unclear how frequently serial imaging should be performed in order to assess prosthetic valve function, as this issue has not been systematically studied. PMID:25081405

  12. Brucella Endocarditis in Prosthetic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Mehanic, Snjezana; Mulabdic, Velida; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzovic-Cengic, Meliha; Pinjo, Fikret; Hadziosmanovic, Vesna; Topalovic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Brucella endocarditis (BE) is a rare but severe and potentially lethal manifestation of brucellosis. Pre-existing valves lesions and prosthetic valves (PV) are favorable for BE. Case report We represent the case of a 46-year-old man who was treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Clinical Center of Sarajevo University, as blood culture positive (Brucella melitensis) mitral and aortic PV endocarditis. He was treated with combined anti-brucella and cardiac therapy. Surgical intervention was postponed due to cardiac instability. Four months later he passed away. Surgery was not performed. PMID:24493988

  13. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  14. Prosthetic valve endocarditis. Experience with porcine bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Sett, S S; Hudon, M P; Jamieson, W R; Chow, A W

    1993-03-01

    time for late prosthetic valve endocarditis. Annular abscess formation occurred in 27% of the patients. There were no complex aortic or mitral reconstructions. There was one reoperation for recurrent and residual endocarditis. There was one late death as a result of recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis. We advocate early diagnosis and aggressive combined medical and surgical treatment before the development of hemodynamic compromise and other characteristic signs when the culprit organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative organisms, and Candida albicans. PMID:8445921

  15. Prosthetic synovitis.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, N S; Doty, S B; Johnston, A D; Parisien, M V

    1985-01-01

    The term "prosthetic synovitis" is applied to reactive changes resulting from a synovial-like membrane formed between a failed prosthesis (noninfected) and the bone interface. This report is the result of light-microscopic and clinical examination of more than 100 specimens obtained at surgery of failed previous hip replacements. The morphology and cell distribution of those tissues removed at surgery in 51 noninfected cemented total hip operations allowed a quantitative estimate of surface cell population by a "touch imprint" technique; qualitative and quantitative estimate (scale, 1 to 4+) of cell population and foreign body materials by light microscopy; and electron microscopy and biochemical analysis of selected samples. Histologic examination included the following cell population, in decreasing order of frequency: acidophilic histiocytes (95%); giant cells (80%); fibronoid material (80%); lymphocyte and plasma cells (26%); and neutrophils (8%). Microscopic examination showed that the largest particles of acrylic cement and shards of high-density polyethylene appeared to be walled off by connective tissue capsules. The majority of smaller particles were incorporated into the histiocyte/macrophage or giant cell population. Histochemistry indicated that these particles elicited "foci" of cellular activity within the synovial-like membrane. This increased activity included the appearance of increased endogenous peroxidase activity in those macrophages within the "foci"; increased betagalactosidae activity among these histiocytes; and a localization of acid phosphates activity within giant cells along the borders of inclusions within the cell cytoplasm. We conclude that wear products resulting from total hip arthroplasty, including the bone cement, can induce increased lysosomal and proteolytic activity within the histiocyte and giant cell populations. It may be important to emphasize that there were "reactive foci" within the membrane and that the entire

  16. Aortic root abscess resulting from endocarditis: spectrum of angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.W.; Dinsmore, R.E.

    1984-11-01

    Abscesses in the aortic root are a serious complication of infective endocarditis and require accurate diagnosis for antibiotic and surgical management. Nineteen cases of endocarditis of a native valve or prosthetic valve and adjacent abscess cavities were identified with angiography. Of 6 patients with endocarditis of a native valve, 5 had bicuspid aortic valves and all had severe aortic regurgitation. Of 13 patients with endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve, all had paravalvular regurgitation. Fistulas were detected into the mitral anulus in 8 patients, and into the right ventricle in 3 patients. No complications from the catheterization were recorded during the 48-hour follow-up.

  17. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    SciTech Connect

    Purnell, G.L.; Walker, C.W.; Allison, J.W.; Dalrymple, G.V. )

    1990-08-01

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection.

  18. Recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Aspergillus delacroxii (formerly Aspergillus nidulans var. echinulatus)

    PubMed Central

    Uhrin, Gábor Balázs; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Korup, Eva; Grønlund, Jens; Hjort, Ulla; Moser, Claus; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2015-01-01

    We report Aspergillus delacroxii (formerly Aspergillus nidulans var. echinulatus) causing recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis. The fungus was the sole agent detected during replacement of a mechanical aortic valve conduit due to abscess formation. Despite extensive surgery and anti-fungal treatment, the patient had a cerebral hemorrhage 4 months post-surgery prompting a diagnosis of recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis and fungemia. PMID:26909244

  19. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  2. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic valve prolapse; Aortic regurgitation ... Any condition that prevents the aortic valve from closing completely can cause this problem. When the valve doesn't close all the way, a small amount of blood comes ...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  7. Combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in an adult with Scheie's disease.

    PubMed

    Butman, S M; Karl, L; Copeland, J G

    1989-07-01

    Mitral, aortic, and coronary arterial disease have been described in the various mucopolysaccharidoses. We report the first successful combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in an adult female patient with severe aortic and mitral stenosis due to Scheie's syndrome, a mucopolysaccharide storage disease. Both annulae were of sufficient integrity for good prosthetic placement, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:2500310

  8. Reconstructing the infected aortic root with antibiotic impregnated biological glue.

    PubMed

    McGiffin, David C; Davies, James E; Kirklin, James K

    2014-05-01

    Prosthetic valve dehiscence and persistent infection are two complications following reconstruction of the aortic root in destructive endocarditis. A technique is described involving the principles of aggressive debridement, closure of large abscess cavities with biological material incorporating a slurry of antibiotic-impregnated biological sealant, and replacement of the aortic valve with an aortic allograft valve. This strategy appears to have been successful in preventing persistent endocarditis and valve dehiscence in a limited number of patients. PMID:24433228

  9. [Surgical Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Sugaya, Akira; Kurumisawa, Soki; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shinichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    Between 2003 and 2014, at Jichi Medical University Hospital, 11 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) underwent re-operation. There was 1 in-hospital death and 2 late deaths. The cause of death was cirrhosis, heart failure and sepsis, respectively. Emergency surgery, previous double valve replacement (DVR) and Staphylococcus infection were common risk factors for all 3 cases. Two cases of patients that survived who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) and DVR for PVE after DVR were treated with multiple antibiotic courses for bacteremia associated with hemodialysis and colon cancer. One patient who underwent DVR after mitral valve plasty which was complicated with cerebral hemorrhage, had survived and was discharged. Of the aortic PVE patients, 2 cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a mechanical valve, 1 case of aortic root replacement (ARR) using a mechanical valve, and 1 ARR using the homograft, were considered cured and never relapsed. A patient with aortic PVE, who underwent AVR after cesarean section for heart failure in birth period, has received ARR twice with the mechanical valve for recurrent pseudo-aneurysm of the left ventricular outflow tract. Since hemodialysis and colon cancer is a risk factor for recurrent PVE, it is necessary to consider the long-term administration of antibiotics after surgery. PMID:26469256

  10. Optimal Design of Aortic Leaflet Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Reul, Helmut; Ray, Gautam; Chandran, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design criteria for an optimum prosthetic-aortic leaflet valve are a smooth washout in the valve cusps, minimal leaflet stress, minimal transmembrane pressure for the valve to open, an adequate lifetime (for a given blood-compatible leaflet material's fatigue data). A rigorous design analysis is presented to obtain the prosthetic tri-leaflet aortic valve leaflet's optimum design parameters. Four alternative optimum leaflet geometries are obtained to satisfy the criteria of a smooth washout and minimal leaflet stress. The leaflet thicknesses of these four optimum designs are determined by satisfying the two remaining design criteria for minimal transmembrane opening pressure and adequate fatigue lifetime, which are formulated in terms of the elastic and fatigue properties of the selected leaflet material - Avcothane-51 (of the Avco-Everett Co. of Massachusetts). Prosthetic valves are fabricated on the basis of the optimum analysis and the resulting detailed engineering drawings of the designs are also presented in the paper.

  11. Progressive upper limb prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Lake, Chris; Dodson, Robert

    2006-02-01

    The field of upper extremity prosthetics is a constantly changing arena as researchers and prosthetists strive to bridge the gap between prosthetic reality and upper limb physiology. With the further development of implantable neurologic sensing devices and targeted muscle innervation (discussed elsewhere in this issue), the challenge of limited input to control vast outputs promises to become a historical footnote in the future annals of upper limb prosthetics. Soon multidextrous terminal devices, such as that found in the iLimb system(Touch EMAS, Inc., Edinburgh, UK), will be a clinical reality (Fig. 22). Successful prosthetic care depends on good communication and cooperation among the surgeon, the amputee, the rehabilitation team, and the scientists harnessing the power of technology to solve real-life challenges. If the progress to date is any indication, amputees of the future will find their dreams limited only by their imagination. PMID:16517345

  12. Prosthetics and Related Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Related Technology for Restoring Veterans’ Abilities DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT PROSTHETICS AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY VA Research and ... technology to perform day-to-day activities. DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT A Message to Our ...

  13. Prosthetic Care FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and practice management. What is a Certified Prosthetist (CP)? ABC Certified Prosthetists are healthcare professionals that have ... a free searchable database of its Certified Prosthetists (CPs) and accredited orthotic and prosthetic facilities to assist ...

  14. Mechanical versus biological aortic valve replacement strategies.

    PubMed

    Reineke, D; Gisler, F; Englberger, L; Carrel, T

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the most frequently performed procedure in valve surgery. The controversy about the optimal choice of the prosthetic valve is as old as the technique itself. Currently there is no perfect valve substitute available. The main challenge is to choose between mechanical and biological prosthetic valves. Biological valves include pericardial (bovine, porcine or equine) and native porcine bioprostheses designed in stented, stentless and sutureless versions. Homografts and pulmonary autografts are reserved for special indications and will not be discussed in detail in this review. We will focus on the decision making between artificial biological and mechanical prostheses, respectively. The first part of this article reviews guideline recommendations concerning the choice of aortic prostheses in different clinical situations while the second part is focused on novel strategies in the treatment of patients with aortic valve pathology. PMID:26678683

  15. Current status of valve replacement in children.

    PubMed

    Schaff, H V; Danielson, G K

    1986-01-01

    Management of valve diseases in children demands an eclectic approach by the surgeon. Whenever possible, valve function should be restored by repair rather than prosthetic replacement. Recent evidence firmly demonstrates that there are accelerated calcification and degeneration of porcine heterografts in children, especially in the aortic and mitral positions. For this reason, we reserve the use of heterograft prostheses for the right atrioventricular position and for conduits from the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery. Such patients are observed carefully for signs of valve degeneration. Long-term followup of the Starr-Edwards prosthesis in children demonstrates excellent durability and a thromboembolic rate that is equal to or lower than that found in adult patients. Hemodynamic properties of the Starr-Edwards valve are adequate even in the smallest size used in infants and have allowed children to reach early adolescence at which time valve re-replacement with an adult-sized prosthesis is possible. Intermediate-term experience with the Bjork-Shiley valve in children has also been favorable. At present we continue to use systemic anticoagulation with warfarin in all children with mechanical prostheses. PMID:3742534

  16. Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. Case report

    PubMed Central

    MOLDOVAN, MARIA-SÎNZIANA; BEDELEANU, DANIELA; KOVACS, EMESE; CIUMĂRNEAN, LORENA; MOLNAR, ADRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction, a complication of mechanical prosthetic valve replacement, is rare, with a slowly progressive evolution, but it can be acute, severe, requiring surgical reintervention. We present the case of a patient with a mechanical single disc aortic prosthesis, with moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch, minor pannus found on previous ultrasound examinations, who presented to our service with angina pain with a duration of 1 hour, subsequently interpreted as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) syndrome. Coronarography showed normal epicardial coronary arteries, an ample movement of the prosthetic disc, without evidence of coronary thromboembolism, and Gated Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) with Technetium (Tc)-99m detected no perfusion defects. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) evidenced a dysfunctional prosthesis due to a subvalvular mass; transesophageal echocardiography (TOE) showed the interference of this mass, with a pannus appearance, with the closure of the prosthetic disc. Under conditions of repeated angina episodes, under anticoagulant treatment, surgery was performed, with the intraoperative confirmation of pannus and its removal. Postoperative evolution was favorable. This case reflects the diagnostic and therapeutic management problems of pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. PMID:27004041

  17. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  18. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  20. Development of prosthetic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  1. Upper Extremity Amputations and Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ovadia, Steven A.; Askari, Morad

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions. PMID:25685104

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  4. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  5. Aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A; Clough, Rachel E; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Suzuki, Toru; Gibbs, Richard; Mussa, Firas; Jenkins, Michael T; Thompson, Matt M; Evangelista, Arturo; Yeh, James S M; Cheshire, Nicholas; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition caused by a tear in the intimal layer of the aorta or bleeding within the aortic wall, resulting in the separation (dissection) of the layers of the aortic wall. Aortic dissection is most common in those 65-75 years of age, with an incidence of 35 cases per 100,000 people per year in this population. Other risk factors include hypertension, dyslipidaemia and genetic disorders that involve the connective tissue, such as Marfan syndrome. Swift diagnostic confirmation and adequate treatment are crucial in managing affected patients. Contemporary management is multidisciplinary and includes serial non-invasive imaging, biomarker testing and genetic risk profiling for aortopathy. The choice of approach for repairing or replacing the damaged region of the aorta depends on the severity and the location of the dissection and the risks of complication from surgery. Open surgical repair is most commonly used for dissections involving the ascending aorta and the aortic arch, whereas minimally invasive endovascular intervention is appropriate for descending aorta dissections that are complicated by rupture, malperfusion, ongoing pain, hypotension or imaging features of high risk. Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of aortic dissection have led to more patients being considered at substantial risk of complications and, therefore, in need of endovascular intervention rather than only medical or surgical intervention. PMID:27440162

  6. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  7. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  8. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  9. Guide to prosthetic cardiac valves

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, D.; Steiner, R.M.; Fernandez, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The development of artificial heart valves: Introduction and historical perspective; The radiology of prosthetic heart valves; The evaluation of patients for prosthetic valve implantation; Pathology of cardiac valve replacement; and Bioengineering of mechanical and biological heart valve substitutes.

  10. Upper extremity myoelectric prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Uellendahl, J E

    2000-08-01

    Myoelectric control of upper limb prostheses has proven to be an effective and efficient means of controlling prosthetic components. This means of control has been used extensively for over 30 years, during which time these systems have become reliable and durable in most situations. Myoelectric control, or any other prosthetic control scheme, should not be considered as the optimal control for arm prostheses, but rather as one of the several effective ways of producing desired function. Advanced clinical practice calls for a blending of all control schemes, as appropriate, to allow the prosthesis to serve the intentions of the user efficiently and with little mental effort. Technology continues to change, bringing with it new and sometimes better ways of fitting amputees. Microprocessors and programmable controllers have opened new and exciting avenues for improvement in function. New, and as of yet unidentified, electronic and mechanical advances are certainly on the horizon. There is much work to be done before upper limb prostheses rightfully are called arm replacements. But progress is occurring and advances are being made toward the goal of replacing the function and appearance of that marvelous tool, the human arm. PMID:10989484

  11. Cognitive Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Richard A.; Hwang, Eun Jung; Mulliken, Grant H.

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive neural prosthetic (CNP) is a very versatile method for assisting paralyzed patients and patients with amputations. The CNP records the cognitive state of the subject, rather than signals strictly related to motor execution or sensation. We review a number of high-level cortical signals and their application for CNPs, including intention, motor imagery, decision making, forward estimation, executive function, attention, learning, and multi-effector movement planning. CNPs are defined by the cognitive function they extract, not the cortical region from which the signals are recorded. However, some cortical areas may be better than others for particular applications. Signals can also be extracted in parallel from multiple cortical areas using multiple implants, which in many circumstances can increase the range of applications of CNPs. The CNP approach relies on scientific understanding of the neural processes involved in cognition, and many of the decoding algorithms it uses also have parallels to underlying neural circuit functions. PMID:19575625

  12. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals. PMID:27376685

  13. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  14. Reverse U aortotomy (Kırali incision) for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kırali, Kaan

    2016-06-01

    The presence of patent vein grafts on the proximal aorta may cause technical difficulties during reoperations for aortic valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass surgery. A 65-year-old man underwent reoperation for aortic valve replacement two years after his first open heart surgery (valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aorta-right coronary artery saphenous vein graft). The aortotomy incision was started approximately 2 cm above the proximal anastomosis and continued down at both sides until the prosthetic graft. The reverse U aortotomy prevents unnecessary and risky manipulations of proximal anastomoses, provides perfect exposure, and can be used securely during reoperative aortic valve surgery. PMID:25759482

  15. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  16. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  17. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the ... with high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who ...

  18. Decellularized aortic homografts for aortic valve and aorta ascendens replacement†

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Igor; Horke, Alexander; Cebotari, Serghei; Sarikouch, Samir; Boethig, Dietmar; Breymann, Thomas; Beerbaum, Philipp; Bertram, Harald; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Theodoridis, Karolina; Bobylev, Dmitry; Cheptanaru, Eduard; Ciubotaru, Anatol; Haverich, Axel

    2016-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS DAHs withstand systemic circulation, provide outstanding EOA and appear as an alternative to conventional grafts for AVR in young patients. EARR using DAH is a further option in aortic valve disease associated with aorta ascendens dilatation as it avoids the use of any prosthetic material. PMID:26896320

  19. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    PubMed

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  20. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    PubMed

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  1. Prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees, having a C-shaped clamping mechanism for grasping cylindrical objects, is described. The clamping mechanism is pivotally mounted to a cuff that fits on the amputee's lower arm. The present invention is utilized by placing an arm that has been amputated below the elbow into the cuff. The clamping mechanism then serves as a hand whenever it becomes necessary for the amputee to grasp a cylindrical object such as a handle, a bar, a rod, etc. To grasp the cylindrical object, the object is jammed against the opening in the C-shaped spring, causing the spring to open, the object to pass to the center of the spring, and the spring to snap shut behind the object. Various sizes of clamping mechanisms can be provided and easily interchanged to accommodate a variety of diameters. With the extension that pivots and rotates, the clamping mechanism can be used in a variety of orientations. Thus, this invention provides the amputee with a clamping mechanism that can be used to perform a number of tasks.

  2. Fibrinolytic Treatment after Transient Ischaemic Attack Caused by Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Neuß, Michael; Tambor, Grit; Hölschermann, Frank; Butter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the most severe complications after surgical valve replacement. There are many possible presentations: from asymptomatic to life-threatening complications. We report on a 61-year-old female patient with prosthetic replacement of the aortic and mitral valve in the in-house department of cardiac surgery 3 months ago. The patient was suffering from aphasia during 5 minutes in domesticity. After her presentation in the emergency room, the echocardiographic examination revealed a thrombotic formation of the prosthetic mitral valve. At presentation, the anticoagulation was outside the effective range (INR: 1.7). A successful thrombolytic therapy with the plasminogen activator urokinase was begun with complete resolution of the thrombus. PMID:27313908

  3. A second-time percutaneous aortic-valve implantation for bioprosthetic failure

    PubMed Central

    Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin Assa, Hana; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a case of an 84-year-old man with a history of surgical aortic-valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) who later developed severe prosthetic valve AR. Subsequent treatment with a Corevalve® was unsuccessful with severe AR seen at 3 years after the valve-in-valve procedure. The patient was then successfully treated with a second catheter-based Corevalve® implantation. PMID:26401281

  4. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed. PMID:26732266

  5. Surgical Management of Necrotizing Mediastinitis With Large Aortic Pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Andrew T; Khaja, Minhaj S; Yang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with necrotizing mediastinitis complicated by a giant retrosternal mycotic pseudoaneurysm and prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully managed with a redo sternotomy under hypothermic circulatory arrest. The approach then included extensive débridement of the mediastinum, replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, redo aortic valve replacement, and wound closure with omental flap and myocutaneous flap. After a 2-year survival, the patient suffered reinfection from hemodialysis. Our approach is also applicable to more common presentations of mediastinitis. PMID:27106461

  6. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image. PMID:23101609

  7. Rothia prosthetic knee joint infection.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Manish N; Malhotra, Prashant

    2015-08-01

    Rothia species - Gram-positive pleomorphic bacteria that are part of the normal oral and respiratory flora - are commonly associated with dental cavities and periodontal disease although systemic infections have been described. We describe a 53-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by prosthetic knee joint infection due to Rothia species, which was successfully treated by surgical removal of prosthesis and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. The issue of antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures among patients with prosthetic joint replacements is discussed. PMID:23357608

  8. A Prosthetic Memory: An Application of the Prosthetic Environment Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Roy S., Jr.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A set of artifical reminders'' are developed to compensate for a profound memory deficit in a young brain damaged male. The prosthetic memory techniques are described, and his increase in functional level is documented. A report of a 15-month follow-up is included. (Author)

  9. Aortic valve decalcification revisited.

    PubMed

    Marty, A T; Mufti, S; Murabit, I

    1989-11-01

    A 75-year-old woman with a small calcified aortic root, severe aortic stenosis and triple vessel coronary artery disease developed angina at rest. Aortic valve decalcification and quadruple aorto-coronary bypass were done as her aortic root was too small and calcified to do anything else. Postoperative clinical and hemodynamic results have been excellent. Literature review supports application of this therapy in selected patients with trileaflet senescent aortic stenosis. PMID:2614067

  10. Performance characteristics of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Dollar, Aaron M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we set forth a review of performance characteristics for both common commercial prosthetics as well as anthropomorphic research devices. Based on these specifications as well as surveyed results from prosthetic users, ranges of hand attributes are evaluated and discussed. End user information is used to describe the performance requirements for prosthetic hands for clinical use. PMID:22275674

  11. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  12. Control method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  13. Prosthetic failure in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Kutkut, Ahmad; Kim, Hyeongil

    2015-01-01

    Although osseointegrated dental implants have become a predictable and effective modality for the treatment of single or multiple missing teeth, their use is associated with clinical complications. Such complications can be biologic, technical, mechanical, or esthetic and may compromise implant outcomes to various degrees. This article presents prosthetic complications accompanied with implant-supported single and partial fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25434566

  14. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  15. Aortic valve replacement in rheumatoid aortic incompetence.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A B; Goldstraw, P; Caves, P K

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid aortic valve disease is uncommon. and there are few reports of valve replacement in this condition. Aortic valve replacement and partial pericardiectomy was performed in a patient with acute rheumatoid aortitis and aortic incompetence. Previous reports suggest that any patient with rheumatoid arthritis who develops cardiac symptoms should be carefully assessed for surgically treatable involvement of the pericardium or heart valves. Images PMID:725829

  16. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  17. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  18. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  19. Two-Stage Procedure for Infected Aortic Graft Pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    von Aspern, Konstantin; Etz, Christian D.; Mohr, Friedrich W.; Battellini, Roberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic graft infections with mediastinitis following aortic surgery are rare, yet represent grave complications yielding high morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 57-year-old female patient with past history of emergent surgery for iatrogenic Type A dissection treated by supracoronary ascending aortic replacement. Four months after the initial surgery, a sternal fistula had formed and due to severe bleeding emergent reoperation was required. Imaging and pathology on admission revealed an infected pseudoaneurysm at the distal aortic prosthesis and mediastinitis with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Rescue surgery was performed by means of a two-stage approach, with extensive debridement, graft replacement and continuous antiseptic lavage in a first step and an omental wrapping of the new prosthesis in a second stage 24 hours later. During 10 years of follow-up, no recurrent infection occurred. The operative approach and general considerations for management of infected pseudoaneurysms are discussed. PMID:27069945

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ... blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age ...

  1. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  2. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  3. Evolution of penile prosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Le, Brian; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-03-01

    Penile implant usage dates to the 16th century yet penile implants to treat erectile dysfunction did not occur until nearly four centuries later. The modern era of penile implants has progressed rapidly over the past 50 years as physicians' knowledge of effective materials for penile prostheses and surgical techniques has improved. Herein, we describe the history of penile prosthetics and the constant quest to improve the technology. Elements of the design from the first inflatable penile prosthesis by Scott and colleagues and the Small-Carrion malleable penile prosthesis are still found in present iterations of these devices. While there have been significant improvements in penile prosthesis design, the promise of an ideal prosthetic device remains elusive. As other erectile dysfunction therapies emerge, penile prostheses will have to continue to demonstrate a competitive advantage. A particular strength of penile prostheses is their efficacy regardless of etiology, thus allowing treatment of even the most refractory cases. PMID:25763121

  4. Evolution of penile prosthetic devices

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Penile implant usage dates to the 16th century yet penile implants to treat erectile dysfunction did not occur until nearly four centuries later. The modern era of penile implants has progressed rapidly over the past 50 years as physicians' knowledge of effective materials for penile prostheses and surgical techniques has improved. Herein, we describe the history of penile prosthetics and the constant quest to improve the technology. Elements of the design from the first inflatable penile prosthesis by Scott and colleagues and the Small-Carrion malleable penile prosthesis are still found in present iterations of these devices. While there have been significant improvements in penile prosthesis design, the promise of an ideal prosthetic device remains elusive. As other erectile dysfunction therapies emerge, penile prostheses will have to continue to demonstrate a competitive advantage. A particular strength of penile prostheses is their efficacy regardless of etiology, thus allowing treatment of even the most refractory cases. PMID:25763121

  5. Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis with mycotic aneurysm: Case report.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Mariana; Almeida, Jorge; Ferraz, Rita; Santos, Lurdes; Pinho, Paulo; Casanova, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an extremely severe form of infective endocarditis, with poor prognosis and high mortality despite treatment. Candida albicans is the most common etiological agent for this rare but increasingly frequent condition. We present a case of fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis due to C. albicans following aortic and pulmonary valve replacement in a 38-year-old woman with a history of surgically corrected tetralogy of Fallot, prior infective endocarditis and acute renal failure with need for catheter-based hemodialysis. Antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B was initiated prior to cardiac surgery, in which the bioprostheses were replaced by homografts, providing greater resistance to recurrent infection. During hospitalization, a mycotic aneurysm was diagnosed following an episode of acute arterial ischemia, requiring two vascular surgical interventions. Despite the complications, the patient's outcome was good and she was discharged on suppressive antifungal therapy with oral fluconazole for at least a year. The reported case illustrates multiple risk factors for fungal endocarditis, as well as complications and predictors of poor prognosis, demonstrating its complexity. PMID:27493128

  6. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  7. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  8. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  9. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  11. Rothia mucilaginosa Prosthetic Device Infections: a Case of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Tokarczyk, Mindy J.; Jungkind, Donald; DeSimone, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is increasingly recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen associated with prosthetic device infections. Infective endocarditis is one of the most common clinical presentations. We report a case of R. mucilaginosa prosthetic valve endocarditis and review the literature of prosthetic device infections caused by this organism. PMID:23467598

  12. [Aortic Valve Replacement after Balloon Valvuloplasty for Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Dialysis Patient with Cardiogenic Shock;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Masanori; Hirotani, Takashi; Ohtsubo, Satoshi; Saito, Sumikatsu; Takeuchi, Shigeyuki; Hasegawa, Tasuku; Endo, Ayaka; Yamasaki, Yu; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2015-06-01

    A 67-year-old man on chronic hemodialysis was admitted with worsening congestive heart failure due to critical aortic stenosis. Echocardiography showed severe aortic stenosis with a valve area of 0.67 cm2 and an ejection fraction of 0.31. Cardiac catheterization revealed severe pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary artery pressures of 62/32 mmHg. In the middle of cardiac catheterization, the systolic pressure declined to 60 mmHg due to cardiogenic shock. Dopamine hydrochloride and dobutamine hydrochloride infusions were necessary to maintain a systolic pressure greater than 80 mmHg. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty was urgently performed. The patient's symptoms rapidly resolved except for angina on exertion. One month later, elective aortic valve replacement was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the he was discharged on the 60th postoperative day. A follow-up echocardiogram 6 months postoperatively revealed normal prosthetic valve function and an ejection fraction of 0.6. PMID:26066880

  13. Novel Materials for Prosthetic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragolta, Carolina I.; Morford, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Existing materials for prosthetic liners tend to be thick and airtight, causing perspiration to accumulate inside the liner and potentially causing infection and injury that reduce quality of life. The purpose of this project was to examine the suitability of aerogel for prosthetic liner applications. Three tests were performed on several types of aerogel to assess the properties of each material. Moisture vapor permeability was tested by incubating four aerogel varieties with an artificial sweat solution at 37.0 C and less than 20% relative humidity for 24 hours. Two aerogel varieties were eliminated from the study due to difficulties in handling the material, and further testing proceeded with Pyrogel in 2.0 and 6.0 mm thicknesses. Force distribution was tested by compressing samples under a load of 4448 N at a rate of 2.5 mm/min. Biofilm formation was tested in a high-shear CDC Biofilm Reactor. Results showed that 2.0 mm Pyrogel blanket allowed 55.7 plus or minus 28.7% of an artificial sweat solution to transpire, and 35.5 plus or minus 27.8% transpired through 6.0 mm Pyrogel blanket. Samples also outperformed the load-bearing capabilities of existing liner materials. No statistically significant difference was found between the two Pyrogel thicknesses for either moisture vapor permeability or force distribution. In addition, biofilm formation results showed no change between the two Pyrogel thicknesses. The breathability and load bearing properties of aerogel make it a suitable material for application to prosthetic liners.

  14. Surgical and Antimicrobial Treatment of Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infections at Different Surgical Sites: A Retrospective Study of Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Elzi, Luigia; Gurke, Lorenz; Battegay, Manuel; Widmer, Andreas F.; Weisser, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about optimal management of prosthetic vascular graft infections, which are a rare but serious complication associated with graft implants. The goal of this study was to compare and characterize these infections with respect to the location of the graft and to identify factors associated with outcome. Methods This was a retrospective study over more than a decade at a tertiary care university hospital that has an established multidisciplinary approach to treating graft infections. Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria. Patients were divided into groups according to the locations of their grafts: thoracic-aortic, abdominal-aortic, or peripheral-arterial. Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections. The primary endpoint was cure at one year after diagnosis of the infection. Results Characterization of graft infections according to the graft location did show that these infections differ in terms of their characteristics and that the prognosis for treatment seems to be influenced by the location of the infection. Cure rate and all-cause mortality at one year were 87.5% and 12.5% in 24 patients with thoracic-aortic graft infections, 37.0% and 55.6% in 27 patients with abdominal-aortic graft infections, and 70.0% and 30.0% in 10 patients with peripheral-arterial graft infections. In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate. Conclusions We recommend that future prospective studies differentiate prosthetic vascular graft infections according to the location of the

  15. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  16. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  17. Candida parapsilosis prosthetic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Pinto, André; Ferraz, Rita; Casanova, Jorge; Sarmento, António; Santos, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Candida endocarditis is a rare infection associated with high mortality and morbidity. There are still some controversies about Candida endocarditis treatment, especially about the treatment duration. We report a case of a Candida parapsilosis endocarditis that presented as a lower limb ischemia. The patient was surgically treated with a cryopreserved homograft aortic replacement. We used intravenous fluconazole 800 mg as initial treatment, followed with 12 months of 400 mg fluconazole per os. The patient outcome was good. PMID:26288749

  18. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    PubMed

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  19. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  20. Biological response to prosthetic debris

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  1. Biological response to prosthetic debris.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-03-18

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  2. Wireless Microstimulators for Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Pikov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    One of the roadblocks in the field of neural prosthetics is the lack of microelectronic devices for neural stimulation that can last a lifetime in the central nervous system. Wireless multi-electrode arrays are being developed to improve the longevity of implants by eliminating the wire interconnects as well as the chronic tissue reactions due to the tethering forces generated by these wires. An area of research that has not been sufficiently investigated is a simple single-channel passive microstimulator that can collect the stimulus energy that is transmitted wirelessly through the tissue and immediately convert it into the stimulus pulse. For example, many neural prosthetic approaches to intraspinal microstimulation require only a few channels of stimulation. Wired spinal cord implants are not practical for human subjects because of the extensive flexions and rotations that the spinal cord experiences. Thus, intraspinal microstimulation may be a pioneering application that can benefit from submillimetersize floating stimulators. Possible means of energizing such a floating microstimulator, such as optical, acoustic, and electromagnetic waves, are discussed. PMID:21488815

  3. Pregnancy in patients after valve replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, C; Doherty, P

    1976-01-01

    This report is based on information obtained from a questionnaire sent to major cardiac centres in the United Kingdom. This produced details of 39 pregnancies in 34 patients after valve replacement. The 39 pregnancies gave rise to 30 healthy babies. The small size of the series probably reflects both the increasing rarity of young women with rheumatic heart disease in this country and the cautious attitude of their cardiologists. This makes it likely that these women represented the best end of the spectrum of cardiac function after valve replacement. Twenty-four pregnancies in 20 women who were not given anticoagulants producted 23 healthy babies and 1 spontaneous abortion. This group comprised 6 patients with free aortic homografts, 1 patient with a fascia lata mitral valve, 1 with a Beall tricuspid prosthesis, 1 with a combined mitral homograft and Starr Edwards aortic prosthesis, and 1 with mitral and aortic frame-mounted fascia lata valves. There were no maternal deaths or thromboembolic complications in this group which included 5 patients who were in atrial fibrillation. Fifteen pregnancies in 14 women who received anticoagulants gave rise to 7 healthy babies. The fetal losses were one stillbirth, one intrauterine death at 34 weeks, and 3 spontaneous abortions; one surviving child has hydrocephalus as a result of blood clot and there were 2 maternal deaths. This group included 13 patients with Starr Edwards valves, 11 mitral and 2 aortic. A patient with a Hammersmith mitral valve was the only one to have been treated with heparin and her valve thrombosed. One patient with a mounted mitral homograft had a cerebral embolus. Nine of these patients were in atrial fibrillation. In 3 additional patients the valve replacement was carried out during pregnancy. Two of the patients survived operation. In one of these who was treated with warfarin the pregnancy well, but there is an increased fetal wastage in patients pregnancy gave rise to a congenitally malformed

  4. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  5. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  6. Usefulness of Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Prosthetic Coronary Artery Graft with Interposition Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Ryotaro; Iwata, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masashi; Doi, Atsushi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Otsuka, Ryo; Hozumi, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Ehara, Shoichi; Hanatani, Akihisa; Muro, Takashi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    An 80-year-old Japanese man was admitted with orthopnea and pitting edema of both lower legs. We diagnosed congestive heart failure (CHF) on the basis of a chest X-ray and an echocardiogram. An electrocardiogram showed a heart rate of 120 beats/min with atrial fibrillation rhythm (Af). The patient developed aortic valve failure and destruction of the base of right coronary artery (RCA) due to infectious endocarditis at 71 years of age. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting with an interposed graft with polyester vascular graft to RCA. The patient recovered from CHF after the 6 days of treatment with diuretics and verapamil. We confirmed the patency of coronary arteries and bypass grafts using a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography scan (CT) and diagnosed CHF due to Af. Here we describe the estimation of the prosthetic coronary artery graft patency with the interposition procedure using 64-slice cardiac CT. PMID:21079753

  7. Use of aspirin as the sole antiplatelet agent following prosthetic valve replacement in rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    John, S; Bashi, V V; John, C N; Ravikumar, E; Kumar, H P; Rao, S

    1994-01-01

    Aspirin was administered as the sole antiplatelet agent in 147 patients following valve replacement, who were at low risk for thromboembolism. Of these, 67 underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR), 61 aortic valve replacement (AVR) and 19 combined aortic and mitral valve replacement (DVR). The mean follow up period was 6.63 years (range 1-14 years). The incidence of thromboembolic episodes (TEE) in patients following MVR, AVR, and DVR was 0.41, 0.80 and nil respectively. The TEE free survival at the first year follow-up was 98.4%, 99.3% and 100% in patients following MVR, AVR and DVR respectively. Fatal intracranial haemorrhage was not encountered. Valve thrombosis in this patient population was not seen. In conclusion, aspirin as the sole antiplatelet agent appears to be safe and effective following prosthetic valve replacement in selected patients. Further studies involving larger number of patients are necessary to confirm these results. PMID:7797223

  8. Surgery for Aortic Root Abscess: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, Sabit; Ozen, Yucel; Sacli, Hakan; Basaran, Eylul; Yerlikhan, Ozge Altas; Aydin, Ebuzer; Rabus, Murat Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Aortic root abscess is the most severe sequela of infective endocarditis, and its surgical management is a complicated procedure because of the high risk of morbidity and death. Twenty-seven patients were included in this 15-year retrospective study: 21 (77.8%) with native- and 6 (22.2%) with prosthetic-valve endocarditis. The surgical reconstruction of the aortic root consisted of aortic valve replacement in 19 patients (70.4%) with (11) or without (8) a pericardial patch, or total aortic root replacement in 7 patients (25.9%); 5 of the 27 (18.5%) underwent the modified Bentall procedure with the flanged conduit. Only one patient (3.7%) underwent subaortic pericardial patch reconstruction without valve replacement. A total of 7 patients (25.9%) underwent reoperation: 6 with prior valve surgery, and 1 with prior isolated sinus of Valsalva repair. The mean follow-up period was 6.8 ± 3.7 years. There were 6 (22.2%) in-hospital deaths, 3 (11.1%) of which were perioperative, among patients who underwent emergent surgery. Five patients (23.8%) died during follow-up, and the overall survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 70.3% ± 5.8%, 62.9% ± 6.4%, and 59.2% ± 7.2%, respectively. Two of 21 patients (9.5%) underwent reoperation because of paravalvular leakage and early recurrence of infection during follow-up. After complete resection of the perianular abscess, replacement of the aortic root can be implemented for reconstruction of the aortic root, with or without left ventricular outflow tract injuries. Replacing the aortic root with a flanged composite graft might provide the best anatomic fit. PMID:27047281

  9. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Payment for Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices, and Surgical Dressings § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic...

  10. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Payment for Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic...

  11. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Payment for Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  17. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic devices subject...

  18. Smart prosthetics based on magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J. David; Matthis, Wilfried; Toscano, James R.

    2001-06-01

    One of the most exciting new applications for magnetorheological fluid technology is that of real-time controlled dampers for use in advanced prosthetic devices. In such systems a small magnetorheological fluid damper is used to control, in real-time, the motion of an artificial limb based on inputs from a group of sensors. A 'smart' prosthetic knee system based on a controllable magnetorheological fluid damper was commercially introduced to the orthopedics and prosthetics market in 2000. The benefit of such an artificial knee is a more natural gait that automatically adapts to changing gait conditions.

  19. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance. PMID:19964378

  20. 3D bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A; Kang, Kevin H; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2013-05-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4 ± 3.4% for SMC and 83.2 ± 4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  1. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:22464092

  2. Juxtarenal aortic occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    Tapper, S S; Jenkins, J M; Edwards, W H; Mulherin, J L; Martin, R S; Edwards, W H

    1992-01-01

    The authors' experience with 113 aortic occlusions in 103 patients during a 26-year period (1965 to 1991) is reviewed. The authors found three distinct patterns of presentation: group I (n = 26) presented with acute aortic occlusion, group II (n = 66) presented with chronic aortic occlusion, and group III (n = 21) presented with complete occlusion of an aortic graft. Perioperative mortality rates were 31%, 9%, and 4.7% for each respective group and achieved statistical significance when comparing group I with group II (p = 0.009) and group I with group III (p = 0.015). Group I presented with profound metabolic insults due to acute ischemia and fared poorly. Group II presented with chronic claudication and did well long-term. Group III presented with acute ischemia but did well because of established collateral circulation. The treatment and expected outcome of aortic occlusion depends on the cause. PMID:1616381

  3. Conservative Management of Chronic Aortic Dissection with Underlying Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf Beebeejaun, Mohammad; Malec, Aleksandra; Gupta, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Aortic dissection is one of the most common aortic emergencies affecting around 2000 Americans each year. It usually presents in the acute state but in a small percentage of patients aortic dissections go unnoticed and these patients survive without any adequate therapy. With recent advances in medical care and diagnostic technologies, aortic dissection can be successfully managed through surgical or medical options, consequently increasing the related survival rate. However, little is known about the optimal long-term management of patients suffering from chronic aortic dissection. The purpose of the present report is to review aortic dissection, namely its pathology and the current diagnostic tools available, and to discuss the management options for chronic aortic dissection. We report a patient in which chronic aortic dissection presented with recurring episodes of vomiting and also discuss the management plan of our patient who had a chronic aortic dissection as well as an underlying aortic aneurysm. PMID:24179638

  4. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis Caused by Bartonella quintana

    PubMed Central

    Klein, John L.; Nair, Sukumaran K.; Harrison, Tim G.; Hunt, Ian; Fry, Norman K.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first case of Bartonella quintana endocarditis affecting a prosthetic valve in a person with no known risk factors for this infection. Bartonella should be considered as a cause of endocarditis in any clinical setting. PMID:11897074

  5. Limb Loss in Children: Prosthetic Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Part 3 Prosthetic Issues for Children http://www.amputee-coalition.org/inmotion/may_jun_06/congenital_part3. ... 05/2009 Back to Top © Copyrighted by the Amputee Coalition . Local reproduction for use by Amputee Coalition ...

  6. [Retromuscular prosthetic repair: experience from France].

    PubMed

    Flament, J B; Palot, J P; Lubrano, D; Levy-Chazal, N; Concé, J P; Marcus, C

    2002-10-01

    Large incisional hernias cannot be cured without prosthetic material. A large pore size prosthetic tissue seems to be the best alternative, since connective invasion of the mesh provides a very strong fixation of the prosthesis. In our view, the mesh should be placed in the rectus sheath, in a position we have described as "retromuscular prefascial". With this technique, a good result can be achieved in 98% of very large incisional hernias. PMID:12395165

  7. Prosthetic Tool For Holding Small Ferromagnetic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Carden, James R.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Tool attached to prosthetic hand or arm enables user to hold nails, screws, nuts, rivets, and other small ferromagnetic objects on small magnetic tip. Device adjusted to hold nail or screw at proper angle for hammering or for use of screwdriver, respectively. Includes base connector with threaded outer surface and lower male member inserted in standard spring-action, quick-connect/quick-disconnect wrist adapter on prosthetic hand or arm.

  8. Rotational joint assembly for the prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.; Jones, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly for a prosthetic leg has been devised, which enables an artificial foot to rotate slightly when a person is walking, running or turning. The prosthetic leg includes upper and lower tubular members with the rotational joint assembly interposed between them. The assembly includes a restrainer mechanism which consists of a pivotably mounted paddle element. This device applies limiting force to control the rotation of the foot and also restores torque to return the foot back to its initial position.

  9. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin). PMID:7869722

  10. Implications of smart materials in advanced prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoe, Edward M.; Radicic, William N.; Knapp, Michael S.

    1994-05-01

    This research reviews common implant materials and suggests smart materials that may be used as substitutes. Current prosthetic technology, including artificial limbs, joints, and soft and hard tissue, falls short in comprehensive characterization of the chemo-mechanics and materials relationships of the natural tissues and their prosthetic materials counterparts. Many of these unknown chemo-mechanical properties in natural tissue systems maintain cooperative function that allows for optimum efficiency in performance and healing. Traditional prosthetic devices have not taken into account the naturally occurring electro-chemo-mechanical stress- strain relationships that normally exist in a tissue system. Direct mechanical deformation of tissue and cell membrane as a possible use of smart materials may lead to improved prosthetic devices once the mechanosensory systems in living tissues are identified and understood. Smart materials may aid in avoiding interfacial atrophy which is a common cause of prosthetic failure. Finally, we note that advanced composite materials have not received sufficient attention, they should be more widely used in prosthetics. Their structural efficiency allows design and construction of truly efficient bionic devices.

  11. [Vasoplegic Syndrome after Aortic Valve Replacement].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kazuto; Shigematsu, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of vasoplegic syndrome (VS) after aortic valve replacement in a 65 year old male with aortic stenosis. The patient developed hypotension after separation from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Transesophageal echocardiography revealed well-maintained cardiac function and normal prosthetic valve function. However, his cardiac index was 3.0 l x min(-1) x m(-2) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) was 1100 dynes x sec(-1) x cm(-5) x m(-2). Diagnosing VS, norepinephrine administration was commenced. Since his respiratory status was good, the patient was extubated on the day of surgery. Two days after surgery, catecholamines were discontinued with the stabilization of his circulatory status. However, his respiratory status showed gradual deterioration, and he was re-intubated. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion, which was treated by drainage and fluid restriction. With this, his oxygenation improved and he could be extubated 5 days after surgery. Vasoplegic syndrome is a potentially life-threatening complication following cardiac surgery. Hypotension at the time of separation from CPB can be due to multiple factors. Despite an incidence rate of 10%, little is known about VS. We hope that, in future, tailored therapeutic protocols for VS will be developed. PMID:27004393

  12. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  13. Ascending aortic graft thrombosis and diffuse embolization from early endoluminal Aspergillus infection.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Domenico; Bashir, Mohammad; Gailey, Michael P

    2012-10-01

    We present a 43-year-old man who underwent emergent replacement of the ascending aorta for type A dissection and hemiarch reconstruction with a 28-mm prosthetic graft. Dramatic neurologic symptoms, renal failure, and bowel ischemia developed on postoperative day 5. A computed tomography scan showed a large floating thrombus in the ascending aortic graft and massive peripheral embolization throughout the body. PMID:23006693

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  15. Valvar prosthetic dysfunction. Localisation and evaluation of the dysfunction using the Doppler technique.

    PubMed Central

    Veyrat, C; Witchitz, S; Lessana, A; Ameur, A; Abitbol, G; Kalmanson, D

    1985-01-01

    Thirty patients with 33 mitral or aortic prostheses or both were examined using the pulsed Doppler technique combined with cross sectional echocardiography to study the applicability of the Doppler technique in the diagnosis and evaluation of the severity of prosthetic dysfunction and to assess the ability of the mapping procedure to estimate the site and the size of the prosthetic defect. The dysfunction was valvar regurgitation in 29 instances and stenoses in eight, all of which were confirmed by invasive procedures. The severity of the dysfunction was graded on a three point scale. A control group of 73 subjects with 88 normal prostheses also underwent pulsed Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography. The pulsed Doppler study followed the usual procedure for a valvar disease including two and three dimensional mapping for regurgitation. Eight patients also underwent a continuous wave Doppler examination. The diagnostic reliability of the pulsed Doppler technique was greater than or equal to 90%. The severity of the dysfunction was accurately assessed in 86% of cases. In the case of aortic regurgitation, mapping of the jets was performed as easily for prostheses as for native regurgitant valves. In the case of mitral regurgitation, the mapping patterns depended on the cause of the dysfunction. With valvar tears, a jet was detected at the centre of the annulus, and with paravalvar leaks eccentric atrial jets were seen opposite the site of the leak. The pulsed Doppler and the surgical findings correlated well for both the site of the dysfunction (16/20 (80%) patients) and the size of the leak (13/16 (81%) patients). Thus, despite some limitations, pulsed Doppler and particularly the mapping procedure provide sufficient information to give an accurate non-invasive assessment of prosthetic valve dysfunction. Images PMID:3899151

  16. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  17. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  18. Choice of prosthetic heart valve in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Talwar, Sachin; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical prostheses and stented xenografts (bioprosthesis) are most commonly used substitutes for aortic and mitral valve replacement. The mechanical valves have the advantage of durability but are accompanied with the risk of thromboembolism, problems of long-term anticoagulation, and associated risk of bleeding. In contrast, bioprosthetic valves do not require long-term anticoagulation, but carry the risk of structural valve degeneration and re-operation. A mechanical valve is favoured in young patients (<40 years) if reliable anticoagulation is ensured. In elderly patients (>60 years), a bioprosthesis is a suitable substitute. In middle-aged patients (40–60 years), risk of re-operation in a bioprosthesis is equal to that of bleeding in a mechanical valve. Traditionally, a bioprosthesis is opted in patients with limited life expectancy. Calculation of life expectancy, based solely upon chronological age, is erroneous. In developing countries, the calculated life expectancy is much lower than that of Western population, hence age related Western cut-offs are not valid in developing countries. Besides age, cardiac condition of the patient, systemic illnesses, socio-economic status, gender and geographical location also decide the life expectancy of the patients. Selection of the prosthetic valve substitute should be based on: aspiration of the patient, life expectancy, socio-economic and educational background, occupation of the patient, availability, cost, monitoring of anti-coagulation, monitoring of valve function and other valve related complications, and possibility of re-operation. PMID:27326237

  19. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... choose to have your aortic valve surgery at a center that does many of these procedures. ... DA, Harken AH. Acquired heart disease: valvular. In: Townsend CM, ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  20. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  2. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... double aortic arch may press on the windpipe (trachea) and esophagus, leading to trouble breathing and swallowing. ... to relieve pressure on the esophagus and windpipe (trachea). The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and ...

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  4. Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jalaj; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Sarungbam, Judy; Jain, Diwakar

    2016-01-01

    St. Jude mechanical prosthesis is the most commonly used prosthetic device with least valvular complications with excellent hemodynamics. However, prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the serious complications, with rates between 0.03% and 0.13% per patient-year depending on the type of anticoagulation used and compliance to the therapy. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the initial screening tool (class I) that would provide clues for the assessment of valvular hemodynamics. Fluoroscopy is an alternate imaging modality for the assessment of mechanical leaflet motion, especially in patients when prosthetic valves are difficult to image on TTE or transesophageal echocardiography. A complete fluoroscopic evaluation of a prosthetic valve includes assessment of valvular motion and structural integrity. Opening and closing angles can be measured fluoroscopically to determine whether a specific valve is functioning properly. We discuss a case of a 91-year-old man with thrombosis of bileaflet mechanical mitral prosthesis that was demonstrated on real-time fluoroscopy (not evident on TTE). An algorithmic approach to diagnosis and management of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is outlined. PMID:25486519

  5. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua Cy; Bale, R Stephen; Trail, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes. PMID:27583013

  6. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua CY; Bale, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes. PMID:27583013

  7. Surgical Aortic Valvuloplasty Versus Balloon Aortic Valve Dilatation in Children.

    PubMed

    Donald, Julia S; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2016-09-01

    Balloon aortic valve dilatation (BAD : is assumed to provide the same outcomes as surgical aortic valvuloplasty (SAV). However, the development of precise modern surgical valvuloplasty techniques may result in better long-term durability of the aortic valve repair. This review of the recent literature suggests that current SAV provides a safe and durable repair. Furthermore, primary SAV appears to have greater freedom from reintervention and aortic valve replacement when compared to BAD. PMID:27587493

  8. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up. PMID:23380562

  9. Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nikos; Sinning, Jan-Malte

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) negatively affects prognosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). As transcatheter heart valves (THV) are anchored using a certain degree of oversizing at the level of the aortic annulus, incomplete stent frame expansion because of heavily annular calcifications, suboptimal placement of the prosthesis, and/or annulus-prosthesis size-mismatch can contribute to paravalvular AR with subsequent increased mortality risk. Echocardiography is essential to differentiate between transvalvular and paravalvular AR and to further elucidate the etiology of AR during the procedure. However, because echocardiographic quantification of AR in TAVR patients remains challenging, especially in the implantation situation, a multimodal approach to the evaluation of AR with use of hemodynamic measurements and imaging modalities is useful to precisely quantify the severity of AR immediately after valve deployment. "Next-generation" THVs are already on the market and first results show that paravalvular AR related to design modifications (eg, paravalvular space-fillers, full repositionability) are rarely seen in these valve types.  PMID:24632758

  10. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infective Endocarditis Following Aortic Valve Implantation: A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Dapás, Juan Ignacio; Rivero, Cynthia; Burgos, Pablo; Vila, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) in patients with prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a rare complication of this relatively novel procedure and current guidelines do not include specific recommendations for its treatment. We report a case of PVE due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after TAVI that required SAVR, with successful outcome. PVE usually occurs during the first year after TAVI and entails a high mortality risk because patients eligible for this min-imally invasive procedure are fragile (i.e. advanced age and/or severe comorbidities). Additionally, clinical presentation may be atypical or subtle and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) may not be conclusive, which delays diagnosis and treatment worsening the prognosis. This case highlights that open SAVR might be ultimately indicated as part of treatment for TAVI-PVE despite a high-risk surgery score. PMID:27014375

  12. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000236.htm Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. AAA repair - endovascular - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular - discharge; EVAR - discharge; Endovascular aneurysm repair - discharge ...

  13. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  14. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  15. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  16. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  17. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  18. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or...

  19. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  20. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  1. First Human Case of Retrograde Transcatheter Implantation of an Aortic Valve Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, David; Condado, José A.; Besso, José; Vélez, Manuel; Burger, Bruno; Bibbo, Salvatore; Cedeno, Douglas; Acquatella, Harry; Mejia, Carlos; Induni, Eduardo; Fish, R. David

    2005-01-01

    The transcatheter route is an emerging approach to treating valvular disease in high-risk patients. The 1st clinical antegrade transcatheter placement of an aortic valve prosthesis was reported in 2002. We describe the first retrograde transcatheter implantation of a new aortic valve prosthesis, in a 62-year-old man with inoperable calcific aortic stenosis and multiple severe comorbidities. Via the right femoral artery, a Cook introducer was advanced into the abdominal aorta. The aortic valve was crossed with a straight wire, and a pigtail catheter was advanced into the left ventricle to obtain pressure-gradient and anatomic measurements. An 18-mm valvuloplasty balloon was then used to predilate the aortic valve. Initial attempts to position the prosthetic valve caused a transient cardiac arrest. Implantation was achieved by superimposing the right coronary angiogram onto fluoroscopic landmarks in the same radiographic plane. A balloon-expandable frame was used to deliver the valve. After device implantation, the transvalvular gradient was <5 mmHg. The cardiac output increased from 1 to 5 L/min, and urine production increased to 200 mL/h. The patient was extubated on the 2nd postimplant day. Twelve hours later, he had to be reintubated because of respiratory distress and high pulmonary pressures. His condition deteriorated, and he died of biventricular failure and refractory hypotension on day 5. Despite the severe hypotension, valve function was satisfactory on echo-Doppler evaluation. In our patient, retrograde transcatheter implantation of a prosthetic aortic valve yielded excellent hemodynamic results and paved the way for further use of this technique in selected high-risk patients. PMID:16392228

  2. Strategies to treat thoracic aortitis and infected aortic grafts.

    PubMed

    Kahlberg, A; Melissano, G; Tshomba, Y; Leopardi, M; Chiesa, R

    2015-04-01

    Infectious thoracic aortitis is a rare disease, especially since the incidence of syphilis and tuberculosis has dropped in western countries. However, the risk to develop an infectious aortitis and subsequent mycotic aneurysm formation is still present, particularly in case of associated endocarditis, sepsis, and in immunosuppressive disorders. Moreover, the number of surgical and endovascular thoracic aortic repairs is continuously increasing, and infective graft complications are observed more frequently. Several etiopathogenetic factors may play a role in thoracic aortic and prosthetic infections, including hematogenous seeding, local bacterial translocation, and iatrogenous contamination. Also, fistulization of the esophagus or the bronchial tree is commonly associated with these diseases, and it represents a critical event requiring a multidisciplinary management. Knowledge on underlying micro-organisms, antibiotic efficacy, risk factors, and prevention strategies has a key role in the management of this spectrum of infectious diseases involving the thoracic aorta. When the diagnosis of a mycotic aneurysm or a prosthetic graft infection is established, treatment is demanding, often including a number of surgical options. Patients are usually severely compromised by sepsis, and in most cases they are considered unfit for surgery for general clinical conditions or local concerns. Thus, results of different therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases of the thoracic aorta are still burdened with very high morbidity and mortality. In this manuscript, we review the literature regarding the main issues related to thoracic infectious aortitis and aortic graft infections, and we report our personal series of patients surgically treated at our institution for these conditions from 1993 to 2014. PMID:25608572

  3. Mechanical behavior of provisional implant prosthetic abutments

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Roig-Vanaclocha, Ana; Román-Rodriguez, Juan-Luis; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implant-supported prostheses have to overcome a major difficulty presented by the morphology and esthetics of peri-implant tissues in the anterior sector. Diverse therapeutic techniques are used for managing the mucosa adjacent to the implant and the most noteworthy is immediate/deferred fixed provisionalization. Objectives: In vitro testing of strength and deformation of implant prosthetic abutments made from different materials (Titanium/PEEK/methacrylate). Material and Methods: Forty Sweden&Martina® implant prosthetic abutments (n=40) were divided into five groups: Group MP: methacrylate provisional abutments with machined titanium base; Group PP: Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) provisional abutments; Group TP: titanium provisional abutments; Group TAD: titanium anti-rotational definitive abutments; Group TRD: titanium rotational definitive abutments. Their mechanical behavior under static loading was analyzed. Samples were examined under a microscope to determine the type of fracture produced. Results and Conclusions: Definitive anti-rotational titanium abutments and definitive rotational titanium abutments achieved the best mean compression strength, while PEEK resin provisional abutments obtained the lowest. The group that showed the greatest elastic deformation was the group of titanium provisional abutments. Key words:Immediate loading, immediate provisionalization, implant prosthetic abutment, definitive implant prosthetic abutment. PMID:25129253

  4. Proceedings, 1972 Carahan Conference on Electronic Prosthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, John S., Ed.; DeVore, R. William, Ed.

    Presented are 28 papers given at a 1972 conference on electronic prosthetics for the handicapped. Among the papers are the following titles: "Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Employing Artifician Sense Organs for Alternatives to Proprioceptive Feedback"; "Excessive Neuromuscular Time Delay as a Possible Cause of Poor Hand-Eye Coordination and…

  5. Transluminal aortic valve placement. A feasibility study with a newly designed collapsible aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Moazami, N; Bessler, M; Argenziano, M; Choudhri, A F; Cabreriza, S E; Allendorf, J D; Rose, E A; Oz, M C

    1996-01-01

    Percutaneous stents are used in vascular applications in conjunction with angioplasty and in combination with graft material for repair of abdominal aneurysms. The authors have designed a collapsible bioprosthetic aortic valve for placement by a transluminal catheter technique. This trileaflet stent valve is composed of stainless steel and bovine pericardium. Stent valves, 23 and 29 mm, were tested in a pulse duplicator system with rigid rings from 21 to 31 mm in 2 mm increments. At a mean flow of 3.1 L/min (+/-0.7), normal systemic aortic pressure was generated with a transvalvular gradient of 14.9 +/- 7 mmHg (mean +/- SD). Regurgitation fraction ranged from 10 to 18% (mean 13.8 +/- 3%) in the best ring size. Valves with the best hemodynamic profile were used for implantation in three 70 kg pigs in an open chest model. The valve was collapsed in a 24 Fr catheter designed to allow slow, controlled release. After resection of the native leaflets, the new valve was placed in the subcoronary position. No additional sutures were used for securing the valve. Two animals were successfully weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass and maintained systemic pressures of 100/45 (+/-10) and 116/70 (+/-15) mmHg, respectively. Intraoperative color echocardiography revealed minimal regurgitation, central flow, full apposition of all leaflets, and no interference with coronary blood flow. Both animals were sacrificed after being off bypass for 2 hr. Postmortem examination revealed the valves to be securely anchored. The third animal was weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass but developed refractory ventricular fibrillation because of valve dislodgment due to structural failure. Although long term survival data are needed, development of a hemodynamically acceptable prosthetic aortic valve for transluminal placement is feasible. PMID:8944912

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care. PMID:27021619

  7. Different techniques for aortic valve repair and the associated root reconstruction – prospective long-term follow-up of the first 100 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gocol, Radosław; Malinowski, Marcin; Hudziak, Damian; Duraj, Piotr; Frackiewicz, Joanna; Kargul, Tomasz; Deja, Marek A.; Woś, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The advantages of aortic valve and aortic root reconstructive surgery include the provision of natural postoperative valve hemodynamics and the avoidance of prosthetic valve-related complications. A systematic approach based on functional classification of aortic regurgitation allows standardization and reproducibility. Its potential applicability, however, is limited by the relative lack of long-term follow-up data. Aim To achieve the long term results of aortic valve and root repair in prospectively recruited group of 100 patients operated on during first seven years. Material and methods Between the years 2003 and 2013, 225 consecutive patients (175 male, 50 female, mean age 51.3 years) with severe aortic regurgitation and aortic root enlargement underwent aortic valve repair or sparing surgery. The first 100 patients operated between 2003 and 2009 were prospectively enrolled in the study in order to achieve a 105-month follow-up. They underwent aortic valve repair and associated aortic root reconstruction. This prospective study is aimed at assessing the major endpoints of overall survival and freedom from reoperation. Additionally, log-rank testing for the risk factors associated with overall mortality, reoperation, and aortic valve repair failure was performed. Results Among 225 patients, early mortality occurred in the case of 5 patients (2.2%), while 6 (2.5%) patients experienced early valve failure. In a prospective analysis performed on the first 100 patients, long-term results achieved with Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a survival rate of 93% and freedom from reoperation at the level of 91.3%. The risk factors for overall mortality included NYHA class, creatinine level, and perioperative root replacement as reimplantation. Redo operation was associated with bicuspid aortic valve and perioperative leaflet resection with pericardial patch repair. Conclusions One hundred and five month follow-up data from this prospectively analyzed cohort of

  8. [Metaplasia of aortic tissue into tracheal tissue. Surgical perspectives].

    PubMed

    Martinod, E; Zakine, G; Fornes, P; Zegdi, R; d'Audiffret, A; Aupecle, B; Goussef, N; Azorin, J; Chachques, J C; Fabiani, J N; Carpentier, A

    2000-05-01

    Tracheal reconstruction after extensive resection remains an unsolved surgical problem. Numerous attempts have been made using tracheal grafts or prosthetic conduits with disappointing results. In this study, we propose a new alternative using an aortic autograft as tracheal substitute. In a first series of experiments, a half circumference of two rings was replaced with an autologous carotid artery patch. In a second series, a complete segment of trachea was replaced with an autologous aortic graft supported by an endoluminal tracheal stent. No dehiscence or stenosis was observed. Microscopic examinations at 3 and 6 months showed the replacement of the aortic tissue by tracheal tissue comprising neoformation of cartilage and mucociliary or non-keratinizing metaplastic polystratified squamous epithelium. Although these results need to be confirmed by a larger series of experiments, they showed that a vascular tissue placed in a different environment with a different function can be submitted to a metaplastic transformation which tends to restore a normal structure adapted to its new function. These remarkable findings offer new perspectives in tracheal reconstruction in human. PMID:10879293

  9. Current Clinical Evidence on Rapid Deployment Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Glenn R.; Shrestha, Malakh Lal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the Western world. It is caused primarily by age-related degeneration and progressive calcification typically detected in patients 65 years and older. In patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, the average survival rate is only 2 years without appropriate treatment. Approximately one half of all patients die within the first 2 to 3 years of symptom onset. In addition, the age of the patients presenting for aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increased along with the demographic changes. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) database shows that the number of patients older than 80 years has increased from 12% to 24% during the past 20 years. At the same time, the percentage of candidates requiring AVR as well as concomitant coronary bypass surgery has increased from 5% to 25%. Surgical AVR continues to be the criterion standard for treatment of aortic stenosis, improving survival and quality of life. Recent advances in prosthetic valve technology, such as transcatheter AVR, have expanded the indication for AVR to the extreme high-risk population, and the most recent surgical innovation, rapid deployment AVR, provides an additional tool to the surgeons’ armamentarium. PMID:26918310

  10. [Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement Via Right Mini-thoracotomy].

    PubMed

    Totsugawa, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    Here we demonstrate our surgical procedure of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement through right anterolateral mini-thoracotomy. Preoperative evaluation of the whole aorta by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan is important to prevent cerebrovascular complications. The patient is set in a mild left lateral decubitus position. A skin incision is made along the anterior axillary line to the inframammary fold and the chest is opened at the 3rd or 4th intercostal space. Cardiopulmonary bypass is usually established by femoro-femoral bypass. The ascending aorta is clamped with a Chitwood clamp and antegrade or selective cardioplegia is administered. Four traction sutures placed at the aortotomy widely open the aortotomy and offer fine surgical view of the aortic valve. The annular calcifications are excised using a cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator. Double-needle braided sutures with pledgets are placed in a non-everting mattress manner. Then the prosthetic valve is sewn onto the aortic annulus. Finger knot tying through anterolateral mini-thoracotomy is usually challenging;therefore, all sutures are tied using a knot pusher. The aortotomy is closed and the aorta is de-clamped. The pericardium is loosely closed;chest tubes are placed;and the thoracotomy is closed in a usual manner. PMID:27440021

  11. Segmental Aortic Stiffening Contributes to Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Development

    PubMed Central

    Raaz, Uwe; Zöllner, Alexander M.; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Brandt, Moritz; Emrich, Fabian C.; Kayama, Yosuke; Eken, Suzanne; Adam, Matti; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hertel, Thomas; Deng, Alicia; Jagger, Ann; Buerke, Michael; Dalman, Ronald L.; Spin, Joshua M.; Kuhl, Ellen; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stiffening of the aortic wall is a phenomenon consistently observed in age and in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, its role in AAA pathophysiology is largely undefined. Methods and Results Using an established murine elastase-induced AAA model, we demonstrate that segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) precedes aneurysm growth. Finite element analysis (FEA) reveals that early stiffening of the aneurysm-prone aortic segment leads to axial (longitudinal) wall stress generated by cyclic (systolic) tethering of adjacent, more compliant wall segments. Interventional stiffening of AAA-adjacent aortic segments (via external application of surgical adhesive) significantly reduces aneurysm growth. These changes correlate with reduced segmental stiffness of the AAA-prone aorta (due to equalized stiffness in adjacent segments), reduced axial wall stress, decreased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), attenuated elastin breakdown, and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration, as well as attenuated apoptosis within the aortic wall. Cyclic pressurization of segmentally stiffened aortic segments ex vivo increases the expression of genes related to inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Finally, human ultrasound studies reveal that aging, a significant AAA risk factor, is accompanied by segmental infrarenal aortic stiffening. Conclusions The present study introduces the novel concept of segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) as an early pathomechanism generating aortic wall stress and triggering aneurysmal growth, thereby delineating potential underlying molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. In addition, monitoring SAS may aid the identification of patients at risk for AAA. PMID:25904646

  12. Polymeric trileaflet prosthetic heart valves: evolution and path to clinical reality

    PubMed Central

    Claiborne, Thomas E; Slepian, Marvin J; Hossainy, Syed; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Present prosthetic heart valves, while hemodynamically effective, remain limited by progressive structural deterioration of tissue valves or the burden of chronic anticoagulation for mechanical valves. An idealized valve prosthesis would eliminate these limitations. Polymeric heart valves (PHVs), fabricated from advanced polymeric materials, offer the potential of durability and hemocompatibility. Unfortunately, the clinical realization of PHVs to date has been hampered by findings of in vivo calcification, degradation and thrombosis. Here, the authors review the evolution of PHVs, evaluate the state of the art of this technology and propose a pathway towards clinical reality. In particular, the authors discuss the development of a novel aortic PHV that may be deployed via transcatheter implantation, as well as its optimization via device thrombogenicity emulation. PMID:23249154

  13. Bicuspid aortic valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... is unclear, but it is the most common congenital heart disease . It often runs in families. The bicuspid aortic ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  14. Fibrinolytic treatment of thrombus on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed Central

    Witchitz, S; Veyrat, C; Moisson, P; Scheinman, N; Rozenstajn, L

    1980-01-01

    Fibrinolytic agents were administered for 13 episodes of thrombus formation on mitral or aortic valvar prostheses in 12 patients. The most common presenting features were pulmonary oedema (six cases) or arterial emboli (six cases). The diagnosis of thrombus formation was made by phonocardiography on the following criteria: (a) modifications of the prosthetic sounds (12 cases), (b) appearance of a valvar obstructive syndrome (10 cases). The treatment consisted of streptokinase (100 000 units/h after a loading dose, seven cases) or urokinase using either low doses (75 000 or 112 500 units/h, three cases) or moderate doses (150 000 units/h, three cases) for one to four days. Immediate complete regression of clinical and phonocardiographic anomalies was seen in eight cases. Incomplete improvement was seen in two patients, leading to operation: this was unsuccessful in one patient who had surgery on the third day, and was successful in the other on the 75th day. There were three failures leading to successful reoperative procedures in two patients and to an early death in the third patient suffering from acute myocardial infarction. One non-fatal haemopericardium was observed in a patient treated with streptokinase. No important side effect was noted during delivery in a pregnant woman. During subsequent follow-up, a recurrent episode of thrombus formation was observed in one patient, treated by fibrinolytic therapy with success. One patient had an operation for a valve replacement six months after fibrinolytic treatment because of non-thrombotic valvar dysfunction; the outcome was fatal. Six patients are alive and in good condition, with a follow-up of six months to five years. Images PMID:7437196

  15. Aortic valve annuloplasty: new single suture technique.

    PubMed

    Schöllhorn, Joachim; Rylski, Bartosz; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction strategies for aortic valve insufficiency in the presence of aortic annulus dilatation are usually surgically challenging. We demonstrate a simple, modified Taylor technique of downsizing and stabilization of the aortic annulus using a single internal base suture. Since April 2011, 22 consecutive patients have undergone safe aortic valve annuloplasty. No reoperations for aortic valve insufficiency and no deaths occurred. PMID:24882316

  16. Targeted Muscle Reinnervation and Advanced Prosthetic Arms

    PubMed Central

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E.; Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to improve the control of upper limb prostheses. Residual nerves from the amputated limb are transferred to reinnervate new muscle targets that have otherwise lost their function. These reinnervated muscles then serve as biological amplifiers of the amputated nerve motor signals, allowing for more intuitive control of advanced prosthetic arms. Here the authors provide a review of surgical techniques for TMR in patients with either transhumeral or shoulder disarticulation amputations. They also discuss how TMR may act synergistically with recent advances in prosthetic arm technologies to improve prosthesis controllability. Discussion of TMR and prosthesis control is presented in the context of a 41-year-old man with a left-side shoulder disarticulation and a right-side transhumeral amputation. This patient underwent bilateral TMR surgery and was fit with advanced pattern-recognition myoelectric prostheses. PMID:25685105

  17. Common Prosthetic Implant Complications in Fixed Restorations.

    PubMed

    Link-Bindo, Elyce E; Soltys, James; Donatelli, David; Cavanaugh, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Many clinicians consider implants to be one of the most important innovations in dental care. Even so, over the past 40 years of implant dentistry, complications have been a constant struggle for restorative dentists, surgeons, and patients alike. Implant-related problems can be particularly challenging and frustrating, especially given that an implant is thought to be a "lifetime" solution expected to yield minimal difficulties. This, however, is not necessarily the case with prosthetic restorations. With innovations in implant technology continuing to rapidly advance, maintaining knowledge of all the latest developments can be challenging for clinicians. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic understanding of the treatment, management, and prevention of common prosthetic and technical implant complications seen in the office of a restorative dentist. PMID:27548395

  18. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  19. Control system and method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the movable body part through the full-shrug position of the movable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the movable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective movable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  20. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  1. Retinal Prosthetics, Optogenetics, and Chemical Photoswitches

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  2. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  3. Design and evaluation of prosthetic shoulder controller

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Joseph E.; Sorkin, John D.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) shoulder position transducer (sensing shoulder protraction-retraction and elevation-depression) that can be used to control two of a powered prosthetic humerus' DOFs. We also developed an evaluation protocol based on Fitts' law to assess the performance of our device. The primary motivation for this work was to support development of powered prosthetic shoulder joints of a new generation of prosthetic arms for people with shoulder disarticulation and very high-level transhumeral amputation. We found that transducers that provided resistance to shoulder movement performed better than those providing no resistance. We also found that a position control scheme, where effector position is proportional to shoulder position, performed better than a velocity control scheme, where effector velocity is proportional to shoulder position. More generally, our transducer can be used to control motion along any two DOFs. It can also be used in a more general 4-DOF control scheme by sequentially controlling two DOFs at a time. The evaluation protocol has general applicability for researchers and practitioners. Researchers can employ it to compare different prosthesis designs and control schemes, while practitioners may find the evaluation protocol useful in evaluating and training people with amputation in the use of prostheses. PMID:25357185

  4. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  5. Aortic Valve Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Published Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Sancho, Elena; Abello, David; Bashir, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that aortic valve disease is surgically managed with aortic valve replacement (AVR) using different available prostheses. The long-term survival, durability of the valve, and freedom from reoperation after AVR are well established in published literature. Over the past two decades, aortic valve repair (AVr) has evolved into an accepted surgical option for patients with aortic valve disease. We review and analyze the published literature on AVr. Methods: A systematic review of the current literature was performed through three electronic databases from inception to August 2013 to identify all relevant studies relating to aortic valve repair. Articles selected were chosen by two reviewers. Articles were excluded if they contained a pediatric population or if the patient number was less than 50. Results: Twenty-four studies conformed to the inclusion criteria for inclusion in the systematic review. In total, 4986 patients underwent aortic valve repair. 7 studies represented bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) repair, 5 studies represented cusp prolapse, and 3 studies represented valve repair with root dilation or aneurysm. Overall weighted in-hospital mortality for all studies was low (1.46% ± 1.21). Preoperative aortic insufficiency (AI) ≥ 2+ did not correlate to reoperation for valve failure (Pearson's Rs 0.2705, P = 0.2585). AI at discharge was reported in 9 studies with a mean AI ≥ 2+ in 6.1% of patients. Weighted average percentage for valve reoperation following BAV repair was 10.23% ± 3.2. Weighted average reoperation following cusp prolapse repair was 3.83 ± 1.96. Weighted average reoperation in aortic valve sparing procedures with root replacement was 4.25% ± 2.46. Although there are limitations and complications of prosthetic valves, especially for younger individuals, there is ample published literature that confers strong evidence for AVR. On the contrary, aortic valve repair may be a useful option for selected patients

  6. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26118429

  7. Towards Optimization of a Novel Trileaflet Polymeric Prosthetic Heart Valve Via Device Thrombogenicity Emulation (DTE)

    PubMed Central

    Claiborne, Thomas E.; Xenos, Michalis; Sheriff, Jawaad; Chiu, Wei-Che; Soares, Joao; Alemu, Yared; Gupta, Shikha; Judex, Stefan; Slepian, Marvin J.; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Aortic stenosis the is most prevalent and life threatening form of valvular heart disease. It is primarily treated via open-heart surgical valve replacement with either a tissue or mechanical prosthetic heart valve (PHV), each prone to degradation and thrombosis, respectively. Polymeric PHVs may be optimized to eliminate these complications, and they may be more suitable for the new transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure and in devices like the Total Artificial Heart. However, the development of polymer PHVs has been hampered by persistent in vivo calcification, degradation, and thrombosis. To address these issues, we have developed a novel surgically implantable polymer PHV comprised of a new thermoset polyolefin called xSIBS, in which key parameters were optimized for superior functionality via our Device Thrombogenicity Emulation (DTE) methodology. In this parametric study, we compared our homogeneous optimized polymer PHV to a prior composite polymer PHV and to a benchmark tissue valve. Our results show significantly improved hemodynamics and reduced thrombogenicity in the optimized polymer PHV compared to the other valves. These results indicate that our new design may not require anticoagulants and may be more durable than its predecessor, and validates the improvement, towards optimization, of this novel polymeric PHV design. PMID:23644615

  8. Micromanaging abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to "fine tune" the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  9. An extremely lightweight fingernail worn prosthetic interface device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetkin, Oguz; Ahluwalia, Simranjit; Silva, Dinithi; Kasi-Okonye, Isioma; Volker, Rachael; Baptist, Joshua R.; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Upper limb prosthetics are currently operated using several electromyography sensors mounted on an amputee's residual limb. In order for any prosthetic driving interface to be widely adopted, it needs to be responsive, lightweight, and out of the way when not being used. In this paper we discuss the possibility of replacing such electrodes with fingernail optical sensor systems mounted on the sound limb. We present a prototype device that can detect pinch gestures and communicate with the prosthetic system. The device detects the relative position of fingers to each other by measuring light transmitted via tissue. Applications are not limited to prosthetic control, but can be extended to other human-machine interfaces.

  10. Replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis at the time of continuous flow ventricular assist device implantation for preexisting aortic valve dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles; Mountis, Maria; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation has become a mainstay of therapy for advanced heart failure patients who are either ineligible for, or awaiting, cardiac transplantation. Controversy remains over the optimal therapeutic strategy for preexisting aortic valvular dysfunction in these patients at the time of LVAD implant. In patients with moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, surgical approaches are center specific and range from variable leaflet closure techniques to concomitant aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a bioprosthesis. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed our outcomes in patients who underwent simultaneous AVR and LVAD implantation secondary to antecedent aortic valve pathology. Between January 2004 and June 2010, 144 patients underwent LVAD implantation at a single institution. Of these, 7 patients (4.8%) required concomitant AVR. Five of the 7 patients (71%) survived to hospital discharge and suffered no adverse events in the perioperative period. One-year survival for the discharged patients was 80%, and no prosthetic valve-related adverse events were observed in long-term follow-up. Given our experience, we conclude that bioprosthetic AVR is a plausible alternative for end-stage heart failure patients at the time of LVAD implantation. PMID:26424939

  11. Surgical Management of Aorto-Esophageal Fistula as a Late Complication after Graft Replacement for Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Na, Bubse; Hwang, Yoohwa; Kim, Yong Han; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Kyung-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    A 49-year-old male presented with chills and a fever. Five years previously, he underwent ascending aorta and aortic arch replacement using the elephant trunk technique for DeBakey type 1 aortic dissection. The preoperative evaluation found an esophago-paraprosthetic fistula between the prosthetic graft and the esophagus. Multiple-stage surgery was performed with appropriate antibiotic and antifungal management. First, we performed esophageal exclusion and drainage of the perigraft abscess. Second, we removed the previous graft, debrided the abscess, and performed an in situ re-replacement of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and proximal descending thoracic aorta, with separate replacement of the innominate artery, left common carotid artery, and extra-anatomical bypass of the left subclavian artery. Finally, staged esophageal reconstruction was performed via transthoracic anastomosis. The patient's postoperative course was unremarkable and the patient has done well without dietary problems or recurrent infections over one and a half years of follow-up. PMID:26889449

  12. Two-Stage Procedure for Infected Aortic Graft Pseudoaneurysm: 10-Year Follow Up after Omental Prosthesis Wrapping.

    PubMed

    von Aspern, Konstantin; Etz, Christian D; Mohr, Friedrich W; Battellini, Roberto R

    2015-08-01

    Prosthetic graft infections with mediastinitis following aortic surgery are rare, yet represent grave complications yielding high morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 57-year-old female patient with past history of emergent surgery for iatrogenic Type A dissection treated by supracoronary ascending aortic replacement. Four months after the initial surgery, a sternal fistula had formed and due to severe bleeding emergent reoperation was required. Imaging and pathology on admission revealed an infected pseudoaneurysm at the distal aortic prosthesis and mediastinitis with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Rescue surgery was performed by means of a two-stage approach, with extensive debridement, graft replacement and continuous antiseptic lavage in a first step and an omental wrapping of the new prosthesis in a second stage 24 hours later. During 10 years of follow-up, no recurrent infection occurred. The operative approach and general considerations for management of infected pseudoaneurysms are discussed. PMID:27069945

  13. Treatment of an aortic fungal false aneurysm by composite stentless porcine/pericardial conduit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, B; Caputo, M; Angelini, G D; Bryan, A J

    2003-02-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an uncommon but serious condition with high early and long-term mortality. The majority of these cases occur after aortic valve surgery and are caused by Candida species. Radical debridement of all infected tissues, valve replacement with perioperative and long-term anti-fungal agents is the recommended treatment. Choice of prosthesis varies widely among surgeons, but present recommendations favour biological prostheses. We report for the first time the case of a fungal PVE with false aneurysm after composite aortic root replacement with a dacron composite conduit treated successfully with aortic root replacement using a Shelhigh (Shelhigh Inc., Millburn, NJ) stentless porcine pericardial valved conduit. PMID:12543581

  14. Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with a Prosthetic Mechanical Heart Valve

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sherif W.; Hassanein, Mahmoud M.; Mohamed, Elsayed A.; Gohar, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pregnancy is associated with several cardiocirculatory changes that can significantly impact underlying cardiac disease. These changes include an increase in cardiac output, sodium, and water retention leading to blood volume expansion, and reductions in systemic vascular resistance and systemic blood pressure. In addition, pregnancy results in a hypercoagulable state that increases the risk of thromboembolic complications. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study is to assess the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves (PHVs). METHODS This is a prospective observational study that included 100 pregnant patients with cardiac mechanical valve prostheses on anticoagulant therapy. The main maternal outcomes included thromboembolic or hemorrhagic complications, prosthetic valve thrombosis, and acute decompensated heart failure. Fetal outcomes included miscarriage, fetal death, live birth, small-for-gestational age, and warfarin embryopathy. The relationship between the following were observed: – Maternal and fetal complications and the site of the replaced valve (mitral, aortic, or double)– Maternal and fetal complications and warfarin dosage (≤5 mg, >5 mg)– Maternal and fetal complications and the type of anticoagulation administered during the first trimester RESULTS This study included 60 patients (60%) with mitral valve replacement (MVR), 22 patients (22%) with aortic valve replacement (AVR), and 18 patients (18%) with double valve replacement (DVR). A total of 65 patients (65%) received >5 mg of oral anticoagulant (warfarin), 33 patients (33%) received ≤5 mg of warfarin, and 2 patients (2%) received low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH; enoxaparin sodium) throughout the pregnancy. A total of 17 patients (17%) received oral anticoagulant (warfarin) during the first trimester: 9 patients received a daily warfarin dose of >5 mg while the remaining 8 patients received a daily dose of ≤5 mg. Twenty

  15. 78 FR 35099 - Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items... information needed to determine eligibility and authorize funding for various prosthetic services. DATES..., VA Form 10- 1394. (d) Prosthetic Authorization for Items or Services, VA Form 10- 2421....

  16. Late outcome analysis of the Braile Biomédica® pericardial valve in the aortic position

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Lisandro Gonçalves; Veronese, Elinthon Tavares; Santiago, José Augusto Duncan; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aortic valve replacement with Braile bovine pericardial prosthesis has been routinely done at the Heart Institute of the Universidade de São Paulo Medical School since 2006. The objective of this study is to analyze the results of Braile Biomédica® aortic bioprosthesis in patients with aortic valve disease. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients with aortic valve disease submitted to aortic valve replacement with Braile Biomédica® bovine pericardial prosthesis, between 2006 and 2010. Mean age was 59.41±16.34 years and 67.3% were male. Before surgery, 73.4% of patients were in NYHA functional class III or IV. Results Hospital mortality was 8.16% (16 patients). Linearized rates of mortality, endocarditis, reintervention, and structural dysfunction were 1.065%, 0.91%, 0.68% and 0.075% patients/year, respectively. Actuarial survival was 90.59±2.56% in 88 months. Freedom from reintervention, endocarditis and structural dysfunction was respectively 91.38±2.79%, 89.84±2.92% and 98.57±0.72% in 88 months. Conclusion The Braile Biomédica® pericardial aortic valve prosthesis demonstrated actuarial survival and durability similar to that described in the literature, but further follow up is required to assess the incidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis and structural dysfunction in the future. PMID:25372903

  17. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Rare Congenital Cause of Aortic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Shah, Priyank; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly causing aortic regurgitation usually in the fifth to sixth decade of life. Earlier, the diagnosis was mostly during postmortem or intraoperative, but now with the advent of better imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, more cases are being diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have QAV, with the help of TEE, while undergoing evaluation for a diastolic murmur. The patient was found to have Type B QAV with moderate aortic regurgitation. We also present a brief review of classification, pathophysiology, and embryological basis of this rare congenital anomaly. The importance of diagnosing QAV lies in the fact that majority of these patients will require surgery for aortic regurgitation and close follow-up so that aortic valve replacement/repair is done before the left ventricular decompensation occurs. PMID:27195176

  18. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  19. Blunt thoracic aortic injury: old problem and new technology.

    PubMed

    Britt, L D; Campbell, Matthew M

    2003-01-01

    The lethal nature of transmural aortic injuries has remained constant; however, both the diagnostic and therapeutic interventional options have improved. Although aortography is still the "gold standard" against which all other diagnostic modalities are measured, contrast-enhanced spiral thoracic computed tomography has emerged as the diagnostic study that could potentially supplant aortography. The advent of the fast spiral computed tomography scanners offer several advantages, including being less affected by patient motion and volume-averaging artifacts than the earlier generation CT scanners. The operative has broadened from primary repair and interposition prosthetic graft placement (with possible use of shunt or roller vs. centrifugal bypass) to the potential widespread use of endovascular stents. The Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS) experience during the first 10-year period (see table below) highlights the majority of patients undergoing interposition prosthetic graft placement. There was no use of shunts during this period. At the midpoint of the second 10-year period (1997-2007), the method of repair is exclusively interposition graft placement. The role of endovascular stent insertion in the management of these injuries is currently being debated. [table: see text] PMID:14649580

  20. Tactile sensing means for prosthetic limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An improved prosthetic device characterized by a frame and a socket for mounting on the stump of a truncated human appendage is described. Flexible digits extend from the distal end and transducers located within the digits act as sensing devices for detecting tactile stimuli. The transducers are connected through a power circuit with a slave unit supported by a strap and fixed to the stump. The tactile stimuli detected at the sensing devices are reproduced and applied to the skin of the appendage in order to stimulate the sensory organs located therein.

  1. Prosthetic joint infection caused by Trueperella bernardiae.

    PubMed

    Gilarranz, Raul; Chamizo, Francisco; Horcajada, Iballa; Bordes-Benítez, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Trueperella bernardiae is a Gram-positive coryneform bacilli which role as human pathogen is unknown because it has been usually considered a contaminant. Furthermore its identification by biochemical test was difficult. We describe a prosthetic joint infection in a women who years ago underwent a total knee replacement with superinfection and necrosis of the patellar tendon as major complications. In the sample of synovial fluid collected grew a gram-positive bacilli which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) as T. bernardiae. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin and currently preserves the prosthesis without signs of infection. PMID:26964529

  2. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Plastic Surgery Management.

    PubMed

    Meaike, Jesse D; Kaufman, Matthew G; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    Orthopedic prosthetic infections are potentially devastating complications. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted to aid in the management of the soft tissue defects that are created by these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify established treatment methods for soft tissue coverage of orthopedic hardware infections for a variety of anatomic locations. The following treatment guidelines and soft tissue reconstructive options were identified as viable options for the management of exposed or infected orthopedic hardware. This review provides descriptions of the various soft tissue reconstructive options available as well as adjunctive treatment methods. PMID:27152099

  3. [Panorama of prosthetic options in osseointegrated implantology].

    PubMed

    Khayat, P; Missika, P; Hockers, T

    1990-12-01

    Today, several prosthetic options can be used with osseointegrated implants. Fixed bridges may be retained by screws or cemented. Detachable bridges may be screwed on cylindrical, conical, straight or angulated abutments. In certain cases, they will be placed directly in contact with the implants. Cemented bridges may be placed over screwed, cemented or transfixed copings. They also may be cemented over transfixed metallic structures already splinting the implants. Removable prosthesis may be stabilized with bars, stud attachments or magnets. All these different options are discussed, and their advantages and disadvantages presented. PMID:2268784

  4. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  5. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  6. 75 FR 65060 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ...- art prosthetics and the associated rehabilitation research, development, and evaluation of such... November 10, the Committee will be briefed by the Chief Consultant for Prosthetics and Sensory Aids...

  7. 76 FR 64429 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... art prosthetics and the associated rehabilitation research, development, and evaluation of such..., Amputation System of Care; and Deputy Chief Consultant, Prosthetics and Sensory Aids Service. On November...

  8. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  9. National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for Orthotic and Prosthetic Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association, Washington, DC.

    The booklet sets forth the National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for the one-year apprenticeship program for orthotic and/or prosthetic technicians, as developed and recommended by the American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association. Standards in various areas--such as qualifications for apprenticeship, hours of work, salaries, records,…

  10. Current strategies with 2-staged prosthetic breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Harless, Christin; Jacobson, Steven R

    2015-06-01

    Over the last decade, prosthetic-based breast reconstruction has been revolutionized with technological advancements. Reconstructive surgeons now have a multitude of prosthetic devices and tissue expanders, tools for intraoperative perfusion analysis, implantable bioprosthetic materials and a technique for autoaugmentation within their armamentarium to reconstruct natural breasts today like never before. PMID:26161305

  11. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  16. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External limb prosthetic component. 890.3420 Section 890.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  17. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External limb prosthetic component. 890.3420 Section 890.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  18. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External limb prosthetic component. 890.3420 Section 890.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  19. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  20. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  1. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  2. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  3. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External limb prosthetic component. 890.3420 Section 890.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  4. Current strategies with 2-staged prosthetic breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harless, Christin

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, prosthetic-based breast reconstruction has been revolutionized with technological advancements. Reconstructive surgeons now have a multitude of prosthetic devices and tissue expanders, tools for intraoperative perfusion analysis, implantable bioprosthetic materials and a technique for autoaugmentation within their armamentarium to reconstruct natural breasts today like never before. PMID:26161305

  5. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic accessory. 890.3025 Section 890.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External limb prosthetic component. 890.3420 Section 890.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  7. Consumer Guide for Amputees: A Guide to Lower Limb Prosthetics

    MedlinePlus

    Consumer Guide for Amputees: A Guide to Lower Limb Prosthetics: Part I -- Prosthetic Design: Basic Concepts Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 ... C. Michael Schuch, CPO, FISPO, FAAOP Introduction The Amputee Coalition has long wanted to have available a ...

  8. Intraoperative aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Mehta, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection is a rare but fatal complication of open heart surgery. By recognizing the population at risk and by using a gentle operative technique in such patients, the surgeon can usually avoid iatrogenic injury to the aorta. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and epiaortic scanning are invaluable for prompt diagnosis and determination of the extent of the injury. Prevention lies in the strict control of blood pressure during cannulation/decannulation, construction of proximal anastomosis, or in avoiding manipulation of the aorta in high-risk patients. Immediate repair using interposition graft or Dacron patch graft is warranted to reduce the high mortality associated with this complication. PMID:26440240

  9. Prosthetic metal implants and airport metal detectors

    PubMed Central

    Dancey, A; Titley, OG

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Metal detectors have been present in airports and points of departure for some time. With the introduction of heightened security measures in response to fears of an increased threat of terrorism, they may become more prevalent in other public locations. The aim of this study was to ascertain which prosthetic devices activated metal detector devices used for security purposes. Methods A range of prosthetic devices used commonly in orthopaedic and plastic surgery procedures were passed through an arch metal detector at Birmingham Airport in the UK. Additionally, each item was passed under a wand detector. Items tested included expandable breast prostheses, plates used in wrist and hand surgery, screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ ligation clips and staples. Results No prostheses were detected by the arch detector. The expandable implants and wrist plates were the only devices detected by passing the wand directly over them. No device was detected by the wand when it was under cover of the axillary soft tissue. Screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ clips and staples were not detected under any of the study conditions. Conclusions Although unlikely to trigger a detector, it is possible that an expandable breast prosthesis or larger plate may do so. It is therefore best to warn patients of this so they can anticipate detection and further examination. PMID:23827294

  10. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Suchá, Dominika; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, Lex A; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-09-01

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerged as new potential imaging modalities for valve prostheses. We present an overview of the possibilities and pitfalls of CT and MRI for PHV assessment based on a systematic literature review of all experimental and patient studies. For this, a comprehensive systematic search was performed in PubMed and Embase on March 24, 2015, containing CT/MRI and PHV synonyms. Our final selection yielded 82 articles on surgical valves. CT allowed adequate assessment of most modern PHVs and complemented echocardiography in detecting the obstruction cause (pannus or thrombus), bioprosthesis calcifications, and endocarditis extent (valve dehiscence and pseudoaneurysms). No clear advantage over echocardiography was found for the detection of vegetations or periprosthetic regurgitation. Whereas MRI metal artifacts may preclude direct prosthesis analysis, MRI provided information on PHV-related flow patterns and velocities. MRI demonstrated abnormal asymmetrical flow patterns in PHV obstruction and allowed prosthetic regurgitation assessment. Hence, CT shows great clinical relevance as a complementary imaging tool for the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected PHV obstruction and endocarditis. MRI shows potential for functional PHV assessment although more studies are required to provide diagnostic reference values to allow discrimination of normal from pathological conditions. PMID:26353926