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Sample records for state-dependent presynaptic inhibition

  1. Presynaptic inhibition of spinal sensory feedback ensures smooth movement

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Andrew J. P.; Croce, Katherine R.; Huang, Z. Josh; Abbott, L. F.; Jessell, Thomas M.; Azim, Eiman

    2014-01-01

    The precision of skilled movement depends on sensory feedback and its refinement by local inhibitory microcircuits. One specialized set of spinal GABAergic interneurons forms axo-axonic contacts with the central terminals of sensory afferents, exerting presynaptic inhibitory control over sensory-motor transmission. The inability to achieve selective access to the GABAergic neurons responsible for this unorthodox inhibitory mechanism has left unresolved the contribution of presynaptic inhibition to motor behavior. We used Gad2 as a genetic entry point to manipulate the interneurons that contact sensory terminals, and show that activation of these interneurons in mice elicits the defining physiological characteristics of presynaptic inhibition. Selective genetic ablation of Gad2-expressing interneurons severely perturbs goal-directed reaching movements, uncovering a pronounced and stereotypic forelimb motor oscillation, the core features of which are captured by modeling the consequences of sensory feedback at high gain. Our findings define the neural substrate of a genetically hard-wired gain control system crucial for the smooth execution of movement. PMID:24784215

  2. Presynaptic inhibition of corticothalamic feedback by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Georgia M; Godwin, Dwayne W

    2005-07-01

    The thalamus relays sensory information to cortex, but this information may be influenced by excitatory feedback from cortical layer VI. The full importance of this feedback has only recently been explored, but among its possible functions are influences on the processing of sensory features, synchronization of thalamic firing, and transitions in response mode of thalamic relay cells. Uncontrolled, corticothalamic feedback has also been implicated in pathological thalamic rhythms associated with certain neurological disorders. We have found a form of presynaptic inhibition of corticothalamic synaptic transmission that is mediated by a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) and activated by high-frequency corticothalamic activity. We tested putative retinogeniculate and corticogeniculate synapses for Group II mGluR modulation within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the ferret thalamus. Stimulation of optic-tract fibers elicited paired-pulse depression of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), whereas stimulation of the optic radiations elicited paired-pulse facilitation. Paired-pulse responses were subsequently used to characterize the pathway of origin of stimulated synapses. Group II mGluR agonists (LY379268 and DCG-IV) applied to thalamic neurons under voltage-clamp conditions reduced the amplitude of corticogeniculate EPSCs. Stimulation with high-frequency trains produced a facilitating response that was reduced by Group II mGluR agonists, but was enhanced by the selective antagonist LY341495, revealing a presynaptic, mGluR-mediated reduction of high-frequency corticogeniculate feedback. Agonist treatment did not affect EPSCs from stimulation of the optic tract. NAAG (reported to be selective for mGluR3) was ineffective at the corticogeniculate synapse, implicating mGluR2 in the observed effects. Our data are the first to show a synaptically elicited form of presynaptic inhibition of corticothalamic synaptic transmission that is mediated by

  3. Presynaptic GABAergic inhibition regulated by BDNF contributes to neuropathic pain induction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeremy Tsung-chieh; Guo, Da; Campanelli, Dario; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Zhou, Luming; Kuner, Rohini; Heppenstall, Paul A; Knipper, Marlies; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gate control theory proposes the importance of both pre- and post-synaptic inhibition in processing pain signal in the spinal cord. However, although postsynaptic disinhibition caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proved as a crucial mechanism underlying neuropathic pain, the function of presynaptic inhibition in acute and neuropathic pain remains elusive. Here we show that a transient shift in the reversal potential (EGABA) together with a decline in the conductance of presynaptic GABAA receptor result in a reduction of presynaptic inhibition after nerve injury. BDNF mimics, whereas blockade of BDNF signalling reverses, the alteration in GABAA receptor function and the neuropathic pain syndrome. Finally, genetic disruption of presynaptic inhibition leads to spontaneous development of behavioural hypersensitivity, which cannot be further sensitized by nerve lesions or BDNF. Our results reveal a novel effect of BDNF on presynaptic GABAergic inhibition after nerve injury and may represent new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25354791

  4. Presynaptic GABAergic inhibition regulated by BDNF contributes to neuropathic pain induction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy Tsung-chieh; Guo, Da; Campanelli, Dario; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Zhou, Luming; Kuner, Rohini; Heppenstall, Paul A.; Knipper, Marlies; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gate control theory proposes the importance of both pre- and post-synaptic inhibition in processing pain signal in the spinal cord. However, although postsynaptic disinhibition caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proved as a crucial mechanism underlying neuropathic pain, the function of presynaptic inhibition in acute and neuropathic pain remains elusive. Here we show that a transient shift in the reversal potential (EGABA) together with a decline in the conductance of presynaptic GABAA receptor result in a reduction of presynaptic inhibition after nerve injury. BDNF mimics, whereas blockade of BDNF signalling reverses, the alteration in GABAA receptor function and the neuropathic pain syndrome. Finally, genetic disruption of presynaptic inhibition leads to spontaneous development of behavioural hypersensitivity, which cannot be further sensitized by nerve lesions or BDNF. Our results reveal a novel effect of BDNF on presynaptic GABAergic inhibition after nerve injury and may represent new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25354791

  5. Hypothesis: Hughlings Jackson and presynaptic inhibition: is there a big picture?

    PubMed

    McComas, Alan J

    2016-07-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is a very powerful inhibitory mechanism and, despite many detailed studies, its purpose is still only partially understood. One accepted function is that, by reducing afferent inflow to the spinal cord and brainstem, the tonic level of presynaptic inhibition prevents sensory systems from being overloaded. A corollary of this function is that much of the incoming sensory data from peripheral receptors must be redundant, and this conclusion is reinforced by observations on patients with sensory neuropathies or congenital obstetric palsy in whom normal sensation may be preserved despite loss of sensory fibers. The modulation of incoming signals by presynaptic inhibition has a further function in operating a "gate" in the dorsal horn, thereby determining whether peripheral stimuli are likely to be perceived as painful. On the motor side, the finding that even minimal voluntary movement of a single toe is associated with widespread inhibition in the lumbosacral cord points to another function for presynaptic inhibition: to prevent reflex perturbations from interfering with motor commands. This last function, together with the normal suppression of muscle and cutaneous reflex activity at rest, is consistent with Hughlings Jackson's concept of evolving neural hierarchies, with each level inhibiting the one below it. PMID:27121579

  6. Loss of Striatonigral GABAergic Presynaptic Inhibition Enables Motor Sensitization in Parkinsonian Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borgkvist, Anders; Avegno, Elizabeth M.; Wong, Minerva Y.; Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Sonders, Mark S.; Hen, Rene; Sulzer, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson’s disease (PD) causes hypokinesia, but DA replacement therapy can elicit exaggerated voluntary and involuntary behaviors that have been attributed to enhanced DA receptor sensitivity in striatal projection neurons. Here we reveal that in hemiparkinsonian mice, striatal D1 receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) directly projecting to the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) lose tonic presynaptic inhibition by GABAB receptors. The absence of presynaptic GABAB response potentiates evoked GABA release from MSN efferents to the SNr and drives motor sensitization. This alternative mechanism of sensitization suggests a synaptic target for PD pharmacotherapy. PMID:26335644

  7. GCP II (NAALADase) inhibition suppresses mossy fiber-CA3 synaptic neurotransmission by a presynaptic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Emilio R Garrido; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Slusher, Barbara S; Keller, Asaf

    2004-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that endogenous N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) presynaptically inhibits glutamate release at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. For this purpose, we made use of 2-(3-mercaptopropyl)pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA), an inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase II [GCP II; also known as N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase)], the enzyme that hydrolyzes NAAG into N-acetylaspartate and glutamate. Application of 2-MPPA (1-20 microM) had no effect on intrinsic membrane properties of CA3 pyramidal neurons recorded in vitro in whole cell current- or voltage-clamp mode. Bath application of 10 microM 2-MPPA suppressed evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitudes. Attenuation of EPSC amplitudes was accompanied by a significant increase in paired-pulse facilitation (50-ms interpulse intervals), suggesting that a presynaptic mechanism is involved. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-y l) propanoic acid (LY341495) prevented the 2-MPPA-dependent suppression of EPSC amplitudes. 2-MPPA reduced the frequencies of TTX-insensitive miniature EPSCs (mEPSC), without affecting their amplitudes, further supporting a presynaptic action for GCP II inhibition. 2-MPPA-induced reduction of mEPSC frequencies was prevented by LY341495, reinforcing the role of presynaptic group II mGluR. Because GCP II inhibition is thought to increase NAAG levels, these results suggest that NAAG suppresses synaptic transmission at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses through presynaptic activation of group II mGluRs. PMID:12917384

  8. Tick holocyclotoxins trigger host paralysis by presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chand, Kirat K; Lee, Kah Meng; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Rodriguez-Valle, Manuel; Ijaz, Hina; Koehbach, Johannes; Clark, Richard J; Lew-Tabor, Ala; Noakes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are important vectors of pathogens and secreted neurotoxins with approximately 69 out of 692 tick species having the ability to induce severe toxicoses in their hosts. The Australian paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus) is known to be one of the most virulent tick species producing a flaccid paralysis and fatalities caused by a family of neurotoxins known as holocyclotoxins (HTs). The paralysis mechanism of these toxins is temperature dependent and is thought to involve inhibition of acetylcholine levels at the neuromuscular junction. However, the target and mechanism of this inhibition remain uncharacterised. Here, we report that three members of the holocyclotoxin family; HT-1 (GenBank AY766147), HT-3 (GenBank KP096303) and HT-12 (GenBank KP963967) induce muscle paralysis by inhibiting the dependence of transmitter release on extracellular calcium. Previous study was conducted using extracts from tick salivary glands, while the present study is the first to use pure toxins from I. holocyclus. Our findings provide greater insight into the mechanisms by which these toxins act to induce paralysis. PMID:27389875

  9. Tick holocyclotoxins trigger host paralysis by presynaptic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Kirat K.; Lee, Kah Meng; Lavidis, Nickolas A.; Rodriguez-Valle, Manuel; Ijaz, Hina; Koehbach, Johannes; Clark, Richard J.; Lew-Tabor, Ala; Noakes, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are important vectors of pathogens and secreted neurotoxins with approximately 69 out of 692 tick species having the ability to induce severe toxicoses in their hosts. The Australian paralysis tick (Ixodes holocyclus) is known to be one of the most virulent tick species producing a flaccid paralysis and fatalities caused by a family of neurotoxins known as holocyclotoxins (HTs). The paralysis mechanism of these toxins is temperature dependent and is thought to involve inhibition of acetylcholine levels at the neuromuscular junction. However, the target and mechanism of this inhibition remain uncharacterised. Here, we report that three members of the holocyclotoxin family; HT-1 (GenBank AY766147), HT-3 (GenBank KP096303) and HT-12 (GenBank KP963967) induce muscle paralysis by inhibiting the dependence of transmitter release on extracellular calcium. Previous study was conducted using extracts from tick salivary glands, while the present study is the first to use pure toxins from I. holocyclus. Our findings provide greater insight into the mechanisms by which these toxins act to induce paralysis. PMID:27389875

  10. Measuring Spinal Presynaptic Inhibition in Mice By Dorsal Root Potential Recording In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grünewald, Benedikt; Geis, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is one of the most powerful inhibitory mechanisms in the spinal cord. The underlying physiological mechanism is a depolarization of primary afferent fibers mediated by GABAergic axo-axonal synapses (primary afferent depolarization). The strength of primary afferent depolarization can be measured by recording of volume-conducted potentials at the dorsal root (dorsal root potentials, DRP). Pathological changes of presynaptic inhibition are crucial in the abnormal central processing of certain pain conditions and in some disorders of motor hyperexcitability. Here, we describe a method of recording DRP in vivo in mice. The preparation of spinal cord dorsal roots in the anesthetized animal and the recording procedure using suction electrodes are explained. This method allows measuring GABAergic DRP and thereby estimating spinal presynaptic inhibition in the living mouse. In combination with transgenic mouse models, DRP recording may serve as a powerful tool to investigate disease-associated spinal pathophysiology. In vivo recording has several advantages compared to ex vivo isolated spinal cord preparations, e.g. the possibility of simultaneous recording or manipulation of supraspinal networks and induction of DRP by stimulation of peripheral nerves. PMID:24747664

  11. Inhibition of spontaneous EPSCs and IPSCs by presynaptic GABAB receptors on rat supraoptic magnocellular neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kabashima, N; Shibuya, I; Ibrahim, N; Ueta, Y; Yamashita, H

    1997-01-01

    1. The function of presynaptic GABA receptors in the regulation of transmitter release in supraoptic nucleus (SON) magnocellular neurons was investigated by recording spontaneous postsynaptic currents from rat magnocellular SON neurons in a slice preparation (150 microns thick, 1.8 mm in diameter) using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. 2. Both the spontaneous EPSCs and IPSCs were TTX resistant. The EPSCs were abolished by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), whereas the IPSCs were abolished by picrotoxin, suggesting that the EPSCs and IPSCs are synaptic inputs from glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, respectively. 3. The selective GABAB agonist, baclofen, reduced the frequency of both the EPSCs and IPSCs without affecting the amplitude. The time constant of the decay phase of both the EPSCs and IPSCs remained unchanged after baclofen application. 4. The reduction of the frequency of the synaptic currents by baclofen was dose dependent (10 nM to 100 microM) and the EC50 values were 5.8 and 8.5 microM for the EPSCs and IPSCs, respectively. 5. The effect of baclofen (10 microM) was antagonized by the selective GABAB antagonist, 2-hydroxy-saclofen (2OH-saclofen), at 300 microM. 6. When given alone, 2OH-saclofen (100 microM) increased the frequency of both the EPSCs and IPSCs without affecting their amplitude, suggesting that endogenously released GABA in the slice acts on presynaptic GABAB receptors. 7. The GABAA agonist, muscimol, reduced the frequency of EPSCs, and picrotoxin increased the frequency of the EPSCs, suggesting that GABAA receptors also participate in the presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. 8. Taken together, these data suggest that GABAB receptors are present on the presynaptic terminals of both GABA and glutamate neurons in the SON, and that these presynaptic GABAB receptors play an important role in the regulation of the neuronal activity in SON magnocellular neurons. Images Figure 1 PMID:9350623

  12. Presynaptic inhibition of gamma lobe neurons is required for olfactory learning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shixing; Roman, Gregg

    2013-12-16

    The loss of heterotrimeric G(o) signaling through the expression of pertussis toxin (PTX) within either the α/β or γ lobe mushroom body neurons of Drosophila results in the impaired aversive olfactory associative memory formation. Herein, we focus on the cellular effects of G(o) signaling in the γ lobe mushroom body neurons during memory formation. Expression of PTX in the γ lobes specifically inhibits G(o) activation, leading to poor olfactory learning and an increase in odor-elicited synaptic vesicle release. In the γ lobe neurons, training decreases synaptic vesicle release elicited by the unpaired conditioned stimulus -, while leaving presynaptic activation by the paired conditioned stimulus + unchanged. PTX expression in γ lobe neurons inhibits the generation of this differential synaptic activation by conditioned stimuli after negative reinforcement. Hyperpolarization of the γ lobe neurons or the inhibition of presynaptic activity through the expression of dominant negative dynamin transgenes ameliorated the memory impairment caused by PTX, indicating that the disinhibition of these neurons by PTX was responsible for the poor memory formation. The role for γ lobe inhibition, carried out by G(o) activation, indicates that an inhibitory circuit involving these neurons plays a positive role in memory acquisition. This newly uncovered requirement for inhibition of odor-elicited activity within the γ lobes is consistent with these neurons serving as comparators during learning, perhaps as part of an odor salience modification mechanism. PMID:24291093

  13. Task- and time-dependent modulation of Ia presynaptic inhibition during fatiguing contractions performed by humans

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Adam H.; Gould, Jeffrey R.; Enoka, Roger M.

    2011-01-01

    Presynaptic modulation of Ia afferents converging onto the motor neuron pool of the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) was compared during contractions (20% of maximal force) sustained to failure as subjects controlled either the angular position of the wrist while supporting an inertial load (position task) or exerted an equivalent force against a rigid restraint (force task). Test Hoffmann (H) reflexes were evoked in the ECR by stimulating the radial nerve above the elbow. Conditioned H reflexes were obtained by stimulating either the median nerve above the elbow or at the wrist (palmar branch) to assess presynaptic inhibition of homonymous (D1 inhibition) and heteronymous Ia afferents (heteronymous Ia facilitation), respectively. The position task was briefer than the force task (P = 0.001), although the maximal voluntary force and electromyograph for ECR declined similarly at failure for both tasks. Changes in the amplitude of the conditioned H reflex were positively correlated between the two conditioning methods (P = 0.02) and differed between the two tasks (P < 0.05). The amplitude of the conditioned H reflex during the position task first increased (129 ± 20.5% of the initial value, P < 0.001) before returning to its initial value (P = 0.22), whereas it increased progressively during the force task to reach 122 ± 17.4% of the initial value at failure (P < 0.001). Moreover, changes in conditioned H reflexes were associated with the time to task failure and force fluctuations. The results suggest a task- and time-dependent modulation of presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents during fatiguing contractions. PMID:21543747

  14. State-Dependent Inhibition of Sodium Channels by Local Anesthetics: A 40-Year Evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, G-K; Strichartz, G R

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge about the mechanism of impulse blockade by local anesthetics has evolved over the past four decades, from the realization that Na(+) channels were inhibited to affect the impulse blockade to an identification of the amino acid residues within the Na(+) channel that bind the local anesthetic molecule. Within this period appreciation has grown of the state-dependent nature of channel inhibition, with rapid binding and unbinding at relatively high affinity to the open state, and weaker binding to the closed resting state. Slow binding of high affinity for the inactivated state accounts for the salutary therapeutic as well as the toxic actions of diverse class I anti-arrhythmic agents, but may have little importance for impulse blockade, which requires concentrations high enough to block the resting state. At the molecular level, residues on the S6 transmembrane segments in three of the homologous domains of the channel appear to contribute to the binding of local anesthetics, with some contribution also from parts of the selectivity filter. Binding to the inactivated state, and perhaps the open state, involves some residues that are not identical to those that bind these drugs in the resting state, suggesting spatial flexibility in the "binding site". Questions remaining include the mechanism that links local anesthetic binding with the inhibition of gating charge movements, and the molecular nature of the theoretical "hydrophobic pathway" that may be critical for determining the recovery rates from blockade of closed channels, and thus account for both therapeutic and cardiotoxic actions. PMID:23710324

  15. Inhibition of exocytotic noradrenaline release by presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors on peripheral sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ishac, E. J.; Jiang, L.; Lake, K. D.; Varga, K.; Abood, M. E.; Kunos, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Activation of CB1 receptors by plant cannabinoids or the endogenous ligand, anandamide, causes hypotension via a sympathoinhibitory action in anaesthetized rats. In mouse isolated vas deferens, activation of CB1 receptors inhibits the electrically evoked twitch response. To determine if these effects are related to presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release, we examined the effects of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), anandamide and the CB1 antagonist, SR141716A, on exocytotic NA release in rat isolated atria and vasa deferentia. 2. In isolated atria and vasa deferentia preloaded with [3H]-NA, electrical field stimulation caused [3H]-NA release, which was abolished by tetrodotoxin 0.5 microM and concentration-dependently inhibited by delta 9-THC or anandamide, 0.3-10 microM. The inhibitory effect of delta 9-THC and anandamide was competitively antagonized by SR 141716A, 1-10 microM. 3. Tyramine, 1 microM, also induced [3H]-NA release, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, delta 9-THC or anandamide in either atria or vasa deferentia. 4. CB1 receptor mRNA is present in the superior cervical ganglion, as well as in whole brain, cerebellum, hypothalamus, spleen, and vas deferens and absent in medulla oblongata and atria, as demonstrated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was no evidence of the presence of CB1A receptor mRNA in ganglia, brain, or cerebellum. These results suggest that activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors located on peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals mediate sympathoinhibitory effects in vitro and in vivo. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8864538

  16. Presynaptic GABAB receptors reduce transmission at parabrachial synapses in the lateral central amygdala by inhibiting N-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, A.J.; Crane, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    The nocioceptive information carried by neurons of the pontine parabrachial nucleus to neurons of the lateral division of the central amydala (CeA-L) is thought to contribute to the affective components of pain and is required for the formation of conditioned-fear memories. Importantly, excitatory transmission between parabrachial axon terminals and CeA-L neurons can be inhibited by a number of presynaptic receptors linked to Gi/o-type G-proteins, including α2-adrenoceptors and GABAB receptors. While the intracellular signalling pathway responsible for α2-adrenoceptor inhibition of synaptic transmission at this synapse is known, the mechanism by which GABAB receptors inhibits transmission has not been determined. The present study demonstrates that activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors reduces excitatory transmission between parabrachial axon terminals and CeA-L neurons by inhibiting N-type calcium channels. While the involvement of Gβγ subunits in mediating the inhibitory effects of GABAB receptors on N-type calcium channels is unclear, this inhibition does not involve Gβγ-independent activation of pp60C-src tyrosine kinase. The results of this study further enhance our understanding of the modulation of the excitatory input from parabrachial axon terminals to CeA-L neurons and indicate that presynaptic GABAB receptors at this synapse could be valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of fear- and pain-related disorders. PMID:26755335

  17. Presynaptic GABAB receptors reduce transmission at parabrachial synapses in the lateral central amygdala by inhibiting N-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Delaney, A J; Crane, J W

    2016-01-01

    The nocioceptive information carried by neurons of the pontine parabrachial nucleus to neurons of the lateral division of the central amydala (CeA-L) is thought to contribute to the affective components of pain and is required for the formation of conditioned-fear memories. Importantly, excitatory transmission between parabrachial axon terminals and CeA-L neurons can be inhibited by a number of presynaptic receptors linked to Gi/o-type G-proteins, including α2-adrenoceptors and GABAB receptors. While the intracellular signalling pathway responsible for α2-adrenoceptor inhibition of synaptic transmission at this synapse is known, the mechanism by which GABAB receptors inhibits transmission has not been determined. The present study demonstrates that activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors reduces excitatory transmission between parabrachial axon terminals and CeA-L neurons by inhibiting N-type calcium channels. While the involvement of Gβγ subunits in mediating the inhibitory effects of GABAB receptors on N-type calcium channels is unclear, this inhibition does not involve Gβγ-independent activation of pp60C-src tyrosine kinase. The results of this study further enhance our understanding of the modulation of the excitatory input from parabrachial axon terminals to CeA-L neurons and indicate that presynaptic GABAB receptors at this synapse could be valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of fear- and pain-related disorders. PMID:26755335

  18. Inhibition of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Input to Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli Mediated by Suppression of Presynaptic Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Matt; McGann, John P.; Heyward, Philip M.; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanism underlying presynaptic regulation of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) input to the mouse olfactory bulb using optical-imaging techniques that selectively report activity in the ORN pre-synaptic terminal. First, we loaded ORNs with calcium-sensitive dye and imaged stimulus-evoked calcium influx in a slice preparation. Single olfactory nerve shocks evoked rapid fluorescence increases that were largely blocked by the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA. Paired shocks revealed a long-lasting suppression of calcium influx with ~40% suppression at 400-ms interstimulus intervals and a recovery time constant of ~450 ms. Blocking activation of postsynaptic olfactory bulb neurons with APV/CNQX reduced this suppression. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited calcium influx, whereas GABAB antagonists reduced paired-pulse suppression without affecting the response to the conditioning pulse. We also imaged transmitter release directly using a mouse line that expresses synaptopHluorin selectively in ORNs. We found that the relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release was superlinear and that paired-pulse suppression of transmitter release was reduced, but not eliminated, by APV/CNQX and GABAB antagonists. These results demonstrate that primary olfactory input to the CNS can be presynaptically regulated by GABAergic interneurons and show that one major intracellular pathway for this regulation is via the suppression of calcium influx through N-type calcium channels in the pre-synaptic terminal. This mechanism is unique among primary sensory afferents. PMID:15917320

  19. Presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors dampen cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, S G; Gonçalves, F Q; Marques, J M; Tomé, Â R; Rodrigues, R J; Nunes-Correia, I; Ledent, C; Harkany, T; Venance, L; Cunha, R A; Köfalvi, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Both cannabinoid CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors (CB1 receptors and A2A receptors) control synaptic transmission at corticostriatal synapses, with great therapeutic importance for neurological and psychiatric disorders. A postsynaptic CB1−A2A receptor interaction has already been elucidated, but the presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated control of presynaptic neuromodulation by CB1 receptors remains to be defined. Because the corticostriatal terminals provide the major input to the basal ganglia, understanding the interactive nature of converging neuromodulation on them will provide us with novel powerful tools to understand the physiology of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and interpret changes associated with pathological conditions. Experimental Approach Pharmacological manipulation of CB1 and A2A receptors was carried out in brain nerve terminals isolated from rats and mice, using flow synaptometry, immunoprecipitation, radioligand binding, ATP and glutamate release measurement. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made in horizontal corticostriatal slices. Key Results Flow synaptometry showed that A2A receptors were extensively co-localized with CB1 receptor-immunopositive corticostriatal terminals and A2A receptors co-immunoprecipitated CB1 receptors in these purified terminals. A2A receptor activation decreased CB1 receptor radioligand binding and decreased the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of high-K+-evoked glutamate release in corticostriatal terminals. Accordingly, A2A receptor activation prevented CB1 receptor-mediated paired-pulse facilitation and attenuated the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission in glutamatergic synapses of corticostriatal slices. Conclusions and Implications Activation of presynaptic A2A receptors dampened CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal terminals. This constitutes a thus far unrecognized mechanism to modulate the potent CB1 receptor-mediated presynaptic

  20. Presynaptic dopamine D2-like receptors inhibit excitatory transmission onto rat ventral tegmental dopaminergic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Eiko; Momiyama, Toshihiko

    2000-01-01

    The effects of dopamine (DA) on non-NMDA glutamatergic transmission onto dopaminergic neurones in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were examined in rat midbrain slices using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. EPSCs in dopaminergic neurones evoked by focal stimulation within the VTA were reversibly blocked by 5 μm CNQX in the presence of bicuculline (20 μm), strychnine (0.5 μm) and D-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5, 25 μm). Bath application of DA reduced the amplitude of EPSCs up to 65.1 ± 9.52% in a concentration-dependent manner between 0.3–1000 μm (IC50, 16.0 μm) without affecting the holding current at −60 mV measured using a Cs+-filled electrode. The effect of DA on evoked EPSCs was mimicked by the D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole but not by the D1-like receptor agonist SKF 81297, and was antagonized by the D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride (KB, 0.96 μm), but not by the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (KB, 228.6 μm). Dopamine (30 μm) reduced the mean frequency of spontaneous miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) without affecting their mean amplitude, and the DA-induced effect on the mEPSCs was dependent on the external Ca2+ concentration. These results suggest that afferent glutamatergic fibres which terminate on VTA dopaminergic neurones possess presynaptic D2-like receptors, activation of which inhibits glutamate release by reducing Ca2+ influx. PMID:10673553

  1. Post-synaptic conductance increase associated with presynaptic inhibition in cat lumbar motoneurones.

    PubMed Central

    Carlen, P L; Werman, R; Yaari, Y

    1980-01-01

    1. Motoneurones were examined in which low-intensity p.b.s.t conditioning volleys caused a 5% or greater decrease of gastrocnemius monosynaptic e.p.s.p.s without evidence of long-lasting i.p.s.p.s on superimposed single sweeps. 2. Short constant current pulses were injected into these cells and in twenty-two of twenty-three cases the voltage decay was faster when preceded by the same p.b.s.t. conditioning stimuli which caused a decrease in the Ia e.p.s.p. 3. Comparing these decays to short pulse decays generated in a simple analogue neurone model suggested that after conditioning stimuli a tonic conductance increase had occurred which was located electrotonically remote from the soma in some cases or more diffusely in other cases. 4. Long-lasting i.p.s.p.s were brought out by averaging the baseline following conditioning stimuli in ten of fifteen cases, also suggesting a post-synaptic conductance increase. 5. Averaging the voltage response to long saturating constant current pulses showed a decreased motoneurone input resistance in three of eight cases. 6. The semilogarithmic decay of four of eleven conditioned e.p.s.p.s was more rapid than controls. 7. Although short pulse voltage decay analysis revealed consistent evidence for increased post-synaptic conductance following conditioning stimuli, it was not possible to decide if the location and extent of this conductance increase were sufficient to rule out presynaptic inhibition. PMID:7359439

  2. Vesicular zinc promotes presynaptic and inhibits postsynaptic long term potentiation of mossy fiber-CA3 synapse

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Enhui; Zhang, Xiao-an; Huang, Zhen; Krezel, Artur; Zhao, Min; Tin-berg, Christine E.; Lippard, Stephen J.; McNamara, James O.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of zinc in glutamatergic synaptic vesicles of excitatory neurons of mammalian cerebral cortex suggests that zinc might regulate plasticity of synapses formed by these neurons. Long term potentiation (LTP) is a form of synaptic plasticity that may underlie learning and memory. We tested the hypothesis that zinc within vesicles of mossy fibers (mf) contributes to mf-LTP, a classical form of presynaptic LTP. We synthesized an extracellular zinc chelator with selectivity and kinetic properties suitable for study of the large transient of zinc in the synaptic cleft induced by mf stimulation. We found that vesicular zinc is required for presynaptic mf-LTP. Unexpectedly, vesicular zinc also inhibits a novel form of postsynaptic mf-LTP. Because the mf-CA3 synapse provides a major source of excitatory input to the hippocampus, regulating its efficacy by these dual actions of vesicular zinc is critical to proper function of hippocampal circuitry in health and disease. PMID:21943607

  3. Presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferents does not vary with center of pressure displacements during upright standing.

    PubMed

    Johannsson, J; Duchateau, J; Baudry, S

    2015-07-01

    The present work was designed to investigate the presynaptic modulation of soleus Ia afferents with the position and the direction of the displacement of the center of pressure (CoP) during unperturbed upright standing and exaggerated CoP displacements in young adults. Hoffmann (H) reflex was evoked in the soleus by stimulating the tibial nerve at the knee level. Modulation of Ia presynaptic inhibition was assessed by conditioning the H reflex with fibular nerve (D1 inhibition) and femoral nerve (heteronymous facilitation) stimulation. Leg muscle activity was assessed by electromyography (EMG). The results indicate that in unperturbed standing and exaggerated CoP displacements, the H-reflex amplitude was greater during forward than backward CoP direction (p<0.05). However, the amplitude of the conditioned H reflex (expressed relative to unconditioned H reflex) did not vary with CoP displacement, regardless of the experimental condition. The soleus EMG was greater during forward than backward CoP direction and during anterior than posterior position in both experimental conditions (p<0.05). The modulation of the unconditioned H reflex with CoP direction was positively associated with the corresponding changes in soleus EMG (r(2)>0.34). The tibialis anterior EMG did not change during unperturbed standing, but was greater for backward than forward CoP direction during exaggerated CoP displacements. In this experimental condition, soleus EMG was negatively associated with tibialis anterior EMG (r(2)=0.81). These results indicate that Ia presynaptic inhibition is not modulated with CoP direction and position, but rather suggest that CoP displacements induced changes in excitability of the soleus motor neuron pool. PMID:25869621

  4. Differential effects of acidosis, high potassium concentrations, and metabolic inhibition on noradrenaline release and its presynaptic muscarinic regulation.

    PubMed

    Haunstetter, Armin; Schulze Icking, Babette; Backs, Johannes; Krüger, Carsten; Haass, Markus

    2002-03-01

    It was the aim of the present study to characterize the effect of single components of ischaemia, such as inhibition of aerobic and anaerobic energy production by combined anoxic and glucose-free perfusion (metabolic inhibition), high extracellular potassium concentrations (hyperkalaemia), and acidosis, on (1). the stimulated release of noradrenaline from the in situ perfused guinea-pig heart and (2). its presynaptic modulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The release of endogenous noradrenaline from efferent cardiac sympathetic nerve endings was induced by electrical stimulation of the left stellate ganglion (1 min, 5 V, 12 Hz) and quantified in the coronary venous effluent by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions, two consecutive electrical stimulations (S1, S2) elicited a similar noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.98 plus minus 0.05). After 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia overflow of endogenous noradrenaline was significantly reduced (S2/S1: 0.18 plus minus 0.03; P< 0.05). When studied separately, metabolic inhibition, hyperkalaemia (16 mM), and acidosis (pH 6.0) each markedly attenuated stimulated noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.65 plus minus 0.05, 0.43 plus minus 0.14, and 0.37 plus minus 0.09, respectively; P< 0.05). The muscarinic agonist carbachol (10 microM) inhibited stimulated noradrenaline release under normoxic conditions (S2/S1: 0.41 plus minus 0.07; P< 0.05). However, after 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia the inhibitory effect of carbachol on noradrenaline overflow was completely lost. Single components of ischaemia had a differential effect on presynaptic muscarinic modulation. Whereas hyperkalaemia (8-16 mM) did not affect muscarinic inhibition of noradrenaline release, carbachol lost its inhibitory effect during acidosis and metabolic inhibition. In conclusion, hyperkalaemia, metabolic inhibition, and severe acidosis each contribute to reduced overflow of noradrenaline after 10 min of myocardial

  5. Membrane resistance and shunting inhibition: where biophysics meets state-dependent human neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Walter; Rothwell, John C

    2016-05-15

    Activation of neurons not only changes their membrane potential and firing rate but as a secondary action reduces membrane resistance. This loss of resistance, or increase of conductance, may be of central importance in non-invasive magnetic or electric stimulation of the human brain since electrical fields cause larger changes in transmembrane voltage in resting neurons with low membrane conductances than in active neurons with high conductance. This may explain why both the immediate effects and after-effects of brain stimulation are smaller or even reversed during voluntary activity compared with rest. Membrane conductance is also increased during shunting inhibition, which accompanies the classic GABAA IPSP. This short-circuits nearby EPSPs and is suggested here to contribute to the magnitude and time course of short-interval intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation. PMID:26940751

  6. Involvement of multiple µ-opioid receptor subtypes on the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Takagi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Chizuko; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Sato, Takumi; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of the μ-opioid receptor subtypes on the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission was characterized in ddY mice using endomorphins. Intrathecal treatment with capsaicin, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) or substance P elicited characteristic nociceptive behaviors that consisted primarily of vigorous biting and/or licking with some scratching. Intrathecal co-administration of endogenous μ-opioid peptide endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2 resulted in a potent antinociceptive effect against the nociceptive behaviors induced by capsaicin, NMDA or substance P, which was eliminated by i.t. co-administration of the μ-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP). The antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-1 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of the μ2-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-D-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (D-Pro2-endomorphin-1) but not the μ1-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-D-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (D-Pro2-endomorphin-2) on capsaicin- or NMDA-elicited nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, the antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-2 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of D-Pro2-endomorphin-2 but not D-Pro2-endomorphin-1 on capsaicin-, NMDA- or substance P-elicited nociceptive behaviors. Interestingly, regarding substance P-elicited nociceptive behaviors, the antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-1 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of another μ2-opioid receptor antagonist, Tyr-D-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2 (D-Pro2-Tyr-W-MIF-1), but not D-Pro2-endomorphin-1 or D-Pro2-endomorphin-2. The present results suggest that the multiple μ-opioid receptor subtypes are involved in the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission. PMID:24512946

  7. State-dependent inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels by a novel peptide toxin.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew D; Thompson, Christopher H; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Freeman, Cody S; Schay, Eszter; Szakács, Gergely; Bakos, Eva; Sarkadi, Balázs; McMaster, Denis; French, Robert J; Pohl, Jan; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A

    2007-12-28

    Peptide toxins from animal venom have been used for many years for the identification and study of cation-permeable ion channels. However, no peptide toxins have been identified that interact with known anion-selective channels, including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the protein defective in cystic fibrosis and a member of the ABC transporter superfamily. Here, we describe the identification and initial characterization of a novel 3.7-kDa peptide toxin, GaTx1, which is a potent and reversible inhibitor of CFTR, acting from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Thus, GaTx1 is the first peptide toxin identified that inhibits a chloride channel of known molecular identity. GaTx1 exhibited high specificity, showing no effect on a panel of nine transport proteins, including Cl(-) and K(+) channels, and ABC transporters. GaTx1-mediated inhibition of CFTR channel activity is strongly state-dependent; both potency and efficacy are reduced under conditions of elevated [ATP], suggesting that GaTx1 may function as a non-competitive inhibitor of ATP-dependent channel gating. This tool will allow the application of new quantitative approaches to study CFTR structure and function, particularly with respect to the conformational changes that underlie transitions between open and closed states. PMID:17951250

  8. Presynaptic inhibition upon CB1 or mGlu2/3 receptor activation requires ERK/MAPK phosphorylation of Munc18-1.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Sabine K; King, Cillian; Kortleven, Christian; Huson, Vincent; Kroon, Tim; Kevenaar, Josta T; Schut, Desiree; Saarloos, Ingrid; Hoetjes, Joost P; de Wit, Heidi; Stiedl, Oliver; Spijker, Sabine; Li, Ka Wan; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Cornelisse, Lennart Niels; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2016-06-01

    Presynaptic cannabinoid (CB1R) and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) regulate synaptic strength by inhibiting secretion. Here, we reveal a presynaptic inhibitory pathway activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) that mediates CB1R- and mGluR2/3-induced secretion inhibition. This pathway is triggered by a variety of events, from foot shock-induced stress to intense neuronal activity, and induces phosphorylation of the presynaptic protein Munc18-1. Mimicking constitutive phosphorylation of Munc18-1 results in a drastic decrease in synaptic transmission. ERK-mediated phosphorylation of Munc18-1 ultimately leads to degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Conversely, preventing ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation increases synaptic strength. CB1R- and mGluR2/3-induced synaptic inhibition and depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) are reduced upon ERK/MEK pathway inhibition and further reduced when ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation is blocked. Thus, ERK-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation provides a major negative feedback loop to control synaptic strength upon activation of presynaptic receptors and during intense neuronal activity. PMID:27056679

  9. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  10. Proton-mediated feedback inhibition of presynaptic calcium channels at the cone photoreceptor synapse.

    PubMed

    Vessey, John P; Stratis, Anna K; Daniels, Bryan A; Da Silva, Noel; Jonz, Michael G; Lalonde, Melanie R; Baldridge, William H; Barnes, Steven

    2005-04-20

    Generation of center-surround antagonistic receptive fields in the outer retina occurs via inhibitory feedback modulation of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels in cone photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Both conventional and unconventional neurotransmitters, as well as an ephaptic effect, have been proposed, but the intercellular messaging that mediates the inhibitory feedback signal from postsynaptic horizontal cells (HCs) to cones remains unknown. We examined the possibility that proton concentration in the synaptic cleft is regulated by HCs and that it carries the feedback signal to cones. In isolated, dark-adapted goldfish retina, we assessed feedback in the responses of HCs to light and found that strengthened pH buffering reduced both rollback and the depolarization to red light. In zebrafish retinal slices loaded with Fluo-4, depolarization with elevated K(+) increased Ca signals in the synaptic terminals of cone photoreceptors. Kainic acid, which depolarizes HCs but has no direct effect on cones, depressed the K(+)-induced Ca signal, whereas CNQX, which hyperpolarizes HCs, increased the Ca signals, suggesting that polarization of HCs alters inhibitory feedback to cones. We found that these feedback signals were blocked by elevated extracellular pH buffering, as well as amiloride and divalent cations. Voltage clamp of isolated HCs revealed an amiloride-sensitive conductance that could mediate modulation of cleft pH dependent on the membrane potential of these postsynaptic cells. PMID:15843613

  11. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  12. Pre-Synaptic Inhibition of Afferent Feedback in the Macaque Spinal Cord Does Not Modulate with Cycles of Peripheral Oscillations Around 10 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Ferran; Baker, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal interneurons are partially phase-locked to physiological tremor around 10 Hz. The phase of spinal interneuron activity is approximately opposite to descending drive to motoneurons, leading to partial phase cancellation and tremor reduction. Pre-synaptic inhibition of afferent feedback modulates during voluntary movements, but it is not known whether it tracks more rapid fluctuations in motor output such as during tremor. In this study, dorsal root potentials (DRPs) were recorded from the C8 and T1 roots in two macaque monkeys following intra-spinal micro-stimulation (random inter-stimulus interval 1.5–2.5 s, 30–100 μA), whilst the animals performed an index finger flexion task which elicited peripheral oscillations around 10 Hz. Forty one responses were identified with latency < 5 ms; these were narrow (mean width 0.59 ms), and likely resulted from antidromic activation of afferents following stimulation near terminals. Significant modulation during task performance occurred in 16/41 responses, reflecting terminal excitability changes generated by pre-synaptic inhibition (Wall's excitability test). Stimuli falling during large-amplitude 8–12 Hz oscillations in finger acceleration were extracted, and sub-averages of DRPs constructed for stimuli delivered at different oscillation phases. Although some apparent phase-dependent modulation was seen, this was not above the level expected by chance. We conclude that, although terminal excitability reflecting pre-synaptic inhibition of afferents modulates over the timescale of a voluntary movement, it does not follow more rapid changes in motor output. This suggests that pre-synaptic inhibition is not part of the spinal systems for tremor reduction described previously, and that it plays a role in overall—but not moment-by-moment—regulation of feedback gain. PMID:26635536

  13. Circuit Motifs for Contrast-Adaptive Differentiation in Early Sensory Systems: The Role of Presynaptic Inhibition and Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J.

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems. PMID:25723493

  14. Modulation of GABAergic inhibition in the rat superior colliculus by a presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Neale, S A; Salt, T E

    2006-12-01

    Previous work has indicated that metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) modulate visual responses of superior colliculus (SC) neurones in vivo in a variety of ways, in a manner that can be dependent upon visual stimulus properties. How this occurs remains unclear. In this study we aimed to determine how activation of mGluR2 and mGluR3 receptors (Group II) might modulate visual responses, by using field potential and whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques in rat SC slice. Stimulation within the superficial layers of the SC, in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, evoked IPSCs that were blocked by bicuculline indicating that they are mediated via GABAA receptors. It is likely that these IPSCs were of heterogeneous origin as they showed substantial variation in paired-pulse behaviour. Nevertheless, activation of Group II mGluRs with the group-selective agonist LY354740 (300 nM, bath application) resulted in a reduction of these IPSCs (to 56% of control amplitude), and this was associated with a decrease in paired-pulse depression. At the same concentration, LY354740 did not reduce the EPSC or field-EPSP evoked by stimulation of the retinal input to the SC. The effects of LY354740 on IPSCs were not mimicked by the mGluR3-selective agonist N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG, 200-500 microM). Stimulation of IPSCs with trains of impulses (10 at 20 Hz) in order to mimic natural activation patterns resulted in sequences of IPSCs that were reduced in amplitude towards the end of the stimulus train. Application of the Group II antagonist LY341495 (100 nM) under these conditions resulted in an increase in later IPSCs in a third of neurones tested. These findings indicate that mGluR2 (but not mGluR3) can selectively modulate GABAergic inhibition in SC, probably via a presynaptic mechanism. Furthermore, these receptors may be activated by synaptically released transmitter during patterns of activation similar to those seen during visual processing

  15. Nocistatin inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine release in the mouse neocortex via presynaptic Gi/o protein linked pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fantin, M; Fischetti, C; Trapella, C; Morari, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nocistatin (NST) is a neuropeptide generated from cleavage of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) precursor. Evidence has been presented that NST acts as a functional antagonist of N/OFQ, although NST receptor and transduction pathways have not yet been identified. We previously showed that N/OFQ inhibited [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5-HT) release from mouse cortical synaptosomes via activation of NOP receptors. We now investigate whether NST regulates [3H]5-HT release in the same preparation. Experimental approach: Mouse and rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes in superfusion, preloaded with [3H]5-HT and stimulated with 1 min pulses of 10 mM KCl, were used. Key results: Bovine NST (b-NST) inhibited the K+-induced [3H]5-HT release, displaying similar efficacy but lower potency than N/OFQ. b-NST action underwent concentration-dependent and time-dependent desensitization, and was not prevented either by the NOP receptor antagonist [Nphe1 Arg14,Lys15]N/OFQ(1-13)-NH2 (UFP-101) or by the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Contrary to N/OFQ, b-NST reduced [3H]5-HT release from synaptosomes obtained from NOP receptor knockout mice. However, both N/OFQ and NST were ineffective in synaptosomes pre-treated with the Gi/o protein inhibitor, Pertussis toxin. NST-N/OFQ interactions were also investigated. Co-application of maximal concentrations of both peptides did not result in additive effects, whereas pre-application of maximal b-NST concentrations partially attenuated N/OFQ inhibition. Conclusions and implications: We conclude that b-NST inhibits [3H]5-HT release via activation of Gi/o protein linked pathways, not involving classical opioid receptors and the NOP receptor. The present data strengthen the view that b-NST is, per se, a biologically active peptide endowed with agonist activity. PMID:17618307

  16. Serotonin 5-HT1B receptor-mediated calcium influx-independent presynaptic inhibition of GABA release onto rat basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Nishijo, Takuma; Momiyama, Toshihiko

    2016-07-01

    Modulatory roles of serotonin (5-HT) in GABAergic transmission onto basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were investigated, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the rat brain slices. GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were evoked by focal stimulation. Bath application of 5-HT (0.1-300 μm) reversibly suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Application of a 5-HT1B receptor agonist, CP93129, also suppressed the evoked IPSCs, whereas a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT had little effect on the evoked IPSCs amplitude. In the presence of NAS-181, a 5-HT1B receptor antagonist, 5-HT-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs was antagonised, whereas NAN-190, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist did not antagonise the 5-HT-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs. Bath application of 5-HT reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs without changing their amplitude distribution. The effect of 5-HT on miniature IPSCs remained unchanged when extracellular Ca(2+) was replaced by Mg(2+) . The paired-pulse ratio was increased by CP93129. In the presence of ω-CgTX, the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-Aga-TK, the P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, or SNX-482, the R-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, 5-HT could still inhibit the evoked IPSCs. 4-AP, a K(+) channel blocker, enhanced the evoked IPSCs, and CP93129 had no longer inhibitory effect in the presence of 4-AP. CP93129 increased the number of action potentials elicited by depolarising current pulses. These results suggest that activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors on the terminals of GABAergic afferents to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons inhibits GABA release in Ca(2+) influx-independent manner by modulation of K(+) channels, leading to enhancement of neuronal activities. PMID:27177433

  17. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy - Electroencephalography-Based Brain-State-Dependent Electrotherapy: A Computational Approach Based on Excitation-Inhibition Balance Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Snigdha; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy; Bapi, Raju Surampudi; Dutta, Anirban; Roy, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The poststroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG) and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE). In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation-inhibition (E-I) balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the poststroke individual brain state using online fNIRS-EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local E-I (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA), which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual "forward models" to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons, which can be captured with E-I-based brain models. Furthermore, E-I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing, which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review the evidence that shows how this local imbalance between E-I leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) resulting in large-scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Second, we show evidence how BSDE based on E-I balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment. Hence, computational neural mass model-based integration of neurostimulation with

  18. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy – Electroencephalography-Based Brain-State-Dependent Electrotherapy: A Computational Approach Based on Excitation–Inhibition Balance Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Dagar, Snigdha; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy; Bapi, Raju Surampudi; Dutta, Anirban; Roy, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The poststroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG) and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE). In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation–inhibition (E–I) balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the poststroke individual brain state using online fNIRS–EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local E–I (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA), which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual “forward models” to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons, which can be captured with E–I-based brain models. Furthermore, E–I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing, which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review the evidence that shows how this local imbalance between E–I leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (motor cortex and somatosensory cortex) resulting in large-scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Second, we show evidence how BSDE based on E–I balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment. Hence, computational neural mass model-based integration of

  19. Presynaptic Inhibition of Diverse Afferents to the Locus Coeruleus by Kappa Opiate Receptors: a Novel Mechanism for Regulating the Central Norepinephrine System

    PubMed Central

    Kreibich, Arati S.; Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Curtis, Andre L.; Ecke, Laurel; Chavkin, Charles; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.; Valentino, Rita J.

    2008-01-01

    The norepinephrine nucleus, locus coeruleus (LC), is activated by diverse stimuli and modulates arousal and behavioral strategies in response to these stimuli through its divergent efferent system. Afferents communicating information to the LC include excitatory amino acids (EAA), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and endogenous opioids acting at μ-opiate receptors. As the LC is also innervated by the endogenous κ-opiate receptor (κ-OR) ligand, dynorphin, and expresses κ-ORs, this study investigated κ-OR regulation of LC neuronal activity in rat. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed a prominent localization of κ-ORs in axon terminals in the LC that also contained either the vesicular glutamate transporter or CRF. Microinfusion of the κ-OR agonist, U50488, into the LC did not alter LC spontaneous discharge but attenuated phasic discharge evoked by stimuli that engage EAA afferents to the LC, including sciatic nerve stimulation and auditory stimuli and the tonic activation associated with opiate withdrawal. Inhibitory effects of the κ-OR agonist were not restricted to EAA afferents, as U50488 also attenuated tonic LC activation by hypotensive stress, an effect mediated by CRF afferents. Together, these results indicate that κ-ORs are poised to presynaptically inhibit diverse afferent signaling to the LC. This is a novel and potentially powerful means of regulating the LC-NE system that can impact on forebrain processing of stimuli and the organization of behavioral strategies in response to environmental stimuli. The results implicate κ-ORs as a novel target for alleviating symptoms of opiate withdrawal, stress-related disorders or disorders characterized by abnormal sensory responses, such as autism. PMID:18562623

  20. Cyfip1 Regulates Presynaptic Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Kuangfu; Harony-Nicolas, Hala; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations encompassing the gene encoding Cyfip1 have been associated with a variety of human diseases, including autism and schizophrenia. Here we show that juvenile mice hemizygous for Cyfip1 have altered presynaptic function, enhanced protein translation, and increased levels of F-actin. In developing hippocampus, reduced Cyfip1 levels serve to decrease paired pulse facilitation and increase miniature EPSC frequency without a change in amplitude. Higher-resolution examination shows these changes to be caused primarily by an increase in presynaptic terminal size and enhanced vesicle release probability. Short hairpin-mediated knockdown of Cyfip1 coupled with expression of mutant Cyfip1 proteins indicates that the presynaptic alterations are caused by dysregulation of the WAVE regulatory complex. Such dysregulation occurs downstream of Rac1 as acute exposure to Rac1 inhibitors rescues presynaptic responses in culture and in hippocampal slices. The data serve to highlight an early and essential role for Cyfip1 in the generation of normally functioning synapses and suggest a means by which changes in Cyfip1 levels could impact the generation of neural networks and contribute to abnormal and maladaptive behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Several developmental brain disorders have been associated with gene duplications and deletions that serve to increase or decrease levels of encoded proteins. Cyfip1 is one such protein, but the role it plays in brain development is poorly understood. We asked whether decreased Cyfip1 levels altered the function of developing synapses. The data show that synapses with reduced Cyfip1 are larger and release neurotransmitter more rapidly. These effects are due to Cyfip1's role in actin polymerization and are reversed by expression of a Cyfip1 mutant protein retaining actin regulatory function or by inhibiting Rac1. Thus, Cyfip1 has a more prominent early role regulating presynaptic activity during a stage of development when

  1. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  2. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  3. Excitement about inhibitory presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Vandael, David H F; Espinoza, Claudia; Jonas, Peter

    2015-03-18

    Based on extrapolation from excitatory synapses, it is often assumed that depletion of the releasable pool of synaptic vesicles is the main factor underlying depression at inhibitory synapses. In this issue of Neuron, using subcellular patch-clamp recording from inhibitory presynaptic terminals, Kawaguchi and Sakaba (2015) show that at Purkinje cell-deep cerebellar nuclei neuron synapses, changes in presynaptic action potential waveform substantially contribute to synaptic depression. PMID:25789750

  4. Synthetic Aβ oligomers (Aβ(1-42) globulomer) modulate presynaptic calcium currents: prevention of Aβ-induced synaptic deficits by calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Hermann, David; Mezler, Mario; Müller, Michaela K; Wicke, Karsten; Gross, Gerhard; Draguhn, Andreas; Bruehl, Claus; Nimmrich, Volker

    2013-02-28

    Alzheimer's disease is accompanied by increased brain levels of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers. It has been suggested that oligomers directly impair synaptic function, thereby causing cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease patients. Recently, it has been shown that synthetic Aβ oligomers directly modulate P/Q-type calcium channels, possibly leading to excitotoxic cascades and subsequent synaptic decline. Using whole-cell recordings we studied the modulation of recombinant presynaptic calcium channels in HEK293 cells after application of a stable Aβ oligomer preparation (Aβ1-42 globulomer). Aβ globulomer shifted the half-activation voltage of P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels to more hyperpolarized values (by 11.5 and 7.5 mV). Application of non-aggregated Aβ peptides had no effect. We then analyzed the potential of calcium channel blockers to prevent Aβ globulomer-induced synaptic decline in hippocampal slice cultures. Specific block of P/Q-type or N-type calcium channels with peptide toxins completely reversed Aβ globulomer-induced deficits in glutamatergic neurotransmission. Two state-dependent low molecular weight P/Q-type and N-type calcium channel blockers also protected neurons from Aβ-induced alterations. On the contrary, inhibition of L-type calcium channels failed to reverse the deficit. Our data show that Aβ globulomer directly modulates recombinant P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels in HEK293 cells. Block of presynaptic calcium channels with both state-dependent and state-independent modulators can reverse Aβ-induced functional deficits in synaptic transmission. These findings indicate that presynaptic calcium channel blockers may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23376566

  5. The actin cytoskeleton in presynaptic assembly.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jessica C; Stavoe, Andrea K H; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Dramatic morphogenetic processes underpin nearly every step of nervous system development, from initial neuronal migration and axon guidance to synaptogenesis. Underlying this morphogenesis are dynamic rearrangements of cytoskeletal architecture. Here we discuss the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in the development of presynaptic terminals, from the elaboration of terminal arbors to the recruitment of presynaptic vesicles and active zone components. The studies discussed here underscore the importance of actin regulation at every step in neuronal circuit assembly. PMID:23628914

  6. Presynaptic Mechanisms of Lead Neurotoxicity: Effects on Vesicular Release, Vesicle Clustering and Mitochondria Number

    PubMed Central

    McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Stanton, Patric K.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  7. Presynaptic mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity: effects on vesicular release, vesicle clustering and mitochondria number.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Guariglia, Sara R; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Stanton, Patric K; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  8. Bounds for state-dependent quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yongjian; Zhang Yongsheng; Guo Guangcan

    2002-11-01

    Due to the no-cloning theorem, the unknown quantum state can only be cloned approximately or exactly with some probability. There are two types of cloners: universal and state-dependent cloner. The optimal universal cloner has been found and can be viewed as a special state-dependent quantum cloner that has no information about the states. In this paper, we investigate the state-dependent cloning when the state set contains more than two states. We get some bounds of the global fidelity for these processes. This method is not dependent on the number of the states contained in the state set. It is also independent of the numbers of copying.

  9. How Addictive Drugs Disrupt Presynaptic Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle that unites addictive drugs appears to be that each enhances synaptic dopamine by means that dissociate it from normal behavioral control, so that they act to reinforce their own acquisition. This occurs via the modulation of synaptic mechanisms involved in learning, including enhanced excitation or disinhibition of dopamine neuron activity, blockade of dopamine reuptake, and altering the state of the presynaptic terminal to enhance evoked over basal transmission. Amphetamines offer an exception to such modulation in that they combine multiple effects to produce non-exocytic stimulation-independent release of neurotransmitter via reverse transport independent from normal presynaptic function. Questions on the molecular actions of addictive drugs, prominently including the actions of alcohol and solvents, remain unresolved, but their ability to co-opt normal presynaptic functions helps to explain why treatment for addiction has been challenging. PMID:21338876

  10. Homeostatic control of presynaptic neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Davis, Graeme W; Müller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the active properties of nerve and muscle cells are stabilized by homeostatic signaling systems. In organisms ranging from Drosophila to humans, neurons restore baseline function in the continued presence of destabilizing perturbations by rebalancing ion channel expression, modifying neurotransmitter receptor surface expression and trafficking, and modulating neurotransmitter release. This review focuses on the homeostatic modulation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release, termed presynaptic homeostasis. First, we highlight criteria that can be used to define a process as being under homeostatic control. Next, we review the remarkable conservation of presynaptic homeostasis at the Drosophila, mouse, and human neuromuscular junctions and emerging parallels at synaptic connections in the mammalian central nervous system. We then highlight recent progress identifying cellular and molecular mechanisms. We conclude by reviewing emerging parallels between the mechanisms of homeostatic signaling and genetic links to neurological disease. PMID:25386989

  11. Presynaptic calcium currents in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Steinberg, I Z; Walton, K

    1981-01-01

    A voltage clamp study has been performed in the presynaptic terminal of the squid stellate ganglion. After blockage of the voltage-dependent sodium and potassium conductances, an inward calcium current is demonstrated. Given a step-depolarization pulse, this voltage- and time-dependent conductance has an S-shaped onset. At the "break" of the voltage step, a rapid tail current is observed. From these results a kinetic model is generated which accounts for the experimental results and predicts for the time course and amplitude a possible calcium entry during presynaptic action potentials. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7225510

  12. State dependency of inhibitory control performance: an electrical neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    De Pretto, Michael; Sallard, Etienne; Spierer, Lucas

    2016-07-01

    Behavioral and brain responses to stimuli not only depend on their physical features but also on the individuals' neurocognitive states before stimuli onsets. While the influence of pre-stimulus fluctuations in brain activity on low-level perceptive processes is well established, the state dependency of high-order executive processes remains unclear. Using a classical inhibitory control Go/NoGo task, we examined whether and how fluctuations in the brain activity during the period preceding the stimuli triggering inhibition influenced inhibitory control performance. Seventeen participants completed the Go/NoGo task while 64-channel electroencephalogram was recorded. We compared the event-related potentials preceding the onset of the NoGo stimuli associated with inhibition failures false alarms (FA) vs. successful inhibition correct rejections (CR) with data-driven statistical analyses of global measures of the topography and strength of the scalp electric field. Distributed electrical source estimations were used to localize the origin of the event-related potentials modulations. We observed differences in the global field power of the event-related potentials (FA > CR) without concomitant topographic modulations over the 40 ms period immediately preceding NoGo stimuli. This result indicates that the same brain networks were engaged in the two conditions, but more strongly before FA than CR. Source estimations revealed that this effect followed from a higher activity before FA than CR within bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the right inferior parietal lobule. These findings suggest that uncontrolled quantitative variations in pre-stimulus activity within attentional and control brain networks influence inhibition performance. The present data thereby demonstrate the state dependency of cognitive processes of up to high-order executive levels. PMID:27116703

  13. Tau pathology-mediated presynaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Morfini, G; Buitrago, L; Ujlaki, G; Choi, S; Yu, E; Moreira, J E; Avila, J; Brady, S T; Pant, H; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R

    2016-06-14

    Brain tauopathies are characterized by abnormal processing of tau protein. While somatodendritic tau mislocalization has attracted considerable attention in tauopathies, the role of tau pathology in axonal transport, connectivity and related dysfunctions remains obscure. We have previously shown using the squid giant synapse that presynaptic microinjection of recombinant human tau protein (htau42) results in failure of synaptic transmission. Here, we evaluated molecular mechanisms mediating this effect. Thus, the initial event, observed after htau42 presynaptic injection, was an increase in transmitter release. This event was mediated by calcium release from intracellular stores and was followed by a reduction in evoked transmitter release. The effect of htau42 on synaptic transmission was recapitulated by a peptide comprising the phosphatase-activating domain of tau, suggesting activation of phosphotransferases. Accordingly, findings indicated that htau42-mediated toxicity involves the activities of both GSK3 and Cdk5 kinases. PMID:27012611

  14. Presynaptic Molecular Determinants of Quantal Size

    PubMed Central

    Takamori, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The quantal hypothesis for the release of neurotransmitters at the chemical synapse has gained wide acceptance since it was first worked out at the motor endplate in frog skeletal muscle in the 1950’s. Considering the morphological identification of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at the nerve terminals that appeared to be homogeneous in size, the hypothesis proposed that signal transduction at synapses is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters packed in SVs that are individually uniform in size; the amount of transmitter in a synaptic vesicle is called a quantum. Although quantal size—the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited by the release of neurotransmitters from a single vesicle—clearly depends on the number and sensitivity of the postsynaptic receptors, accumulating evidence has also indicated that the amount of neurotransmitters stored in SVs can be altered by various presynaptic factors. Here, I provide an overview of the concepts and underlying presynaptic molecular underpinnings that may regulate quantal size. PMID:26903855

  15. Sensory-Derived Glutamate Regulates Presynaptic Inhibitory Terminals in Mouse Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Mende, Michael; Fletcher, Emily V; Belluardo, Josephine L; Pierce, Joseph P; Bommareddy, Praveen K; Weinrich, Jarret A; Kabir, Zeeba D; Schierberl, Kathryn C; Pagiazitis, John G; Mendelsohn, Alana I; Francesconi, Anna; Edwards, Robert H; Milner, Teresa A; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; van Roessel, Peter J; Mentis, George Z; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2016-06-15

    Circuit function in the CNS relies on the balanced interplay of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic signaling. How neuronal activity influences synaptic differentiation to maintain such balance remains unclear. In the mouse spinal cord, a population of GABAergic interneurons, GABApre, forms synapses with the terminals of proprioceptive sensory neurons and controls information transfer at sensory-motor connections through presynaptic inhibition. We show that reducing sensory glutamate release results in decreased expression of GABA-synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 in GABApre terminals and decreased presynaptic inhibition. Glutamate directs GAD67 expression via the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1β on GABApre terminals and regulates GAD65 expression via autocrine influence on sensory terminal BDNF. We demonstrate that dual retrograde signals from sensory terminals operate hierarchically to direct the molecular differentiation of GABApre terminals and the efficacy of presynaptic inhibition. These retrograde signals comprise a feedback mechanism by which excitatory sensory activity drives GABAergic inhibition to maintain circuit homeostasis. PMID:27263971

  16. Presynaptic Kainate Receptor Activation Preserves Asynchronous GABA Release Despite the Reduction in Synchronous Release from Hippocampal CCK Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Michael I.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; McBain, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in mediated by a wide variety of different interneuron classes which are assumed to play different roles in network activity. Activation of presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) has been shown to reduce inhibitory transmission but the interneuron class(es) at which they act is only recently beginning to emerge. Using paired recordings we show that KAR activation causes a decrease in presynaptic release from CCK- but not PV-containing interneurons and that this decrease is observed when pyramidal cells, but not interneurons, are the postsynaptic target. We also show that although the synchronous release component is reduced, the barrage of asynchronous GABA release from CCK interneurons during sustained firing is unaffected by KAR activation. This indicates that presynaptic KARs preserve and act in concert with asynchronous release to switch CCK interneurons from a phasic inhibition mode to produce prolonged inhibition during periods of intense activity. PMID:20720128

  17. The Block of CFTR by Scorpion Venom is State-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Matthew D.; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A.

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) adenosine triphosphate-dependent chloride channels are expressed in epithelial cells and are associated with a number of genetic disorders, including cystic fibrosis. Venom of the scorpion Leirus quinquestriatus hebraeus reversibly inhibits CFTR when applied to its cytoplasmic surface. To examine the state-dependence of inhibition we recorded wild-type and mutant CFTR channel currents using inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes. Application of either venom or diphenylamine-2-carboxylate to channels that were either activated (open) or resting (closed) indicate primarily closed state-dependent inhibition of CFTR by venom, whereas diphenylamine-2-carboxylate showed no state-dependence of block. Efficacy of venom-mediated macroscopic current inhibition was inversely related to channel activity. Analysis of single-channel and macropatch data indicated that venom could either inhibit channel opening, if it binds during an interburst closed state or in the absence of cytosolic adenosine triphosphate, or introduce new intraburst closed states, if it binds during an open event. The on-rate of venom binding for intraburst block could be modulated by changing CFTR activity with vanadate or adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, or by introducing the Walker A mutation K1250A. These findings represent the first description of state-dependent inhibition of CFTR and suggest that the active toxin could be used as a tool to study the conformational changes that occur during CFTR gating. PMID:16183882

  18. The block of CFTR by scorpion venom is state-dependent.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew D; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2005-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) adenosine triphosphate-dependent chloride channels are expressed in epithelial cells and are associated with a number of genetic disorders, including cystic fibrosis. Venom of the scorpion Leirus quinquestriatus hebraeus reversibly inhibits CFTR when applied to its cytoplasmic surface. To examine the state-dependence of inhibition we recorded wild-type and mutant CFTR channel currents using inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes. Application of either venom or diphenylamine-2-carboxylate to channels that were either activated (open) or resting (closed) indicate primarily closed state-dependent inhibition of CFTR by venom, whereas diphenylamine-2-carboxylate showed no state-dependence of block. Efficacy of venom-mediated macroscopic current inhibition was inversely related to channel activity. Analysis of single-channel and macropatch data indicated that venom could either inhibit channel opening, if it binds during an interburst closed state or in the absence of cytosolic adenosine triphosphate, or introduce new intraburst closed states, if it binds during an open event. The on-rate of venom binding for intraburst block could be modulated by changing CFTR activity with vanadate or adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, or by introducing the Walker A mutation K1250A. These findings represent the first description of state-dependent inhibition of CFTR and suggest that the active toxin could be used as a tool to study the conformational changes that occur during CFTR gating. PMID:16183882

  19. On the Role of Glutamate in Presynaptic Development: Possible Contributions of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fedder, Karlie N.; Sabo, Shasta L.

    2015-01-01

    Proper formation and maturation of synapses during development is a crucial step in building the functional neural circuits that underlie perception and behavior. It is well established that experience modifies circuit development. Therefore, understanding how synapse formation is controlled by synaptic activity is a key question in neuroscience. In this review, we focus on the regulation of excitatory presynaptic terminal development by glutamate, the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. We discuss the evidence that NMDA receptor activation mediates these effects of glutamate and present the hypothesis that local activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) contributes to glutamate-dependent control of presynaptic development. Abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant synapse development are both thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding how glutamate signaling and synapse development are linked is important for understanding the etiology of these diseases. PMID:26694480

  20. On the Role of Glutamate in Presynaptic Development: Possible Contributions of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fedder, Karlie N; Sabo, Shasta L

    2015-01-01

    Proper formation and maturation of synapses during development is a crucial step in building the functional neural circuits that underlie perception and behavior. It is well established that experience modifies circuit development. Therefore, understanding how synapse formation is controlled by synaptic activity is a key question in neuroscience. In this review, we focus on the regulation of excitatory presynaptic terminal development by glutamate, the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. We discuss the evidence that NMDA receptor activation mediates these effects of glutamate and present the hypothesis that local activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) contributes to glutamate-dependent control of presynaptic development. Abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant synapse development are both thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding how glutamate signaling and synapse development are linked is important for understanding the etiology of these diseases. PMID:26694480

  1. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  2. CCL5-glutamate interaction in central nervous system: Early and acute presynaptic defects in EAE mice.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Merega, Elisa; Milanese, Marco; Summa, Maria; Casazza, Simona; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Pistoia, Vito; Uccelli, Antonio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the CCL5-glutamate interaction in the cortex and in the spinal cord from mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) at 13 and 21/30 days post immunization (d.p.i.), representing the onset and the peak of the disease, respectively. An early reduction of the KCl-evoked glutamate release was observed in cortical terminals from EAE mice at 13 d.p.i., persisting until 21/30 d.p.i. A concomitant reduction of the depolarization-evoked cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), but not of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) cortical production also occurred at 13 d.p.i, that still was detectable at the acute stage of disease (21 dp.i.). Inasmuch, the CCL5-mediated inhibition of glutamate exocytosis observed in control mice turned to facilitation in EAE mouse cortex at 13 d.p.i., then becoming undetectable at 21/30 d.p.i. Differently, glutamate exocytosis, as well as IP3 and cAMP productions were unaltered in spinal cord synaptosomes from EAE mice at 13 d.p.i., but significantly increased at 21/30 d.p.i., while the presynaptic CCL5-mediated facilitation of glutamate exocytosis observed in control mice remained unchanged. In both CNS regions, the presynaptic defects were parallelled by increased CCL5 availability. Inasmuch, the presynaptic defects so far described in EAE mice were reminiscent of the effects acute CCL5 exerts in control conditions. Based on these observations we propose that increased CCL5 bioavailability could have a role in determining the abovedescribed impaired presynaptic impairments in both CNS regions. These presynaptic defects could be relevant to the onset of early cognitive impairments and acute neuroinflammation and demyelinating processes observed in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:23958452

  3. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  4. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca(2+) influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  5. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  6. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  7. Resolving presynaptic structure by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Guy A; Jackson, Dakota R; Spirou, George A

    2015-05-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological, and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last 15 years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  8. Versican in the developing brain: lamina-specific expression in interneuronal subsets and role in presynaptic maturation.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Masahito; Sanes, Joshua R

    2005-09-14

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) of the extracellular matrix help stabilize synaptic connections in the postnatal brain and impede regeneration after injury. Here, we show that a CSPG of the lectican family, versican, also promotes presynaptic maturation in the developing brain. In the embryonic chick optic tectum, versican is expressed selectively by subsets of interneurons confined to the retinorecipient laminae, in which retinal axons arborize and form synapses. It is a major receptor for the Vicia villosa B4 lectin (VVA), shown previously to inhibit invasion of the retinorecipient lamina by retinal axons (Inoue and Sanes, 1997). In vitro, versican promotes enlargement of presynaptic varicosities in retinal axons. Depletion of versican in ovo, by RNA interference, results in retinal arbors with smaller than normal varicosities. We propose that versican provides a lamina-specific cue for presynaptic maturation and discuss the related but distinct effects of versican depletion and VVA blockade. PMID:16162928

  9. Presynaptic mechanisms of neuronal plasticity and their role in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Jochen C.; Semtner, Marcus; Winkelmann, Aline; Wolfart, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic communication requires constant adjustments of pre- and postsynaptic efficacies. In addition to synaptic long term plasticity, the presynaptic machinery underlies homeostatic regulations which prevent out of range transmitter release. In this minireview we will discuss the relevance of selected presynaptic mechanisms to epilepsy including voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels as well as cannabinoid and adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:24987332

  10. State-dependent control of breathing by the retrotrapezoid nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Peter GR; Kanbar, Roy; Basting, Tyler M; Hodges, Walter M; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-01

    Key points This study explores the state dependence of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex (HCVR). We simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity by activating or inhibiting the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) by optogenetics in conscious rats. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia increased both breathing frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. Optogenetic inhibition of RTN reduced VT in all sleep–wake states, but reduced fR only during quiet wake and non-REM sleep. RTN stimulation always increased VT but raised fR only in quiet wake and non-REM sleep. Phasic RTN stimulation produced active expiration and reduced early expiratory airflow (i.e. increased upper airway resistance) only during wake. We conclude that the HCVR is highly state-dependent. The HCVR is reduced during REM sleep because fR is no longer under chemoreceptor control and thus could explain why central sleep apnoea is less frequent in REM sleep. Abstract Breathing has different characteristics during quiet wake, non-REM or REM sleep, including variable dependence on . We investigated whether the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a proton-sensitive structure that mediates a large portion of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex, regulates breathing differently during sleep vs. wake. Electroencephalogram, neck electromyogram, blood pressure, respiratory frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) were recorded in 28 conscious adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Optogenetic stimulation of RTN with channelrhodopsin-2, or inhibition with archaerhodopsin, simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity. Both opsins were delivered with PRSX8-promoter-containing lentiviral vectors. RTN and catecholaminergic neurons were transduced. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia (3 or 6% ) increased both fR and VT whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. RTN

  11. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  12. State-dependent architecture of thalamic reticular sub-networks

    PubMed Central

    Halassa, Michael M.; Chen, Zhe; Wimmer, Ralf D.; Brunetti, Philip M.; Zhao, Shengli; Zikopoulos, Basilis; Wang, Fan; Brown, Emery N.; Wilson, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral state is known to influence interactions between thalamus and cortex, which are important for sensation, action and cognition. The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is hypothesized to regulate thalamo-cortical transmission, but the underlying functional architecture of this process and its state-dependence are unknown. By combining the first TRN ensemble recording with psychophysics and connectivity-based optogenetic tagging, we find that the TRN is composed of distinct sub-networks. While activity of limbic-projecting TRN neurons correlates with arousal, sensory-projecting neurons participate in spindles and show elevated synchrony by slow waves during sleep. Conversely, sensory-projecting neurons are suppressed by attentional states, demonstrating common microcircuit mechanisms of sensory processing in sleep and attention. Bidirectional manipulation of attentional performance was achieved through optogenetic manipulation of these TRN sub-networks. Our findings provide evidence for differential regulation of thalamic inhibition across brain states, suggesting that the TRN separately controls external stimulus processing and internally-generated computations, a basic determinant of cognitive function. PMID:25126786

  13. Blockade of presynaptic 4-aminopyridine-sensitive potassium channels increases initial neurotransmitter release probability, reinstates synaptic transmission altered by GABAB receptor activation in rat midbrain periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangying; Liu, Zhi-Liang; Zhang, Wei-Ning; Yang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor subtype B (GABAB) receptors in the midbrain ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) induces both postsynaptic and presynaptic inhibition. Whereas the postsynaptic inhibition is mediated by G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K channels, the presynaptic inhibition of neurotransmitter release is primarily mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels. Using whole-cell recordings from acute rat PAG slices, we report here that the bath application of 4-aminopyridine, a voltage-gated K channel blocker, increases the initial GABA and glutamate release probability (P) and reinstates P depressed by presynaptic GABAB receptor activation at inhibitory and excitatory synapses, respectively. However, Ba, which blocks G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K channels, does not produce similar effects. Our data suggest that the blockade of presynaptic 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K channels in vlPAG facilitates neurotransmitter release and reinstates synaptic transmission that has been altered by presynaptic GABAB receptor activation. Because vlPAG is involved in the descending pain control system, the present results may have potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26575285

  14. CSPα—chaperoning presynaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission relies on precisely regulated and exceedingly fast protein-protein interactions that involve voltage-gated channels, the exocytosis/endocytosis machinery as well as signaling pathways. Although we have gained an ever more detailed picture of synaptic architecture much remains to be learned about how synapses are maintained. Synaptic chaperones are “folding catalysts” that preserve proteostasis by regulating protein conformation (and therefore protein function) and prevent unwanted protein-protein interactions. Failure to maintain synapses is an early hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic vesicle protein and molecular chaperone that has a central role in preventing synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Over the past few years, a number of different “client proteins” have been implicated as CSPα substrates including voltage-dependent ion channels, signaling proteins and proteins critical to the synaptic vesicle cycle. Here we review the ion channels and synaptic protein complexes under the influence of CSPα and discuss gaps in our current knowledge. PMID:24808827

  15. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Jähne, Sebastian; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Helm, Martin S.

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  16. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  17. Postnatal development of GABAergic signalling in the rat lateral geniculate nucleus: presynaptic dendritic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Marie-Claude; Qin, Yi; Heggelund, Paul; Zhu, J Julius

    2003-01-01

    Diverse forms of GABAergic inhibition are found in the mature brain. To understand how this diversity develops, we studied the changes in morphology of inhibitory interneurons and changes in interneuron-mediated synaptic transmission in the rat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). We found a steady expansion of the dendritic tree of interneurons over the first three postnatal weeks. During this period, the area around a thalamocortical cell from which GABAA inhibition could be elicited also expanded. Dendritic branching and burst firing in interneurons evolved more slowly. The distal dendrites of interneurons began to branch extensively after the third week, and at the same time burst firing appeared. The appearance of burst firing and an elaborated dendritic tree were accompanied by a pronounced GABAB inhibition of thalamocortical cells. Thus, GABA inhibition of thalamocortical cells developed from one type of GABAA inhibition (spatially restricted) in the young animal into two distinct types of GABAA inhibition (short- and long-range) and GABAB inhibition in the adult animal. The close temporal relationships between the development of the diverse forms of inhibition and the postnatal changes in morphology of local GABAergic interneurons in the dLGN suggest that postnatal dendritic maturation is an important presynaptic factor for the developmental time course of the various types of feedforward inhibition in thalamus. PMID:12509484

  18. Heterogeneity of presynaptic proteins: do not forget isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Bragina, Luca; Fattorini, Giorgia; Giovedì, Silvia; Bosco, Federica; Benfenati, Fabio; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of presynaptic protein expression in glutamatergic and GABAergic central synapses performed in several laboratories and with different techniques is unveiling a complex scenario, largely because each presynaptic protein exists in several isoforms. The interpretation of these findings is generally based on the notion that each synapse and each synaptic vesicle contains one of the isoforms of each family of presynaptic proteins. We verified whether this interpretation is tenable by performing triple labeling and immunoisolation studies with the aim of detecting two isoforms of a given presynaptic protein in glutamatergic or GABAergic axon terminals and/or synaptic vesicles (SVs). Here, we show that: (1) the possibility that not all families of presynaptic proteins are expressed in all terminals must be taken into serious account; (2) the expression of a given protein isoform in a terminal does not exclude the expression of other isoforms of the same protein in the same terminal and in the same vesicle. These conclusions open new and interesting problems; their experimental analysis might improve our understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of central synapses. PMID:23382710

  19. Target-Specific Expression of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors in Neocortical Microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Katherine A.; Blackman, Arne V.; Moreau, Alexandre W.; Elgar, Dale; Costa, Rui P.; Lalanne, Txomin; Tudor Jones, Adam A.; Oyrer, Julia; Sjöström, P. Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Summary Traditionally, NMDA receptors are located postsynaptically; yet, putatively presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) have been reported. Although implicated in controlling synaptic plasticity, their function is not well understood and their expression patterns are debated. We demonstrate that, in layer 5 of developing mouse visual cortex, preNMDARs specifically control synaptic transmission at pyramidal cell inputs to other pyramidal cells and to Martinotti cells, while leaving those to basket cells unaffected. We also reveal a type of interneuron that mediates ascending inhibition. In agreement with synapse-specific expression, we find preNMDAR-mediated calcium signals in a subset of pyramidal cell terminals. A tuned network model predicts that preNMDARs specifically reroute information flow in local circuits during high-frequency firing, in particular by impacting frequency-dependent disynaptic inhibition mediated by Martinotti cells, a finding that we experimentally verify. We conclude that postsynaptic cell type determines presynaptic terminal molecular identity and that preNMDARs govern information processing in neocortical columns. PMID:22884329

  20. Strength and precision of neurotransmission at mammalian presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Classically, the basic concept of chemical synaptic transmission was established at the frog neuromuscular junction, and direct intracellular recordings from presynaptic terminals at the squid giant presynaptic terminal have further clarified principles of neurotransmitter release. More recently, whole-cell patch-camp recordings from the calyx of Held in rodent brainstem slices have extended the classical concept to mammalian synapses providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying strength and precision of neurotransmission and developmental changes therein. This review summarizes findings from our laboratory and others on these subjects, mainly at the calyx of Held, with a particular focus on precise, high-fidelity, fast neurotransmission. The mechanisms by which presynaptic terminals acquire strong, precise neurotransmission during postnatal development are also discussed. PMID:26194855

  1. Presence and functional significance of presynaptic ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Ron; Pattarini, Roberto; Geiger, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) mediated by sarcoplasmic reticulum resident ryanodine receptors (RyRs) has been well described in cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle. In brain, RyRs are localised primarily to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and have been demonstrated in postsynaptic entities, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes where they regulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), membrane potential and the activity of a variety of second messenger systems. Recently, the contribution of presynaptic RyRs and CICR to functions of central and peripheral presynaptic terminals, including neurotransmitter release, has received increased attention. However, there is no general agreement that RyRs are localised to presynaptic terminals, nor is it clear that RyRs regulate a large enough pool of intracellular Ca(2+) to be physiologically significant. Here, we review direct and indirect evidence that on balance favours the notion that ER and RyRs are found in presynaptic terminals and are physiologically significant. In so doing, it became obvious that some of the controversy originates from issues related to (i) the ability to demonstrate conclusively the physical presence of ER and RyRs, (ii) whether the biophysical properties of RyRs are such that they can contribute physiologically to regulation of presynaptic [Ca(2+)](i), (iii) how ER Ca(2+) load and feedback gain of CICR contributes to the ability to detect functionally relevant RyRs, (iv) the distance that Ca(2+) diffuses from plasma membranes to RyRs to trigger CICR and from RyRs to the Active Zone to enhance vesicle release, and (v) the experimental conditions used. The recognition that ER Ca(2+) stores are able to modulate local Ca(2+) levels and neurotransmitter release in presynaptic terminals will aid in the understanding of the cellular mechanisms controlling neuronal function. PMID:12880633

  2. Anti-epileptogenic and anticonvulsant activity of L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate, a presynaptic glutamate receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, A S; Attwell, P J; Singh Kent, N; Bradford, H F; Croucher, M J; Jane, D E

    1997-05-01

    The protective effect of amygdaloid (focally administered) doses of the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) was tested on the development of electrical kindling and in fully kindled animals. L-AP4 inhibited epileptogenesis at 10 nmol in 0.5 microl buffer, by preventing the increase in both seizure score and afterdischarge duration. The effects were reversible after withdrawal of the drug, with all treated animals subsequently progressing to the fully kindled state at the same rate as control animals. The same concentration of the drug was also effective when injected into fully kindled animals. It significantly decreased the mean seizure score by 88% (P < 0.005) and increased the mean generalized seizure threshold (GST) by 85% (P < 0.005). The increase in GST was accompanied by a significant delay before the onset of generalized seizure and by a 37% reduction in generalized seizure duration. MPPG ((RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenyl glycine) a selective antagonist of L-AP4 at glutamate pre-synaptic receptors inhibited the depressant effect of L-AP4 in a dose-dependent manner. MPPG (10 nmol) inhibited the antiseizure activity of L-AP4, whilst MPPG (40 nmol) reduced both the anti-epileptogenic and antiseizure activities of L-AP4. MPPG (40 nmol) by itself had no effect on generalized seizure activity, and it had no detectable influence on the normal rate of kindled epileptogenesis. During in vitro studies using a microsuperfusion method, L-AP4 inhibited depolarization-induced release of [3H]D-aspartate from rat cortical synaptosomes (IC50 125.1 microM) and decreased the depolarization-evoked uptake of 45Ca2+ in a dose-dependent manner. Both actions of L-AP4 were reduced by the selective antagonist MPPG. When applied alone MPPG (200 microM) had no detectable action on veratridine-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake by the synaptosomes. These results suggest the mechanisms by which presynaptically active glutamate receptor

  3. Activation of presynaptic glycine receptors facilitates glycine release from presynaptic terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Jang, Il-Sung; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Akaike, Norio

    2003-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Here we report the novel finding that presynaptic glycine autoreceptors modulate release from terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) neurons. In mechanically dissociated SDCN neurons, in which functional presynaptic nerve terminals remain adherent to the isolated neurons, exogenously applied glycine (3 μM) increased the frequency of glycinergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) without affecting their amplitudes or decay times. This suggests that glycine acts presynaptically to increase glycine release probability. Picrotoxin, at a concentration that had little direct effect on sIPSC frequency and amplitude (30 μM), significantly attenuated glycine-induced presynaptic sIPSC facilitation. The glycine-induced sIPSC frequency facilitation was completely abolished either in a Ca2+-free external solution or in the presence of 100 μM Cd2+, suggesting the involvement of extracellular Ca2+ influx into the nerve terminals. The glycine action was also completely occluded in the presence of 300 nM tetrodotoxin. In recordings from SDCN neurons in spinal cord slices, glycine (10 μM) increased evoked IPSC (eIPSC) amplitude and decreased the extent of paired-pulse facilitation. In response to brief high frequency stimulus trains the eIPSCs displayed a profound frequency-dependent facilitation that was greatly reduced by picrotoxin (30 μM). These results indicate that glycine acts at presynaptic autoreceptors, causing depolarization of the glycinergic nerve terminals, the subsequent activation of voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels, and facilitation of glycine release. Furthermore, this presynaptic facilitation was observed under more physiological conditions, suggesting that these glycinergic autoreceptors may contribute to the integration of local inhibitory inputs to SDCN neurons. PMID:12754315

  4. Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  5. Control of autophagosome axonal retrograde flux by presynaptic activity unveiled using botulinum neurotoxin type a.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B; Mavlyutov, Timur A; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R; Cooper-White, Justin J; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2015-04-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  6. Encoding-Imagery Specificity in Alcohol State-Dependent Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Herbert; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A free-recall procedure demonstrated state-dependent learning using alcohol. Information encoded and stored while intoxicated was more effectively retrieved when later tests of recall were performed while intoxicated, as compared to recall accomplished in the sober state. (Editor/RK)

  7. Astrocytes regulate heterogeneity of presynaptic strengths in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Mathieu; Park, Yun Kyung; Chater, Thomas E; Chipman, Peter H; Gautam, Sunita Ghimire; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Goda, Yukiko

    2016-05-10

    Dendrites are neuronal structures specialized for receiving and processing information through their many synaptic inputs. How input strengths are modified across dendrites in ways that are crucial for synaptic integration and plasticity remains unclear. We examined in single hippocampal neurons the mechanism of heterosynaptic interactions and the heterogeneity of synaptic strengths of pyramidal cell inputs. Heterosynaptic presynaptic plasticity that counterbalances input strengths requires N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and astrocytes. Importantly, this mechanism is shared with the mechanism for maintaining highly heterogeneous basal presynaptic strengths, which requires astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling involving NMDAR activation, astrocyte membrane depolarization, and L-type Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular infusion of NMDARs or Ca(2+)-channel blockers into astrocytes, conditionally ablating the GluN1 NMDAR subunit, or optogenetically hyperpolarizing astrocytes with archaerhodopsin promotes homogenization of convergent presynaptic inputs. Our findings support the presence of an astrocyte-dependent cellular mechanism that enhances the heterogeneity of presynaptic strengths of convergent connections, which may help boost the computational power of dendrites. PMID:27118849

  8. Expression of GluK1c underlies the developmental switch in presynaptic kainate receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Vesikansa, Aino; Sakha, Prasanna; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Molchanova, Svetlana; Rivera, Claudio; Huttunen, Henri J.; Rauvala, Heikki; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E.

    2012-01-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via multiple mechanisms, depending on their subunit composition. Presynaptic KARs tonically depress glutamatergic transmission during restricted period of synapse development; however, the molecular basis behind this effect is unknown. Here, we show that the developmental and cell-type specific expression pattern of a KAR subunit splice variant, GluK1c, corresponds to the immature-type KAR activity in the hippocampus. GluK1c localizes to dendritic contact sites at distal axons, the distal targeting being promoted by heteromerization with the subunit GluK4. Presynaptic expression of GluK1c strongly suppresses glutamatergic transmission in cell-pairs in vitro and mimics the immature-type KAR activity at CA3-CA1 synapses in vivo, at a developmental stage when the endogenous expression is already downregulated. These data support a central role for GluK1c in mediating tonic inhibition of glutamate release and the consequent effects on excitability and activity-dependent fine-tuning of the developing hippocampal circuitry. PMID:22413061

  9. Expression of GluK1c underlies the developmental switch in presynaptic kainate receptor function.

    PubMed

    Vesikansa, Aino; Sakha, Prasanna; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Molchanova, Svetlana; Rivera, Claudio; Huttunen, Henri J; Rauvala, Heikki; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2012-01-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via multiple mechanisms, depending on their subunit composition. Presynaptic KARs tonically depress glutamatergic transmission during restricted period of synapse development; however, the molecular basis behind this effect is unknown. Here, we show that the developmental and cell-type specific expression pattern of a KAR subunit splice variant, GluK1c, corresponds to the immature-type KAR activity in the hippocampus. GluK1c localizes to dendritic contact sites at distal axons, the distal targeting being promoted by heteromerization with the subunit GluK4. Presynaptic expression of GluK1c strongly suppresses glutamatergic transmission in cell-pairs in vitro and mimics the immature-type KAR activity at CA3-CA1 synapses in vivo, at a developmental stage when the endogenous expression is already downregulated. These data support a central role for GluK1c in mediating tonic inhibition of glutamate release and the consequent effects on excitability and activity-dependent fine-tuning of the developing hippocampal circuitry. PMID:22413061

  10. Presynaptic kainate receptor facilitation of glutamate release involves protein kinase A in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio; Sihra, Talvinder S

    2004-01-01

    We have explored the mechanisms involved in the facilitation of glutamate release mediated by the activation of kainate receptors in the rat hippocampus using isolated nerve terminal (synaptosome) and slice preparations. In hippocampal nerve terminals, kainate (KA) produced an increase of glutamate release at concentrations of agonist ranging from 10 to 1000 μm. In hippocampal slices, KA at low nanomolar concentrations (20–50 nm) also produced an increase of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) at mossy fibre–CA3 synapses. In both, synaptosomes and slices, the effect of KA was antagonized by CNQX, and persisted after pretreatment with a cocktail of antagonists for other receptors whose activation could potentially have produced facilitation of release. These data indicate that the facilitation of glutamate release observed is mediated by the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors of the kainate type. Mechanistically, the observed effects of KA appear to be the same in synaptosomal and slice preparations. Thus, the effect of KA on glutamate release and mossy fibre–CA3 synaptic transmission was occluded by the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin and suppressed by the inhibition of protein kinase A by H-89 or Rp-Br-cAMP. We conclude that kainate receptors present at presynaptic terminals in the rat hippocampus mediate the facilitation of glutamate release through a mechanism involving the activation of an adenylyl cyclase–second messenger cAMP–protein kinase A signalling cascade. PMID:15107475

  11. State-dependent neutral delay equations from population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Barbarossa, M V; Hadeler, K P; Kuttler, C

    2014-10-01

    A novel class of state-dependent delay equations is derived from the balance laws of age-structured population dynamics, assuming that birth rates and death rates, as functions of age, are piece-wise constant and that the length of the juvenile phase depends on the total adult population size. The resulting class of equations includes also neutral delay equations. All these equations are very different from the standard delay equations with state-dependent delay since the balance laws require non-linear correction factors. These equations can be written as systems for two variables consisting of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) and a generalized shift, a form suitable for numerical calculations. It is shown that the neutral equation (and the corresponding ODE--shift system) is a limiting case of a system of two standard delay equations. PMID:25117688

  12. State-dependent control of lumbar motoneurons by the hypocretinergic system.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, Jack; Fung, Simon J; Xi, Mingchu; Chase, Michael H

    2010-02-01

    Neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) that synthesize hypocretins (Hcrt-1 and Hcrt-2) are active during wakefulness and excite lumbar motoneurons. Because hypocretinergic cells also discharge during phasic periods of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, we sought to examine their action on the activity of motoneurons during this state. Accordingly, cat lumbar motoneurons were intracellularly recorded, under alpha-chloralose anesthesia, prior to (control) and during the carbachol-induced REM sleep-like atonia (REMc). During control conditions, LH stimulation induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials (composite EPSP) in motoneurons. In contrast, during REMc, identical LH stimulation induced inhibitory PSPs in motoneurons. We then tested the effects of LH stimulation on motoneuron responses following the stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) which is part of a brainstem-spinal cord system that controls motoneuron excitability in a state-dependent manner. LH stimulation facilitated NRGc stimulation-induced composite EPSP during control conditions whereas it enhanced NRGc stimulation-induced IPSPs during REMc. These intriguing data indicate that the LH exerts a state-dependent control of motor activity. As a first step to understand these results, we examined whether hypocretinergic synaptic mechanisms in the spinal cord were state dependent. We found that the juxtacellular application of Hcrt-1 induced motoneuron excitation during control conditions whereas motoneuron inhibition was enhanced during REMc. These data indicate that the hypocretinergic system acts on motoneurons in a state-dependent manner via spinal synaptic mechanisms. Thus, deficits in Hcrt-1 may cause the coexistence of incongruous motor signs in cataplectic patients, such as motor suppression during wakefulness and movement disorders during REM sleep. PMID:19962375

  13. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory. PMID:27089282

  14. State dependence of Rydberg interaction-induced collisional loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhigang; Zhao, Kejia; Miao, Jingyuan; Li, Difei; Yang, Zhijun; Wu, Zhaochun; He, Zhao; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    We present a simple analytical formula from an existing theoretical model and theoretically investigate in detail the state dependence of interaction-induced collisional loss rate coefficients, and the various parameter effects on collisional loss rate. We also investigate the different mechanisms and corresponding effects on collisional loss by analyzing our previous experimental results using the present formula, and even investigate the time evolution of Rydberg atom number for different Rydberg states.

  15. Risk, resources and state-dependent adaptive behavioural syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Luttbeg, Barney; Sih, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Many animals exhibit behavioural syndromes—consistent individual differences in behaviour across two or more contexts or situations. Here, we present adaptive, state-dependent mathematical models for analysing issues about behavioural syndromes. We find that asset protection (where individuals with more ‘assets’ tend be more cautious) and starvation avoidance, two state-dependent mechanisms, can explain short-term behavioural consistency, but not long-term stable behavioural types (BTs). These negative-feedback mechanisms tend to produce convergence in state and behaviour over time. In contrast, a positive-feedback mechanism, state-dependent safety (where individuals with higher energy reserves, size, condition or vigour are better at coping with predators), can explain stable differences in personality over the long term. The relative importance of negative- and positive-feedback mechanisms in governing behavioural consistency depends on environmental conditions (predation risk and resource availability). Behavioural syndromes emerge more readily in conditions of intermediate ecological favourability (e.g. medium risk and medium resources, or high risk and resources, or low risk and resources). Under these conditions, individuals with higher initial state maintain a tendency to be bolder than individuals that start with low initial state; i.e. later BT is determined by state during an early ‘developmental window’. In contrast, when conditions are highly favourable (low risk, high resources) or highly unfavourable (high risk, low resources), individuals converge to be all relatively bold or all relatively cautious, respectively. In those circumstances, initial differences in BT are not maintained over the long term, and there is no early developmental window where initial state governs later BT. The exact range of ecological conditions favouring behavioural syndromes depends also on the strength of state-dependent safety. PMID:21078650

  16. Reconsolidation may incorporate state-dependency into previously consolidated memories.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Rodrigo O; Cassini, Lindsey F; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana P; Duran, Johanna M; Haubrich, Josué; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas; Quillfeldt, Jorge A

    2013-07-01

    Some memories enter into a labile state after retrieval, requiring reconsolidation in order to persist. One functional role of memory reconsolidation is the updating of existing memories. There are reports suggesting that reconsolidation can be modulated by a particular endogenous process taking place concomitantly to its natural course, such as water or sleep deprivation. Here, we investigated whether an endogenous process activated during a natural/physiological experience, or a pharmacological intervention, can also contribute to memory content updating. Using the contextual fear conditioning paradigm in rats, we found that the endogenous content of an aversive memory can be updated during its reconsolidation incorporating consequences of natural events such as water deprivation, transforming a previously stored memory into a state-dependent one. This updating seems to be mediated by the activation of angiotensin AT1 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus and local infusion of human angiotensin II (ANGII) was shown to mimic the water deprivation effects on memory reconsolidation. Systemic morphine injection was also able to turn a previously acquired experience into a state-dependent memory, reproducing the very same effects obtained by water deprivation or local angiotensin II infusion, and suggesting that other state-dependent-inducing protocols would also be able to contribute to memory updating. These findings trigger new insights about the influence of ordinary daily life events upon memory in its continuing reconstruction, adding the realm of reconsolidation to the classical view of endogenous modulation of consolidation. PMID:23782508

  17. Pharmacological differentiation of presynaptic inhibitory alpha-adrenoceptors and opiate receptors in the cat nictitating membrane.

    PubMed

    Dubocovich, M L; Langer, S Z

    1980-11-01

    1 The action of morphine, naturally occurring and synthetic opiate peptides on [3H]-noradrenaline release induced by nerve stimulation was studied in the isolated nerve muscle preparation of the cat nictitating membrane under experimental conditions in which the alpha-presynaptic receptors were blocked by phentolamine 1 microM. 2 Morphine and the naturally occurring peptides: [Met5]-enkephalin, [Leu5]-enkephalin and beta-endorphin reduced 3H-transmitter overflow and responses to nerve stimulation from the cat nictitating membrane, effects which were completely antagonized by naloxone 0.3 microM. The relative order of potency for the inhibition of the stimulation-induced 3H-transmitter overflow at the level of the IC50 (microM) was as follows: [Met5]-enkephalin (0.020 microM) greater than or equal to [Leu5]-enkephalin (0.036 microM) > morphine (0.3 microM) > beta-endorphin (1 microM). 3 The synthetic opiate pentapeptides: BW 180 C (Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-Phe-D-Leu), and BW834 C (Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-pClPhe-DLeu), which are resistant to enzymatic degradation were more potent than the enkephalins in reducing the stimulation-evoked transmitter overflow from the cat nictitating membrane. On the other hand, the tetrapeptide BW832 C, which lacks the D-leucine terminal of BW180 C l was less potent than the enkephalins in inhibiting neurotransmission. 4 In the presence of phenoxybenzamine 1 microM, 3H-transmitter overflow was increased 8 fold and the inhibition of neurotransmission by methionine-enkephalin was not affected. Exposure to phenoxybenzamine 10 microM increased [3H]-noradrenaline overflow 15 fold and antagonized the effects of methionine enkephalin on transmitter release. 5 In the cat nictitating membrane the inhibitory presynaptic opiate receptors are different from the presynaptic alpha-autoreceptors which regulate the release of noradrenaline elicited by nerve depolarization through a negative feed-back mechanism. PMID:6254597

  18. Enhanced nitric oxide production during lead (Pb²⁺) exposure recovers protein expression but not presynaptic localization of synaptic proteins in developing hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Neal, April P; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2012-02-23

    We have previously reported that lead (Pb(2+)) exposure results in both presynaptic and postsynaptic changes in developing neurons as a result of inhibition of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). NMDAR inhibition by Pb(2+) during synaptogenesis disrupts downstream trans-synaptic signaling of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and exogenous addition of BDNF can recover the effects of Pb(2+) on both presynaptic protein expression and presynaptic vesicular release. NMDAR activity can modulate other trans-synaptic signaling pathways, such as nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Thus, it is possible that other trans-synaptic pathways in addition to BDNF signaling may be disrupted by Pb(2+) exposure. The current study investigated whether exogenous addition of NO could recover the presynaptic vesicular proteins lost as a result of Pb(2+) exposure during synaptogenesis, namely Synaptophysin (Syn) and Synaptobrevin (Syb). We observed that exogenous addition of NO during Pb(2+) exposure results in complete recovery of whole-cell Syn levels and partial recovery of Syn and Syb synaptic targeting in Pb(2+)-exposed neurons. PMID:22265330

  19. MicroRNA-22 Gates Long-Term Heterosynaptic Plasticity in Aplysia through Presynaptic Regulation of CPEB and Downstream Targets.

    PubMed

    Fiumara, Ferdinando; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Antonov, Igor; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Sossin, Wayne S; Kandel, Eric R

    2015-06-30

    The maintenance phase of memory-related long-term facilitation (LTF) of synapses between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia depends on a serotonin (5-HT)-triggered presynaptic upregulation of CPEB, a functional prion that regulates local protein synthesis at the synapse. The mechanisms whereby serotonin regulates CPEB levels in presynaptic sensory neurons are not known. Here, we describe a sensory neuron-specific microRNA 22 (miR-22) that has multiple binding sites on the mRNA of CPEB and inhibits it in the basal state. Serotonin triggers MAPK/Erk-dependent downregulation of miR-22, thereby upregulating the expression of CPEB, which in turn regulates, through functional CPE elements, the presynaptic expression of atypical PKC (aPKC), another candidate regulator of memory maintenance. Our findings support a model in which the neurotransmitter-triggered downregulation of miR-22 coordinates the regulation of genes contributing synergistically to the long-term maintenance of memory-related synaptic plasticity. PMID:26095361

  20. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores. PMID:23100436

  1. Mobility of calcium channels in the presynaptic membrane.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Romy; Hosy, Eric; Kohl, Johannes; Klueva, Julia; Choquet, Daniel; Thomas, Ulrich; Voigt, Andreas; Heine, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Unravelling principles underlying neurotransmitter release are key to understand neural signaling. Here, we describe how surface mobility of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) modulates release probabilities (P(r)) of synaptic vesicles (SVs). Coupling distances of <10 to >100 nm have been reported for SVs and VDCCs in different synapses. Tracking individual VDCCs revealed that within hippocampal synapses, ∼60% of VDCCs are mobile while confined to presynaptic membrane compartments. Intracellular Ca(2+) chelation decreased VDCC mobility. Increasing VDCC surface populations by co-expression of the α2δ1 subunit did not alter channel mobility but led to enlarged active zones (AZs) rather than higher channel densities. VDCCs thus scale presynaptic scaffolds to maintain local mobility. We propose that dynamic coupling based on mobile VDCCs supports calcium domain cooperativity and tunes neurotransmitter release by equalizing Pr for docked SVs within AZs. PMID:25892305

  2. Advances in imaging ultrastructure yield new insights into presynaptic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Joseph J.; Zhan, Hong; O’Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental functional units of neural circuits, and their dysregulation has been implicated in diverse neurological disorders. At presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles are released in response to calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels activated by the arrival of an action potential. Decades of electrophysiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have contributed to a growing understanding of presynaptic biology. Imaging studies are yielding new insights into how synapses are organized to carry out their critical functions. The development of techniques for rapid immobilization and preservation of neuronal tissues for electron microscopy (EM) has led to a new renaissance in ultrastructural imaging that is rapidly advancing our understanding of synapse structure and function. PMID:26052269

  3. Organization and dynamics of SNARE proteins in the presynaptic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Our view of the lateral organization of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane has evolved substantially in the last few decades. It is widely accepted that many, if not all, plasma membrane proteins and lipids are organized in specific domains. These domains vary widely in size, composition, and stability, and they represent platforms governing diverse cell functions. The presynaptic plasma membrane is a well-studied example of a membrane which undergoes rearrangements, especially during exo- and endocytosis. Many proteins and lipids involved in presynaptic function are known, and major efforts have been made to understand their spatial organization and dynamics. Here, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the organization of SNAREs, the key proteins of the fusion machinery, in distinct domains, and we discuss the functional significance of these clusters. PMID:25852575

  4. Lipid Bilayer Membrane-Triggered Presynaptic Vesicle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of functional synapses on artificial substrates is a very important step in the development of engineered in vitro neural networks. Spherical supported bilayer lipid membranes (SS-BLMs) are used here as a novel substrate to demonstrate presynaptic vesicle accumulation at an in vitro synaptic junction. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments have been used to characterize the SS-BLMs. Conventional immunocytochemistry combined with confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the formation of presynaptic vesicles at the neuron−SS-BLM contacts. These results indicate that lipid phases may play a role in the observed phenomenon, in addition to the chemical and electrostatic interactions between the neurons and SS-BLMs. The biocompatibility of lipid bilayers along with their membrane tunability makes the suggested approach a useful “toolkit” for many neuroengineering applications including artificial synapse formation and synaptogenesis in vivo. PMID:22778819

  5. The Innate Immune Receptor PGRP-LC Controls Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nathan; Braiser, Daniel J; Dickman, Dion K; Fetter, Richard D; Tong, Amy; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-12-16

    It is now appreciated that the brain is immunologically active. Highly conserved innate immune signaling responds to pathogen invasion and injury and promotes structural refinement of neural circuitry. However, it remains generally unknown whether innate immune signaling has a function during the day-to-day regulation of neural function in the absence of pathogens and irrespective of cellular damage or developmental change. Here we show that an innate immune receptor, a member of the peptidoglycan pattern recognition receptor family (PGRP-LC), is required for the induction and sustained expression of homeostatic synaptic plasticity. This receptor functions presynaptically, controlling the homeostatic modulation of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles following inhibition of postsynaptic glutamate receptor function. Thus, PGRP-LC is a candidate receptor for retrograde, trans-synaptic signaling, a novel activity for innate immune signaling and the first known function of a PGRP-type receptor in the nervous system of any organism. PMID:26687223

  6. Actions of acute and chronic ethanol on presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Marisa; Treistman, Steven N; Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z; Weiner, Jeff; Galindo, Rafael; Mameli, Manuel; Valenzuela, Fernando; Zhu, Ping Jun; Lovinger, David; Zhang, Tao A; Hendricson, Adam H; Morrisett, Richard; Siggins, George Robert

    2006-02-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium entitled "The Tipsy Terminal: Presynaptic Effects of Ethanol" (held at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, in Santa Barbara, CA, June 27, 2005). The objective of this symposium was to focus on a cellular site of ethanol action underrepresented in the alcohol literature, but quickly becoming a "hot" topic. The chairs of the session were Marisa Roberto and George Robert Siggins. Our speakers were chosen on the basis of the diverse electrophysiological and other methods used to discern the effects of acute and chronic ethanol on presynaptic terminals and on the basis of significant insights that their data provide for understanding ethanol actions on neurons in general, as mechanisms underlying problematic behavioral effects of alcohol. The 5 presenters drew from their recent studies examining the effects of acute and chronic ethanol using a range of sophisticated methods from electrophysiological analysis of paired-pulse facilitation and spontaneous and miniature synaptic currents (Drs. Weiner, Valenzuela, Zhu, and Morrisett), to direct recording of ion channel activity and peptide release from acutely isolated synaptic terminals (Dr. Treistman), to direct microscopic observation of vesicular release (Dr. Morrisett). They showed that ethanol administration could both increase and decrease the probability of release of different transmitters from synaptic terminals. The effects of ethanol on synaptic terminals could often be correlated with important behavioral or developmental actions of alcohol. These and other novel findings suggest that future analyses of synaptic effects of ethanol should attempt to ascertain, in multiple brain regions, the role of presynaptic terminals, relevant presynaptic receptors and signal transduction linkages, exocytotic mechanisms, and their involvement in alcohol's behavioral actions. Such studies could lead to new treatment strategies for alcohol intoxication

  7. Presynaptic clathrin levels are a limiting factor for synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    López-Murcia, Francisco J; Royle, Stephen J; Llobet, Artur

    2014-06-18

    To maintain communication, neurons must recycle their synaptic vesicles with high efficiency. This process places a huge burden on the clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery, but the consequences of this are poorly understood. We found that the amount of clathrin in a presynaptic terminal is not fixed. During stimulation, clathrin moves out of synapses as a function of stimulus strength and neurotransmitter release probability, which, together with membrane coat formation, transiently reduces the available pool of free clathrin triskelia. Correlative functional and morphological experiments in cholinergic autapses established by superior cervical ganglion neurons in culture show that presynaptic terminal function is compromised if clathrin levels fall by 20% after clathrin heavy chain knock down using RNAi. Synaptic transmission is depressed due to a reduction of cytoplasmic and readily releasable pools of vesicles. However, synaptic depression reverts after dialysis of exogenous clathrin, thus compensating RNAi-induced depletion. Lowering clathrin levels also reduces quantal size, which occurs concomitantly with a decrease in the size of synaptic vesicles. Large dense-core vesicles are unaffected by clathrin knock down. Together, our results show that clathrin levels are a dynamic property of presynaptic terminals that can influence short-term plasticity in a stimulus-dependent manner. PMID:24948816

  8. A Role for GAT-1 in Presynaptic GABA Homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fiorenzo; Melone, Marcello; Fattorini, Giorgia; Bragina, Luca; Ciappelloni, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    In monoamine-releasing terminals, neurotransmitter transporters – in addition to terminating synaptic transmission by clearing released transmitters from the extracellular space – are the primary mechanism for replenishing transmitter stores and thus regulate presynaptic homeostasis. Here, we analyze whether GAT-1, the main plasma membrane GABA transporter, plays a similar role in GABAergic terminals. Re-examination of existing literature and recent data gathered in our laboratory show that GABA homeostasis in GABAergic terminals is dominated by the activity of the GABA synthesizing enzyme and that GAT-1-mediated GABA transport contributes to cytosolic GABA levels. However, analysis of GAT-1 KO, besides demonstrating the effects of reduced clearance, reveals the existence of changes compatible with an impaired presynaptic function, as miniature IPSCs frequency is reduced by one-third and glutamic acid decarboxylases and phosphate-activated glutaminase levels are significantly up-regulated. Although the changes observed are less robust than those reported in mice with impaired dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin plasma membrane transporters, they suggest that in GABAergic terminals GAT-1 impacts on presynaptic GABA homeostasis, and may contribute to the activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory efficacy. PMID:21503156

  9. A Role for Presynaptic alpha(sub 2)-Adrenoceptors in Angiotensin 2-Induced Drinking in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, Melvin J.; Rowland, Neil E.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that either central or peripheral administration of clonidine, the alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, can attenuate a variety of dipsogenic stimuli in rats. Further, yohimbine and tolazoline, alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor antagonists, augment the drinking response to both peripherally administered isoproterenol and angiotensin 2. Studies reported here establish a dose-inhibition relationship between the dose of clonidine administered (2 to 32 micrograms/kg) intracerebroventricularly (IVT) and inhibition of the drinking response to peripherally administered angiotensin 2 (200 micrograms/kg, SC). DI(sub 50) was approximately 4 micrograms/kg. Yohimbine (300 micrograms/kg, SC) reversed the antidipsogenic effect of centrally administered clonidine (32 micrograms/kg, IVT) on angiotensin 2-induced (200 micrograms/kg, SC) water intake. Phenylephrine, an alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, administered IVT (40 and 80 micrograms/kg) also inhibited angiotensin 2-induced drinking in a dose-related fashion. The antidipsogenic effect of phenylephfine (80 micrograms/kg) was blocked by administration of yohimbine (100 micrograms/kg, SC). Thus, this effect of phenylephrine most likely occurs by way of alpha(sub 2)- adrenoceptors. These results support a role for the pre-synaptic alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor in the mediation of drinking in rats. Activation of alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptors is accompanied by reduced water intake while inhibition of these receptors enhances water intake.

  10. Effects of Levetiracetam, Carbamazepine, Phenytoin, Valproate, Lamotrigine, Oxcarbazepine, Topiramate, Vinpocetine and Sertraline on Presynaptic Hippocampal Na(+) and Ca(2+) Channels Permeability.

    PubMed

    Sitges, María; Chiu, Luz María; Reed, Ronald C

    2016-04-01

    Ion channels are targets of various antiepileptic drugs. In cerebral presynaptic nerve endings Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels are particularly abundant, as they control neurotransmitter release, including the release of glutamate (Glu), the most concentrated excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the brain. Several pre-synaptic channels are implicated in the mechanism of action of the pro-convulsive agent, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). In the present study the effects of levetiracetam and other established and newer (vinpocetine) anti-epileptic drugs, as well as of the anti-depressant, sertraline on the increase in Ca(2+) induced by 4-AP in hippocampal isolated nerve endings were investigated. Also the effects of some of the anti-seizure drugs on the selective increase in Ca(2+) induced by high K(+), or on the selective increase in Na(+) induced by veratridine were tested. Sertraline and vinpocetine effectively inhibited the rise in Ca(2+) induced by 4-AP, which was dependent on the out-in Na(+) gradient and tetrodotoxin sensitive. Carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine inhibited the rise in Ca(2+) induced by 4-AP too, but at higher concentrations than sertraline and vinpocetine, whereas levetiracetam, valproic acid and topiramate did not. The three latter antiepileptic drugs also failed in modifying other responses mediated by the activation of brain presynaptic Na(+) or Ca(2+) channels, including Glu release. This indicates that levetiracetam, valproic acid and topiramate mechanisms of action are unrelated with a decrease in presynaptic Na(+) or Ca(2+) channels permeability. It is concluded that depolarized cerebral isolated nerve endings represent a useful tool to unmask potential antiepileptic drugs targeting presynaptic Na(+) and/or Ca(2+) channels in the brain; such as vinpocetine or the anti-depressant sertraline, which high effectiveness to control seizures in the animal in vivo has been demonstrated. PMID:26542150

  11. State-dependent μ-opioid modulation of social motivation

    PubMed Central

    Loseth, Guro E.; Ellingsen, Dan-Mikael; Leknes, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Social mammals engage in affiliative interactions both when seeking relief from negative affect and when searching for pleasure and joy. These two motivational states are both modulated by μ-opioid transmission. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system in the brain mediates pain relief and reward behaviors, and is implicated in social reward processing and affiliative bonding across mammalian species. However, pharmacological manipulation of the μ-opioid system has yielded opposite effects on rodents and primates: in rodents, social motivation is generally increased by MOR agonists and reduced by antagonists, whereas the opposite pattern has been shown in primates. Here, we address this paradox by taking into account differences in motivational state. We first review evidence for μ-opioid mediation of reward processing, emotion regulation, and affiliation in humans, non-human primates, rodents and other species. Based on the consistent cross-species similarities in opioid functioning, we propose a unified, state-dependent model for μ-opioid modulation of affiliation across the mammalian species. Finally, we show that this state-dependent model is supported by evidence from both rodent and primate studies, when species and age differences in social separation response are taken into account. PMID:25565999

  12. The Alzheimer's β-secretase BACE1 localizes to normal presynaptic terminals and to dystrophic presynaptic terminals surrounding amyloid plaques.

    PubMed

    Kandalepas, Patty C; Sadleir, Katherine R; Eimer, William A; Zhao, Jie; Nicholson, Daniel A; Vassar, Robert

    2013-09-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is the β-secretase that initiates Aβ production in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 levels are increased in AD, which could contribute to pathogenesis, yet the mechanism of BACE1 elevation is unclear. Furthermore, the normal function of BACE1 is poorly understood. We localized BACE1 in the brain at both the light and electron microscopic levels to gain insight into normal and pathophysiologic roles of BACE1 in health and AD, respectively. Our findings provide the first ultrastructural evidence that BACE1 localizes to vesicles (likely endosomes) in normal hippocampal mossy fiber terminals of both non-transgenic and APP transgenic (5XFAD) mouse brains. In some instances, BACE1-positive vesicles were located near active zones, implying a function for BACE1 at the synapse. In addition, BACE1 accumulated in swollen dystrophic autophagosome-poor presynaptic terminals surrounding amyloid plaques in 5XFAD cortex and hippocampus. Importantly, accumulations of BACE1 and APP co-localized in presynaptic dystrophies, implying increased BACE1 processing of APP in peri-plaque regions. In primary cortical neuron cultures, treatment with the lysosomal protease inhibitor leupeptin caused BACE1 levels to increase; however, exposure of neurons to the autophagy inducer trehalose did not reduce BACE1 levels. This suggests that BACE1 is degraded by lysosomes but not by autophagy. Our results imply that BACE1 elevation in AD could be linked to decreased lysosomal degradation of BACE1 within dystrophic presynaptic terminals. Elevated BACE1 and APP levels in plaque-associated presynaptic dystrophies could increase local peri-plaque Aβ generation and accelerate amyloid plaque growth in AD. PMID:23820808

  13. Nutritional State-Dependent Ghrelin Activation of Vasopressin Neurons via Retrograde Trans-Neuronal–Glial Stimulation of Excitatory GABA Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Haam, Juhee; Halmos, Katalin C.; Di, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological coupling between energy balance and fluid homeostasis is critical for survival. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin has been shown to stimulate the secretion of the osmoregulatory hormone vasopressin (VP), linking nutritional status to the control of blood osmolality, although the mechanism of this systemic crosstalk is unknown. Here, we show using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in rat brain slices that ghrelin stimulates VP neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in a nutritional state-dependent manner by activating an excitatory GABAergic synaptic input via a retrograde neuronal–glial circuit. In slices from fasted rats, ghrelin activation of a postsynaptic ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), in VP neurons caused the dendritic release of VP, which stimulated astrocytes to release the gliotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP activation of P2X receptors excited presynaptic GABA neurons to increase GABA release, which was excitatory to the VP neurons. This trans-neuronal–glial retrograde circuit activated by ghrelin provides an alternative means of stimulation of VP release and represents a novel mechanism of neuronal control by local neuronal–glial circuits. It also provides a potential cellular mechanism for the physiological integration of energy and fluid homeostasis. PMID:24790191

  14. LIM Kinase, a Newly Identified Regulator of Presynaptic Remodeling by Rod Photoreceptors After Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rod photoreceptors retract their axon terminals and develop neuritic sprouts in response to retinal detachment and reattachment, respectively. This study examines the role of LIM kinase (LIMK), a component of RhoA and Rac pathways, in the presynaptic structural remodeling of rod photoreceptors. Methods Phosphorylated LIMK (p-LIMK), the active form of LIMK, was examined in salamander retina with Western blot and confocal microscopy. Axon length within the first 7 hours and process growth after 3 days of culture were assessed in isolated rod photoreceptors treated with inhibitors of upstream regulators ROCK and p21-activated kinase (Pak) (Y27632 and IPA-3) and a direct LIMK inhibitor (BMS-5). Porcine retinal explants were also treated with BMS-5 and analyzed 24 hours after detachment. Because Ca2+ influx contributes to axonal retraction, L-type channels were blocked in some experiments with nicardipine. Results Phosphorylated LIMK is present in rod terminals during retraction and in newly formed processes. Axonal retraction over 7 hours was significantly reduced by inhibition of LIMK or its regulators, ROCK and Pak. Process growth was reduced by LIMK or Pak inhibition especially at the basal (axon-bearing) region of the rod cells. Combining Ca2+ channel and LIMK inhibition had no additional effect on retraction but did further inhibit sprouting after 3 days. In detached porcine retina, LIMK inhibition reduced rod axonal retraction and improved retinal morphology. Conclusions Thus structural remodeling, in the form of either axonal retraction or neuritic growth, requires LIMK activity. LIM kinase inhibition may have therapeutic potential for reducing pathologic rod terminal plasticity after retinal injury. PMID:26658506

  15. Presynaptic and postsynaptic effects of the venom of the Australian tiger snake at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Datyner, M. E.; Gage, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    1. Crude venom (TSV) from the Australian tiger snake (Notechis scutatus scutatus) has both presynaptic and postsynaptic effects at the neuromuscular junctions of toads. 2. TSV (50 μg/ml) rapidly blocked indirectly elicited muscle twitches without affecting the compound action potential in the sciatic nerve or twitches elicited by direct stimulation. 3. Low concentrations of the venom (1-10 μg/ml) reduced the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials (m.e.p.ps) and inhibited the depolarization of muscle fibres normally caused by carbachol. It was concluded that a fraction of the venom binds to acetylcholine receptors. 4. The frequency of m.e.p.ps was at first increased by TSV at a concentration of 1 μg/ml. Occasional, high frequency `bursts' of m.e.p.ps were recorded in some preparations. The mean frequency of m.e.p.ps appeared to fall after several hours in the venom. 5. The quantal content of endplate potentials (e.p.ps) was reduced by the venom. With low concentrations (1 μg/ml), an initial increase in quantal content was often seen. When the quantal content was markedly depressed there was no parallel reduction in the amplitude of nerve terminal spikes recorded extracellularly, though a later fall in size and slowing of time course was often seen. 6. There was evidence that TSV eventually changed the normal Poisson characteristics of the spontaneous release of quanta and this may be correlated with electronmicroscopic changes in nerve terminals. 7. Tiger snake antivenene counteracted the postsynaptic, but not the presynaptic effects of TSV when they had developed. PMID:4367126

  16. APP is cleaved by Bace1 in pre-synaptic vesicles and establishes a pre-synaptic interactome, via its intracellular domain, with molecular complexes that regulate pre-synaptic vesicles functions.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Dolores; Lombino, Franco; Liu, Xinran; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is a type I membrane protein that undergoes extensive processing by secretases, including BACE1. Although mutations in APP and genes that regulate processing of APP, such as PSENs and BRI2/ITM2B, cause dementias, the normal function of APP in synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and memory formation is poorly understood. To grasp the biochemical mechanisms underlying the function of APP in the central nervous system, it is important to first define the sub-cellular localization of APP in synapses and the synaptic interactome of APP. Using biochemical and electron microscopy approaches, we have found that APP is localized in pre-synaptic vesicles, where it is processed by Bace1. By means of a proteomic approach, we have characterized the synaptic interactome of the APP intracellular domain. We focused on this region of APP because in vivo data underline the central functional and pathological role of the intracellular domain of APP. Consistent with the expression of APP in pre-synaptic vesicles, the synaptic APP intracellular domain interactome is predominantly constituted by pre-synaptic, rather than post-synaptic, proteins. This pre-synaptic interactome of the APP intracellular domain includes proteins expressed on pre-synaptic vesicles such as the vesicular SNARE Vamp2/Vamp1 and the Ca2+ sensors Synaptotagmin-1/Synaptotagmin-2, and non-vesicular pre-synaptic proteins that regulate exocytosis, endocytosis and recycling of pre-synaptic vesicles, such as target-membrane-SNAREs (Syntaxin-1b, Syntaxin-1a, Snap25 and Snap47), Munc-18, Nsf, α/β/γ-Snaps and complexin. These data are consistent with a functional role for APP, via its carboxyl-terminal domain, in exocytosis, endocytosis and/or recycling of pre-synaptic vesicles. PMID:25247712

  17. APP Is Cleaved by Bace1 in Pre-Synaptic Vesicles and Establishes a Pre-Synaptic Interactome, via Its Intracellular Domain, with Molecular Complexes that Regulate Pre-Synaptic Vesicles Functions

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Dolores; Lombino, Franco; Liu, Xinran; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is a type I membrane protein that undergoes extensive processing by secretases, including BACE1. Although mutations in APP and genes that regulate processing of APP, such as PSENs and BRI2/ITM2B, cause dementias, the normal function of APP in synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and memory formation is poorly understood. To grasp the biochemical mechanisms underlying the function of APP in the central nervous system, it is important to first define the sub-cellular localization of APP in synapses and the synaptic interactome of APP. Using biochemical and electron microscopy approaches, we have found that APP is localized in pre-synaptic vesicles, where it is processed by Bace1. By means of a proteomic approach, we have characterized the synaptic interactome of the APP intracellular domain. We focused on this region of APP because in vivo data underline the central funtional and pathological role of the intracellular domain of APP. Consistent with the expression of APP in pre-synaptic vesicles, the synaptic APP intracellular domain interactome is predominantly constituted by pre-synaptic, rather than post-synaptic, proteins. This pre-synaptic interactome of the APP intracellular domain includes proteins expressed on pre-synaptic vesicles such as the vesicular SNARE Vamp2/Vamp1 and the Ca2+ sensors Synaptotagmin-1/Synaptotagmin-2, and non-vesicular pre-synaptic proteins that regulate exocytosis, endocytosis and recycling of pre-synaptic vesicles, such as target-membrane-SNAREs (Syntaxin-1b, Syntaxin-1a, Snap25 and Snap47), Munc-18, Nsf, α/β/γ-Snaps and complexin. These data are consistent with a functional role for APP, via its carboxyl-terminal domain, in exocytosis, endocytosis and/or recycling of pre-synaptic vesicles. PMID:25247712

  18. Presynaptic dystrophic neurites surrounding amyloid plaques are sites of microtubule disruption, BACE1 elevation, and increased Aβ generation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Kandalepas, Patty C; Buggia-Prévot, Virginie; Nicholson, Daniel A; Thinakaran, Gopal; Vassar, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid plaques composed of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide surrounded by swollen presynaptic dystrophic neurites consisting of dysfunctional axons and terminals that accumulate the β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme (BACE1) required for Aβ generation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern presynaptic dystrophic neurite formation are unclear, and elucidating these processes may lead to novel AD therapeutic strategies. Previous studies suggest Aβ may disrupt microtubules, which we hypothesize have a critical role in the development of presynaptic dystrophies. To investigate this further, here we have assessed the effects of Aβ, particularly neurotoxic Aβ42, on microtubules during the formation of presynaptic dystrophic neurites in vitro and in vivo. Live-cell imaging of primary neurons revealed that exposure to Aβ42 oligomers caused varicose and beaded neurites with extensive microtubule disruption, and inhibited anterograde and retrograde trafficking. In brain sections from AD patients and the 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of amyloid pathology, dystrophic neurite halos with BACE1 elevation around amyloid plaques exhibited aberrant tubulin accumulations or voids. At the ultrastructural level, peri-plaque dystrophies were strikingly devoid of microtubules and replete with multi-lamellar vesicles resembling autophagic intermediates. Proteins of the microtubule motors, kinesin and dynein, and other neuronal proteins were aberrantly localized in peri-plaque dystrophies. Inactive pro-cathepsin D also accumulated in peri-plaque dystrophies, indicating reduced lysosomal function. Most importantly, BACE1 accumulation in peri-plaque dystrophies caused increased BACE1 cleavage of APP and Aβ generation. Our study supports the hypothesis that Aβ induces microtubule disruption in presynaptic dystrophic neurites that surround plaques, thus impairing axonal transport and leading to accumulation of

  19. Vibrational State Dependent Large Amplitude Tunneling Dynamics in Malonaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Grant; Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-06-01

    The quantum dynamics of intramolecular proton transfer in malonaldehyde has represented a major challenge for first principles theoretical calculation, in large measure due to the highly concerted motion of all 9 nuclei throughout the tunneling event. This talk describes efforts to predict quantum state dependent tunneling rates from high level ab initio calculations, exploiting the large amplitude motion (LAM) Hamiltonian methods of Hougen, Bunker and Johns.A An effective adiabatic potential surface for the tunneling path is constructed from CCSD(T)/AVnZ-F12 calculations using explicitly correlated basis set methods and extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. This potential is adiabatically corrected by zero point excitation in the remaining 3N-7 = 20 vibrational modes, with the multidimensional tunneling dependence of the effective mass explicitly taken into AccountB and numerically solved with Numerov methods. Of special importance, this method permits calculation of mode dependent tunneling splittings as a function of vibrational quantum state, which offers interesting prospects for comparison with recent FTIR slit jet cooled data of Suhm and coworkers.C A J. T. Hougen, P. R. Bunker and J. W. C. Johns, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 34, 136 (1970). B D. J. Rush and K. B. Wiberg, J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 3143 (1997). C N. O. B. Luttschwager, T. N. Wassermann, S. Coussan and M. A. Suhm, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., DOI: 10.1039/c002345k (2010)

  20. Presynaptic Disorders: Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome and Botulism.

    PubMed

    Gable, Karissa L; Massey, Janice M

    2015-08-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and botulism are acquired presynaptic nerve terminal disorders of the neuromuscular junction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is an idiopathic or paraneoplastic autoimmune syndrome in which autoantibodies of the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel play a role in decreasing the release of acetylcholine, resulting in clinical symptoms of skeletal muscle weakness, diminished reflexes, and autonomic symptoms. Paraneoplastic LEMS is most often associated with small cell lung cancer. Diagnosis is confirmed by positive serologic testing and electrophysiological studies, which display characteristic features of low compound muscle action potentials, a decrement at 3Hz repetitive nerve stimulation, and facilitation with exercise or high-frequency repetitive stimulation. Treatment involves cancer monitoring and treatment, 3,4-diaminopyridine, immunosuppressive medications, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Botulism is another presynaptic disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Clinical features classically involve cranial and bulbar palsies followed by descending weakness of the limbs, respiratory failure, and autonomic dysfunction. Electrodiagnostic testing is important in the evaluation and diagnosis. Treatment is supportive, and administration of antitoxin is beneficial in selected cases. PMID:26502758

  1. SNAP-25, a Known Presynaptic Protein with Emerging Postsynaptic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Flavia; Corradini, Irene; Fossati, Giuliana; Tomasoni, Romana; Menna, Elisabetta; Matteoli, Michela

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different “synaptopathies”. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis, and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions. PMID:27047369

  2. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels. PMID:24257812

  3. Developmental switch in the contribution of presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDA receptors to long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Corlew, Rebekah; Wang, Yun; Ghermazien, Haben; Erisir, Alev; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2007-09-12

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation is required for many forms of learning and memory as well as sensory system receptive field plasticity, yet the relative contribution of presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDARs over cortical development remains unknown. Here we demonstrate a rapid developmental loss of functional presynaptic NMDARs in the neocortex. Presynaptic NMDARs enhance neurotransmitter release at synapses onto visual cortex pyramidal cells in young mice [before postnatal day 20 (P20)], but they have no apparent effect after the onset of the critical period for receptive field plasticity (>P23). Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the loss of presynaptic NMDAR function is likely attributable in part to a 50% reduction in the prevalence of presynaptic NMDARs. Coincident with the observed loss of presynaptic NMDAR function, there is an abrupt change in the mechanisms of timing-dependent long-term depression (tLTD). Induction of tLTD before the onset of the critical period requires activation of presynaptic but not postsynaptic NMDARs, whereas the induction of tLTD in older mice requires activation of postsynaptic NMDARs. By demonstrating that both presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDARs contribute to the induction of synaptic plasticity and that their relative roles shift over development, our findings define a novel, and perhaps general, property of synaptic plasticity in emerging cortical circuits. PMID:17855598

  4. State-dependent phenomena in cat masseter motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, K A; López-Rodríguez, F; Liu, R H; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1996-05-25

    In the present study we explored the mechanisms of carbachol-induced muscle atonia in the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized animal. We compared our findings to those that have been previously obtained in unanesthetized cats during muscle atonia occurring during natural active sleep. Accordingly, in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose, intracellular records were obtained from masseter motoneurons before and after carbachol-induced motor atonia. Following the induction of atonia, the membrane potential activity was dominated by high-frequency, discrete, hyperpolarizing potentials. These hyperpolarizing potentials were reversed in polarity by the intracellular injection of chloride ions and abolished by the application of strychnine. These findings indicate that they were inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) mediated by glycine. These IPSPs appeared exclusively during muscle atonia. In addition, masseter motoneurons were significantly hyperpolarized and their rheobase increased. There was a decrease in input resistance and membrane time constant. In the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized preparation, stimulation of the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) induced IPSPs in masseter motoneurons following, but never prior to, the pontine injection of carbachol. Thus, this is the first demonstration that "reticular response-reversal' may be elicited in an anesthetized preparation. Another state-dependent phenomenon of active sleep, the occurrence of IPSPs in motoneurons that are temporally correlated with ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, was also observed in this preparation only after carbachol administration. Based on the data in this report, we conclude that the inhibitory system that mediates atonia during the state of active sleep can be activated in an animal that is anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. Specifically, the neuronal groups that generate spontaneous IPSPs, those that mediate the phenomenon of reticular response-reversal, and those involved in the generation

  5. Number sense and state-dependent valuation in cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsang-I; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2016-08-31

    Identifying the amount of prey available is an important part of an animal's foraging behaviour. The risk-sensitive foraging theory predicts that an organism's foraging decisions with regard to food rewards depending upon its satiation level. However, the precise interaction between optimal risk-tolerance and satiation level remains unclear. In this study, we examined, firstly, whether cuttlefish, with one of the most highly evolved nervous system among the invertebrates, have number sense, and secondly, whether their valuation of food reward is satiation state dependent. When food such as live shrimps is present, without training, cuttlefish turn toward the prey and initiate seizure behaviour. Using this visual attack behaviour as a measure, cuttlefish showed a preference for a larger quantity when faced with two-alternative forced choice tasks (1 versus 2, 2 versus 3, 3 versus 4 and 4 versus 5). However, cuttlefish preferred the small quantity when the choice was between one live and two dead shrimps. More importantly, when the choice was between one large live shrimp and two small live shrimps (a prey size and quantity trade-off), the cuttlefish chose the large single shrimp when they felt hunger, but chose the two smaller prey when they were satiated. These results demonstrate that cuttlefish are capable of number discrimination and that their choice of prey number depends on the quality of the prey and on their appetite state. The findings also suggest that cuttlefish integrate both internal and external information when making a foraging decision and that the cost of obtaining food is inversely correlated with their satiation level, a phenomenon similar to the observation that metabolic state alters economic decision making under risk among humans. PMID:27559063

  6. Protonation State-Dependent Communication in Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Ghane, Tahereh; Reidelbach, Marco; Woelke, Anna Lena; Knapp, Ernst Walter; Imhof, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase from the cellular inside to the binuclear redox center (BNC) can occur through two distinct pathways, the D- and K-channels. For the protein to function as both redox enzyme and proton pump, proton transfer out of either of the channels toward the BNC or into the protein toward a proton loading site, and ultimately through the membrane, must be highly regulated. The O→E intermediate of cytochrome c oxidase is the first redox state in its catalytic cycle, where proton transfer through the K-channel, from K362 to Y288 at the BNC, is important. Molecular dynamics simulations of this intermediate with 16 different combinations of protonation states of key residues in the D- and K-channel show the mutual impact of the two proton-conducting channels to be protonation state-dependent. Strength as well as means of communication, correlations in positions, or connections along the hydrogen-bonded network, change with the protonation state of the K-channel residue K362. The conformational and hydrogen-bond dynamics of the D-channel residue N139 regulated by an interplay of protonation in the D-channel and K362. N139 thus assumes a gating function by which proton passage through the D-channel toward E286 is likely facilitated for states with protonated K362 and unprotonated E286, which would in principle allow proton transfer to the BNC, but no proton pumping until a proton has reached E286. PMID:27508434

  7. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R; Court, Felipe A; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  8. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R.; Court, Felipe A.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  9. Dopaminergic Presynaptic Modulation of Nigral Afferents: Its Role in the Generation of Recurrent Bursting in Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata Neurons

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Aceves, José; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernández, Ricardo; Plata, Víctor; Ibañez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown the functions associated with activation of dopamine presynaptic receptors in some substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) afferents: (i) striatonigral terminals (direct pathway) posses presynaptic dopamine D1-class receptors whose action is to enhance inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and GABA transmission. (ii) Subthalamonigral terminals posses D1- and D2-class receptors where D1-class receptor activation enhances and D2-class receptor activation decreases excitatory postsynaptic currents. Here we report that pallidonigral afferents posses D2-class receptors (D3 and D4 types) that decrease inhibitory synaptic transmission via presynaptic modulation. No action of D1-class agonists was found on pallidonigral synapses. In contrast, administration of D1-receptor antagonists greatly decreased striatonigral IPSCs in the same preparation, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels help in maintaining the function of the striatonigral (direct) pathway. When both D3 and D4 type receptors were blocked, pallidonigral IPSCs increased in amplitude while striatonigral connections had no significant change, suggesting that tonic dopamine levels are repressing a powerful inhibition conveyed by pallidonigral synapses (a branch of the indirect pathway). We then blocked both D1- and D2-class receptors to acutely decrease direct pathway (striatonigral) and enhance indirect pathways (subthalamonigral and pallidonigral) synaptic force. The result was that most SNr projection neurons entered a recurrent bursting firing mode similar to that observed during Parkinsonism in both patients and animal models. These results raise the question as to whether the lack of dopamine in basal ganglia output nuclei is enough to generate some pathological signs of Parkinsonism. PMID:21347219

  10. Protein interactome mining defines melatonin MT1 receptors as integral component of presynaptic protein complexes of neurons.

    PubMed

    Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Chen, Lina; Sokolina, Kate; Wong, Victoria; Jurisica, Igor; Emerit, Michel Boris; Darmon, Michèle; Espin, Almudena; Stagljar, Igor; Tafelmeyer, Petra; Zamponi, Gerald W; Delagrange, Philippe; Maurice, Pascal; Jockers, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the hormone melatonin is mainly produced by the pineal gland with nocturnal peak levels. Its peripheral and central actions rely either on its intrinsic antioxidant properties or on binding to melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors, belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) super-family. Melatonin has been reported to be involved in many functions of the central nervous system such as circadian rhythm regulation, neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, memory, sleep, and also in Alzheimer's disease and depression. However, little is known about the subcellular localization of melatonin receptors and the molecular aspects involved in neuronal functions of melatonin. Identification of protein complexes associated with GPCRs has been shown to be a valid approach to improve our understanding of their function. By combining proteomic and genomic approaches we built an interactome of MT1 and MT2 receptors, which comprises 378 individual proteins. Among the proteins interacting with MT1 , but not with MT2 , we identified several presynaptic proteins, suggesting a potential role of MT1 in neurotransmission. Presynaptic localization of MT1 receptors in the hypothalamus, striatum, and cortex was confirmed by subcellular fractionation experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. MT1 physically interacts with the voltage-gated calcium channel Cav 2.2 and inhibits Cav 2.2-promoted Ca(2+) entry in an agonist-independent manner. In conclusion, we show that MT1 is part of the presynaptic protein network and negatively regulates Cav 2.2 activity, providing a first hint for potential synaptic functions of MT1. PMID:26514267

  11. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Lovinger, David M.; Mathur, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for regulation of information storage and control of actions, as well as synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity; the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a “common pathway” are described. Here, we review the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate if all Gi/o-GPCR are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD. PMID:25160683

  12. The Roles of Microtubule-Based Transport at Presynaptic Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Yagensky, Oleksandr; Kalantary Dehaghi, Tahere; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Targeted intracellular movement of presynaptic proteins plays important roles during synapse formation and, later, in the homeostatic maintenance of mature synapses. Movement of these proteins, often as vesicular packages, is mediated by motor complexes travelling along intracellular cytoskeletal networks. Presynaptic protein transport by kinesin motors in particular plays important roles during synaptogenesis to bring newly synthesized proteins to establish nascent synaptic sites. Conversely, movement of proteins away from presynaptic sites by Dynein motors enables synapse-nuclear signaling and allows for synaptic renewal through degradation of unwanted or damaged proteins. Remarkably, recent data has indicated that synaptic and protein trafficking machineries can modulate each other’s functions. Here, we survey the mechanisms involved in moving presynaptic components to and away from synapses and how this process supports presynaptic function. PMID:26903856

  13. State-dependent modulation of CFTR gating by pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2009-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated chloride channel. ATP-induced dimerization of CFTR's two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) has been shown to reflect the channel open state, whereas hydrolysis of ATP is associated with channel closure. Pyrophosphate (PPi), like nonhydrolytic ATP analogues, is known to lock open the CFTR channel for tens of seconds when applied with ATP. Here, we demonstrate that PPi by itself opens the CFTR channel in a Mg(2+)-dependent manner long after ATP is removed from the cytoplasmic side of excised membrane patches. However, the short-lived open state (tau approximately 1.5 s) induced by MgPPi suggests that MgPPi alone does not support a stable NBD dimer configuration. Surprisingly, MgPPi elicits long-lasting opening events (tau approximately 30 s) when administrated shortly after the closure of ATP-opened channels. These results indicate the presence of two different closed states (C(1) and C(2)) upon channel closure and a state-dependent effect of MgPPi on CFTR gating. The relative amount of channels entering MgPPi-induced long-open bursts during the ATP washout phase decreases over time, indicating a time-dependent dissipation of the closed state (C(2)) that can be locked open by MgPPi. The stability of the C(2) state is enhanced when the channel is initially opened by N(6)-phenylethyl-ATP, a high affinity ATP analogue, but attenuated by W401G mutation, which likely weakens ATP binding to NBD1, suggesting that an ATP molecule remains bound to the NBD1 site in the C(2) state. Taking advantage of the slow opening rate of Y1219G-CFTR, we are able to identify a C(2)-equivalent state (C(2)*), which exists before the channel in the C(1) state is opened by ATP. This closed state responds to MgPPi much more inefficiently than the C(2) state. Finally, we show that MgAMP-PNP exerts its effects on CFTR gating via a similar mechanism as MgPPi. The structural and functional

  14. State-dependent modulation of CFTR gating by pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated chloride channel. ATP-induced dimerization of CFTR's two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) has been shown to reflect the channel open state, whereas hydrolysis of ATP is associated with channel closure. Pyrophosphate (PPi), like nonhydrolytic ATP analogues, is known to lock open the CFTR channel for tens of seconds when applied with ATP. Here, we demonstrate that PPi by itself opens the CFTR channel in a Mg2+-dependent manner long after ATP is removed from the cytoplasmic side of excised membrane patches. However, the short-lived open state (τ ∼1.5 s) induced by MgPPi suggests that MgPPi alone does not support a stable NBD dimer configuration. Surprisingly, MgPPi elicits long-lasting opening events (τ ∼30 s) when administrated shortly after the closure of ATP-opened channels. These results indicate the presence of two different closed states (C1 and C2) upon channel closure and a state-dependent effect of MgPPi on CFTR gating. The relative amount of channels entering MgPPi-induced long-open bursts during the ATP washout phase decreases over time, indicating a time-dependent dissipation of the closed state (C2) that can be locked open by MgPPi. The stability of the C2 state is enhanced when the channel is initially opened by N6-phenylethyl-ATP, a high affinity ATP analogue, but attenuated by W401G mutation, which likely weakens ATP binding to NBD1, suggesting that an ATP molecule remains bound to the NBD1 site in the C2 state. Taking advantage of the slow opening rate of Y1219G-CFTR, we are able to identify a C2-equivalent state (C2*), which exists before the channel in the C1 state is opened by ATP. This closed state responds to MgPPi much more inefficiently than the C2 state. Finally, we show that MgAMP-PNP exerts its effects on CFTR gating via a similar mechanism as MgPPi. The structural and functional significance of our findings is discussed. PMID:19332621

  15. Presynaptic control of dopamine release by BETA-phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikova, A.D.; Godukhin, O.V.

    1985-04-01

    The authors study the effect of extracellular ions (Ca/sup 2 +/, Na/sup 2 +/) on the beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA) releasing effect, dependence of this effect on the membrane potential of dopaminergic endings, and the participation of dopamine presynaptic autoreceptors in the realization of the effects of beta-PEA on dopamine (DA) release. Experi ments were carried out on noninbred male albino rats. By means of a microsyringe, (/sup 3/H)-DA hydrochloride was injected. The significance of the difference in levels of (/sup 3/H)-DA release during analogous periods of perfusion in the groups of animals compared was estimated by Student's test. These experiments in vivo thus demonstrated the ability of beta-PEA to regulate DA release in different directions depending on the functional state of the dopaminergic neuron.

  16. Presynaptic elements involved in the maintenance of the neuromuscular junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in the neuromuscular junction were observed in rats preceding loss of muscle mass. In view of the possibility that these alterations involve changes in the secretion of myotrophic agents by presynaptic motor neurons, an investigation was undertaken to characterize a neuronall factor which is thought to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of cholinergic synapses. This factor, which is secreted into the incubation medium by NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells, induces the aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on primary cultures of rat hindlimb myotubes. Previous attempts to purify this factor failed. Extensive washing of the NG108-15 cells with hepes-buffered salt solution followed by short (4 hour) collection times resulted in the collection of incubation medium containing maximal aggregation activity with as little as 5 ug secreted protein per ml of fresh medium. A three-fold increase in specific activity was obtained after anion exchange chromatography.

  17. SUMOylation of Syntaxin1A regulates presynaptic endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Tim J.; Anderson, Dina; Evans, Ashley J.; Girach, Fatima; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic terminal is under very precise spatial and temporal control. Following neurotransmitter release, synaptic vesicles are recycled by endocytosis and refilled with neurotransmitter. During the exocytosis event leading to release, SNARE proteins provide most of the mechanical force for membrane fusion. Here, we show one of these proteins, Syntaxin1A, is SUMOylated near its C-terminal transmembrane domain in an activity-dependent manner. Preventing SUMOylation of Syntaxin1A reduces its interaction with other SNARE proteins and disrupts the balance of synaptic vesicle endo/exocytosis, resulting in an increase in endocytosis. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates the emerging role of Syntaxin1A in vesicle endocytosis, which in turn, modulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic function. PMID:26635000

  18. Calcium transients in cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, W G; Atluri, P P

    1995-01-01

    Calcium ions act presynaptically to modulate synaptic strength and to trigger neurotransmitter release. Here we detect stimulus-evoked changes in residual free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in rat cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals. Granule cell axons, known as parallel fibers, and their associated boutons, were labeled with several calcium indicators. When parallel fibers were extracellularly activated with stimulus trains, calcium accumulated in the terminals, producing changes in the fluorescence of the indicators. During the stimulus train, the fluorescence change per pulse became progressively smaller with the high affinity indicators Fura-2 and calcium green-2 but remained constant with the low affinity dyes BTC and furaptra. In addition, fluorescence transients of high affinity dyes were slower than those of low affinity indicators, which appear to accurately report the time course of calcium transients. Simulations show that differences in the observed transients can be explained by the different affinities and off rates of the fluorophores. The return of [Ca2+]i to resting levels can be approximated by an exponential decay with a time constant of 150 ms. On the basis of the degree of saturation in the response of high affinity dyes observed during trains, we estimate that each action potential increases [Ca2+]i in the terminal by several hundred nanomolar. These findings indicate that in these terminals [Ca2+]i transients are much larger and faster than those observed in larger boutons, such as those at the neuromuscular junction. Such rapid [Ca2+]i dynamics may be found in many of the terminals in the mammalian brain that are similar in size to parallel fiber boutons. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612860

  19. Presynaptic NMDA receptors – dynamics and distribution in developing axons in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Ishwar; Droubi, Sammy; Giovedi, Silvia; Fedder, Karlie N.; Bury, Luke A. D.; Bosco, Federica; Sceniak, Michael P.; Benfenati, Fabio; Sabo, Shasta L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During cortical development, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) facilitate presynaptic terminal formation, enhance neurotransmitter release and are required in presynaptic neurons for spike-timing-dependent long-term depression (tLTD). However, the extent to which NMDARs are found within cortical presynaptic terminals has remained controversial, and the sub-synaptic localization and dynamics of axonal NMDARs are unknown. Here, using live confocal imaging and biochemical purification of presynaptic membranes, we provide strong evidence that NMDARs localize to presynaptic terminals in vitro and in vivo in a developmentally regulated manner. The NR1 and NR2B subunits (also known as GRIN1 and GRIN2B, respectively) were found within the active zone membrane, where they could respond to synaptic glutamate release. Surprisingly, NR1 also appeared in glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic vesicles. During synaptogenesis, NR1 was mobile throughout axons – including growth cones and filopodia, structures that are involved in synaptogenesis. Upon synaptogenic contact, NMDA receptors were quickly recruited to terminals by neuroligin-1 signaling. Unlike dendrites, the trafficking and distribution of axonal NR1 were insensitive to activity changes, including NMDA exposure, local glutamate uncaging or action potential blockade. These results support the idea that presynaptic NMDARs play an early role in presynaptic development. PMID:25526735

  20. Structural Organization of the Presynaptic Density at Identified Synapses in the Locust Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Leitinger, Gerd; Masich, Sergej; Neumüller, Josef; Pabst, Maria Anna; Pavelka, Margit; Rind, F Claire; Shupliakov, Oleg; Simmons, Peter J; Kolb, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    In a synaptic active zone, vesicles aggregate around a densely staining structure called the presynaptic density. We focus on its three-dimensional architecture and a major molecular component in the locust. We used electron tomography to study the presynaptic density in synapses made in the brain by identified second-order neuron of the ocelli. Here, vesicles close to the active zone are organized in two rows on either side of the presynaptic density, a level of organization not previously reported in insect central synapses. The row of vesicles that is closest to the density's base includes vesicles docked with the presynaptic membrane and thus presumably ready for release, whereas the outer row of vesicles does not include any that are docked. We show that a locust ortholog of the Drosophila protein Bruchpilot is localized to the presynaptic density, both in the ocellar pathway and compound eye visual neurons. An antibody recognizing the C-terminus of the Bruchpilot ortholog selectively labels filamentous extensions of the presynaptic density that reach out toward vesicles. Previous studies on Bruchpilot have focused on its role in neuromuscular junctions in Drosophila, and our study shows it is also a major functional component of presynaptic densities in the central nervous system of an evolutionarily distant insect. Our study thus reveals Bruchpilot executes similar functions in synapses that can sustain transmission of small graded potentials as well as those relaying large, spike-evoked signals. J. Comp. Neurol. 520:384–400, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21826661

  1. Presynaptic effects of d-tubocurarine on neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Matzner, H; Parnas, H; Parnas, I

    1988-01-01

    1. Presynaptic effects of d-tubocurarine on neurotransmitter release were examined at the frog neuromuscular junction, using intracellular and extracellular recording techniques. 2. d-Tubocurarine in concentrations of 10(-7)-10(-6) M decreased the quantal content (m) measured by the coefficient of variation and failure methods. 3. d-Tubocurarine produced a shift to the right of the curve relating log quantal content to log [Ca2+]o without changing the slope. 4. The duration of twin-impulse facilitation was not affected by 5 x 10(-7) M-d-tubocurarine. Early facilitation was higher in d-tubocurarine. 5. d-Tubocurarine altered the synaptic delay histogram. The peak of the histogram was shifted to longer delays. Prolongation of the minimal delay was seen in most but not all experiments. 6. These results suggest that d-tubocurarine inhibits release of neurotransmitter by affecting a stage in the process of release, which occurs after the entry of Ca2+ ions. PMID:2899171

  2. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine's actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  3. Modulation of Presynaptic GABA Release by Oxidative Stress in Mechanically-isolated Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eu-Teum; Seo, Jung-Woo; Hur, Jinyoung

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the superoxide anion (O2-·), and the hydroxyl radical (OH·), are generated as by-products of oxidative metabolism in cells. The cerebral cortex has been found to be particularly vulnerable to production of ROS associated with conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion, Parkinson's disease, and aging. To investigate the effect of ROS on inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission, we examined the electrophysiological mechanisms of the modulatory effect of H2O2 on GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSCs) in mechanically isolated rat cerebral cortical neurons retaining intact synaptic boutons. The membrane potential was voltage-clamped at -60 mV and mIPSCs were recorded and analyzed. Superfusion of 1-mM H2O2 gradually potentiated mIPSCs. This potentiating effect of H2O2 was blocked by the pretreatment with either 10,000-unit/mL catalase or 300-µM N-acetyl-cysteine. The potentiating effect of H2O2 was occluded by an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and was blocked by a protein kinase A inhibitor, N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino] ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride. This study indicates that oxidative stress may potentiate presynaptic GABA release through the mechanism of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathways, which may result in the inhibition of the cerebral cortex neuronal activity. PMID:20631883

  4. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F. Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J. Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine’s actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  5. Presynaptic modulation of 5-HT release in the rat septal region.

    PubMed

    Rutz, S; Riegert, C; Rothmaier, A K; Jackisch, R

    2007-05-11

    5-HT released from serotonergic axon terminals in the septal nuclei modulates the activity of septal output neurons (e.g. septohippocampal cholinergic neurons) bearing somatodendritic 5-HT receptors. Therefore, we studied the mechanisms involved in the presynaptic modulation of 5-HT release in the lateral (LS) and medial septum (MS), and the diagonal band of Broca (DB). HPLC analysis showed that tissue concentrations of noradrenaline, dopamine and 5-HT were highest in DB (DB>MS>LS). Slices prepared from LS, MS and DB regions were preincubated with [(3)H]5-HT, superfused in the presence of 6-nitro-2-(1-piperazinyl)-quinoline (6-nitroquipazine) and electrically stimulated up to three times (first electrical stimulation period (S(1)), S(2), S(3); 360 pulses, 3 Hz, 2 ms, 26-28 mA). In all septal regions the Ca(2+)-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive electrically-evoked overflow of [(3)H] was inhibited by the 5-HT(1B) agonist CP-93,129 and the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist 5-bromo-6-(2-imidazolin-2-ylamino)-quinoxaline tartrate (UK-14,304). Also the mu- and kappa-opioid receptor agonists (d-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), glycinol(5))-enkephalin (DAMGO) and [trans-(1S,2S(-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl) cyclohexyl]-benzenacetamide hydro-chloride] (U-50,488H), respectively, acted inhibitory (although less potently), whereas the delta-opioid receptor agonist (d-Pen(2), d-Pen(5))-enkephalin (DPDPE), the dopamine D(2) receptor agonist quinpirole and the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine were all ineffective; the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen had weak effects. All inhibitory effects of the agonists were antagonized by the corresponding antagonists (3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-4-hydroxy-N-[4-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]benzamide dihydrochloride (GR-55,562), idazoxan, naloxone, nor-binaltorphimine), which also significantly enhanced the evoked release of 5-HT at S(1). It is concluded that 5-HT release in septal nuclei of the rat is modulated by

  6. The Physical State Dependence of Carboxypeptidase Aα and Aγ Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Spilburg, Curtis A.; Bethune, J. Lemuel; Vallee, Bert L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrochemical probes have demonstrated that the conformations of carboxypeptidase A (EC 3.4.12.2) differ in solution and in the crystalline state. Detailed kinetic studies of carboxypeptidase Aα and Aγ crystals and solutions now show that the physical state of the enzyme is also a critical parameter that affects the function of the Aα and Aγ enzymes in the same manner. The kinetic profiles and the corresponding kinetic constants of substrate hydrolysis are, therefore, important functional indices of the known conformational differences of the enzyme in these two physical states. The complex kinetic behavior of this enzyme, however, precludes meaningful comparisons of activity measurements for crystals and solutions obtained at only one substrate concentration. Underlying differences in varying substrate-inhibiting or -activating binding modes can result in either high or low activity ratios, concealing the true, functional consequences of the change in physical state. Thus, for all substrates examined, crystallization of the enzyme markedly reduces catalytic efficiency, kcat, from 20- to 1000-fold. Equally as important, the substrate inhibition, apparent in solution for some di- and depsipeptides, is abolished with crystals, while for longer substrates the normal solution kinetics may acquire activation with the crystals. Hypothetical modes of substrate-enzyme interaction, generated by superimposing substrate models on the crystal structure of carboxypeptidase to simulate kinetics in solution, have failed to detect both of these changes, which affect inhibitory or activating binding modes. The only structure of carboxypeptidase yet published and that of its functionally inert complex with the pseudosubstrate, glycyl-L-tyrosine, derive from a unique form of carboxypeptidase Aα crystals. These crystals differ from all others with regard both to their spectral properties and activity toward carbobenzoxy-glycyl-L-phenylalanine, which is 30% of that in solution

  7. Dynamics and control of state-dependent networks for probing genomic organization

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Indika; Groudine, Mark; Mesbahi, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    A state-dependent dynamic network is a collection of elements that interact through a network, whose geometry evolves as the state of the elements changes over time. The genome is an intriguing example of a state-dependent network, where chromosomal geometry directly relates to genomic activity, which in turn strongly correlates with geometry. Here we examine various aspects of a genomic state-dependent dynamic network. In particular, we elaborate on one of the important ramifications of viewing genomic networks as being state-dependent, namely, their controllability during processes of genomic reorganization such as in cell differentiation. PMID:21911407

  8. Pharmacological profiles of presynaptic nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptors modulating 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline release in the rat neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Matteo; Stocchi, Sara; Paganini, Francesca; Mela, Flora; Risi, Carmela De; Calo', Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo; Barnes, Timothy A; Lambert, David G; Beani, Lorenzo; Bianchi, Clementina; Morari, Michele

    2003-01-01

    The pharmacological profiles of presynaptic nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptors (NOP) modulating 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NE) release in the rat neocortex were characterized in a preparation of superfused synaptosomes challenged with 10 mM KCl. N/OFQ concentration-dependently inhibited K+-evoked [3H]-5-HT and [3H]-NE overflow with similar potency (pEC50 ∼7.9 and ∼7.7, respectively) and efficacy (maximal inhibition ∼40%). N/OFQ (0.1 μM) inhibition of [3H]-5-HT and [3H]-NE overflow was antagonized by selective NOP receptor antagonists of peptide ([Nphe1]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2 and UFP-101; 10 and 1 μM, respectively) and non-peptide (J-113397 and JTC-801; both 0.1 μM) nature. Antagonists were routinely applied 3 min before N/OFQ. However, a 21 min pre-application time was necessary for J-113397 and JTC-801 to prevent N/OFQ inhibition of [3H]-NE overflow. The NOP receptor ligand [Phe1ψ(CH2-NH)Gly2]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2 ([F/G]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2; 3 μM) did not affect K+-evoked [3H]-NE but inhibited K+-evoked [3H]-5-HT overflow in a UFP-101 sensitive manner. [F/G]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2 antagonized N/OFQ actions on both neurotransmitters. The time-dependency of JTC-801 action was studied in CHO cells expressing human NOP receptors. N/OFQ inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and JTC-801, tested at different concentrations (0.1–10 μM) and pre-incubation times (0, 40 and 90 min), antagonized this effect in a time-dependent manner. The Schild-type analysis excluded a competitive type of antagonism. We conclude that presynaptic NO receptors inhibiting 5-HT and NE release in the rat neocortex have similar pharmacological profiles. Nevertheless, they can be differentiated pharmacologically on the basis of responsiveness to [F/G]N/OFQ(1-13)NH2 and time-dependent sensitivity towards non-peptide antagonists. PMID:12522077

  9. Nanoscale-targeted patch-clamp recordings of functional presynaptic ion channels.

    PubMed

    Novak, Pavel; Gorelik, Julia; Vivekananda, Umesh; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Ermolyuk, Yaroslav S; Bailey, Russell J; Bushby, Andrew J; Moss, Guy W J; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Klenerman, David; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Volynski, Kirill E; Korchev, Yuri E

    2013-09-18

    Direct electrical access to presynaptic ion channels has hitherto been limited to large specialized terminals such as the calyx of Held or hippocampal mossy fiber bouton. The electrophysiology and ion-channel complement of far more abundant small synaptic terminals (≤ 1 μm) remain poorly understood. Here we report a method based on superresolution scanning ion conductance imaging of small synapses in culture at approximately 100-150 nm 3D resolution, which allows presynaptic patch-clamp recordings in all four configurations (cell-attached, inside-out, outside-out, and whole-cell). Using this technique, we report presynaptic recordings of K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+) channels. This semiautomated approach allows direct investigation of the distribution and properties of presynaptic ion channels at small central synapses. PMID:24050398

  10. Presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, Robert; Florenzano, Fulvio; Mango, Dalila; Ferraina, Caterina; Grilli, Massimo; Di Prisco, Silvia; Nobili, Annalisa; Saccucci, Stefania; D'Amelio, Marcello; Morbin, Michela; Marchi, Mario; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Davis, Roger J.; Pittaluga, Anna; Feligioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a critical step for neuronal death occurring in several neurological conditions. JNKs can be activated via receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA glutamate receptors. While JNK has been generally associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors, its presynaptic role remains largely unexplored. Here, by means of biochemical, morphological and functional approaches, we demonstrate that JNK and its scaffold protein JIP1 are also expressed at the presynaptic level and that the NMDA-evoked glutamate release is controlled by presynaptic JNK-JIP1 interaction. Moreover, using knockout mice for single JNK isoforms, we proved that JNK2 is the essential isoform in mediating this presynaptic event. Overall the present findings unveil a novel JNK2 localization and function, which is likely to play a role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25762148

  11. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  12. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Yan McCurdy, Li; Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Emonet, Thierry; Nitabach, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  13. Early presynaptic changes during plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ninan, Ipe; Liu, Shumin; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Arancio, Ottavio

    2006-01-01

    Long-lasting increase in synaptic strength is thought to underlie learning. An explosion of data has characterized changes in postsynaptic (pstS) AMPA receptor cycling during potentiation. However, changes occurring within the presynaptic (prS) terminal remain largely unknown. We show that appearance of new release sites during potentiation between cultured hippocampal neurons is due to (a) conversion of nonrecycling sites to recycling sites, (b) formation of new releasing sites from areas containing diffuse staining for the prS marker Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-2 and (c) budding of new recycling sites from previously existing recycling sites. In addition, potentiation is accompanied by a release probability increase in pre-existing boutons depending upon their individual probability. These prS changes precede and regulate fluorescence increase for pstS GFP-tagged-AMPA-receptor subunit GluR1. These results suggest that potentiation involves early changes in the prS terminal including remodeling and release probability increase of pre-existing synapses. PMID:16957772

  14. Functional Reorganization of the Presynaptic Dopaminergic Terminal in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Brian P.; Sanberg, Stefan G.; Andersson, Magnus; Mithyantha, Jahnavi; Carroll, F. Ivy; Garris, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Whether dopamine release is compensated during the presymptomatic phase of Parkinson's disease is controversial. Here we use in vivo voltammetry in the parkinsonian rat and an electrical stimulation protocol established to fatigue nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to investigate the plasticity of dopamine release mechanisms. Amplitudes of evoked voltammetric signals recorded in intact rat striata decreased with repetitive, high-frequency stimulation (60 Hz, every 5 min. / 60 min.). Strikingly, dopamine levels were maintained during an identical “fatiguing” protocol in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned (<40% denervation) striata in the absence of enhanced dopamine synthesis. In contrast, more severely lesioned striata (>55% denervation) also appeared to sustain DA release, however, this was demonstrated in the presence of enhanced synthesis. Sustained release was replicated in intact animals after irreversible blockade of the dopamine transporter via RTI-76, implicating neuronal uptake as a trigger. We further demonstrate through kinetic analysis that lesions and compromised uptake target a “long-term” (time constant of minutes) presynaptic depression, which underlies the maintenance of release. Taken together, our findings identify a denervation-induced maintenance of dopamine release that was independent of activated synthesis and driven by altered uptake. This novel neuroadaptation may contribute to early preclinical normalization of function and help resolve discrepant findings regarding compensatory changes in dopamine release during progression of the parkinsonian state. PMID:21787843

  15. A Vesicle Superpool Spans Multiple Presynaptic Terminals in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staras, Kevin; Branco, Tiago; Burden, Jemima J.; Pozo, Karine; Darcy, Kevin; Marra, Vincenzo; Ratnayaka, Arjuna; Goda, Yukiko

    2010-01-01

    Summary Synapse-specific vesicle pools have been widely characterized at central terminals. Here, we demonstrate a vesicle pool that is not confined to a synapse but spans multiple terminals. Using fluorescence imaging, correlative electron microscopy, and modeling of vesicle dynamics, we show that some recycling pool vesicles at synapses form part of a larger vesicle “superpool.” The vesicles within this superpool are highly mobile and are rapidly exchanged between terminals (turnover: ∼4% of total pool/min), significantly changing vesicular composition at synapses over time. In acute hippocampal slices we show that the mobile vesicle pool is also a feature of native brain tissue. We also demonstrate that superpool vesicles are available to synapses during stimulation, providing an extension of the classical recycling pool. Experiments using focal BDNF application suggest the involvement of a local TrkB-receptor-dependent mechanism for synapse-specific regulation of presynaptic vesicle pools through control of vesicle release and capture to or from the extrasynaptic pool. PMID:20399727

  16. Presynaptic action of adenosine on a 4-aminopyridine-sensitive current in the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Vandier, C; Conway, A F; Landauer, R C; Kumar, P

    1999-01-01

    Plasma adenosine concentration increases during hypoxia to a level that excites carotid body chemoreceptors by an undetermined mechanism. We have examined this further by determining the electrophysiological responses to exogenous adenosine of sinus nerve chemoafferents in vitro and of whole-cell currents in isolated type I cells.Steady-state, single-fibre chemoafferent discharge was increased approximately 5-fold above basal levels by 100 μM adenosine. This adenosine-stimulated discharge was reversibly and increasingly reduced by methoxyverapamil (D600, 100 μM), by application of nickel chloride (Ni2+, 2 mM) and by removal of extracellular Ca2+. These effects strongly suggest a presynaptic, excitatory action of adenosine on type I cells of the carotid body.Adenosine decreased whole-cell outward currents at membrane potentials above -40 mV in isolated type I cells recorded during superfusion with bicarbonate-buffered saline solution at 34–36 °C. This effect was reversible and concentration dependent with a maximal effect at 10 μM.The degree of current inhibition induced by 10 μM adenosine was voltage independent (45.39 ± 2.55% (mean ± s.e.m.) between −40 and +30 mV) and largely (∼75%), but not entirely, Ca2+ independent. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP, 5 mM) decreased the amplitude of the control outward current by 80.60 ± 3.67% and abolished the effect of adenosine.Adenosine was without effect upon currents near the resting membrane potential of approximately −55 mV and did not induce depolarization in current-clamp experiments.We conclude that adenosine acts to inhibit a 4-AP-sensitive current in isolated type I cells of the rat carotid body and suggest that this mechanism contributes to the chemoexcitatory effect of adenosine in the whole carotid body. PMID:10050009

  17. Dendritically released transmitters cooperate via autocrine and retrograde actions to inhibit afferent excitation in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Michiru; Schwab, Yannick; Natah, Sirajedin; Hillard, Cecilia J; Mackie, Ken; Sharkey, Keith A; Pittman, Quentin J

    2004-01-01

    Oxytocin is released from supraoptic magnocellular neurones and is thought to act at presynaptic receptors to inhibit transmitter release. We now show that this effect is mediated by endocannabinoids, but that oxytocin nonetheless plays an important role in endocannabinoid signalling. WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, mimicked the action of oxytocin and occluded oxytocin-induced presynaptic inhibition. The cannabinoid action is at the presynaptic terminal as shown by alteration in paired pulse ratio, a reduction in miniature EPSC frequency and immunohistochemical localization of CB1 receptors on presynaptic terminals. AM251, a CB1 receptor antagonist, blocked both the WIN55,212-2 and the oxytocin-induced presynaptic inhibition of EPSCs. Depolarization of postsynaptic magnocellular neurones (which contain fatty acid amide hydrolase, a cannabinoid catabolic enzyme) caused a transient inhibition of EPSCs that could be blocked by both the AM251 and Manning compound, an oxytocin/vasopressin receptor antagonist. This indicates that somatodendritic peptide release and action on previously identified autoreceptors facilitates the release of endocannabinoids that act as mediators of presynaptic inhibition. PMID:15254151

  18. Presynaptic GABAB Autoreceptor Regulation of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Mediated [3H]-GABA Release from Mouse Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Grady, Sharon R.; Marks, Michael J.; Collins, Allan C.; Stitzel, Jerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) can elicit neurotransmitter release from presynaptic nerve terminals. Mechanisms contributing to cell-and-terminal specific regulation of nAChR-mediated neurotransmitter exocytosis are not fully understood. The experiments discussed here examine how activation of GABAB auto- and hetero-receptors suppress nAChR-mediated release of [3H]-GABA and [3H]-dopamine (3H-DA) from mouse striatal synaptosomes. Activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors with (R)-baclofen decreased both [3H]-GABA and [3H]-DA release evoked by potassium depolarization. However, when nAChRs were activated with ACh to evoke neurotransmitter release, (R)-baclofen had no effect on [3H]-DA release, but potently inhibited ACh-evoked [3H]-GABA release. Inhibition of nAChR-evoked [3H]-GABA release by (R)-baclofen was time sensitive and the effect was lost after prolonged exposure to the GABAB agonist. The early inhibitory effect of GABA activation on ACh-evoked [3H]-GABA release was partially attenuated by antagonists of the phosphatase, calcineurin. Furthermore, antagonists of protein kinase C (PKC) prevented the time-dependent loss of the inhibitory (R)-baclofen effect on [3H]-GABA release. These results suggest that α4β2*-nAChRs present on GABAergic nerve terminals in the striatum are subject to functional regulation by GABAB autoreceptors that is apparently cell-type specific, since it is absent from DAergic striatal nerve terminals. In addition, the functional modulation of α4β2*-type nAChRs on striatal GABAergic nerve terminals by GABAB autoreceptor activation is time-sensitive and appears to involve opposing actions of calcineurin and PKC. PMID:24953818

  19. Isoflurane-sensitive presynaptic R-type calcium channels contribute to inhibitory synaptic transmission in the rat thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Joksovic, Pavle M.; Weiergräber, Marco; Lee, WooYong; Struck, Henrik; Schneider, Toni; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2009-01-01

    Since inhibitory synaptic transmission is a major mechanism of general anesthesia, we examined the effects of isoflurane on properties of GABAergic inhibitory currents in the reticular thalamic nucleus (nRT) in brain slices. The evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) and spontaneous miniature synaptic currents (mIPSCs) of visualized nRT cells in young and adult rats were recorded. Consistent with postsynaptic effects on GABAA receptors, isoflurane prolonged the decay-time constants of both eIPSCs and mIPCSs. Surprisingly, isoflurane completely inhibited the amplitude of eIPSCs at clinically relevant concentrations (IC50 of 240 ± 20 μM), increased the paired-pulse ratio, and decreased the frequency of mIPSCs, indicating that presynaptic mechanisms may also contribute to the effects of isoflurane on IPSCs. The overall effect of isoflurane on eIPSCs in nRT cells was a decrease of net charge-transfer across the postsynaptic membrane. The application of 100 μM nickel (Ni2+) and the more specific R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX-482 (0.5 μM) decreased eIPSC amplitudes, increased the paired-pulse ratio, and attenuated isoflurane-induced inhibition of eIPSCs. In addition, isoflurane potently blocked currents in recombinant human CaV2.3 (α1E) channels with an IC50 of 206 ± 22 μM. Importantly, in vivo electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in adult CaV2.3 knockout mice demonstrated alterations in isoflurane-induced burst-suppression activity. Because the thalamus has a key function in processing sensory information, sleep, and cognition, modulation of its GABAergic tone by presynaptic R-type Ca2+ channels may contribute to the clinical effects of general anesthesia. PMID:19193890

  20. Presynaptic Calcium Channel Localization and Calcium Dependent Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Regulated by the Fuseless Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. Ashleigh; Kim, Eunju; Leung, Hung-Tat; Woodruff, Elvin; An, Lingling; Doerge, R. W.; Pak, William L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Summary A systematic forward genetic Drosophila screen for electroretinogram mutants lacking synaptic transients identified the fuseless (fusl) gene, which encodes a predicted 8-pass transmembrane protein in the presynaptic membrane. Null fusl mutants display >75% reduction in evoked synaptic transmission but, conversely, a ~3-fold increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion events. These neurotransmission defects are rescued by a wildtype fusl transgene targeted only to the presynaptic cell, demonstrating a strictly presynaptic requirement for Fusl function. Defects in FM dye turnover at the synapse show a severely impaired exo-endo synaptic vesicle cycling pool. Consistently, ultrastructural analyses reveal accumulated vesicles arrested in clustered and docked pools at presynaptic active zones. In the absence of Fusl, calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release is dramatically compromised and there is little enhancement of synaptic efficacy with elevated external Ca2+ concentrations. These defects are causally linked with severe loss of the Cacophony voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which fail to localize normally at presynaptic active zone domains in the absence of Fusl. These data indicate that Fusl regulates assembly of the presynaptic active zone Ca2+ channel domains required for efficient coupling of the Ca2+ influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis during neurotransmission. PMID:18385325

  1. Antagonism of the presumed presynaptic action of L-AP4 on GABAergic transmission in the ventrobasal thalamus by the novel mGluR antagonist MPPG.

    PubMed

    Salt, T E; Turner, J P

    1996-02-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists CCG-I and L-AP4, acting at Group II and Group III mGluRs respectively, can reduce GABAergic synaptic inhibition on single neurones in the rat thalamus in vivo via a presumed presynaptic mechanism. The actions of L-AP4 were antagonized by (+/-)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), whereas CCG-I was significantly less affected. Thus MPPG may be a useful tool for detecting physiological roles for Group III mGluRs. PMID:8734494

  2. Whereas Short-Term Facilitation Is Presynaptic, Intermediate-Term Facilitation Involves Both Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Protein Kinases and Protein Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Iksung; Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas short-term plasticity involves covalent modifications that are generally restricted to either presynaptic or postsynaptic structures, long-term plasticity involves the growth of new synapses, which by its nature involves both pre- and postsynaptic alterations. In addition, an intermediate-term stage of plasticity has been identified that…

  3. The translational regulator Cup controls NMJ presynaptic terminal morphology.

    PubMed

    Menon, Kaushiki P; Carrillo, Robert A; Zinn, Kai

    2015-07-01

    During oogenesis and early embryonic development in Drosophila, translation of proteins from maternally deposited mRNAs is tightly controlled. We and others have previously shown that translational regulatory proteins that function during oogenesis also have essential roles in the nervous system. Here we examine the role of Cup in neuromuscular system development. Maternal Cup controls translation of localized mRNAs encoding the Oskar and Nanos proteins and binds to the general translation initiation factor eIF4E. In this paper, we show that zygotic Cup protein is localized to presynaptic terminals at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). cup mutant NMJs have strong phenotypes characterized by the presence of small clustered boutons called satellite boutons. They also exhibit an increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate release events (mEPSPs). Reduction of eIF4E expression synergizes with partial loss of Cup expression to produce satellite bouton phenotypes. The presence of satellite boutons is often associated with increases in retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and we show that synaptic BMP signaling is elevated in cup mutants. cup genetically interacts with two genes, EndoA and Dap160, that encode proteins involved in endocytosis that are also neuronal modulators of the BMP pathway. Endophilin protein, encoded by the EndoA gene, is downregulated in a cup mutant. Our results are consistent with a model in which Cup and eIF4E work together to ensure efficient localization and translation of endocytosis proteins in motor neurons and control the strength of the retrograde BMP signal. PMID:26102195

  4. Strontium, barium, and manganese metabolism in isolated presynaptic nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Rasgado-Flores, H.; Sanchez-Armass, S.; Blaustein, M.P.; Nachshen, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms by which the divalent cations Sr, Ba, and Mn affect neurotransmitter release from presynaptic nerve terminals, the authors examined the sequestration of these cations, ion comparison to Ca, by mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial organelles and the extrusion of these cations from isolated nerve terminals. Sequestration was studied in synaptosomes made leaky to small ions by treatment with saponin; efflux was examined in intact synaptosomes that were preloaded with the divalent cations by incubation in depolarizing (K rich) media. The selectivity sequence for ATP-dependent mitochondrial uptake that they observed was Mn>>Ca>Sr>>Ba, whereas that for the SER was Ca greater than or equal to Mn>Sr>>Ba. When synaptosomes that were preloaded with divalent cations were incubated in Na- and Ca-free media, there was little efflux of /sup 45/Ca, /sup 133/Ba, /sup 85/Sr, or /sup 54/Mn. When the incubation was carried out in media containing Na without Ca, there was substantial stimulation of Ca and Sr efflux, but only slight stimulation of Ba or Mn efflux. In Na-free media, the addition of 1 mM Ca promoted the efflux of all four divalent cations, probably via Ca-divalent cation exchange. In summary, the sequestration and extrusion data suggest that, with equal loads, Mn will be buffered to the greatest extent, whereas Ba will be least well buffered. These results may help to explain why Mn has a very long-lasting effect on transmitter release, while the effect of Sr is much briefer.

  5. Piccolo Directs Activity Dependent F-Actin Assembly from Presynaptic Active Zones via Daam1

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Waites, Clarissa L.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio A.; Maas, Christoph; Reimer, Richard J.; Garner, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of filamentous (F) actin plays essential roles in the assembly of presynaptic boutons, the fusion, mobilization and recycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs), and presynaptic forms of plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the temporal and spatial assembly of presynaptic F-actin remain largely unknown. Similar to other F-actin rich membrane specializations, presynaptic boutons contain a set of molecules that respond to cellular cues and trans-synaptic signals to facilitate activity-dependent assembly of F-actin. The presynaptic active zone (AZ) protein Piccolo has recently been identified as a key regulator of neurotransmitter release during SV cycling. It does so by coordinating the activity-dependent assembly of F-Actin and the dynamics of key plasticity molecules including Synapsin1, Profilin and CaMKII. The multidomain structure of Piccolo, its exquisite association with the AZ, and its ability to interact with a number of actin-associated proteins suggest that Piccolo may function as a platform to coordinate the spatial assembly of F-actin. Here we have identified Daam1, a Formin that functions with Profilin to drive F-actin assembly, as a novel Piccolo binding partner. We also found that within cells Daam1 activation promotes Piccolo binding, an interaction that can spatially direct the polymerization of F-Actin. Moreover, similar to Piccolo and Profilin, Daam1 loss of function impairs presynaptic-F-actin assembly in neurons. These data suggest a model in which Piccolo directs the assembly of presynaptic F-Actin from the AZ by scaffolding key actin regulatory proteins including Daam1. PMID:25897839

  6. Presynaptic facilitation of glycinergic mIPSC is reduced in mice lacking α3 glycine receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Kono, Y; Hülsmann, S

    2016-04-21

    Glycinergic neurons provide an important mechanism to control excitation of motoneurons in the brainstem and a reduction or loss of glycinergic inhibition can be deleterious by leading to hyperexcitation such as in hyperekplexia or neurodegeneration and neuronal death as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Second messenger systems that change cyclic AMP and lead to phosphorylation of the α3 subunit of the glycine receptor (GlyR α3) have been shown to be potent modulators of synaptic inhibition in the spinal cord and brain stem. In this study we analyzed the role of GlyR α3 in synaptic inhibition to the hypoglossal nucleus using Glra3 (the gene encoding the glycine receptor α3 subunit) knockout mice. We observed that baseline glycinergic synaptic transmission to nucleus of hypoglossal motoneurons is rather normal in Glra3 knockout mice. Interestingly, we found that the modulation of synaptic transmission by cAMP-mediated pathways appeared to be reduced in Glra3 knockout mice. In the second postnatal week the forskolin-induced increase of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potential (mIPSC) frequency was significantly larger in control as compared to Glra3 knockout mice suggesting that presynaptic glycine release in the hypoglossal nucleus is partially depending on GlyR α3. PMID:26851771

  7. An automated electrophysiological assay for differentiating Ca(v)2.2 inhibitors based on state dependence and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Andrew M; Niforatos, Wende; Vortherms, Timothy A; Perner, Richard J; Li, Tao; Schrimpf, Michael R; Scott, Victoria E; Lee, Lance; Jarvis, Michael F; McGaraughty, Steve

    2012-12-01

    Ca(V)2.2 (N-type) calcium channels are key regulators of neurotransmission. Evidence from knockout animals and localization studies suggest that Ca(V)2.2 channels play a critical role in nociceptive transmission. Additionally, ziconotide, a selective peptide inhibitor of Ca(V)2.2 channels, is clinically used to treat refractory pain. However, the use of ziconotide is limited by its low therapeutic index, which is believed, at least in part, to be a consequence of ziconotide inhibiting Ca(V)2.2 channels regardless of the channel state. Subsequent efforts have focused on the discovery of state-dependent inhibitors that preferentially bind to the inactivated state of Ca(V)2.2 channels in order to achieve an improved safety profile relative to ziconotide. Much less attention has been paid to understanding the binding kinetics of these state-dependent inhibitors. Here, we describe a novel electrophysiology-based assay on an automated patch platform designed to differentiate Ca(V)2.2 inhibitors based on their combined state dependence and kinetics. More specifically, this assay assesses inactivated state block, closed state block, and monitors the kinetics of recovery from block when channels move between states. Additionally, a use-dependent assay is described that uses a train of depolarizing pulses to drive channels to a similar level of inactivation for comparison. This use-dependent protocol also provides information on the kinetics of block development. Data are provided to show how these assays can be utilized to screen for kinetic diversity within and across chemical classes. PMID:22428804

  8. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C. )

    1989-11-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine continuously synthesized from ({sup 3}H)tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10{sup {minus}6} M tetrodotoxin, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M acetylcholine stimulated ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10{sup {minus}6} M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of ({sup 3}H) dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on ({sup 3}H)dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of ({sup 3}H)dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively.

  9. Glutamate transporters and presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors protect neocortical Cajal-Retzius cells against over-excitation.

    PubMed

    Dvorzhak, Anton; Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2012-08-01

    Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells, early generated neurons in the marginal zone of developing neocortex, are reported to be highly vulnerable to excitotoxic damage. Because extracellular glutamate concentration in the central nervous system is mainly controlled by glutamate transporters (EAATs), we studied the effects of EAAT blockade on CR cells. DL: -TBOA, a specific EAAT antagonist, induced NMDA receptor-dependent bursting discharges in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, indicating that EAATs operate in the uptake mode and their blockade leads to elevation of extracellular glutamate concentration. In CR cells, however, DL: -TBOA failed to change either the membrane resistance or holding current, and moreover, it reduced the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic postsynaptic currents. DL: -TBOA decreased the mean amplitude and increased paired-pulse ratio of evoked GABAergic postsynaptic currents, indicating the presynaptic locus of its action. Indeed, LY379268, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR-II), mimicked the DL: -TBOA-mediated effects, and LY341495, an unspecific mGluR antagonist, eliminated the DL: -TBOA-induced effects. As dihydrokainic acid, a specific EAAT2 blocker, failed to affect evoked GABAergic postsynaptic currents, whereas TFB-TBOA, a selective blocker of EAAT1 and EAAT2, produced effects similar to that of DL: -TBOA, extracellular glutamate concentration in the marginal zone is mainly controlled by EAAT1 (GLAST). Thus, even though CR cells are highly vulnerable to excitotoxic damage, a number of mechanisms serve to protect them against excessive extracellular glutamate concentration including a lack of functional glutamatergic synapses, Mg(2+) blockade of NMDA receptors, and presynaptic mGluRs that inhibit transmission at GABAergic synapses. PMID:22665047

  10. Acute desipramine restores presynaptic cortical defects in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by suppressing central CCL5 overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Merega, Elisa; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Casazza, Simona; Uccelli, Antonio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Altered glutamate exocytosis and cAMP production in cortical terminals of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice occur at the early stage of disease (13 days post-immunization, d.p.i.). Neuronal defects were paralleled by overexpression of the central chemokine CCL5 (also known as RANTES), suggesting it has a role in presynaptic impairments. We propose that drugs able to restore CCL5 content to physiological levels could also restore presynaptic defects. Because of its efficacy in controlling CCL5 overexpression, desipramine (DMI) appeared to be a suitable candidate to test our hypothesis. Experimental Approach Control and EAE mice at 13 d.p.i. were acutely or chronically administered DMI and monitored for behaviour and clinical scores. Noradrenaline and glutamate release, cAMP, CCL5 and TNF-α production were quantified in cortical synaptosomes and homogenates. Peripheral cytokine production was also determined. Key Results Noradrenaline exocytosis and α2-adrenoeceptor-mediated activity were unmodified in EAE mice at 13 d.p.i. when compared with control. Acute, but not chronic, DMI reduced CCL5 levels in cortical homogenates of EAE mice at 13 d.p.i., but did not affect peripheral IL-17 and TNF-α contents or CCL5 plasma levels. Acute DMI caused a long-lasting restoration of glutamate exocytosis, restored endogenous cAMP production and impeded the shift from inhibition to facilitation of the CCL5-mediated control of glutamate exocytosis. Finally, DMI ameliorated anxiety-related behaviour but not motor activity or severity of clinical signs. Conclusions We propose DMI as an add-on therapy to normalize neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis patients at the early stage of the disease. PMID:24528439

  11. LGI1 acts presynaptically to regulate excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Morgane; Lee, Chun-Yao; Allene, Camille; Leguern, Eric; Baulac, Stéphanie; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The secreted leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) protein is an important actor for human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune etiology: mutations in LGI1 cause inherited temporal lobe epilepsy, while LGI1 is involved in antibody-mediated encephalitis. Remarkably, Lgi1-deficient (Lgi1(-/-)) mice recapitulate the epileptic disorder and display early-onset spontaneous seizures. To understand how Lgi1-deficiency leads to seizures during postnatal development, we here investigated the early functional and structural defects occurring before seizure onset in Lgi1(-/-) mice. We found an increased excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices from Lgi1(-/-) mice. No structural alteration in the morphology of pyramidal cell dendrites and synapses was observed at this stage, indicating that Lgi1-deficiency is unlikely to trigger early developmental abnormalities. Consistent with the presynaptic subcellular localization of the protein, Lgi1-deficiency caused presynaptic defects, with no alteration in postsynaptic AMPA receptor activity in Lgi1-/- pyramidal cells before seizure onset. Presynaptic dysfunction led to increased synaptic glutamate levels, which were associated with hyperexcitable neuronal networks. Altogether, these data show that Lgi1 acts presynaptically as a negative modulator of excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development. We therefore here reveal that increased presynaptic glutamate release is a key early event resulting from Lgi1-deficiency, which likely contributes to epileptogenesis. PMID:26878798

  12. The amino-terminal domain of glutamate receptor {delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2008-12-26

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) {delta}2 selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells plays key roles in synapse formation, long-term depression and motor learning. We propose that GluR{delta}2 regulates synapse formation by making a physical linkage between the active zone and postsynaptic density. To examine the issue, GluR{delta}2-transfected 293T cells were cultured with cerebellar neurons. We found numerous punctate signals for presynaptic markers on the surface of 293T cells expressing GluR{delta}2. The presynaptic specializations induced by GluR{delta}2 were capable of exo- and endocytosis as indicated by FM1-43 dye labeling. Replacement of the extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) of GluR{delta}2 with that of the AMPA receptor GluR{alpha}1 abolished the inducing activity. The NTD of GluR{delta}2 fused to the immunoglobulin constant region successfully induced the accumulation of presynaptic specializations on the surface of beads bearing the fusion protein. These results suggest that GluR{delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation by direct interaction with presynaptic components through the NTD.

  13. Presynaptic glycine receptors as a potential therapeutic target for hyperekplexia disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Chen, Shao-Rui; He, Liming; Cheng, Kejun; Zhao, Yi-Lin; Chen, Hong; Li, De-Pei; Homanics, Gregg E.; Peever, John; Rice, Kenner C.; Wu, Ling-gang; Pan, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    While postsynaptic GlyRs as α/β heteromers attract the most research attention, little is known about the role of presynaptic GlyRs, likely α homomers, in diseases. Here, we demonstrate that DH-CBD, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, can rescue GlyR functional deficiency and exaggerated acoustic and tactile startle responses in mice bearing the point-mutations in the α1 GlyRs responsible for a hereditary startle/hyperekplexia disease. The GlyRs expressed as α1 homomers either in HEK-293 cells or at presynaptic terminals of the calyceal synapses in auditory brainstem are most vulnerable to hyperekplexia mutation-induced impairment. Homomeric mutants are more sensitive than heteromers to DH-CBD, suggesting presynaptic GlyRs as a primary target. Consistent with this, DH-CBD selectively rescues impaired presynaptic GlyR activity and diminished glycine release in the brainstem and spinal cord of hyperekplexic mutant mice. Thus, presynaptic α GlyRs emerge as a potential therapeutic target for dominant hyperekplexia disease and other diseases with GlyR deficiency. PMID:24390226

  14. LGI1 acts presynaptically to regulate excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Lee, Chun-Yao; Allene, Camille; Leguern, Eric; Baulac, Stéphanie; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The secreted leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) protein is an important actor for human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune etiology: mutations in LGI1 cause inherited temporal lobe epilepsy, while LGI1 is involved in antibody-mediated encephalitis. Remarkably, Lgi1-deficient (Lgi1−/−) mice recapitulate the epileptic disorder and display early-onset spontaneous seizures. To understand how Lgi1-deficiency leads to seizures during postnatal development, we here investigated the early functional and structural defects occurring before seizure onset in Lgi1−/− mice. We found an increased excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices from Lgi1−/− mice. No structural alteration in the morphology of pyramidal cell dendrites and synapses was observed at this stage, indicating that Lgi1-deficiency is unlikely to trigger early developmental abnormalities. Consistent with the presynaptic subcellular localization of the protein, Lgi1-deficiency caused presynaptic defects, with no alteration in postsynaptic AMPA receptor activity in Lgi1−/− pyramidal cells before seizure onset. Presynaptic dysfunction led to increased synaptic glutamate levels, which were associated with hyperexcitable neuronal networks. Altogether, these data show that Lgi1 acts presynaptically as a negative modulator of excitatory synaptic transmission during early postnatal development. We therefore here reveal that increased presynaptic glutamate release is a key early event resulting from Lgi1-deficiency, which likely contributes to epileptogenesis. PMID:26878798

  15. Receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of quantal release of acetylcholine induced by pralidoxime in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fossier, P; Baux, G; Poulain, B; Tauc, L

    1990-09-01

    1. Possible interactions of contrathion (pralidoxime sulfomethylate), a reactivator of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with the regulation of cholinergic transmission were investigated on an identified synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Transmitter release was evoked either by a presynaptic action potential or, under voltage clamp, by a long depolarization of the presynaptic cell. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, bath-applied contrathion decreased the amplitude of miniature postsynaptic currents and increased their decay time. At the same time, the quantal release of ACh was transiently facilitated. The facilitatory effect of contrathion was prevented by tubocurarine but not by atropine. Because in this preparation, these drugs block, respectively, the presynaptic nicotinic-like and muscarinic-like receptors involved in positive and negative feedback of ACh release, we proposed that contrathion activates presynaptic nicotinic-like receptors. 3. Differential desensitization of the presynaptic receptors is proposed to explain the transience of the facilitatory action of contrathion on ACh release. 4. The complexity of the synaptic action of contrathion raises the possibility that its therapeutic effects in AChE poisonings are not limited to AChE reactivation. PMID:2253262

  16. Essential role of presynaptic NMDA receptors in activity-dependent BDNF secretion and corticostriatal LTP.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungju; Popescu, Andrei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-12-01

    Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in postsynaptic dendrites is required for long-term potentiation (LTP) of many excitatory synapses, but the role of presynaptic axonal NMDARs in synaptic plasticity remains to be clarified. Here we report that axonal NMDARs play an essential role in LTP induction at mouse corticostriatal synapses by triggering activity-induced presynaptic secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Genetic depletion of either BDNF or the NMDAR subunit GluN1 specifically in cortical axons abolished corticostriatal LTP in response to theta burst stimulation (TBS). Furthermore, functional axonal NMDARs were required for TBS-triggered prolonged axonal Ca(2+) elevation and BDNF secretion, supporting the notion that activation of axonal NMDARs induces BDNF secretion via enhancing Ca(2+) signals in the presynaptic nerve terminals. These results demonstrate that presynaptic NMDARs are equally important as postsynaptic NMDARs in LTP induction of corticostriatal synapses due to their role in mediating activity-induced presynaptic BDNF secretion. PMID:25467984

  17. Positive periodic solutions for a neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkun; Zhao, Lili

    2009-04-01

    By using a fixed point theorem of strict-set-contraction, some new criteria are established for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the following periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

  18. A novel mathematical setup for fault tolerant control systems with state-dependent failure process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitraganti, S.; Aberkane, S.; Aubrun, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we consider a fault tolerant control system (FTCS) with state- dependent failures and provide a tractable mathematical model to handle the state-dependent failures. By assuming abrupt changes in system parameters, we use a jump process modelling of failure process and the fault detection and isolation (FDI) process. In particular, we assume that the failure rates of the failure process vary according to which set the state of the system belongs to.

  19. Reactive oxygen species induced by presynaptic glutamate receptor activation is involved in [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain cortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A; Krupko, O; Himmelreich, N

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a response to presynaptic glutamate receptor activation, and the role of ROS in neurotransmitter (GABA) release. Experiments were performed with rat brain cortical synaptosomes using glutamate, NMDA and kainate as agonists of glutamate receptors. ROS production was evaluated with the fluorogenic compound dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA), and GABA release was studied using synaptosomes loaded with [(3)H]GABA. All agonists were found to stimulate ROS production, and specific antagonists of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors, dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-done (CNQX), significantly inhibited the ROS increase. Spontaneous as well as agonist-evoked ROS production was effectively attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a commonly used potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity, that suggests a high contribution of NADPH-oxidase to this process. The replacement of glucose with pyruvate or the simultaneous presence of both substrates in the medium led to the decrease in spontaneous and NMDA-evoked ROS production, but to the increase in ROS production induced by kainate. Scavenging of agonist-evoked ROS production by a potent antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was tightly correlated with the inhibition of agonist-evoked GABA release. Together, these findings show that the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors induces an increase in ROS production, and there is a tight correlation between ROS production and GABA secretion. The pivotal role of kainate/AMPA receptors in ROS production is under discussion. PMID:22864357

  20. Basolateral amygdala CB1 cannabinoid receptors are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ofogh, Sattar Norouzi; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol and morphine are largely co-abused and affect memory formation. The present study intended to investigate the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. Adult male Wistar rats received bilateral cannulation of the BLA, and memory retrieval was measured in step-through type passive avoidance apparatus. Our results showed that post-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of morphine (6mg/kg) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) significantly improved morphine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that there is cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. It should be considered that pre-test administration of ethanol (0.1 and 0.5g/kg, i.p.) by itself had no effect on memory retrieval in the passive avoidance task. Interestingly, pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of different doses of WIN55,212-2 (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3μg/rat), a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, plus an ineffective dose of ethanol (0.1g/kg, i.p.) improved morphine-induced memory impairment. Intra-BLA microinjection of AM251 (0.4-0.6ng/rat), a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, inhibited the improved effect of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) on morphine response. Pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of WIN55,212-2 or AM251 had no effect on memory retrieval or morphine-induced amnesia. Taken together, it can be concluded that morphine and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In addition, the BLA endocannabinoid system mediates via CB1 receptors the functional interaction of morphine and ethanol state-dependent memory retrieval which may depend on the rewarding effects of the drugs. PMID:27327764

  1. Presynaptic Excitation via GABAB Receptors in Habenula Cholinergic Neurons Regulates Fear Memory Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juen; Tan, Lubin; Ren, Yuqi; Liang, Jingwen; Lin, Rui; Feng, Qiru; Zhou, Jingfeng; Hu, Fei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Chao; Yu, Tao; Zhuang, Yinghua; Bettler, Bernhard; Wang, Fengchao; Luo, Minmin

    2016-07-28

    Fear behaviors are regulated by adaptive mechanisms that dampen their expression in the absence of danger. By studying circuits and the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptive response, we show that cholinergic neurons of the medial habenula reduce fear memory expression through GABAB presynaptic excitation. Ablating these neurons or inactivating their GABAB receptors impairs fear extinction in mice, whereas activating the neurons or their axonal GABAB receptors reduces conditioned fear. Although considered exclusively inhibitory, here, GABAB mediates excitation by amplifying presynaptic Ca(2+) entry through Cav2.3 channels and potentiating co-release of glutamate, acetylcholine, and neurokinin B to excite interpeduncular neurons. Activating the receptors for these neurotransmitters or enhancing neurotransmission with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduces fear responses of both wild-type and GABAB mutant mice. We identify the role of an extra-amygdalar circuit and presynaptic GABAB receptors in fear control, suggesting that boosting neurotransmission in this pathway might ameliorate some fear disorders. PMID:27426949

  2. Homeostatic synaptic depression is achieved through a regulated decrease in presynaptic calcium channel abundance.

    PubMed

    Gaviño, Michael A; Ford, Kevin J; Archila, Santiago; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic signaling stabilizes synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of Drosophila, mice, and human. It is believed that homeostatic signaling at the NMJ is bi-directional and considerable progress has been made identifying mechanisms underlying the homeostatic potentiation of neurotransmitter release. However, very little is understood mechanistically about the opposing process, homeostatic depression, and how bi-directional plasticity is achieved. Here, we show that homeostatic potentiation and depression can be simultaneously induced, demonstrating true bi-directional plasticity. Next, we show that mutations that block homeostatic potentiation do not alter homeostatic depression, demonstrating that these are genetically separable processes. Finally, we show that homeostatic depression is achieved by decreased presynaptic calcium channel abundance and calcium influx, changes that are independent of the presynaptic action potential waveform. Thus, we identify a novel mechanism of homeostatic synaptic plasticity and propose a model that can account for the observed bi-directional, homeostatic control of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. PMID:25884248

  3. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Saad; Gerrow, Kim; Triller, Antoine; Smart, Trevor G

    2016-08-16

    Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity. PMID:27498877

  4. Potentiation of presynaptic inhibition of nociceptive pathways as a mechanism for analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sastry, B R

    1980-01-01

    In decerebrated spinal cats, stimulation of cutaneous A delta and C afferents and intraarterial injections of bradykinin into a hind limb produced a reduction in the threshold for antidromic activation in the substantia gelatinosa of single C fibres. Meperidine increased the unconditioned threshold but potentiated the decrease in the threshold produced by A delta fibre stimulation and by bradykinin injection. These results support the suggestion that myelinated cutaneous afferents can depolarize C afferent terminals. The observations also indicate that the depolarization of C afferent terminals produced during pain and by stimulation of other cutaneous afferents is potentiated by meperidine. PMID:7378911

  5. GABA-Mediated Presynaptic Inhibition Is Required for Precision of Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Patrick K.; Dulka, Brooke N.; Ortiz, Samantha; Riccio, David C.; Jasnow, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Though much attention has been given to the neural structures that underlie the long-term consolidation of contextual memories, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of memory precision. Here, we demonstrate a rapid time-dependent decline in memory precision in GABA [subscript B(1a)] receptor knockout mice. First, we…

  6. Posttetanic potentiation critically depends on an enhanced Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion mediated by presynaptic PKC

    PubMed Central

    Korogod, Natalya; Lou, Xuelin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Activity-dependent enhancement of transmitter release is a common form of presynaptic plasticity, but the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained largely unknown, perhaps because of the inaccessibility of most CNS nerve terminals. Here we investigated the signaling steps that underlie posttetanic potentiation (PTP), a form of presynaptic plasticity found at many CNS synapses. Direct whole-cell recordings from the large calyx of Held nerve terminals with the perforated patch-clamp technique showed that PTP was not mediated by changes in the presynaptic action potential waveform. Ca2+ imaging revealed a slight increase of the presynaptic Ca2+ transient during PTP (≈15%), which, however, was too small to explain a large part of PTP. The presynaptic PKC pathway was critically involved in PTP because (i) PTP was occluded by activation of PKC with phorbol esters, and (ii) PTP was largely (by approximately two-thirds) blocked by the PKC inhibitors, Ro31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide. Activation of PKC during PTP most likely acts directly on the presynaptic release machinery, because in presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging experiments, activation of PKC by phorbol ester greatly increased the Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion in a Ro31-8220-sensitive manner (≈300% with small Ca2+ uncaging stimuli), but only slightly increased presynaptic voltage-gated Ca2+ currents (≈15%). We conclude that a PKC-dependent increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of vesicle fusion is a key step in the enhancement of transmitter release during PTP. PMID:17884983

  7. Presynaptic N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Activity Is Increased Through Protein Kinase C in Paclitaxel-induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing-Dun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Zeng, Wei-An; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy is a severe adverse effect of chemotherapeutic drugs such as paclitaxel (Taxol). The glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are critically involved in the synaptic plasticity associated with neuropathic pain. However, paclitaxel treatment does not alter the postsynaptic NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. In this study, we determined whether paclitaxel affects presynaptic NMDAR activity by recording excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) of dorsal horn neurons in spinal cord slices. In paclitaxel-treated rats, the baseline frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) was significantly increased; the NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) completely normalized this frequency. Also, AP5 significantly reduced the amplitude of monosynaptic EPSCs evoked by dorsal root stimulation and reversed the reduction in the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in paclitaxel-treated rats. Blocking GluN2A-containing, but not GluN2B-containing, NMDARs largely decreased the frequency of mEPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs of dorsal horn neurons in paclitaxel-treated rats. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C fully reversed the increased frequency of mEPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs in paclitaxel-treated rats. Paclitaxel treatment significantly increased the protein level of GluN2A and phosphorylated GluN1 in the dorsal root ganglion. In addition, intrathecal injection of AP5 or systemic administration of memantine profoundly attenuated pain hypersensitivity induced by paclitaxel. Our findings indicate that paclitaxel treatment induces tonic activation of presynaptic NMDARs in the spinal cord through protein kinase C to potentiate nociceptive input from primary afferent nerves. Targeting presynaptic NMDARs at the spinal cord level may be an effective strategy for treating chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27458019

  8. A TRPV Channel in Drosophila Motor Neurons Regulates Presynaptic Resting Ca2+ Levels, Synapse Growth, and Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ching-On; Chen, Kuchuan; Lin, Yong Qi; Chao, Yufang; Duraine, Lita; Lu, Zhongmin; Yoon, Wan Hee; Sullivan, Jeremy M.; Broadhead, Geoffrey T.; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Macleod, Gregory T.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Venkatachalam, Kartik

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Presynaptic resting Ca2+ influences synaptic vesicle (SV) release probability. Here, we report that a TRPV channel, Inactive (Iav), maintains presynaptic resting [Ca2+] by promoting Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in Drosophila motor neurons, and is required for both synapse development and neurotransmission. We find that Iav activates the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, calcineurin, which is essential for presynaptic microtubule stabilization at the neuromuscular junction. Thus, loss of Iav induces destabilization of presynaptic microtubules resulting in diminished synaptic growth. Interestingly, expression of human TRPV1 in Iav-deficient motor neurons rescues these defects. We also show that the absence of Iav causes lower SV release probability and diminished synaptic transmission, whereas Iav overexpression elevates these synaptic parameters. Together, our findings indicate that Iav acts as a key regulator of synaptic development and function by influencing presynaptic resting [Ca2+]. PMID:25451193

  9. GABAergic mechanisms regulated by miR-33 encode state-dependent fear.

    PubMed

    Jovasevic, Vladimir; Corcoran, Kevin A; Leaderbrand, Katherine; Yamawaki, Naoki; Guedea, Anita L; Chen, Helen J; Shepherd, Gordon M G; Radulovic, Jelena

    2015-09-01

    Fear-inducing memories can be state dependent, meaning that they can best be retrieved if the brain states at encoding and retrieval are similar. Restricted access to such memories can present a risk for psychiatric disorders and hamper their treatment. To better understand the mechanisms underlying state-dependent fear, we used a mouse model of contextual fear conditioning. We found that heightened activity of hippocampal extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, believed to impair fear and memory, actually enabled their state-dependent encoding and retrieval. This effect required protein kinase C-βII and was influenced by miR-33, a microRNA that regulates several GABA-related proteins. In the extended hippocampal circuit, extrasynaptic GABAA receptors promoted subcortical, but impaired cortical, activation during memory encoding of context fear. Moreover, suppression of retrosplenial cortical activity, which normally impairs retrieval, had an enhancing effect on the retrieval of state-dependent fear. These mechanisms can serve as treatment targets for managing access to state-dependent memories of stressful experiences. PMID:26280760

  10. Mood-state-dependent retrieval: the effects of induced mood on memory reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, P M

    1997-05-01

    Analysis of studies investigating mood-state-dependent retrieval identifies methodological problems that may have contributed to the controversy surrounding the reliability of the effect-in particular, the possible confounding of encoding and retrieval in previous studies. Five experiments are reported investigating the effects of mood on learning and recall. Mood-state-dependent retrieval was observed in Experiment 1a (using Velten's Mood Induction Procedure); Experiment 1b (using a music MIP); and Experiment lc (using Velten's MIP at encoding and a music MIP at retrieval). Subjects who learned and recalled in different moods had significantly greater decrements in recall than did subjects in the same moods. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the effect of observable retrieval cues on mood-state-dependent retrieval. In Experiment 2, the presence of observable retrieval cues at recall overrode state-dependent retrieval. In Experiment 3, by manipulating the presence or absence of observable cues at recall, both the occurrence and the erasure of the mood-state dependency was demonstrated. Mood state during learning and cued recall was also shown to affect performance in a third session under conditions of free recall. PMID:9225625

  11. GABAergic mechanisms regulated by miR-33 encode state-dependent fear

    PubMed Central

    Jovasevic, Vladimir; Corcoran, Kevin A; Leaderbrand, Katherine; Yamawaki, Naoki; Guedea, Anita L; Chen, Helen J; Shepherd, Gordon M G; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Fear-inducing memories can be state dependent, meaning that they can best be retrieved if the brain states at encoding and retrieval are similar. Restricted access to such memories can present a risk for psychiatric disorders and hamper their treatment. To better understand the mechanisms underlying state-dependent fear, we used a mouse model of contextual fear conditioning. We found that heightened activity of hippocampal extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, believed to impair fear and memory, actually enabled their state-dependent encoding and retrieval. This effect required protein kinase C-βII and was influenced by miR-33, a microRNA that regulates several GABA-related proteins. In the extended hippocampal circuit, extrasynaptic GABAA receptors promoted subcortical, but impaired cortical, activation during memory encoding of context fear. Moreover, suppression of retrosplenial cortical activity, which normally impairs retrieval, had an enhancing effect on the retrieval of state-dependent fear. These mechanisms can serve as treatment targets for managing access to state-dependent memories of stressful experiences. PMID:26280760

  12. Presynaptic alpha-synuclein aggregation in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Kateri J; Taylor, Jonathan K; Osterberg, Valerie R; Churchill, Madeline J; Pollock, Eden; Moore, Cynthia; Meshul, Charles K; Unni, Vivek K

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies are associated with abnormal neuronal aggregation of α-synuclein. However, the mechanisms of aggregation and their relationship to disease are poorly understood. We developed an in vivo multiphoton imaging paradigm to study α-synuclein aggregation in mouse cortex with subcellular resolution. We used a green fluorescent protein-tagged human α-synuclein mouse line that has moderate overexpression levels mimicking human disease. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of labeled protein demonstrated that somatic α-synuclein existed primarily in an unbound, soluble pool. In contrast, α-synuclein in presynaptic terminals was in at least three different pools: (1) as unbound, soluble protein; (2) bound to presynaptic vesicles; and (3) as microaggregates. Serial imaging of microaggregates over 1 week demonstrated a heterogeneous population with differing α-synuclein exchange rates. The microaggregate species were resistant to proteinase K, phosphorylated at serine-129, oxidized, and associated with a decrease in the presynaptic vesicle protein synapsin and glutamate immunogold labeling. Multiphoton FRAP provided the specific binding constants for α-synuclein's binding to synaptic vesicles and its effective diffusion coefficient in the soma and axon, setting the stage for future studies targeting synuclein modifications and their effects. Our in vivo results suggest that, under moderate overexpression conditions, α-synuclein aggregates are selectively found in presynaptic terminals. PMID:24501346

  13. ATM protein is located on presynaptic vesicles and its deficit leads to failures in synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vail, Graham; Cheng, Aifang; Han, Yu Ray; Zhao, Teng; Du, Shengwang; Loy, Michael M T; Herrup, Karl; Plummer, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a multisystemic disorder that includes a devastating neurodegeneration phenotype. The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein is well-known for its role in the DNA damage response, yet ATM is also found in association with cytoplasmic vesicular structures: endosomes and lysosomes, as well as neuronal synaptic vesicles. In keeping with this latter association, electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral pathway in hippocampal slices from ATM-deficient mice does not elicit normal long-term potentiation (LTP). The current study was undertaken to assess the nature of this deficit. Theta burst-induced LTP was reduced in Atm(-/-) animals, with the reduction most pronounced at burst stimuli that included 6 or greater trains. To assess whether the deficit was associated with a pre- or postsynaptic failure, we analyzed paired-pulse facilitation and found that it too was significantly reduced in Atm(-/-) mice. This indicates a deficit in presynaptic function. As further evidence that these synaptic effects of ATM deficiency were presynaptic, we used stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction revealed that ATM is significantly more closely associated with Piccolo (a presynaptic marker) than with Homer1 (a postsynaptic marker). These results underline how, in addition to its nuclear functions, ATM plays an important functional role in the neuronal synapse where it participates in the regulation of presynaptic vesicle physiology. PMID:27075534

  14. Differential presynaptic effects of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers on noradrenaline release in cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cristofol, R.M.; Rodriguez-Farre, E. )

    1991-01-01

    To investigate presynaptic effects of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, the release of noradrenaline (NA) in brain tissue was analyzed using rat cerebral cortical slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-NA. {gamma}-HCH (lindane) 50 {mu}M significantly enhanced the ({sup 3}H)-NA release evoked by 15-25 mM K{sup +}. {alpha}- and {beta}-HCH did not produce any significant effect on K{sup +}-evoked ({sup 3}H)-NA release. {delta}-HCH induced a significant decrease of the 25 mM K{sup +}-evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-NA. The effect of the {gamma}- and {delta}-HCH isomers on the presynaptic action of the {alpha}{sub 2}-agonist clonidine and the {alpha}{sub 2}-antagonist yohimbine was also studied. The presynaptic inhibitory effect of clonidine and the stimulatory effect of yohimbine on ({sup 3}H)-NA release was attenuated by lindane and {delta}-HCH, respectively. These results are consistent with a presynaptic action of the HCH isomers on noradrenergic release processes.

  15. Tissue Multicolor STED Nanoscopy of Presynaptic Proteins in the Calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, Pit; Horstmann, Heinz; Engelhardt, Johann; Hell, Stefan W.; Kuner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The calyx of Held, a large glutamatergic terminal in the mammalian auditory brainstem has been extensively employed to study presynaptic structure and function in the central nervous system. Nevertheless, the nanoarchitecture of presynaptic proteins and subcellular components in the calyx terminal and its relation to functional properties of synaptic transmission is only poorly understood. Here, we use stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy of calyces in thin sections of aldehyde-fixed rat brain tissue to visualize immuno-labeled synaptic proteins including VGluT1, synaptophysin, Rab3A and synapsin with a lateral resolution of approximately 40 nm. Excitation multiplexing of suitable fluorescent dyes deciphered the spatial arrangement of the presynaptic phospho-protein synapsin relative to synaptic vesicles labeled with anti-VGluT1. Both predominantly occupied the same focal volume, yet may exist in exclusive domains containing either VGluT1 or synapsin immunoreactivity. While the latter have been observed with diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy, STED microscopy for the first time revealed VGluT1-positive domains lacking synapsins. This observation supports the hypothesis that molecularly and structurally distinct synaptic vesicle pools operate in presynaptic nerve terminals. PMID:23658655

  16. Selective synaptic targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers FGF22 and FGF7

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Akiko; Timmons, Kendall M.; Kikuma, Koto; Pechmann, Yvonne; Kneussel, Matthias; Umemori, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific formation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is crucial for proper functioning of the brain. Fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) and FGF7 are postsynaptic-cell-derived presynaptic organizers necessary for excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic differentiation, respectively, in the hippocampus. For the establishment of specific synaptic networks, these FGFs must localize to appropriate synaptic locations – FGF22 to excitatory and FGF7 to inhibitory postsynaptic sites. Here, we show that distinct motor and adaptor proteins contribute to intracellular microtubule transport of FGF22 and FGF7. Excitatory synaptic targeting of FGF22 requires the motor proteins KIF3A and KIF17 and the adaptor protein SAP102 (also known as DLG3). By contrast, inhibitory synaptic targeting of FGF7 requires the motor KIF5 and the adaptor gephyrin. Time-lapse imaging shows that FGF22 moves with SAP102, whereas FGF7 moves with gephyrin. These results reveal the basis of selective targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers that supports their different synaptogenic functions. Finally, we found that knockdown of SAP102 or PSD95 (also known as DLG4), which impairs the differentiation of excitatory synapses, alters FGF7 localization, suggesting that signals from excitatory synapses might regulate inhibitory synapse formation by controlling the distribution of the inhibitory presynaptic organizer. PMID:25431136

  17. A Presynaptic Role for FMRP during Protein Synthesis-Dependent Long-Term Plasticity in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Sally M.; Li, Hsiu-Ling; Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Kandel, Eric R.; Choi, Yun-Beom

    2011-01-01

    Loss of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is associated with presumed postsynaptic deficits in mouse models of Fragile X syndrome. However, the possible presynaptic roles of FMRP in learning-related plasticity have received little attention. As a result, the mechanisms whereby FMRP influences synaptic function remain poorly…

  18. Axonal Kainate Receptors Modulate the Strength of Efferent Connectivity by Regulating Presynaptic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sakha, Prasanna; Vesikansa, Aino; Orav, Ester; Heikkinen, Joonas; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Shintyapina, Alexandra; Franssila, Sami; Jokinen, Ville; Huttunen, Henri J.; Lauri, Sari E.

    2016-01-01

    Kainate type of glutamate receptors (KARs) are highly expressed during early brain development and may influence refinement of the circuitry, via modulating synaptic transmission and plasticity. KARs are also localized to axons, however, their exact roles in regulating presynaptic processes remain controversial. Here, we have used a microfluidic chamber system allowing specific manipulation of KARs in presynaptic neurons to study their functions in synaptic development and function in vitro. Silencing expression of endogenous KARs resulted in lower density of synaptophysin immunopositive puncta in microfluidically isolated axons. Various recombinant KAR subunits and pharmacological compounds were used to dissect the mechanisms behind this effect. The calcium permeable (Q) variants of the low-affinity (GluK1–3) subunits robustly increased synaptophysin puncta in axons in a manner that was dependent on receptor activity and PKA and PKC dependent signaling. Further, an associated increase in the mean active zone length was observed in electron micrographs. Selective presynaptic expression of these subunits resulted in higher success rate of evoked EPSCs consistent with higher probability of glutamate release. In contrast, the calcium-impermeable (R) variant of GluK1 or the high-affinity subunits (GluK4,5) had no effect on synaptic density or transmission efficacy. These data suggest that calcium permeable axonal KARs promote efferent connectivity by increasing the density of functional presynaptic release sites. PMID:26834558

  19. Charge state dependence of cathodic vacuum arc ion energy andvelocity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Schneider, Jochen M.; Anders, Andre

    2006-08-15

    In the literature, conflicting conclusions are reported concerning the charge state dependence of cathodic arc ion energy and velocity distributions. It appears that data from electrostatic energy analyzers indicate charge state dependence of ion energy, whereas time-of-flight methods support charge state independence of ion velocity. Here we present charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions and calculate the corresponding ion velocity distributions in aluminum vacuum arc plasma. We show that the conflicting conclusions reported in the literature for the two different characterization techniques may originate from the commonly employed data interpretation of energy and velocity, in which peak values and average values are not carefully distinguished.

  20. Missile longitudinal autopilot design using the state-dependent Riccati equation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mracek, C.P.; Cloutier, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    A missile output feedback pitch autopilot is designed using the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) approach presented in. The particular SDRE design methodology chosen for this paper is referred to as SDRE H{sub 2}. The SDRE H{sub 2} design structure is the same as that of linear H{sub 2}, except that the two Riccati equations are state-dependent. Hence, SDRE H{sub 2} design is a nonlinear extension of linear H{sub 2} design. The procedural steps in the SDRE H{sub 2} design process are presented along with design results.

  1. Visualizing K48 Ubiquitination during Presynaptic Formation By Ubiquitination-Induced Fluorescence Complementation (UiFC)

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Pedro, Joana R.; Costa, Rui O.; Almeida, Ramiro D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, signaling through ubiquitin has been shown to be of great importance for normal brain development. Indeed, fluctuations in ubiquitin levels and spontaneous mutations in (de)ubiquitination enzymes greatly perturb synapse formation and neuronal transmission. In the brain, expression of lysine (K) 48-linked ubiquitin chains is higher at a developmental stage coincident with synaptogenesis. Nevertheless, no studies have so far delved into the involvement of this type of polyubiquitin chains in synapse formation. We have recently proposed a role for polyubiquitinated conjugates as triggering signals for presynaptic assembly. Herein, we aimed at characterizing the axonal distribution of K48 polyubiquitin and its dynamics throughout the course of presynaptic formation. To accomplish so, we used an ubiquitination-induced fluorescence complementation (UiFC) strategy for the visualization of K48 polyubiquitin in live hippocampal neurons. We first validated its use in neurons by analyzing changing levels of polyubiquitin. UiFC signal is diffusely distributed with distinct aggregates in somas, dendrites and axons, which perfectly colocalize with staining for a K48-specific antibody. Axonal UiFC aggregates are relatively stable and new aggregates are formed as an axon grows. Approximately 65% of UiFC aggregates colocalize with synaptic vesicle clusters and they preferentially appear in the axonal domains of axo-somatodendritic synapses when compared to isolated axons. We then evaluated axonal accumulation of K48 ubiquitinated signals in bead-induced synapses. We observed rapid accumulation of UiFC signal and endogenous K48 ubiquitin at the sites of newly formed presynapses. Lastly, we show by means of a microfluidic platform, for the isolation of axons, that presynaptic clustering on beads is dependent on E1-mediated ubiquitination at the axonal level. Altogether, these results indicate that enrichment of K48 polyubiquitin at the site of nascent presynaptic

  2. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  3. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  4. State Dependence and Trait Stability of Perfectionism: A Short-Term Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Aldea, Mirela A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined state dependency on depression, trait stability, and state-trait characteristics of perfectionism in a short-term longitudinal study of university students. Relative stability of perfectionism was assessed with test-retest correlations across 3 time points, and results showed higher rank order and relative stability for…

  5. State-dependent doubly weighted stochastic simulation algorithm for automatic characterization of stochastic biochemical rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Min K.; Daigle, Bernie J.; Gillespie, Dan T.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years there has been substantial growth in the development of algorithms for characterizing rare events in stochastic biochemical systems. Two such algorithms, the state-dependent weighted stochastic simulation algorithm (swSSA) and the doubly weighted SSA (dwSSA) are extensions of the weighted SSA (wSSA) by H. Kuwahara and I. Mura [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 165101 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2987701. The swSSA substantially reduces estimator variance by implementing system state-dependent importance sampling (IS) parameters, but lacks an automatic parameter identification strategy. In contrast, the dwSSA provides for the automatic determination of state-independent IS parameters, thus it is inefficient for systems whose states vary widely in time. We present a novel modification of the dwSSA—the state-dependent doubly weighted SSA (sdwSSA)—that combines the strengths of the swSSA and the dwSSA without inheriting their weaknesses. The sdwSSA automatically computes state-dependent IS parameters via the multilevel cross-entropy method. We apply the method to three examples: a reversible isomerization process, a yeast polarization model, and a lac operon model. Our results demonstrate that the sdwSSA offers substantial improvements over previous methods in terms of both accuracy and efficiency.

  6. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed. PMID:23363704

  7. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2×2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc→Sal or Sal→Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal→Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc→Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed. PMID:25447336

  8. Autoradiographic localization of voltage-dependent sodium channels on the mouse neuromuscular junction using /sup 125/I-alpha scorpion toxin. I. Preferential labeling of glial cells on the presynaptic side

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, J.L.; Jover, E.; Cau, P.

    1988-05-01

    Alpha-scorpion toxins bind specifically to the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in excitable membranes, and binding is potential-dependent. The radioiodinated toxin II from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector (alpha ScTx) was used to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels on the presynaptic side of mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) by autoradiography using both light and electron microscopy. Silver grain localization was analyzed by the cross-fire method. At the light-microscopic level, grain density over NMJ appeared 6-8x higher than over nonjunctional muscle membrane. The specificity of labeling was verified by competition/displacement with an excess of native alpha ScTx. Labeling was also inhibited by incubation in depolarizing conditions, showing its potential-dependence. At the electron-microscopic level, analysis showed that voltage-sensitive sodium channels labeled with alpha ScTx were almost exclusively localized on membranes, as expected. Due to washout after incubation, appreciable numbers of binding sites were not found on the postsynaptic membranes. However, on the presynaptic side, alpha ScTx-labeled voltage-sensitive sodium channels were localized on the membrane of non-myelin-forming Schwann cells covering NMJ. The axonal presynaptic membrane was not labeled. These results show that voltage-sensitive sodium channels are present on glial cells in vivo, as already demonstrated in vitro. It is proposed that these glial channels could be indirectly involved in the ionic homeostasis of the axonal environment.

  9. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A.; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D.; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C.; Hell, Stefan W.; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M.; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis. PMID:26471740

  10. Presynaptic spinophilin tunes neurexin signalling to control active zone architecture and function.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Karzan; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Driller, Jan H; Schreiner, Dietmar; Rey, Ulises; Böhme, Mathias A; Hollmann, Christina; Ramesh, Niraja; Depner, Harald; Lützkendorf, Janine; Matkovic, Tanja; Götz, Torsten; Bergeron, Dominique D; Schmoranzer, Jan; Goettfert, Fabian; Holt, Mathew; Wahl, Markus C; Hell, Stefan W; Scheiffele, Peter; Walter, Alexander M; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of synapses at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) depend on trans-synaptic neurexin/neuroligin signalling, which is promoted by the scaffolding protein Syd-1 binding to neurexin. Here we report that the scaffold protein spinophilin binds to the C-terminal portion of neurexin and is needed to limit neurexin/neuroligin signalling by acting antagonistic to Syd-1. Loss of presynaptic spinophilin results in the formation of excess, but atypically small active zones. Neuroligin-1/neurexin-1/Syd-1 levels are increased at spinophilin mutant NMJs, and removal of single copies of the neurexin-1, Syd-1 or neuroligin-1 genes suppresses the spinophilin-active zone phenotype. Evoked transmission is strongly reduced at spinophilin terminals, owing to a severely reduced release probability at individual active zones. We conclude that presynaptic spinophilin fine-tunes neurexin/neuroligin signalling to control active zone number and functionality, thereby optimizing them for action potential-induced exocytosis. PMID:26471740

  11. DGKθ Catalytic Activity Is Required for Efficient Recycling of Presynaptic Vesicles at Excitatory Synapses.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Hana L; Tu-Sekine, Becky; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L; Raben, Daniel M

    2016-01-12

    Synaptic transmission relies on coordinated coupling of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and endocytosis. While much attention has focused on characterizing proteins involved in SV recycling, the roles of membrane lipids and their metabolism remain poorly understood. Diacylglycerol, a major signaling lipid produced at synapses during synaptic transmission, is regulated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK). Here, we report a role for DGKθ in the mammalian CNS in facilitating recycling of presynaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses. Using synaptophysin- and vGlut1-pHluorin optical reporters, we found that acute and chronic deletion of DGKθ attenuated the recovery of SVs following neuronal stimulation. Rescue of recycling kinetics required DGKθ kinase activity. Our data establish a role for DGK catalytic activity at the presynaptic nerve terminal in SV recycling. Altogether, these data suggest that DGKθ supports synaptic transmission during periods of elevated neuronal activity. PMID:26748701

  12. DGKθ Catalytic Activity is Required for Efficient Recycling of Presynaptic Vesicles at Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Hana L.; Tu-Sekine, Becky; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L.; Raben, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Synaptic transmission relies on coordinated coupling of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and endocytosis. While much attention has focused on characterizing proteins involved in SV recycling, the roles of membrane lipids and their metabolism remain poorly understood. Diacylglycerol, a major signaling lipid produced at synapses during synaptic transmission, is regulated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK). Here we report a role for DGKθ in the mammalian central nervous system in facilitating recycling of presynaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses. Using synaptophysin- and vGlut1-pHluorin optical reporters, we found that acute and chronic deletion of DGKθ attenuated the recovery of SVs following neuronal stimulation. Rescue of recycling kinetics required DGKθ kinase activity. Our data establish a role for DGK catalytic activity and its byproduct, phosphatidic acid, at the presynaptic nerve terminal in SV recycling. Together these data suggest DGKθ supports synaptic transmission during periods of elevated neuronal activity. PMID:26748701

  13. Are presynaptic GABA-Cρ2 receptors involved in anti-nociception?

    PubMed

    Tadavarty, R; Hwang, J; Rajput, P S; Soja, P J; Kumar, U; Sastry, B R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the anti-nociceptive effects of GABA-C receptors in the central nervous system. Intracisternal injection of CACA, a GABA-C receptor agonist or isoguvacine, a GABA-A receptor agonist, significantly increased the tail-withdrawal latency. TPMPA, a GABA-C receptor antagonist blocked the effects of CACA but not isoguvacine indicating that GABA-C receptors are involved in regulating pain. Further, double-labelled immunofluorescence studies revealed that GABA-Cρ2 receptors are expressed presynaptically in the spinal dorsal horn, especially, substantia gelatinosa, a region that has been previously implicated in analgesia by regulating nociceptive inflow. These data provide a provenance for future work looking at presynaptic spinal GABA-C receptors in the control of nociception. PMID:26327143

  14. Dscam Expression Levels Determine Presynaptic Arbor Sizes in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Wang, Xin; Coolon, Rosemary; Ye, Bing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Expression of the Down syndrome cell-adhesion molecule (Dscam) is increased in the brains of patients with several neurological disorders. Although Dscam is critically involved in many aspects of neuronal development, little is known about either the mechanism that regulates its expression or the functional consequences of dysregulated Dscam expression. Here, we show that Dscam expression levels serve as an instructive code for the size control of presynaptic arbor. Two convergent pathways, involving dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), control Dscam expression through protein translation. Defects in this regulation of Dscam translation lead to exuberant presynaptic arbor growth in Drosophila somatosensory neurons. Our findings demonstrate a previously unknown aspect of Dscam function and provide insights into how dysregulated Dscam may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. PMID:23764288

  15. A differential equation with state-dependent delay from cell population biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, Philipp; Waurick, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a differential equation, describing the maturation of a stem cell population, with a state-dependent delay, which is implicitly defined via the solution of an ODE. We elaborate smoothness conditions for the model ingredients, in particular vital rates, that guarantee the existence of a local semiflow and allow to specify the linear variational equation. The proofs are based on theoretical results of Hartung et al. combined with implicit function arguments in infinite dimensions. Moreover we elaborate a criterion for global existence for differential equations with state-dependent delay. To prove the result we adapt a theorem by Hale and Lunel to the C1-topology and use a result on metric spaces from Diekmann et al.

  16. State-Dependent Modification of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels by Pyrethroids

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroids disrupt nerve function by altering the rapid kinetic transitions between conducting and nonconducting states of voltage-gated sodium channels that underlie the generation of nerve action potentials. Recent studies of pyrethroid action on cloned insect and mammalian sodium channel isoforms expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes show that in some cases pyrethroid modification is either absolutely dependent on or significantly enhanced by repeated channel activation. These use-dependent effects have been interpreted as evidence of preferential binding of at least some pyrethroids to the open, rather than resting, state of the sodium channel. This paper reviews the evidence for state-dependent modification of insect and mammalian sodium channels expressed in oocytes by pyrethroids and considers the implications of state-dependent effects for understanding the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid action and the development and testing of models of the pyrethroid receptor. PMID:20652092

  17. State-dependent switching control of switched positive fractional-order systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of continuous-time switched positive fractional-order systems is studied by using state-dependent switching. First, the asymptotic stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems with state-dependent switching is given, which is based on the fractional co-positive Lyapunov method. Moreover, by the sliding sector method, the stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems whose subsystems are possibly all unstable is obtained. A variable structure (VS) switching law with sliding sector is also proposed to guarantee the switched positive fractional-order system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of our developed results. PMID:26922493

  18. State-Dependent Riccati Equation Regulation of Systems with State and Control Nonlinearities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeler, Scott C.; Cox, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The state-dependent Riccati equations (SDRE) is the basis of a technique for suboptimal feedback control of a nonlinear quadratic regulator (NQR) problem. It is an extension of the Riccati equation used for feedback control of linear problems, with the addition of nonlinearities in the state dynamics of the system resulting in a state-dependent gain matrix as the solution of the equation. In this paper several variations on the SDRE-based method will be considered for the feedback control problem with control nonlinearities. The control nonlinearities may result in complications in the numerical implementation of the control, which the different versions of the SDRE method must try to overcome. The control methods will be applied to three test problems and their resulting performance analyzed.

  19. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. II. Statistical atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Möller, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    A model for charge-dependent energy loss of slow ions is developed based on the Thomas-Fermi statistical model of atoms. Using a modified electrostatic potential which takes the ionic charge into account, nuclear and electronic energy transfers are calculated, the latter by an extension of the Firsov model. To evaluate the importance of multiple collisions even in nanometer-thick target materials we use the charge-state-dependent potentials in a Monte Carlo simulation in the binary collision approximation and compare the results to experiment. The Monte Carlo results reproduce the incident charge-state dependence of measured data well [see R. A. Wilhelm et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 052708 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052708], even though the experimentally observed charge exchange dependence is not included in the model.

  20. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1988-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  1. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  2. Direct observation of frictional contacts: New insights for state-dependent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rocks and many other materials display a rather complicated, but characteristic, dependence of friction on sliding history. These effects are well-described by empirical rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulations which have been utilized for analysis of fault slip and earthquake processes. We present a procedure for direct quantitative microscopic observation of frictional contacts during slip. The observations reveal that frictional state dependence represents an increase of contact area with contact age. Transient changes of sliding resistance correlate with changes in contact area and arise from shifts of contact population age. Displacement-dependent replacement of contact populations is shown to cause the diagnostic evolution of friction over a characteristic sliding distance that occurs whenever slip begins or sliding conditions change. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  3. Charge-state dependence of kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-07-01

    A calculation is performed in order to analyze the charge-state dependence of the kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the excitation of the electrons, the neutralization of the projectile during its passage through the solid, and the transport of the excited electrons from where they are created to the surface. It is shown that the number of excited electrons depends strongly on the ion charge state. Nevertheless, due to the fast neutralization of the ions within the escape depth of the excited electrons, no significant initial charge-state dependence is expected in the kinetic electron yield. This result is consistent with available experimental data.

  4. State-dependent sensorimotor processing: gaze and posture stability during simulated flight in birds

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Kimberly L.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular responses play an important role in maintaining gaze and posture stability during rotational motion. Previous studies suggest that these responses are state dependent, their expression varying with the environmental and locomotor conditions of the animal. In this study, we simulated an ethologically relevant state in the laboratory to study state-dependent vestibular responses in birds. We used frontal airflow to simulate gliding flight and measured pigeons′ eye, head, and tail responses to rotational motion in darkness, under both head-fixed and head-free conditions. We show that both eye and head response gains are significantly higher during flight, thus enhancing gaze and head-in-space stability. We also characterize state-specific tail responses to pitch and roll rotation that would help to maintain body-in-space orientation during flight. These results demonstrate that vestibular sensorimotor processing is not fixed but depends instead on the animal's behavioral state. PMID:21307332

  5. Mechanism of Calcium Current Modulation Underlying Presynaptic Facilitation and Behavioral Sensitization in Aplysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Marc; Kandel, Eric R.

    1980-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization of the gill-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia is caused by presynaptic facilitation at the synapses of the mechanoreceptor sensory neurons of the reflex onto the motor neurons and interneurons. The presynaptic facilitation has been shown to be simulated by serotonin (the putative presynaptic facilitatory transmitter) and by cyclic AMP and to be accompanied by an increase in the Ca2+ current of sensory neuron cell bodies exposed to tetraethylammonium. This increase in the Ca2+ current could result from either a direct action on the Ca2+ channel or an action on an opposing K+ current. Here we report voltage clamp experiments which indicate that the increase in Ca2+ current associated with presynaptic facilitation results from a decrease in a K+ current. Stimulation of the connective (the pathway that mediates sensitization) or application of serotonin causes a decrease in a voltage-sensitive, steady-state outward current measured under voltage clamp as well as an increase in the transient net inward and a decrease in the transient outward currents elicited by brief depolarizing command steps. The reversal potential of the steady-state synaptic current is sensitive to extracellular K+ concentration, and both the steady-state synaptic current and the changes in the transient currents are blocked by K+ current blocking agents and by washout of K+. These results suggest that serotonin and the natural transmitter released by connective stimulation act to decrease a voltage-sensitive K+ current. The decrease in K+ current prolongs the action potential, and this in turn increases the duration of the inward Ca2+ current and thereby enhances transmitter release.

  6. Presynaptic Release-Regulating mGlu1 Receptors in Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consists of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor subtypes. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), where they preferentially mediate facilitatory signaling in neurones and glial cells, mainly by favoring phospholipase (PLC) translocation. Based on the literature so far available, group I Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are preferentially expressed at the postsynaptic side of chemical synapsis, where they participate in the progression of the chemical stimulus. Studies, however, have shown the presence of these receptors also at the presynaptic level, where they exert several functions, including the modulation of transmitter exocytosis. Presynaptic Group I mGluRs can be both autoreceptors regulating release of glutamate and heteroreceptors regulating the release of various transmitters, including GABA, dopamine, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. While the existence of presynaptic release-regulating mGlu5 receptors is largely recognized, the possibility that mGlu1 receptors also are present at this level has been a matter of discussion for a long time. A large body of evidence published in the last decade, however, supports this notion. This review aims at revisiting the data from in vitro studies concerning the existence and the role of release-regulating mGlu1 receptors presynaptically located in nerve terminals isolated from selected regions of the CNS. The functional interaction linking mGlu5 and mGlu1 receptor subtypes at nerve terminals and their relative contributions as modulators of central transmission will also be discussed. We apologize in advance for omission in our coverage of the existing literature.

  7. Main determinants of presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics at individual mossy fiber - CA3 pyramidal cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic transmission between hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) and CA3 pyramidal cells exhibits remarkable use-dependent plasticity. The underlying presynaptic mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Here we have used fluorescent Ca2+ indicators Fluo-4, Fluo-5F and Oregon Green BAPTA-1 to investigate Ca2+ dynamics in individual giant MF boutons (MFBs) in area CA3 traced from the somata of granule cells held in whole-cell mode. In an individual MFB, a single action potential induces a brief peak of free Ca2+ (estimated in the range of 8-9 μM) followed by an elevation to ~320 nM which slowly decays to its resting level of ~110 nM. Changes in the somatic membrane potential influence presynaptic Ca2+ entry at proximal MFBs in the hilus. This influence decays with distance along the axon, with a length constant of approximately 200 μm. In giant MFBs in CA3, progressive saturation of endogenous Ca2+ buffers during repetitive spiking amplifies rapid Ca2+ peaks and the residual Ca2+ several-fold, suggesting a causal link to synaptic facilitation. We find that internal Ca2+ stores contribute to maintaining the low resting Ca2+ providing ~22% of the buffering/extrusion capacity of giant MFBs. Rapid Ca2+ release from stores represents up to 20% of the presynaptic Ca2+ transient evoked by a brief train of action potentials. The results identify the main components of presynaptic Ca2+ dynamics at this important cortical synapse. PMID:16807336

  8. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine’s effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity. PMID:25901168

  9. Positive periodic solutions of periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkun

    2007-06-01

    By using a fixed point theorem of strict-set-contraction, some new criteria are established for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the following periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays where (i,j=1,2,...,n) are [omega]-periodic functions and (i=1,2,...,n) are [omega]-periodic functions with respect to their first arguments, respectively.

  10. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain. PMID:25286119

  11. Synaptic plasticity in myenteric neurons of the guinea-pig distal colon: presynaptic mechanisms of inflammation-induced synaptic facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Krauter, Eric M; Linden, David R; Sharkey, Keith A; Mawe, Gary M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms that contribute to synaptic facilitation in the myenteric plexus of the trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-inflamed guinea-pig distal colon. Intracellular recordings of evoked fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in myenteric S neurons were evaluated, and the density of synaptic terminals was morphometrically analysed by transmission electron microscopy. In inflamed tissue, fEPSPs were reduced to control levels by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, but H89 did not affect the fEPSPs in control tissue. This PKA activation in inflamed tissue did not appear to involve 5-HT4 receptors because the antagonist/inverse agonist, GR 125487, caused comparable decreases of fEPSPs in both tissues. Inhibition of BK channels with iberiotoxin did not alter the fEPSPs in inflamed tissue, but increased the fEPSPs in control tissue to the amplitude detected in inflamed tissue. During trains of stimuli, run-down of EPSPs was less extensive in inflamed tissue and there was a significant increase in the paired pulse ratio. Depolarizations in response to exogenous neurotransmitters were not altered in inflamed tissue. These inflammation-induced changes were not accompanied by alterations in the pharmacological profile of EPSPs, and no changes in synaptic density were detected by electron microscopy. Collectively, these data indicate that synaptic facilitation in the inflamed myenteric plexus involves a presynaptic increase in PKA activity, possibly involving an inhibition of BK channels, and an increase in the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. PMID:17363386

  12. Fusion pore modulation as a presynaptic mechanism contributing to expression of long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sukwoo; Klingauf, Jürgen; Tsien, Richard W

    2003-04-29

    Working on the idea that postsynaptic and presynaptic mechanisms of long-term potentiation (LTP) expression are not inherently mutually exclusive, we have looked for the existence and functionality of presynaptic mechanisms for augmenting transmitter release in hippocampal slices. Specifically, we asked if changes in glutamate release might contribute to the conversion of 'silent synapses' that show N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses but no detectable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) responses, to ones that exhibit both. Here, we review experiments where NMDA receptor responses provided a bioassay of cleft glutamate concentration, using opposition between peak [glu](cleft )and a rapidly reversible antagonist, L-AP5. We discuss findings of a dramatic increase in peak [glu](cleft) upon expression of pairing-induced LTP (Choi). We present simulations with a quantitative model of glutamatergic synaptic transmission that includes modulation of the presynaptic fusion pore, realistic cleft geometry and a distributed array of postsynaptic receptors and glutamate transporters. The modelling supports the idea that changes in the dynamics of glutamate release can contribute to synaptic unsilencing. We review direct evidence from Renger et al., in accord with the modelling, that trading off the strength and duration of the glutamate transient can markedly alter AMPA receptor responses with little effect on NMDA receptor responses. An array of additional findings relevant to fusion pore modulation and its proposed contribution to LTP expression are considered. PMID:12740115

  13. Dynamic mechanisms of neuroligin-dependent presynaptic terminal assembly in living cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synapse formation occurs when synaptogenic signals trigger coordinated development of pre and postsynaptic structures. One of the best-characterized synaptogenic signals is trans-synaptic adhesion. However, it remains unclear how synaptic proteins are recruited to sites of adhesion. In particular, it is unknown whether synaptogenic signals attract synaptic vesicle (SV) and active zone (AZ) proteins to nascent synapses or instead predominantly function to create sites that are capable of forming synapses. It is also unclear how labile synaptic proteins are at developing synapses after their initial recruitment. To address these issues, we used long-term, live confocal imaging of presynaptic terminal formation in cultured cortical neurons after contact with the synaptogenic postsynaptic adhesion proteins neuroligin-1 or SynCAM-1. Results Surprisingly, we find that trans-synaptic adhesion does not attract SV or AZ proteins nor alter their transport. In addition, although neurexin (the presynaptic partner of neuroligin) typically accumulates over the entire region of contact between axons and neuroligin-1-expressing cells, SV proteins selectively assemble at spots of enhanced neurexin clustering. The arrival and maintenance of SV proteins at these sites is highly variable over the course of minutes to hours, and this variability correlates with neurexin levels at individual synapses. Conclusions Together, our data support a model of synaptogenesis where presynaptic proteins are trapped at specific axonal sites, where they are stabilized by trans-synaptic adhesion signaling. PMID:24885664

  14. Activity-dependent upregulation of presynaptic kainate receptors at immature CA3-CA1 synapses.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Vernon R J; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Hirvonen, Teemu; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2014-12-10

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate glutamate release probability and short-term plasticity in various areas of the brain. Here we show that long-term depression (LTD) in the area CA1 of neonatal rodent hippocampus is associated with an upregulation of tonic inhibitory KAR activity, which contributes to synaptic depression and causes a pronounced increase in short-term facilitation of transmission. This increased KAR function was mediated by high-affinity receptors and required activation of NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthetase, and postsynaptic calcium signaling. In contrast, KAR activity was irreversibly downregulated in response to induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that depended on activation of the TrkB-receptor of BDNF. Both tonic KAR activity and its plasticity were restricted to early stages of synapse development and were lost in parallel with maturation of the network due to ongoing BDNF-TrkB signaling. These data show that presynaptic KARs are targets for activity-dependent modulation via diffusible messengers NO and BDNF, which enhance and depress tonic KAR activity at immature synapses, respectively. The plasticity of presynaptic KARs in the developing network allows nascent synapses to shape their response to incoming activity. In particular, upregulation of KAR function after LTD allows the synapse to preferentially pass high-frequency afferent activity. This can provide a potential rescue from synapse elimination by uncorrelated activity and also increase the computational dynamics of the developing CA3-CA1 circuitry. PMID:25505341

  15. In vivo knockdown of Piccolino disrupts presynaptic ribbon morphology in mouse photoreceptor synapses

    PubMed Central

    Regus-Leidig, Hanna; Fuchs, Michaela; Löhner, Martina; Leist, Sarah R.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio; Chiodo, Vince A.; Hauswirth, William W.; Garner, Craig C.; Brandstätter, Johann H.

    2014-01-01

    Piccolo is the largest known cytomatrix protein at active zones of chemical synapses. A growing number of studies on conventional chemical synapses assign Piccolo a role in the recruitment and integration of molecules relevant for both endo- and exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, the dynamic assembly of presynaptic F-actin, as well as the proteostasis of presynaptic proteins, yet a direct function in the structural organization of the active zone has not been uncovered in part due to the expression of multiple alternatively spliced isoforms. We recently identified Piccolino, a Piccolo splice variant specifically expressed in sensory ribbon synapses of the eye and ear. Here we down regulated Piccolino in vivo via an adeno-associated virus-based RNA interference approach and explored the impact on the presynaptic structure of mouse photoreceptor ribbon synapses. Detailed immunocytochemical light and electron microscopical analysis of Piccolino knockdown in photoreceptors revealed a hitherto undescribed photoreceptor ribbon synaptic phenotype with striking morphological changes of synaptic ribbon ultrastructure. PMID:25232303

  16. Netrin and Frazzled regulate presynaptic gap junctions at a Drosophila giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brian O; Borgen, Melissa A; Caruccio, Phyllis M; Murphey, Rodney K

    2014-04-16

    Netrin and its receptor, Frazzled, dictate the strength of synaptic connections in the giant fiber system (GFS) of Drosophila melanogaster by regulating gap junction localization in the presynaptic terminal. In Netrin mutant animals, the synaptic coupling between a giant interneuron and the "jump" motor neuron was weakened and dye coupling between these two neurons was severely compromised or absent. In cases in which Netrin mutants displayed apparently normal synaptic anatomy, half of the specimens exhibited physiologically defective synapses and dye coupling between the giant fiber (GF) and the motor neuron was reduced or eliminated, suggesting that gap junctions were disrupted in the Netrin mutants. When we examined the gap junctions with antibodies to Shaking-B (ShakB) Innexin, they were significantly decreased or absent in the presynaptic terminal of the mutant GF. Frazzled loss of function mutants exhibited similar defects in synaptic transmission, dye coupling, and gap junction localization. These data are the first to show that Netrin and Frazzled regulate the placement of gap junctions presynaptically at a synapse. PMID:24741033

  17. Localization of Presynaptic Plasticity Mechanisms Enables Functional Independence of Synaptic and Ectopic Transmission in the Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the cerebellar molecular layer parallel fibre terminals release glutamate from both the active zone and from extrasynaptic “ectopic” sites. Ectopic release mediates transmission to the Bergmann glia that ensheathe the synapse, activating Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and glutamate transporters. Parallel fibre terminals exhibit several forms of presynaptic plasticity, including cAMP-dependent long-term potentiation and endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression, but it is not known whether these presynaptic forms of long-term plasticity also influence ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. Stimulation of parallel fibre inputs at 16 Hz evoked LTP of synaptic transmission, but LTD of ectopic transmission. Pharmacological activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin caused LTP at Purkinje neurons, but only transient potentiation at Bergmann glia, reinforcing the concept that ectopic sites lack the capacity to express sustained cAMP-dependent potentiation. Activation of mGluR1 caused depression of synaptic transmission via retrograde endocannabinoid signalling but had no significant effect at ectopic sites. In contrast, activation of NMDA receptors suppressed both synaptic and ectopic transmission. The results suggest that the signalling mechanisms for presynaptic LTP and retrograde depression by endocannabinoids are restricted to the active zone at parallel fibre synapses, allowing independent modulation of synaptic transmission to Purkinje neurons and ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. PMID:26171253

  18. A conotoxin from Conus textile with unusual posttranslational modifications reduces presynaptic Ca2+ influx

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Alan C.; Lucas-Meunier, Estelle; Kalume, Dário E.; Czerwiec, Eva; Hambe, Björn; Dahlqvist, Ingrid; Fossier, Philippe; Baux, Gérard; Roepstorff, Peter; Baleja, James D.; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce; Stenflo, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Cone snails are gastropod mollusks of the genus Conus that live in tropical marine habitats. They are predators that paralyze their prey by injection of venom containing a plethora of small, conformationally constrained peptides (conotoxins). We report the identification, characterization, and structure of a γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing peptide, conotoxin ɛ-TxIX, isolated from the venom of the molluscivorous cone snail, Conus textile. The disulfide bonding pattern of the four cysteine residues, an unparalleled degree of posttranslational processing including bromination, hydroxylation, and glycosylation define a family of conotoxins that may target presynaptic Ca2+ channels or act on G protein-coupled presynaptic receptors via another mechanism. This conotoxin selectively reduces neurotransmitter release at an Aplysia cholinergic synapse by reducing the presynaptic influx of Ca2+ in a slow and reversible fashion. The three-dimensional structure, determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy, identifies an electronegative patch created by the side chains of two γ-carboxyglutamic acid residues that extend outward from a cavernous cleft. The glycosylated threonine and hydroxylated proline enclose a localized hydrophobic region centered on the brominated tryptophan residue within the constrained intercysteine region. PMID:10318957

  19. Enhancing the fidelity of neurotransmission by activity-dependent facilitation of presynaptic potassium currents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Mei; Wang, Wei; Fedchyshyn, Michael J; Zhou, Zhuan; Ding, Jiuping; Wang, Lu-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Neurons convey information in bursts of spikes across chemical synapses where the fidelity of information transfer critically depends on synaptic input-output relationship. With a limited number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) in the readily releasable pool (RRP), how nerve terminals sustain transmitter release during intense activity remains poorly understood. Here we report that presynaptic K(+) currents evoked by spikes facilitate in a Ca(2+)-independent but frequency- and voltage-dependent manner. Experimental evidence and computer simulations demonstrate that this facilitation originates from dynamic transition of intermediate gating states of voltage-gated K(+) channels (Kvs), and specifically attenuates spike amplitude and inter-spike potential during high-frequency firing. Single or paired recordings from a mammalian central synapse further reveal that facilitation of Kvs constrains presynaptic Ca(2+) influx, thereby efficiently allocating SVs in the RRP to drive postsynaptic spiking at high rates. We conclude that presynaptic Kv facilitation imparts neurons with a powerful control of transmitter release to dynamically support high-fidelity neurotransmission. PMID:25078759

  20. Slit2 as a β-catenin/Ctnnb1-dependent retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Bowman, Andrew; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Lin, Thiri W; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin (Ctnnb1) in muscle is critical for motoneuron differentiation; however, little is known about the relevant retrograde signal. In this paper, we dissected which functions of muscle Ctnnb1 are critical by an in vivo transgenic approach. We show that Ctnnb1 mutant without the transactivation domain was unable to rescue presynaptic deficits of Ctnnb1 mutation, indicating the involvement of transcription regulation. On the other hand, the cell-adhesion function of Ctnnb1 is dispensable. We screened for proteins that may serve as a Ctnnb1-directed retrograde factor and identified Slit2. Transgenic expression of Slit2 specifically in the muscle was able to diminish presynaptic deficits by Ctnnb1 mutation in mice. Slit2 immobilized on beads was able to induce synaptophysin puncta in axons of spinal cord explants. Together, these observations suggest that Slit2 serves as a factor utilized by muscle Ctnnb1 to direct presynaptic differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07266.001 PMID:26159615

  1. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  2. State-Dependent Pseudo-Linear Filter for Spacecraft Attitude and Rate Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the development and performance of a special algorithm for estimating the attitude and angular rate of a spacecraft. The algorithm is a pseudo-linear Kalman filter, which is an ordinary linear Kalman filter that operates on a linear model whose matrices are current state estimate dependent. The nonlinear rotational dynamics equation of the spacecraft is presented in the state space as a state-dependent linear system. Two types of measurements are considered. One type is a measurement of the quaternion of rotation, which is obtained from a newly introduced star tracker based apparatus. The other type of measurement is that of vectors, which permits the use of a variety of vector measuring sensors like sun sensors and magnetometers. While quaternion measurements are related linearly to the state vector, vector measurements constitute a nonlinear function of the state vector. Therefore, in this paper, a state-dependent linear measurement equation is developed for the vector measurement case. The state-dependent pseudo linear filter is applied to simulated spacecraft rotations and adequate estimates of the spacecraft attitude and rate are obtained for the case of quaternion measurements as well as of vector measurements.

  3. Bifurcation analysis on a turning system with large and state-dependent time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilkee; Bae, Sanghyun; Seok, Jongwon

    2012-12-01

    Stability and bifurcation analyses were performed in this study on the turning process with a state-dependent and large time delay using the method of multiple scales (MMS). The turning system tool was modeled as an oscillator with two degrees of freedom, and both the cubic nonlinear stiffness and the nonlinear cutting force were considered. The nonlinear cutting force was appropriately expanded in a Taylor series considering the state-dependency of the time delay. The time delay and parameters were scaled through the proper ordering process to reflect the large delay effect on an asymptotic formulation of the MMS. Asymptotic solutions were then obtained by the MMS in the large delay regime and used to calculate the linear stability boundaries (i.e., Hopf bifurcation points) and coexisting one-period periodic solutions (i.e., limit cycles) of the turning system. To investigate the local and global behaviors of the tool chatter, bifurcation diagrams were obtained at various workpiece rotating speeds. The validity of the results was examined by comparison with those obtained through the method of harmonic balance and direct numerical integration. Additionally, using the bifurcation diagrams, the effects of the state-dependent time delay and nonlinear stiffness on the chatter vibration behaviors were examined.

  4. Remarks on the necessity and implications of state-dependence in the black hole interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2016-04-01

    We revisit the "state-dependence" of the map that we proposed recently between bulk operators in the interior of a large anti-de Sitter black hole and operators in the boundary CFT. By refining recent versions of the information paradox, we show that this feature is necessary for the CFT to successfully describe local physics behind the horizon—not only for single-sided black holes but even in the eternal black hole. We show that state-dependence is invisible to an infalling observer who cannot differentiate these operators from those of ordinary quantum effective field theory. Therefore the infalling observer does not observe any violations of quantum mechanics. We successfully resolve a large class of potential ambiguities in our construction. We analyze states where the CFT is entangled with another system and show that the ER =EPR conjecture emerges from our construction in a natural and precise form. We comment on the possible semiclassical origins of state-dependence.

  5. State-Dependent Propagation of Neuronal Sub-Population in Spontaneous Synchronized Bursts

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Yuichiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Repeating stable spatiotemporal patterns emerge in synchronized spontaneous activity in neuronal networks. The repertoire of such patterns can serve as memory, or a reservoir of information, in a neuronal network; moreover, the variety of patterns may represent the network memory capacity. However, a neuronal substrate for producing a repertoire of patterns in synchronization remains elusive. We herein hypothesize that state-dependent propagation of a neuronal sub-population is the key mechanism. By combining high-resolution measurement with a 4096-channel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectrode array (MEA) and dimensionality reduction with non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), we investigated synchronized bursts of dissociated rat cortical neurons at approximately 3 weeks in vitro. We found that bursts had a repertoire of repeating spatiotemporal patterns, and different patterns shared a partially similar sequence of sub-population, supporting the idea of sequential structure of neuronal sub-populations during synchronized activity. We additionally found that similar spatiotemporal patterns tended to appear successively and periodically, suggesting a state-dependent fluctuation of propagation, which has been overlooked in existing literature. Thus, such a state-dependent property within the sequential sub-population structure is a plausible neural substrate for performing a repertoire of stable patterns during synchronized activity. PMID:27065820

  6. A search for presynaptic inhibitory histamine receptors in guinea-pig tissues: Further H3 receptors but no evidence for H4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Petri, Doris; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2016-07-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is coupled to Gi/o proteins and expressed on inflammatory cells and lymphoid tissues; it was suggested that this receptor also occurs in the brain or on peripheral neurones. Since many Gi/o protein-coupled receptors, including the H3 receptor, serve as presynaptic inhibitory receptors, we studied whether the sympathetic neurones supplying four peripheral tissues and the cholinergic neurones in the hippocampus from the guinea-pig are equipped with release-modulating H4 and H3 receptors. For this purpose, we preincubated tissue pieces from the aorta, atrium, renal cortex and vas deferens with (3)H-noradrenaline and hippocampal slices with (3)H-choline and determined the electrically evoked tritium overflow. The stimulation-evoked overflow in the five superfused tissues was inhibited by the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine, which served as a positive control, but not affected by the H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine. The H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine inhibited noradrenaline release in the peripheral tissues without affecting acetylcholine release in the hippocampal slices. Thioperamide shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine in the aorta and the renal cortex to the right, yielding apparent pA2 values of 8.0 and 8.1, respectively, which are close to its affinity at other H3 receptors but higher by one log unit than its pKi at the H4 receptor of the guinea-pig. In conclusion, histamine H4 receptors could not be identified in five experimental models of the guinea-pig that are suited for the detection of presynaptic inhibitory receptors whereas H3 receptors could be shown in the peripheral tissues but not in the hippocampus. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26211976

  7. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Ca(v)2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, R; Rutten, K; Valdor, M; Schiene, K; Wigge, S; Schunk, S; Damann, N; Christoph, T; Dickenson, A H

    2015-06-25

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Ca(v)2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Ca(v)2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Ca(v)2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. PMID:25839150

  8. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Cav2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R.; Rutten, K.; Valdor, M.; Schiene, K.; Wigge, S.; Schunk, S.; Damann, N.; Christoph, T.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Cav2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Cav2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Cav2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. PMID:25839150

  9. Characterization of the substituted N-triazole oxindole TROX-1, a small-molecule, state-dependent inhibitor of Ca(V)2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Andrew M; Herrington, James; Bugianesi, Randal M; Dai, Ge; Haedo, Rodolfo J; Ratliff, Kevin S; Smith, McHardy M; Warren, Vivien A; Arneric, Stephen P; Eduljee, Cyrus; Parker, David; Snutch, Terrance P; Hoyt, Scott B; London, Clare; Duffy, Joseph L; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; McManus, Owen B

    2012-03-01

    Biological, genetic, and clinical evidence provide validation for N-type calcium channels (Ca(V)2.2) as therapeutic targets for chronic pain. A state-dependent Ca(V)2.2 inhibitor may provide an improved therapeutic window over ziconotide, the peptidyl Ca(V)2.2 inhibitor used clinically. Supporting this notion, we recently reported that in preclinical models, the state-dependent Ca(V)2 inhibitor (3R)-5-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)-3-methyl-3-(pyrimidin-5-ylmethyl)-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (TROX-1) has an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconotide. Here we characterize TROX-1 inhibition of Cav2.2 channels in more detail. When channels are biased toward open/inactivated states by depolarizing the membrane potential under voltage-clamp electrophysiology, TROX-1 inhibits Ca(V)2.2 channels with an IC(50) of 0.11 μM. The voltage dependence of Ca(V)2.2 inhibition was examined using automated electrophysiology. TROX-1 IC(50) values were 4.2, 0.90, and 0.36 μM at -110, -90, and -70 mV, respectively. TROX-1 displayed use-dependent inhibition of Ca(V)2.2 with a 10-fold IC(50) separation between first (27 μM) and last (2.7 μM) pulses in a train. In a fluorescence-based calcium influx assay, TROX-1 inhibited Ca(V)2.2 channels with an IC(50) of 9.5 μM under hyperpolarized conditions and 0.69 μM under depolarized conditions. Finally, TROX-1 potency was examined across the Ca(V)2 subfamily. Depolarized IC(50) values were 0.29, 0.19, and 0.28 μM by manual electrophysiology using matched conditions and 1.8, 0.69, and 1.1 μM by calcium influx for Ca(V)2.1, Ca(V)2.2, and Ca(V)2.3, respectively. Together, these in vitro data support the idea that a state-dependent, non-subtype-selective Ca(V)2 channel inhibitor can achieve an improved therapeutic window over the relatively state-independent Ca(V)2.2-selective inhibitor ziconotide in preclinical models of chronic pain. PMID:22188924

  10. Approximate controllability of impulsive differential equations with state-dependent delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Anandhi, E. R.

    2010-02-01

    In order to describe various real-world problems in physical and engineering sciences subject to abrupt changes at certain instants during the evolution process, impulsive differential equations have been used to describe the system model. In this article, the problem of approximate controllability for nonlinear impulsive differential equations with state-dependent delay is investigated. We study the approximate controllability for nonlinear impulsive differential system under the assumption that the corresponding linear control system is approximately controllable. Using methods of functional analysis and semigroup theory, sufficient conditions are formulated and proved. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the proposed theory.

  11. Glial nitric oxide-mediated long-term presynaptic facilitation revealed by optical imaging in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2004-11-01

    We investigated a presynaptic form of long-term potentiation (LTP) in horizontal slices of the rat spinal cord by visualizing presynaptic and postsynaptic excitation with a voltage-sensitive dye. To record presynaptic excitation, we stained primary afferent fibers anterogradely from the dorsal root. A single-pulse test stimulation of C fiber-activating strength to the dorsal root elicited action potential (AP)-like or compound AP-like optical signals throughout the superficial dorsal horn. After conditioning (240 pulses at 2 Hz for 2 min), the presynaptic excitation was augmented. Furthermore, new excitation was elicited in the areas that were silent before conditioning. For postsynaptic recording, projection neurons in spinal lamina I were stained retrogradely from the periaqueductal gray in the brain stem. The test stimulation elicited AP-like or EPSP-like optical signals in the stained neurons. After conditioning, the EPSP-like responses were augmented, and previously silent neurons were converted to active ones. Results obtained with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, NO synthase inhibitors, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist and mGluR1 antagonist, and a glial metabolism inhibitor suggest that after conditioning, presynaptic excitation is facilitated by NO released from glial cells via the activation of mGluR1. The results also indicate the possible presence of additional presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanism(s) for the LTP induction. Activity-dependent LTP of nociceptive afferent synaptic transmission in the spinal cord is believed to underlie central sensitization after inflammation or nerve injury. This glial NO-mediated control of presynaptic excitation may contribute to the induction at least in part. PMID:15525773

  12. State-dependent Regulation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Gating by a High Affinity Fe3+ Bridge between the Regulatory Domain and Cytoplasmic Loop 3*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu

    2010-01-01

    The unique regulatory (R) domain differentiates the human CFTR channel from other ATP-binding cassette transporters and exerts multiple effects on channel function. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, an intracellular high affinity (2.3 × 10−19 m) Fe3+ bridge is reported as a novel approach to regulating channel gating. It inhibited CFTR activity by primarily reducing an open probability and an opening rate, and inhibition was reversed by EDTA and phenanthroline. His-950, His-954, Cys-832, His-775, and Asp-836 were found essential for inhibition and phosphorylated Ser-768 may enhance Fe3+ binding. More importantly, inhibition by Fe3+ was state-dependent. Sensitivity to Fe3+ was reduced when the channel was locked in an open state by AMP-PNP. Similarly, a K978C mutation from cytoplasmic loop 3 (CL3), which promotes ATP-independent channel opening, greatly weakened inhibition by Fe3+ no matter whether NBD2 was present or not. Therefore, although ATP binding-induced dimerization of NBD1-NBD2 is required for channel gating, regulation of CFTR activity by Fe3+ may involve an interaction between the R domain and CL3. These findings may support proximity of the R domain to the cytoplasmic loops. They also suggest that Fe3+ homeostasis may play a critical role in regulating pathophysiological CFTR activity because dysregulation of this protein causes cystic fibrosis, secretary diarrhea, and infertility. PMID:20952391

  13. 7-(3-(4-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)piperazinyl)propoxy)-2 (1H)-quinolinone (OPC-4392), a presynaptic dopamine autoreceptor agonist and postsynaptic D2 receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Y.; Kikuchi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Tsutsui, M.; Yamada, K.; Hiyama, T.

    1988-01-01

    The assertion that OPC-4392 acts as an agonist at presynaptic dopamine autoreceptors is supported by the following behavioral and biochemical observations: OPC-4392, 3-PPP and apomorphine inhibited the reserpine-induced increase in DOPA accumulation in the forebrain of mice and in the frontal cortex, limbic forebrain and striatum of rats. In addition, the gamma-butyrolactone (GBL)-induced increase in DOPA accumulation in the mouse forebrain was also inhibited by OPC-4392, 3-PPP and apomorphine. The inhibitory effect of OPC-4392 on GBL-induced DOPA accumulation lasted for at least 8 hours after oral administration to mice, while that of 3-PPP and apomorphine disappeared in 4 hours after subcutaneous injection. OPC-4392 failed to increase spontaneous motor activity in reserpinized mice, enhance spontaneous ipsilateral rotation in rats with unilateral striatal kainic acid (KA) lesions, induce contralateral rotation in rats with unilateral striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions and inhibit /sup 14/C-acetylcholine (Ach) release stimulated by 20 mM KCl in rat striatal slices.

  14. Age-related changes in tonic activation of presynaptic versus extrasynaptic γ-amniobutyric acid type B receptors in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Haley E; Kelly, Kyle B; Bizon, Jennifer L; Frazier, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of age on both glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid mediated (GABAergic) signaling in the rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), with an emphasis on revealing novel changes contributing to increased inhibition in age. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from layer 2/3 mPFC pyramidal neurons in acute cortical slices prepared from either young (4 months) or aged (20-24 months) male F344 rats. Results indicated that GABAB receptors on GABAergic, but not on glutamatergic, inputs to layer 2/3 pyramidal cells are tonically activated by ambient GABA in young animals and further demonstrated that this form of tonic inhibition is significantly attenuated in aged mPFC. Moreover, concurrent with loss of tonic presynaptic GABAB autoreceptor activation, layer 2/3 pyramidal cells in aged mPFC are subjected to increased tonic activation of extrasynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors. These data demonstrate a shift in the site of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory tone in the aged mPFC that clearly promotes increased inhibition of pyramidal cells in aged animals, and that may plausibly contribute to impaired executive function. PMID:27459929

  15. The Optimal Solution of a Non-Convex State-Dependent LQR Problem and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xudan; Zhu, J. Jim; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies a Non-convex State-dependent Linear Quadratic Regulator (NSLQR) problem, in which the control penalty weighting matrix in the performance index is state-dependent. A necessary and sufficient condition for the optimal solution is established with a rigorous proof by Euler-Lagrange Equation. It is found that the optimal solution of the NSLQR problem can be obtained by solving a Pseudo-Differential-Riccati-Equation (PDRE) simultaneously with the closed-loop system equation. A Comparison Theorem for the PDRE is given to facilitate solution methods for the PDRE. A linear time-variant system is employed as an example in simulation to verify the proposed optimal solution. As a non-trivial application, a goal pursuit process in psychology is modeled as a NSLQR problem and two typical goal pursuit behaviors found in human and animals are reproduced using different control weighting . It is found that these two behaviors save control energy and cause less stress over Conventional Control Behavior typified by the LQR control with a constant control weighting , in situations where only the goal discrepancy at the terminal time is of concern, such as in Marathon races and target hitting missions. PMID:24747417

  16. State-dependent climate sensitivity in past warm climates and its implications for future climate projections

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Rodrigo; Huber, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Projections of future climate depend critically on refined estimates of climate sensitivity. Recent progress in temperature proxies dramatically increases the magnitude of warming reconstructed from early Paleogene greenhouse climates and demands a close examination of the forcing and feedback mechanisms that maintained this warmth and the broad dynamic range that these paleoclimate records attest to. Here, we show that several complementary resolutions to these questions are possible in the context of model simulations using modern and early Paleogene configurations. We find that (i) changes in boundary conditions representative of slow “Earth system” feedbacks play an important role in maintaining elevated early Paleogene temperatures, (ii) radiative forcing by carbon dioxide deviates significantly from pure logarithmic behavior at concentrations relevant for simulation of the early Paleogene, and (iii) fast or “Charney” climate sensitivity in this model increases sharply as the climate warms. Thus, increased forcing and increased slow and fast sensitivity can all play a substantial role in maintaining early Paleogene warmth. This poses an equifinality problem: The same climate can be maintained by a different mix of these ingredients; however, at present, the mix cannot be constrained directly from climate proxy data. The implications of strongly state-dependent fast sensitivity reach far beyond the early Paleogene. The study of past warm climates may not narrow uncertainty in future climate projections in coming centuries because fast climate sensitivity may itself be state-dependent, but proxies and models are both consistent with significant increases in fast sensitivity with increasing temperature. PMID:23918397

  17. State-dependent firing determines intrinsic dendritic Ca2+ signaling in thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Errington, Adam C; Renger, John J; Uebele, Victor N; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    Activity-dependent dendritic Ca(2+) signals play a critical role in multiple forms of nonlinear cellular output and plasticity. In thalamocortical neurons, despite the well established spatial separation of sensory and cortical inputs onto proximal and distal dendrites, respectively, little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling during the different state-dependent firing patterns that are characteristic of these neurons. Here we demonstrate that T-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed throughout the entire dendritic tree of rat thalamocortical neurons and that they mediate regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes, typical of, but not exclusive to, sleep states, resulting in global dendritic Ca(2+) influx. In contrast, actively backpropagating action potentials, typical of wakefulness, result in smaller Ca(2+) influxes that can temporally summate to produce dendritic Ca(2+) accumulations that are linearly related to firing frequency but spatially confined to proximal dendritic regions. Furthermore, dendritic Ca(2+) transients evoked by both action potentials and low-threshold spikes are shaped by Ca(2+) uptake by sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases but do not rely on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Our data demonstrate that thalamocortical neurons are endowed with intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling properties that are spatially and temporally modified in a behavioral state-dependent manner and suggest that backpropagating action potentials faithfully inform proximal sensory but not distal corticothalamic synapses of neuronal output, whereas corticothalamic synapses only "detect" Ca(2+) signals associated with low-threshold spikes. PMID:21048143

  18. State-dependent and cell type-specific temporal processing in auditory thalamocortical circuit

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Shuzo

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing spontaneous activity in cortical circuits defines cortical states, but it still remains unclear how cortical states shape sensory processing across cortical laminae and what type of response properties emerge in the cortex. Recording neural activity from the auditory cortex (AC) and medial geniculate body (MGB) simultaneously with electrical stimulations of the basal forebrain (BF) in urethane-anesthetized rats, we investigated state-dependent spontaneous and auditory-evoked activities in the auditory thalamocortical circuit. BF stimulation induced a short-lasting desynchronized state, with sparser firing and increased power at gamma frequency in superficial layers. In this desynchronized state, the reduction in onset response variability in both AC and MGB was accompanied by cell type-specific firing, with decreased responses of cortical broad spiking cells, but increased responses of cortical narrow spiking cells. This onset response was followed by distinct temporal evolution in AC, with quicker rebound firing in infragranular layers. This temporal profile was associated with improved processing of temporally structured stimuli across AC layers to varying degrees, but not in MGB. Thus, the reduction in response variability during the desynchronized state can be seen subcortically whereas the improvement of temporal tuning emerges across AC layers, emphasizing the importance of state-dependent intracortical processing in hearing. PMID:26728584

  19. Relative navigation for autonomous formation flying satellites using the state-dependent Riccati equation filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Han-Earl; Kim, Young-Rok

    2016-01-01

    A relative navigation method for autonomous formation flying using the state-dependent Riccati equation filter (SDREF) is presented. In the SDREF, nonlinear relative dynamics, including J2 perturbation, are parameterized into a state-dependent coefficient (SDC) form without any loss of nonlinearity. The relative navigation algorithm is established based on the carrier-phase differential GPS (CDGPS) and single-frequency GPS data, in which the SDREF is used as a nonlinear estimator. To evaluate the SDREF performance, two different extended Kalman filters (EKFR1 and EKFR2) are introduced. The dynamic models of all the filters are based on relative motion including J2 perturbation. However, the SDREF and the EKFR1 use linear state propagation, whereas EKFR2 employs nonlinear state propagation. The navigation simulation is performed for each filter using live GPS signals simulated by a GPS signal generator, and the result is analyzed in terms of estimation accuracy and computational load. As a result, the SDREF provides a relative navigation solution with 3-D RMS accuracies of 6.0 mm and 0.153 mm/s for position and velocity, respectively, for a separation of 50 km with a computation time of approximately 34 s. The simulation results demonstrate that the SDREF estimates the relative states as rapidly as the EKFR1 and as accurately as the EKFR2, which means that the developed SDREF combines the strong points of EKFR1 and EKFR2 and overcomes their disadvantages.

  20. Tracking move-stop-move targets with state-dependent mode transition probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking ground moving targets with a GMTI radar. To avoid detection by the GMTI radar, targets can deliberately stop for some time before moving again. The GMTI radar does not detect a target when the radial velocity (along the line-of-sight from the sensor) falls below a certain minimum detectable velocity (MDV). We develop a new approach by using state-dependent mode transition probabilities to track move-stop-move targets. Since in a real scenario, the maximum deceleration is always limited, a target can not switch to the stopped-target model from a high speed. Therefore, with the use of the stopped-target model, the Markov chain of the mode switching has jump probabilities that depend on the target's kinematic state. A mode transition matrix with zero jump probabilities to the stopped-target mode is used when the speed is above a certain "stopping" limit (above which the target cannot stop in one sampling interval, designated as "fast stage") and another transition matrix with non-zero jump probabilities to the stopped-target mode is used when the speed is below this limit (designated as "slow stage"). The stage probabilities are calculated using the kinematic state statistics from the IMM estimator and then used to combine the state-dependent mode transition probabilities (SDP) in the two different transition matrices. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms previous methods.

  1. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  2. A Latent Transition Analysis Model for Latent-State-Dependent Nonignorable Missingness.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Sonya K

    2016-06-01

    Psychologists often use latent transition analysis (LTA) to investigate state-to-state change in discrete latent constructs involving delinquent or risky behaviors. In this setting, latent-state-dependent nonignorable missingness is a potential concern. For some longitudinal models (e.g., growth models), a large literature has addressed extensions to accommodate nonignorable missingness. In contrast, little research has addressed how to extend the LTA to accommodate nonignorable missingness. Here we present a shared parameter LTA that can reduce bias due to latent-state-dependent nonignorable missingness: a parallel-process missing-not-at-random (MNAR-PP) LTA. The MNAR-PP LTA allows outcome process parameters to be interpreted as in the conventional LTA, which facilitates sensitivity analyses assessing changes in estimates between LTA and MNAR-PP LTA. In a sensitivity analysis for our empirical example, previous and current membership in high-delinquency states predicted adolescents' membership in missingness states that had high nonresponse probabilities for some or all items. A conventional LTA overestimated the proportion of adolescents ending up in a low-delinquency state, compared to an MNAR-PP LTA. PMID:25697371

  3. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  4. A new genetic model of activity-induced Ras signaling dependent pre-synaptic plasticity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Amanda; Bowers, Mallory; Mortimer, Alysia Vrailas; Timmerman, Christina; Roux, Stephanie; Ramaswami, Mani; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2010-01-01

    Techniques to induce activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in vivo allow the underlying signaling pathways to be studied in their biological context. Here, we demonstrate activity-induced plasticity at neuromuscular synapses of Drosophila double mutant for comatose (an NSF mutant) and Kum (a SERCA mutant), and present an analysis of the underlying signaling pathways. comt; Kum (CK) double mutants exhibit increased locomotor activity under normal culture conditions, concomitant with a larger neuromuscular junction synapse and stably elevated evoked transmitter release. The observed enhancements of synaptic size and transmitter release in CK mutants are completely abrogated by: a) reduced activity of motor neurons; b) attenuation of the Ras/ERK signaling cascade; or c) inhibition of the transcription factors Fos and CREB. all of which restrict synaptic properties to near wild type levels. Together, these results document neural activity-dependent plasticity of motor synapses in CK animals that requires Ras/ERK signaling and normal transcriptional activity of Fos and CREB. Further, novel in vivo reporters of neuronal Ras activation and Fos transcription also confirm increased signaling through a Ras/AP-1 pathway in motor neurons of CK animals, consistent with results from our genetic experiments. Thus, this study: a) provides a robust system in which to study activity-induced synaptic plasticity in vivo; b) establishes a causal link between neural activity, Ras signaling, transcriptional regulation and pre-synaptic plasticity in glutamatergic motor neurons of Drosophila larvae; and c) presents novel, genetically encoded reporters for Ras and AP-1 dependent signaling pathways in Drosophila. PMID:20193670

  5. Melamine Alters Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission of CA3-CA1 Synapses Presynaptically Through Autophagy Activation in the Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Xi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Melamine is an industrial chemical that can cause central nervous system disorders including excitotoxicity and cognitive impairment. Its illegal use in powdered baby formula was the focus of a milk scandal in China in 2008. One of our previous studies showed that melamine impaired glutamatergic transmission in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. However, the underlying mechanism of action of melamine is unclear, and it is unknown if the CA3-CA1 pathway is directly involved. In the present study, a whole-cell patch-clamp technique was employed to investigate the effect of melamine on the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway in vitro. Both the evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (eEPSC) and the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) were recorded. Furthermore, we examined whether autophagy was involved in glutamatergic transmission alterations induced by melamine. Our data showed that melamine significantly increased the amplitude of eEPSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor did not prevent the increase in eEPSC amplitude. In addition, the PPR was remarkably decreased by a melamine concentration of 5 × 10(-5) g/mL. It was found that autophagy could be activated by melamine and an autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA, prevented the melamine-induced increase in eEPSC amplitude. Overall, our results show that melamine presynaptically alters glutamatergic synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses in vitro and this is likely associated with autophagy alteration. PMID:26530910

  6. Selective presynaptic insectotoxin (alpha-latroinsectotoxin) isolated from black widow spider venom.

    PubMed

    Magazanik, L G; Fedorova, I M; Kovalevskaya, G I; Pashkov, V N; Bulgakov, O V; Grishin, E V

    1992-01-01

    A homogenous protein of 120,000 mol. wt isolated from black widow spider (Lactrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus) venom and referred to as alpha-latroinsectotoxin was highly potent (4 nM) in the induction of an increase of the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials in blowfly (Calliphora vicina) larvae neuromuscular preparations. In the frog nerve ending, however, even 50 nM alpha-latroinsectotoxin failed to affect transmitter release. Pretreatment of insect preparations with alpha-latrotoxin or frog preparations with alpha-latroinsectotoxin did not prevent the specific effect of consequent applications of alpha-latroinsectotoxin (insect) and alpha-latrotoxin (frog), respectively. The binding of labelled [125I]alpha-latroinsectotoxin to insect and [125I]alpha-latrotoxin to bovine membrane preparations was saturable and highly specific. The presynaptic effect, but not the binding of alpha-latroinsectotoxin, was dependent on the presence of divalent cations in the external medium. Mg2+ could readily substitute for Ca2+ and increase of transmitter release induced by alpha-latroinsectotoxin also occurred in Ca(2+)-free solutions. Pretreatment of preparations with 300 micrograms/ml concanavalin A completely abolished both the presynaptic effect of alpha-latroinsectotoxin and its binding to insect membrane preparations. Thus, the phenomenology of alpha-latroinsectotoxin action on insects resembles in general that described for the action of alpha-latrotoxin on vertebrates. The selectivity of alpha-latrotoxin and alpha-latroinsectotoxin seems to be due to differences in the structure of neurotoxin receptors in nerve endings of vertebrates and insects, although the mode of presynaptic action has a great deal in common. PMID:1594101

  7. Region-specific changes in presynaptic agmatine and glutamate levels in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y; Liu, P; Leitch, B

    2016-01-15

    During the normal aging process, the brain undergoes a range of biochemical and structural alterations, which may contribute to deterioration of sensory and cognitive functions. Age-related deficits are associated with altered efficacy of synaptic neurotransmission. Emerging evidence indicates that levels of agmatine, a putative neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, are altered in a region-specific manner during the aging process. The gross tissue content of agmatine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of aged rat brains is decreased whereas levels in the temporal cortex (TE) are increased. However, it is not known whether these changes in gross tissue levels are also mirrored by changes in agmatine levels at synapses and thus could potentially contribute to altered synaptic function with age. In the present study, agmatine levels in presynaptic terminals in the PFC and TE regions (300 terminals/region) of young (3month; n=3) and aged (24month; n=3) brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats were compared using quantitative post-embedding immunogold electron-microscopy. Presynaptic levels of agmatine were significantly increased in the TE region (60%; p<0.001) of aged rats compared to young rats, however no significant differences were detected in synaptic levels in the PFC region. Double immunogold labeling indicated that agmatine and glutamate were co-localized in the same synaptic terminals, and quantitative analyses revealed significantly reduced glutamate levels in agmatine-immunopositive synaptic terminals in both regions in aged rats compared to young animals. This study, for the first time, demonstrates differential effects of aging on agmatine and glutamate in the presynaptic terminals of PFC and TE. Future research is required to understand the functional significance of these changes and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26548412

  8. Facilitation of the presynaptic calcium current at an auditory synapse in rat brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Cuttle, Matthew F; Tsujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Forsythe, Ian D; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    1998-01-01

    The presynaptic calcium current (IpCa) was recorded from the calyx of Held in rat brainstem slices using the whole-cell patch clamp technique.Tetanic activation of IpCa by 1 ms depolarizing voltage steps markedly enhanced the amplitude of IpCa. Using a paired pulse protocol, the second (test) response was facilitated with inter-pulse intervals of less than 100 ms. The facilitation was greater at shorter intervals and was maximal (about 20 %) at intervals of 5–10 ms.When the test pulse duration was extended, the facilitation was revealed as an increased rate of IpCa activation. From the current-voltage relationship measured at 1 ms from onset, facilitation could be described by a shift in the half-activation voltage of about −4 mV.IpCa facilitation was not attenuated when guanosine-5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) or guanosine-5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS) was included in the patch pipette, suggesting that G-proteins are not involved in this phenomenon.On reducing [Ca2+]o, the magnitude of facilitation diminished proportionally to the amplitude of IpCa. Replacement of [Ca2+]o by Ba2+ or Na+, or buffering of [Ca2+]i with EGTA or BAPTA attenuated IpCa facilitation.We conclude that repetitive presynaptic activity can facilitate the presynaptic Ca2+ current through a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. This mechanism would be complementary to the action of residual Ca2+ on the exocytotic machinery in producing activity-dependent facilitation of synaptic responses. PMID:9769416

  9. Presynaptic CaV2.1 calcium channels carrying familial hemiplegic migraine mutation R192Q allow faster recovery from synaptic depression in mouse calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J.; Di Guilmi, Mariano N.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Forsythe, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels have a dominant and specific role in initiating fast synaptic transmission at central excitatory synapses, through a close association between release sites and calcium sensors. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 channel. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harboring the FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study the consequences of this mutation in neurotransmission at the giant synapse of the auditory system formed by the presynaptic calyx of Held terminal and the postsynaptic neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). Although synaptic transmission seems unaffected by low-frequency stimulation in physiological Ca2+ concentration, we observed that with low Ca2+ concentrations (<1 mM) excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed increased amplitudes in R192Q KI mice compared with wild type (WT), meaning significant differences in the nonlinear calcium dependence of nerve-evoked transmitter release. In addition, when EPSCs were evoked by broadened presynaptic action potentials (achieved by inhibition of K+ channels) via Cav2.1-triggered exocytosis, R192Q KI mice exhibited further enhancement of EPSC amplitude and charge compared with WT mice. Repetitive stimulation of afferent axons to the MNTB at different frequencies caused short-term depression of EPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice than in WT mice. Faster recovery in R192Q KI mice was prevented by the calcium chelator EGTA-AM, pointing to enlarged residual calcium as a key factor in accelerating the replenishment of synaptic vesicles. PMID:22956801

  10. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  11. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  12. Chronic hypoxia-induced alteration of presynaptic protein profiles and neurobehavioral dysfunction are averted by supplemental oxygen in Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Fei, G-H; Feng, Z-P

    2008-04-22

    Chronic hypoxia causes neural dysfunction. Oxygen (O(2)) supplements have been commonly used to increase the O(2) supply, yet the therapeutic benefit of this treatment remains controversial due to a lack of cellular and molecular evidence. In this study, we examined the effects of short-burst O(2) supplementation on neural behavior and presynaptic protein expression profiles in a simple chronic hypoxia model of snail Lymnaea stagnalis. We reported that hypoxia delayed the animal response to light stimuli, suppressed locomotory activity, induced expression of stress-response proteins, hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), repressed syntaxin-1 (a membrane-bound presynaptic protein) and elevated vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1) (a vesicle-bound presynaptic protein) level. O(2) supplements relieved suppression of neural behaviors, and corrected hypoxia-induced protein alterations in a dose-dependent manner. The effectiveness of supplemental O(2) was further evaluated by determining time courses for recovery of neural behaviors and expression of stress response proteins and presynaptic proteins after relief from hypoxia conditions. Our findings suggest that O(2) supplement improves hypoxia-induced adverse alterations of presynaptic protein expression and neurobehaviors, however, the optimal level of O(2) required for improvement is protein specific and system specific. PMID:18343591

  13. Presynaptic Spike Timing-Dependent Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Paulsen, Ole; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a Hebbian learning rule important for synaptic refinement during development and for learning and memory in the adult. Given the importance of the hippocampus in memory, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms and functions of hippocampal STDP. In the present work, we investigated the requirements for induction of hippocampal spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) and spike timing-dependent long-term depression (t-LTD) and the mechanisms of these 2 forms of plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses in young (P12–P18) mouse hippocampus. We found that both t-LTP and t-LTD can be induced at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses by pairing presynaptic activity with single postsynaptic action potentials at low stimulation frequency (0.2 Hz). Both t-LTP and t-LTD require NMDA-type glutamate receptors for their induction, but the location and properties of these receptors are different: While t-LTP requires postsynaptic ionotropic NMDA receptor function, t-LTD does not, and whereas t-LTP is blocked by antagonists at GluN2A and GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors, t-LTD is blocked by GluN2C or GluN2D subunit-preferring NMDA receptor antagonists. Both t-LTP and t-LTD require postsynaptic Ca2+ for their induction. Induction of t-LTD also requires metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, phospholipase C activation, postsynaptic IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, postsynaptic endocannabinoid (eCB) synthesis, activation of CB1 receptors and astrocytic signaling, possibly via release of the gliotransmitter d-serine. We furthermore found that presynaptic calcineurin is required for t-LTD induction. t-LTD is expressed presynaptically as indicated by fluctuation analysis, paired-pulse ratio, and rate of use-dependent depression of postsynaptic NMDA receptor currents by MK801. The results show that CA3-CA1 synapses display both NMDA receptor-dependent t-LTP and t-LTD during development and identify a

  14. Presynaptic effects of L-DOPA and their possible role in dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Mosharov, Eugene V.; Borgkvist, Anders; Sulzer, David

    2014-01-01

    L-DOPA replacement therapy has long provided the most effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease. We review how this dopamine precursor enhances dopaminergic transmission by providing a greater sphere of neurotransmitter influence, due to the confluence of increased quantal size and decreased dopamine reuptake, as well as loading dopamine as a false transmitter into surviving serotonin neuron synaptic vesicles. We further review literature on how presynaptic dysregulation of DA release following L-DOPA might trigger dyskinesias in Parkinson patients. PMID:25450307

  15. Presynaptic Spike Timing-Dependent Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Paulsen, Ole; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a Hebbian learning rule important for synaptic refinement during development and for learning and memory in the adult. Given the importance of the hippocampus in memory, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms and functions of hippocampal STDP. In the present work, we investigated the requirements for induction of hippocampal spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) and spike timing-dependent long-term depression (t-LTD) and the mechanisms of these 2 forms of plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses in young (P12-P18) mouse hippocampus. We found that both t-LTP and t-LTD can be induced at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses by pairing presynaptic activity with single postsynaptic action potentials at low stimulation frequency (0.2 Hz). Both t-LTP and t-LTD require NMDA-type glutamate receptors for their induction, but the location and properties of these receptors are different: While t-LTP requires postsynaptic ionotropic NMDA receptor function, t-LTD does not, and whereas t-LTP is blocked by antagonists at GluN2A and GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors, t-LTD is blocked by GluN2C or GluN2D subunit-preferring NMDA receptor antagonists. Both t-LTP and t-LTD require postsynaptic Ca(2+) for their induction. Induction of t-LTD also requires metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, phospholipase C activation, postsynaptic IP3 receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release from internal stores, postsynaptic endocannabinoid (eCB) synthesis, activation of CB1 receptors and astrocytic signaling, possibly via release of the gliotransmitter d-serine. We furthermore found that presynaptic calcineurin is required for t-LTD induction. t-LTD is expressed presynaptically as indicated by fluctuation analysis, paired-pulse ratio, and rate of use-dependent depression of postsynaptic NMDA receptor currents by MK801. The results show that CA3-CA1 synapses display both NMDA receptor-dependent t-LTP and t-LTD during development and identify a

  16. Altered presynaptic protein NACP is associated with plaque formation and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Masliah, E.; Iwai, A.; Mallory, M.; Uéda, K.; Saitoh, T.

    1996-01-01

    We have recently identified, in the brain tissue of patients afflicted with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the non-A beta component of AD amyloid (NAC) as a new constituent of amyloid. NAC is derived from a larger precursor, NACP, a presynaptic protein. To better understand the role of NACP/NAC in the pathogenesis of AD, we used semiquantitative immunoblotting and combined double-immunocytochemistry/laser scanning confocal microscopy to study the concentration and distribution of NACP/NAC in human brain, and compared them to the concentration and distribution of the presynaptic marker synaptophysin and the amyloid marker A beta. The semiquantitative immunoblotting demonstrated that the NACP concentration is slightly increased in the AD frontal cortex without statistical significance, whereas synaptophysin was reduced in its levels in AD. Consequently the proportion of NACP/synaptophysin was more than double in the AD frontal cortex as compared with controls. In the AD neocortex, NACP was colocalized with approximately 80% of the synaptophysin-immunoreactive structures (presumably the presynaptic terminals) and with the dystrophic neuritic component of the plaques. Computer-aided analysis showed that numbers of NACP-immunoreactive structures along synaptophysin-immunoreactive structures were significantly diminished (30 to 40%) in AD. Although the overall numbers of NACP-positive structures were decreased, there was a significant increase in the intensity of NACP-immunoreactivity per structure in AD. This increased intensity of NACP immunoreactivity per structure in AD was not observed with anti-synaptophysin, consistent with immunoblotting-based quantification. Antibodies against NAC immunoreacted with amyloid in 35% of the diffuse plaques and 55% of the mature plaques. Normal aged control brains containing small groups of diffuse plaques were negative with anti-NAC. Double-immunolabeling studies with A beta antibodies showed that NAC immunoreactivity is more abundant

  17. Evaluating State Dependence and Subtype Selectivity of Calcium Channel Modulators in Automated Electrophysiology Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Brown, Arthur M.; Duzic, Emir

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels play essential roles in control of neurosecretion and muscle contraction. The pharmacological significance of Cav channels stem from their identification as the molecular targets of calcium blockers used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, angina, and arrhythmia, and neurologic diseases, such as pain and seizure. It has been proposed that state-dependent Cav inhibitors, that is, those that preferentially bind to channels in open or inactivated states, may improve the therapeutic window over relatively state-independent Cav inhibitors. High-throughput fluorescent-based functional assays have been useful in screening chemical libraries to identify Cav inhibitors. However, hit confirmation, mechanism of action, and subtype selectivity are better suited to automated patch clamp assays that have sufficient capacity to handle the volume of compounds identified during screening, even of modest sized libraries (≤500,000 compounds), and the flexible voltage control that allows evaluation of state-dependent drug blocks. IonWorks™ Barracuda (IWB), the newest generation of IonWorks instruments, provides the opportunity to accelerate the Cav drug discovery studies in an automated patch clamp platform in 384-well format capable of medium throughput screening and profiling studies. We have validated hCav1.2, hCav2.1, hCav2.2, and hCav3.2 channels assays on the IWB platform (population patch clamp mode) and demonstrated that the biophysical characteristics of the channels (activation, inactivation, and steady-state inactivation) obtained with the IWB system are consistent with known subtype-specific characteristics. Using standard reference compounds (nifedipine, BAY K8644, verapamil, mibefradil, and pimozide), we demonstrated subtype-selective and state- and use-dependent characteristics of drug–channel interactions. Here we describe the design and validation of novel robust high-throughput Cav channel

  18. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N.; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M.; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Rosin, Diane L.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel anti-parkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional functionally significant segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of cortico-striatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19936569

  19. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In "driver" thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  20. Stability analysis of a state dependent delayed, coupled two DOF model of drill-stringvibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, K.; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2013-05-01

    Stick-slip and bit-bounce are dangerous dynamic phenomena encountered during rotary drilling of oil-wells, but their exact origins and interplay are far from obvious. In this paper, we consider a fully coupled two degrees-of-freedom model, which assumes a state-dependent time delay and a viscous damping for both the axial and torsional motions. Without making any asymptotic assumptions, we have conducted a detailed linear stability analysis of the resultant mathematical model, which is composed of two coupled delay differential equations. The main significance of our work lies in providing practically useful results, which are in the form of stability charts in the plane of drilling rates and rotary speeds.

  1. A proteomic approach reveals integrin activation state-dependent control of microtubule cortical targeting.

    PubMed

    Byron, Adam; Askari, Janet A; Humphries, Jonathan D; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Koper, Ewa J; Warwood, Stacey; Choi, Colin K; Stroud, Matthew J; Chen, Christopher S; Knight, David; Humphries, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Integrin activation, which is regulated by allosteric changes in receptor conformation, enables cellular responses to the chemical, mechanical and topological features of the extracellular microenvironment. A global view of how activation state converts the molecular composition of the region proximal to integrins into functional readouts is, however, lacking. Here, using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies, we report the isolation of integrin activation state-dependent complexes and their characterization by mass spectrometry. Quantitative comparisons, integrating network, clustering, pathway and image analyses, define multiple functional protein modules enriched in a conformation-specific manner. Notably, active integrin complexes are specifically enriched for proteins associated with microtubule-based functions. Visualization of microtubules on micropatterned surfaces and live cell imaging demonstrate that active integrins establish an environment that stabilizes microtubules at the cell periphery. These data provide a resource for the interrogation of the global molecular connections that link integrin activation to adhesion signalling. PMID:25609142

  2. IonWorks Barracuda Assay for Assessment of State-Dependent Sodium Channel Modulators.

    PubMed

    Cerne, Rok; Wakulchik, Mark; Krambis, Michael J; Burris, Kevin D; Priest, Birgit T

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels represent important drug targets. The implementation of higher throughput electrophysiology assays is necessary to characterize the interaction of test compounds with several conformational states of the channel, but has presented significant challenges. We describe a novel high throughput approach to assess the effects of test agents on voltage-gated sodium currents. The multiple protocol mode of the automated electrophysiology instrument IonWorks Barracuda was used to control the level of inactivation and monitor current stability. Good temporal stability of currents and spatial uniformity of inactivation were obtained by optimizing the experimental conditions. The resulting assay allowed for robust assessment of state-dependent effects of test agents and enabled direct comparison of compound potency across several sodium channel subtypes at equivalent levels of inactivation. PMID:26844665

  3. Breaking inversion symmetry in a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: artificial graphene with tunable band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Staarmann, C.; Ölschläger, C.; Simonet, J.; Sengstock, K.

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present the application of a novel method for controlling the geometry of a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: the energy offset between the two sublattices of the honeycomb structure can be adjusted by rotating the atomic quantization axis. This enables us to continuously tune between a homogeneous graphene-like honeycomb lattice and a triangular lattice and to open an energy gap at the characteristic Dirac points. We probe the symmetry of the lattice with microwave spectroscopy techniques and investigate the behavior of atoms excited to the second energy band. We find a striking influence of the energy gap at the Dirac cones onto the lifetimes of bosonic atoms in the excited band.

  4. Qualitative analysis and applications of a kind of state-dependent impulsive differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyan; Pang, Guoping; Chen, Lansun

    2008-06-01

    This paper analyzes a certain type of impulsive differential equations (IDEs). Several useful theorems for its periodic solutions and their stabilities are given. The key idea is that a periodically time-dependent IDE can be transformed into the state-dependent IDE. As applications of our theory, the optimization problems in population dynamics are studied. That is, the maximum sustainable yields of single population models with periodically impulsive constant harvesting are discussed. Furthermore, we apply these results to the studies of the order-1 periodic solutions and their stability of a single population model with stage structure in which the mature is impulsively proportionally harvested while the immature is impulsively added with the constant.

  5. A proteomic approach reveals integrin activation state-dependent control of microtubule cortical targeting

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Adam; Askari, Janet A.; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Koper, Ewa J.; Warwood, Stacey; Choi, Colin K.; Stroud, Matthew J.; Chen, Christopher S.; Knight, David; Humphries, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Integrin activation, which is regulated by allosteric changes in receptor conformation, enables cellular responses to the chemical, mechanical and topological features of the extracellular microenvironment. A global view of how activation state converts the molecular composition of the region proximal to integrins into functional readouts is, however, lacking. Here, using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies, we report the isolation of integrin activation state-dependent complexes and their characterization by mass spectrometry. Quantitative comparisons, integrating network, clustering, pathway and image analyses, define multiple functional protein modules enriched in a conformation-specific manner. Notably, active integrin complexes are specifically enriched for proteins associated with microtubule-based functions. Visualization of microtubules on micropatterned surfaces and live cell imaging demonstrate that active integrins establish an environment that stabilizes microtubules at the cell periphery. These data provide a resource for the interrogation of the global molecular connections that link integrin activation to adhesion signalling. PMID:25609142

  6. Dynamical properties induced by state-dependent delays in photonic systems

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Llinàs, Jade; Porte, Xavier; Soriano, Miguel C.; Colet, Pere; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    In many dynamical systems and complex networks time delays appear naturally in feedback loops or coupling connections of individual elements. Moreover, in a whole class of systems, these delay times can depend on the state of the system. Nevertheless, so far the understanding of the impact of such state-dependent delays remains poor with a particular lack of systematic experimental studies. Here we fill this gap by introducing a conceptually simple photonic system that exhibits dynamics of self-organised switching between two loops with two different delay times, depending on the state of the system. On the basis of experiments and modelling on semiconductor lasers with frequency-selective feedback mirrors, we characterize the switching between the states defined by the individual delays. Our approach opens new perspectives for the study of this class of dynamical systems and enables applications in which the self-organized switching can be exploited. PMID:26081000

  7. Smoothness of semiflows for parabolic partial differential equations with state-dependent delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yunfei; Yuan, Rong; Pei, Yongzhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the smoothness properties of semiflows on C1-solution submanifold of a parabolic partial differential equations with state-dependent delay are investigated. The problem is formulated as an abstract ordinary retarded functional differential equation of the form du (t) / dt = Au (t) + F (ut) with a continuously differentiable map G from an open subset U of the space C1 ([ - h , 0 ] ,L2 (Ω)), where A is the infinitesimal generator of a compact C0-semigroup. The present study is continuation of a previous work [14] that highlights the classical solutions and C1-smoothness of solution manifold. Here, we further prove the continuous differentiability of the semiflow. We finally verify all hypotheses by a biological example which describes a stage structured diffusive model where the delay, which is the time taken from birth to maturity, is assumed as a function of a immature species population.

  8. Risk assessment of multistate progression of breast tumor with state-dependent genetic and environmental covariates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ying; Yen, Ming-Fang; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2014-02-01

    Few studies have focused on the different roles risk factors play in the multistate temporal natural course of breast cancer. We proposed a three-state Markov regression model to predict the risk from free of breast cancer (FBC) to the preclinical screen-detectable phase (PCDP) and from the PCDP to the clinical phase (CP). We searched the initiators and promoters affecting onset and subsequent progression of breast tumor to build up a three-state temporal natural history model with state-dependent genetic and environmental covariates. This risk assessment model was applied to a 1 million Taiwanese women cohort. The proposed model was verified by external validation with another independent data set. We identified three kinds of initiators, including the BRCA gene, seven single nucleotides polymorphism, and breast density. ER, Ki-67, and HER-2 were found as promoters. Body mass index and age at first pregnancy both played a role. Among women carrying the BRCA gene, the 10-year predicted risk for the transition from FBC to CP was 25.83%, 20.31%, and 13.84% for the high-, intermediate-, and low-risk group, respectively. The corresponding figures were 1.55%, 1.22%, and 0.76% among noncarriers. The mean sojourn time of staying at the PCDP ranged from 0.82 years for the highest risk group to 6.21 years for the lowest group. The lack of statistical significance for external validation (x(4)2=5.30,p=0.26) revealed the adequacy of our proposed model. The three-state model with state-dependent covariates of initiators and promoters was proposed for achieving individually tailored screening and also for personalized clinical surveillance of early breast cancer. PMID:24111840

  9. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L

    2015-09-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca(2+) cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca(2+) re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100-200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50μM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100-200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  10. Earthquake nucleation on faults with rate-and state-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Dieterich, J.H., 1992. Earthquake nucleation on faults with rate- and state-dependent strength. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 115-134. Faults with rate- and state-dependent constitutive properties reproduce a range of observed fault slip phenomena including spontaneous nucleation of slip instabilities at stresses above some critical stress level and recovery of strength following slip instability. Calculations with a plane-strain fault model with spatially varying properties demonstrate that accelerating slip precedes instability and becomes localized to a fault patch. The dimensions of the fault patch follow scaling relations for the minimum critical length for unstable fault slip. The critical length is a function of normal stress, loading conditions and constitutive parameters which include Dc, the characteristic slip distance. If slip starts on a patch that exceeds the critical size, the length of the rapidly accelerating zone tends to shrink to the characteristic size as the time of instability approaches. Solutions have been obtained for a uniform, fixed-patch model that are in good agreement with results from the plane-strain model. Over a wide range of conditions, above the steady-state stress, the logarithm of the time to instability linearly decreases as the initial stress increases. Because nucleation patch length and premonitory displacement are proportional to Dc, the moment of premonitory slip scales by D3c. The scaling of Dc is currently an open question. Unless Dc for earthquake faults is significantly greater than that observed on laboratory faults, premonitory strain arising from the nucleation process for earthquakes may by too small to detect using current observation methods. Excluding the possibility that Dc in the nucleation zone controls the magnitude of the subsequent earthquake, then the source dimensions of the smallest

  11. Pentylenetetrazol produces a state-dependent conditioned place aversion to alcohol withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Chester, Julia A; Coon, Laran E

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal could be detected in mice using the place conditioning procedure and whether the GABA(A) receptor antagonist, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), would increase the aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal and increase the probability of detecting conditioned place aversion. Subjects were alcohol-naïve mice from a specific line selectively bred for low alcohol preference (LAP1; n=91) and were assigned to three groups: alcohol withdrawal, PTZ alone, and PTZ+alcohol withdrawal. On four trials, mice received either a 4.0 g/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of alcohol (alcohol withdrawal, PTZ+alcohol withdrawal groups) or saline (PTZ group) 8 h prior to being placed on a distinctive floor texture for a 30-min conditioning session. Five minutes before these sessions, mice in the PTZ and PTZ+alcohol withdrawal groups received PTZ (5.0 mg/kg; i.p.) and the alcohol withdrawal group received saline. On intervening days mice received two saline injections at the same time points prior to being placed on a different floor texture. Post-conditioning floor preference was assessed in two 60-min tests; the first test was drug-free and the second test was state-dependent. Neither alcohol withdrawal nor PTZ produced significant place conditioning. The PTZ+alcohol withdrawal group showed a significant place aversion during the state-dependent test. These data suggest that the combined stimulus properties of PTZ and alcohol withdrawal facilitated the expression of conditioned place aversion to alcohol withdrawal. PMID:20138906

  12. Pentylenetetrazol Produces a State-Dependent Conditioned Place Aversion to Alcohol Withdrawal in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Julia A.; Coon, Laran E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal could be detected in mice using the place conditioning procedure and whether the GABAA receptor antagonist, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), would increase the aversive effects of alcohol withdrawal and increase the probability of detecting conditioned place aversion. Subjects were alcohol-naïve mice from a specific line selectively bred for low alcohol preference (LAP1; n=91) and were assigned to three groups: alcohol withdrawal, PTZ alone, and PTZ + alcohol withdrawal. On four trials, mice received either a 4.0 g/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of alcohol (alcohol withdrawal, PTZ + alcohol withdrawal groups) or saline (PTZ group) 8 hrs prior to being placed on a distinctive floor texture for a 30-min conditioning session. Five min before these sessions, mice in the PTZ and PTZ + alcohol withdrawal groups received PTZ (5.0 mg/kg; i.p.) and the alcohol withdrawal group received saline. On intervening days mice received two saline injections at the same time points prior to being placed on a different floor texture. Post-conditioning floor preference was assessed in two 60-min tests; the first test was drug-free and the second test was state-dependent. Neither alcohol withdrawal nor PTZ produced significant place conditioning. The PTZ + alcohol withdrawal group showed a significant place aversion during the state-dependent test. These data suggest that the combined stimulus properties of PTZ and alcohol withdrawal facilitated the expression of conditioned place aversion to alcohol withdrawal. PMID:20138906

  13. Brain State-Dependent Closed-Loop Modulation of Paired Associative Stimulation Controlled by Sensorimotor Desynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Royter, Vladislav; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pairing peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) increases corticospinal excitability when applied with a specific temporal pattern. When the two stimulation techniques are applied separately, motor imagery (MI)-related oscillatory modulation amplifies both ES-related cortical effects—sensorimotor event-related desynchronization (ERD), and TMS-induced peripheral responses—motor-evoked potentials (MEP). However, the influence of brain self-regulation on the associative pairing of these stimulation techniques is still unclear. Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of MI-related ERD during associative ES and TMS on subsequent corticospinal excitability. Method: The paired application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle and subsequent single-pulse TMS (110% resting motor threshold (RMT)) of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) was controlled by beta-band (16–22 Hz) ERD during MI of finger extension and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in six healthy subjects. Neural correlates were probed by acquiring the stimulus-response curve (SRC) of both MEP peak-to-peak amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) before and after the intervention. Result: The application of approximately 150 pairs of associative FES and TMS resulted in a significant increase of MEP amplitudes and AUC, indicating that the induced increase of corticospinal excitability was mediated by the recruitment of additional neuronal pools. MEP increases were brain state-dependent and correlated with beta-band ERD, but not with the background EDC muscle activity; this finding was independent of the FES intensity applied. Conclusion: These results could be relevant for developing closed-loop therapeutic approaches such as the application of brain state-dependent, paired associative stimulation (PAS) in the context of neurorehabilitation. PMID

  14. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  15. Evidence for the pharmacological similarity between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and postsynaptic muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, D. M.; Marek, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty antagonist substances with varying potencies for central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors have been examined for effects on the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor. This has been monitored by measuring the stimulating effects of the substances on acetylcholine synthesis by rat neocortical tissue prisms. Dose-response curves for selected agents showed that maximal stimulation of synthesis was to 136-140% of the value without an antagonist. At a concentration of 1 microM, 17 of the substances caused a significant increase in synthesis, whilst at 0.01 microM significant stimulation occurred with only atropine, dexetimide, N-methyl-piperdin-4-yl (R)-2-cyclohexyl-2-hydroxyl-2-phenylacetate, quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and scopolamine. Linear regression analysis between synthesis values obtained with the substances and published data for the effects on either cholinoceptor-agonist induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum or the binding of [3H]-QNB to rat forebrain membranes gave correlation coefficients of r = 0.84 (P less than 0.01), and r = 0.75 (P less than 0.02) respectively. The results provide no indication of a pharmacological difference between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors. PMID:7186824

  16. Diminished Presynaptic GABAB Receptor Function in the Neocortex of a Genetic Model of Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Yugi; D’Antuono, Margherita; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Biagini, Giuseppe; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Changes in GABAB receptor subunit expression have been recently reported in the neocortex of epileptic WAG/Rij rats that are genetically prone to experience absence seizures. These alterations may lead to hyperexcitability by down-regulating the function of presynaptic GABAB receptors in neocortical networks as suggested by a reduction in paired-pulse depression. Here, we tested further this hypothesis by analyzing the effects induced by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (0.1–10 μM) on the inhibitory events recorded in vitro from neocortical slices obtained from epileptic (>180 day-old) WAG/Rij and age-matched, non-epileptic control (NEC) rats. We found that higher doses of baclofen were required to depress pharmacologically isolated, stimulus-induced IPSPs generated by WAG/Rij neurons as compared to NEC. We also obtained similar evidence by comparing the effects of baclofen on the rate of occurrence of synchronous GABAergic events recorded by WAG/Rij and NEC neocortical slices treated with 4-aminopyridine + glutamatergic receptor antagonists. In conclusion, these data highlight a decreased function of presynaptic GABAB receptors in the WAG/Rij rat neocortex. We propose that this alteration may contribute to neocortical hyperexcitability and thus to absence seizures. PMID:19176980

  17. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Experience-Dependent Development of Inhibitory Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kotak, Vibhakar C.; Sanes, Dan H.

    2010-01-01

    Short-term changes in synaptic gain support information processing throughout the CNS, yet we know little about the developmental regulation of such plasticity. Here we report that auditory experience is necessary for the normal maturation of synaptic inhibitory short-term plasticity (iSTP) in the auditory cortex, and that presynaptic GABAB receptors regulate this development. Moderate or severe hearing loss was induced in gerbils, and iSTP was characterized by measuring inhibitory synaptic current amplitudes in response to repetitive stimuli. We reveal a profound developmental shift of iSTP from depressing to facilitating after the onset of hearing. Even moderate hearing loss prevented this shift. This iSTP change was mediated by a specific class of inhibitory interneurons, the low-threshold spiking cells. Further, using paired recordings, we reveal that presynaptic GABAB receptors at interneuron-pyramidal connections regulate iSTP in an experience-dependent manner. This novel synaptic mechanism may support the emergence of mature temporal processing in the auditory cortex. PMID:20164356

  18. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rachel E; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  19. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Rachel E.; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  20. Deformation of Attractor Landscape via Cholinergic Presynaptic Modulations: A Computational Study Using a Phase Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Kanamaru, Takashi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Corticopetal acetylcholine (ACh) is released transiently from the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) into the cortical layers and is associated with top-down attention. Recent experimental data suggest that this release of ACh disinhibits layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons (PYRs) via muscarinic presynaptic effects on inhibitory synapses. Together with other possible presynaptic cholinergic effects on excitatory synapses, this may result in dynamic and temporal modifications of synapses associated with top-down attention. However, the system-level consequences and cognitive relevance of such disinhibitions are poorly understood. Herein, we propose a theoretical possibility that such transient modifications of connectivity associated with ACh release, in addition to top-down glutamatergic input, may provide a neural mechanism for the temporal reactivation of attractors as neural correlates of memories. With baseline levels of ACh, the brain returns to quasi-attractor states, exhibiting transitive dynamics between several intrinsic internal states. This suggests that top-down attention may cause the attention-induced deformations between two types of attractor landscapes: the quasi-attractor landscape (Q-landscape, present under low-ACh, non-attentional conditions) and the attractor landscape (A-landscape, present under high-ACh, top-down attentional conditions). We present a conceptual computational model based on experimental knowledge of the structure of PYRs and interneurons (INs) in cortical layers 1 and 2/3 and discuss the possible physiological implications of our results. PMID:23326520

  1. Contributions of SERCA pump and ryanodine-sensitive stores to presynaptic residual Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Scullin, Chessa S.; Partridge, L. Donald

    2010-01-01

    The presynaptic Ca2+ signal, which triggers vesicle release, disperses to a broadly distributed residual [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]res) that plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We have previously reported a slowing in the decay timecourse of [Ca2+]res during the second of paired pulses. In this study, we investigated the contributions of organelle and plasma membrane Ca2+ flux pathways to the reduction of effectiveness of [Ca2+]res clearance during short-term plasticity in Schaffer collateral terminals in the CA1 field of the hippocampus. We show that the slowed decay timecourse is mainly the result of a transport-dependent Ca2+ clearance process; that presynaptic caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ stores are not functionally loaded in the unstimulated terminal, but that these stores can effectively take up Ca2+ even during high frequency trains of stimuli; and that a rate limiting step of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) kinetics following the first pulse is responsible for a large portion of the observed slowing of [Ca2+]res clearance during the second pulse. We were able to accurately fit our [Ca2+]res data with a kinetic model based on these observations and this model predicted a reduction in availability of unbound SERCA during paired pulses, but no saturation of Ca2+ buffer in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:20153896

  2. Presynaptic control of inhibitory neurotransmitter content in VIAAT containing synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Aubrey, Karin R

    2016-09-01

    In mammals, fast inhibitory neurotransmission is carried out by two amino acid transmitters, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine. The higher brain uses only GABA, but in the spinal cord and brain stem both GABA and glycine act as inhibitory signals. In some cases GABA and glycine are co-released from the same neuron where they are co-packaged into synaptic vesicles by a shared vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter, VIAAT (also called vGAT). The vesicular content of all other classical neurotransmitters (eg. glutamate, monoamines, acetylcholine) is determined by the presence of a specialized vesicular transporter. Because VIAAT is non-specific, the phenotype of inhibitory synaptic vesicles is instead predicted to be dependent on the relative concentration of GABA and glycine in the cytosol of the presynaptic terminal. This predicts that changes in GABA or glycine supply should be reflected in vesicle transmitter content but as yet, the mechanisms that control GABA versus glycine uptake into synaptic vesicles and their potential for modulation are not clearly understood. This review summarizes the most relevant experimental data that examines the link between GABA and glycine accumulation in the presynaptic cytosol and the inhibitory vesicle phenotype. The accumulated evidence challenges the hypothesis that vesicular phenotype is determined simply by the competition of inhibitory transmitter for VIAAT and instead suggest that the GABA/glycine balance in vesicles is dynamically regulated. PMID:27296116

  3. Presynaptic DLG regulates synaptic function through the localization of voltage-activated Ca(2+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Astorga, César; Jorquera, Ramón A; Ramírez, Mauricio; Kohler, Andrés; López, Estefanía; Delgado, Ricardo; Córdova, Alex; Olguín, Patricio; Sierralta, Jimena

    2016-01-01

    The DLG-MAGUK subfamily of proteins plays a role on the recycling and clustering of glutamate receptors (GLUR) at the postsynaptic density. discs-large1 (dlg) is the only DLG-MAGUK gene in Drosophila and originates two main products, DLGA and DLGS97 which differ by the presence of an L27 domain. Combining electrophysiology, immunostaining and genetic manipulation at the pre and postsynaptic compartments we study the DLG contribution to the basal synaptic-function at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction. Our results reveal a specific function of DLGS97 in the regulation of the size of GLUR fields and their subunit composition. Strikingly the absence of any of DLG proteins at the presynaptic terminal disrupts the clustering and localization of the calcium channel DmCa1A subunit (Cacophony), decreases the action potential-evoked release probability and alters short-term plasticity. Our results show for the first time a crucial role of DLG proteins in the presynaptic function in vivo. PMID:27573697

  4. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Parras, M. Teresa; Delgado-García, José M.; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics. PMID:26848590

  5. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  6. Oxidative phosphorylation, not glycolysis, powers presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms underlying brain information processing.

    PubMed

    Hall, Catherine N; Klein-Flügge, Miriam C; Howarth, Clare; Attwell, David

    2012-06-27

    Neural activity has been suggested to initially trigger ATP production by glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation, for three reasons: glycolytic enzymes are associated with ion pumps; neurons may increase their energy supply by activating glycolysis in astrocytes to generate lactate; and activity increases glucose uptake more than O₂ uptake. In rat hippocampal slices, neuronal activity rapidly decreased the levels of extracellular O₂ and intracellular NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), even with lactate dehydrogenase blocked to prevent lactate generation, or with only 20% superfused O₂ to mimic physiological O₂ levels. Pharmacological analysis revealed an energy budget in which 11% of O₂ use was on presynaptic action potentials, 17% was on presynaptic Ca²⁺ entry and transmitter release, 46% was on postsynaptic glutamate receptors, and 26% was on postsynaptic action potentials, in approximate accord with theoretical brain energy budgets. Thus, the major mechanisms mediating brain information processing are all initially powered by oxidative phosphorylation, and an astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle is not needed for this to occur. PMID:22745494

  7. Presynaptic DLG regulates synaptic function through the localization of voltage-activated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Astorga, César; Jorquera, Ramón A.; Ramírez, Mauricio; Kohler, Andrés; López, Estefanía; Delgado, Ricardo; Córdova, Alex; Olguín, Patricio; Sierralta, Jimena

    2016-01-01

    The DLG-MAGUK subfamily of proteins plays a role on the recycling and clustering of glutamate receptors (GLUR) at the postsynaptic density. discs-large1 (dlg) is the only DLG-MAGUK gene in Drosophila and originates two main products, DLGA and DLGS97 which differ by the presence of an L27 domain. Combining electrophysiology, immunostaining and genetic manipulation at the pre and postsynaptic compartments we study the DLG contribution to the basal synaptic-function at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction. Our results reveal a specific function of DLGS97 in the regulation of the size of GLUR fields and their subunit composition. Strikingly the absence of any of DLG proteins at the presynaptic terminal disrupts the clustering and localization of the calcium channel DmCa1A subunit (Cacophony), decreases the action potential-evoked release probability and alters short-term plasticity. Our results show for the first time a crucial role of DLG proteins in the presynaptic function in vivo. PMID:27573697

  8. Lateral Mobility of Presynaptic L-Type Calcium Channels at Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Chen, Minghui; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2011-01-01

    At most synapses, presynaptic Ca2+ channels are positioned near vesicle release sites, and increasing this distance reduces synaptic strength. We examined the lateral membrane mobility of presynaptic L-type Ca2+ channels at photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina. Movements of individual Ca2+ channels were tracked by coupling quantum dots to an antibody against the extracellular α2δ4 Ca2+ channel subunit. α2δ4 antibodies labeled photoreceptor terminals and co-localized with antibodies to synaptic vesicle protein SV2 and Ca2+ channel CaV1.4 α1 subunits. The results show that Ca2+ channels are dynamic and move within a confined region beneath the synaptic ribbon. The size of this confinement area is regulated by actin and membrane cholesterol. Fusion of nearby synaptic vesicles caused jumps in Ca2+ channel position, propelling them towards the outer edge of the confinement domain. Channels rebounded rapidly towards the center. Thus, although CaV channels are mobile, molecular scaffolds confine them beneath the ribbon to maintain neurotransmission even at high release rates. PMID:21430141

  9. The Presynaptic Component of the Serotonergic System is Required for Clozapine's Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Prem N; Abbas, Atheir I; Farrell, Martilias S; Setola, Vincent; Sciaky, Noah; Huang, Xi-Ping; Kroeze, Wesley K; Crawford, LaTasha K; Piel, David A; Keiser, Michael J; Irwin, John J; Shoichet, Brian K; Deneris, Evan S; Gingrich, Jay; Beck, Sheryl G; Roth, Bryan L

    2011-01-01

    Clozapine, by virtue of its absence of extrapyramidal side effects and greater efficacy, revolutionized the treatment of schizophrenia, although the mechanisms underlying this exceptional activity remain controversial. Combining an unbiased cheminformatics and physical screening approach, we evaluated clozapine's activity at >2350 distinct molecular targets. Clozapine, and the closely related atypical antipsychotic drug olanzapine, interacted potently with a unique spectrum of molecular targets. This distinct pattern, which was not shared with the typical antipsychotic drug haloperidol, suggested that the serotonergic neuronal system was a key determinant of clozapine's actions. To test this hypothesis, we used pet1−/− mice, which are deficient in serotonergic presynaptic markers. We discovered that the antipsychotic-like properties of the atypical antipsychotic drugs clozapine and olanzapine were abolished in a pharmacological model that mimics NMDA-receptor hypofunction in pet1−/− mice, whereas haloperidol's efficacy was unaffected. These results show that clozapine's ability to normalize NMDA-receptor hypofunction, which is characteristic of schizophrenia, depends on an intact presynaptic serotonergic neuronal system. PMID:21048700

  10. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Parras, M Teresa; Delgado-García, José M; Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics. PMID:26848590

  11. On the state-dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-07-01

    A still open question is how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - is depending on background climate. We here present paleo-data based evidence on the state-dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with 3-D ice-sheet model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land-ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity was in similar approaches not accounted for due to previously more simplistic approximations of land-ice albedo radiative forcing being a linear function of sea level change. Important for the non-linearity between land-ice albedo and sea level is a latitudinal dependency in ice sheet area changes.In our setup, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land-ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state-dependency in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods S[CO2,LI] is on average ∼ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevents a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land-ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP) the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state-change in the climate system with the wide appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land-ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar paleo data-based approaches to calculate climate

  12. On the state dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-12-01

    It is still an open question how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - depends on background climate. We here present palaeodata-based evidence on the state dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with a 3-D ice-sheet-model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity has not, so far, been accounted for in similar approaches due to previously more simplistic approximations, in which land ice albedo radiative forcing was a linear function of sea level change. The latitudinal dependency of ice-sheet area changes is important for the non-linearity between land ice albedo and sea level. In our set-up, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state dependence in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods, S[CO2,LI] is on average ~ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevent a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP), the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state change in the climate system with the widespread appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar palaeodata

  13. A Regional Scale Earthquake Simulator for Faults With Rate- and State-Dependent Frictional Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards-Dinger, K.; Dieterich, J.

    2006-12-01

    Long-term (~10,000 year) catalogs of simulated earthquakes can be used to address a host of questions related to both seismic hazard calculations and more fundamental issues of earthquake occurrence and interaction (e.g. Ward [1996], Rundle et al. [2004], Ziv and Rubin [2000, 2003]). The quasi-static models of Ziv and Rubin [2000, 2003] are based on the computational strategy of Dieterich [1995] for efficiently computing large numbers of earthquakes, including the seismic nucleation process on faults with rate- and state-dependent frictional properties. Both Dieterich [1995] and Ziv and Rubin [2000, 2003] considered only single planar faults embedded in a whole-space. Faults in nature are not geometrically flat nor do they exist in isolation but form complex networks. Slip of such networks involves processes and interactions that do not occur in planar fault models and may strongly affect earthquake processes. We are in the process of constructing simulations of earthquake occurrence in complex, regional-scale fault networks whose elements obey rate- and state-dependent frictional laws. The solutions of Okada [1992] for dislocations in an elastic half-space are used to calculate the stress interaction coefficients between the elements. We employ analytic solutions for the nucleation process that include the effects of time-varying normal stress. At the time of this abstract we have conducted initial experiments with a single 100 km x 15 km strike-slip fault which produce power-law magnitude distributions with reasonable b-values. The model is computationally efficient - simulations of 50,000 events on a fault with 1500 elements require about seven minutes on a single 2.5 GHz CPU. The very largest events (which rupture nearly the entire fault) occur quasi-periodically, whereas the entire catalog displays temporal clustering in that its waiting time distribution is a power-law with a slope similar to that observed for actual seismicity in both California and Iceland

  14. State-dependent climate sensitivity of the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Peter; de Boer, Bas; von der Heydt, Anna; Stap, Lennert; van de Wal, Roderik

    2015-04-01

    Equilibrium temperature rise in response to increase in radiative forcing is called equilibrium climate sensitivity, an important quantity calculated by climate models to project future warming. For model validation comparisons with estimates based on paleo reconstructions are necessary. Here we use an energy balance model (Köhler et al., 2010) to estimate climate sensitivity using CO2 proxy data together with model-based reconstruction of land ice (de Boer et al., 2014) over the last 5 million years. We find that equilibrium climate sensitivity containing the radiative forcing of CO2 and land ice albedo depends on the background climate. This state-dependency is mainly contained in the non-linearity of the land-ice forcing. Results differ in detail if based on ice core CO2 of the last 800,000 years covering mainly colder than present climates (von der Heydt et al., 2014) or on CO2 proxies of the last 5 million years. Nevertheless, the climate sensitivity of the warm Pliocene, a paleo-analogy for a warmer future, is at least about a third higher than for preindustrial background climates. References: de Boer, B., Lourens, L. J. & van de Wal, R. S. Persistent 400,000-year variability of Antarctic ice volume and the carbon cycle is revealed throughout the Plio-Pleistocene. Nature Communications 5, 2999 (2014). doi: 10.1038/ncomms3999. Köhler, P. Bintanja, R., Fischer, H., Joos, F., Knutti, R., Lohmann, G. & Masson-Delmotte, V. What caused Earth's temperature variations during the last 800,000 years? Data-based evidences on radiative forcing and constraints on climate sensitivity. Quaternary Science Reviews 29, 129-145 (2010). doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.09.026. von der Heydt, A. S., Köhler, P., van de Wal, R. S. & Dijkstra, H. A. On the state dependency of fast feedback processes in (paleo) climate sensitivity. Geophysical Research Letters 41, 6484-6492 (2014). doi: 10.1002/2014GL061121.

  15. State-dependent variation in the inhibitory effect of (D-Ala sup 2 , D-Leu sup 5 )-enkephalin on hippocampal serotonin release in ground squirrels

    SciTech Connect

    Kramarova, L.I.; Lee, T.F.; Cui, Y.; Wang, L.C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that increased endogenous opioid activities may facilitate the onset of hibernation either directly or possibly through modulation of other neurotransmitter systems. The seasonal change of (D-Ala{sup 2}, D-Leu{sup 5})-enkephalin (DADLE), a {delta} receptor agonist, in modulating K{sup +}-induced ({sup 3}H)-5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from the hippocampal and hypothalamic slices of euthermic and hibernating Richardsons' ground squirrels was therefore investigated. DADLE had no effect on 5-HT release in the hypothalamic slices but elicited a dose-related inhibition on ({sup 3}H)-5-HT release from the hippocampal slices of the euthermic ground squirrel. The inhibitory effect of DADLE was completely reversed by naloxone, but not by tetrodotoxin. In contrast, DADLE failed to alter the K{sup +}-induced 5-HT release from the hippocampal slices of the hibernating ground squirrel. This state-dependent reduction in responsiveness to an opioid is consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced endogenous opioid activity in the hibernating phase could lead to down regulation of the opioid receptors and minimize its inhibition on hippocampal serotonergic activity. A high 5-HT activity would inhibit midbrain reticular activating system indirectly through non-serotonergic fibers, which in turn facilitate the onset or maintenance of hibernation.

  16. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal. PMID:23831917

  17. Effect of rotational-state-dependent molecular alignment on the optical dipole force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Lee Yeong; Lee, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Hye Ah; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Friedrich, Bretislav; Zhao, Bum Suk

    2016-07-01

    The properties of molecule-optical elements such as lenses or prisms based on the interaction of molecules with optical fields depend in a crucial way on the molecular quantum state and its alignment created by the optical field. Herein, we consider the effects of state-dependent alignment in estimating the optical dipole force acting on the molecules and, to this end, introduce an effective polarizability which takes proper account of molecular alignment and is directly related to the alignment-dependent optical dipole force. We illustrate the significance of including molecular alignment in the optical dipole force by a trajectory study that compares previously used approximations with the present approach. The trajectory simulations were carried out for an ensemble of linear molecules subject to either propagating or standing-wave optical fields for a range of temperatures and laser intensities. The results demonstrate that the alignment-dependent effective polarizability can serve to provide correct estimates of the optical dipole force, on which a state-selection method applicable to nonpolar molecules could be based. We note that an analogous analysis of the forces acting on polar molecules subject to an inhomogeneous static electric field reveals a similarly strong dependence on molecular orientation.

  18. Singular Hopf bifurcation in a differential equation with large state-dependent delay.

    PubMed

    Kozyreff, G; Erneux, T

    2014-02-01

    We study the onset of sustained oscillations in a classical state-dependent delay (SDD) differential equation inspired by control theory. Owing to the large delays considered, the Hopf bifurcation is singular and the oscillations rapidly acquire a sawtooth profile past the instability threshold. Using asymptotic techniques, we explicitly capture the gradual change from nearly sinusoidal to sawtooth oscillations. The dependence of the delay on the solution can be either linear or nonlinear, with at least quadratic dependence. In the former case, an asymptotic connection is made with the Rayleigh oscillator. In the latter, van der Pol's equation is derived for the small-amplitude oscillations. SDD differential equations are currently the subject of intense research in order to establish or amend general theorems valid for constant-delay differential equation, but explicit analytical construction of solutions are rare. This paper illustrates the use of singular perturbation techniques and the unusual way in which solvability conditions can arise for SDD problems with large delays. PMID:24511255

  19. Effects of Electronic-State-Dependent Solute Polarizability: Application to Solute-Pump/Solvent-Probe Spectra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Ladanyi, Branka M; Stratt, Richard M

    2015-07-23

    Experimental studies of solvation dynamics in liquids invariably ask how changing a solute from its electronic ground state to an electronically excited state affects a solution's dynamics. With traditional time-dependent-fluorescence experiments, that means looking for the dynamical consequences of the concomitant change in solute-solvent potential energy. But if one follows the shift in the dynamics through its effects on the macroscopic polarizability, as recent solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra do, there is another effect of the electronic excitation that should be considered: the jump in the solute's own polarizability. We examine the spectroscopic consequences of this solute polarizability change in the classic example of the solvation dye coumarin 153 dissolved in acetonitrile. After demonstrating that standard quantum chemical methods can be used to construct accurate multisite models for the polarizabilities of ground- and excited-state solvation dyes, we show via simulation that this polarizability change acts as a contrast agent, significantly enhancing the observable differences in optical-Kerr spectra between ground- and excited-state solutions. A comparison of our results with experimental solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra supports our interpretation and modeling of this spectroscopy. We predict, in particular, that solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra should be sensitive to changes in both the solvent dynamics near the solute and the electronic-state-dependence of the solute's own rotational dynamics. PMID:25299940

  20. State-Dependent Network Connectivity Determines Gating in a K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Bollepalli, Murali K.; Fowler, Philip W.; Rapedius, Markus; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary X-ray crystallography has provided tremendous insight into the different structural states of membrane proteins and, in particular, of ion channels. However, the molecular forces that determine the thermodynamic stability of a particular state are poorly understood. Here we analyze the different X-ray structures of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir1.1) in relation to functional data we obtained for over 190 mutants in Kir1.1. This mutagenic perturbation analysis uncovered an extensive, state-dependent network of physically interacting residues that stabilizes the pre-open and open states of the channel, but fragments upon channel closure. We demonstrate that this gating network is an important structural determinant of the thermodynamic stability of these different gating states and determines the impact of individual mutations on channel function. These results have important implications for our understanding of not only K+ channel gating but also the more general nature of conformational transitions that occur in other allosteric proteins. PMID:24980796

  1. State-dependent network connectivity determines gating in a K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Bollepalli, Murali K; Fowler, Philip W; Rapedius, Markus; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    X-ray crystallography has provided tremendous insight into the different structural states of membrane proteins and, in particular, of ion channels. However, the molecular forces that determine the thermodynamic stability of a particular state are poorly understood. Here we analyze the different X-ray structures of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir1.1) in relation to functional data we obtained for over 190 mutants in Kir1.1. This mutagenic perturbation analysis uncovered an extensive, state-dependent network of physically interacting residues that stabilizes the pre-open and open states of the channel, but fragments upon channel closure. We demonstrate that this gating network is an important structural determinant of the thermodynamic stability of these different gating states and determines the impact of individual mutations on channel function. These results have important implications for our understanding of not only K+ channel gating but also the more general nature of conformational transitions that occur in other allosteric proteins. PMID:24980796

  2. Eyes wide shut: Transcranial alternating current stimulation drives alpha rhythm in a state dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ruhnau, Philipp; Neuling, Toralf; Fuscá, Marco; Herrmann, Christoph S; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Weisz, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is used to modulate brain oscillations to measure changes in cognitive function. It is only since recently that brain activity in human subjects during tACS can be investigated. The present study aims to investigate the phase relationship between the external tACS signal and concurrent brain activity. Subjects were stimulated with tACS at individual alpha frequency during eyes open and eyes closed resting states. Electrodes were placed at Cz and Oz, which should affect parieto-occipital areas most strongly. Source space magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were used to estimate phase coherence between tACS and brain activity. Phase coherence was significantly increased in areas in the occipital pole in eyes open resting state only. The lag between tACS and brain responses showed considerable inter-individual variability. In conclusion, tACS at individual alpha frequency entrains brain activity in visual cortices. Interestingly, this effect is state dependent and is clearly observed with eyes open but only to a lesser extent with eyes closed. PMID:27252047

  3. State-dependent access of anions to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2008-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is gated by intracellular factors; however, conformational changes in the channel pore associated with channel activation have not been identified. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the state-dependent accessibility of substituted cysteine residues in the CFTR channel pore to a range of cysteine-reactive reagents applied to the extracellular side of the membrane. Using functional modification of the channel current-voltage relationship as a marker of modification, we find that several positively charged reagents are able to penetrate deeply into the pore from the outside irrespective of whether or not the channels have been activated. In contrast, access of three anionic cysteine-reactive reagents, the methanesulfonate sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanesulfonate, the organic mercurial p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid, and the permeant anion Au(CN)(2)(-), to several different sites in the pore is strictly limited prior to channel activation. This suggests that in nonactivated channels some ion selectivity mechanism exists to exclude anions yet permit cations into the channel pore from the extracellular solution. We suggest that activation of CFTR channels involves a conformational change in the pore that removes a strong selectivity against anion entry from the extracellular solution. We propose further that this conformational change occurs in advance of channel opening, suggesting that multiple distinct closed pore conformations exist. PMID:18167343

  4. Eyes wide shut: Transcranial alternating current stimulation drives alpha rhythm in a state dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Philipp; Neuling, Toralf; Fuscá, Marco; Herrmann, Christoph S.; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Weisz, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is used to modulate brain oscillations to measure changes in cognitive function. It is only since recently that brain activity in human subjects during tACS can be investigated. The present study aims to investigate the phase relationship between the external tACS signal and concurrent brain activity. Subjects were stimulated with tACS at individual alpha frequency during eyes open and eyes closed resting states. Electrodes were placed at Cz and Oz, which should affect parieto-occipital areas most strongly. Source space magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were used to estimate phase coherence between tACS and brain activity. Phase coherence was significantly increased in areas in the occipital pole in eyes open resting state only. The lag between tACS and brain responses showed considerable inter-individual variability. In conclusion, tACS at individual alpha frequency entrains brain activity in visual cortices. Interestingly, this effect is state dependent and is clearly observed with eyes open but only to a lesser extent with eyes closed. PMID:27252047

  5. State-Dependent Decisions Cause Apparent Violations of Rationality in Animal Choice

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Normative models of choice in economics and biology usually expect preferences to be consistent across contexts, or “rational” in economic language. Following a large body of literature reporting economically irrational behaviour in humans, breaches of rationality by animals have also been recently described. If proven systematic, these findings would challenge long-standing biological approaches to behavioural theorising, and suggest that cognitive processes similar to those claimed to cause irrationality in humans can also hinder optimality approaches to modelling animal preferences. Critical differences between human and animal experiments have not, however, been sufficiently acknowledged. While humans can be instructed conceptually about the choice problem, animals need to be trained by repeated exposure to all contingencies. This exposure often leads to differences in state between treatments, hence changing choices while preserving rationality. We report experiments with European starlings demonstrating that apparent breaches of rationality can result from state-dependence. We show that adding an inferior alternative to a choice set (a “decoy”) affects choices, an effect previously interpreted as indicating irrationality. However, these effects appear and disappear depending on whether state differences between choice contexts are present or not. These results open the possibility that some expressions of maladaptive behaviour are due to oversights in the migration of ideas between economics and biology, and suggest that key differences between human and nonhuman research must be recognised if ideas are to safely travel between these fields. PMID:15550984

  6. Earthquake Nucleation on Faults with a Revised Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kame, Nobuki; Fujita, Satoshi; Nakatani, Masao; Kusakabe, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    Recently N agata et al. (J Geophys Res 117:B02314, 2012) have proposed a new version of rate- and state-dependent friction law (RSF) that seems to have eventually resolved all the previously known discrepancies in the existing RSFs from laboratory observations. The values of a and b, empirical RSF parameters determined by fitting the same laboratory experiments, have been revised to be five times greater and a newly noticed weakening effect by shear stress with a coefficient c has been introduced. By using this revised RSF, we reinvestigated a problem of 2D quasi-static nucleation on faults. A crack-like nucleation-zone expansion known for the `aging' version of RSF is not sustainable with the `Nagata' law, which is understandable as the Nagata law does not produce a slip-weakening distance proportional to the involved strength reduction, an aging law's feature that contradicts laboratory observations. The later stage of Nagata-law nucleation shows localization of quasi-static slip within a limited spatial extent, but the localization is much milder than that predicted by the `slip' version of RSF. With an appropriate c parameter of the Nagata law, the nucleation size seems to be reduced only by a factor from that of the aging law.

  7. A microphysical interpretation of rate- and state-dependent friction for fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Marone, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of fault strength during the seismic cycle plays a key role in the mode of fault slip, nature of earthquake stress drop, and earthquake nucleation. Laboratory-based rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) laws can describe changes in fault strength during slip, but the connections between fault strength and the mechanisms that dictate the mode of failure, from aseismic creep to earthquake rupture, remain poorly understood. The empirical nature of RSF laws remains a drawback to their application in nature. Here we analyze an extensive data set of friction constitutive parameters with the goal of illuminating the microphysical processes controlling RSF. We document robust relationships between: (1) the initial value of sliding (or kinetic) friction, (2) RSF parameters, and (3) the time rates of frictional strengthening (aging). We derive a microphysical model based on asperity contact mechanics and show that these relationships are dictated by: (1) an activation energy that controls the rate of asperity growth by plastic creep, and (2) an inverse relationship between material hardness and the activation volume of plastic deformation. Collectively, our results illuminate the physics expressed by the RSF parameters, and which describe the absolute value of frictional strength and its dependence on time and slip rate. Moreover, we demonstrate that seismogenic fault behavior may be dictated by the interplay between grain properties and ambient conditions controlling the local shear strength of grain-scale asperity contacts.

  8. Thirst and the state-dependent representation of incentive stimulus value in human motive circuitry.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christoph A; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T

    2015-12-01

    Depletion imposes both need and desire to drink, and potentiates the response to need-relevant cues in the environment. The present fMRI study aimed to determine which neural structures selectively increase the incentive value of need-relevant stimuli in a thirst state. Towards this end, participants were scanned twice--either in a thirst or no-thirst state--while viewing pictures of beverages and chairs. As expected, thirst led to a selective increase in self-reported pleasantness and arousal by beverages. Increased responses to beverage when compared with chair stimuli were observed in the cingulate cortex, insular cortex and the amygdala in the thirst state, which were absent in the no-thirst condition. Enhancing the incentive value of need-relevant cues in a thirst state is a key mechanism for motivating drinking behavior. Overall, distributed regions of the motive circuitry, which are also implicated in salience processing, craving and interoception, provide a dynamic body-state dependent representation of stimulus value. PMID:25971601

  9. Are high-quality mates always attractive?: State-dependent mate preferences in birds and humans.

    PubMed

    Riebel, Katharina; Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Verhulst, Simon; Fawcett, Tim W

    2010-05-01

    Sexual selection theory posits that females should choose mates in a way that maximizes their reproductive success. But what exactly is the optimal choice? Most empirical research is based on the assumption that females seek a male of the highest possible quality (in terms of the genes or resources he can provide), and hence show directional preferences for indicators of male quality. This implies that attractiveness and quality should be highly correlated. However, females frequently differ in what they find attractive. New theoretical and empirical insights provide mounting evidence that a female's own quality biases her judgement of male attractiveness, such that male quality and attractiveness do not always coincide. A recent experiment in songbirds demonstrated for the first time that manipulation of female condition can lead to divergent female preferences, with low-quality females actively preferring low-quality males over high-quality males. This result is in line with theory on state-dependent mate choice and is reminiscent of assortative mating preferences in humans. Here we discuss the implications of this work for the study of mate preferences. PMID:20714411

  10. Evidence for oxidation-state-dependent conformational changes in human ferredoxin from multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, B; Volkman, B F; Markley, J L

    1998-03-17

    Human ferredoxin belongs to the vertebrate ferredoxin family which includes bovine adrenodoxin. It is a small (13.8 kDa) acidic protein with a [2Fe-2S] cluster. It functions as an electron shuttle in the cholesterol side-chain cleavage reaction which is the first step of steroid hormone biosynthesis. The protein studied here was produced in Escherichia coli and doubly labeled with 13C and 15N. The diamagnetic 15N, 13C', 13C alpha, 13C beta, 1H alpha, and 1HN resonances from about 70% of the 124 amino acid residues for oxidized human ferredoxin and 80% of those for the reduced protein have been assigned primarily on the basis of results from three-dimensional, triple-resonance experiments. Secondary structure features for human ferredoxin in its oxidized and reduced states have been identified from a combination of chemical shift index and NOE data. Comparison of NMR results from the protein in its oxidized and reduced states indicates that structural changes accompany the change in the oxidation state of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Major differences are localized at two regions: residues 29-31 and residues 109-124; the latter stretch forms the C-terminal region of the protein. The possible functional significance of these oxidation-state-dependent structural changes is discussed. PMID:9521718

  11. Singular Hopf bifurcation in a differential equation with large state-dependent delay

    PubMed Central

    Kozyreff, G.; Erneux, T.

    2014-01-01

    We study the onset of sustained oscillations in a classical state-dependent delay (SDD) differential equation inspired by control theory. Owing to the large delays considered, the Hopf bifurcation is singular and the oscillations rapidly acquire a sawtooth profile past the instability threshold. Using asymptotic techniques, we explicitly capture the gradual change from nearly sinusoidal to sawtooth oscillations. The dependence of the delay on the solution can be either linear or nonlinear, with at least quadratic dependence. In the former case, an asymptotic connection is made with the Rayleigh oscillator. In the latter, van der Pol’s equation is derived for the small-amplitude oscillations. SDD differential equations are currently the subject of intense research in order to establish or amend general theorems valid for constant-delay differential equation, but explicit analytical construction of solutions are rare. This paper illustrates the use of singular perturbation techniques and the unusual way in which solvability conditions can arise for SDD problems with large delays. PMID:24511255

  12. Plasticity of chemoreceptor gene expression: Sensory and circuit inputs modulate state-dependent chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Matthew; van der Linden, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Animals dramatically modify their chemosensory behaviors when starved, which could allow them to alter and optimize their food-search strategies. Dynamic changes in the gene expression of chemoreceptors may be a general mechanism underlying food and state-dependent changes in chemosensory behaviors. In our recent study,(1) we identified chemoreceptors in the ADL sensory neuron type of C. elegans that are modulated by feeding state and food availability. Here, we highllight our recent findings by which sensory inputs into ADL, neuronal outputs from ADL, and circuit inputs from the RMG interneuron, which is electrically connected to ADL, are required to regulate an ADL-expressed chemoreceptor. This sensory and circuit-mediated regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression is dependent on cell-autonomous pathways acting in ADL, e.g. KIN-29, DAF-2, OCR-2 and calcium signaling, and circuit inputs from RMG mediated by NPR-1. Based on these findings, we propose an intriguing but speculative feedback modulatory circuit mechanism by which sensory perception of food and internal state signals may be coupled to regulate ADL-expressed chemoreceptors, which may allow animals to precisely regulate and fine-tune their chemosensory neuron responses as a function of feeding state. PMID:26430563

  13. State-Dependent Partial Occlusion of Cortical LTP-Like Plasticity in Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Marion; Mainberger, Florian; Feige, Bernd; Maier, Jonathan G; Mall, Volker; Jung, Nicolai H; Reis, Janine; Klöppel, Stefan; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The synaptic plasticity hypothesis of major depressive disorder (MDD) posits that alterations in synaptic plasticity represent a final common pathway underlying the clinical symptoms of the disorder. This study tested the hypotheses that patients with MDD show an attenuation of cortical synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in comparison with healthy controls, and that this attenuation recovers after remission. Cortical synaptic LTP-like plasticity was measured using a transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol, ie, paired associative stimulation (PAS), in 27 in-patients with MDD according to ICD-10 criteria and 27 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The amplitude of motor-evoked potentials was measured before and after PAS. Patients were assessed during the acute episode and at follow-up to determine the state- or trait-character of LTP-like changes. LTP-like plasticity, the PAS-induced increase in motor-evoked potential amplitudes, was significantly attenuated in patients with an acute episode of MDD compared with healthy controls. Patients with remission showed a restoration of synaptic plasticity, whereas the deficits persisted in patients without remission, indicative for a state-character of impaired LTP-like plasticity. The results provide first evidence for a state-dependent partial occlusion of cortical LTP-like plasticity in MDD. This further identifies impaired LTP-like plasticity as a potential pathomechanism and treatment target of the disorder. PMID:26442602

  14. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Behavioral State-Dependent Bidirectional Modulation of Motor Cortex Output

    PubMed Central

    Schiemann, Julia; Puggioni, Paolo; Dacre, Joshua; Pelko, Miha; Domanski, Aleksander; van Rossum, Mark C.W.; Duguid, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neuronal activity in primary motor cortex (M1) correlates with behavioral state, but the cellular mechanisms underpinning behavioral state-dependent modulation of M1 output remain largely unresolved. Here, we performed in vivo patch-clamp recordings from layer 5B (L5B) pyramidal neurons in awake mice during quiet wakefulness and self-paced, voluntary movement. We show that L5B output neurons display bidirectional (i.e., enhanced or suppressed) firing rate changes during movement, mediated via two opposing subthreshold mechanisms: (1) a global decrease in membrane potential variability that reduced L5B firing rates (L5Bsuppressed neurons), and (2) a coincident noradrenaline-mediated increase in excitatory drive to a subpopulation of L5B neurons (L5Benhanced neurons) that elevated firing rates. Blocking noradrenergic receptors in forelimb M1 abolished the bidirectional modulation of M1 output during movement and selectively impaired contralateral forelimb motor coordination. Together, our results provide a mechanism for how noradrenergic neuromodulation and network-driven input changes bidirectionally modulate M1 output during motor behavior. PMID:25981037

  15. M/G/c/c state dependent travel time models and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor Smith, J.; Cruz, F. R. B.

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important problems in today’s modeling of transportation networks is an accurate estimate of travel time on arterial links, highway, and freeways. There are a number of deterministic formulas that have been developed over the years to achieve a simple and direct way to estimate travel times for this complex task. Realistically, however, travel time is a random variable. These deterministic formula are briefly reviewed and also a new way to compute travel time over arterial links, highway, and freeways, is presented based on an analytical state dependent queueing model. One of the features of the queueing model is that it is analyzed within the context of the theoretical three-phase traffic flow model. We show that the model provides a quantitative foundation alternative to qualitative three-phase traffic flow theory. An important property shown with the model is that the travel time function is not convex, but a sigmoid S-shaped (i.e. logistic curve). Extensive analytical and simulation experiments are shown to verify the S-shaped nature of the travel time function and the use of the model’s method of estimation of travel time over vehicular traffic links as compared with traditional approaches. Finally, it is shown that the point-of-inflection of the S-shaped curve represents the threshold point where the traffic flow volume switches from Free Flow to Congested Flow.

  16. Adaptations of presynaptic dopamine terminals induced by psychostimulant self-administration.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Cody A; Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-21

    A great deal of research has focused on investigating neurobiological alterations induced by chronic psychostimulant use in an effort to describe, understand, and treat the pathology of psychostimulant addiction. It has been known for several decades that dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is integrally involved in the selection and execution of motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and that psychostimulants act on this system to exert many of their effects. As such, a large body of work has focused on defining the consequences of psychostimulant use on dopamine signaling in the striatum as it relates to addictive behaviors. Here, we review presynaptic dopamine terminal alterations observed following self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine, as well as possible mechanisms by which these alterations occur and their impact on the progression of addiction. PMID:25491345

  17. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of primed SNARE complexes in presynaptic terminals and β cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Sawada, Wakako; Noguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Yagishita, Sho; Ohno, Mitsuyo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Kasai, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear how readiness for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis depends on varying degrees of SNARE complex assembly. Here we directly investigate the SNARE assembly using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between three pairs of neuronal SNAREs in presynaptic boutons and pancreatic β cells in the islets of Langerhans. These FRET probes functionally rescue their endogenous counterparts, supporting ultrafast exocytosis. We show that trans-SNARE complexes accumulated in the active zone, and estimate the number of complexes associated with each docked vesicle. In contrast, SNAREs were unassembled in resting state, and assembled only shortly prior to insulin exocytosis, which proceeds slowly. We thus demonstrate that distinct states of fusion readiness are associated with SNARE complex formation. Our FRET/FLIM approaches enable optical imaging of fusion readiness in both live and chemically fixed tissues.

  18. Nanoscale dynamics of synaptic vesicle trafficking and fusion at the presynaptic active zone

    PubMed Central

    Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Henry, Diane; Akmentin, Wendy; Matthews, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) is a macromolecular complex that facilitates the supply of release-ready synaptic vesicles to support neurotransmitter release at synapses. To reveal the dynamics of this supply process in living synapses, we used super-resolution imaging to track single vesicles at voltage-clamped presynaptic terminals of retinal bipolar neurons, whose CAZ contains a specialized structure—the synaptic ribbon—that supports both fast, transient and slow, sustained modes of transmission. We find that the synaptic ribbon serves a dual function as a conduit for diffusion of synaptic vesicles and a platform for vesicles to fuse distal to the plasma membrane itself, via compound fusion. The combination of these functions allows the ribbon-type CAZ to achieve the continuous transmitter release required by synapses of neurons that carry tonic, graded visual signals in the retina. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13245.001 PMID:26880547

  19. Na+ current in presynaptic terminals of the crayfish opener cannot initiate action potentials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Action potential (AP) propagation in presynaptic axons of the crayfish opener neuromuscular junction (NMJ) was investigated by simultaneously recording from a terminal varicosity and a proximal branch. Although orthodromically conducting APs could be recorded in terminals with amplitudes up to 70 mV, depolarizing steps in terminals to -20 mV or higher failed to fire APs. Patch-clamp recordings did detect Na(+) current (INa) in most terminals. The INa exhibited a high threshold and fast activation rate. Local perfusion of Na(+)-free saline showed that terminal INa contributed to AP waveform by slightly accelerating the rising phase and increasing the peak amplitude. These findings suggest that terminal INa functions to "touch up" but not to generate APs. PMID:26561611

  20. A presynaptic role for the cytomatrix protein GIT in synaptic vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Podufall, Jasmin; Tian, Rui; Knoche, Elena; Puchkov, Dmytro; Walter, Alexander M; Rosa, Stefanie; Quentin, Christine; Vukoja, Anela; Jung, Nadja; Lampe, Andre; Wichmann, Carolin; Böhme, Mathias; Depner, Harald; Zhang, Yong Q; Schmoranzer, Jan; Sigrist, Stephan J; Haucke, Volker

    2014-06-12

    Neurotransmission involves the exo-endocytic cycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs) within nerve terminals. Exocytosis is facilitated by a cytomatrix assembled at the active zone (AZ). The precise spatial and functional relationship between exocytic fusion of SVs at AZ membranes and endocytic SV retrieval is unknown. Here, we identify the scaffold G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 interacting (GIT) protein as a component of the AZ-associated cytomatrix and as a regulator of SV endocytosis. GIT1 and its D. melanogaster ortholog, dGIT, are shown to directly associate with the endocytic adaptor stonin 2/stoned B. In Drosophila dgit mutants, stoned B and synaptotagmin levels are reduced and stoned B is partially mislocalized. Moreover, dgit mutants show morphological and functional defects in SV recycling. These data establish a presynaptic role for GIT in SV recycling and suggest a connection between the AZ cytomatrix and the endocytic machinery. PMID:24882013

  1. Imaging Exocytosis of Single Synaptic Vesicles at a Fast CNS Presynaptic Terminal.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic vesicles are tethered to the active zone where they are docked/primed so that they can fuse rapidly upon Ca(2+) influx. To directly study these steps at a CNS presynaptic terminal, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at the live isolated calyx of Held terminal and measured the movements of single synaptic vesicle just beneath the plasma membrane. Only a subset of vesicles within the TIRF field underwent exocytosis. Following exocytosis, new vesicles (newcomers) approached the membrane and refilled the release sites slowly with a time constant of several seconds. Uniform elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) using flash photolysis elicited an exocytotic burst followed by the sustained component, representing release of the readily releasable vesicles and vesicle replenishment, respectively. Surprisingly, newcomers were not released within a second of high Ca(2+). Instead, already-tethered vesicles became release-ready and mediated the replenishment. Our results reveal an important feature of conventional synapses. PMID:26539890

  2. Stereotyped initiation of retinal waves by bipolar cells via presynaptic NMDA autoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Wei; Li, Xiao-Quan; Kawakami, Koichi; Du, Jiu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Glutamatergic retinal waves, the spontaneous patterned neural activities propagating among developing retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), instruct the activity-dependent refinement of visuotopic maps. However, its initiation and underlying mechanism remain largely elusive. Here using larval zebrafish and multiple in vivo approaches, we discover that bipolar cells (BCs) are responsible for the generation of glutamatergic retinal waves. The wave originates from BC axon terminals (ATs) and propagates laterally to nearby BCs and vertically to downstream RGCs and the optic tectum. Its initiation is triggered by the activation of and consequent glutamate release from BC ATs, and is mediated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDARs) expressed at these ATs. Intercellular asymmetry of NMDAR expression at BC ATs enables the preferential initiation of waves at the temporal retina, where BC ATs express more NMDARs. Thus, our findings indicate that glutamatergic retinal waves are initiated by BCs through a presynaptic NMDA autoreceptor-dependent process. PMID:27586999

  3. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of primed SNARE complexes in presynaptic terminals and β cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Noriko; Sawada, Wakako; Noguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Yagishita, Sho; Ohno, Mitsuyo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Kasai, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear how readiness for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis depends on varying degrees of SNARE complex assembly. Here we directly investigate the SNARE assembly using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between three pairs of neuronal SNAREs in presynaptic boutons and pancreatic β cells in the islets of Langerhans. These FRET probes functionally rescue their endogenous counterparts, supporting ultrafast exocytosis. We show that trans-SNARE complexes accumulated in the active zone, and estimate the number of complexes associated with each docked vesicle. In contrast, SNAREs were unassembled in resting state, and assembled only shortly prior to insulin exocytosis, which proceeds slowly. We thus demonstrate that distinct states of fusion readiness are associated with SNARE complex formation. Our FRET/FLIM approaches enable optical imaging of fusion readiness in both live and chemically fixed tissues. PMID:26439845

  4. Resting-state functional connectivity and presynaptic monoamine signaling in Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Dutta, Nisha; Helton, Sarah G; Schwandt, Melanie; Yan, Jia; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Cortes, Carlos R; Kerich, Mike; Hall, Samuel; Sun, Hui; Phillips, Monte; Momenan, Reza; Lohoff, Falk W

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol Dependence (AD) is a chronic relapsing disorder with high degrees of morbidity and mortality. While multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved in the complex symptomatology of AD, monoamine dysregulation and subsequent neuroadaptations have been long postulated to play an important role. Presynaptic monoamine transporters, such as the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1), are likely critical as they represent a key common entry point for monoamine regulation and may represent a shared pathway for susceptibility to AD. Excessive monoaminergic signaling as mediated by genetic variation in VMAT1 might affect functional brain connectivity in particular in alcoholics compared to controls. We conducted resting-state fMRI functional connectivity (FC) analysis using the independent component analysis (ICA) approach in 68 AD subjects and 72 controls. All subjects were genotyped for the Thr136Ile (rs1390938) variant in VMAT1. Functional connectivity analyses showed a significant increase of resting-state FC in 4 networks in alcoholics compared to controls (P < 0.05, corrected). The FC was significantly positively correlated with Alcohol Dependence Scale (ADS). The hyperfunction allele 136Ile was associated with a significantly decreased FC in the Default Mode Network, Prefrontal Cortex Network, and Executive Control Network in alcohol dependent participants (P < 0.05, corrected), but not in controls. Our data suggest that increased FC might represent a neuroadaptive mechanism relevant to AD that is furthermore mediated by genetic variation in VMAT1. The hyperfunction allele Thr136Ile might have a protective effect that is, in particular, relevant in AD by mechanism of increased monoamine transport into presynaptic storage vesicles. PMID:26368063

  5. Presynaptic actions of transcranial and local direct current stimulation in the red nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bączyk, M; Jankowska, E

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine to what extent long-lasting subcortical actions of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be related to its presynaptic actions. This was investigated in the red nucleus, where tDCS was recently demonstrated to facilitate transmission between interpositorubral and rubrospinal neurons. Changes in the excitability of preterminal axonal branches of interpositorubral neurons close to rubrospinal neurons were investigated during and after tDCS (0.2 mA) applied over the sensorimotor cortical area in deeply anaesthetized rats and cats. As a measure of the excitability, we used the probability of antidromic activation of individual interpositorubral neurons by electrical stimuli applied in the red nucleus. Our second aim was to compare effects of weak (≤1 μA) direct current applied within the red nucleus with effects of tDCS to allow the use of local depolarization in a further analysis of mechanisms of tDCS instead of widespread and more difficult to control depolarization evoked by distant electrodes. Local cathodal polarization was found to replicate all effects of cathodal tDCS hitherto demonstrated in the rat, including long-lasting facilitation of trans-synaptically evoked descending volleys and trisynaptically evoked EMG responses in neck muscles. It also replicated all effects of anodal tDCS in the cat. In both species, it increased the excitability of preterminal axonal branches of interpositorubral neurons up to 1 h post-tDCS. Local anodal polarization evoked opposite effects. We thus show that presynaptic actions of polarizing direct current may contribute to both immediate and prolonged effects of tDCS. PMID:25085891

  6. The Amyloid Precursor Protein—A Novel Player within the Molecular Array of Presynaptic Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    More than 20 years ago the amyloid precursor protein (APP) was identified as the precursor protein of the Aβ peptide, the main component of senile plaques in brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The pathophysiology of AD, characterized by a massive loss of synapses, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes was in principle attributed to the accumulation of Aβ. Within the last decades, much effort has gone into understanding the molecular basis of the progression of AD. However, little is known about the actual physiological function of APPs. Allocating APP to the proteome of the structurally and functionally dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a hitherto unknown player within the setting of the presynapse. The molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines comprising the life cycle of synaptic vesicles, exo- and endocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and mitochondrial activity provides a balance between structural and functional maintenance and diversity. The generation of genetically designed mouse models further deciphered APP as an essential player in synapse formation and plasticity. Deletion of APP causes an age-dependent phenotype: while younger mice revealed almost no physiological impairments, this condition was changed in the elderly mice. Interestingly, the proteomic composition of neurotransmitter release sites already revealed substantial changes at young age. These changes point to a network that incorporates APP into a cluster of nanomachines. Currently, the underlying mechanism of how APP acts within these machines is still elusive. Within the scope of this review, we shall construct a network of APP interaction partners within the PAZ. Furthermore, we intend to outline how deletion of APP affects this network during space and time leading to impairments in learning and memory. These alterations may provide a molecular link to the pathogenesis of AD and the physiological function of APP in the central nervous system

  7. Super-Resolution Microscopy Reveals Presynaptic Localization of the ALS/FTD Related Protein FUS in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Michael; Reichel, Jochen M.; Demestre, Maria; Putz, Stefan; Deshpande, Dhruva; Proepper, Christian; Liebau, Stefan; Schmeisser, Michael J.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Michaelis, Jens; Boeckers, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) is a multifunctional RNA-/DNA-binding protein, which is involved in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). A common hallmark of these disorders is the abnormal accumulation of mutated FUS protein in the cytoplasm. Under normal conditions FUS is confined to the nuclear compartment, in neurons, however, additional somatodendritic localization can be observed. In this study, we carefully analyzed the subcellular localization of endogenous FUS at synaptic sites of hippocampal neurons which are among the most affected cell types in FTD with FUS pathology. We could confirm a strong nuclear localization of FUS as well as its prominent and widespread neuronal expression throughout the adult and developing rat brain, particularly in the hippocampus, the cerebellum and the outer layers of the cortex. Intriguingly, FUS was also consistently observed at synaptic sites as detected by neuronal subcellular fractionation as well as by immunolabeling. To define a pre- and/or postsynaptic localization of FUS, we employed super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. FUS was found to be localized within the axon terminal in close proximity to the presynaptic vesicle protein Synaptophysin1 and adjacent to the active zone protein Bassoon, but well separated from the postsynaptic protein PSD-95. Having shown the presynaptic localization of FUS in the nervous system, a novel extranuclear role of FUS at neuronal contact sites has to be considered. Since there is growing evidence that local presynaptic translation might also be an important mechanism for plasticity, FUS – like the fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP – might act as one of the presynaptic RNA-binding proteins regulating this machinery. Our observation of presynaptic FUS should foster further investigations to determine its role in neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and FTD. PMID:26834559

  8. Cognitive Enhancing Treatment with a PPARγ Agonist Normalizes Dentate Granule Cell Presynaptic Function in Tg2576 APP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nenov, Miroslav N.; Laezza, Fernanda; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Starkey, Jonathan M.; Spratt, Heidi; Luxon, Bruce A.; Dineley, Kelly T.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal network hyperexcitability is considered an early indicator of Alzheimer's disease (AD) memory impairment. Some AD mouse models exhibit similar network phenotypes. In this study we focused on dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell spontaneous and evoked properties in 9-month-old Tg2576 mice that model AD amyloidosis and cognitive deficits. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that Tg2576 DG granule cells exhibited spontaneous EPSCs that were higher in frequency but not amplitude compared with wild-type mice, suggesting hyperactivity of DG granule cells via a presynaptic mechanism. Further support of a presynaptic mechanism was revealed by increased I–O relationships and probability of release in Tg2576 DG granule cells. Since we and others have shown that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) axis improves hippocampal cognition in mouse models for AD as well as benefitting memory performance in some humans with early AD, we investigated how PPARγ agonism affected synaptic activity in Tg2576 DG. We found that PPARγ agonism normalized the I–O relationship of evoked EPSCs, frequency of spontaneous EPSCs, and probability of release that, in turn, correlated with selective expression of DG proteins essential for presynaptic SNARE function that are altered in patients with AD. These findings provide evidence that DG principal cells may contribute to early AD hippocampal network hyperexcitability via a presynaptic mechanism, and that hippocampal cognitive enhancement via PPARγ activation occurs through regulation of presynaptic vesicular proteins critical for proper glutamatergic neurotransmitter release, synaptic transmission, and short-term plasticity. PMID:24431460

  9. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  10. Charge-state dependence of binary-encounter-electron cross sections and peak energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidmi, H. I.; Richard, P.; Sanders, J. M.; Schöne, H.; Giese, J. P.; Lee, D. H.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Varghese, S. L.

    1993-12-01

    The charge-state dependence of the binary-encounter-electron (BEE) double-differential cross section (DDCS) at 0° with respect to the beam direction resulting from collisions of 1 MeV/amu H+, Cq+, Nq+, Oq+, Fq+, Siq+, and Clq+, and 0.5 MeV/amu Cuq+ with H2 is reported. The data show an enhancement in the BEE DDCS as the charge state of the projectile is decreased, in agreement with the data reported by Richard et al. [J. Phys. B 23, L213 (1990)]. The DDCS enhancement ratios observed for the three-electron isoelectronic sequence C3+:C6+, N4+:N7+, O5+:O8+, and F6+:F9+ are about 1.35, whereas a DDCS enhancement of 3.5 was observed for Cu4+. The BEE enhancement with increasing electrons on the projectile has been shown by several authors to be due to the non-Coulomb static potential of the projectile and additionally to the e-e exchange interaction. An impulse-approximation (IA) model fits the shape of the BEE DDCS and predicts a Z2p dependence for the bare-ion cross sections. The IA also predicts a binary peak energy that is independent of q and Zp and below the classical value of 4t, where t is the energy of electrons traveling with the projectile velocity. We observed a BEE energy shift ΔE (ΔE=4t-Epeak, where Epeak is the measured energy at the peak of the binary encounter electrons) that is approximately independent of q for the low-Zp ions, whereas the measured ΔE values for Si, Cl, and Cu were found to be q dependent.

  11. Sleep state dependence of ventilatory long-term facilitation following acute intermittent hypoxia in Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, A.; Olson, E. B.; Terada, J.; Wenninger, J. M.; Bisgard, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilatory long-term facilitation (vLTF) is a form of respiratory plasticity induced by acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). Although vLTF has been reported in unanesthetized animals, little is known concerning the effects of vigilance state on vLTF expression. We hypothesized that AIH-induced vLTF is preferentially expressed in sleeping vs. awake male Lewis rats. Vigilance state was assessed in unanesthetized rats with chronically implanted EEG and nuchal EMG electrodes, while tidal volume, frequency, minute ventilation (V̇e), and CO2 production were measured via plethysmography, before, during, and after AIH (five 5-min episodes of 10.5% O2 separated by 5-min normoxic intervals), acute sustained hypoxia (25 min of 10.5% O2), or a sham protocol without hypoxia. Vigilance state was classified as quiet wakefulness (QW), light and deep non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep (l-NREM and d-NREM sleep, respectively), or rapid eye movement sleep. Ventilatory variables were normalized to pretreatment baseline values in the same vigilance state. During d-NREM sleep, vLTF was observed as a progressive increase in V̇e post-AIH (27 ± 5% average, 30–60 min post-AIH). In association, V̇e/V̇co2 (36 ± 2%), tidal volume (14 ± 2%), and frequency (7 ± 2%) were increased 30–60 min post-AIH during d-NREM sleep. vLTF was significant but less robust during l-NREM sleep, was minimal during QW, and was not observed following acute sustained hypoxia or sham protocols in any vigilance state. Thus, vLTF is state-dependent and pattern-sensitive in unanesthetized Lewis rats, with the greatest effects during d-NREM sleep. Although the physiological significance of vLTF is not clear, its greatest significance to ventilatory control is most likely during sleep. PMID:20360430

  12. State-dependent blocker interactions with the CFTR chloride channel: implications for gating the pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is subject to voltage-dependent open-channel block by a diverse range of cytoplasmic anions. However, in most cases the ability of these blocking substances to influence the pore opening and closing process has not been reported. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the state-dependent block of CFTR by cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions. Two major effects of Pt(NO2)4(2-) were identified. First, this anion caused fast, voltage-dependent block of open channels, leading to an apparent decrease in single-channel current amplitude. Secondly, Pt(NO2)4(2-) also decreased channel open probability due to an increase in interburst closed times. Interestingly, mutations in the pore that weakened (K95Q) or strengthened (I344K, V345K) interactions with Pt(NO2)4(2-) altered blocker effects both on Cl(-) permeation and on channel gating, suggesting that both these effects are a consequence of Pt(NO2)4(2-) interaction with a single site within the pore. Experiments at reduced extracellular Cl(-) concentration hinted that Pt(NO2)4(2-) may have a third effect, possibly increasing channel activity by interfering with channel closure. These results suggest that Pt(NO2)4(2-) can enter from the cytoplasm into the pore inner vestibule of both open and closed CFTR channels, and that Pt(NO2)4(2-) bound in the inner vestibule blocks Cl(-) permeation as well as interfering with channel opening and, perhaps, channel closure. Implications for the location of the channel gate in the pore, and the operation of this gate, are discussed. PMID:24671572

  13. A viscoelastic damage rheology and rate- and state-dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Agnon, Amotz

    2005-04-01

    We analyse the relations between a viscoelastic damage rheology model and rate- and state-dependent (RS) friction. Both frameworks describe brittle deformation, although the former models localization zones in a deforming volume while the latter is associated with sliding on existing surfaces. The viscoelastic damage model accounts for evolving elastic properties and inelastic strain. The evolving elastic properties are related quantitatively to a damage state variable representing the local density of microcracks. Positive and negative changes of the damage variable lead, respectively, to degradation and recovery of the material in response to loading. A model configuration having an existing narrow zone with localized damage produces for appropriate loading and temperature-pressure conditions an overall cyclic stick-slip motion compatible with a frictional response. Each deformation cycle (limit cycle) can be divided into healing and weakening periods associated with decreasing and increasing damage, respectively. The direct effect of the RS friction and the magnitude of the frictional parameter a are related to material strengthening with increasing rate of loading. The strength and residence time of asperities (model elements) in the weakening stage depend on the rates of damage evolution and accumulation of irreversible strain. The evolutionary effect of the RS friction and overall change in the friction parameters (a-b) are controlled by the duration of the healing period and asperity (element) strengthening during this stage. For a model with spatially variable properties, the damage rheology reproduces the logarithmic dependency of the steady-state friction coefficient on the sliding velocity and the normal stress. The transition from a velocity strengthening regime to a velocity weakening one can be obtained by varying the rate of inelastic strain accumulation and keeping the other damage rheology parameters fixed. The developments unify previous damage

  14. A state-dependent model for the optimal management of an invasive metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Bogich, Tiffany; Shea, Katriona

    2008-04-01

    Management of invasive species involves choosing between different management strategy options, but often the best strategy for a particular scenario is not obvious. We illustrate the use of optimization methods to determine the most efficient management strategy using one of the most devastating invasive forest pests in North America, the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar), as a case study. The optimization approach involves the application of stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) to a metapopulation framework with different infestation patch sizes, with the goal of minimizing infestation spread. We use a novel "moving window" approach as a way to address a spatially explicit problem without being explicitly spatial. We examine results for two cases in order to develop general rules of thumb for management. We explore a model with limited parameter information and then assess how strategies change with specific parameterization for the gypsy moth. The model results in a complex but stable, state-dependent management strategy for a multiyear management program that is robust even under situations of uncertainty. The general rule of thumb for the basic model consists of three strategies: eradicating medium-density infestations, reducing large-density infestations, and reducing the colonization rate from the main infestation, depending on the state of the system. With specific gypsy moth parameterization, reducing colonization decreases in importance relative to the other two strategies. The application of this model to gypsy moth management emphasizes the importance of managing based on the state of the system, and if applied to a specific geographic area, has the potential to substantially improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of current gypsy moth eradication programs, helping to slow the spread of this pest. Additionally, the approach used for this particular invasive species can be extended to the optimization of management programs for the spread of other

  15. Estrogen- and Satiety State-Dependent Metabolic Lateralization in the Hypothalamus of Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Toth, Istvan; Kiss, David S; Jocsak, Gergely; Somogyi, Virag; Toronyi, Eva; Bartha, Tibor; Frenyo, Laszlo V; Horvath, Tamas L; Zsarnovszky, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is the highest center and the main crossroad of numerous homeostatic regulatory pathways including reproduction and energy metabolism. Previous reports indicate that some of these functions may be driven by the synchronized but distinct functioning of the left and right hypothalamic sides. However, the nature of interplay between the hemispheres with regard to distinct hypothalamic functions is still unclear. Here we investigated the metabolic asymmetry between the left and right hypothalamic sides of ovariectomized female rats by measuring mitochondrial respiration rates, a parameter that reflects the intensity of cell and tissue metabolism. Ovariectomized (saline injected) and ovariectomized+estrogen injected animals were fed ad libitum or fasted to determine 1) the contribution of estrogen to metabolic asymmetry of hypothalamus; and 2) whether the hypothalamic asymmetry is modulated by the satiety state. Results show that estrogen-priming significantly increased both the proportion of animals with detected hypothalamic lateralization and the degree of metabolic difference between the hypothalamic sides causing a right-sided dominance during state 3 mitochondrial respiration (St3) in ad libitum fed animals. After 24 hours of fasting, lateralization in St3 values was clearly maintained; however, instead of the observed right-sided dominance that was detected in ad libitum fed animals here appeared in form of either right- or left-sidedness. In conclusion, our results revealed estrogen- and satiety state-dependent metabolic differences between the two hypothalamic hemispheres in female rats showing that the hypothalamic hemispheres drive the reproductive and satiety state related functions in an asymmetric manner. PMID:26339901

  16. Outbreaks by canopy-feeding geometrid moth cause state-dependent shifts in understorey plant communities.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Stein Rune; Jepsen, Jane Uhd; Odland, Arvid; Ims, Rolf Anker; Elvebakk, Arve

    2013-11-01

    The increased spread of insect outbreaks is among the most severe impacts of climate warming predicted for northern boreal forest ecosystems. Compound disturbances by insect herbivores can cause sharp transitions between vegetation states with implications for ecosystem productivity and climate feedbacks. By analysing vegetation plots prior to and immediately after a severe and widespread outbreak by geometrid moths in the birch forest-tundra ecotone, we document a shift in forest understorey community composition in response to the moth outbreak. Prior to the moth outbreak, the plots divided into two oligotrophic and one eutrophic plant community. The moth outbreak caused a vegetation state shift in the two oligotrophic communities, but only minor changes in the eutrophic community. In the spatially most widespread communities, oligotrophic dwarf shrub birch forest, dominance by the allelopathic dwarf shrub Empetrum nigrum ssp. hermaphroditum, was effectively broken and replaced by a community dominated by the graminoid Avenella flexuosa, in a manner qualitatively similar to the effect of wild fires in E. nigrum communities in coniferous boreal forest further south. As dominance by E. nigrum is associated with retrogressive succession the observed vegetation state shift has widespread implications for ecosystem productivity on a regional scale. Our findings reveal that the impact of moth outbreaks on the northern boreal birch forest system is highly initial-state dependent, and that the widespread oligotrophic communities have a low resistance to such disturbances. This provides a case for the notion that climate impacts on arctic and northern boreal vegetation may take place most abruptly when conveyed by changed dynamics of irruptive herbivores. PMID:23568711

  17. Using Brain–Computer Interfaces and Brain-State Dependent Stimulation as Tools in Cognitive Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ole; Bahramisharif, Ali; Oostenveld, Robert; Klanke, Stefan; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Okazaki, Yuka O.; van Gerven, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Large efforts are currently being made to develop and improve online analysis of brain activity which can be used, e.g., for brain–computer interfacing (BCI). A BCI allows a subject to control a device by willfully changing his/her own brain activity. BCI therefore holds the promise as a tool for aiding the disabled and for augmenting human performance. While technical developments obviously are important, we will here argue that new insight gained from cognitive neuroscience can be used to identify signatures of neural activation which reliably can be modulated by the subject at will. This review will focus mainly on oscillatory activity in the alpha band which is strongly modulated by changes in covert attention. Besides developing BCIs for their traditional purpose, they might also be used as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience. There is currently a strong interest in how brain-state fluctuations impact cognition. These state fluctuations are partly reflected by ongoing oscillatory activity. The functional role of the brain state can be investigated by introducing stimuli in real-time to subjects depending on the actual state of the brain. This principle of brain-state dependent stimulation may also be used as a practical tool for augmenting human behavior. In conclusion, new approaches based on online analysis of ongoing brain activity are currently in rapid development. These approaches are amongst others informed by new insight gained from electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography studies in cognitive neuroscience and hold the promise of providing new ways for investigating the brain at work. PMID:21687463

  18. MAM-2201, a synthetic cannabinoid drug of abuse, suppresses the synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Irie, Tomohiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Usami, Makoto; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Goda, Yukihiro; Sekino, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    Herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids-initially sold as legal alternatives to marijuana-have become major drugs of abuse. Among the synthetic cannabinoids, [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](4-methyl-1-naphthalenyl)-methanone (MAM-2201) has been recently detected in herbal products and has psychoactive and intoxicating effects in humans, suggesting that MAM-2201 alters brain function. Nevertheless, the pharmacological actions of MAM-2201 on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and neuronal functions have not been elucidated. We found that MAM-2201 acted as an agonist of human CB1Rs expressed in AtT-20 cells. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings made from Purkinje cells (PCs) in slice preparations of the mouse cerebellum, we also found that MAM-2201 inhibited glutamate release at parallel fiber-PC synapses via activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. MAM-2201 inhibited neurotransmitter release with an inhibitory concentration 50% of 0.36 μM. MAM-2201 caused greater inhibition of neurotransmitter release than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol within the range of 0.1-30 μM and JWH-018, one of the most popular and potent synthetic cannabinoids detected in the herbal products, within the range of 0.03-3 μM. MAM-2201 caused a concentration-dependent suppression of GABA release onto PCs. Furthermore, MAM-2201 induced suppression of glutamate release at climbing fiber-PC synapses, leading to reduced dendritic Ca(2+) transients in PCs. These results suggest that MAM-2201 is likely to suppress neurotransmitter release at CB1R-expressing synapses in humans. The reduction of neurotransmitter release from CB1R-containing synapses could contribute to some of the symptoms of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication including impairments in cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning. PMID:25747605

  19. State Dependency of Chemosensory Coding in the Gustatory Thalamus (VPMpc) of Alert Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haixin

    2015-01-01

    The parvicellular portion of the ventroposteromedial nucleus (VPMpc) is the part of the thalamus that processes gustatory information. Anatomical evidence shows that the VPMpc receives ascending gustatory inputs from the parabrachial nucleus (PbN) in the brainstem and sends projections to the gustatory cortex (GC). Although taste processing in PbN and GC has been the subject of intense investigation in behaving rodents, much less is known on how VPMpc neurons encode gustatory information. Here we present results from single-unit recordings in the VPMpc of alert rats receiving multiple tastants. Thalamic neurons respond to taste with time-varying modulations of firing rates, consistent with those observed in GC and PbN. These responses encode taste quality as well as palatability. Comparing responses to tastants either passively delivered, or self-administered after a cue, unveiled the effects of general expectation on taste processing in VPMpc. General expectation led to an improvement of taste coding by modulating response dynamics, and single neuron ability to encode multiple tastants. Our results demonstrate that the time course of taste coding as well as single neurons' ability to encode for multiple qualities are not fixed but rather can be altered by the state of the animal. Together, the data presented here provide the first description that taste coding in VPMpc is dynamic and state-dependent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Over the past years, a great deal of attention has been devoted to understanding taste coding in the brainstem and cortex of alert rodents. Thanks to this research, we now know that taste coding is dynamic, distributed, and context-dependent. Alas, virtually nothing is known on how the gustatory thalamus (VPMpc) processes gustatory information in behaving rats. This manuscript investigates taste processing in the VPMpc of behaving rats. Our results show that thalamic neurons encode taste and palatability with time-varying patterns of activity

  20. Mood State-Dependent Retention Using Identical or Non-Identical Mood Inductions at Learning and Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haaga, David A.

    State-dependent retention (SDR) refers to the tendency to recall something more easily when in the same state as when one first learned it. The most directly relevant evidence in favor of mood SDR has confounded matching of mood at learning and recall with matching of mood induction procedure. A study was conducted to test directly whether the use…

  1. Neurotensin Induces Presynaptic Depression of D2 Dopamine Autoreceptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Piccart, Elisabeth; Courtney, Nicholas A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Ford, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased dopaminergic signaling is a hallmark of severe mesencephalic pathologies such as schizophrenia and psychostimulant abuse. Activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons is under strict control of inhibitory D2 autoreceptors. Application of the modulatory peptide neurotensin (NT) to midbrain dopaminergic neurons transiently increases activity by decreasing D2 dopamine autoreceptor function, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie long-lasting effects. Here, we performed patch-clamp electrophysiology and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices to determine the effects of NT on dopamine autoreceptor-mediated neurotransmission. Application of the active peptide fragment NT8–13 produced synaptic depression that exhibited short- and long-term components. Sustained depression of D2 autoreceptor signaling required activation of the type 2 NT receptor and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. NT application increased paired-pulse ratios and decreased extracellular levels of somatodendritic dopamine, consistent with a decrease in presynaptic dopamine release. Surprisingly, we observed that electrically induced long-term depression of dopaminergic neurotransmission that we reported previously was also dependent on type 2 NT receptors and calcineurin. Because electrically induced depression, but not NT-induced depression, was blocked by postsynaptic calcium chelation, our findings suggest that endogenous NT may act through a local circuit to decrease presynaptic dopamine release. The current research provides a mechanism through which augmented NT release can produce a long-lasting increase in membrane excitability of midbrain dopamine neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whereas plasticity of glutamate synapses in the brain has been studied extensively, demonstrations of plasticity at dopaminergic synapses have been more elusive. By quantifying inhibitory neurotransmission between midbrain dopaminergic neurons in brain slices from mice we have

  2. An animal model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure elicits a long-lasting deficit in presynaptic long-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Jonathan W; Corches, Alex; Vieira, Philip A; Hiroto, Alex S; Mackie, Ken; Korzus, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis continues to be the most accessible and popular illicit recreational drug. Whereas current data link adolescence cannabinoid exposure to increased risk for dependence on other drugs, depression, anxiety disorders and psychosis, the mechanism(s) underlying these adverse effects remains controversial. Here we show in a mouse model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure deficient endocannabinoid (eCB)-mediated signaling and presynaptic forms of long-term depression at adult central glutamatergic synapses in the prefrontal cortex. Increasing endocannabinoid levels by blockade of monoacylglycerol lipase, the primary enzyme responsible for degrading the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), with the specific inhibitor JZL 184 ameliorates eCB-LTD deficits. The observed deficit in cortical presynaptic signaling may represent a neural maladaptation underlying network instability and abnormal cognitive functioning. Our study suggests that adolescent cannabinoid exposure may permanently impair brain functions, including the brain's intrinsic ability to appropriately adapt to external influences. PMID:25979486

  3. SAD-B kinase regulates pre-synaptic vesicular dynamics at hippocampal Schaffer collateral synapses and affects contextual fear memory.

    PubMed

    Watabe, Ayako M; Nagase, Masashi; Hagiwara, Akari; Hida, Yamato; Tsuji, Megumi; Ochiai, Toshitaka; Kato, Fusao; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Synapses of amphids defective (SAD)-A/B kinases control various steps in neuronal development and differentiation, such as axon specifications and maturation in central and peripheral nervous systems. At mature pre-synaptic terminals, SAD-B is associated with synaptic vesicles and the active zone cytomatrix; however, how SAD-B regulates neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in vivo remains unclear. Thus, we used SAD-B knockout (KO) mice to study the function of this pre-synaptic kinase in the brain. We found that the paired-pulse ratio was significantly enhanced at Shaffer collateral synapses in the hippocampal CA1 region in SAD-B KO mice compared with wild-type littermates. We also found that the frequency of the miniature excitatory post-synaptic current was decreased in SAD-B KO mice. Moreover, synaptic depression following prolonged low-frequency synaptic stimulation was significantly enhanced in SAD-B KO mice. These results suggest that SAD-B kinase regulates vesicular release probability at pre-synaptic terminals and is involved in vesicular trafficking and/or regulation of the readily releasable pool size. Finally, we found that hippocampus-dependent contextual fear learning was significantly impaired in SAD-B KO mice. These observations suggest that SAD-B kinase plays pivotal roles in controlling vesicular release properties and regulating hippocampal function in the mature brain. Synapses of amphids defective (SAD)-A/B kinases control various steps in neuronal development and differentiation, but their roles in mature brains were only partially known. Here, we demonstrated, at mature pre-synaptic terminals, that SAD-B regulates vesicular release probability and synaptic plasticity. Moreover, hippocampus-dependent contextual fear learning was significantly impaired in SAD-B KO mice, suggesting that SAD-B kinase plays pivotal roles in controlling vesicular release properties and regulating hippocampal function in the mature brain. PMID:26444684

  4. A novel SDS-stable dimer of a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein at presynaptic terminals of squid neurons.

    PubMed

    Lico, D T P; Lopes, G S; Brusco, J; Rosa, J C; Gould, R M; De Giorgis, J A; Larson, R E

    2015-08-01

    The presence of mRNAs in synaptic terminals and their regulated translation are important factors in neuronal communication and plasticity. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complexes are involved in the translocation, stability, and subcellular localization of mRNA and the regulation of its translation. Defects in these processes and mutations in components of the hnRNP complexes have been related to the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite much data on mRNA localization and evidence for protein synthesis, as well as the presence of translation machinery, in axons and presynaptic terminals, the identity of RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA transport and function in presynaptic regions is lacking. We previously characterized a strongly basic RNA-binding protein (p65), member of the hnRNPA/B subfamily, in squid presynaptic terminals. Intriguingly, in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), p65 migrated as a 65-kDa protein, whereas members of the hnRNPA/B family typically have molecular masses ranging from 35 to 42kDa. In this report we present further biochemical and molecular characterization that shows endogenous p65 to be an SDS-stable dimer composed of ∼37-kDa hnRNPA/B-like subunits. We cloned and expressed a recombinant protein corresponding to squid hnRNPA/B-like protein and showed its propensity to aggregate and form SDS-stable dimers in vitro. Our data suggest that this unique hnRNPA/B-like protein co-localizes with synaptic vesicle protein 2 and RNA-binding protein ELAV and thus may serve as a link between local mRNA processing and presynaptic function and regulation. PMID:26012490

  5. Optogenetic activation of presynaptic inputs in lateral amygdala forms associative fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Kim, Hyung-Su; Jeong, Yire; Augustine, George J.

    2014-01-01

    In Pavlovian fear conditioning, the lateral amygdala (LA) has been highlighted as a key brain site for association between sensory cues and aversive stimuli. However, learning-related changes are also found in upstream sensory regions such as thalamus and cortex. To isolate the essential neural circuit components for fear memory association, we tested whether direct activation of presynaptic sensory inputs in LA, without the participation of upstream activity, is sufficient to form fear memory in mice. Photostimulation of axonal projections from the two main auditory brain regions, the medial geniculate nucleus of the thalamus and the secondary auditory cortex, was paired with aversive footshock. Twenty-four hours later the same photostimulation induced robust conditioned freezing and this fear memory formation was disrupted when glutamatergic synaptic transmission was locally blocked in the LA. Therefore, our results prove for the first time that synapses between sensory input areas and the LA, previously implicated as a crucial brain site for fear memory formation, actually are sufficient to serve as a conditioned stimulus. Our results strongly support the idea that the LA may be sufficient to encode and store associations between neutral cue and aversive stimuli during natural fear conditioning as a critical part of a broad fear memory engram. PMID:25322798

  6. Dopamine Disposition in the Presynaptic Process Regulates the Severity of Methamphetamine-induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    KUHN, DONALD M.; FRANCESCUTTI-VERBEEM, DINA M.; THOMAS, DAVID M.

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is well-known for its ability to cause damage to dopamine (DA) nerve endings of the striatum. The mechanisms by which METH causes neurotoxicity are not fully understood but likely candidates are increased oxidative and nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Microglial activation is also emerging as an important element of the METH neurotoxic cascade and it appears that extensive crosstalk between these cells and DA nerve endings is an early event in this process. It may seem paradoxical, but DA itself is also thought to be an essential factor in the neuronal damaging effects of METH, but issues relating to its precise role in this regard remain unanswered. We present in this overview a summary of studies that tested how alterations in the disposition of presynaptic DA (injections of reserpine, L-DOPA, or clorgyline) modulate METH neurotoxicity. In all cases, these drugs significantly increased the magnitude of microglial activation as well as the severity of damage to striatal DA nerve endings caused by METH. The enhancement of METH effects in striatum by reserpine, L-DOPA, and clorgyline persisted for 14 days and showed no evidence of recovery. These data establish that subtle shifts in the newly-synthesized pool of DA can cause substantial changes in the severity of METH-induced neurotoxicity. DA released into the synapse by METH is very likely the source of downstream reactants that provoke microglial activation and the ensuing damage to DA nerve endings. PMID:18991856

  7. Presynaptic BK channels control transmitter release: physiological relevance and potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Griguoli, Marilena; Sgritta, Martina; Cherubini, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    BK channels are large conductance potassium channels characterized by four pore-forming α subunits, often co-assembled with auxiliary β and γ subunits to regulate Ca(2+) sensitivity, voltage dependence and gating properties. Abundantly expressed in the CNS, they have the peculiar characteristic of being activated by both voltage and intracellular calcium rise. The increase in intracellular calcium via voltage-dependent calcium channels (Cav ) during spiking triggers conformational changes and BK channel opening. This narrows the action potential and induces a fast after-hyperpolarization that shuts calcium channels. The tight coupling between BK and Cav channels at presynaptic active zones makes them particularly suitable for regulating calcium entry and neurotransmitter release. While in most synapses, BK channels exert a negative control on transmitter release under basal conditions, in others they do so only under pathological conditions, serving as an emergency brake to protect against hyperactivity. In particular cases, by interacting with other channels (i.e. limiting the activation of the delayed rectifier and the inactivation of Na(+) channels), BK channels induce spike shortening, increase in firing rate and transmitter release. Changes in transmitter release following BK channel dysfunction have been implicated in several neurological disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, mental retardation and autism. In particular, two mutations, one in the α and one in the β3 subunit, resulting in a gain of function have been associated with epilepsy. Hence, these discoveries have allowed identification of BK channels as new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26969302

  8. Metal Toxicity at the Synapse: Presynaptic, Postsynaptic, and Long-Term Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Sanah; Ghazala, Zena; Chowdhury, Arnab; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Metal neurotoxicity is a global health concern. This paper summarizes the evidence for metal interactions with synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Presynaptically metal ions modulate neurotransmitter release through their interaction with synaptic vesicles, ion channels, and the metabolism of neurotransmitters (NT). Many metals (e.g., Pb2+, Cd2+, and Hg+) also interact with intracellular signaling pathways. Postsynaptically, processes associated with the binding of NT to their receptors, activation of channels, and degradation of NT are altered by metals. Zn2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Li3+, Hg+, and methylmercury modulate NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and/or GABA receptors activity. Al3+, Pb2+, Cd2+, and As2O3 also impair synaptic plasticity by targeting molecules such as CaM, PKC, and NOS as well as the transcription machinery involved in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. The multiple effects of metals might occur simultaneously and are based on the specific metal species, metal concentrations, and the types of neurons involved. PMID:22287959

  9. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Julian; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Langlois, Mélanie; May, Patrick; Huneau, Clément; Becker, Felicitas; Muhle, Hiltrud; Suls, Arvid; Lemke, Johannes R; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Thiele, Holger; Konrad, Kathryn; Kawalia, Amit; Toliat, Mohammad R; Sander, Thomas; Rüschendorf, Franz; Caliebe, Almuth; Nagel, Inga; Kohl, Bernard; Kecskés, Angela; Jacmin, Maxime; Hardies, Katia; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Riesch, Erik; Dorn, Thomas; Brilstra, Eva H; Baulac, Stephanie; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehman-Horn, Frank; Roach, Jared C; Glusman, Gustavo; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David J; Martin, Benoit; de Witte, Peter A M; Biskup, Saskia; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Balling, Rudi; Nürnberg, Peter; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V; Weber, Yvonne G; Lerche, Holger

    2014-12-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children and have a strong genetic component. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding syntaxin-1B, that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature. Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes. PMID:25362483

  10. Presynaptic protein synthesis required for NT-3-induced long-term synaptic modulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neurotrophins elicit both acute and long-term modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity. Previously, we demonstrated that the long-term synaptic modulation requires the endocytosis of neurotrophin-receptor complex, the activation of PI3K and Akt, and mTOR mediated protein synthesis. However, it is unclear whether the long-term synaptic modulation by neurotrophins depends on protein synthesis in pre- or post-synaptic cells. Results Here we have developed an inducible protein translation blocker, in which the kinase domain of protein kinase R (PKR) is fused with bacterial gyrase B domain (GyrB-PKR), which could be dimerized upon treatment with a cell permeable drug, coumermycin. By genetically targeting GyrB-PKR to specific cell types, we show that NT-3 induced long-term synaptic modulation requires presynaptic, but not postsynaptic protein synthesis. Conclusions Our results provide mechanistic insights into the cell-specific requirement for protein synthesis in the long-term synaptic modulation by neurotrophins. The GyrB-PKR system may be useful tool to study protein synthesis in a cell-specific manner. PMID:21211057

  11. PET studies of the presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic system in Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, N; Sawle, G V; Playford, E D; Weeks, R; Lammerstma, A A; Lees, A J; Brooks, D J

    1994-01-01

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic pathway has been postulated to underlie the symptomatology of Tourette's syndrome. Presynaptic functional integrity of dopaminergic terminals was assessed with 18F-dopa PET in 10 patients with Tourette's syndrome, three of whom were drug free and seven of whom were on neuroleptic treatment. Dopamine D2 receptor site density was measured with 11C-raclopride PET in a further group of five drug free patients with Tourette's syndrome. Mean caudate and putamen 18F-dopa influx constants were similar in patients with Tourette's syndrome and controls, and there was no difference in striatal 18F-dopa uptake between the treated and untreated Tourette's syndrome groups. Mean caudate and putamen 11C-raclopride binding potentials in patients with Tourette's syndrome were also similar to control values. The findings suggest that striatal metabolism of exogenous levodopa and the density of striatal D2 receptors are both normal in patients with Tourette's syndrome and that Tourette's syndrome does not arise from a primary dysfunction of dopaminergic terminals. Images PMID:7911827

  12. APOE genotype affects the pre-synaptic compartment of glutamatergic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Dumanis, Sonya B; DiBattista, Amanda M; Miessau, Matthew; Moussa, Charbel E H; Rebeck, G William

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype affects outcomes of Alzheimer's disease and other conditions of brain damage. Using APOE knock-in mice, we have previously shown that APOE-ε4 Targeted Replacement (TR) mice have fewer dendritic spines and reduced branching in cortical neurons. As dendritic spines are post-synaptic sites of excitatory neurotransmission, we used APOE TR mice to examine whether APOE genotype affected the various elements of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. We found that levels of glutamine synthetase and glutamate uptake transporters were unchanged among the APOE genotypes. However, compared with APOE-ε3 TR mice, APOE-ε4 TR mice had decreased glutaminase levels (18%, p < 0.05), suggesting decreased conversion of glutamine to glutamate. APOE-ε4 TR mice also had increased levels of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (20%, p < 0.05), suggesting that APOE genotype affects pre-synaptic terminal composition. To address whether these changes affected normal neurotransmission, we examined the production and metabolism of glutamate and glutamine at 4-5 months and 1 year. Using high-frequency (13)C/(1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we found that APOE-ε4 TR mice have decreased production of glutamate and increased levels of glutamine. These factors may contribute to the increased risk of neurodegeneration associated with APOE-ε4, and also act as surrogate markers for Alzheimer's disease risk. PMID:22862561

  13. The schizophrenia risk gene product miR-137 alters presynaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Sandra; Seo, Jinsoo; Kwon, Ester J.; Rudenko, Andrii; Cho, Sukhee; Wang, Wenyuan; Flood, Zachary; Martorell, Anthony J.; Ericsson, Maria; Mungenast, Alison E.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding variants in the human MIR137 gene locus increase schizophrenia risk at a genome-wide significance level. However, the functional consequence of these risk alleles is unknown. Here, we examined induced human neurons harboring the minor alleles of four disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MIR137, and observed increased MIR137 levels compared to major allele-carrying cells. We found that miR-137 gain-of-function causes downregulation of the presynaptic target genes, Complexin-1 (Cplx1), Nsf, and Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1), leading to impaired vesicle release. In vivo, miR-137 gain-of-function results in changes in synaptic vesicle pool distribution, impaired mossy fiber-LTP induction and deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. By sequestering endogenous miR-137, we were able to ameliorate the synaptic phenotypes. Moreover, reinstatement of Syt1 expression partially restored synaptic plasticity, demonstrating the importance of Syt1 as a miR-137 target. Our data provide new insight into the mechanism by which miR-137 dysregulation can impair synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:26005852

  14. Presynaptic mitochondrial morphology in monkey prefrontal cortex correlates with working memory and is improved with estrogen treatment.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuko; Yuk, Frank; Puri, Rishi; Janssen, William G M; Rapp, Peter R; Morrison, John H

    2014-01-01

    Humans and nonhuman primates are vulnerable to age- and menopause-related decline in working memory, a cognitive function reliant on the energy-demanding recurrent excitation of neurons within Brodmann's Area 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the number and morphology (straight, curved, or donut-shaped) of mitochondria in dlPFC presynaptic boutons are altered with aging and menopause in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and that these metrics correlate with delayed response (DR) accuracy, a well-characterized measure of dlPFC-dependent working memory. Although presynaptic bouton density or size was not significantly different across groups distinguished by age or menses status, DR accuracy correlated positively with the number of total and straight mitochondria per dlPFC bouton. In contrast, DR accuracy correlated inversely with the frequency of boutons containing donut-shaped mitochondria, which exhibited smaller active zone areas and fewer docked synaptic vesicles than those with straight or curved mitochondria. We then examined the effects of estrogen administration to test whether a treatment known to improve working memory influences mitochondrial morphology. Aged ovariectomized monkeys treated with vehicle displayed significant working memory impairment and a concomitant 44% increase in presynaptic donut-shaped mitochondria, both of which were reversed with cyclic estradiol treatment. Together, our data suggest that hormone replacement therapy may benefit cognitive aging, in part by promoting mitochondrial and synaptic health in the dlPFC. PMID:24297907

  15. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  16. Novel Attributes of Hed1 Affect Dynamics and Activity of the Rad51 Presynaptic Filament during Meiotic Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Busygina, Valeria; Saro, Dorina; Williams, Gareth; Leung, Wing-Kit; Say, Amanda F.; Sehorn, Michael G.; Sung, Patrick; Tsubouchi, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    During meiosis, recombination events that occur between homologous chromosomes help prepare the chromosome pairs for proper disjunction in meiosis I. The concurrent action of the Rad51 and Dmc1 recombinases is necessary for an interhomolog bias. Notably, the activity of Rad51 is tightly controlled, so as to minimize the use of the sister chromatid as recombination partner. We demonstrated recently that Hed1, a meiosis-specific protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, restricts the access of the recombinase accessory factor Rad54 to presynaptic filaments of Rad51. We now show that Hed1 undergoes self-association in a Rad51-dependent manner and binds ssDNA. We also find a strong stabilizing effect of Hed1 on the Rad51 presynaptic filament. Biochemical and genetic analyses of mutants indicate that these Hed1 attributes are germane for its recombination regulatory and Rad51 presynaptic filament stabilization functions. Our results shed light on the mechanism of action of Hed1 in meiotic recombination control. PMID:22115747

  17. An M/M/c/K State-Dependent Model for Pedestrian Flow Control and Design of Facilities.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdul Ghani, Noraida; Kamil, Anton Abdulbasah; Mustafa, Adli; Chowdhury, Md Ahmed Kabir

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian overflow causes queuing delay and in turn, is controlled by the capacity of a facility. Flow control or blocking control takes action to avoid queues from building up to extreme values. Thus, in this paper, the problem of pedestrian flow control in open outdoor walking facilities in equilibrium condition is investigated using M/M/c/K queuing models. State dependent service rate based on speed and density relationship is utilized. The effective rate of the Poisson arrival process to the facility is determined so as there is no overflow of pedestrians. In addition, the use of the state dependent queuing models to the design of the facilities and the effect of pedestrian personal capacity on the design and the traffic congestion are discussed. The study does not validate the sustainability of adaptation of Western design codes for the pedestrian facilities in the countries like Bangladesh. PMID:26196124

  18. An M/M/c/K State-Dependent Model for Pedestrian Flow Control and Design of Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdul Ghani, Noraida; Kamil, Anton Abdulbasah; Mustafa, Adli; Chowdhury, Md. Ahmed Kabir

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian overflow causes queuing delay and in turn, is controlled by the capacity of a facility. Flow control or blocking control takes action to avoid queues from building up to extreme values. Thus, in this paper, the problem of pedestrian flow control in open outdoor walking facilities in equilibrium condition is investigated using M/M/c/K queuing models. State dependent service rate based on speed and density relationship is utilized. The effective rate of the Poisson arrival process to the facility is determined so as there is no overflow of pedestrians. In addition, the use of the state dependent queuing models to the design of the facilities and the effect of pedestrian personal capacity on the design and the traffic congestion are discussed. The study does not validate the sustainability of adaptation of Western design codes for the pedestrian facilities in the countries like Bangladesh. PMID:26196124

  19. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

  20. Lack of effect of Z-butylidenephthalide on presynaptic N-type Ca²⁺ channels in isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Marcelo; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2016-02-01

    Z-Butylidenephthalide (Bdph) was reported to more potently inhibit electrically induced twitch responses than acetylcholine-induced tonic contraction in isolated guinea-pig ileum (GPI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of Z-Bdph on Ca2+ and K+ channels on GPI. In Locke-Ringer’s solution, both responses were isometrically recorded on a polygraph. Incubation of ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but not Z-Bdph, in the electrically stimulated GPI prior to adding ω-conotoxin GVIA, an irreversible blocker of N-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs), protected the binding sites and resulted in the twitch responses reversible by washing, suggesting that Z-Bdph did not bind to the N-type VDCCs. Interestingly, we found Z-Bdph concentration dependently delayed the onsets of K+-induced twitch responses, suggesting that Z-Bdph may be a blocker of K+ channels to interfere extracellular K+ across through the pre-junctional membrane of nerve ending in K+-free medium. Z-Bdph similar to nifedipine non-competitively inhibited cumulative ACh-induced phasic contractions, suggesting that Z-Bdph may bind to L-type of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca2+ channels on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. In the presence of verapamil, a L-type Ca2+ channel blocker or Z-Bdph, the twitch inhibitions by either were effectively reversed by exogenous Ca2+, suggesting that they may freely pass through pre-junctional N-type, but not L-type which was blocked at least a part by either, of VDDCs open when each electrical coaxial stimulation (ECS) into intracellular space of cholinergic nerve terminal and trigger release of transmitters. In conclusion, results confirm that Z-Bdph more potently inhibits ECS-induced twitch responses than ACh-induced PCs in GPI and suggest that this effect is not mediated by interaction with presynaptic N-type VDCCs. PMID:26497186

  1. Asynchronous GABA Release Is a Key Determinant of Tonic Inhibition and Controls Neuronal Excitability: A Study in the Synapsin II−/− Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Medrihan, Lucian; Ferrea, Enrico; Greco, Barbara; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic epilepsies have frequently been linked to mutations in voltage-gated channels (channelopathies); recently, mutations in several genes encoding presynaptic proteins have been shown to cause epilepsy in humans and mice, indicating that epilepsy can also be considered a synaptopathy. However, the functional mechanisms by which presynaptic dysfunctions lead to hyperexcitability and seizures are not well understood. We show that deletion of synapsin II (Syn II), a presynaptic protein contributing to epilepsy predisposition in humans, leads to a loss of tonic inhibition in mouse hippocampal slices due to a dramatic decrease in presynaptic asynchronous GABA release. We also show that the asynchronous GABA release reduces postsynaptic cell firing, and the parallel impairment of asynchronous GABA release and tonic inhibition results in an increased excitability at both single-neuron and network levels. Restoring tonic inhibition with THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol; gaboxadol), a selective agonist of δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors, fully rescues the SynII−/− epileptic phenotype both ex vivo and in vivo. The results demonstrate a causal relationship between the dynamics of GABA release and the generation of tonic inhibition, and identify a novel mechanism of epileptogenesis generated by dysfunctions in the dynamics of release that can be effectively targeted by novel antiepileptic strategies. PMID:24962993

  2. Ubiquitin–Synaptobrevin Fusion Protein Causes Degeneration of Presynaptic Motor Terminals in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Li, Hongqiao; Sugiura, Yoshie; Han, Weiping; Gallardo, Gilbert; Khvotchev, Mikhail; Zhang, Yinan; Kavalali, Ege T.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregates containing ubiquitin (Ub) are commonly observed in neurodegenerative disorders, implicating the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in their pathogenesis. Here, we aimed to generate a mouse model for monitoring UPS function using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based substrate that carries a “noncleavable” N-terminal ubiquitin moiety (UbG76V). We engineered transgenic mice expressing a fusion protein, consisting of the following: (1) UbG76V, GFP, and a synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin-2 (UbG76V-GFP-Syb2); (2) GFP-Syb2; or (3) UbG76V-GFP-Syntaxin1, all under the control of a neuron-specific Thy-1 promoter. As expected, UbG76V-GFP-Syb2, GFP-Syb2, and UbG76V-GFP-Sytaxin1 were highly expressed in neurons, such as motoneurons and motor nerve terminals of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Surprisingly, UbG76V-GFP-Syb2 mice developed progressive adult-onset degeneration of motor nerve terminals, whereas GFP-Syb2 and UbG76V-GFP-Syntaxin1 mice were normal. The degeneration of nerve terminals in UbG76V-GFP-Syb2 mice was preceded by a progressive impairment of synaptic transmission at the NMJs. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that UbG76V-GFP-Syb2 interacted with SNAP-25 and Syntaxin1, the SNARE partners of synaptobrevin. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a marked reduction in synaptic vesicle density, accompanying an accumulation of tubulovesicular structures at presynaptic nerve terminals. These morphological defects were largely restricted to motor nerve terminals, as the ultrastructure of motoneuron somata appeared to be normal at the stages when synaptic nerve terminals degenerated. Furthermore, synaptic vesicle endocytosis and membrane trafficking were impaired in UbG76V-GFP-Syb2 mice. These findings indicate that UbG76V-GFP-Syb2 may compete with endogenous synaptobrevin, acting as a gain-of-function mutation that impedes SNARE function, resulting in the depletion of synaptic vesicles and degeneration of the nerve

  3. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  4. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S. Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W.; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S.; Sweeney, Mary G.; Griggs, Robert C.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P < 0.00007) and depolarizing currents (P < 0.001) in threshold electrotonus. In the recovery cycle, refractoriness (P < 0.0002) and superexcitability (P < 0.006) were increased. Cav2.1 dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. PMID:26912519

  5. Differing Presynaptic Contributions to LTP and Associative Learning in Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse is an excellent experimental model for studying the interactions between short- and long-term plastic changes taking place following high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of Schaffer collaterals and during the acquisition and extinction of a classical eyeblink conditioning in behaving mice. Input/output curves and a full-range paired-pulse study enabled determining the optimal intensities and inter-stimulus intervals for evoking paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) or depression (PPD) at the CA3-CA1 synapse. Long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by HFS lasted ≈10 days. HFS-induced LTP evoked an initial depression of basal PPF. Recovery of PPF baseline values was a steady and progressive process lasting ≈20 days, i.e., longer than the total duration of the LTP. In a subsequent series of experiments, we checked whether PPF was affected similarly during activity-dependent synaptic changes. Animals were conditioned using a trace paradigm, with a tone as a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electrical shock to the trigeminal nerve as an unconditioned stimulus (US). A pair of pulses (40 ms interval) was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) during the CS-US interval. Basal PPF decreased steadily across conditioning sessions (i.e., in the opposite direction to that during LTP), reaching a minimum value during the 10th conditioning session. Thus, LTP and classical eyeblink conditioning share some presynaptic mechanisms, but with an opposite evolution. Furthermore, PPF and PPD might play a homeostatic role during long-term plastic changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse. PMID:19636387

  6. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, João M.; Wang, Fan; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2015-01-01

    Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN) of the central nervous system (CNS), there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat. PMID:26470056

  7. Presynaptic neuromuscular action of a methanolic extract from the venom of Rhinella schneideri toad

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhinella schneideri, previously known as Bufo paracnemis, is a common toad in many regions of Brazil. Its venom exerts important cardiovascular effects on humans and other animals. Although this toad venom has been the subject of intense investigations, little is known about its neuromuscular activity. Methods The neurotoxicity of a methanolic extract of R. schneideri venom was tested on mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations mounted for conventional twitch tension recording – in response to indirect stimulation – and for electrophysiological measurements. Results Venom extract (50 μg/mL) increased the muscle twitch tension in PND preparations but did not significantly alter the resting membrane potential values. Electrophysiological evaluations showed that the extract (50 μg/mL) significantly augmented the frequency of miniature end-plate potential (from 38 ± 3.5 to 88 ± 15 after 60 minutes; n = 5; p < 0.05) and quantal content (from 128 ± 13 to 272 ± 34 after five minutes; n = 5; p < 0.05). Pretreatment with ouabain (1 μg/mL) for five minutes prevented the increase in quantal content (117 ± 18 and 154 ± 33 after five and 60 minutes, respectively). Conclusion These results indicate that the methanolic extract of R. schneideri venom acts primarily presynaptically to enhance neurotransmitter release in mouse phrenic-diaphragm preparations. PMID:25024696

  8. Transgenic overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter elevates acetylcholine levels and augments motor endurance

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrand, Ericka C.; Lund, David; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Wright, Jane; Martin, Rolicia F.; Ennis, Elizabeth A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Sarter, Martin; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    The hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) sustains cholinergic signaling via the presynaptic uptake of choline derived from dietary sources or from acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-mediated hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). Loss of cholinergic signaling capacity is associated with cognitive and motor deficits in humans and in animal models. Whereas genetic elimination of CHT has revealed the critical nature of CHT in maintaining ACh stores and sustaining cholinergic signaling, the consequences of elevating CHT expression have yet to be studied. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenic methods, we generated mice with integrated additional copies of the mouse Slc5a7 gene. BAC–CHT mice are viable, appear to develop normally, and breed at wild-type (WT) rates. Biochemical studies revealed a 2 to 3-fold elevation in CHT protein levels in the CNS and periphery, paralleled by significant increases in [3H]HC-3 binding and synaptosomal choline transport activity. Elevations of ACh in the BAC–CHT mice occurred without compensatory changes in the activity of either choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or AChE. Immunohistochemistry for CHT in BAC–CHT brain sections revealed markedly elevated CHT expression in the cell bodies of cholinergic neurons and in axons projecting to regions known to receive cholinergic innervation. Behaviorally, BAC–CHT mice exhibited diminished fatigue and increased speeds on the treadmill test without evidence of increased strength. Finally, BAC–CHT mice displayed elevated horizontal activity in the open field test, diminished spontaneous alteration in the Y-maze, and reduced time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies provide biochemical, pharmacological and behavioral evidence that CHT protein expression and activity can be elevated beyond that seen in wild-type animals. BAC–CHT mice thus represent a novel tool to examine both the positive and negative

  9. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  10. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse. PMID:27569547

  11. Vibrodissociation of Neurons from Rodent Brain Slices to Study Synaptic Transmission and Image Presynaptic Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sang Beom; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia; Ikeda, Stephen; Lovinger, David

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical dissociation of neurons from the central nervous system has the advantage that presynaptic boutons remain attached to the isolated neuron of interest. This allows for examination of synaptic transmission under conditions where the extracellular and postsynaptic intracellular environments can be well controlled. A vibration-based technique without the use of proteases, known as vibrodissociation, is the most popular technique for mechanical isolation. A micropipette, with the tip fire-polished to the shape of a small ball, is placed into a brain slice made from a P1-P21 rodent. The micropipette is vibrated parallel to the slice surface and lowered through the slice thickness resulting in the liberation of isolated neurons. The isolated neurons are ready for study within a few minutes of vibrodissociation. This technique has advantages over the use of primary neuronal cultures, brain slices and enzymatically isolated neurons including: rapid production of viable, relatively mature neurons suitable for electrophysiological and imaging studies; superior control of the extracellular environment free from the influence of neighboring cells; suitability for well-controlled pharmacological experiments using rapid drug application and total cell superfusion; and improved space-clamp in whole-cell recordings relative to neurons in slice or cell culture preparations. This preparation can be used to examine synaptic physiology, pharmacology, modulation and plasticity. Real-time imaging of both pre- and postsynaptic elements in the living cells and boutons is also possible using vibrodissociated neurons. Characterization of the molecular constituents of pre- and postsynaptic elements can also be achieved with immunological and imaging-based approaches. PMID:21654624

  12. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Tan, S Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Sweeney, Mary G; Griggs, Robert C; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P < 0.00007) and depolarizing currents (P < 0.001) in threshold electrotonus. In the recovery cycle, refractoriness (P < 0.0002) and superexcitability (P < 0.006) were increased. Cav2.1 dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. PMID:26912519

  13. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibits Calcium Channel Activation, Exocytosis, and Endocytosis at a Central Nerve Terminal

    PubMed Central

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions. PMID:25788684

  14. SALM4 suppresses excitatory synapse development by cis-inhibiting trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lie, Eunkyung; Ko, Ji Seung; Choi, Su-Yeon; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Cho, Yi Sul; Noh, Ran; Kim, Doyoun; Li, Yan; Kang, Hyeyeon; Choi, Tae-Yong; Nam, Jungyong; Mah, Won; Lee, Dongmin; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Hyun; Choi, Se-Young; Um, Ji Won; Kang, Myoung-Goo; Bae, Yong Chul; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate various aspects of synapse development, function and plasticity. These functions mainly involve trans-synaptic interactions and positive regulations, whereas cis-interactions and negative regulation are less understood. Here we report that SALM4, a member of the SALM/Lrfn family of synaptic adhesion molecules, suppresses excitatory synapse development through cis inhibition of SALM3, another SALM family protein with synaptogenic activity. Salm4-mutant (Salm4(-/-)) mice show increased excitatory synapse numbers in the hippocampus. SALM4 cis-interacts with SALM3, inhibits trans-synaptic SALM3 interaction with presynaptic LAR family receptor tyrosine phosphatases and suppresses SALM3-dependent presynaptic differentiation. Importantly, deletion of Salm3 in Salm4(-/-) mice (Salm3(-/-); Salm4(-/-)) normalizes the increased excitatory synapse number. These results suggest that SALM4 negatively regulates excitatory synapses via cis inhibition of the trans-synaptic SALM3-LAR adhesion. PMID:27480238

  15. Amplification of neuromuscular transmission by methylprednisolone involves activation of presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors and redistribution of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L; Costa, A C; Noronha-Matos, J B; Silva, I; Cavalcante, W L G; Timóteo, M A; Corrado, A P; Dal Belo, C A; Ambiel, C R; Alves-do-Prado, W; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying improvement of neuromuscular transmission deficits by glucocorticoids are still a matter of debate despite these compounds have been used for decades in the treatment of autoimmune myasthenic syndromes. Besides their immunosuppressive action, corticosteroids may directly facilitate transmitter release during high-frequency motor nerve activity. This effect coincides with the predominant adenosine A2A receptor tonus, which coordinates the interplay with other receptors (e.g. muscarinic) on motor nerve endings to sustain acetylcholine (ACh) release that is required to overcome tetanic neuromuscular depression in myasthenics. Using myographic recordings, measurements of evoked [(3)H]ACh release and real-time video microscopy with the FM4-64 fluorescent dye, results show that tonic activation of facilitatory A2A receptors by endogenous adenosine accumulated during 50 Hz bursts delivered to the rat phrenic nerve is essential for methylprednisolone (0.3 mM)-induced transmitter release facilitation, because its effect was prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist, ZM 241385 (10 nM). Concurrent activation of the positive feedback loop operated by pirenzepine-sensitive muscarinic M1 autoreceptors may also play a role, whereas the corticosteroid action is restrained by the activation of co-expressed inhibitory M2 and A1 receptors blocked by methoctramine (0.1 μM) and DPCPX (2.5 nM), respectively. Inhibition of FM4-64 loading (endocytosis) by methylprednisolone following a brief tetanic stimulus (50 Hz for 5 s) suggests that it may negatively modulate synaptic vesicle turnover, thus increasing the release probability of newly recycled vesicles. Interestingly, bulk endocytosis was rehabilitated when methylprednisolone was co-applied with ZM241385. Data suggest that amplification of neuromuscular transmission by methylprednisolone may involve activation of presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors by endogenous adenosine leading to synaptic

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of the racemate and individual enantiomers of C-11 labeled methylphenidate as radioligands for the presynaptic dopaminergic neuron

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    1994-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP, ritalin) is a psychostimulant drug widely used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Its therapeutic properties are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine (DA) transporter enhancing synaptic DA. MP has two chiral centers and is marketed as the dl-threo racemic form. However, its pharmacological activity is believed due solely to the d-enantiomer. We have synthesized [{sup 11}C]d,l-threo-methylphenidate ([{sup 11}C]MP) in order to examine its pharmacokinetics in vivo and to examine its suitability as a radioligand for PET studies of the presynaptic DA neuron. [{sup 11}C]MP was prepared by O-{sup 11}C-alkylation of a protected derivative of ritalinic acid with labeled methyl iodide. Serial studies at baseline and after treatment with methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg, 20 min prior); GBR 12909 (1.5 mg/kg; 30 min prior); tomoxetine (1.5 mg/kg, 20 min prior) and citalopram (2.0 mg/kg, 30 min prior) were performed to assess non-specific binding and binding to the DA, norepinephrine and serotonin transporters respectively. Only MP and GBR 12909 changed the SR/CB distribution volume ratio (decrease of 38 and 37% respectively) demonstrating selectivity for DA transporters over other monoamine transporters. We then pursued the synthesis of enantiomerically pure C-{sup 11} labeled d- and l-MP by using enantiomerically pure protected d- and l-ritalinic acids as precursors. A striking difference in SR/CB ratio (3.3 and 1.1 for d- and l-respectively at 1 hr. after i.v. injections) strongly suggests that the pharmacological specificity of MP resides entirely in the d-isomer and the binding of l-isomer was mostly non-specific. Further evaluations are underway. Radioligand reversibility, selectivity and the fact that MP is an approved drug are advantages of using [{sup 11}C]MP.

  17. The Wobbler mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) displays hippocampal hyperexcitability, and reduced number of interneurons, but no presynaptic vesicle release impairments.

    PubMed

    Thielsen, Karina D; Moser, Jakob M; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Jensen, Morten S; Jensen, Kimmo; Holm, Mai Marie

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease. It is a fatal degenerative disease, best recognized for its debilitating neuromuscular effects. ALS however also induces cognitive impairments in as many as 50% of affected individuals. Moreover, many ALS patients demonstrate cortical hyperexcitability, which has been shown to precede the onset of clinical symptoms. The wobbler mouse is a model of ALS, and like ALS patients the wobbler mouse displays cortical hyperexcitability. Here we investigated if the neocortical aberrations of the wobbler mouse also occur in the hippocampus. Consequently, we performed extracellular field excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings in the CA1 region of the hippocampus on acute brain slices from symptomatic (P45-P60) and presymptomatic (P17-P21) wobbler mice. Significant increased excitation of hippocampal synapses was revealed by leftward shifted input/output-curves in both symptomatic and presymptomatic wobbler mice, and substantiated by population spike occurrence analyses, demonstrating that the increased synaptic excitation precedes the onset of visible phenotypic symptoms in the mouse. Synaptic facilitation tested by paired-pulse facilitation and trains in wobbler and control mice showed no differences, suggesting the absence of presynaptic defects. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that symptomatic wobbler mice have a lower number of parvalbumin positive interneurons when compared to controls and presymptomatic mice. This study reveals that the wobbler mouse model of ALS exhibits hippocampal hyperexcitability. We suggest that the hyperexcitability could be caused by increased excitatory synaptic transmission and a concomitant reduced inhibition due to a decreased number of parvalbumin positive interneurons. Thus we substantiate that wobbler brain impairments are not confined to the motor cortex, but extend to the hippocampus. Importantly, we have revealed more details of the

  18. Ketamine-mediated afferent-specific presynaptic transmission blocks in low-threshold and sex-specific subpopulation of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons of rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Yin, Lei; Fan, Yao; Wang, Ye; Chen, Wei-Ran; Chen, Pei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Xiao-Long; Sun, Hong-Li; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine enhances autonomic activity, and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptor afferents are more susceptible to be blocked by ketamine than myelinated A-types. However, the presynaptic transmission block in low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) is not elucidated. Methods Action potentials (APs) and excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were investigated in BRNs/barosensitive neurons identified by conduction velocity (CV), capsaicin-conjugated with Iberiotoxin-sensitivity and fluorescent dye using intact nodose slice and brainstem slice in adult female rats. The expression of mRNA and targeted protein for NMDAR1 was also evaluated. Results Ketamine time-dependently blocked afferent CV in Ah-types in nodose slice with significant changes in AP discharge. The concentration-dependent inhibition of ketamine on AP discharge profiles were also assessed and observed using isolated Ah-type BRNs with dramatic reduction in neuroexcitability. In brainstem slice, the 2nd-order capsaicin-resistant EPSCs were identified and ∼50% of them were blocked by ketamine concentration-dependently with IC50 estimated at 84.4 μM compared with the rest (708.2 μM). Interestingly, the peak, decay time constant, and area under curve of EPSCs were significantly enhanced by 100 nM iberiotoxin in ketamine-more sensitive myelinated NTS neurons (most likely Ah-types), rather than ketamine-less sensitive ones (A-types). Conclusions These data have demonstrated, for the first time, that low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type BRNs in nodose and Ah-type barosensitive neurons in NTS are more susceptible to ketamine and may play crucial roles in not only mean blood pressure regulation but also buffering dynamic changes in pressure, as well as the ketamine-mediated cardiovascular dysfunction through sexual-dimorphic baroreflex afferent pathway. PMID:26675761

  19. Presynaptic NCAM Is Required for Motor Neurons to Functionally Expand Their Peripheral Field of Innervation in Partially Denervated Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, Peter H.; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    The function of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression in motor neurons during axonal sprouting and compensatory reinnervation was explored by partially denervating soleus muscles in mice lacking presynaptic NCAM (Hb9creNCAMflx). In agreement with previous studies, the contractile force of muscles in wild-type (NCAM+/+) mice recovered completely 2 weeks after 75% of the motor innervation was removed because motor unit size increased by 2.5 times. In contrast, similarly denervated muscles in Hb9creNCAMflx mice failed to recover the force lost due to the partial denervation because motor unit size did not change. Anatomical analysis indicated that 50% of soleus end plates were completely denervated 1–4 weeks post-partial denervation in Hb9creNCAMflx mice, while another 25% were partially reinnervated. Synaptic vesicles (SVs) remained at extrasynaptic regions in Hb9creNCAMflx mice rather than being distributed, as occurs normally, to newly reinnervated neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Electrophysiological analysis revealed two populations of NMJs in partially denervated Hb9creNCAMflx soleus muscles, one with high (mature) quantal content, and another with low (immature) quantal content. Extrasynaptic SVs in Hb9creNCAMflx sprouts were associated with L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) immunoreactivity and maintained an immature, L-VDCC-dependent recycling phenotype. Moreover, acute nifedipine treatment potentiated neurotransmission at newly sprouted NMJs, while chronic intraperitoneal treatment with nifedipine during a period of synaptic consolidation enhanced functional motor unit expansion in the absence of presynaptic NCAM. We propose that presynaptic NCAM bridges a critical link between the SV cycle and the functional expansion of synaptic territory through the regulation of L-VDCCs. PMID:25100585

  20. The timing of phasic transmitter release is Ca2+-dependent and lacks a direct influence of presynaptic membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, triggers transmitter release in nerve terminals. However, it is controversial whether in addition to the opening of Ca2+ channels, membrane potential directly affects transmitter release. Here, we assayed the influence of membrane potential on transmitter release at the calyx of Held nerve terminals. Transmitter release was evoked by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging, or by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging paired with presynaptic voltage-clamp depolarizations to +80 mV, under pharmacological block of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Such a change in membrane potential did not alter the Ca2+ dependence of transmitter release rates or synaptic delays. We also found, by varying the amount of Ca2+ influx during Ca2+ tail-currents, that the time course of phasic transmitter release is not invariant to changes in release probability. Rather, the time difference between peak Ca2+ current and peak transmitter release became progressively shorter with increasing Ca2+ current amplitude. When this time difference was plotted as a function of the estimated local [Ca2+]i at the sites of vesicle fusion, a slope of ≈100 μs per 10 μM [Ca2+]i was found, in reasonable agreement with a model of cooperative Ca2+ binding and vesicle fusion. Thus, the amplitude and time course of the [Ca2+]i signal at the sites of vesicle fusion controls the timing and the amount of transmitter release, both under conditions of brief periods of Ca2+ influx, as well as during step-like elevations of [Ca2+]i produced by Ca2+ uncaging. PMID:14630950

  1. The timing of phasic transmitter release is Ca2+-dependent and lacks a direct influence of presynaptic membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-12-01

    Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, triggers transmitter release in nerve terminals. However, it is controversial whether in addition to the opening of Ca2+ channels, membrane potential directly affects transmitter release. Here, we assayed the influence of membrane potential on transmitter release at the calyx of Held nerve terminals. Transmitter release was evoked by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging, or by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging paired with presynaptic voltage-clamp depolarizations to +80 mV, under pharmacological block of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Such a change in membrane potential did not alter the Ca2+ dependence of transmitter release rates or synaptic delays. We also found, by varying the amount of Ca2+ influx during Ca2+ tail-currents, that the time course of phasic transmitter release is not invariant to changes in release probability. Rather, the time difference between peak Ca2+ current and peak transmitter release became progressively shorter with increasing Ca2+ current amplitude. When this time difference was plotted as a function of the estimated local [Ca2+]i at the sites of vesicle fusion, a slope of approximately 100 micros per 10 microM [Ca2+]i was found, in reasonable agreement with a model of cooperative Ca2+ binding and vesicle fusion. Thus, the amplitude and time course of the [Ca2+]i signal at the sites of vesicle fusion controls the timing and the amount of transmitter release, both under conditions of brief periods of Ca2+ influx, as well as during step-like elevations of [Ca2+]i produced by Ca2+ uncaging. PMID:14630950

  2. Presynaptic size of associational/commissural CA3 synapses is controlled by fibroblast growth factor 22 in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pasaoglu, Taliha; Schikorski, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Associational/commissural CA3-CA3 synapses define the recurrent CA3 network that generates the input to CA1 pyramidal neurons. We quantified the fine structure of excitatory synapses in the stratum radiatum of the CA3d area in adult wild type (WT) and fibroblast growth factor 22 knock-out (FGF22KO) mice by using serial 3D electron microscopy. WT excitatory CA3 synapses are rather small yet range 10 fold in size. Spine size, however, was small and uniform and did not correlate with the size of the synaptic junction. To reveal mechanisms that regulate presynaptic structure, we investigated the role of FGF22, a target-derived signal specific for the distal part of area CA3 (CA3d). In adult FGF22KO mice, postsynaptic properties of associational CA3 synapses were unaltered. Presynaptically, the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs), the bouton volume, and the number of vesicles in axonal regions (the super pool) were reduced. This concurrent decrease suggests concerted control by FGF22 of presynaptic size. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that WT presynapses in the proximal part of area CA3 (CA3p) that do not receive FGF22 signaling in WT mice were smaller than presynapses in CA3d in WT but of comparable size in CA3d of FGF22KO mice. Docked SV density was decreased in CA1, CA3d, and CA3p in FGF22KO mice. Because CA1 and CA3p are not directly affected by the loss of FGF22, the smaller docked SV density may be an adaptation to activity changes in the CA3 network. Thus, docked SV density potentially is a long-term regulator for the synaptic release probability and/or the strength of short-term depression in vivo. PMID:26222899

  3. Glutamate presynaptic vesicular transporter and postsynaptic receptor levels correlate with spatial memory status in aging rat models.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi; Vigneault, Erika; Bouchard, Sylvain; Ferland, Guylaine; El Mestikawy, Salah; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2015-03-01

    In humans, memory capacities are generally affected with aging, even without any reported neurologic disorders. The mechanisms behind cognitive decline are not well understood. We studied here whether postsynaptic glutamate receptor and presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) levels may change in the course of aging and be related to cognitive abilities using various age-impaired (AI) or age-unimpaired rat strains. Twenty-four-month-old Long-Evans (LE) rats with intact spatial memory maintained postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptor levels in the hippocampal-adjacent cortex similar to those of young animals. In contrast, AI rats showed significantly reduced expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor GluR2, NR2A and NR2B subunits. In AI LE rats, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 levels were increased and negatively correlated with receptor levels as shown by principal component analysis and correlation matrices. We also investigated whether glutamatergic receptors and VGLUT levels were altered in the obesity-resistant LOU/C/Jall (LOU) rat strain which is characterized by intact memory despite aging. No difference was observed between 24-month-old LOU rats and their young counterparts. Taken together, the unaltered spatial memory performance of 24-month-old age-unimpaired LE and LOU rats suggests that intact coordination of the presynaptic and postsynaptic hippocampal-adjacent cortex glutamatergic networks may be important for successful cognitive aging. Accordingly, altered expression of presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamatergic components, such as in AI LE rats, could be considered a marker of age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:25556161

  4. Fear extinction can be made state-dependent on peripheral epinephrine: role of norepinephrine in the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Jessica; Myskiw, Jociane C; Furini, Cristiane R G; Sapiras, Gerson G; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    We investigate whether the extinction of inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning can be subjected to endogenous state-dependence with systemic injections of epinephrine (E), and whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS)→locus coeruleus→hippocampus/amygdala (HIPP/BLA) pathway participate in this. Rats trained in IA were submitted to two sessions of extinction 24 h apart: In the first, the animals were submitted to a training session of extinction, and in the second they were tested for the retention of extinction. Saline or E were given i.p. immediately after the extinction training (post-extinction training injections) and/or 6 min before the extinction test (pre-extinction test). Post-extinction training E (50 or 100 μg/kg) induced a poor retrieval of extinction in the test session of this task unless an additional E injection (50 μg/kg) was given prior to the extinction test. This suggested state-dependence. Muscimol (0.01 μg/side) microinfused into the NTS prior to the extinction test session blocked E-induced state-dependence. Norepinephrine (NE, 1 μg/side) infused bilaterally into NTS restores the extinction impairment caused by post-extinction training i.p. E. In animals with bilateral NTS blockade induced by muscimol, NE (1 μg/side) given prior to the extinction test into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus or into the basolateral amygdala restored the normal extinction levels that had been impaired by muscimol. These results suggest a role for the NTS→locus coeruleus→HIPP/BLA pathway in the retrieval of extinction, as it has been shown to have in the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance and of object recognition learning. PMID:24161888

  5. Existence and stability of periodic solution of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Linfei; Peng, Jigen; Teng, Zhidong; Hu, Lin

    2009-02-01

    According to biological and chemical control strategy for pest, we investigate the dynamic behavior of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey state-dependent impulsive system by releasing natural enemies and spraying pesticide at different thresholds. By using Poincaré map and the properties of the Lambert W function, we prove that the sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of semi-trivial solution and positive periodic solution. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results.

  6. A Discrete Event Simulation Model for Evaluating the Performances of an M/G/C/C State Dependent Queuing System

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Ruzelan; M. Nawawi, Mohd Kamal; Kawsar, Luthful A.; Ghani, Noraida A.; Kamil, Anton A.; Mustafa, Adli

    2013-01-01

    M/G/C/C state dependent queuing networks consider service rates as a function of the number of residing entities (e.g., pedestrians, vehicles, and products). However, modeling such dynamic rates is not supported in modern Discrete Simulation System (DES) software. We designed an approach to cater this limitation and used it to construct the M/G/C/C state-dependent queuing model in Arena software. Using the model, we have evaluated and analyzed the impacts of various arrival rates to the throughput, the blocking probability, the expected service time and the expected number of entities in a complex network topology. Results indicated that there is a range of arrival rates for each network where the simulation results fluctuate drastically across replications and this causes the simulation results and analytical results exhibit discrepancies. Detail results that show how tally the simulation results and the analytical results in both abstract and graphical forms and some scientific justifications for these have been documented and discussed. PMID:23560037

  7. When the sense of smell meets emotion: anxiety-state-dependent olfactory processing and neural circuitry adaptation.

    PubMed

    Krusemark, Elizabeth A; Novak, Lucas R; Gitelman, Darren R; Li, Wen

    2013-09-25

    Phylogenetically the most ancient sense, olfaction is characterized by a unique intimacy with the emotion system. However, mechanisms underlying olfaction-emotion interaction remain unclear, especially in an ever-changing environment and dynamic internal milieu. Perturbing the internal state with anxiety induction in human subjects, we interrogated emotion-state-dependent olfactory processing in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Following anxiety induction, initially neutral odors become unpleasant and take longer to detect, accompanied by augmented response to these odors in the olfactory (anterior piriform and orbitofrontal) cortices and emotion-relevant pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. In parallel, the olfactory sensory relay adapts with increased anxiety, incorporating amygdala as an integral step via strengthened (afferent or efferent) connections between amygdala and all levels of the olfactory cortical hierarchy. This anxiety-state-dependent neural circuitry thus enables cumulative infusion of limbic affective information throughout the olfactory sensory progression, thereby driving affectively charged olfactory perception. These findings could constitute an olfactory etiology model of emotional disorders, as exaggerated emotion-olfaction interaction in negative mood states turns innocuous odors aversive, fueling anxiety and depression with rising ambient sensory stress. PMID:24068799

  8. Capturing state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-receptors: a microscopic look into the structural and functional insights.

    PubMed

    Payghan, Pavan V; Bera, Indrani; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2016-08-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid type A receptors (GABAA-Rs) are the key players in the mammalian brain that meditate fast inhibitory neurotransmission events. The structural integrity of these ligand-gated ion channel controls chloride ion permeability, which in turn monitors important pharmacological functions. Despite ample studies on GABAA-Rs, there was a need for a study on full-length receptor structures, devoted to track structure-function correlations based on their dynamic behavior consideration. We have employed molecular dynamics simulations accompanied by other biophysical methods to shed light on sequential and unaddressed questions like How GABAA-R structure facilitates the entry of GABA molecules at its two orthosteric binding sites? After entry, what structural features and changes monitor site-wise GABA binding differences? In the same context, what are the roles and responsibilities of loops such as C and F? On physiologically relevant time scales, how open to close state transition occurs? How salt bridges such as E155-R207 and E153-R207 maintain state-dependent C-loop structures? In an attempt, our simulation study unravels the complete course of GABA binding-unbinding pathway. This provides us with the relevant understanding of state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-Rs. PMID:26372345

  9. Release properties of individual presynaptic boutons expressed during homosynaptic depression and heterosynaptic facilitation of the Aplysia sensorimotor synapse

    PubMed Central

    Malkinson, Guy; Spira, Micha E.

    2013-01-01

    Much of what we know about the mechanisms underlying Homosynaptic Depression (HSD) and heterosynaptic facilitation is based on intracellular recordings of integrated postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). This methodological approach views the presynaptic apparatus as a single compartment rather than taking a more realistic representation reflecting the fact that it is made up of tens to hundreds of individual and independent Presynaptic Release Boutons (PRBs). Using cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapses, we reexamined HSD and its dishabituation by imaging the release properties of individual PRBs. We find that the PRB population is heterogeneous and can be clustered into three groups: ~25% of the PRBs consistently release neurotransmitter throughout the entire habituation paradigm (35 stimuli, 0.05 Hz) and have a relatively high quantal content, 36% of the PRBs display intermittent failures only after the tenth stimulation, and 39% are low quantal-content PRBs that exhibit intermittent release failures from the onset of the habituation paradigm. 5HT-induced synaptic dishabituation by a single 5HT application was generated by the enhanced recovery of the quantal content of the habituated PRBs and did not involve the recruitment of new release boutons. The characterization of the PRB population as heterogeneous in terms of its temporal pattern of release-probability and quantal content provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying HSD and its dishabituation. PMID:24068986

  10. Release properties of individual presynaptic boutons expressed during homosynaptic depression and heterosynaptic facilitation of the Aplysia sensorimotor synapse.

    PubMed

    Malkinson, Guy; Spira, Micha E

    2013-01-01

    Much of what we know about the mechanisms underlying Homosynaptic Depression (HSD) and heterosynaptic facilitation is based on intracellular recordings of integrated postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). This methodological approach views the presynaptic apparatus as a single compartment rather than taking a more realistic representation reflecting the fact that it is made up of tens to hundreds of individual and independent Presynaptic Release Boutons (PRBs). Using cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapses, we reexamined HSD and its dishabituation by imaging the release properties of individual PRBs. We find that the PRB population is heterogeneous and can be clustered into three groups: ~25% of the PRBs consistently release neurotransmitter throughout the entire habituation paradigm (35 stimuli, 0.05 Hz) and have a relatively high quantal content, 36% of the PRBs display intermittent failures only after the tenth stimulation, and 39% are low quantal-content PRBs that exhibit intermittent release failures from the onset of the habituation paradigm. 5HT-induced synaptic dishabituation by a single 5HT application was generated by the enhanced recovery of the quantal content of the habituated PRBs and did not involve the recruitment of new release boutons. The characterization of the PRB population as heterogeneous in terms of its temporal pattern of release-probability and quantal content provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying HSD and its dishabituation. PMID:24068986

  11. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It’s reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  12. New phenylglycine derivatives with potent and selective antagonist activity at presynaptic glutamate receptors in neonatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jane, D E; Pittaway, K; Sunter, D C; Thomas, N K; Watkins, J C

    1995-08-01

    The depression of the monosynaptic excitation of neonatal rat motoneurones produced by the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists (1S,3S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylate (ACPD) or L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) was antagonized by three novel phenylglycine analogues: (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). The potencies of all the new compounds were greater than that of the previously reported (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). For L-AP4-sensitive presynaptic mGluRs, the order of antagonist potency found was MPPG > MSPG > MTPG > MCPG. In contrast, the order of antagonist potency found for (1S,3S)-ACPD-sensitive presynaptic mGluRs was MTPG > MPPG > MSPG > MCPG. To date, MPPG (KD 9.2 microM) is the most potent L-AP4-sensitive receptor antagonist yet tested on the neonatal rat spinal cord. In addition, MTPG (KD 77 microM) is the most potent antagonist yet tested for (1S,3S)-ACPD-sensitive receptors in this preparation. PMID:8532166

  13. Mutations in the human GlyT2 gene define a presynaptic component of human startle disease

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Mark I.; Harvey, Kirsten; Pearce, Brian R.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Duguid, Ian C.; Thomas, Philip; Beatty, Sarah; Graham, Gail E.; Armstrong, Linlea; Shiang, Rita; Abbott, Kim J.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Stephenson, John B.P.; Owen, Michael J.; Tijssen, Marina A.J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; Smart, Trevor G.; Supplisson, Stéphane; Harvey, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperekplexia is a human neurological disorder characterized by an excessive startle response and is typically caused by missense and nonsense mutations in the gene encoding the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) α1 subunit (GLRA1)1-3. Genetic heterogeneity has been confirmed in isolated sporadic cases with mutations in other postsynaptic glycinergic proteins including the GlyR β subunit (GLRB)4, gephyrin (GPHN)5 and RhoGEF collybistin (ARHGEF9)6. However, many sporadic patients diagnosed with hyperekplexia do not carry mutations in these genes2-7. Here we reveal that missense, nonsense and frameshift mutations in the presynaptic glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2) gene (SLC6A5)8 also cause hyperekplexia. Patients harbouring mutations in SLC6A5 presented with hypertonia, an exaggerated startle response to tactile or acoustic stimuli, and life-threatening neonatal apnoea episodes. GlyT2 mutations result in defective subcellular localisation and/or decreased glycine uptake, with selected mutations affecting predicted glycine and Na+ binding sites. Our results demonstrate that SLC6A5 is a major gene for hyperekplexia and define the first neurological disorder linked to mutations in a Na+/Cl−-dependent transporter for a classical fast neurotransmitter. By analogy, we suggest that in other human disorders where defects in postsynaptic receptors have been identified, similar symptoms could result from defects in the cognate presynaptic neurotransmitter transporter. PMID:16751771

  14. Description and Validation of a Dynamical Systems Model of Presynaptic Serotonin Function: Genetic Variation, Brain Activation and Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Stoltenberg, Scott F.; Nag, Parthasarathi

    2010-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of empirical work on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on behavior, the details across levels of analysis are not well understood. We describe a mathematical model of the genetic control of presynaptic serotonergic function that is based on control theory, implemented using systems of differential equations, and focused on better characterizing pathways from genes to behavior. We present the results of model validation tests that include the comparison of simulation outcomes with empirical data on genetic effects on brain response to affective stimuli and on impulsivity. Patterns of simulated neural firing were consistent with recent findings of additive effects of serotonin transporter and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 polymorphisms on brain activation. In addition, simulated levels of cerebral spinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (CSF 5-HIAA) were negatively correlated with Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (Version 11) Total scores in college students (r = −.22, p = .002, N = 187), which is consistent with the well-established negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA and impulsivity. The results of the validation tests suggest that the model captures important aspects of the genetic control of presynaptic serotonergic function and behavior via brain activation. The proposed model can be: (1) extended to include other system components, neurotransmitter systems, behaviors and environmental influences; (2) used to generate testable hypotheses. PMID:20111992

  15. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It's reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  16. Calcium channels link the muscle-derived synapse organizer laminin β2 to Bassoon and CAST/Erc2 to organize presynaptic active zones

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Billings, Sara E.; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Synapse formation requires the organization of presynaptic active zones, the synaptic vesicle release sites, in precise apposition to postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor clusters; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these processes remain unclear. Here, we show that P/Q-type and N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) play essential roles as scaffolding proteins in the organization of presynaptic active zones. The neuromuscular junction of double knockout mice for P/Q- and N-type VDCCs displayed a normal size, but had significantly reduced numbers of active zones and docked vesicles and featured an attenuation of the active zone proteins Bassoon, Piccolo, and CAST/Erc2. Consistent with this phenotype, direct interactions of the VDCC β1b or β4 subunits and the active zone-specific proteins Bassoon or CAST/Erc2 were confirmed by immunoprecipitation. A decrease in the number of active zones caused by a loss of presynaptic VDCCs resembled the pathological conditions observed in the autoimmune neuromuscular disorder Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS). At the synaptic cleft of double knockout mice, we also observed a decrease of the synaptic organizer laminin β2 protein, an extracellular ligand of P/Q- and N-type VDCCs. However, the transcription level of laminin β2 did not decrease in double knockout mice, suggesting that the synaptic accumulation of laminin β2 protein required its interaction with presynaptic VDCCs. These results suggest that presynaptic VDCCs link the target-derived synapse organizer laminin β2 to active zone proteins and function as scaffolding proteins to anchor active zone proteins to the presynaptic membrane. PMID:21228161

  17. Characterization of the triazine, T4, a representative from a novel series of CaV2 inhibitors with strong state-dependence, poor use-dependence, and distinctively fast kinetics.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Andrew M; Niforatos, Wende; Lee, Chih-Hung; Jarvis, Michael F; McGaraughty, Steve

    2014-12-15

    There is strong pharmacological, biological, and genetic evidence supporting the role of N-type calcium channels (CaV2.2) in nociception. There is also human validation data from ziconotide, the CaV2.2-selective peptidyl inhibitor used clinically to treat refractory pain. Unfortunately, ziconotide utility is limited by its narrow therapeutic window and required intrathecal route of administration. A major focus has been placed on identifying state-dependent CaV2.2 inhibitors to improve safety margins. Much less attention, however, has been given to characterizing the kinetics of CaV2.2 inhibitors as a means to further differentiate compounds and maximize therapeutic potential. Here we provide a detailed characterization of the CaV2.2 inhibitor T4 in terms of its state-dependence, use-dependence, kinetics, and mechanism of inhibition. Compound T4 displayed a >20-fold difference in potency when measured under inactivating conditions (IC50=1.1 μM) as compared to closed-state conditions (IC50=25 μM). At 3 μM, T4 produced a 15-fold hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve for CaV2.2 while having no effect on channel activation. To assess the kinetic properties of T4 in a more physiological manner, its inhibition kinetics were assessed at 32°C using 2 mM Ca(2+) as the charge carrier. Surprisingly, the repriming rate for CaV2.2 channels at hyperpolarized potentials was similar in both the presence and absence of T4. This was in contrast to other compounds which markedly delayed repriming. Furthermore, T4 inhibited CaV2.2 channels more potently when channel inactivation was driven through a tonic sub-threshold depolarization rather than through a use-dependent protocol, despite similar levels of inactivation. PMID:25446431

  18. Ziram, a pesticide associated with increased risk for Parkinson's disease, differentially affects the presynaptic function of aminergic and glutamatergic nerve terminals at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ciara A; Myers, Katherine M; Chen, Audrey; Martin, Nathan T; Barajas, Angel; Schweizer, Felix E; Krantz, David E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple populations of aminergic neurons are affected in Parkinson's disease (PD), with serotonergic and noradrenergic loci responsible for some non-motor symptoms. Environmental toxins, such as the dithiocarbamate fungicide ziram, significantly increase the risk of developing PD and the attendant spectrum of both motor and non-motor symptoms. The mechanisms by which ziram and other environmental toxins increase the risk of PD, and the potential effects of these toxins on aminergic neurons, remain unclear. To determine the relative effects of ziram on the synaptic function of aminergic versus non-aminergic neurons, we used live-imaging at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In contrast to nearly all other studies of this model synapse, we imaged presynaptic function at both glutamatergic Type Ib and aminergic Type II boutons, the latter responsible for storage and release of octopamine, the invertebrate equivalent of noradrenalin. To quantify the kinetics of exo- and endo-cytosis, we employed an acid-sensitive form of GFP fused to the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (DVMAT-pHluorin). Additional genetic probes were used to visualize intracellular calcium flux (GCaMP) and voltage changes (ArcLight). We find that at glutamatergic Type Ib terminals, exposure to ziram increases exocytosis and inhibits endocytosis. By contrast, at octopaminergic Type II terminals, ziram has no detectable effect on exocytosis and dramatically inhibits endocytosis. In contrast to other reports on the neuronal effects of ziram, these effects do not appear to result from perturbation of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) or calcium homeostasis. Unexpectedly, ziram also caused spontaneous and synchronized bursts of calcium influx (measured by GCaMP) and electrical activity (measured by ArcLight) at aminergic Type II, but not glutamatergic Type Ib, nerve terminals. These events are sensitive to both tetrodotoxin and cadmium chloride, and thus appear

  19. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Joel P.; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C.; Hoppa, Michael B.; Ryan, Timothy A.; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ influx without significantly altering the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca2+]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e). Lowering external Ca2+ to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca2+ entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca2+ entry without significant direct effects on Ca2+-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca2+ influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  20. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Joel P; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C; Hoppa, Michael B; Ryan, Timothy A; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2015-09-22

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx without significantly altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca(2+)]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]e). Lowering external Ca(2+) to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca(2+) entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca(2+) entry without significant direct effects on Ca(2+)-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca(2+) influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  1. Revisiting Antagonist Effects in Hypoglossal Nucleus: Brainstem Circuit for the State-Dependent Control of Hypoglossal Motoneurons: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Fenik, Victor B.

    2015-01-01

    We reassessed and provided new insights into the findings that were obtained in our previous experiments that employed the injections of combined adrenergic, serotonergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus in order to pharmacologically abolish the depression of hypoglossal nerve activity that occurred during carbachol-induced rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep-like state in anesthetized rats. We concluded that noradrenergic disfacilitation is the major mechanism that is responsible for approximately 90% of the depression of hypoglossal motoneurons, whereas the remaining 10% can be explained by serotonergic mechanisms that have net inhibitory effect on hypoglossal nerve activity during REM sleep-like state. We hypothesized that both noradrenergic and serotonergic state-dependent mechanisms indirectly control hypoglossal motoneuron excitability during REM sleep; their activities are integrated and mediated to hypoglossal motoneurons by reticular formation neurons. In addition, we proposed a brainstem neural circuit that can explain the new findings. PMID:26648908

  2. A STATE-DEPENDENT INFLUENCE OF TYPE I BURSTS ON THE ACCRETION IN 4U 1608-52?

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Long; Zhang, Shu; Chen, YuPeng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Jian; Torres, Diego F.; Kretschmar, Peter

    2014-08-20

    We investigated the possible feedback of type I bursts on the accretion process during the spectral evolution of the atoll source 4U 1608-52. By fitting the burst spectrum with a blackbody and an adjustable, persistent spectral component, we found that the latter is significantly state-dependent. In the banana state, the persistent flux increases along the burst evolution, while in the island state this trend holds only when the bursts are less luminous and start to reverse at higher burst luminosities. We speculate that, by taking into account both the Poynting-Robertson drag and radiation pressure, these phenomena may arise from the interactions between the radiation field of the type I burst and the inner region of the accretion disk.

  3. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. I. Experimental results on the transmission of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Smejkal, Valerie; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-05-01

    We report on energy loss measurements of slow (v ≪v0 ), highly charged (Q >10 ) ions upon transmission through a 1-nm-thick carbon nanomembrane. We emphasize here the scaling of the energy loss with the velocity and charge exchange or loss. We show that a weak linear velocity dependence exists, whereas charge exchange dominates the kinetic energy loss, especially in the case of a large charge capture. A universal scaling of the energy loss with the charge exchange and velocity is found and discussed in this paper. A model for charge-state-dependent energy loss for slow ions is presented in paper II in this series [R. A. Wilhelm and W. Möller, Phys. Rev. A 93, 052709 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052709].

  4. The near optimality of the stabilizing control in a weakly nonlinear system with state-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Mikhail G.; Makarov, Dmitry A.

    2016-08-01

    We carried out analysis of near optimality of one computationally effective nonlinear stabilizing control built for weakly nonlinear systems with coefficients depending on the state and the formal small parameter. First investigation of that problem was made in [M. G. Dmitriev, and D. A. Makarov, "The suboptimality of stabilizing regulator in a quasi-linear system with state-depended coefficients," in 2016 International Siberian Conference on Control and Communications (SIBCON) Proceedings, National Research University, Moscow, 2016]. In this paper, another optimal control and gain matrix representations were used and theoretical results analogous to cited work above were obtained. Also as in the cited work above the form of quality criterion on which this close-loop control is optimal was constructed.

  5. A State-dependent Influence of Type I Bursts on the Accretion in 4U 1608-52?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Long; Zhang, Shu; Chen, YuPeng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Torres, Diego F.; Kretschmar, Peter; Li, Jian

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the possible feedback of type I bursts on the accretion process during the spectral evolution of the atoll source 4U 1608-52. By fitting the burst spectrum with a blackbody and an adjustable, persistent spectral component, we found that the latter is significantly state-dependent. In the banana state, the persistent flux increases along the burst evolution, while in the island state this trend holds only when the bursts are less luminous and start to reverse at higher burst luminosities. We speculate that, by taking into account both the Poynting-Robertson drag and radiation pressure, these phenomena may arise from the interactions between the radiation field of the type I burst and the inner region of the accretion disk.

  6. The dynamics of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest for predator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Linfei; Teng, Zhidong; Hu, Lin; Peng, Jigen

    2009-11-01

    According to the economic and biological aspects of renewable resources management, we propose a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest. By using the Poincaré map, some conditions for the existence and stability of positive periodic solution are obtained. Moreover, we show that there is no periodic solution with order larger than or equal to three under some conditions. Numerical results are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results. The bifurcation diagrams of periodic solutions are obtained by using the numerical simulations, and it is shown that a chaotic solution is generated via a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations, which implies that the presence of pulses makes the dynamic behavior more complex. PMID:19523503

  7. Desensitization-resistant and -sensitive GPCR-mediated inhibition of GABA release occurs by Ca2+-dependent and -independent mechanisms at a hypothalamic synapse.

    PubMed

    Pennock, Reagan L; Hentges, Shane T

    2016-06-01

    Whereas the activation of Gαi/o-coupled receptors commonly results in postsynaptic responses that show acute desensitization, the presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release caused by many Gαi/o-coupled receptors is maintained during agonist exposure. However, an exception has been noted where GABAB receptor (GABABR)-mediated inhibition of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded in mouse proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons exhibit acute desensitization in ∼25% of experiments. To determine whether differential effector coupling confers sensitivity to desensitization, voltage-clamp recordings were made from POMC neurons to compare the mechanism by which μ-opioid receptors (MORs) and GABABRs inhibit transmitter release. Neither MOR- nor GABABR-mediated inhibition of release relied on the activation of presynaptic K(+) channels. Both receptors maintained the ability to inhibit release in the absence of external Ca(2+) or in the presence of ionomycin-induced Ca(2+) influx, indicating that inhibition of release can occur through a Ca(2+)-independent mechanism. Replacing Ca(2+) with Sr(2+) to disrupt G-protein-mediated inhibition of release occurring directly at the release machinery did not alter MOR- or GABAB -mediated inhibition of IPSCs, suggesting that reductions in evoked release can occur through the inhibition of Ca(2+) channels. Additionally, both receptors inhibited evoked IPSCs in the presence of selective blockers of N- or P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels. Altogether, the results show that MORs and GABABRs can inhibit transmitter release through the inhibition of calcium influx and by direct actions at the release machinery. Furthermore, since both the desensitizing and nondesensitizing presynaptic receptors are similarly coupled, differential effector coupling is unlikely responsible for differential desensitization of the inhibition of release. PMID:26912590

  8. Regulation of a DLK-1 and p38 MAP kinase pathway by the ubiquitin ligase RPM-1 is required for presynaptic development.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Katsunori; Abrams, Benjamin; Grill, Brock; Goncharov, Alexandr; Huang, Xun; Chisholm, Andrew D; Jin, Yishi

    2005-02-11

    Synapses display a stereotyped ultrastructural organization, commonly containing a single electron-dense presynaptic density surrounded by a cluster of synaptic vesicles. The mechanism controlling subsynaptic proportion is not understood. Loss of function in the C. elegans rpm-1 gene, a putative RING finger/E3 ubiquitin ligase, causes disorganized presynaptic cytoarchitecture. RPM-1 is localized to the presynaptic periactive zone. We report that RPM-1 negatively regulates a p38 MAP kinase pathway composed of the dual leucine zipper-bearing MAPKKK DLK-1, the MAPKK MKK-4, and the p38 MAP kinase PMK-3. Inactivation of this pathway suppresses rpm-1 loss of function phenotypes, whereas overexpression or constitutive activation of this pathway causes synaptic defects resembling rpm-1(lf) mutants. DLK-1, like RPM-1, is localized to the periactive zone. DLK-1 protein levels are elevated in rpm-1 mutants. The RPM-1 RING finger can stimulate ubiquitination of DLK-1. Our data reveal a presynaptic role of a previously unknown p38 MAP kinase cascade. PMID:15707898

  9. In vitro and in vivo evidence for the existence of presynaptic muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Consolo, S; Wang, J X; Fusi, R; Vinci, R; Forloni, G; Ladinsky, H

    1984-08-20

    The intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid cleared 50% of muscarinic receptors and favored the detection of a further 20% loss in hippocampal presynaptic muscarinic receptors produced by electrolytic lesion of the medial septal nucleus as determined by Scatchard analysis of the saturation isotherms of [3H]dexetimide binding. In accordance, a decrease of about 20% in the in vivo accumulation of [3H]dexetimide in the hippocampus was found in animals lesioned in the medial septal nucleus. This effect occurred at both the dose of 5 micrograms/kg and at the saturating dose of 100 micrograms/kg of [3H]dexetimide. The results suggest that the loss was due to decreased receptor number rather than decreased receptor affinity. PMID:6488003

  10. Presynaptic and postsynaptic effects of local cathodal DC polarization within the spinal cord in anaesthetized animal preparations

    PubMed Central

    Bolzoni, F; Jankowska, E

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare presynaptic and postsynaptic actions of direct current polarization in the spinal cord, focusing on DC effects on primary afferents and motoneurons. To reduce the directly affected spinal cord region, a weak polarizing direct current (0.1–0.3 μA) was applied locally in deeply anaesthetized cats and rats; within the hindlimb motor nuclei in the caudal lumbar segments, or in the dorsal horn within the terminal projection area of low threshold skin afferents. Changes in the excitability of primary afferents activated by intraspinal stimuli (20–50 μA) were estimated using increases or decreases in compound action potentials recorded from the dorsal roots or peripheral nerves as their measure. Changes in the postsynaptic actions of the afferents were assessed from intracellularly recorded monosynaptic EPSPs in hindlimb motoneurons and monosynaptic extracellular field potentials (evoked by group Ia afferents in motor nuclei, or by low threshold cutaneous afferents in the dorsal horn). The excitability of motoneurons activated by intraspinal stimuli was assessed using intracellular records or motoneuronal discharges recorded from a ventral root or a muscle nerve. Cathodal polarization was found to affect motoneurons and afferents providing input to them to a different extent. The excitability of both was markedly increased during DC application, although post-polarization facilitation was found to involve presynaptic afferents and some of their postsynaptic actions, but only negligibly motoneurons themselves. Taken together, these results indicate that long-lasting post-polarization facilitation of spinal activity induced by locally applied cathodal current primarily reflects the facilitation of synaptic transmission. PMID:25416625

  11. Chronic Morphine Alters the Presynaptic Protein Profile: Identification of Novel Molecular Targets Using Proteomics and Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Annangudi, Suresh P.; Ma'ayan, Avi; Ramos-Ortolaza, Dinah L.; Stockton, Steven D.; Gomes, Ivone; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2011-01-01

    Opiates produce significant and persistent changes in synaptic transmission; knowledge of the proteins involved in these changes may help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying opiate dependence. Using an integrated quantitative proteomics and systems biology approach, we explored changes in the presynaptic protein profile following a paradigm of chronic morphine administration that leads to the development of dependence. For this, we isolated presynaptic fractions from the striata of rats treated with saline or escalating doses of morphine, and analyzed the proteins in these fractions using differential isotopic labeling. We identified 30 proteins that were significantly altered by morphine and integrated them into a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network representing potential morphine-regulated protein complexes. Graph theory-based analysis of this network revealed clusters of densely connected and functionally related morphine-regulated clusters of proteins. One of the clusters contained molecular chaperones thought to be involved in regulation of neurotransmission. Within this cluster, cysteine-string protein (CSP) and the heat shock protein Hsc70 were downregulated by morphine. Interestingly, Hsp90, a heat shock protein that normally interacts with CSP and Hsc70, was upregulated by morphine. Moreover, treatment with the selective Hsp90 inhibitor, geldanamycin, decreased the somatic signs of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal, suggesting that Hsp90 upregulation at the presynapse plays a role in the expression of morphine dependence. Thus, integration of proteomics, network analysis, and behavioral studies has provided a greater understanding of morphine-induced alterations in synaptic composition, and identified a potential novel therapeutic target for opiate dependence. PMID:22043286

  12. Sensitivity study of forecasted aftershock seismicity based on Coulomb stress calculation and rate- and state-dependent frictional response (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, M.; Hainzl, S.; Woessner, J.; Enescu, B.; Catalli, F.; Lombardi, A.

    2009-12-01

    It is nowadays well established that both Coulomb stress perturbations and the rate- and state-dependent frictional response of fault populations are needed to model the spatial and temporal evolution of seismicity. This represents the most popular physics-based approach to forecast the rate of earthquake production and its performances have to be verified with respect to alternative statistical methods. Despite the numerous applications of Coulomb stress interactions, a rigorous validation of the forecasting capabilities is still missing. In this work, we use the Dieterich (1994) physics-based approach to simulate the spatio-temporal evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches modelled through a rate- and state-dependent friction law. According to this model, seismicity rate changes depend on the amplitude of stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults (represented by the parameter Aσ), the stressing rate and the background seismicity rate of the study area. In order to apply this model in a predictive manner, we need to understand the variability of input physical model parameters and their correlations. We first discuss the impact of uncertainties in model parameters and, in particular, in computed coseismic stress perturbations on the seismicity rate changes forecasted through the frictional model. We aim to understand how the variability of Coulomb stress changes affects the correlation between predicted and observed changes in the rate of earthquake production. We use the aftershock activity following the 1992 M 7.3 Landers (California) earthquake as one of our case studies. We analyze the variability of stress changes resulting from the use of different published slip distributions. We find that the standard deviation of the uncertainty is of the same size as the absolute stress change and that their ratio, the coefficient of variation (CV), is approximately constant in

  13. Parvalbumin is a mobile presynaptic Ca2+ buffer in the calyx of Held that accelerates the decay of Ca2+ and short-term facilitation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martin; Felmy, Felix; Schwaller, Beat; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2007-02-28

    Presynaptic Ca2+ signaling plays a crucial role in short-term plasticity of synaptic transmission. Here, we studied the role of mobile endogenous presynaptic Ca2+ buffer(s) in modulating paired-pulse facilitation at a large excitatory nerve terminal in the auditory brainstem, the calyx of Held. To do so, we assessed the effect of presynaptic whole-cell recording, which should lead to the diffusional loss of endogenous mobile Ca2+ buffers, on paired-pulse facilitation and on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) transients evoked by action potentials. In unperturbed calyces briefly preloaded with the Ca2+ indicator fura-6F, the [Ca2+]i transient decayed surprisingly fast (tau(fast), approximately 30 ms). Presynaptic whole-cell recordings made without additional Ca2+ buffers slowed the decay kinetics of [Ca2+]i and paired-pulse facilitation (twofold to threefold), but the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient was changed only marginally. The fast [Ca2+]i decay was restored by adding the slow Ca2+ buffer EGTA (50-100 microM) or parvalbumin (100 microM), a Ca2+-binding protein with slow Ca2+-binding kinetics, to the presynaptic pipette solution. In contrast, the fast Ca2+ buffer fura-2 strongly reduced the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient and slowed its decay, suggesting that the mobile endogenous buffer in calyces of Held has slow, rather than fast, binding kinetics. In parvalbumin knock-out mice, the decay of [Ca2+]i and facilitation was slowed approximately twofold compared with wild-type mice, similar to what is observed during whole-cell recordings in rat calyces of Held. Thus, in young calyces of Held, a mobile Ca2+ buffer with slow binding kinetics, primarily represented by parvalbumin, accelerates the decay of spatially averaged [Ca2+]i and paired-pulse facilitation. PMID:17329423

  14. Presynaptic P2X1-3 and α3-containing nicotinic receptors assemble into functionally interacting ion channels in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Almeida, Teresa; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel; Marques, Joana M; Franco, Rafael; Solsona, Carles; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa; Ciruela, Francisco; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies documented a cross-talk between purinergic P2X (P2XR) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in heterologous expression systems and peripheral preparations. We now investigated if this occurred in native brain preparations and probed its physiological function. We found that P2XR and nAChR were enriched in hippocampal terminals, where both P2X1-3R and α3, but not α4, nAChR subunits were located in the active zone and in dopamine-β-hydroxylase-positive hippocampal terminals. Notably, P2XR ligands displaced nAChR binding and nAChR ligands displaced P2XR binding to hippocampal synaptosomes. In addition, a negative P2XR/nAChR cross-talk was observed in the control of the evoked release of noradrenaline from rat hippocampal synaptosomes, characterized by a less-than-additive facilitatory effect upon co-activation of both receptors. This activity-dependent cross-inhibition was confirmed in Xenopus oocytes transfected with P2X1-3Rs and α3β2 (but not α4β2) nAChR. Besides, P2X2 co-immunoprecipitated α3β2 (but not α4β2) nAChR, both in HEK cells and rat hippocampal membranes indicating that this functional interaction is supported by a physical association between P2XR and nAChR. Moreover, eliminating extracellular ATP with apyrase in hippocampal slices promoted the inhibitory effect of the nAChR antagonist tubocurarine on noradrenaline release induced by high- but not low-frequency stimulation. Overall, these results provide integrated biochemical, pharmacological and functional evidence showing that P2X1-3R and α3β2 nAChR are physically and functionally interconnected at the presynaptic level to control excessive noradrenergic terminal activation upon intense synaptic firing in the hippocampus. PMID:26801076

  15. Beyond-mean-field study of a binary bosonic mixture in a state-dependent honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lushuai; Krönke, Sven; Stockhofe, Jan; Simonet, Juliette; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-04-01

    We investigate a binary mixture of bosonic atoms loaded into a state-dependent honeycomb lattice. For this system, the emergence of a so-called twisted-superfluid ground state was experimentally observed in Soltan-Panahi et al. [Nat. Phys. 8, 71 (2012), 10.1038/nphys2128]. Theoretically, the origin of this effect is not understood. We perform numerical simulations of an extended single-band Bose-Hubbard model adapted to the experimental parameters employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method for Bosons. Our results confirm the overall applicability of mean-field theory in the relevant parameter range, within the extended single-band Bose-Hubbard model. Beyond this, we provide a detailed analysis of correlation effects correcting the mean-field result. These have the potential to induce asymmetries in single shot time-of-flight measurements, but we find no indication of the patterns characteristic of the twisted superfluid. We comment on the restrictions of our model and possible extensions.

  16. Construction of quasi-periodic solutions of state-dependent delay differential equations by the parameterization method II: Analytic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaolong; de la Llave, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    We construct analytic quasi-periodic solutions of a state-dependent delay differential equation with quasi-periodically forcing. We show that if we consider a family of problems that depends on one dimensional parameters (with some non-degeneracy conditions), there is a positive measure set Π of parameters for which the system admits analytic quasi-periodic solutions. The main difficulty to be overcome is the appearance of small divisors and this is the reason why we need to exclude parameters. Our main result is proved by a Nash-Moser fast convergent method and is formulated in the a-posteriori format of numerical analysis. That is, given an approximate solution of a functional equation which satisfies some non-degeneracy conditions, we can find a true solution close to it. This is in sharp contrast with the finite regularity theory developed in [18]. We conjecture that the exclusion of parameters is a real phenomenon and not a technical difficulty. More precisely, for generic families of perturbations, the quasi-periodic solutions are only finitely differentiable in open sets in the complement of parameters set Π.

  17. Assessment of temporal state-dependent interactions between auditory fMRI responses to desired and undesired acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Olulade, O; Hu, S; Gonzalez-Castillo, J; Tamer, G G; Luh, W-M; Ulmer, J L; Talavage, T M

    2011-07-01

    A confounding factor in auditory functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is the presence of the acoustic noise inherently associated with the echo planar imaging acquisition technique. Previous studies have demonstrated that this noise can induce unwanted neuronal responses that can mask stimulus-induced responses. Similarly, activation accumulated over multiple stimuli has been demonstrated to elevate the baseline, thus reducing the dynamic range available for subsequent responses. To best evaluate responses to auditory stimuli, it is necessary to account for the presence of all recent acoustic stimulation, beginning with an understanding of the attenuating effects brought about by interaction between and among induced unwanted neuronal responses, and responses to desired auditory stimuli. This study focuses on the characterization of the duration of this temporal memory and qualitative assessment of the associated response attenuation. Two experimental parameters--inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and repetition time (TR)--were varied during an fMRI experiment in which participants were asked to passively attend to an auditory stimulus. Results present evidence of a state-dependent interaction between induced responses. As expected, attenuating effects of these interactions become less significant as TR and ISI increase and in contrast to previous work, persist up to 18s after a stimulus presentation. PMID:21426929

  18. Adaptive cruise control with stop&go function using the state-dependent nonlinear model predictive control approach.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Payman; Ordys, Andrzej; Askari, Mohamad R

    2012-09-01

    In the design of adaptive cruise control (ACC) system two separate control loops - an outer loop to maintain the safe distance from the vehicle traveling in front and an inner loop to control the brake pedal and throttle opening position - are commonly used. In this paper a different approach is proposed in which a single control loop is utilized. The objective of the distance tracking is incorporated into the single nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) by extending the original linear time invariant (LTI) models obtained by linearizing the nonlinear dynamic model of the vehicle. This is achieved by introducing the additional states corresponding to the relative distance between leading and following vehicles, and also the velocity of the leading vehicle. Control of the brake and throttle position is implemented by taking the state-dependent approach. The model demonstrates to be more effective in tracking the speed and distance by eliminating the necessity of switching between the two controllers. It also offers smooth variation in brake and throttle controlling signal which subsequently results in a more uniform acceleration of the vehicle. The results of proposed method are compared with other ACC systems using two separate control loops. Furthermore, an ACC simulation results using a stop&go scenario are shown, demonstrating a better fulfillment of the design requirements. PMID:22704362

  19. Classical open systems with nonlinear nonlocal dissipation and state-dependent diffusion: Dynamical responses and the Jarzynski equality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2011-11-01

    We have studied dynamical responses and the Jarzynski equality (JE) of classical open systems described by the generalized Caldeira-Leggett model with the nonlocal system-bath coupling. In the derived non-Markovian Langevin equation, the nonlinear nonlocal dissipative term and state-dependent diffusion term yielding multiplicative colored noise satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation relation. Simulation results for harmonic oscillator systems have shown the following: (a) averaged responses of the system to applied sinusoidal and step forces significantly depend on model parameters of magnitudes of additive and multiplicative noises and the relaxation time of colored noise, although stationary marginal probability distribution functions are independent of them, (b) a combined effect of nonlinear dissipation and multiplicative colored noise induces enhanced fluctuations <[x-]2> for an applied sinusoidal force, and (c) the JE holds for an applied ramp force independently of the model parameters with a work distribution function which is (symmetric) Gaussian and (asymmetric) non-Gaussian for additive and multiplicative noises, respectively. It has been shown that the non-Markovian Langevin equation in the local and overdamped limits is quite different from the widely adopted, phenomenological Markovian Langevin equation subjected to additive and multiplicative noises.

  20. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State-Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula, Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N=15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  1. State-dependent changes of prefrontal-posterior coupling in the context of affective processing: susceptibility to humor.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Reiser, Eva M; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Fink, Andreas; Samson, Andrea C; Lackner, Helmut K; Schulter, Günter

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether interindividual differences in the coupling or decoupling of prefrontal and posterior cortices during the exposure to social-emotional information may predict an individual's positive emotional responsiveness. Susceptibility to humor was assessed in a behavioral paradigm several weeks after the EEG recordings. State-dependent changes of prefrontal-posterior EEG beta coherence were recorded during stimulation with other people's auditory expressions of cheerfulness and sadness. Greater decreases of coherence during the stimulation with positive affect expressions prospectively predicted greater positive emotional responsiveness, indicated by higher amusement ratings in response to cartoons and higher scores in a questionnaire measure of exhilarability. Greater increases of coherence during the stimulation with negative affect expressions did not predict perceived funniness but were related to shorter response latencies to the amusement ratings. The results further support the notion that a more loose prefrontal-posterior coupling may be related to loosening of control of the prefrontal cortex over incoming emotional information and, thus, to a propensity to deeper emotional involvement and a greater impact of perceptual input, whereas increased prefrontal-posterior coupling may be related to strong control and the propensity to protect oneself from becoming emotionally affected. PMID:23208750

  2. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milan, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15, This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar core. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotop c enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites, However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores, We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N-15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D emichment. These calculations therefore support the view that Solar System N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage, We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  3. Theoretical life history responses of juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss to changes in food availability using a dynamic state-dependent approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romine, Jason G.; Benjamin, Joseph R.; Perry, Russell W.; Casal, Lynne; Connolly, Patrick J.; Sauter, Sally S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine subsidies can play an important role in the growth, survival, and migratory behavior of rearing juvenile salmonids. Availability of high-energy, marine-derived food sources during critical decision windows may influence the timing of emigration or the decision to forego emigration completely and remain in the freshwater environment. Increasing growth and growth rate during these decision windows may result in an altered juvenile population structure, which will ultimately affect the adult population age-structure. We used a state dependent model to understand how the juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss population structure may respond to increased availability of salmon eggs in their diet during critical decision windows. Our models predicted an increase in smolt production until coho salmon eggs comprised more than 50 percent of juvenile O. mykiss diet at the peak of the spawning run. At higher-than intermediate levels of egg consumption, smolt production decreased owing to increasing numbers of fish adopting a resident life-history strategy. Additionally, greater growth rates decreased the number of age-3 smolts and increased the number of age-2 smolts. Increased growth rates with higher egg consumption also decreased the age at which fish adopted the resident pathway. Our models suggest that the introduction of a high-energy food source during critical periods of the year could be sufficient to increase smolt production.

  4. Stimulus-induced and state-dependent sustained gamma activity is tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Koch, Stefan P; Werner, Peter; Steinbrink, Jens; Fries, Pascal; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2009-11-01

    A prompt behavioral response to a stimulus depends both on the salience of the stimulus as well as the subject's preparedness. Thus, both stimulus properties and cognitive factors, such as attention, may determine the strength of neuronal synchronization in the gamma range. For a comprehensive investigation of stimulus-response processing through noninvasive imaging, it is, however, a crucial issue whether both kinds of gamma modulation elicit a hemodynamic response. Here, we show that, in the human visual cortex, stimulus strength and internal state modulate sustained gamma activity and hemodynamic response in close correspondence. When participants reported velocity changes of gratings varying in contrast, gamma activity (35-70 Hz) increased systematically with contrast. For stimuli of constant contrast, the amplitude of gamma activity before the behaviorally relevant velocity change was inversely correlated to the behavioral response latency. This indicates that gamma activity also reflects an overall attentive state. For both sources of variance, gamma activity was tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response measured through optical topography. Because of the close relationship between high-frequency neuronal activity and the hemodynamic signal, we conclude that both stimulus-induced and state-dependent gamma activity trigger a metabolic demand and are amenable to vascular-based imaging. PMID:19890006

  5. Structure and dynamics of reduced Bacillus pasteurii cytochrome c: oxidation state dependent properties and implications for electron transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Bartalesi, Ilaria; Bertini, Ivano; Rosato, Antonio

    2003-01-28

    The solution structure of reduced Bacillus pasteurii cytochrome c, which has only 71 amino acids, has been determined by NMR to an RMSD of 0.46 +/- 0.08 A for all backbone atoms and 0.79 +/- 0.08 A for all heavy atoms and refined through restrained energy minimization. The target function out of 1645 constraints is 0.52 +/- 0.11 A(2), and the penalty function is 66 +/- 12 kJ mol(-)(1). The structure appears very similar to that in the oxidized state, only Trp87 and the propionates showing significant differences. The mobility was investigated through (15)N R(1) and R(2) relaxation rates, (15)N-(1)H NOE, and (1)H/(2)H exchange. It is found that the oxidized form is generally more mobile than the reduced one. By comparing the redox-state dependence of the structural/dynamic properties of Fe-S proteins, cytochrome c, and blue copper proteins, hints are provided for a better comprehension of the electron transfer processes. PMID:12534286

  6. ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN PRIMITIVE SOLAR SYSTEM MATTER: SPIN-STATE-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF NITROGEN AND DEUTERIUM IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Wirstroem, Eva S.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-09-20

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and {sup 15}N. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and {sup 15}N and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large {sup 15}N enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, {sup 15}N enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H{sub 2}, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both {sup 15}N and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest {sup 15}N enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system {sup 15}N and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  7. Feedforward and Feedback inhibition in Neostriatal GABAergic Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, James M.; Wilson, Charles J.; Koós, Tibor

    2008-01-01

    There are two distinct inhibitory GABAergic circuits in the neostriatum. The feedforward circuit consists of a relatively small population of GABAergic interneurons that receives excitatory input from the neocortex and exerts monosynaptic inhibition onto striatal spiny projection neurons. The feedback circuit comprises the numerous spiny projection neurons and their interconnections via local axon collaterals. This network has long been assumed to provide the majority of striatal GABAergic inhibition and to sharpen and shape striatal output through lateral inhibition, producing increased activity in the most strongly excited spiny cells at the expense of their less strongly excited neighbors. Recent results, mostly from recording experiments of synaptically connected pairs of neurons, have revealed that the two GABAergic circuits differ markedly in terms of the total number of synapses made by each, the strength of the postsynaptic response detected at the soma, the extent of presynaptic convergence and divergence and the net effect of the activation of each circuit on the postsynaptic activity of the spiny neuron. These data have revealed that the feedforward inhibition is powerful and widespread, with spiking in a single interneuron being capable of significantly delaying or even blocking the generation of spikes in a large number of postsynaptic spiny neurons. In contrast, the postsynaptic effects of spiking in a single presynaptic spiny neuron on postsynaptic spiny neurons are weak when measured at the soma, and unable to significantly affect spike timing or generation. Further, reciprocity of synaptic connections between spiny neurons is only rarely observed. These results suggest that the bulk of the fast inhibition that has the strongest effects on spiny neuron spike timing comes from the feedforward interneuronal system whereas the axon collateral feedback system acts principally at the dendrites to control local excitability as well as the overall level of

  8. Identification and Characterization of ML352: A Novel, Noncompetitive Inhibitor of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is the rate-limiting determinant of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis, yet the transporter remains a largely undeveloped target for the detection and manipulation of synaptic cholinergic signaling. To expand CHT pharmacology, we pursued a high-throughput screen for novel CHT-targeted small molecules based on the electrogenic properties of transporter-mediated choline transport. In this effort, we identified five novel, structural classes of CHT-specific inhibitors. Chemical diversification and functional analysis of one of these classes identified ML352 as a high-affinity (Ki = 92 nM) and selective CHT inhibitor. At concentrations that fully antagonized CHT in transfected cells and nerve terminal preparations, ML352 exhibited no inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) and also lacked activity at dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporters, as well as many receptors and ion channels. ML352 exhibited noncompetitive choline uptake inhibition in intact cells and synaptosomes and reduced the apparent density of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding sites in membrane assays, suggesting allosteric transporter interactions. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed limited in vitro metabolism and significant CNS penetration, with features predicting rapid clearance. ML352 represents a novel, potent, and specific tool for the manipulation of CHT, providing a possible platform for the development of cholinergic imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:25560927

  9. Ultra-rapid axon-axon ephaptic inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells by the pinceau.

    PubMed

    Blot, Antonin; Barbour, Boris

    2014-02-01

    Excitatory synaptic activity in the brain is shaped and balanced by inhibition. Because inhibition cannot propagate, it is often recruited with a synaptic delay by incoming excitation. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are driven by long-range excitatory parallel fiber inputs, which also recruit local inhibitory basket cells. The axon initial segment of each Purkinje cell is ensheathed by basket cell axons in a structure called the pinceau, which is largely devoid of chemical synapses. In mice, we found at the single-cell level that the pinceau mediates ephaptic inhibition of Purkinje cell firing at the site of spike initiation. The reduction of firing rate was synchronous with the presynaptic action potential, eliminating a synaptic delay and allowing granule cells to inhibit Purkinje cells without a preceding phase of excitation. Axon-axon ephaptic intercellular signaling can therefore mediate near-instantaneous feedforward and lateral inhibition. PMID:24413696

  10. Retinal co-mediator acetylcholine evokes muscarinic inhibition of recurrent excitation in frog tectum column.

    PubMed

    Baginskas, Armantas; Kuras, Antanas

    2016-08-26

    Acetylcholine receptors contribute to the control of neuronal and neuronal network activity from insects to humans. We have investigated the action of acetylcholine receptors in the optic tectum of Rana temporaria (common frog). Our previous studies have demonstrated that acetylcholine activates presynaptic nicotinic receptors, when released into the frog optic tectum as a co-mediator during firing of a single retinal ganglion cell, and causes: a) potentiation of retinotectal synaptic transmission, and b) facilitation of transition of the tectum column to a higher level of activity. In the present study we have shown that endogenous acetylcholine also activates muscarinic receptors, leading to a delayed inhibition of recurrent excitatory synaptic transmission in the tectum column. The delay of muscarinic inhibition was evaluated to be of ∼80ms, with an extent of inhibition of ∼2 times. The inhibition of the recurrent excitation determines transition of the tectum column back to its resting state, giving a functional sense for the inhibition. PMID:27394688

  11. A rate- and state-dependent flow law of halite as determined with a high-temperature biaxial machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    A phrase, "rate- and state-dependent law" (r-s law) is nowadays frequently used to describe the complex mechanical property of a fault after Dieterich [1979] and Ruina [1983]. This phrase was also used to describe the mechanical behavior of ductile deformation of a crystalline material [e.g. Chapter 1 of Frost, 1959], but a ductile flow law in such a framework at large shear strain is not studied very well. On the other hand, geological observations such as repeated overprinting of textures of pseudotachylytes and mylonites [Lin et al., 2005] suggest that a ductile flow law and the combination with a frictional constitutive law are important in the interseismic stress accumulation process, the earthquake cycle, and the fault behavior around the down- dip limit of the seismogenic zone. In order to investigate how to combine brittle and ductile flow laws, it is important to know both of the end-members, but a ductile flow law comparable to the r-s frictional law has not yet established. Halite is almost only one rock-forming mineral known to cross the brittle-ductile transition under experimentally convenient condition [Shimamoto, 1986; Kawamoto and Shimamoto, 1997, 1998]. Previous experimental studies mainly concentrated on the steady state frictional resistance or construction of the strength profile of a crust without paying much attention to the transient behavior on a change in the slip rate. In this work, we have conducted velocity-stepping tests for a simulated halite shear zone at a range of temperatures and loading velocities or strain rates including the ductile regime where the dependency of the resistance to the normal stress almost vanishes with using a high-temperature biaxial deformation apparatus at Hiroshima University. Then, we have tested several constitutive laws if they can be fit to the mechanical data reasonably, considering the spring-slide model. We used an iterative least-squares method [Reinen and Weeks, 1994]. Specifically, we adopt a

  12. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localization and material classification with state-dependent modulation.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Luca; Hellbach, Sven; Krause, André F; Arena, Paolo; Dürr, Volker

    2012-01-01

    INSECTS CARRY A PAIR OF ANTENNAE ON THEIR HEAD: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviors. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localizing, probing, and negotiating obstacles. Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe and basal angular encoders allow tactile localization in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behavior of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material. The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: first, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localization with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorization. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the input signals

  13. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localization and material classification with state-dependent modulation

    PubMed Central

    Patanè, Luca; Hellbach, Sven; Krause, André F.; Arena, Paolo; Dürr, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Insects carry a pair of antennae on their head: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviors. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localizing, probing, and negotiating obstacles. Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe and basal angular encoders allow tactile localization in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behavior of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material. The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: first, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localization with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorization. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the input signals

  14. Immobilized cytochrome c bound to cardiolipin exhibits peculiar oxidation state-dependent axial heme ligation and catalytically reduces dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Antonio; Millo, Diego; Di Rocco, Giulia; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bortolotti, Carlo A; Borsari, Marco; Sola, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cytc) plays an important role in programmed cell death upon binding to cardiolipin (CL), a negatively charged phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Although this binding has been thoroughly investigated in solution, little is known on the nature and reactivity of the adduct (cytc-CL) immobilized at IMM. In this work, we have studied electrochemically cytc-CL immobilized on a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of decane-1-thiol. This construct would reproduce the motional restriction and the nonpolar environment experienced by cytc-CL at IMM. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) studies allowed the axial heme iron ligands to be identified, which were found to be oxidation state dependent and differ from those of cytc-CL in solution. In particular, immobilized cytc-CL experiences an equilibrium between a low-spin (LS) 6c His/His and a high-spin (HS) 5c His/- coordination states. The former prevails in the oxidized and the latter in the reduced form. Axial coordination of the ferric heme thus differs from the (LS) 6c His/Lys and (LS) 6c His/OH(-) states observed in solution. Moreover, a relevant finding is that the immobilized ferrous cytc-CL is able to catalytically reduce dioxygen, likely to superoxide ion. These findings indicate that restriction of motional freedom due to interaction with the membrane is an additional factor playing in the mechanism of cytc unfolding and cytc-mediated peroxidation functional to the apoptosis cascade. PMID:25627142

  15. Delta opioid receptors presynaptically regulate cutaneous mechanosensory neuron input to the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C; Mennicken, Françoise; O'Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I; MacDermott, Amy B; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-03-19

    Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  16. Actin- and Myosin-Dependent Vesicle Loading of Presynaptic Docking Sites Prior to Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takafumi; Malagon, Gerardo; Pulido, Camila; Llano, Isabel; Neher, Erwin; Marty, Alain

    2016-08-17

    Variance analysis of postsynaptic current amplitudes suggests the presence of distinct docking sites (also called release sites) where vesicles pause before exocytosis. Docked vesicles participate in the readily releasable pool (RRP), but the relation between docking site number and RRP size remains unclear. It is also unclear whether all vesicles of the RRP are equally release competent, and what cellular mechanisms underlie RRP renewal. We address here these questions at single glutamatergic synapses, counting released vesicles using deconvolution. We find a remarkably low variance of cumulative vesicle counts during action potential trains. This, combined with Monte Carlo simulations, indicates that vesicles transit through two successive states before exocytosis, so that the RRP is up to 2-fold higher than the docking site number. The transition to the second state has a very rapid rate constant, and is specifically inhibited by latrunculin B and blebbistatin, suggesting the involvement of actin and myosin. PMID:27537485

  17. Delta Opioid Receptors Presynaptically Regulate Cutaneous Mechanosensory Neuron Input to the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A.; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C.; Mennicken, Françoise; O’Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Woodbury, C. Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I.; MacDermott, Amy B.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  18. Clarin-1 acts as a modulator of mechanotransduction activity and presynaptic ribbon assembly.

    PubMed

    Ogun, Oluwatobi; Zallocchi, Marisa

    2014-11-10

    Clarin-1 is a four-transmembrane protein expressed by hair cells and photoreceptors. Mutations in its corresponding gene are associated with Usher syndrome type 3, characterized by late-onset and progressive hearing and vision loss in humans. Mice carrying mutations in the clarin-1 gene have hair bundle dysmorphology and a delay in synapse maturation. In this paper, we examined the expression and function of clarin-1 in zebrafish hair cells. We observed protein expression as early as 1 d postfertilization. Knockdown of clarin-1 resulted in inhibition of FM1-43 incorporation, shortening of the kinocilia, and mislocalization of ribeye b clusters. These phenotypes were fully prevented by co-injection with clarin-1 transcript, requiring its C-terminal tail. We also observed an in vivo interaction between clarin-1 and Pcdh15a. Altogether, our results suggest that clarin-1 is functionally important for mechanotransduction channel activity and for proper localization of synaptic components, establishing a critical role for clarin-1 at the apical and basal poles of hair cells. PMID:25365995

  19. What shall I do now? State-dependent variations of life-history traits with aging in Wandering Albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Deborah; Barbraud, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2014-02-01

    Allocation decisions depend on an organism's condition which can change with age. Two opposite changes in life-history traits are predicted in the presence of senescence: either an increase in breeding performance in late age associated with terminal investment or a decrease due to either life-history trade-offs between current breeding and future survival or decreased efficiency at old age. Age variation in several life-history traits has been detected in a number of species, and demographic performances of individuals in a given year are influenced by their reproductive state the previous year. Few studies have, however, examined state-dependent variation in life-history traits with aging, and they focused mainly on a dichotomy of successful versus failed breeding and non-breeding birds. Using a 50-year dataset on the long-lived quasi-biennial breeding wandering albatross, we investigated variations in life-history traits with aging according to a gradient of states corresponding to potential costs of reproduction the previous year (in ascending order): non-breeding birds staying at sea or present at breeding grounds, breeding birds that failed early, late or were successful. We used multistate models to study survival and decompose reproduction into four components (probabilities of return, breeding, hatching, and fledging), while accounting for imperfect detection. Our results suggest the possible existence of two strategies in the population: strict biennial breeders that exhibited almost no reproductive senescence and quasi-biennial breeders that showed an increased breeding frequency with a strong and moderate senescence on hatching and fledging probabilities, respectively. The patterns observed on survival were contrary to our predictions, suggesting an influence of individual quality rather than trade-offs between reproduction and survival at late ages. This work represents a step further into understanding the evolutionary ecology of senescence and its

  20. A synthetic seismicity model for the Xianshuihe fault, southwestern China: simulation using a rate- and state-dependent friction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Naoyuki; Lei, Xinglin; Wen, Xueze

    2007-04-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of seismic activity along the Xianshuihe fault, a highly active strike-slip fault approximately 350 km long, located along the eastern margin area of the Tibetan plateau, southwestern China. Historical earthquake data over the last 300 yr indicate repeated periods of seismic activity, and migration of large earthquakes along the fault during active seismic periods. To understand the characteristics of historical seismicity and to obtain insight into seismic potential, we performed a numerical simulation of slip behaviour along the fault using a 2-D elastic plate model. The friction on the model fault obeys a laboratory-derived rate- and state-dependent friction law, while the long-term slip rates along the fault are assumed to be consistent with geologically and geodetically estimated slip rates. To simulate segmented rupture behaviour we introduced non-uniformity into friction parameters along the fault. The simulation results indicate that seismic rupture is arrested in regions with frictional properties that are highly velocity-strengthening or large values of characteristic slip distance over which frictional stress evolves. In the regions where seismic rupture is arrested, post-seismic sliding occurs, causing time-dependent stress transfer along the fault. Post-seismic slip histories in highly velocity-strengthening regions are well approximated by logarithmic time functions, while those in regions with large characteristic slip distances increase more rapidly in the initial stages of post-seismic sliding. This difference in post-seismic sliding produces the difference in time-dependent stress transfer and, in consequence, the statistical characteristics of earthquake recurrence. Fault interactions near a fault branch point produce complexity in the simulated earthquake sequence. Simulated rupture commonly triggers additional rupture in a neighbouring segment with a time delay of several years. The simulated seismic activity

  1. Implementation into earthquake sequence simulations of a rate- and state-dependent friction law incorporating pressure solution creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.

    2016-05-01

    Pressure solution creep (PSC) is an important elementary process in rock friction at high temperatures where solubilities of rock-forming minerals are significantly large. It significantly changes the frictional resistance and enhances time-dependent strengthening. A recent microphysical model for PSC-involved friction of clay-quartz mixtures, which can explain a transition between dilatant and non-dilatant deformation (d-nd transition), was modified here and implemented in dynamic earthquake sequence simulations. The original model resulted in essentially a kind of rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law, but assumed a constant friction coefficient for clay resulting in zero instantaneous rate dependency in the dilatant regime. In this study, an instantaneous rate dependency for the clay friction coefficient was introduced, consistent with experiments, resulting in a friction law suitable for earthquake sequence simulations. In addition, a term for time-dependent strengthening due to PSC was added which makes the friction law logarithmically rate-weakening in the dilatant regime. The width of the zone in which clasts overlap or, equivalently, the interface porosity involved in PSC plays a role as the state variable. Such a concrete physical meaning of the state variable is a great advantage in future modelling studies incorporating other physical processes such as hydraulic effects. Earthquake sequence simulations with different pore pressure distributions demonstrated that excess pore pressure at depth causes deeper rupture propagation with smaller slip per event and a shorter recurrence interval. The simulated ruptures were arrested a few kilometres below the point of pre-seismic peak stress at the d-nd transition and did not propagate spontaneously into the region of pre-seismic non-dilatant deformation. PSC weakens the fault against slow deformation and thus such a region cannot produce a dynamic stress drop. Dynamic rupture propagation further down to

  2. Implementation into earthquake sequence simulations of a rate- and state-dependent friction law incorporating pressure solution creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.

    2016-03-01

    Pressure solution creep (PSC) is an important elementary process in rock friction at high temperatures where solubilities of rock-forming minerals are significantly large. It significantly changes the frictional resistance and enhances time-dependent strengthening. A recent microphysical model for PSC-involved friction of clay-quartz mixtures, which can explain a transition between dilatant and nondilatant deformation (d-nd transition), was modified here and implemented in dynamic earthquake sequence simulations. The original model resulted in essentially a kind of rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law, but assumed a constant friction coefficient for clay resulting in zero instantaneous rate-dependency in the dilatant regime. In the current study, an instantaneous rate-dependency for the clay friction coefficient was introduced, consistent with experiments, resulting in a friction law suitable for earthquake sequence simulations. In addition, a term for time-dependent strengthening due to PSC was added which makes the friction law logarithmically rate-weakening in the dilatant regime. The width of the zone in which clasts overlap or, equivalently, the interface porosity involved in PSC plays a role as the state-variable. Such a concrete physical meaning of the state variable is a great advantage in future modeling studies incorporating other physical processes such as hydraulic effects. Earthquake sequence simulations with different pore pressure distributions demonstrated that excess pore pressure at depth causes deeper rupture propagation with smaller slip per event and a shorter recurrence interval. The simulated ruptures were arrested a few kilometers below the point of preseismic peak stress at the d-nd transition, and did not propagate spontaneously into the region of preseismic non-dilatant deformation. PSC weakens the fault against slow deformation and thus such a region cannot produce a dynamic stress drop. Dynamic rupture propagation further down

  3. What shall I do now? State-dependent variations of life-history traits with aging in Wandering Albatrosses

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Deborah; Barbraud, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Allocation decisions depend on an organism's condition which can change with age. Two opposite changes in life-history traits are predicted in the presence of senescence: either an increase in breeding performance in late age associated with terminal investment or a decrease due to either life-history trade-offs between current breeding and future survival or decreased efficiency at old age. Age variation in several life-history traits has been detected in a number of species, and demographic performances of individuals in a given year are influenced by their reproductive state the previous year. Few studies have, however, examined state-dependent variation in life-history traits with aging, and they focused mainly on a dichotomy of successful versus failed breeding and non-breeding birds. Using a 50-year dataset on the long-lived quasi-biennial breeding wandering albatross, we investigated variations in life-history traits with aging according to a gradient of states corresponding to potential costs of reproduction the previous year (in ascending order): non-breeding birds staying at sea or present at breeding grounds, breeding birds that failed early, late or were successful. We used multistate models to study survival and decompose reproduction into four components (probabilities of return, breeding, hatching, and fledging), while accounting for imperfect detection. Our results suggest the possible existence of two strategies in the population: strict biennial breeders that exhibited almost no reproductive senescence and quasi-biennial breeders that showed an increased breeding frequency with a strong and moderate senescence on hatching and fledging probabilities, respectively. The patterns observed on survival were contrary to our predictions, suggesting an influence of individual quality rather than trade-offs between reproduction and survival at late ages. This work represents a step further into understanding the evolutionary ecology of senescence and its

  4. A comparison of presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic agonists on inhibitory control performance in rats perinatally exposed to PCBs.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Abby E; Miller, Mellessa M; Nelms Sprowles, Jenna L; Levine, Lauren R; Sable, Helen J K

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) are very stable environmental contaminants whose exposure induces a number of health and cognitive concerns. Currently, it is well known that PCB exposure leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. It is also well known that dopamine (DA) depletion within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. However, what is not well established is whether or not the inhibitory control problems found following PCB exposure are mediated by DA depletion in mPFC. This study was an investigation into the link between perinatal exposure to PCBs, the effect of this exposure on DA neurotransmission in the mPFC, and inhibitory-control problems during adulthood using a rodent model. The current study served to determine if microinjections of different DA agonists (the presynaptic DA transporter inhibitor and vesicular monoamine transporter agonist bupropion, the postsynaptic DA receptor 2 (DAD2) agonist quinpirole, and the postsynaptic DA receptor 1 (DAD1) agonist SKF81297) directly into the mPFC would differentially improve performance on an inhibitory control task in rats perinatally exposed to an environmentally relevant PCB mixture. Findings suggest several significant sex-based differences on differential reinforcement of low rates (DRL) 15 performance as well as some evidence of differential effectiveness of the DA agonists based on PCB exposure group. PMID:26022001

  5. Subtle alterations of excitatory transmission are linked to presynaptic changes in the hippocampus of PINK1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Feligioni, Marco; Mango, Dalila; Piccinin, Sonia; Imbriani, Paola; Iannuzzi, Filomena; Caruso, Alessandra; De Angelis, Francesca; Blandini, Fabio; Mercuri, Nicola B; Pisani, Antonio; Nisticò, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Homozygous or heterozygous mutations in the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene have been linked to early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Several neurophysiological studies have demonstrated alterations in striatal synaptic plasticity along with impaired dopamine release in PINK1-deficient mice. Using electrophysiological methods, here we show that PINK1 loss of function causes a progressive increase of spontaneous glutamate-mediated synaptic events in the hippocampus, without influencing long-term potentiation. Moreover, fluorescence analysis reveals increased neurotrasmitter release although our biochemical results failed to detect which presynaptic proteins might be engaged. This study provides a novel role for PINK1 beyond the physiology of nigrostriatal dopaminergic circuit. Specifically, PINK1 might contribute to preserve synaptic function and glutamatergic homeostasis in the hippocampus, a brain region underlying cognition. The subtle changes in excitatory transmission here observed might be a pathogenic precursor to excitotoxic neurodegeneration and cognitive decline often observed in PD. Using electrophysiological and fluorescence techniques, we demonstrate that lack of PINK1 causes increased excitatory transmission and neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus, which might lead to the cognitive decline often observed in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26850695

  6. A Comparison of Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Dopaminergic Agonists on Inhibitory Control Performance in Rats Perinatally Exposed to PCBs

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Abby E.; Miller, Mellessa M.; Nelms Sprowles, Jenna L.; Levine, Lauren R.; Sable, Helen J. K.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) are very stable environmental contaminants whose exposure induces a number of health and cognitive concerns. Currently, it is well known that PCB exposure leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. It is also well known that dopamine (DA) depletion within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. However, what is not well established is whether or not the inhibitory control problems found following PCB exposure are mediated by DA depletion in mPFC. This study was an investigation into the link between perinatal exposure to PCBs, the effect of this exposure on DA neurotransmission in the mPFC, and inhibitory-control problems during adulthood using a rodent model. The current study served to determine if microinjections of different DA agonists (the presynaptic DA transporter inhibitor and vesicular monoamine transporter agonist bupropion, the postsynaptic DA receptor 2 (DAD2) agonist quinpirole, and the postsynaptic DA receptor 1 (DAD1) agonist SKF81297) directly into the mPFC would differentially improve performance on an inhibitory control task in rats perinatally exposed to an environmentally relevant PCB mixture. Findings suggest several significant sex-based differences on differential reinforcement of low rates (DRL) 15 performance as well as some evidence of differential effectiveness of the DA agonists based on PCB exposure group. PMID:26022001

  7. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Facilitate Vesicle Endocytosis by Increasing Presynaptic Calcium Channel Expression at a Central Synapse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Cheng; Ge, Jian-Long; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Hao, Mei; Wu, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yi-An; La, Ting; Yao, Pan-Tong; Mei, Yan-Ai; Feng, Yi; Xue, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests significant biological effects caused by extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF). Although exo-endocytosis plays crucial physical and biological roles in neuronal communication, studies on how ELF-EMF regulates this process are scarce. By directly measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance at a large mammalian central nervous synapse, the calyx of Held, we report for the first time that ELF-EMF critically affects synaptic transmission and plasticity. Exposure to ELF-EMF for 8 to 10 days dramatically increases the calcium influx upon stimulation and facilitates all forms of vesicle endocytosis, including slow and rapid endocytosis, endocytosis overshoot and bulk endocytosis, but does not affect the RRP size and exocytosis. Exposure to ELF-EMF also potentiates PTP, a form of short-term plasticity, increasing its peak amplitude without impacting its time course. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms and found that calcium channel expression, including the P/Q, N, and R subtypes, at the presynaptic nerve terminal was enhanced, accounting for the increased calcium influx upon stimulation. Thus, we conclude that exposure to ELF-EMF facilitates vesicle endocytosis and synaptic plasticity in a calcium-dependent manner by increasing calcium channel expression at the nerve terminal. PMID:26887777

  8. LRRK2 overexpression alters glutamatergic presynaptic plasticity, striatal dopamine tone, postsynaptic signal transduction, motor activity and memory.

    PubMed

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N; Paschall, Sarah A; Tatarnikov, Igor; Co, Kimberley; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Bergeron, Sabrina; Mitchell, Emma; Han, Heather; Melrose, Heather L; Tapia, Lucia; Raymond, Lynn A; Farrer, Matthew J; Milnerwood, Austen J

    2015-03-01

    Mutations