Science.gov

Sample records for stellar cusp formation

  1. Beach-cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

  2. HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION INTEGRAL-FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF THE GALAXY'S NUCLEAR CLUSTER: A MISSING STELLAR CUSP?

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Larkin, J.; Lu, J. R.; Matthews, K.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the structure of the nuclear star cluster in the innermost 0.16 pc of the Galaxy as measured by the number density profile of late-type giants. Using laser guide star adaptive optics in conjunction with the integral field spectrograph, OSIRIS, at the Keck II telescope, we are able to differentiate between the older, late-type (approx 1 Gyr) stars, which are presumed to be dynamically relaxed, and the unrelaxed young (approx 6 Myr) population. This distinction is crucial for testing models of stellar cusp formation in the vicinity of a black hole, as the models assume that the cusp stars are in dynamical equilibrium in the black hole potential. In the survey region, we classified 60 stars as early-type (22 newly identified) and 74 stars as late-type (61 newly identified). We find that contamination from young stars is significant, with more than twice as many young stars as old stars in our sensitivity range (K' < 15.5) within the central arcsecond. Based on the late-type stars alone, the surface stellar number density profile, SIGMA(R) propor to R {sup -G}AMMA, is flat, with GAMMA = -0.27 +- 0.19. Monte Carlo simulations of the possible de-projected volume density profile, n(r) propor tor {sup -g}amma, show that gamma is less than 1.0 at the 99.7% confidence level. These results are consistent with the nuclear star cluster having no cusp, with a core profile that is significantly flatter than that predicted by most cusp formation theories, and even allows for the presence of a central hole in the stellar distribution. Of the possible dynamical interactions that can lead to the depletion of the red giants observable in this survey-stellar collisions, mass segregation from stellar remnants, or a recent merger event-mass segregation is the only one that can be ruled out as the dominant depletion mechanism. The lack of a stellar cusp around a supermassive black hole would have important implications for black hole growth models and inferences on the

  3. Cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, T.; Sekiguchi, T.

    1983-12-01

    The Institute of Plasma Physics at Nagoya and the Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, discuss the Radio-Frequency-Plugged-Cusp (RFC-XX). The objective of the Radio-Frequency-Confinement Program is to study high-beta plasma confinement in a linear, axisymmetric, impurity-free double-cusp geometry, as an extension of its predecessor TPD-III, a single-cusp device. The apparatus of the RFC-XX is described and shown in a schematic diagram. Main results and major physical achievments are listed and experimental subjects in progress and a program plan are given. The High-Beta Double and Triple Cusp plasma confinement experiments are giving new results by substantially lengthening the period of high beta.

  4. The Stellar Cusp in the Galactic Center: Three-Dimensional Orbits of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Samantha; Ghez, Andrea M.; Boehle, Anna; Yelda, Sylvana; Sitarski, Breann; Witzel, Gunther; Do, Tuan; Lu, Jessica R.; Morris, Mark; Becklin, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    We present new findings from our long term study of the nuclear star cluster around the Galaxy's central supermassive blackhole (SMBH). Measurements where made using speckle and laser guided adaptive optics imaging and integral field spectroscopy on the Keck telescopes. We report 13 new measurable accelerating sources around the SMBH, down to ~17 mag in K band, only 4 of which are known to be young stars, the rest are either known to be old stars or have yet to be spectral typed. Thus we more than double the number of measured accelerations for the known old stars and unknown spectral type population (increasing the number from 6 to 15). Previous observations suggest a flat density profile of late-type stars, contrary to the theorized Bahcall-Wolf cusp (Bahcall & Wolf 1976, 1977; Buchholz et al. 2009; Do et al. 2009; Bartko et al. 2010). With three-dimensional orbits of significantly accelerating sources, we will be able to better characterize the stellar cusp in the Galactic center, including the slope of the stellar density profile.

  5. A field data assessment of contemporary models of beach cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.R.; Psuty, N.P.; Bauer, B.O.; Carter, R.W.G.

    1996-01-01

    Cusp formation was observed during an instrumented, daily profiled, time series of a reflective beach in Canaveral National Seashore, Florida on January 5, 1988. The monitored cusp embayment formed by erosion of the foreshore and the cusp series had a mean spacing of approximately 28 m. During this time, inshore fluid flows were dominated by two standing edge waves at frequencies of 0.06 Hz (primary) and 0.035 Hz (secondary) whereas incident waves were broadbanded at 0.12-0.16 Hz. Directly measured flows (and indirectly estimated swash excursion) data support both the standing wave subharmonic model and the self-organization model of cusp formation in this study.

  6. The removal of cusps from galaxy centres by stellar feedback in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Couchman, H M P; Wadsley, James

    2006-08-01

    The standard cosmological model, now strongly constrained by direct observations of the Universe at early epochs, is very successful in describing the evolution of structure on large and intermediate scales. Unfortunately, serious contradictions remain on smaller, galactic scales. Among the main small-scale problems is a significant and persistent discrepancy between observations of nearby galaxies, which imply that galactic dark matter haloes have a density profile with a flat core, and the cosmological model, which predicts that the haloes should have divergent density (a cusp) at the centre. Here we report numerical simulations that show that random bulk motions of gas in small primordial galaxies, of the magnitude expected in these systems, will result in a flattening of the central dark matter cusp on relatively short timescales (approximately 10(8) years). Gas bulk motions in early galaxies are driven by supernova explosions that result from ongoing star formation. Our mechanism is general, and would have operated in all star-forming galaxies at redshifts z > or = 10. Once removed, the cusp cannot be reintroduced during the subsequent mergers involved in the build-up of larger galaxies. As a consequence, in the present Universe both small and large galaxies would have flat dark matter core density profiles, in agreement with observations. PMID:16885978

  7. Beach cusp destruction, formation, and evolution during and subsequent to an extratropical storm, Duck, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Miller, S.M.O.; Torzynski, C.A.; Kochel, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Many studies have debated whether beach cusps are erosional or depositional features. The April 12-14, 1988, extratropical storm provided an opportunity to view the direct effects of one of the largest storms of the past decade upon beach sedimentology and morphology on barrier islands near Duck, North Carolina. Prior to the storm, the beach at Duck was characterized by a well-defined pattern of beach cusps with horn-to-horn spacings averaging 35 m. Storm-induced alterations were dominated by an initial period of beach erosion that remobilized the upper 30 to 50 cm of beach sediment, followed by aggradation. Net aggradation was most prominent along the middle beachface and within the pre-storm cusp bays. These morphologic adjustments resulted in the destruction of cusps, which were replaced with a post-storm planar beachface composed of horizontally bedded fine- to coarse-grained sediments. Within 24 hrs of storm subsidence, new beach cusps formed sequentially along the coast in the direction of longshore transport. Initial cusp formation resulted from beach erosion and the creation of bays in the planar storm-beach surface at positions of preferential post-storm runup. The initial cusp horns were composed of truncated horizontal beds of the planar beach accreted during the storm. After their formation, the cusps sequentially migrated downdrift. Migrating horns were composed of a coarse-grained sediment wedge that thickened toward horn crests, suggesting formation by deposition. It is concluded from these observations that beach cusps are both erosional and depositional in nature.

  8. Study of the electric field formation in a multi-cusped magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui Yu, Daren; Wu, Huan; Zhao, Yinjian; Ma, Chengyu; Wang, Di; Wei, Haoyu

    2014-09-15

    The multi-cusped field thruster is a kind of electric thruster adopting a cusped magnetic field to achieve a potentially longer lifetime. It is observed in some experiments that the main electric potential drop forms near the exhaust plane, but the formation mechanism of the electric field in this kind of thrusters is not fully clear yet. Based on the analysis of the electron movement, a 2D Particle-in-Cell plus Monte Carlo model is built to reveal the difference of the constraint to electrons between the central leak path and the lateral region of the thruster. Electron trajectories from cathode are analyzed furthermore. It is found that the central leak path inside the discharge channel may play a significant role in the formation of the main electric potential drop near the exhaust plane.

  9. Formation of molecular lines in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkle, K. H.; Lambert, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Statistical equilibrium of electronic states of diatomic molecules in stellar atmospheres is examined. Atmospheres discussed are representative of the sun, Arcturus (K-giant) and Betelgeuse (M-supergiant). A comparison of the relative collisional and radiative contributions to the equilibrium of the ground electronic state shows that this state is collisionally controlled and that the line source function for vibration-rotation transitions within this state is equivalent to the Planck function. Examination of the equilibrium for excited electronic states demonstrates that the exchange between these states and the ground electronic state is most probably determined by radiative excitation. This result implies that scattering rather than pure absorption is the appropriate mechanism for the formation of lines belonging to these electronic transitions. The scattering hypothesis is given a preliminary check against solar observations. Areas for future investigations are outlined.

  10. FUEL EFFICIENT GALAXIES: SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Samuel N.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2011-06-10

    We examine the importance of secular stellar mass loss for fueling ongoing star formation in disk galaxies during the late stages of their evolution. For a galaxy of a given stellar mass, we calculate the total mass loss rate of its entire stellar population using star formation histories derived from the observed evolution of the M{sub *}-star formation rate (SFR) relation, along with the predictions of standard stellar evolution models for stellar mass loss for a variety of initial stellar mass functions. Our model shows that recycled gas from stellar mass loss can provide most or all of the fuel required to sustain the current level of star formation in late-type galaxies. Stellar mass loss can therefore remove the tension between the low gas infall rates that are derived from observations and the relatively rapid star formation occurring in disk galaxies. For galaxies where cold gas infall rates have been estimated, we demonstrate explicitly that stellar mass loss can account for most of the deficit between their SFR and infall rate.

  11. Stellar halos: a rosetta stone for galaxy formation and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis Read, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos make up about a percent of the total stellar mass in galaxies. Yet their old age and long phase mixing times make them living fossil records of galactic history. In this talk, I review the latest simulations of structure formation in our standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmology. I discuss the latest predictions for stellar halos and the relationship between the stellar halo light and the underlying dark matter. Finally, I discuss how these simulations compare to observations of the Milky Way and Andromeda and, ultimately, what this means for our cosmological model and the formation history of the Galaxy.

  12. Stellar feedback in dwarf galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P

    2008-01-11

    Dwarf galaxies pose substantial challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark-matter density that is divergent at the center, which is in sharp contrast with observations that indicate a core of roughly constant density. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motions of the interstellar gas, resulting in substantial gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations. PMID:18048653

  13. Stellar Chemical Signatures and Hierarchical Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Irwin, Mike; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Tout, Christopher A.; Hill, Vanessa; Tolstoy, Eline

    2004-09-01

    To compare the chemistries of stars in the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxies with stars in the Galaxy, we have compiled a large sample of Galactic stellar abundances from the literature. When kinematic information is available, we have assigned the stars to standard Galactic components through Bayesian classification based on Gaussian velocity ellipsoids. As found in previous studies, the [α/Fe] ratios of most stars in the dSph galaxies are generally lower than similar metallicity Galactic stars in this extended sample. Our kinematically selected stars confirm this for the Galactic halo, thin-disk, and thick-disk components. There is marginal overlap in the low [α/Fe] ratios between dSph stars and Galactic halo stars on extreme retrograde orbits (V<-420 km s-1), but this is not supported by other element ratios. Other element ratios compared in this paper include r- and s-process abundances, where we find a significant offset in the [Y/Fe] ratios, which results in a large overabundance in [Ba/Y] in most dSph stars compared with Galactic stars. Thus, the chemical signatures of most of the dSph stars are distinct from the stars in each of the kinematic components of the Galaxy. This result rules out continuous merging of low-mass galaxies similar to these dSph satellites during the formation of the Galaxy. However, we do not rule out very early merging of low-mass dwarf galaxies, since up to one-half of the most metal-poor stars ([Fe/H]<=-1.8) have chemistries that are in fair agreement with Galactic halo stars. We also do not rule out merging with higher mass galaxies, although we note that the LMC and the remnants of the Sgr dwarf galaxy are also chemically distinct from the majority of the Galactic halo stars. Formation of the Galaxy's thick disk by heating of an old thin disk during a merger is also not ruled out; however, the Galaxy's thick disk itself cannot be comprised of the remnants from a low-mass (dSph) dwarf galaxy, nor of a high

  14. Formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dengkai

    2014-09-01

    Observations reveal the presence of multiple stellar populations (MSPs) in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in their Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams. We present a scenario for the formation of MSPs in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the anomalous-abundance stars observed in GCs are the merged and accreted stars produced by binary interactions, which are rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation. A stellar population with binaries can reproduce two important observational pieces of evidence of MSPs, the Na-O anticorrelation and the multiple sequences in the HR diagram.

  15. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ∼ 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  16. Evidences for Black Hole Formation by Complete Stellar Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, Igor Felix

    2016-07-01

    One of the most critical parameters that determines the formation of binary black holes is the range of masses of black holes that may form by direct collapse, namely, with no energetic supernova kicks that would unbound the stellar binary. Theoretical models set mass ranges and limits for black hole formation through the complete collapse of the stellar progenitor. However, observational constraints for those mass limits have been elusive. Since the velocity of a stellar black hole encodes the history of its formation and evolution, it may provide observational constraints on the strength of kicks by natal supernova explosions in the formation of the black hole. Based on the motion in three dimensions of five black hole binaries in our Galaxy it is found that the three black holes with < 10 solar masses are runaway black hole binaries due to kicks from natal supernovae, whereas the two black holes with 10 to 15 solar masses remained in their birth place and must have been form by complete or almost complete collapse of the progenitor star. These observations show that there may be binary black holes with components having masses as low as 10 solar masses, which suggests that a significant fraction of massive stellar binaries would end as black hole binaries that would produce a large stochastic gravitational-wave background.

  17. Stellar halos and the link to galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmi, Amina

    2016-08-01

    I present a brief overview of how stellar halos may be used to constrain the process of galaxy formation. In particular, streams and substructure in stellar halos trace merger events but can also be used to determine the mass distribution of the host galaxy and hence put constraints on the nature of dark matter. Much of the focus of this contribution is on the Milky Way, but I also present an attempt to understand the kinematics of the globular cluster system of M31.

  18. Galaxies on FIRE: Stellar Feedback Explains Inefficient Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-06-01

    Many of the most fundamental unsolved questions in star and galaxy formation revolve around star formation and "feedback" from both massive stars and accretion onto super-massive black holes. I'll present new simulations which attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from stellar radiation pressure, supernovae, stellar winds, and photo-ionization. These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law and the global inefficiency of star formation -- the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, their behavior in galaxy mergers, and structure of the inter-galactic medium: these winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches.

  19. Stellar velocity dispersion in dissipative galaxy mergers with star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Stickley, Nathaniel R.; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    In order to better understand stellar dynamics in merging systems, such as NGC 6240, we examine the evolution of central stellar velocity dispersion (σ{sub *}) in dissipative galaxy mergers using a suite of binary disk merger simulations that include feedback from stellar formation and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that σ{sub *} undergoes the same general stages of evolution that were observed in our previous dissipationless simulations: coherent oscillation, then phase mixing, followed by dynamical equilibrium. We also find that measurements of σ{sub *} that are based only upon the youngest stars in simulations consistently yield lower values than measurements based upon the total stellar population. This finding appears to be consistent with the so-called 'σ{sub *} discrepancy', observed in real galaxies. We note that quasar-level AGN activity is much more likely to occur when σ{sub *} is near its equilibrium value rather than during periods of extreme σ{sub *}. Finally, we provide estimates of the scatter inherent in measuring σ{sub *} in ongoing mergers.

  20. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Center super-massive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. Following an analytical approach, we explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of identical stellar winds via the Non-Linear Thin Shell Instability. We have found that the collision of relatively slow (<750 km s^{-1}) and strong (˜10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<2000 AU) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, however close binaries, such as IRS 16SW, are promising clump sources (see Calderón et al. 2016). We also present the first results of 2D models of colliding wind systems using the hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, aiming to obtain a clump mass function, and the rate of clump formation and ejection to the ISM. We study the effect of parameters such as wind properties, stellar separation and orbital motion, in order to understand how likely the formation of G2 is in this context.

  1. Galactic flows and the formation of stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the formation of stellar clusters from a Galactic scale SPH simulation. The simulation traces star formation over a 5 Myr timescale, with local gravitational instabilities resulting in ˜ 105 solar masses of star formation in the form of sink particles. The large scale flow dominates the compression from low densities before self-gravity takes over in higher density regions. We investigate the time evolution of the physical properties of the forming clusters including their half-mass radii, their energies and the depletion time of the gas.We show that the more massive clusters (up to ˜ 2 × 104 solar masses) gather their material from of order 10 pc due to the large scale motions associated with the spiral arm passage and shock. The bulk of the gas becomes gravitationally bound near 1-2 Myr before sink formation, and in the absence of feedback, significant accretion ongoing on longer timescales.

  2. The Energetics of Cusp Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Aaron J.; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2015-06-01

    We present a new analytic estimate for the energy required to create a constant density core within a dark matter halo that, based on more realistic assumptions, leads to demands that are orders of magnitude lower than claimed in earlier works. We define a core size based on the logarithmic slope of the dark matter density profile as it is insensitive to the functional form used to fit observed data. The energy required to form a core sensitively depends on the radial scale over which dark matter within the cusp is redistributed within the halo. Simulations indicate that within a region in size comparable to the active star forming regions of the central galaxy inhabiting a halo, dark matter particles have their orbits radially increased by a factor of 2-3 during core formation. Thus, the inner properties of the dark matter halo set the energy requirements. The energy cost increases slowly with halo mass as {M}{h} {}0.3{-0.7} for core sizes ≲1 kpc. We use the expected star formation history for a given halo mass to predict dwarf galaxy core sizes. We find that supernovae alone would create well over 4 kpc cores in 1010 M{}⊙ galaxies if 100% of the energy were transferred to dark matter particle orbits. We can directly constrain the efficiency factor by studying galaxies with known stellar content and core size. We find that the efficiency of coupling between stellar feedback and dark matter orbital energy need only be ≲1% to explain Fornax’s 1 kpc core.

  3. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  4. STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J. E.

    2010-11-20

    The solar photosphere is depleted in refractory elements compared to most solar twins, with the degree of depletion increasing with an element's condensation temperature. Here, I show that adding 4 Earth masses of Earth-like and carbonaceous-chondrite-like material to the solar convection zone brings the Sun's composition into line with the mean value for the solar twins. The observed solar composition could have arisen if the Sun's convection zone accreted material from the solar nebula that was depleted in refractory elements due to the formation of the terrestrial planets and ejection of rocky protoplanets from the asteroid belt. Most solar analogs are missing 0-10 Earth masses of rocky material compared to the most refractory-rich stars, providing an upper limit to the mass of rocky terrestrial planets that they possess. The missing mass is correlated with stellar metallicity. This suggests that the efficiency of planetesimal formation increases with stellar metallicity. Stars with and without known giant planets show a similar distribution of abundance trends. If refractory depletion is a signature of the presence of terrestrial planets, this suggests that there is not a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial and giant planets in the same system.

  5. ON THE FORMATION OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Charlie, Conroy; Spergel, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all globular clusters (GCs) studied to date show evidence for multiple stellar populations, in stark contrast to the conventional view that GCs are a mono-metallic, coeval population of stars. This generic feature must therefore emerge naturally within massive star cluster formation. Building on earlier work, we propose a simple physical model for the early evolution (several 10{sup 8} yr) of GCs. We consider the effects of stellar mass loss, Type II supernovae (SNe II) and prompt Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), ram pressure, and accretion from the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) on the development of a young GC's own gas reservoir. In our model, SNe II from a first generation of star formation clears the GC of its initial gas reservoir. Over the next several 10{sup 8} yr, mass lost from asymptotic giant branch stars and matter accreted from the ambient ISM collect at the center of the GC. This material must remain quite cool (T {approx} 10{sup 2} K), but does not catastrophically cool on a crossing time because of the high Lyman-Werner flux density in young GCs. The collection of gas within the GC must compete with ram pressure from the ambient ISM. After several 10{sup 8} yr, the Lyman-Werner photon flux density drops by more than three orders of magnitude, allowing molecular hydrogen and then stars to form. After this second generation of star formation, SNe II from the second generation and then prompt SNe Ia associated with the first generation maintain a gas-free GC, thereby ending the cycle of star formation events. Our model makes clear predictions for the presence or absence of multiple stellar populations within GCs as a function of GC mass and formation environment. While providing a natural explanation for the approximately equal number of first- and second-generation stars in GCs, substantial accretion from the ambient ISM may produce fewer chemically peculiar second-generation stars than are observed. Analyzing intermediate-age LMC clusters, we

  6. Influence of pions and hyperons on stellar black hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Bruno; Oertel, Micaela; Novak, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    We present numerical simulations of stellar core collapse with spherically symmetric, general relativistic hydrodynamics up to black hole formation. Using the CoCoNuT code, with a newly developed grey leakage scheme for the neutrino treatment, we investigate the effects of including pions and Λ hyperons into the equation of state at high densities and temperatures on the black hole formation process. Results show non-negligible differences between the models with reference equation of state without any additional particles and models with the extended ones. For the latter, the maximum masses supported by the proto-neutron star are smaller and the collapse to a black hole occurs earlier. A phase transition to hyperonic matter is observed when the progenitor allows for a high enough accretion rate onto the proto-neutron star. Rough estimates of neutrino luminosity from these collapses are given, too.

  7. Effect of Stellar Encounters on Comet Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, A.; Kokubo, E.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated the effect of stellar encounters on the formation and disruption of the Oort cloud using the classical impulse approximation. We calculate the evolution of a planetesimal disk into a spherical Oort cloud due to the perturbation from passing stars for 10 Gyr. We obtain the empirical fits of the e-folding time for the number of Oort cloud comets using the standard exponential and Kohlrausch formulae as functions of the stellar parameters and the initial semimajor axes of planetesimals. The e-folding time and the evolution timescales of the orbital elements are also analytically derived. In some calculations, the effect of the Galactic tide is additionally considered. We also show the radial variations of the e-folding times to the Oort cloud. From these timescales, we show that if the initial planetesimal disk has the semimajor axes distribution {dn}/{da}\\propto {a}-2, which is produced by planetary scattering, the e-folding time for planetesimals in the Oort cloud is ∼10 Gyr at any heliocentric distance r. This uniform e-folding time over the Oort cloud means that the supply of comets from the inner Oort cloud to the outer Oort cloud is sufficiently effective to keep the comet distribution as {dn}/{dr}\\propto {r}-2. We also show that the final distribution of the semimajor axes in the Oort cloud is approximately proportional to {a}-2 for any initial distribution.

  8. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, D.; Ballone, A.; Cuadra, J.; Schartmann, M.; Burkert, A.; Gillessen, S.

    2016-02-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Centre supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. We explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of stellar winds via the non-linear thin shell instability. Following an analytical approach, we study the thermal evolution of slabs formed in the symmetric collision of winds, evaluating whether instabilities occur, and estimating possible clump masses. We find that the collision of relatively slow (≲750 km s-1) and strong (˜10-5 M⊙ yr-1) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<10 mpc) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their known orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, making this process a possible but unlikely origin for G2. We also discuss clump formation in close binaries such as IRS 16SW and in asymmetric encounters as promising alternatives that deserve further numerical study.

  9. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  10. Why stellar feedback promotes disc formation in simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übler, Hannah; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Aumer, Michael; Sales, Laura V.; White, Simon D. M.

    2014-09-01

    We study how feedback influences baryon infall on to galaxies using cosmological, zoom-in simulations of haloes with present mass Mvir = 6.9 × 1011 to 1.7 × 1012 M⊙. Starting at z = 4 from identical initial conditions, implementations of weak and strong stellar feedback produce bulge- and disc-dominated galaxies, respectively. Strong feedback favours disc formation: (1) because conversion of gas into stars is suppressed at early times, as required by abundance matching arguments, resulting in flat star formation histories and higher gas fractions; (2) because 50 per cent of the stars form in situ from recycled disc gas with angular momentum only weakly related to that of the z = 0 dark halo; (3) because late-time gas accretion is typically an order of magnitude stronger and has higher specific angular momentum, with recycled gas dominating over primordial infall; (4) because 25-30 per cent of the total accreted gas is ejected entirely before z ˜ 1, removing primarily low angular momentum material which enriches the nearby intergalactic medium. Most recycled gas roughly conserves its angular momentum, but material ejected for long times and to large radii can gain significant angular momentum before re-accretion. These processes lower galaxy formation efficiency in addition to promoting disc formation.

  11. Formation and stellar spin-orbit misalignment of hot Jupiters from Lidov-Kozai oscillations in stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kassandra R.; Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Observed hot Jupiter (HJ) systems exhibit a wide range of stellar spin-orbit misalignment angles. This paper investigates the inward migration of giant planets due to Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations induced by a distant stellar companion. We conduct a large population synthesis study, including the octupole gravitational potential from the stellar companion, mutual precession of the host stellar spin axis and planet orbital axis, tidal dissipation in the planet and stellar spin-down in the host star due to magnetic braking. We consider a range of planet masses (0.3-5 MJ) and initial semimajor axes (1-5 au), different properties for the host star, and varying tidal dissipation strengths. The fraction of systems that result in HJs depends on planet mass and stellar type, with fHJ = 1-4 per cent (depending on tidal dissipation strength) for Mp = 1 MJ, and larger (up to 8 per cent) for more massive planets. The production efficiency of `hot Saturns' (Mp = 0.3MJ) is much lower, because most migrating planets are tidally disrupted. We find that the fraction of systems that result in either HJ formation or tidal disruption, fmig ≃ 11-14 per cent is roughly constant, having little variation with planet mass, stellar type and tidal dissipation strength. The distribution of final HJ stellar obliquities exhibits a complex dependence on the planet mass and stellar type. For Mp = (1-3)MJ, the distribution is always bimodal, with peaks around 30° and 130°. The distribution for 5MJ planets depends on host stellar type, with a preference for low obliquities for solar-type stars, and higher obliquities for more massive (1.4 M⊙) stars.

  12. Planet formation in multiple stellar systems: GG Tau A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Köhler, R.; Piétu, V.

    2014-12-01

    GG Tau is a hierarchical quadruple system of young, low-mass stars. Because of its well-studied bright circumbinary ring of dust and gas surrounding the main binary GG Tau A, it is a unique laboratory to study planet formation in the disturbed environment of binary/multiple stellar systems. We have started a large observing program of GG Tau A that combines several high-resolution instruments in a multi-wavelength approach. We have recently reported the detection of a new low-mass companion in GG Tau A that turns out to itself be a triple system. This discovery was possible thanks to the very high angular resolution of the near-IR instrument PIONIER on the VLT interferometer, and was confirmed with sub-aperture masking techniques on VLT/NaCo. The detected close binary GG Tau Ab (ρ = 0.032'', or about 5 AU) provides a natural explanation for two enigmas: the discrepancy between the dynamical mass and the spectral type estimates in GG Tau A, and the absence of dust thermal emission in the vicinity of the Ab component. GRAVITY will provide the adequate angular resolution to complete the astrometric characterization of the close binary in the next 10 years. With now 5 coeval low-mass stars, GG Tau is an ideal laboratory to calibrate stellar evolution tracks at young ages (few Myr). Beyond this peculiar system, GRAVITY also has a strong potential to study the impact of multiplicity on the existence of disks, and in fine on planet formation mechanisms in multiple systems.

  13. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Fayolle, Edith C.; Reiter, John B.; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-02-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T ≈ 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics - CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO - in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history.

  14. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history. PMID:25302375

  15. Formation of the first galaxies under Population III stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Myoungwon

    2015-01-01

    will discuss key physical quantities of the first galaxies derived from our simulations, such as their stellar population mix, star formation rates, metallicities, and resulting broad-band color and recombination spectra.

  16. The Role of Stellar Feedback in the Formation of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Klypin, Anatoly

    2009-04-01

    Although supernova (SN) explosions and stellar winds happen at very small scales, they affect the interstellar medium (ISM) at galactic scales and regulate the formation of a whole galaxy. Previous attempts of mimicking these effects in simulations of galaxy formation use very simplified assumptions. We develop a much more realistic prescription for modeling the feedback, which minimizes any ad hoc subgrid physics. We start with developing high-resolution models of the ISM and formulate the conditions required for its realistic functionality: formation of multiphase medium with hot chimneys, superbubbles, cold molecular phase, and very slow consumption of gas. We find that this can be achieved only by doing what the real universe does: formation of dense (>10 H atoms cm-3), cold (T ≈ 100 K) molecular phase, where the star formation happens, and which young stars disrup. Another important ingredient is the effect of runaway stars: massive binary stars ejected from molecular clouds when one of the companions becomes an SN. Those stars can move to 10-100 pc away from molecular clouds before exploding themselves as SNe. This greatly facilitates the feedback. Once those effects are implemented into cosmological simulations, galaxy formation proceeds more realistically. For example, we do not have the overcooling problem. The angular momentum problem (resulting in a too massive bulge) is also reduced substantially: the rotation curves are nearly flat. The galaxy formation also becomes more violent. Just as often observed in quasar absorption lines, there are substantial outflows from forming and active galaxies. At high redshifts we routinely find gas with few hundred km s-1 and occasionally 1000-2000 km s-1. The gas has high metallicity, which may exceed the solar metallicity. The temperature of the gas in the outflows and in chimneys can be very high: T = 107-108 K. The density profile of dark matter is still consistent with a cuspy profile. The simulations reproduce

  17. Initiating solar system formation through stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Myhill, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and other meteoritical components require nucleosynthesis in stellar interiors, condensation into dust grains in stellar envelopes, transport of the grains through the interstellar medium by stellar outflows, and finally injection of the grains into the presolar nebula. The proximity of the presolar cloud to these energetic stellar events suggests that a shock wave from a stellar outflow might have initiated the collapse of an otherwise stable presolar cloud. We have begun to study the interactions of stellar shock waves with thermally supported, dense molecular cloud cores, using a three spatial dimension (3D) radiative hydrodynamics code. Supernova shock waves have been shown by others to destroy quiescent clouds, so we are trying to determine if the much smaller shock speeds found in, e.g., asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star winds, are strong enough to initiate collapse in an otherwise stable, rotating, solar-mass cloud core, without leading to destruction of the cloud.

  18. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  19. Prevalence and characteristics of talon cusps in Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Yeliz; Kasimoglu, Yelda; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Gencay, Koray; Aktoren, Oya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Talon cusp is a rare dental anomaly characterized by a cusp-like projection, often including the palatal surface of the affected tooth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of talon cusps in a group of Turkish children. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 14,400 subjects who attended the clinics of the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. Subjects ranged in age from 1 to 14 years with a mean age of 10.5 ± 2.55 years. Talon cusps were mainly categorized by visual examination according to the classification of Hattab et al. The distribution and frequency of talon cusps were calculated with respect to dentition type, tooth type, talon type, the affected surface, associated dental anomalies, and clinical complications. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, frequencies, and crosstabs with Chi-square analysis. Results: Talon cusps were detected in 49 subjects (26 males and 23 females) of 14,400 (0.34%). A total of 108 teeth showed talon cusps. Distribution of talon cusps according to gender showed no statistically significant differences. The incidence of talon cusps was found to be greater in maxillary lateral incisors (53.7%) than central incisors (29.62%). Regarding the type of talon cusp, 47.22% of teeth showed a Type III talon cusp, whereas 30.55% of teeth demonstrated a Type II talon and 22.22% of teeth demonstrated a Type I talon cusp. Nine patients (18.36%) with talon cups also exhibited other developmental dental anomalies. Clinical complications associated with talon cusps were detected as caries formation and occlusal interference. Conclusion: This is the most comprehensive study of the prevalence of talon cusps in Turkish population using the largest sample size to date. Also, taurodontism associated with a talon cusp has been reported here for the 1st time. Clinical complications associated with talon cusps need more

  20. Cusps and spouts in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duboin, Aurélien; Malloggi, Florent; Monti, Fabrice; Tabeling, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    By injecting mineral oil (inner phase) and polymer solutions (outer phase), in a microfluidic flow focusing geometry, we observed the formation of cusps. These cusps undergo a transition from a steady state, to a thin cylindrical spout (oil in polymer). These oil spouts, do not touch the walls, and are surprisingly stable (they do not break into droplets). We study the nature of the cusp-spout transition, and find it is of first order. By taking advantage of the stability of the jet, we expect to synthesize micro-wires with this approach.

  1. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPIC STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF NEARBY DISKS: HINTS OF STELLAR MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yoachim, Peter; Roskar, Rok; Debattista, Victor P.

    2012-06-20

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) to observe 12 nearby disk galaxies. We successfully measure ages in the outer disk in six systems. In three cases (NGC 2684, NGC 6155, and NGC 7437), we find that a downward break in the disk surface brightness profile corresponds with a change in the dominant stellar population with the interior being dominated by active star formation and the exterior having older stellar populations that are best fit with star formation histories that decline with time. The observed increase in average stellar ages beyond a profile break is similar to theoretical models that predict surface brightness breaks are caused by stellar migration, with the outer disk being populated from scattered old interior stars. In three more cases (IC 1132, NGC 4904, and NGC 6691), we find no significant change in the stellar population as one crosses the break radius. In these galaxies, both the inner and outer disks are dominated by active star formation and younger stellar populations. While radial migration can contribute to the stellar populations beyond the break, it appears that more than one mechanism is required to explain all of our observed stellar profile breaks.

  2. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsi, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the absolute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional `box-in-a-star' model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI 777 nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  3. The study of electromagnetic cusp solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Deepa; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    2015-01-15

    The formation of a cusp structure in the envelope of electromagnetic solitons for electron-ion plasma at the ion wave breaking point has been shown by Farina and Bulanov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5289 (2001)]. The analytical form of the cusp structure has been obtained here. The analytical form of the cusp is shown to compare well with the exact numerically obtained solutions. Such cusp solitons occurring at the ion wave breaking point may have relevance to ion acceleration mechanism. In an effort towards studying the dynamical stability of such structures, the time evolution studies have been carried out which show that the structure survives for several plasma periods. However, ultimately it breaks apart due to the instability associated with the forward Raman scattering.

  4. Stellar collapse and the formation of black holes.

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, C. L.; Dupuis, R.

    2003-01-01

    We review the engines behind neutrino-driven supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. Combined with our understanding of the convection-enhanced, neutrino-driven supernova mechanism, the stellar collapse can explain all of the supernova-like explosions observed from normal supernovae, to weak explosions and jet-like hypernovae. Combining this theoretical understanding with observations suggests that the collapsar rate is roughly 1/1000th that of normal supernovae.

  5. Stellar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation.' As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules.' The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly-ionized oxygen atoms.

  6. Axion dark matter, solitons and the cusp-core problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.; Pop, Ana-Roxana

    2015-08-01

    Self-gravitating bosonic fields can support stable and localized (solitonic) field configurations. Such solitons should be ubiquitous in models of axion dark matter, with their characteristic mass and size depending on some inverse power of the axion mass, ma. Using a scaling symmetry and the uncertainty principle, the soliton core size can be related to the central density and axion mass in a universal way. Solitons have a constant central density due to pressure support, unlike the cuspy profile of cold dark matter (CDM). Consequently, solitons composed of ultralight axions (ULAs) may resolve the `cusp-core' problem of CDM. In dark matter (DM) haloes, thermodynamics will lead to a CDM-like Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile at large radii, with a central soliton core at small radii. Using Monte Carlo techniques to explore the possible density profiles of this form, a fit to stellar kinematical data of dwarf spheroidal galaxies is performed. The data favour cores, and show no preference concerning the NFW part of the halo. In order for ULAs to resolve the cusp-core problem (without recourse to baryon feedback, or other astrophysical effects) the axion mass must satisfy ma < 1.1 × 10-22 eV at 95 per cent C.L. However, ULAs with ma ≲ 1 × 10-22 eV are in some tension with cosmological structure formation. An axion solution to the cusp-core problem thus makes novel predictions for future measurements of the epoch of reionization. On the other hand, improved measurements of structure formation could soon impose a Catch 22 on axion/scalar field DM, similar to the case of warm DM.

  7. THE STELLAR POPULATION AND STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu; Gu Qiusheng E-mail: yugao@pmo.ac.cn

    2011-02-15

    We study stellar populations, star formation histories (SFHs), and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6. The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range of galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive stellar populations and reconstruct SFHs for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation, but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be up to 10 Gyr, while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to approximately three orders of magnitude younger ({approx}10 Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multiwavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The star formation rate (SFR) for our sample galaxies spans nearly three orders of magnitude, from a few 10{sup -3} to {approx}1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, with a median value of {approx}0.1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We find that about 90% of BCDs in our sample have their birthrate parameter (the ratio of the current SFR to the averaged past SFR) b>2-3. We further discuss correlations of the current SFR with the integrated galactic stellar mass and explore the connection between SFR and metallicity.

  8. On the configuration of the polar cusps in earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, G.-H.; Wolf, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and the earth's vacuum dipole field leads to the formation of a discontinuity called the magnetopause. In the standard picture, the magnetopause confines the magnetic field in such a manner that the polar cusp field lines originate from high latitudes in the dayside ionosphere and end at the two magnetic neutral points. Wu (1983, 1984) has questioned this standard picture of the polar cusp. MHD simulations indicate the existence of a current sheet above the polar cusp region, called 'the cusp current sheet' by Wu. Wu (1983) concluded that the difference between his cusp configuration and the standard picture is due to the fact that his geometry results from a plasma model, whereas the standard picture is based on a vacuum concept. In the present investigation, Wu's conclusion is questioned, and it is demonstrated that the standard cusp configuration is not restricted to the vacuum magnetosphere.

  9. A new methodology to test galaxy formation models using the dependence of clustering on stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, David J. R.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Mitchell, Peter D.; Helly, John C.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Simha, Vimal; Farrow, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    We present predictions for the two-point correlation function of galaxy clustering as a function of stellar mass, computed using two new versions of the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model. These models make use of a high resolution, large volume N-body simulation, set in the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmology. One model uses a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF), while the other assumes different IMFs for quiescent star formation and bursts. Particular consideration is given to how the assumptions required to estimate the stellar masses of observed galaxies (such as the choice of IMF, stellar population synthesis model, and dust extinction) influence the perceived dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass. Broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting is carried out to estimate stellar masses for the model galaxies in the same manner as in observational studies. We show clear differences between the clustering signals computed using the true and estimated model stellar masses. As such, we highlight the importance of applying our methodology to compare theoretical models to observations. We introduce an alternative scheme for the calculation of the merger time-scales for satellite galaxies in GALFORM, which takes into account the dark matter subhalo information from the simulation. This reduces the amplitude of small-scale clustering. The new merger scheme offers improved or similar agreement with observational clustering measurements, over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.7. We find reasonable agreement with clustering measurements from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly Survey, but find larger discrepancies for some stellar mass ranges and separation scales with respect to measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey, depending on the GALFORM model used.

  10. Galaxies on FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments): stellar feedback explains cosmologically inefficient star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan; Oñorbe, José; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman; Bullock, James S.

    2014-11-01

    We present a series of high-resolution cosmological simulations1 of galaxy formation to z = 0, spanning halo masses ˜108-1013 M⊙, and stellar masses ˜104-1011 M⊙. Our simulations include fully explicit treatment of the multiphase interstellar medium and stellar feedback. The stellar feedback inputs (energy, momentum, mass, and metal fluxes) are taken directly from stellar population models. These sources of feedback, with zero adjusted parameters, reproduce the observed relation between stellar and halo mass up to Mhalo ˜ 1012 M⊙. We predict weak redshift evolution in the M*-Mhalo relation, consistent with current constraints to z > 6. We find that the M*-Mhalo relation is insensitive to numerical details, but is sensitive to feedback physics. Simulations with only supernova feedback fail to reproduce observed stellar masses, particularly in dwarf and high-redshift galaxies: radiative feedback (photoheating and radiation pressure) is necessary to destroy giant molecular clouds and enable efficient coupling of later supernovae to the gas. Star formation rates (SFRs) agree well with the observed Kennicutt relation at all redshifts. The galaxy-averaged Kennicutt relation is very different from the numerically imposed law for converting gas into stars, and is determined by self-regulation via stellar feedback. Feedback reduces SFRs and produces reservoirs of gas that lead to rising late-time star formation histories, significantly different from halo accretion histories. Feedback also produces large short-time-scale variability in galactic SFRs, especially in dwarfs. These properties are not captured by common `sub-grid' wind models.

  11. Chromospheric dust formation, stellar masers and mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A multistep scenario which describes a plausible mass loss mechanism associated with red giant and related stars is outlined. The process involves triggering a condensation instability in an extended chromosphere, leading to the formation of cool, dense clouds which are conducive to the formation of molecules and dust grains. Once formed, the dust can be driven away from the star by radiation pressure. Consistency with various observed phenomena is discussed.

  12. The star formation main sequence and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparre, Martin; Hayward, Christopher C.; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the physical processes that drive star formation is a key challenge for galaxy formation models. In this paper, we study the tight correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of galaxies at a given redshift, how halo growth influences star formation, and star formation histories of individual galaxies. We study these topics using Illustris, a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulation of galaxy formation. Illustris reproduces the observed relation (the star formation main sequence, SFMS) between SFR and stellar mass at redshifts z = 0 and 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ≃ 1-2, the simulated SFMS has a significantly lower normalization than reported by observations. The scatter in the relation is consistent with the observed scatter. However, the fraction of outliers above the SFR-stellar mass relation in Illustris is less than that observed. Galaxies with halo masses of ˜1012 M⊙ dominate the SFR density of the Universe, in agreement with the results of abundance matching. Furthermore, more-massive galaxies tend to form the bulk of their stars at high redshift, which indicates that `downsizing' occurs in Illustris. We also studied the star formation histories of individual galaxies, including the use of a principal component analysis decomposition. We find that for fixed stellar mass, galaxies that form earlier have more-massive black holes at z = 0, indicating that star formation and black hole growth are tightly linked processes in Illustris. While many of the properties of normal star-forming galaxies are well reproduced in the Illustris simulation, forming a realistic population of starbursts will likely require higher resolution and probably a more sophisticated treatment of star formation and feedback from stars and black holes.

  13. ARE THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES JUST CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth

    2011-01-20

    We develop a technique to investigate the possibility that some of the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way might be cusp caustics rather than gravitationally self-bound systems. Such cusps can form when a stream of stars folds, creating a region where the projected two-dimensional surface density is enhanced. In this work, we construct a Poisson maximum likelihood test to compare the cusp and exponential models of any substructure on an equal footing. We apply the test to the Hercules dwarf (d {approx} 113 kpc, M{sub V} {approx} -6.2, e {approx} 0.67). The flattened exponential model is strongly favored over the cusp model in the case of Hercules, ruling out at high confidence that Hercules is a cusp catastrophe. This test can be applied to any of the Milky Way dwarfs, and more generally to the entire stellar halo population, to search for the cusp catastrophes that might be expected in an accreted stellar halo.

  14. THE TRIPLE EVOLUTION DYNAMICAL INSTABILITY: STELLAR COLLISIONS IN THE FIELD AND THE FORMATION OF EXOTIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Hagai B.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2012-12-01

    Physical collisions and close approaches between stars play an important role in the formation of exotic stellar systems. Standard theories suggest that collisions are rare, occurring only via random encounters between stars in dense clusters. We present a different formation pathway, the triple evolution dynamical instability (TEDI), in which mass loss in an evolving triple star system causes orbital instability. The subsequent chaotic orbital evolution of the stars triggers close encounters, collisions, exchanges between the stellar components, and the dynamical formation of eccentric compact binaries (including Sirius-like binaries). We demonstrate that the rate of stellar collisions due to the TEDI is approximately 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1} per Milky Way Galaxy, which is nearly 30 times higher than the total collision rate due to random encounters in the Galactic globular clusters. Moreover, we find that the dominant type of stellar collision is qualitatively different; most collisions involve asymptotic giant branch stars, rather than main sequence or slightly evolved stars, which dominate collisions in globular clusters. The TEDI mechanism should lead us to revise our understanding of collisions and the formation of compact, eccentric binaries in the field.

  15. Binary Interactions as a Possible Scenario for the Formation of Multiple Stellar Populations in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen; Li, Lifang

    2014-07-01

    Observations have revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the stars with anomalous abundances observed in GCs are merged stars and accretor stars produced by binary interactions—rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation—and that these stars are more massive than normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. We find that, due to their own evolution, these rapidly rotating stars have surface abundances, effective temperatures, and luminosities that are different from normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. This stellar population of binaries reproduces two important points of observational evidence of multiple stellar populations: a Na-O anticorrelation and multiple sequences in the HR diagram. This evidence suggests that binary interactions may be a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs.

  16. Binary interactions as a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen; Li, Lifang E-mail: zhanwenhan@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-07-01

    Observations have revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the stars with anomalous abundances observed in GCs are merged stars and accretor stars produced by binary interactions—rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation—and that these stars are more massive than normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. We find that, due to their own evolution, these rapidly rotating stars have surface abundances, effective temperatures, and luminosities that are different from normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. This stellar population of binaries reproduces two important points of observational evidence of multiple stellar populations: a Na-O anticorrelation and multiple sequences in the HR diagram. This evidence suggests that binary interactions may be a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs.

  17. On the Incorporation of Metallicity Data into Measurements of Star Formation History from Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of spectroscopic stellar metallicities and resolved star color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) has the potential to constrain the entire star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy better than fitting CMDs alone (as is most common in SFH studies using resolved stellar populations). In this paper, two approaches to incorporating external metallicity information into CMD-fitting techniques are presented. Overall, the joint fitting of metallicity and CMD information can increase the precision of measured age–metallicity relationships (AMRs) and star formation rates by 10% over CMD fitting alone. However, systematics in stellar isochrones and mismatches between spectroscopic and photometric determinations of metallicity can reduce the accuracy of the recovered SFHs. I present a simple mitigation of these systematics that can reduce their amplitude to the level obtained from CMD fitting alone, while ensuring that the AMR is consistent with spectroscopic metallicities. As is the case in CMD-fitting analysis, improved stellar models and calibrations between spectroscopic and photometric metallicities are currently the primary impediment to gains in SFH precision from jointly fitting stellar metallicities and CMDs.

  18. Internal Structure of Stellar Clusters: Geometry of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Emilio J.; Sánchez, Néstor

    2011-04-01

    The study of the internal structure of star clusters provides important clues concerning their formation mechanism and dynamical evolution. There are both observational and numerical evidences indicating that open clusters evolve from an initial clumpy structure, presumably a direct consequence of the formation in a fractal medium, toward a centrally condensed state. This simple picture has, however, several drawbacks. There can be very young clusters exhibiting radial patterns maybe reflecting the early effect of gravity on primordial gas. There can be also very evolved clusters showing fractal patterns that either have survived through time or have been generated subsequently by some (unknown) mechanism. Additionally, the fractal structure of some open clusters is much clumpier than the average structure of the interstellar medium in the Milky Way, although in principle a very similar structure should be expected. Here we summarize and discuss observational and numerical results concerning this subject.

  19. Toward a Complete Accounting of Energy and Momentum from Stellar Feedback in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  20. TOWARD A COMPLETE ACCOUNTING OF ENERGY AND MOMENTUM FROM STELLAR FEEDBACK IN GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-10

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping

    2012-07-10

    Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

  2. Dual Stellar Halos in Early-type Galaxies and Formation of Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-08-01

    M105 in the Leo I Group is a textbook example of a standard elliptical galaxy. It is only one of the few elliptical galaxies for which we can study their stellar halos using the resolved stars. It is an ideal target to study the structure and composition of stellar halos in elliptical galaxies. We present photometry and metallicity of the resolved stars in the inner and outer regions of M105. These provide strong evidence that there are two distinct stellar halos in this galaxy, a metal-poor (blue) halo and a metal-rich (red) halo. Then we compare them with those in other early-type galaxies and use the dual halo mode formation scenario to describe how massive galaxies formed.

  3. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does Stellar Feedback Result in Cloud Death?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation, and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localized thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series, which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback, and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localized thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the lower bound expected for a supernova may play a relatively minor role in the galactic structure of quiescent Milky-Way-type galaxies, compared to gravitational interactions and disk shear.

  4. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. PMID:26819043

  5. Long-term star formation at the Galactic center and its effect on the stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, E.

    Although the central kpc-scale bulge of our Galaxy consists predominantly of old stars, the central parsec, in contrast, is host to a sizable number of very young stars. At intermediate scales, the nature of the stellar population remains very uncertain because high extinction has thus far limited observations. This talk will attempt to bridge these two regimes. As several other young stellar clusters are present in the central few hundred parsecs, star-formation is in fact quite widespread in our Galaxy's nucleus. Based on the current distribution of dense nuclear interstellar gas, and the current rate of star-formation, the hypothesis of our Galactic nucleus as a site of sustained, low-level star formation then emerges. The result of a long-term star formation rate of a few tenths of a solar mass per year would be a flattened central cluster of intermediate-age stars, amounting to about a billion solar masses. A stellar cluster of the requisite mass and linear scale is indeed present in our Galactic nucleus, and arguments will be presented that our Galaxy's central ``1 over r-squared' ' cluster is in fact an intermediate age population resulting from long-term star formation, and not simply the innermost part of the more elderly bulge.

  6. The dynamic cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J. ); Arnoldy, R.L. ); Woch, J. ); Friis-Christensen, E. )

    1992-03-01

    A unique alignment of the Viking satellite with respect to a network of magnetometers in Greenland has provided the opportunity to study the relationship of pulsations and plasma characteristics in the dayside cusp. The presence of Pc 1 bursts, Pc 4-5 pulsations, and a tailward traveling twin vortex pattern of ionospheric convection suggests that the magnetosphere may have been temporarily compressed. Magnetic field data acquired at synchrotrons altitude from GOES 5 and on the ground from Huancayo support this suggestion. Plasma with ion dispersion characteristics associated with a cusp during southward IMF was detected by Viking over a 3.5{degree} range of latitude. The presence of standing Alfven waves and ring current ions suggest that this cusplike plasma was observed on closed geomagnetic field lines. As Viking moved further poleward, it detected a different region of plasma with characteristics associated with a cusp during northward IMF. The presence of plasma on closed field lines with southward IMF ion dispersion characteristics can be explained with a poleward moving plasma source. The authors suggest that the magnetosphere, during a northward IMF, is temporarily compressed by a solar wind pressure enhancement that produces the Pc 1 bursts, Pc 4-5 pulsations, and ionospheric vortices. As the magnetosphere recovers to its precompressed shape, the source of cusp plasma will move poleward until it reaches an equilibrium position for northward IMF. The Viking satellite, following in the wake of this source, will detect plasma with southward IMF characteristics until it reaches the latitude of the actual northward IMF cusp.

  7. Alternative cosmology from cusp geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Reinaldo; Herbin Stalder Díaz, Diego

    We study an alternative geometrical approach on the problem of classical cosmological singularity. It is based on a generalized function f(x,y)=x(2+y^2=(1-z)z^n) which consists of a cusped projected coupled isosurface. Such a projected geometry is computed and analized into the context of Friedmann singularity-free cosmology where a pre-big bang scenario is considered. Assuming that the mechanism of cusp formation is described by non-linear oscillations of a pre- big bang extended very high energy density field (>3x10^{94} kg/m^3$), we show that the action under the gravitational field follows a tautochrone of revolution, understood here as the primary projected geometry that alternatively replaces the Friedmann singularity in the standard big bang theory. As shown here this new approach allows us to interpret the nature of both matter and dark energy from first geometric principles [1]. [1] Rosa et al. DOI: 10.1063/1.4756991

  8. THE AGE, STELLAR CONTENT, AND STAR FORMATION TIMESCALE OF THE B59 DENSE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, K. R.; Lada, C. J.; Muench, A. A.; Forbrich, J.; Ascenso, J.; Roman-Zuniga, C.

    2010-10-20

    We have investigated the stellar content of Barnard 59 (B59), the most active star-forming core in the Pipe Nebula. Using the SpeX spectrograph on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, we obtained moderate resolution, near-infrared (NIR) spectra for 20 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in B59 and a representative sample of NIR and mid-IR bright sources distributed throughout the Pipe. Measuring luminosity and temperature sensitive features in these spectra, we identified likely background giant stars and measured each star's spectral type, extinction, and NIR continuum excess. To measure B59's age, we place its candidate YSOs in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and compare their location to YSOs in several well-studied star-forming regions, as well as predictions of pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models. We find that B59 is composed of late-type (K4-M6) low-mass (0.9-0.1 M{sub sun}) YSOs whose median stellar age is comparable to, if not slightly older than, that of YSOs within the {rho} Oph, Taurus, and Chameleon star-forming regions. Deriving absolute age estimates from PMS models computed by D'Antona et al., and accounting only for statistical uncertainties, we measure B59's median stellar age to be 2.6 {+-} 0.8 Myr. Including potential systematic effects increases the error budget for B59's median (DM98) stellar age to 2.6{sup +4.1}{sub -2.6} Myr. We also find that the relative age orderings implied by PMS evolutionary tracks depend on the range of stellar masses sampled, as model isochrones possess significantly different mass dependences. The maximum likelihood median stellar age we measure for B59, and the region's observed gas properties, suggests that the B59 dense core has been stable against global collapse for roughly six dynamical timescales and is actively forming stars with a star formation efficiency per dynamical time of {approx}6%. While the {approx}150% uncertainties associated with our age measurement propagate directly into these

  9. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.; Bothwell, Matt S.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Hα to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Hα luminosities. Using the UV and Hα fluxes of a sample of ∼300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and 80-130 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270{sub −80}{sup +110} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, suggesting a tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with the directly estimated SFR, the local supernova discoveries strongly constrain any physical effects that might increase the energy output of massive stars, including, but not limited to, stellar rotation. The cosmic SFR and cosmic supernova rate data, on the other hand, show the opposite trend, with the cosmic SFR higher than that inferred from cosmic supernovae, constraining a significant decrease in the energy output of massive stars. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that the true SFR calibration factors cannot be too far from their canonical values.

  10. Ages, chemistry, and type 1A supernovae: Clues to the formation of the galactic stellar halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    We endeavor to resolve two conflicting constraints on the duration of the formation of the Galactic stellar halo - 2-3 Gyr age differences in halo stars, and the time scale inferred from the observed constant values of chemical element abundance ratios characteristic of enrichment by Type II supernovae - by investigating the time scale for the onset of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in the currently favored progenitor model - mergers of carbon and oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs).

  11. Star Formation and Young Stellar Content in the W3 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the "Class" scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  12. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG STELLAR CONTENT IN THE W3 GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-10

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the 'Class' scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  13. Star formation in early-type galaxies: the role of stellar winds and kinematics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Early-Type galaxies (ETGs) host a hot ISM produced mainly by stellar winds, and heated by Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and the thermalization of stellar motions. Recent high resolution 2D hydrodynamical simulations (Negri et al. 2014) showed that ordered rotation in the stellar component alters significantly the evolution of the hot ISM, and results in the formation of a centrifugally supported cold equatorial disc. This agrees well with the recent evidence that approximately 50% of massive ETGs host significant quantities of cold gas (Morganti et al. 2006; Young et al. 2014), often in settled configurations, sharing the same kinematics of the stars. In particular, in a systematic investigation of the ATLAS3D sample, the most massive fast-rotating ETGs always have kinematically aligned gas, which suggests an internal origin for it, and molecular gas is detected only in fast rotators (Davis et al. 2011). The observed cold gas seems also to provide material for low level star formation (SF) activity (Combes et al. 2007, Davis et al. 2014). Interestingly, in the ATLAS3D sample, SF and young stellar populations are detected only in fast rotators (Sarzi et al. 2013). In a recent work we investigated whether and how SF takes place in the cold gas disc typically produced in rotating ETGs by our previous 2D simulations, by adding to them the possibility for the gas to form stars (Negri et al. 2015). We also inserted the injection of mass, momentum and energy appropriate for the newly (and continuously) forming stellar population. We found that subsequent generations of stars are formed, and that most of the extended and massive cold disc is consumed by this process, leaving at the present epoch cold gas masses that compare well with those observed. The mass in secondary generations of stars resides mostly in a disc, and could be related to a younger, more metal rich disky stellar component indeed observed in fast rotator ETGs (Cappellari et al. 2013). Most of the mass in

  14. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  15. Brightest group galaxies: stellar mass and star formation rate (paper I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozaliasl, Ghassem; Finoguenov, Alexis; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Mirkazemi, Mohammad; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    We study the distribution and evolution of the stellar mass and the star formation rate (SFR) of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) over 0.04 < z < 1.3 using a large sample of 407 X-ray galaxy groups selected from the COSMOS, AEGIS, and XMM-LSS fields. We compare our results with predictions from the semi-analytic models based on the Millennium simulation. In contrast to model predictions, we find that, as the Universe evolves, the stellar mass distribution evolves towards a normal distribution. This distribution tends to skew to low-mass BGGs at all redshifts implying the presence of a star-forming population of the BGGs with MS ˜ 1010.5 M⊙ which results in the shape of the stellar mass distribution deviating from a normal distribution. In agreement with the models and previous studies, we find that the mean stellar mass of BGGs grows with time by a factor of ˜2 between z = 1.3 and z = 0.1, however, the significant growth occurs above z = 0.4. The BGGs are not entirely a dormant population of galaxies, as low-mass BGGs in low-mass haloes are more active in forming stars than the BGGs in more massive haloes, over the same redshift range. We find that the average SFR of the BGGs evolves steeply with redshift and fraction of the passive BGGs increases as a function of increasing stellar mass and halo mass. Finally, we show that the specific SFR of the BGGs within haloes with M200 ≤ 1013.4 M⊙ decreases with increasing halo mass at z < 0.4.

  16. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Maciel, Tamela E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  17. GG Tau: the ringworld and beyond. Mass accretion and planetary formation in young multiple stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Beck, Tracy; Guilloteau, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In binary stellar systems, exoplanet searches have revealed planetary mass companions orbiting both in circumstellar and in circumbinary orbits. Modelling studies suggest increased dynamical complexity around the young stars that form such systems. Circumstellar and circumbinary disks likely exhibit different physical conditions for planet formation, which also depends on the stellar separation. Although binaries and higher order multiple stars are relatively common in nearby star-forming regions, surprisingly few systems with circumbinary distributions of proto-planetary material have been found. With its spectacular ring of dust and gas encircling the central triple star, one such system, GG Tau A, has become a unique laboratory for investigating the physics of circumsystem gas and dust evolution. We review here its physical properties.

  18. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass–metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ∼130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%–55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  19. Planet formation in a triple stellar system: implications of the third star's orbital inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingos, R. C.; Winter, O. C.; Izidoro, A.

    2015-04-01

    Planets have been revealed both in binary and triple stellar systems. Although there have been several studies of the late stages of planet formation in binary stars this process does not appear to have been studied in triple stellar systems. To understand how the late stage of planetary accretion is affected by a third companion, in this work we have numerically investigated the formation of planets in a hypothetical triple stellar system. The system is composed by an inner binary formed by two half-solar-mass components orbited by a solar-mass star. In our experiments, lunar and Mars-sized planetary embryos are distributed around the centre of mass of the inner binary system. Our main goal is to analyse how the formation of planets evolves depending on the orbital configuration of the massive distant companion. We have performed an extensive number of numerical simulations considering different orbital configurations for the third star. All simulations were numerically integrated for at least 107 years. The results show that when the protoplanetary disc and the stars are initially on coplanar orbits, one or two planets are quickly formed between 6 and 8 AU. In general such planets have also small eccentricities with values about 10-2. On the other hand, when the third star is considered initially on inclined orbits (even tiny values), there tends to occur a significant increase in the inclination of bodies of protoplanetary disc, which prevents the collisions between these objects and their growth. As a result, in this latter case we do not evidence the formation of planets during the timescale of our integrations but note the existence of several leftover objects that can survive for longer than 10 Myr, moving in orbits with semi-major axes ranging between ~6 and 8 AU. Thus, our results do not rule out the planet formation in this kind of stellar arrangements at all, but they indicate that, if planetary bodies keep stable orbits, the late stage of planet

  20. The Spatially-Resolved Star Formation History of the M31 Disk from Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alexia R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-02-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program that has mapped the resolved stellar populations of ~1/3 of the disk of M31 from the UV through the near-IR. This data provides color and luminosity information for more than 150 million stars. Using stellar evolution models, we model the optical color-magnitude diagram to derive spatially-resolved recent star formation histories (SFHs) over large areas of M31 with 100 pc resolution. These include individual star-forming regions as well as quiescent portions of the disk. With these gridded SFHs, we create movies of star formation activity to study the evolution of individual star-forming events across the disk. We analyze the structure of star formation and examine the relation between star formation and gas throughout the disk and particularly in the 10-kpc star-forming ring. We find that the ring has been continuously forming stars for at least 500 Myr. As the only large disk galaxy that is close enough to obtain the photometry for this type of spatially-resolved SFH mapping, M31 plays an important role in our understanding of the evolution of an L* galaxy.

  1. Star Cluster Formation with Stellar Feedback and Large-scale Inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzner, Christopher D.; Jumper, Peter H.

    2015-12-01

    During star cluster formation, ongoing mass accretion is resisted by stellar feedback in the form of protostellar outflows from the low-mass stars and photo-ionization and radiation pressure feedback from the massive stars. We model the evolution of cluster-forming regions during a phase in which both accretion and feedback are present and use these models to investigate how star cluster formation might terminate. Protostellar outflows are the strongest form of feedback in low-mass regions, but these cannot stop cluster formation if matter continues to flow in. In more massive clusters, radiation pressure and photo-ionization rapidly clear the cluster-forming gas when its column density is too small. We assess the rates of dynamical mass ejection and of evaporation, while accounting for the important effect of dust opacity on photo-ionization. Our models are consistent with the census of protostellar outflows in NGC 1333 and Serpens South and with the dust temperatures observed in regions of massive star formation. Comparing observations of massive cluster-forming regions against our model parameter space, and against our expectations for accretion-driven evolution, we infer that massive-star feedback is a likely cause of gas disruption in regions with velocity dispersions less than a few kilometers per second, but that more massive and more turbulent regions are too strongly bound for stellar feedback to be disruptive.

  2. THE DUAL ORIGIN OF STELLAR HALOS. II. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AS TRACERS OF FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James E-mail: bwillman@haverford.ed

    2010-09-20

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [{alpha}/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local L{sup *} galaxies.

  3. SuperMassive Blackholes grow from stellar BHs of star formation history?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    The origin of the supermassive black hole masses M SMBH discovered at the highest redshifts is still actively debated. Moreover the statistically significant relation of M SMBH with bulge luminosities L V , extended on several magnitude orders, confirms a common physical process linking small (<= 1pc) to large (kpcs) size scales. The Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of two z=3.8 radio galaxies 4C41.17 and TN J2007-1316, best-fitted by evolved early type galaxy and starburst scenarios also imply masses of stellar remnants. Computed with the evolutionary code Pegase.3, the cumulated stellar black hole mass M sBH reach up to several 109M⊙, similar to M SMBH at same z. We propose the SMBH growth is due to the migration of the stellar dense residues (sBH) towards the galaxy core by dynamical friction. Discussed in terms of time-scales, this process which is linking AGN and star formation, also fully justifies the famous relation M SMBH -L V .

  4. The Dual Origin of Stellar Halos. II. Chemical Abundances as Tracers of Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Governato, Fabio; Hogg, David W.; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2010-09-01

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [α/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local Lsstarf galaxies.

  5. UVMag: stellar formation, evolution, structure and environment with space UV and visible spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Baade, D.; Fullerton, A.; Gry, C.; Hussain, G.; Lèbre, A.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.; Sundqvist, J. O.; ud-Doula, A.; Vidotto, A. A.; Wade, G. A.

    2014-11-01

    Important insights into the formation, structure, evolution and environment of all types of stars can be obtained through the measurement of their winds and possible magnetospheres. However, this has hardly been done up to now mainly because of the lack of UV instrumentation available for long periods of time. To reach this aim, we have designed UVMag, an M-size space mission equipped with a high-resolution spectropolarimeter working in the UV and visible spectral range. The UV domain is crucial in stellar physics as it is very rich in atomic and molecular lines and contains most of the flux of hot stars. Moreover, covering the UV and visible spectral domains at the same time will allow us to study the star and its environment simultaneously. Adding polarimetric power to the spectrograph will multiply tenfold the capabilities of extracting information on stellar magnetospheres, winds, disks, and magnetic fields. Examples of science objectives that can be reached with UVMag are presented for pre-main sequence, main sequence and evolved stars. They will cast new light onto stellar physics by addressing many exciting and important questions. UVMag is currently undergoing a Research & Technology study and will be proposed at the forthcoming ESA call for M-size missions. This spectropolarimeter could also be installed on a large UV and visible observatory (e.g. NASA's LUVOIR project) within a suite of instruments.

  6. A FORMATION SCENARIO OF YOUNG STELLAR GROUPS IN THE REGION OF THE SCORPIO CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, V. G.; Jilinski, E.; De la Reza, R.; Bazzanella, B.

    2009-04-15

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the role played by Lower Centaurus Crux (LCC) and Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL), both subcomponents of the Scorpio Centaurus OB association (Sco-Cen), in the formation of the groups {beta} Pictoris, TW Hydrae, and the {eta} Chamaeleontis cluster. The dynamical evolution of all the stellar groups involved and of the bubbles and shells blown by LCC and UCL are calculated, and followed from the past to the present. This leads to a formation scenario in which (1) the groups {beta} Pictoris, TW Hydrae were formed in the wake of the shells created by LCC and UCL, (2) the young cluster {eta} Chamaeleontis was born as a consequence of the collision of the shells of LCC and UCL, and (3) the formation of Upper Scorpius (US), the other main subcomponent of the Sco-Cen association, may have been started by the same process that created {eta} Chamaeleontis.

  7. Saturn's Magnetospheric Cusp: Cassini Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, J. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Sergis, N.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    The first in-situ analysis of the high-latitude magnetospheric cusp region at Saturn is presented using data from the Cassini spacecraft. The cusp is a funnel-shaped region where shocked solar wind plasma is able to enter the magnetosphere via the process of magnetic reconnection. The analysis is presented in three sections: Firstly, a high-latitude spacecraft trajectory is shown to cross the northern cusp where magnetosheath plasma is observed in-situ. The ion observations are shown to be a result of `bursty' reconnection occurring at the dayside magnetopause. A different interval is also presented where the southern cusp is observed to oscillate with a period the same as Saturn's rotational period. Secondly, the locations of all the cusp crossings are shown. The field-aligned distances (calculated from observed ion energy-pitch angle dispersions) from the reconnection site are presented. The cusp events are also compared to solar wind propagation models to investigate any correlations. Finally, the magnetic field observations of the cusps are analysed focusing on the diamagnetic depressions. The data are subtracted from a magnetic field model, and the calculated magnetic pressure deficits are compared to the particle pressures. A high plasma pressure layer in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp is discovered to also depress the magnetic field.

  8. Extremely Large Cusp Diamagnetic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, which is unexpected by the current MHD (or ISM) models, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash, which provides a challenge to the existing MHD (or ISM) models. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. During high solar wind pressure period on April 21, 1999, the POLAR spacecraft observed lower ion flux in the dayside high-latitude magnetosheath than that in the neighbouring cusp cavities. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity have significant global impacts on the geospace environment research and will be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in upstream ion events.

  9. THE COUPLING BETWEEN THE CORE/CUSP AND MISSING SATELLITE PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Penarrubia, Jorge; Pontzen, Andrew; Walker, Matthew G.; Koposov, Sergey E.

    2012-11-10

    We calculate the energy that baryons must inject into cold dark matter (CDM) halos in order to remove centrally divergent DM cusps on scales relevant to observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We estimate that the CDM halos often associated with the Milky Way's dSphs (M{sub vir}/M{sub Sun} {approx} 10{sup 9-10}) require {Delta}E {approx} 10{sup 53-55} erg in order to form cores on scales comparable to the luminous size of these galaxies. While supernova Type II (SNeII) explosions can in principle generate this energy, the actual contribution is limited by the low star formation efficiency implied by the abundance of luminous satellites. Considering that CDM's well-known 'core/cusp' and 'missing satellite' problems place opposing demands on star formation efficiencies, existing observational evidences for large cores in the most luminous dSphs require that CDM models invoke some combination of the following: (1) efficient (of the order of unity) coupling of SNeII energy into dark matter particles, (2) star formation histories peaking at unexpectedly high redshifts (z {approx}> 6), (3) a top-heavy stellar initial mass function, and/or (4) substantial satellite disruption or other stochastic effects to ease the substructure abundance constraints. Our models show that the tension between CDM problems on small scales would increase if cored DM profiles were to be found in fainter dwarfs.

  10. A Backwards Approach to the Formation of Disk Galaxies. I. Stellar and Gas Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Silk, Joseph

    2001-08-01

    A simple chemical enrichment code is described where the two basic mechanisms driving the evolution of the ages and metallicities of the stellar populations are the star formation efficiency and the fraction of gas ejected from the galaxy. Using the observed Tully-Fisher relation in different passbands as a constraint, it is found that a steep correlation between the maximum disk rotational velocity (vROT) and star formation efficiency (Ceff) must exist-Ceff~v4ROT-either for a linear or a quadratic Schmidt law. Outflows do not play a major role. This result is in contrast with what we have found for early-type systems, where the Faber-Jackson constraint in different bands allows a significant range of outflows and requires a large star formation efficiency regardless of galaxy mass. The extremely low efficiencies found at low masses translate into a large spread in the distribution of stellar ages in these systems, as well as a large gas mass fraction independently of the star formation law. The model predictions are consistent with the star formation rates in low-mass local galaxies. However, our predictions for gas mass are in apparent conflict with the estimates of atomic hydrogen content observed through the flux of the 21 cm line of H I. The presence of large masses of cold molecular hydrogen-especially in systems with low mass and metallicity-is predicted, up to ratios M(H2)/M(H I)~4, in agreement with a recent tentative detection of warm H2. The redshift evolution of disk galaxies is explored, showing that a significant change in the slope of the Tully-Fisher relation (L~vγROT) is expected because of the different age distributions of the stellar components in high and low-mass disk galaxies. The slope measured in the rest frame B,K-bands is found to change from γB~3,γK~4 at z=0 up to ~4.5, 5 at z~1, with a slight dependence on formation redshift.

  11. Reassessing the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Olivia Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies depends on a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The observed strength of this dependence varies substantially depending on the choice of metallicity calibration, but has significant implications for theories of galaxy evolution, as it constrains the interplay between infall of pristine gas, metal production due to star formation, and ejection of enriched gas from galaxies. We present a new analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity and SFR for ~140,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a new set of theoretically calibrated abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013), we find a weaker dependence of metallicity on SFR at fixed stellar mass than was found by previous studies using different calibration techniques for gas phase metallicity. We analyze possible biases in the derivation of mass, metallicity, and SFR that could cause the observed strength of the metallicity dependence on SFR to differ from reality, as the calculation of each of these quantities is subject to systematic errors. Chemical evolution models must carefully consider these sources of potential bias when accounting for metallicity dependence on SFR.

  12. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  13. Recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation and implications for the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segers, Marijke C.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-02-01

    We use cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments and OverWhelmingly Large Simulations projects to assess the significance of recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation. The fractional contributions of stellar mass-loss to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass densities increase with time, reaching 35 and 19 per cent, respectively, at z = 0. The importance of recycling increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass for M* < 1010.5 M⊙, and decreases mildly at higher mass. This trend arises from the mass dependence of feedback associated with star formation and AGN, which preferentially suppresses star formation fuelled by recycling. Recycling is more important for satellites than centrals and its contribution decreases with galactocentric radius. The relative contribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars increases with time and towards galaxy centres. This is a consequence of the more gradual release of AGB ejecta compared to that of massive stars, and the preferential removal of the latter by star formation-driven outflows and by lock up in stellar remnants. Recycling-fuelled star formation exhibits a tight, positive correlation with galaxy metallicity, with a secondary dependence on the relative abundance of alpha elements (which are predominantly synthesized in massive stars), that is insensitive to the subgrid models for feedback. Hence, our conclusions are directly relevant for the origin of the mass-metallicity relation and metallicity gradients. Applying the relation between recycling and metallicity to the observed mass-metallicity relation yields our best estimate of the mass-dependent contribution of recycling. For centrals with a mass similar to that of the Milky Way, we infer the contributions of recycled stellar ejecta to the SFR and stellar mass to be 35 and 20 per cent, respectively.

  14. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first metal-enriched stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Montgomery, Michael H.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low-metallicity (10-2 Z⊙) stellar cluster at redshift z ˜ 14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 M⊙. Their masses range from ˜0.1 to 14.4 M⊙ with a median mass ˜0.5-1 M⊙. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while lower mass protostars are stunted in growth by close encounters and many-body ejections. In the regime explored here, the characteristic mass scale is determined by the cosmic microwave background temperature floor and the onset of efficient dust-gas coupling. It seems unlikely that host galaxies of the first bursts of metal-enriched star formation will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope or other next-generation infrared observatories. Instead, the most promising access route to the dawn of cosmic star formation may lie in the scrutiny of metal-poor, ancient stellar populations in the Galactic neighbourhood. The observable targets corresponding to the system simulated here are ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies such as Boötes II and Willman I.

  15. WINGS-SPE II: A catalog of stellar ages and star formation histories, stellar masses and dust extinction values for local clusters galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; Bressan, A.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.

    2011-02-01

    Context. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (wings) is a project whose primary goal is to study the galaxy populations in clusters in the local universe (z < 0.07) and of the influence of environment on their stellar populations. This survey has provided the astronomical community with a high quality set of photometric and spectroscopic data for 77 and 48 nearby galaxy clusters, respectively. Aims: In this paper we present the catalog containing the properties of galaxies observed by the wings SPEctroscopic (wings-spe) survey, which were derived using stellar populations synthesis modelling approach. We also check the consistency of our results with other data in the literature. Methods: Using a spectrophotometric model that reproduces the main features of observed spectra by summing the theoretical spectra of simple stellar populations of different ages, we derive the stellar masses, star formation histories, average age and dust attenuation of galaxies in our sample. Results: ~ 5300 spectra were analyzed with spectrophotometric techniques, and this allowed us to derive the star formation history, stellar masses and ages, and extinction for the wings spectroscopic sample that we present in this paper. Conclusions: The comparison with the total mass values of the same galaxies derived by other authors based on sdss data, confirms the reliability of the adopted methods and data. Based on observations taken at the Anglo Australian Telescope (3.9 m- AAT), and at the William Herschel Telescope (4.2 m- WHT).Full Table 2 is available in electronic form both at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A45, and by querying the wings database at http://web.oapd.inaf.it/wings/new/index.html

  16. The physics of the accretion process in the formation and evolution of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, C. F.

    2014-07-01

    The formation of planets is thought to happen in protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars during the first few Myrs of their pre-main-sequence evolution. In order to understand planet formation a detailed knowledge of the disk evolution process is needed. By studying the interaction of the disk with the central star, which includes accretion of matter due to viscous processes in the disk, we can constrain the physical conditions of the inner gaseous disk in which planet formation takes place. With the recent advent of the X-Shooter spectrograph, a second generation instrument of the ESO/VLT, the excess emission due to accretion in the ultraviolet can be studied simultaneously with the accretion signatures in the visible and in the near-infrared, finally giving a complete view of this phenomenon. In this Thesis I have studied various X-Shooter datasets of young stars to determine the intensity and the properties of the accretion process at various phases of disk evolution and as a function of the central star mass and age. To fully exploit the potential of the X-Shooter spectra, I have developed an innovative method of analysis to derive accretion and stellar parameters with an automatic algorithm. This is based on a set of models, composed of a set of photospheric templates of young stars that I gathered and characterized, a set of slab models, that I have coded, to reproduce the emission due to the accretion shock, and a reddening law to take into account extinction effects. This method allows to accurately determine for the first time the stellar and accretion parameters of the targets self-consistently and with no prior assumptions, a significant improvement with respect to previous studies. I have applied this methodology to determine the correct stellar parameters of two objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster that were reported in the literature to have an anomalous old age. My analysis has shown why previous investigations could not resolve the degeneracy

  17. Galaxy Formation From A Local Perspective: Constraints from the Resolved Stellar Populations of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.

    2008-09-01

    I present a capsulized summary of the exciting field of the study of galaxy formation and evolution based on inspection of the local neighborhood-the stars of the Milky Way (and its dwarf galaxy populations). After a brief overview of the topic, I discuss previous surveys of the stellar populations of the Milky Way, in particular those directed at the identification of stars in the halo. I then present a discussion of current surveys, and consider what has already been revealed by examination of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several examples of detailed analyses for stars of particular importance for constraining the early epochs of chemical evolution are then discussed. Efforts to model the formation and evolution of the Milky Way, based on such data, are then presented. Finally, I consider the next steps to be taken on this journey of understanding.

  18. Extremely large cusp diamagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T.; Siscoe, G.

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities are always there day by day. Some of the diamagnetic cavities have been observed in the morningside during intervals when the IMF By component was positive (duskward), suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity to the entire magnetopause may have significant global impacts on the geospace environment. They will possibly be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in the regions upstream of the subsolar magnetopause where energetic ion events frequently are observed.

  19. Recovering star formation histories: Integrated-light analyses vs. stellar colour-magnitude diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lara, T.; Pérez, I.; Gallart, C.; Alloin, D.; Monelli, M.; Koleva, M.; Pompei, E.; Beasley, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Florido, E.; Aparicio, A.; Fleurence, E.; Hardy, E.; Hidalgo, S.; Raimann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Accurate star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies are fundamental for understanding the build-up of their stellar content. However, the most accurate SFHs - those obtained from colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stars reaching the oldest main-sequence turnoffs (oMSTO) - are presently limited to a few systems in the Local Group. It is therefore crucial to determine the reliability and range of applicability of SFHs derived from integrated light spectroscopy, as this affects our understanding of unresolved galaxies from low to high redshift. Aims: We evaluate the reliability of current full spectral fitting techniques in deriving SFHs from integrated light spectroscopy by comparing SFHs from integrated spectra to those obtained from deep CMDs of resolved stars. Methods: We have obtained a high signal-to-noise (S/N ~ 36.3 per Å) integrated spectrum of a field in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using EFOSC2 at the 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla Observatory. For this same field, resolved stellar data reaching the oMSTO are available. We have compared the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time and the age-metallicity relation (AMR) obtained from the integrated spectrum using STECKMAP, and the CMD using the IAC-star/MinnIAC/IAC-pop set of routines. For the sake of completeness we also use and discuss other synthesis codes (STARLIGHT and ULySS) to derive the SFR and AMR from the integrated LMC spectrum. Results: We find very good agreement (average differences ~4.1%) between the SFR (t) and the AMR obtained using STECKMAP on the integrated light spectrum, and the CMD analysis. STECKMAP minimizes the impact of the age-metallicity degeneracy and has the advantage of preferring smooth solutions to recover complex SFHs by means of a penalized χ2. We find that the use of single stellar populations (SSPs) to recover the stellar content, using for instance STARLIGHT or ULySS codes, hampers the reconstruction of the SFR (t) and AMR

  20. The role of stellar relaxation in the formation and evolution of the first massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2016-04-01

    We present calculations on the formation of massive black holes of 105 M⊙ at z > 6, which can be the seeds of supermassive black holes at z ≳ 6. Under the assumption of compact star cluster formation in merging galaxies, star clusters in haloes of ˜ 108-109 M⊙ can undergo rapid core collapse, leading to the formation of very massive stars (VMSs) of ˜ 1000 M⊙ that collapse directly into black holes with similar masses. Star clusters in haloes of ≳ 109 M⊙ experience Type II supernovae before the formation of VMSs, due to long core-collapse time-scales. We also model the subsequent growth of black holes via accretion of residual stars in clusters. Two-body relaxation refills the loss cones of stellar orbits efficiently at larger radii and resonant relaxation at small radii is the main driver for accretion of stars on to black holes. As a result, more than 90 percent of stars in the initial cluster are swallowed by the central black holes before z = 6. Using dark matter merger trees, we derive black hole mass functions at z = 6-20. The mass function ranges from 103-105 M⊙ at z ≲ 15. Major merging of galaxies of ≳ 4 × 108 M⊙ at z ˜ 20 leads successfully to the formation of ≳ 105 M⊙ black holes by z ≳ 10, which could be the potential seeds of supermassive black holes seen today.

  1. Ultraviolet to infrared emission of z > 1 galaxies: Can we derive reliable star formation rates and stellar masses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Morrison, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our knowledge of the cosmic mass assembly relies on measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar), of galaxies as a function of redshift. These parameters must be estimated in a consistent way with a good knowledge of systematics before studying their correlation and the variation of the specific SFR. Constraining these fundamental properties of galaxies across the Universe is of utmost importance if we want to understand galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We seek to derive SFRs and stellar masses in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of infrared emission originating from dust. Results: We build a sample of galaxies with z > 1, all observed from the ultraviolet to the infrared in their rest frame. The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different star formation histories are introduced: an exponentially decreasing or increasing SFR and a more complex one coupling a decreasing SFR with a younger burst of constant star formation. We define different sets of data, with or without a good sampling of the ultraviolet range, near-infrared, and thermal infrared data. Variations of the metallicity are also investigated. The impact of these different cases on the determination of stellar mass and SFR are analysed. Conclusions: Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population zf ≃ 8 cannot fit the data correctly. All the other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter, especially for the exponentially decreasing models. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As

  2. The formation and gravitational-wave detection of massive stellar black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Buonanno, Alessandra; Cantiello, Matteo; Fryer, Chris L.; Holz, Daniel E.; Mandel, Ilya; Miller, M. Coleman

    2014-07-10

    If binaries consisting of two ∼100 M{sub ☉} black holes exist, they would serve as extraordinarily powerful gravitational-wave sources, detectable to redshifts of z ∼ 2 with the advanced LIGO/Virgo ground-based detectors. Large uncertainties about the evolution of massive stars preclude definitive rate predictions for mergers of these massive black holes. We show that rates as high as hundreds of detections per year, or as low as no detections whatsoever, are both possible. It was thought that the only way to produce these massive binaries was via dynamical interactions in dense stellar systems. This view has been challenged by the recent discovery of several ≳ 150 M{sub ☉} stars in the R136 region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Current models predict that when stars of this mass leave the main sequence, their expansion is insufficient to allow common envelope evolution to efficiently reduce the orbital separation. The resulting black hole-black hole binary remains too wide to be able to coalesce within a Hubble time. If this assessment is correct, isolated very massive binaries do not evolve to be gravitational-wave sources. However, other formation channels exist. For example, the high multiplicity of massive stars, and their common formation in relatively dense stellar associations, opens up dynamical channels for massive black hole mergers (e.g., via Kozai cycles or repeated binary-single interactions). We identify key physical factors that shape the population of very massive black hole-black hole binaries. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors will provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of very massive stars.

  3. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN LYNDS 1641: DISKS, ACCRETION, AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Flaherty, Kevin; Van Boekel, Roy; Henning, Thomas; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Lynds 1641 (L1641) cloud using multi-wavelength data including Spitzer, WISE, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and XMM covering {approx}1390 YSOs across a range of evolutionary stages. In addition, we targeted a sub-sample of YSOs for optical spectroscopy with the MMT/Hectospec and the MMT/Hectochelle. We use these data, along with archival photometric data, to derive spectral types, extinction values, masses, ages, and accretion rates. We obtain a disk fraction of {approx}50% in L1641. The disk frequency is almost constant as a function of stellar mass with a slight peak at log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) Almost-Equal-To -0.25. The analysis of multi-epoch spectroscopic data indicates that the accretion variability of YSOs cannot explain the two orders of magnitude of scatter for YSOs with similar masses. Forty-six new transition disk (TD) objects are confirmed in this work, and we find that the fraction of accreting TDs is lower than for optically thick disks (40%-45% versus 77%-79%, respectively). We confirm our previous result that the accreting TDs have a median accretion rate similar to normal optically thick disks. We confirm that two star formation modes (isolated versus clustered) exist in L1641. We find that the diskless YSOs are statistically older than the YSOs with optically thick disks and the TD objects have a median age that is intermediate between those of the other two populations. We tentatively study the star formation history in L1641 based on the age distribution and find that star formation started to be active 2-3 Myr ago.

  4. Characterizing Extragalactic Star Formation with GALEX Legacy Photometric Analysis of UV-Bright Stellar Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David

    At the close of nearly a decade of observing, GALEX has accumulated an unprecedented archive of ultraviolet (UV) images revealing both the scope and intricacy of star formation (SF) in many thousands of galaxies inhabiting the local universe. If the observed hierarchical SF morphology can be quantified systematically, and physically interpreted with multi-wavelength ancillary data and modeling, then the low redshift GALEX legacy will approach completion. However, the GALEX GR6 pipeline database contains a highly incomplete census of young stellar complexes even for very well-studied galaxies. We propose to apply a dedicated photometry algorithm that has been optimized for measuring the properties of irregularly shaped sources in crowded galaxy images containing spatially variant, diffuse intra-clump emission. Structures will be selected in the UV, but we will compile UV-visible-MIR SEDs for each detection utilizing Pan-STARRS1+SDSS and WISE data. These SEDs will then be fit using population-synthesis models to derive estimated stellar mass, age, and extinction. Processing will be completed for the entire diameter-limited GALEX Large Galaxy Atlas (GLGA) sample of 20,000+ galaxies, at a variety of standardized spatial resolutions. Although the precise categorization of the cataloged substructures will depend on galaxy distance, the outcome of our analysis will be a catalog similar to the stellar association surveys of past decades for very nearby galaxies based on resolved stars (e.g. van den Bergh 1964, Hodge 1986, Efremov et al. 1987), except that our investigation will probe a galaxy sample of dramatically larger size using the integrated UV light from such groupings of young stars. Our algorithm is multi-scale in nature and will thus preserve the hierarchical properties of the stellar distribution, by linking sub-clumps to their larger-scale parent feature(s). The resulting database will be a fundamental resource for follow-up multi-wavelength studies probing SF

  5. Building a predictive model of galaxy formation - I. Phenomenological model constrained to the z = 0 stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Andrew J.

    2014-11-01

    We constrain a highly simplified semi-analytic model of galaxy formation using the z ≈ 0 stellar mass function of galaxies. Particular attention is paid to assessing the role of random and systematic errors in the determination of stellar masses, to systematic uncertainties in the model, and to correlations between bins in the measured and modelled stellar mass functions, in order to construct a realistic likelihood function. We derive constraints on model parameters and explore which aspects of the observational data constrain particular parameter combinations. We find that our model, once constrained, provides a remarkable match to the measured evolution of the stellar mass function to z = 1, although fails dramatically to match the local galaxy H I mass function. Several `nuisance parameters' contribute significantly to uncertainties in model predictions. In particular, systematic errors in stellar mass estimate are the dominant source of uncertainty in model predictions at z ≈ 1, with additional, non-negligble contributions arising from systematic uncertainties in halo mass functions and the residual uncertainties in cosmological parameters. Ignoring any of these sources of uncertainties could lead to viable models being erroneously ruled out. Additionally, we demonstrate that ignoring the significant covariance between bins the observed stellar mass function leads to significant biases in the constraints derived on model parameters. Careful treatment of systematic and random errors in the constraining data, and in the model being constrained, is crucial if this methodology is to be used to test hypotheses relating to the physics of galaxy formation.

  6. Dual Stellar Halos in the Standard Elliptical Galaxy M105 and Formation of Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2015-08-01

    M105 in the Leo I Group is a textbook example of a standard elliptical galaxy. Old red giant stars in the halo of M105 are easily resolved in the HST images so that it is an ideal target to study the structure and composition of stellar halos in elliptical galaxies. It is only one of the few elliptical galaxies for which we can study their stellar halos using the resolved stars. We present photometry of the resolved stars in its inner region at R~4 arcmin, obtained from F606W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. Then we combine this with photometry of the remote outer region at R~12 arcmin studied before. Deep color-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stars in the inner region show a prominent red giant branch (RGB) with a large color range, while those for the outer region show better a narrow blue RGB. We derive the metallicity of the RGB stars using the isochrones. The metallicity distribution function of the RGB stars shows the existence of two distinct subpopulations: a dominant metal-rich population and a much weaker metal-poor population. The peak metallicity of the metal-rich population changes little as galactocentric distance increases, while the fraction of the metal-poor population increases. The radial number density profile of the metal-poor RGB stars is flatter in the outer region than that of the metal-rich RGB stars. These provide strong evidence that there are two distinct stellar halos in this galaxy, blue (metal-poor) and red (metal-rich) halos, which is consistent with the results based on the study of the globular cluster systems in bright early-type galaxies (Park \\& Lee 2013,ApJ,773, 27). We discuss the implications of these results with regard to the formation of massive early-type galaxies in the dual halo mode formation scenario as well as in the two-phase formation scenario based on similuations.

  7. The Stellar Populations in the Outer Regions of M33. III. Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Sarajedini, Ata; Geisler, Doug; Harding, Paul; Schommer, Robert

    2007-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of three fields in M33 located approximately four to six visual scale lengths from its nucleus. These fields were imaged with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope and reach ~2.5 mag below the red clump of core helium-burning stars. The observed color-magnitude diagrams are modeled as linear combinations of individual synthetic populations with different ages and metallicities. To gain a better understanding of the systematic errors, we have conducted the analysis with two different sets of stellar evolutionary tracks, which we designate as Padova and Teramo. The precise details of the results depend on which tracks are used, but we can make several conclusions that are fairly robust despite the differences. Both sets of tracks predict the mean age to increase and the mean metallicity to decrease with radius. Allowing age and metallicity to be free parameters and assuming that star formation began ~14 Gyr ago, we find that the mean age of all stars and stellar remnants increases from ~6 to ~8 Gyr, and the mean global metallicity decreases from approximately -0.7 to approximately -0.9. The fraction of stars formed by 4.5 Gyr ago increases from ~65% to ~80%. The mean star formation rate 80-800 Myr ago decreases from ~30% of the lifetime average to just ~5%. The random errors on these estimates are ~10%, 1.0 Gyr, and 0.1 dex. By comparing the results of the two sets of stellar tracks for the real data and for test populations with known SFHs, we have estimated the systematic errors to be 15%, 1.0 Gyr, and 0.2 dex. These do not include uncertainties in the bolometric corrections or variations in α-element abundance, which deserve future study. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5

  8. Observational Constraints on Low-Mass Stellar Evolution and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne Louise

    2011-07-01

    Low-mass stars (? < 1.0M⊙) account for more than 70% of the galactic stellar population yet models describing the evolution of their fundamental properties lack stringent observational constraints, especially at early ages. Furthermore, recent observations indicate a significant discrepancy between model predictions and the precise (2 - 3%) observed, dynamical masses and radii measured using low-mass eclipsing binary systems (EBs). Additionally, the theory of planet formation via core accretion predicts notably less hot-Jupiter formation around M-dwarfs (Mdot ? ≤ 0.6M⊙), but as yet, no large enough study exists to robustly test it. Further still, it is predicted that the dynamic environment of stellar clusters, in which most stars are believed to form, hampers planet formation, but again, current null detections of planets in stellar clusters are not statistically significant to test the theory. More observations are required to cement both the theory of low-mass stellar evolution and planet formation. This thesis aims to provide the necessary constraints by uncovering new low-mass EBs and transiting exoplanets in time-series photometry and follow-up spectroscopy from the Monitor project, a photometric monitoring campaign of low-mass stars in nine young open clusters, and in the WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS), a photometric monitoring campaign of ∼10,000 field M-dwarfs. Chapters 3 and 4 present my study of the young (130 Myr) cluster, M 50. I confirm three EB candidates as cluster members, including evidence that one of these is in a triple system with a wide-separation, low-mass tertiary component. The derived masses and radii for this system and one further double-lined, non-cluster member are presented, but these objects required dedicated, single-slit spectroscopic follow-up to yield the accuracy required to test pre-main sequence models. My non-detection of planets in this cluster is consistent with the results of all other cluster transit surveys. The

  9. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF Bz component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF BZ is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION- 4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF By component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere.

  10. Constraints on Stellar Grain Formation from Presolar Graphite in the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Cowsik, Ramanath; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Amari, Sachiko; Lewis, Roy S.

    1996-12-01

    We report the results of isotopic, chemical, structural, and crystallographic micro analyses of graphitic spherules (0.3-9 μm) extracted from the Murchison meteorite. The spherules have 12C/13C ratios ranging over 3 orders of magnitude (from 0.02 to 80 times solar), clearly establishing their presolar origin as stellar condensates. These and other isotopic constraints point to a variety of stellar types as sources of the carbon, including low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and supernovae. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of ultrathin sections of the spherules revealed that many have a composite structure consisting of a core of nanocrystalline carbon surrounded by a mantle of well-graphitized carbon. The nanocrystalline cores are compact masses consisting of randomly oriented graphene sheets, from PAH-sized units up to sheets 3-4 nm in diameter, with little graphitic layering order. These sheets probably condensed as isolated particles that subsequently coalesced to form the cores, after which the surrounding graphitic mantles were added by vapor deposition. We also detected internal crystals of metal carbides in one-third of the spherules. These crystals (5-200 nm) have compositions ranging from nearly pure TiC to nearly pure Zr-Mo carbide. Some of these car- bides occur at the centers of the spherules and are surrounded by well-graphitized carbon, having evidently served as heterogeneous nucleation centers for condensation of carbon. Others were entrained by carbon as the spherules grew. The chemical and textural evidence indicates that these carbides formed prior to carbon condensation, which indicates that the C/O ratios in the stellar sources were very close to unity. Only one of the 67 spherules studied in the TEM contained SiC, from which we infer that carbon condensation nearly always preceded SiC formation. This observation places stringent limits on the possible delay of graphite formation and is consistent with the predictions of

  11. Blast wave formation of the extended stellar shells surrounding elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. E.; Christiansen, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The existence of stellar shells at large distances from isolated elliptical galaxies is explained in terms of a blast wave associated with an active nucleus phase early in the history of the galaxy. The blast wave sweeps the initial interstellar medium out of the galaxy into an expanding shell which radiatively cools behind its leading shock front. Cooling of the shell following turnoff of the nucleus activity, which keeps the shell photoionized, leads to a brief epoch of star formation which is terminated by heating of the shell from supernovae and UV radiation from massive stars. The stars so formed follow similar, highly radial, bound orbits, moving in phase with each other and spending much of their time near apogalacteum, thus taking on the appearance of a shell. Multiple shells may be produced when conditions allow repeated episodes of shell cooling and supernovae heating to occur in the blast wave.

  12. Star Formation in W3—AFGL 333: Young Stellar Content, Properties, and Roles of External Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jessy; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Samal, Manash R.; Bieging, John H.; Meyer, Michael R.; Sherry, William H.

    2016-05-01

    One of the key questions in the field of star formation is the role of stellar feedback on the subsequent star formation process. The W3 giant molecular cloud complex at the western border of the W4 super bubble is thought to be influenced by the massive stars in W4. This paper presents a study of the star formation activity within AFGL 333, a ∼104 M ⊙ cloud within W3, using deep JHK s photometry obtained from the NOAO Extremely Wide Field Infrared Imager combined with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry. Based on the infrared excess, we identify 812 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the complex, of which 99 are Class I and 713 are Class II sources. The stellar density analysis of YSOs reveals three major stellar aggregates within AFGL 333, namely AFGL 333 Main, AFGL 333 NW1 and AFGL 333 NW2. The disk fraction within AFGL 333 is estimated to be ∼50%–60%. We use the extinction map made from the H-{K}s colors of the background stars and CO data to understand the cloud structure and to estimate the cloud mass. From the stellar and cloud mass associated with AFGL 333, we infer that the region is currently forming stars with an efficiency of ∼4.5% and at a rate of ∼2–3 M ⊙ Myr‑1 pc‑2. In general, the star formation activity within AFGL 333 is comparable to that of nearby low mass star-forming regions. We do not find any strong evidence to suggest that the stellar feedback from the massive stars of nearby W4 super bubble has affected the global star formation properties of the AFGL 333 region.

  13. Star Formation in W3—AFGL 333: Young Stellar Content, Properties, and Roles of External Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jessy; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Samal, Manash R.; Bieging, John H.; Meyer, Michael R.; Sherry, William H.

    2016-05-01

    One of the key questions in the field of star formation is the role of stellar feedback on the subsequent star formation process. The W3 giant molecular cloud complex at the western border of the W4 super bubble is thought to be influenced by the massive stars in W4. This paper presents a study of the star formation activity within AFGL 333, a ˜104 M ⊙ cloud within W3, using deep JHK s photometry obtained from the NOAO Extremely Wide Field Infrared Imager combined with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry. Based on the infrared excess, we identify 812 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the complex, of which 99 are Class I and 713 are Class II sources. The stellar density analysis of YSOs reveals three major stellar aggregates within AFGL 333, namely AFGL 333 Main, AFGL 333 NW1 and AFGL 333 NW2. The disk fraction within AFGL 333 is estimated to be ˜50%–60%. We use the extinction map made from the H-{K}s colors of the background stars and CO data to understand the cloud structure and to estimate the cloud mass. From the stellar and cloud mass associated with AFGL 333, we infer that the region is currently forming stars with an efficiency of ˜4.5% and at a rate of ˜2–3 M ⊙ Myr‑1 pc‑2. In general, the star formation activity within AFGL 333 is comparable to that of nearby low mass star-forming regions. We do not find any strong evidence to suggest that the stellar feedback from the massive stars of nearby W4 super bubble has affected the global star formation properties of the AFGL 333 region.

  14. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  15. Star-formation and stellar feedback recipes in galaxy evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone; Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Kuehtreiber, Matthias; Steyrleithner, Patrick; Liu, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Modeling galaxy formation and evolution is critically depending on star formation (SF). Since cosmological and galaxy-scale simulations cannot resolve the spatial and density scales on which SF acts, a large variety of methods are developed and applied over the last decades. Nonetheless, we are still in the test phase how the choice of parameters affects the models and how they agree with observations.As a simple ansatz, recipes are based on power-law SF dependences on gas density as justified by gas cooling and collapse timescales. In order to prevent SF spread throughout the gas, temperature and density thresholds are also used, although gas dynamical effects, like e.g. gas infall, seem to trigger SF significantly.The formed stars influence their environment immediately by energetic and materialistic feedback. It has been experienced in numerical models that supernova typeII explosions act with a too long time delay to regulate the SF, but that winds and ionizing radiation by massive stars must be included. The implementation of feedback processes, their efficiencies and timescales, is still in an experimental state, because they depend also on the physical state of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).Combining a SF-gas density relation with stellar heating vs. gas cooling and taking the temperature dependence into account, we have derived an analytical expression of self-regulated SF which is free of arbitrary parameters. We have performed numerical models to study this recipe and different widely used SF criteria in both, particle and grid codes. Moreover, we compare the SF behavior between single-gas phase and multi-phase treatments of the ISM.Since dwarf galaxies (DGs) are most sensitive to environmental influences and contain only low SF rates, we explore two main affects on their models: 1. For external effects we compare SF rates of isolated and ram-pressure suffering DGs. Moreover, we find a SF enhancement in tidal-tail DGs by the compressive tidal

  16. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG STELLAR POPULATION IN BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD SFO 38

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Rumpa; Bhatt, H. C.; Mookerjea, Bhaswati E-mail: hcbhatt@iiap.res.i

    2010-07-10

    We have investigated the young stellar population in and around SFO 38, one of the massive globules located in the northern part of the Galactic H II region IC 1396, using the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations (3.6-24 {mu}m), and followed up with ground-based optical photometric and spectroscopic observations. Based on the IRAC and MIPS colors and H{alpha} emission, we identify {approx}45 young stellar objects (Classes 0/I/II) and 13 probable pre-main-sequence candidates. We derive the spectral types (mostly K- and M-type stars), effective temperatures, and individual extinction of the relatively bright and optically visible Class II objects. Most of the Class II objects show variable H{alpha} emission as well as optical and near-infrared photometric variability, which confirm their 'youth'. Based on optical photometry and theoretical isochrones, we estimate the spread in stellar ages to be between 1 and 8 Myr with a median age of 3 Myr and a mass distribution of 0.3-2.2 M{sub sun} with a median value around 0.5 M{sub sun}. Using the width of the H{alpha} emission line measured at 10% peak intensity, we derive the mass accretion rates of individual objects to be between 10{sup -10} and 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. From the continuum-subtracted H{alpha} line image, we find that the H{alpha} emission of the globule is not spatially symmetric with respect to the O-type ionizing star HD 206267, and the interstellar extinction toward the globule is also anomalous. We clearly detect an enhanced concentration of YSOs closer to the southern rim of SFO 38 and identify an evolutionary sequence of YSOs from the rim to the dense core of the cloud, with most of the Class II objects located at the bright rim. The YSOs appear to be aligned along two different directions toward the O6.5V type star HD 206267 and the B0V type star HD 206773. This is consistent with the Radiation Driven Implosion (RDI) model for triggered star formation. Further, the apparent speed of

  17. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. I. Evidence of suppressed planet formation due to stellar companions within 20 au and validation of four planets from the Kepler multiple planet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Barclay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The planet occurrence rate for multiple stars is important in two aspects. First, almost half of stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are multiple systems. Second, the comparison of the planet occurrence rate for multiple stars to that for single stars sheds light on the influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation and evolution. We developed a method of distinguishing planet occurrence rates for single and multiple stars. From a sample of 138 bright (K{sub P} < 13.5) Kepler multi-planet candidate systems, we compared the stellar multiplicity rate of these planet host stars to that of field stars. Using dynamical stability analyses and archival Doppler measurements, we find that the stellar multiplicity rate of planet host stars is significantly lower than field stars for semimajor axes less than 20 AU, suggesting that planet formation and evolution are suppressed by the presence of a close-in companion star at these separations. The influence of stellar multiplicity at larger separations is uncertain because of search incompleteness due to a limited Doppler observation time baseline and a lack of high-resolution imaging observation. We calculated the planet confidence for the sample of multi-planet candidates and find that the planet confidences for KOI 82.01, KOI 115.01, KOI 282.01, and KOI 1781.02 are higher than 99.7% and thus validate the planetary nature of these four planet candidates. This sample of bright Kepler multi-planet candidates with refined stellar and orbital parameters, planet confidence estimation, and nearby stellar companion identification offers a well-characterized sample for future theoretical and observational study.

  18. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disc morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Masters, Karen L.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O. Ivy; Nichol, Robert C.; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-05-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate (SFR) relation in star-forming disc galaxies at z ≤ 0.085, using Galaxy Zoo morphologies to examine different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. We examine the number of spiral arms, their relative pitch angle, and the presence of a galactic bar in the disc, and show that both the slope and dispersion of the M⋆-SFR relation is constant when varying all the above parameters. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by ˜0.3 dex; this is significantly smaller than the increase seen in merging systems at z > 1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M⋆-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50 per cent are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  19. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  20. Core-halo age gradients and star formation in the Orion Nebula and NGS 2024 young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze age distributions of two nearby rich stellar clusters, the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) and Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Our analysis is based on samples from the MYStIX survey and a new estimator of pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar ages, Age{sub JX} , derived from X-ray and near-infrared photometric data. To overcome the problem of uncertain individual ages and large spreads of age distributions for entire clusters, we compute median ages and their confidence intervals of stellar samples within annular subregions of the clusters. We find core-halo age gradients in both the NGC 2024 cluster and ONC: PMS stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than PMS stars in cluster peripheries. These findings are further supported by the spatial gradients in the disk fraction and K-band excess frequency. Our age analysis is based on Age{sub JX} estimates for PMS stars and is independent of any consideration of OB stars. The result has important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. One basic implication is that clusters form slowly and the apparent age spreads in young stellar clusters, which are often controversial, are (at least in part) real. The result further implies that simple models where clusters form inside-out are incorrect and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  1. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  2. CHARACTERIZING THE FORMATION HISTORY OF MILKY WAY LIKE STELLAR HALOS WITH MODEL EMULATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Facundo A.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Coleman-Smith, Christopher E.; Tumlinson, Jason; Wolpert, Robert L.

    2012-12-01

    We use the semi-analytic model ChemTreeN, coupled to cosmological N-body simulations, to explore how different galaxy formation histories can affect observational properties of Milky Way like galaxies' stellar halos and their satellite populations. Gaussian processes are used to generate model emulators that allow one to statistically estimate a desired set of model outputs at any location of a p-dimensional input parameter space. This enables one to explore the full input parameter space orders of magnitude faster than could be done otherwise. Using mock observational data sets generated by ChemTreeN itself, we show that it is possible to successfully recover the input parameter vectors used to generate the mock observables if the merger history of the host halo is known. However, our results indicate that for a given observational data set, the determination of 'best-fit' parameters is highly susceptible to the particular merger history of the host. Very different halo merger histories can reproduce the same observational data set, if the 'best-fit' parameters are allowed to vary from history to history. Thus, attempts to characterize the formation history of the Milky Way using these kind of techniques must be performed statistically, analyzing large samples of high-resolution N-body simulations.

  3. Explaining the Three-decade Correlation between Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass in Galaxies at z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawiser, Eric J.; Kurczynski, Peter; Acquaviva, Viviana; UVUDF Team, CANDELS Team

    2016-01-01

    In star-forming galaxies across cosmic time, a correlation has been found between the mass of stars already assembled and its time derivative, the star formation rate. This surprising correlation was not predicted by theory, but it can be reproduced within cosmological hydrodynamics simulations and semi-analytical models of galaxy formation. Here we use SpeedyMC, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code for Spectral Energy Distribution fitting, to measure the star formation rates and stellar masses of 800 galaxies from the Ultraviolet Ultradeep Field (UVUDF) and CANDELS/GOODS-S field at redshift 1 < z < 1.5. This galaxy sample leverages the deepest images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope to extend the SFR-M* correlation a factor of 10-100X lower in M* than previous studies, down to values of 10^7 M_sun comparable to present-day dwarf galaxies. Accounting for each galaxy's parameter uncertainties, including their covariances, yields a power-law correlation across three decades with intrinsic scatter of 0.2 dex. Having assumed realistic star formation histories that can rise and fall with time, we are able to measure star formation rates on timescales varying from instantaneous to the "lifetime" average for each galaxy. As the timescale over which star formation rate is averaged increases, the power-law exponent of the correlation with stellar mass increases to unity, and the scatter decreases to 0.05 dex. We conclude that the observed correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass results from a tight correlation between recent and lifetime-average star formation rates and a narrow spread of galaxy ages at a given star formation rate. The resulting correlation provides crucial evidence that galaxy formation proceeds through self-regulated star formation. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant AST-1055919 and grants from NASA via the Space Telescope Science Institute in support of programs 12060.57, 12445.56, and GO-12534.

  4. Determining the mechanism of cusp proton aurora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; He, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Zhonglei

    2013-01-01

    Earth's cusp proton aurora occurs near the prenoon and is primarily produced by the precipitation of solar energetic (2–10 keV) protons. Cusp auroral precipitation provides a direct source of energy for the high-latitude dayside upper atmosphere, contributing to chemical composition change and global climate variability. Previous studies have indicated that magnetic reconnection allows solar energetic protons to cross the magnetopause and enter the cusp region, producing cusp auroral precipitation. However, energetic protons are easily trapped in the cusp region due to a minimum magnetic field existing there. Hence, the mechanism of cusp proton aurora has remained a significant challenge for tens of years. Based on the satellite data and calculations of diffusion equation, we demonstrate that EMIC waves can yield the trapped proton scattering that causes cusp proton aurora. This moves forward a step toward identifying the generation mechanism of cusp proton aurora. PMID:23575366

  5. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean; Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines: the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF B(sub Z) component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF B(sub Z) is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION-4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF B(sub y) component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere. The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly

  6. Gravoturbulent star formation: Effects of the equation of state on stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klessen, Ralf S.; Spaans, Marco; Jappsen, Anne-Katharina

    Stars form by gravoturbulent fragmentation of interstellar gas clouds. The supersonic turbulence ubiquitously observed in Galactic molecular gas generates strong density fluctuations with gravity taking over in the densest and most massive regions. Collapse sets in to build up stars and star clusters.Turbulence plays a dual role. On global scales it provides support, while at the same time it can promote local collapse. Stellar birth is thus intimately linked to the dynamic behavior of parental gas clouds, which governs when and where protostellar cores form, and how they contract and grow in mass via accretion from the surrounding cloud material to build up stars. The equation of state plays a pivotal role in the fragmentation process. Under typical cloud conditions, massive stars form as part of dense clusters following the "normal" mass function observed, e.g. in the solar neighborhood. However, for gas with an effective polytropic index greater than unity star formation becomes biased towards isolated massive stars. This is relevant for understanding the properties of zero-metallicity stars (Population III) or stars that form under extreme environmental conditions like in the Galactic center or in luminous starbursts.

  7. The most distant galaxies: star formation rates, stellar populations and contribution to reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Andrew; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Wilkins, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decade we have identified the first galaxies at redshift 6 and beyond, within the first billion years when the Gunn-Peterson absorption produces significant Lyman breaks in the spectra. Since the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) was imaged with HST/ACS, the advent of sensitive near-infrared imaging on HST with WFC3 has enabled us to push the use of the Lyman break technique to redshifts between 7 and 12, within the epoch of reionization. Rest-frame UV luminosity functions derived from various deep HST fields such as the HUDF and Frontier Fields, wider field imaging such as CANDELS, and ground-based imaging such as UltraVISTA, can be used to constrain the contribution of ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies. I will review what we have learned about the role of galaxies in the reionization of the IGM, and discuss the implications of the observed blue spectral slopes at these epochs and the redshift evolution of the fraction of strong Lyman-alpha emitters. Coupled with observations from Spitzer/IRAC, we can estimate the stellar masses as well as star formation rates for this population of proto-galaxies. I will look ahead to the prospects with JWST, in particular our NIRSpec GTO programme to obtain spectra of star-forming galaxies within the epoch of reionization.

  8. The stellar content and formation history of the Giant HII region W51 using IRMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; MacKenty, John; Clark, Simon; Figer, Don

    2007-08-01

    The W51 Giant Molecular Cloud is amongst the most massive within the Galaxy, and harbours widespread and significant massive star formation (SF). However this activity appears qualitatively different from the spatially segregated, sequentially triggered SF occuring in e.g. the G305 and the 30 Dor star forming regions, apparently being quasi- simultaneous and multi-seeded. We propose to obtain near-IR spectroscopy of selected regions within W51 to complement planned deep imaging observations, in order to (i) determine if SF at these sites is proceeding independently or instead is triggered by older, adjacent activity and (ii) to investigate the claims of Okumura et al. (2000) for a top heavy IMF and hence to investigate if the IMF shows an environmental dependence. Finally, a measurement of the total stellar mass in W51 will enable the SF efficiency to be determined and compared to other star forming regions, to investigate potential dependencies on environment or the mode of SF, e.g triggered or multi-seeded.

  9. Formation of warped disks by galactic flyby encounters. I. Stellar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeonghwan H.; An, Sung-Ho; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Peirani, Sebastien; Kim, Sungsoo; Ann, Hong Bae

    2014-07-01

    Warped disks are almost ubiquitous among spiral galaxies. Here we revisit and test the 'flyby scenario' of warp formation, in which impulsive encounters between galaxies are responsible for warped disks. Based on N-body simulations, we investigate the morphological and kinematical evolution of the stellar component of disks when galaxies undergo flyby interactions with adjacent dark matter halos. We find that the so-called 'S'-shaped warps can be excited by flybys and sustained for even up to a few billion years, and that this scenario provides a cohesive explanation for several key observations. We show that disk warp properties are governed primarily by the following three parameters: (1) the impact parameter, i.e., the minimum distance between two halos; (2) the mass ratio between two halos; and (3) the incident angle of the flyby perturber. The warp angle is tied up with all three parameters, yet the warp lifetime is particularly sensitive to the incident angle of the perturber. Interestingly, the modeled S-shaped warps are often non-symmetric depending on the incident angle. We speculate that the puzzling U- and L-shaped warps are geometrically superimposed S-types produced by successive flybys with different incident angles, including multiple interactions with a satellite on a highly elongated orbit.

  10. Beach Cusps: Spatial distribution and time evolution at Massaguaçú beach (SP), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, H. H.; Siegle, E.; Sousa, P. H.

    2013-05-01

    Beach cusps are crescentic morphological structures observed on the foreshore of beaches characterized by steep seaward protruding extensions, called cusp horns, and gently sloped landward extensions, called cusp embayments. Their formation depends on the grain size, beach slope, tidal range and incoming waves. Cusps are best developed on gravel or shingle beaches, small tidal range with a large slope for incoming waves generate a well-developed swash excursion. These structures are quickly responding to wave climate and tidal range, changing the position of the rhythmic features on the beach face. Beach cusps are favored by normal incoming waves, while oblique waves tend to wash these features out. This study aims to analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of rhythmic features such as beach cusps in Massaguaçú embayment (Caraguatatuba, northern coast of São Paulo, Brazil). This embayment has an extension of 7.5 km with reflective beaches cusped mainly in its more exposed central portion. The data set for this study consists of a series of video images (Argus system), covering a stretch of the beach. Visible beach cusps were digitalized from these rectified images. Results obtained from the images were related to the wave climate, water level and the storm surges. Results show that the cusps on the upper portion of the foreshore were more regular and present than the cusps on the lower portion of the foreshore due to the tidal modulation of wave action. The cusp spacing on the upper portion of the foreshore is of about 38 m and the lower portion of the foreshore is of about 28 m and their presence was correlated with the wave direction and water elevation. As expected, waves approaching with shore-normal angles (southeast direction) were favorable to the formation of beach cusps while the waves from the southwest, south, east and northeast generated a longshore current that reduced or destroyed any rhythmic feature. Other important forcing was

  11. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  12. Constraining the Dark Cusp in the Galactic Center by Long-period Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Tal; Pfuhl, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei are believed to be surrounded by a high-density stellar cluster, whose mass is mostly in hard-to-detect faint stars and compact remnants. Such dark cusps dominate the dynamics near the MBH: a dark cusp in the Galactic center (GC) of the Milky Way would strongly affect orbital tests of general relativity there; on cosmic scales, dark cusps set the rates of gravitational wave emission events from compact remnants that spiral into MBHs, and they modify the rates of tidal disruption events, to list only some implications. A recently discovered long-period massive young binary (with period P 12 <~ 1 yr, total mass M_{12}\\sim {\\cal O}(100\\, M_{\\odot }), and age T 12 ~ 6 × 106 yr), only ~0.1 pc from the Galactic MBH, sets a lower bound on the stellar two-body relaxation timescale there, min t rlxvprop(P 12/M 12)2/3 T 12 ~ 107 yr, and, correspondingly, an upper bound on the stellar number density, \\max n_{\\star }\\sim {few\\times }10^{8}/\\langle M_{\\star }^{2}\\rangle \\,{pc^{-3}} (\\langle M_{\\star }^{2}\\rangle ^{1/2} is the rms stellar mass), based on the binary's survival against evaporation by the dark cusp. However, a conservative dynamical estimate, the drain limit, implies t_{{rlx}} \\gt {\\cal O}({10^{8}}\\,{yr}). Such massive binaries are thus too short-lived and tightly bound to constrain a dense relaxed dark cusp. We explore here in detail the use of longer-period, less massive, and longer-lived binaries (P 12 ~ few yr, M 12 ~ 2-4 M ⊙, T 12 ~ 108-1010 yr), presently just below the detection threshold, for probing the dark cusp and develop the framework for translating their future detections among the giants in the GC into dynamical constraints.

  13. SIMULTANEOUS MODELING OF THE STELLAR AND DUST EMISSION IN DISTANT GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAR FORMATION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Utomo, Dyas; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-03-10

    We have used near-ultraviolet (NUV) to mid-infrared (MIR) composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to simultaneously model the attenuated stellar and dust emission of 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 2.0 galaxies. These composite SEDs were previously constructed from the photometric catalogs of the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey by stacking the observed photometry of galaxies that have similar rest-frame NUV-to-NIR SEDs. In this work, we include a stacked MIPS 24 μm measurement for each SED type to extend the SEDs to rest-frame MIR wavelengths. Consistent with previous studies, the observed MIR emission for most SED types is higher than expected from only the attenuated stellar emission. We fit the NUV-to-MIR composite SEDs with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis (FSPS) models, which include both stellar and dust emission. We compare the best-fit star formation rates (SFRs) to the SFRs based on simple UV+IR estimators. Interestingly, the UV and IR luminosities overestimate SFRs—compared to the model SFRs—by more than ∼1 dex for quiescent galaxies, while for the highest star-forming galaxies in our sample the two SFRs are broadly consistent. The difference in specific SFRs also shows a gradually increasing trend with declining specific SFR, implying that quiescent galaxies have even lower specific SFRs than previously found. Contributions from evolved stellar populations to both the UV and the MIR SEDs most likely explain the discrepancy. Based on this work, we conclude that SFRs should be determined from modeling the attenuated stellar and dust emission simultaneously, instead of employing simple UV+IR-based SFR estimators.

  14. Stellar Masses and Start Formation Rates of Lensed Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies from the SPT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Gonzalez, Anthony; SPT SMG Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift (2.8 ≤ z ≤ 5.7) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using HST, Spitzer, Herschel and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution HST/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in Spitzer/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses, IR luminosities, and star formation rates (SFRs). The SED fits of six SPT sources show that the intrinsic stellar masses span a range more than one order of magnitude with a median value ˜ 5 ×1010M⊙. The intrinsic IR luminosities range from 4×1012L⊙ to 4×1013L⊙. They all have prodigious intrinsic star formation rates of 510 to 4800 M⊙yr-1. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these six DSFGs have specific SFRs that all lie above the MS, including two galaxies that are a factor of 10 higher than the MS. Our results suggest that we are witnessing the ongoing strong starburst events which may be driven by major mergers.

  15. The Role of Bulge Formation in the Homogenization of Stellar Populations at z~2 as revealed by Internal Color Dispersion in CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boada, Steven; Tilvi, V.; Papovich, C.; Quadri, R. F.; Hilton, M.; Finkelstein, S.; Guo, Yicheng; Bond, N.; Conselice, C.; Dekel, A.; Ferguson, H.; Giavalisco, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.

    2015-04-01

    We use data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey to study how the spatial variation in the stellar populations of galaxies relates to the formation of galaxies at 1.5\\lt z\\lt 3.5. We use the internal color dispersion (ICD), measured between the rest-frame UV and optical bands, which is sensitive to age (and dust attenuation) variations in stellar populations. The ICD shows a relation with the stellar masses and morphologies of the galaxies. Galaxies with the largest variation in their stellar populations as evidenced by high ICD have disk-dominated morphologies (with Sérsic indexes \\lt 2) and stellar masses between 10\\lt log (M/{{M}⊙ })\\lt 11. There is a marked decrease in the ICD as the stellar mass and/or the Sérsic index increases. By studying the relations between the ICD and other galaxy properties including size, total color, star formation rate, and dust attenuation, we conclude that the largest variations in stellar populations occur in galaxies where the light from newly, high star-forming clumps contrasts older stellar disk populations. This phase reaches a peak for galaxies only with a specific stellar mass range, 10 \\lt log (M/{{M}⊙ }) \\lt 11, and prior to the formation of a substantial bulge/spheroid. In contrast, galaxies at higher or lower stellar masses and/or higher Sérsic index (n\\gt 2) show reduced ICD values, implying a greater homogeneity of their stellar populations. This indicates that if a galaxy is to have a quiescent bulge along with a star-forming disk, typical of Hubble sequence galaxies, this is most common for stellar masses 10 \\lt log (M/{{M}⊙ }) \\lt 11 and when the bulge component remains relatively small (n\\lt 2).

  16. The statistics of triggered star formation: an overdensity of massive young stellar objects around Spitzer bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. A.; Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Morgan, L. K.

    2012-03-01

    We present a detailed statistical study of massive star formation in the environment of 322 Spitzer mid-infrared bubbles by using the Red MSX Source (RMS) survey for massive young stellar objects (YSOs). Using a combination of simple surface density plots and a more sophisticated angular cross-correlation function analysis, we show that there is a statistically significant overdensity of RMS YSOs towards the bubbles. There is a clear peak in the surface density and angular cross-correlation function of YSOs projected against the rim of the bubbles. By investigating the autocorrelation function of the RMS YSOs, we show that this is not due to intrinsic clustering of the RMS YSO sample. RMS YSOs and Spitzer bubbles are essentially uncorrelated with each other beyond a normalized angular distance of two bubble radii. The bubbles associated with RMS YSOs tend to be both smaller and thinner than those that are not associated with YSOs. We interpret this tendency to be due to an age effect, with YSOs being preferentially found around smaller and younger bubbles. We find no evidence to suggest that the YSOs associated with the bubbles are any more luminous than the rest of the RMS YSO population, which suggests that the triggering process does not produce a top-heavy luminosity function or initial mass function. We suggest that it is likely that the YSOs were triggered by the expansion of the bubbles and estimate that the fraction of massive stars in the Milky Way formed by this process could be between 14 and 30 per cent.

  17. The Relation between Star-Formation Rate and Stellar Mass of Galaxies at z ~ 1-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    The relation between the star-formation Rate and stellar mass (M ⋆) of galaxies represents a fundamental constraint on galaxy formation, and has been studied extensively both in observations and cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. However, the observed amplitude of the star-formation rate-stellar mass relation has not been successfully reproduced in simulations, indicating either that the halo accretion history and baryonic physics are poorly understood/modelled or that observations contain biases. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the SFR - M ⋆ relation of z ~ 1-4 galaxies and display the inconsistency between observed relations that are obtained using different techniques. We employ cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from various groups which are tuned to reproduce a range of observables and compare these with a range of observed SFR - M ⋆ relations. We find that numerical results are consistent with observations that use Spectral Energy Distribution techniques to estimate star-formation rates, dust corrections, and stellar masses. On the contrary, simulations are not able to reproduce results that were obtained by combining only UV and IR luminosities (UV+IR). These imply star-formation rates at a fixed stellar mass that are larger almost by a factor of 5 than those of Spectral Energy Distribution measurements for z ~ 1.5-4. For z < 1.5, the results from simulations, Spectral Energy Distribution fitting techniques and IR+UV conversion agree well. We find that surveys that preferably select star-forming galaxies (e.g. by adopting Lyman-break or blue selection) typically predict a larger median/average star-formation rate at a fixed stellar mass especially for high mass objects, with respect to mass selected samples and hydrodynamic simulations. Furthermore, we find remarkable agreement between the numerical results from various authors who have employed different cosmological codes and run simulations with different resolutions. This is

  18. Stellar contents and star formation in the young star cluster Be 59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ogura, K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chen, W. P.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We present UBV Ic CCD photometry of the young open cluster Be 59 with the aim to study the star formation scenario in the cluster. The radial extent of the cluster is found to be ~10 arcmin (2.9 pc). The interstellar extinction in the cluster region varies between E(B - V) ~= 1.4 to 1.8 mag. The ratio of total-to-selective extinction in the cluster region is estimated as 3.7 +/- 0.3. The distance of the cluster is found to be 1.00 +/- 0.05 kpc. Using near-infrared (NIR) colours and slitless spectroscopy, we have identified young stellar objects (YSOs) in the open cluster Be 59 region. The ages of these YSOs range between <1 and ~2 Myr, whereas the mean age of the massive stars in the cluster region is found to be ~2 Myr. There is evidence for second-generation star formation outside the boundary of the cluster, which may be triggered by massive stars in the cluster. The slope of the initial mass function, Γ, in the mass range 2.5 < M/Msolar <= 28 is found to be -1.01 +/- 0.11 which is shallower than the Salpeter value (-1.35), whereas in the mass range 1.5 < M/Msolar <= 2.5 the slope is almost flat. The slope of the K-band luminosity function is estimated as 0.27 +/- 0.02, which is smaller than the average value (~0.4) reported for young embedded clusters. Approximately 32 per cent of Hα emission stars of Be 59 exhibit NIR excess indicating that inner discs of the T Tauri star (TTS) population have not dissipated. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) and IRAS-HIRES images around the cluster region are also used to study the emission from unidentified infrared bands and to estimate the spatial distribution of optical depth of warm and cold interstellar dust.

  19. Improved Constraints on the Milky Way’s Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass from Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licquia, Timothy; Newman, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method for improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by building upon the previous measurements found in the literature, combining the information contained in each of them using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical analysis that allows us to account for the possibility that any one of them may be incorrect or have underestimated its errors. In this application, the HB method yields similar estimates to a weighted average, but with more realistic error estimates. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about potential problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields a SFR for the Galaxy of 1.66 ± 0.20 M⊙ yr-1. When calculating the stellar mass contained in each component of the Milky Way, we incorporate Monte Carlo simulations to reflect the latest estimates of the galactocentric radius of the sun and stellar mass surface density of the local neighborhood. We show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is M*B = 0.91 ± 0.08 × 1010 M⊙, the disk mass is M*D = 4.89+0.98-0.82 × 1010 M⊙, and their combination yields a total stellar mass of M* = 5.76+0.98-0.82 × 1010 M⊙. This work displays the advantage of using HB meta-analysis to robustly combine a set of measurements that are prone to numerous systematic errors, while simultaneously providing information on the level of systematics that may be having an impact.

  20. Improved Estimates of the Milky Way's Stellar Mass and Star Formation Rate from Hierarchical Bayesian Meta-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    We present improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by combining previous measurements from the literature using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical method that allows us to account for the possibility that any value may be incorrect or have underestimated errors. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about the nature of problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields an SFR for the Galaxy of {{\\dot{M}}\\star }=1.65+/- 0.19 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1}, assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF). By combining HB methods with Monte Carlo simulations that incorporate the latest estimates of the Galactocentric radius of the Sun, R0, the exponential scale length of the disk, Ld, and the local surface density of stellar mass, {{Σ}\\star }({{R}0}), we show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is M\\star B=0.91+/- 0.07× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ }, the disk mass is M\\star D=5.17+/- 1.11× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ }, and their combination yields a total stellar mass of {{M}\\star }=6.08+/- 1.14× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ } (assuming a Kroupa IMF and an exponential disk profile). This analysis is based upon a new compilation of literature bulge mass estimates, normalized to common assumptions about the stellar IMF and Galactic disk properties, presented herein. We additionally find a bulge-to-total mass ratio for the Milky Way of B/T=0.150-0.019+0.028 and a specific SFR of {{\\dot{M}}\\star }/{{M}\\star }=2.71+/- 0.59× {{10}-11} yr-1.

  1. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Context. Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. Aims: To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808 B, which is in the process of PR formation. Methods: We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging in the F450W, F555W, or F606W and F814W filters. Extensive completeness tests, PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Results: Both PRGs contain young CSSs (<1 Gyr) with masses of up to 5 × 106M⊙, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive CSSs may be progenitors of metal-rich globular clusters or ultra compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies. We identify one such young UCD candidate, NGC 3808 B-8, and measure its size of reff = 25.23+1.43-2.01 pc. We reconstruct the star formation history of the two PRGs and find strong peaks in the star formation rate (SFR, ≃200 M⊙/yr) in NGC 3808 B, while NGC 4650 A shows milder (declining) star formation (SFR< 10 M⊙/yr). This difference may support different evolutionary paths between these PRGs. Conclusions: The spatial distribution, masses, and peak star formation epoch of the clusters in NGC 3808 suggest for a tidally triggered star formation. Incompleteness at old ages prevents us from probing the SFR at earlier epochs of NGC 4650 A, where we observe the fading tail of CSS formation. This also impedes us from testing the formation scenarios of this PRG.

  2. Missing Mass Measurement Using Kinematic Cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ian-Woo

    2010-02-10

    We propose a new method for mass measurement of missing energy particle using cusp structure in the kinematic distribution. We consider a resonance particle decay into a pair of missing energy particles and a pair of visible particles and show invariant mass and angular distribution have non-smooth profiles. The cusp location only depends on mass parameters. Invariant mass and angular distribution are complementary in visibility of the cusp.

  3. The CUSP as a Source of Magnetospheric Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, Theodore A.; Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    Observations made by the Polar satellite have shown that plasma of solar wind magnetosheath origin is rammed into the high altitude polar cusp creating a diamagnetic cavity of large dimensions. The Earth's dipole field can be excluded from this region in it turbulent manner with the magnitude of the field strength reaching close to zero nT at times. At such times energetic particles are produced in this region in intensities which exceed those measured in the trapping regions of the magnetosphere beyond L = 6.5. These particles can then flow back out of the cusp along field lines that form the magnetopause. A fraction of these particles can enter the magnetosphere along the magnetopause on the dusk and dawn flanks. Due to existing gradients in the geomagnetic field, cusp accelerated ions can enter the magnetosphere along the dawn flank and electrons along the dusk flank. For those particles entering near the geomagnetic equatorial plane with pitch angles close to ninety degrees they will drift along contours of constant magnetic field strength reaching deep into the nightside inner magnetosphere. From observations made by the Polar ATS-6, and ISEE satellites it is argued that this cusp source appears to be capable of providing energetic ions to the magnetosphere and possibly energetic electrons which form the source population of the Subsequent radial diffusion and formation of the radiation belts.

  4. Detailed requirements document for the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer decommutation and formatting programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brose, J. F.; Bourgeois, V.

    1975-01-01

    The requirements are defined for developing a decommutation and a data reformat program to process test data obtained by the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer used in a joint experiment with the Space Research Laboratory in the Netherlands. Background information and objectives are discussed.

  5. Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-10-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on nearby galaxies, which are best suited to study this theme. Of course, the understanding of stellar populations is intimately connected to understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies, one of the great outstanding problems of astronomy. We are currently in a situation where very large observational advances have been made in recent years. Galaxies have been detected up to a redshift of ten. A huge effort has to be made so that stellar population theory can catch up with observations. Since most galaxies are far away, information about them has to come from stellar population synthesis of integrated light. Here I will discuss how stellar evolution theory, together with observations in our Milky Way and Local Group, are used as building blocks to analyse these integrated stellar populations.

  6. FORMATION OF LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXIES: GAS RETURN FROM STELLAR POPULATIONS REGULATES DISK DESTRUCTION AND BULGE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Martig, Marie; Bournaud, Frederic

    2010-05-10

    Spiral galaxies have most of their stellar mass in a large rotating disk, and only a modest fraction in a central spheroidal bulge. This challenges present models of galaxy formation: galaxies form at the center of dark matter halos through a combination of hierarchical merging and gas accretion along cold streams. Cosmological simulations thus predict that galaxies rapidly grow their bulge through mergers and instabilities and end up with most of their mass in the bulge and an angular momentum much below the observed level, except in dwarf galaxies. We propose that the continuous return of gas by stellar populations over cosmic times could help to solve this issue. A population of stars formed at a given instant typically returns half of its initial mass in the form of gas over 10 billion years, and the process is not dominated by supernovae explosions but by the long-term mass-loss from low- and intermediate-mass stars. Using simulations of galaxy formation, we show that this gas recycling can strongly affect the structural evolution of massive galaxies, potentially solving the bulge fraction issue, as the bulge-to-disk ratio of a massive galaxy can be divided by a factor of 3. The continuous recycling of baryons through star formation and stellar mass loss helps the growth of disks and their survival to interactions and mergers. Instead of forming only early-type, spheroid-dominated galaxies (S0 and ellipticals), the standard cosmological model can successfully account for massive late-type, disk-dominated spiral galaxies (Sb-Sc).

  7. Metallofullerene and fullerene formation from condensing carbon gas under conditions of stellar outflows and implication to stardust

    PubMed Central

    Dunk, Paul W.; Adjizian, Jean-Joseph; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Quinn, John P.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Ewels, Christopher P.; Marshall, Alan G.; Kroto, Harold W.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous presolar grains of supernovae origin have long been isolated and are determined to be the carrier of anomalous 22Ne in ancient meteorites. That exotic 22Ne is, in fact, the decay isotope of relatively short-lived 22Na formed by explosive nucleosynthesis, and therefore, a selective and rapid Na physical trapping mechanism must take place during carbon condensation in supernova ejecta. Elucidation of the processes that trap Na and produce large carbon molecules should yield insight into carbon stardust enrichment and formation. Herein, we demonstrate that Na effectively nucleates formation of Na@C60 and other metallofullerenes during carbon condensation under highly energetic conditions in oxygen- and hydrogen-rich environments. Thus, fundamental carbon chemistry that leads to trapping of Na is revealed, and should be directly applicable to gas-phase chemistry involving stellar environments, such as supernova ejecta. The results indicate that, in addition to empty fullerenes, metallofullerenes should be constituents of stellar/circumstellar and interstellar space. In addition, gas-phase reactions of fullerenes with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated to probe “build-up” and formation of carbon stardust, and provide insight into fullerene astrochemistry. PMID:24145444

  8. Metallofullerene and fullerene formation from condensing carbon gas under conditions of stellar outflows and implication to stardust.

    PubMed

    Dunk, Paul W; Adjizian, Jean-Joseph; Kaiser, Nathan K; Quinn, John P; Blakney, Gregory T; Ewels, Christopher P; Marshall, Alan G; Kroto, Harold W

    2013-11-01

    Carbonaceous presolar grains of supernovae origin have long been isolated and are determined to be the carrier of anomalous (22)Ne in ancient meteorites. That exotic (22)Ne is, in fact, the decay isotope of relatively short-lived (22)Na formed by explosive nucleosynthesis, and therefore, a selective and rapid Na physical trapping mechanism must take place during carbon condensation in supernova ejecta. Elucidation of the processes that trap Na and produce large carbon molecules should yield insight into carbon stardust enrichment and formation. Herein, we demonstrate that Na effectively nucleates formation of Na@C60 and other metallofullerenes during carbon condensation under highly energetic conditions in oxygen- and hydrogen-rich environments. Thus, fundamental carbon chemistry that leads to trapping of Na is revealed, and should be directly applicable to gas-phase chemistry involving stellar environments, such as supernova ejecta. The results indicate that, in addition to empty fullerenes, metallofullerenes should be constituents of stellar/circumstellar and interstellar space. In addition, gas-phase reactions of fullerenes with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated to probe "build-up" and formation of carbon stardust, and provide insight into fullerene astrochemistry. PMID:24145444

  9. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  10. Mapping a stellar disk into a boxy bulge: The outside-in part of the Milky Way bulge formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.; Gómez, A.; van Damme, L.; Combes, F.; Hallé, A.; Semelin, B.; Lehnert, M. D.; Katz, D.

    2014-07-01

    By means of idealized, dissipationless N-body simulations that follow the formation and subsequent buckling of a stellar bar, we study the characteristics of boxy/peanut-shaped bulges and compare them with the properties of the stellar populations in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. The main results of our modeling, valid for the general family of boxy/peanut shaped bulges, are the following: (i) Because of the spatial redistribution in the disk initiated at the epoch of bar formation, stars from the innermost regions to the outer Lindblad resonance (OLR) of the stellar bar are mapped into a boxy bulge. (ii) The contribution of stars to the local bulge density depends on their birth radius: stars born in the innermost disk tend to dominate the innermost regions of the boxy bulge, while stars originating closer to the OLR are preferably found in the outer regions of the boxy/peanut structure. (iii) Stellar birth radii are imprinted in the bulge kinematics: the larger the birth radii of stars ending up in the bulge, the greater their rotational support and the higher their line-of-sight velocity dispersions (but note that this last trend depends on the bar viewing angle). (iv) The higher the classical bulge-over-disk ratio, the larger its fractional contribution of stars at large vertical distance from the galaxy midplane. Comparing these results with the properties of the stellar populations of the MW bulge recently revealed by the ARGOS survey, we conclude that (I) the two most metal-rich populations of the MW bulge, labeled A and B in the ARGOS survey, originate in the disk, with the population of A having formed on average closer to the Galaxy center than the population of component B; (II) a massive (B/D ~ 0.25) classical spheroid can be excluded for the MW, thus confirming previous findings that the MW bulge is composed of populations that mostly have a disk origin. On the basis of their chemical and kinematic characteristics, the results of our modeling suggest that

  11. Influence of Stellar Multiplicity on Planet Formation. II. Planets are Less Common in Multiple-star Systems with Separations Smaller than 1500 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-01

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  12. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  13. The Specific Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass Fraction of Low-mass Central Galaxies in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Reese, V.; Colín, P.; González-Samaniego, A.; Valenzuela, O.; Firmani, C.; Velázquez, H.; Ceverino, D.

    2011-08-01

    By means of cosmological N-body + hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies in the context of the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario we explore the specific star formation rates (SSFR = SFR/Ms , Ms is the stellar mass) and stellar mass fractions (Fs ≡ Ms /Mh , Mh is the halo mass) for sub-M* field galaxies at different redshifts (0 <~ z <~ 1.5). Distinct low-mass halos (2.5 <~ Mh /1010 M sun <~ 50 at z = 0) were selected for the high-resolution re-simulations. The Hydrodynamics Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code was used and some variations of the sub-grid parameters were explored. Most simulated galaxies, specially those with the highest resolutions, have significant disk components and their structural and dynamical properties are in reasonable agreement with observations of sub-M* field galaxies. However, the SSFRs are 5-10 times smaller than the averages of several (compiled and homogenized here) observational determinations for field blue/star-forming galaxies at z < 0.3 (at low masses, most observed field galaxies are actually blue/star forming). This inconsistency seems to remain even at z ~ 1-1.5, although it is less drastic. The Fs of simulated galaxies increases with Mh as semi-empirical inferences show. However, the values of Fs at z ≈ 0 are ~5-10 times larger in the simulations than in the inferences; these differences increases probably to larger factors at z ~ 1-1.5. The inconsistencies reported here imply that simulated low-mass galaxies (0.2 <~ Ms /109 M sun <~ 30 at z = 0) assembled their stellar masses much earlier than observations suggest. Our results confirm the predictions found by means of ΛCDM-based models of disk galaxy formation and evolution for isolated low-mass galaxies, and highlight that our understanding and implementation of astrophysics into simulations and models are still lacking vital ingredients.

  14. Cassini observations of Saturn's southern polar cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Jasinski, J. M.; Achilleos, N.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Bunce, E. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Khurana, K. K.; Lamy, L.; Leisner, J. S.; Roussos, E.; Russell, C. T.; Zarka, P.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jones, G. H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetospheric cusps are important sites of the coupling of a magnetosphere with the solar wind. The combination of both ground- and space-based observations at Earth has enabled considerable progress to be made in understanding the terrestrial cusp and its role in the coupling of the magnetosphere to the solar wind via the polar magnetosphere. Voyager 2 fully explored Neptune's cusp in 1989, but highly inclined orbits of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn present the most recent opportunity to repeatedly study the polar magnetosphere of a rapidly rotating planet. In this paper we discuss observations made by Cassini during two passes through Saturn's southern polar magnetosphere. Our main findings are that (i) Cassini directly encounters the southern polar cusp with evidence for the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp via magnetopause reconnection, (ii) magnetopause reconnection and entry of plasma into the cusp can occur over a range of solar wind conditions, and (iii) double cusp morphologies are consistent with the position of the cusp oscillating in phase with Saturn's global magnetospheric periodicities.

  15. Forged in FIRE: cusps, cores and baryons in low-mass dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oñorbe, Jose; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-12-01

    We present multiple ultrahigh resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of M⋆ ≃ 104-6.3 M⊙ dwarf galaxies that form within two Mvir = 109.5-10 M⊙ dark matter halo initial conditions. Our simulations rely on the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) implementation of star formation feedback and were run with high enough force and mass resolution to directly resolve structure on the ˜200 pc scales. The resultant galaxies sit on the M⋆ versus Mvir relation required to match the Local Group stellar mass function via abundance matching. They have bursty star formation histories and also form with half-light radii and metallicities that broadly match those observed for local dwarfs at the same stellar mass. We demonstrate that it is possible to create a large (˜1 kpc) constant-density dark matter core in a cosmological simulation of an M⋆ ≃ 106.3 M⊙ dwarf galaxy within a typical Mvir = 1010 M⊙ halo - precisely the scale of interest for resolving the `too big to fail' problem. However, these large cores are not ubiquitous and appear to correlate closely with the star formation histories of the dwarfs: dark matter cores are largest in systems that form their stars late (z ≲ 2), after the early epoch of cusp building mergers has ended. Our M⋆ ≃ 104 M⊙ dwarf retains a cuspy dark matter halo density profile that matches that of a dark-matter-only run of the same system. Though ancient, most of the stars in our ultrafaint form after reionization; the ultraviolet field acts mainly to suppress fresh gas accretion, not to boil away gas that is already present in the protodwarf.

  16. Gas retention and accumulation in stellar clusters and galaxies: Implications for star formation and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naiman, Jill

    Star formation cannot proceed without the existence of an extensive gas reservoir. In particular, the supply of gas to form stars in dwarf galaxies and star clusters requires overcoming a variety of difficulties - namely, the effectiveness of different feedback mechanisms in removing gas from these shallow gravitational potentials. In addition, the supply of external gas to these systems is determined by the large scale galactic structure in which they reside. This thesis employs computational hydrodynamics coupled with physically realistic subgrid feedback prescriptions to resolve the interplay between the small scale feedback mechanisms and larger scale gas flows to determine the amount of gas a shallow potential can accumulate. First, we consider the flow of gas external to dwarf galaxies and star clusters into their cores as a generalized accretion process. Second, we explore the enhancement of gas accretion rates onto the compact members of young star clusters when the flow of external gas into the cluster cores is large. Third, we discuss how external gas flows initiated by the presence of a massive nuclear star cluster can enhance central massive black hole accretion rates during galaxy mergers. Fourth, we change our focus to exploring internal stellar wind retention in proto-globular clusters as a mechanism to supply gas for multiple episodes of star formation. Finally, the implications of stellar wind retention on the current gas reservoir in globular clusters is discussed.

  17. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  18. Double Cusp Observed By The Cluster Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Bosqued, J. M.; Berchem, J.; Anderson, P. C.; Fehringer, M.; Laakso, H.; Reme, H.

    The polar cusp is characterised by a direct entry of solar wind plasma into the magne- tosphere. Depending on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), Bz positive or negative, the precipitation of the ions in the cusp presents a dispersion in energy directed poleward or equatorward. In addition the polar cusp moves in latitude according to the IMF, from about 75 deg. ILAT for Bz negative to about 82 deg. ILAT for Bz positive. The Cluster spacecraft are crossing the mid-altitude polar cusp, in a "string of pearl" configuration, and are therefore the ideal tool to study the motion and evolution of the cusp on time scale of a few minutes up to 45 min. On 30 August 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft crossed the mid-altitude polar cusp (4-6 Re) around 12.5 H local time with SC4 entering the cusp at 1532 UT, SC2 following 1.5 min later, SC1, 3 min later and finally SC3, 45 min later. SC4 and SC1 observed a typical poleward dispersion associated with Bz negative. SC3 observed first the same disper- sion starting at about 74 deg. ILAT, however at 81 deg. ILAT a second dispersion was observed. The IMF was southward during the dispersion and became slightly positive during the second dispersion. Two hypothesis can be proposed, a fast motion of the cusp poleward during the SC3 crossing or a double injection in the cusp. Preliminary analysis of DMSP satellites, although not exactly in the same sector, indicates that the cusp moved poleward around that time. Cluster observations will be compared with the results from a global MHD simulation model to investigate the geometry of the reconnection between the IMF and the Earth magnetic field.

  19. Recent cusp and cleft results from interball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandahl, Ingrid

    The Interball project has given important contributions to our understanding of the morphology and the physical processes in the cusp and cleft. Interball Tail and Magion-4 have performed more extensive measurements in the high altitude cusp than any previous spacecraft. Interball has also been a part in the ISTP program and data have been used in many multipoint studies. In this paper recent cusp and cleft studies based entirely or partly on Interball data will be reviewed. Interball data show that processes at high latitudes are very important for plasma entry into the magnetosphere. A case study for southward IMF conditions agrees with a model in which the mantle is populated via entry along open high-latitude field lines. A statistical study of events dominated by IMF B y shows that merging in anti-parallel fields, rather than subsolar point reconnection, populates the mantle. Plasma entry also takes place through the turbulent boundary layer, TBL, a region of strong, Alfvenic ULF turbulence above the cusp and cleft. The TBL is almost always present. It extends tailward from the cusp and is proposed to be related to the magnetospheric sash. For the overall magnetosheath plasma entry into the magnetosphere the magnetotail boundary is probably more important than the cusp. The position of the cusp is controlled by the solar wind in a similar way as the low altitude cusp. The mid-altitude cusp was found to maintain its fine structure over periods of the order of one hour. A suprathermal proton population not previously described has been detected in the mid-altitude cusp.

  20. Formation of S0 galaxies through mergers. Antitruncated stellar discs resulting from major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlaff, Alejandro; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Rodríguez-Pérez, Cristina; Querejeta, Miguel; Tapia, Trinidad; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Zamorano, Jaime; Gallego, Jesús; Beckman, John

    2014-10-01

    Context. Lenticular galaxies (S0s) are more likely to host antitruncated (Type III) stellar discs than galaxies of later Hubble types. Major mergers are popularly considered too violent to make these breaks. Aims: We have investigated whether major mergers can result into S0-like remnants with realistic antitruncated stellar discs or not. Methods: We have analysed 67 relaxed S0 and E/S0 remnants resulting from dissipative N-body simulations of major mergers from the GalMer database. We have simulated realistic R-band surface brightness profiles of the remnants to identify those with antitruncated stellar discs. Their inner and outer discs and the breaks have been quantitatively characterized to compare with real data. Results: Nearly 70% of our S0-like remnants are antitruncated, meaning that major mergers that result in S0s have a high probability of producing Type III stellar discs. Our remnants lie on top of the extrapolations of the observational trends (towards brighter magnitudes and higher break radii) in several photometric diagrams, because of the higher luminosities and sizes of the simulations compared to observational samples. In scale-free photometric diagrams, simulations and observations overlap and the remnants reproduce the observational trends, so the physical mechanism after antitruncations is highly scalable. We have found novel photometric scaling relations between the characteristic parameters of the antitruncations in real S0s, which are also reproduced by our simulations. We show that the trends in all the photometric planes can be derived from three basic scaling relations that real and simulated Type III S0s fulfill: hi ∝ RbrkIII, ho ∝ RbrkIII, and μbrkIII ∝ RbrkIII, where hi and ho are the scalelengths of the inner and outer discs, and μbrkIII and RbrkIII are the surface brightness and radius of the breaks. Bars and antitruncations in real S0s are structurally unrelated phenomena according to the studied photometric planes

  1. A LINK BETWEEN STAR FORMATION QUENCHING AND INNER STELLAR MASS DENSITY IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CENTRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.

    2013-10-10

    We study the correlation between galaxy structure and the quenching of star formation using a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey central galaxies with stellar masses 9.75 < log M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} < 11.25 and redshifts z < 0.075. Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV data are used to cleanly divide the sample into star-forming and quenched galaxies and to identify galaxies in transition (the green valley). Despite a stark difference in visual appearance between blue and red galaxies, their average radial stellar mass density profiles are remarkably similar (especially in the outer regions) at fixed mass. The inner stellar mass surface density within a radius of 1 kpc, Σ{sub 1}, is used to quantify the growth of the bulge as galaxies evolve. When galaxies are divided into narrow mass bins, their distribution in the color-Σ{sub 1} plane at fixed mass forms plausible evolutionary tracks. Σ{sub 1} seems to grow as galaxies evolve through the blue cloud, and once it crosses a threshold value, galaxies are seen to quench at fixed Σ{sub 1}. The Σ{sub 1} threshold for quenching grows with stellar mass, Σ{sub 1}∝M{sub *}{sup 0.64}. However, the existence of some star-forming galaxies above the threshold Σ{sub 1} implies that a dense bulge is necessary but not sufficient to quench a galaxy fully. This would be consistent with a two-step quenching process in which gas within a galaxy is removed or stabilized against star formation by bulge-driven processes (such as a starburst, active galactic nucleus feedback, or morphological quenching), whereas external gas accretion is suppressed by separate halo-driven processes (such as halo gas shock heating). Quenching thus depends on an interplay between the inner structure of a galaxy and its surrounding dark matter halo, and lack of perfect synchrony between the two could produce the observed scatter in color versus Σ{sub 1}.

  2. Connection between cusp-core problem and too-big-to-fail problem in CDM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kazuki; Mori, Masao; Ogiya, Go

    2016-08-01

    The standard paradigm of structure formation in the universe, the cold dark matter cosmology, contains several crucial unsolved problems such as ``cusp-core problem'' and ``too-big-to-fail problem''. To solve these problems, we study about the dynamical response of a virialized system with a central cusp to the energy feedback driven by periodic supernova feedback using collisionless N-body simulations with the Nested-Particle-Mesh code. The resonance between dark matter particles and the density wave excited by the oscillating potential plays a significant role in the cusp-core transition of dark matter halos. Furthermore, we show that the cusp-core transition with periodic supernova feedback can solve the too-big-to-fail problem.

  3. Swarm in situ observations of F region polar cap patches created by cusp precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L. V.; Iserhienrhien, B.; Miles, D. M.; Patra, S.; Meeren, C.; Buchert, S. C.; Burchill, J. K.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Knudsen, D. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Moen, J.

    2015-02-01

    High-resolution in situ measurements from the three Swarm spacecraft, in a string-of-pearls configuration, provide new insights about the combined role of flow channel events and particle impact ionization in creating F region electron density structures in the northern Scandinavian dayside cusp. We present a case of polar cap patch formation where a reconnection-driven low-density relative westward flow channel is eroding the dayside solar-ionized plasma but where particle impact ionization in the cusp dominates the initial plasma structuring. In the cusp, density features are observed which are twice as dense as the solar-ionized background. These features then follow the polar cap convection and become less structured and lower in amplitude. These are the first in situ observations tracking polar cap patch evolution from creation by plasma transport and enhancement by cusp precipitation, through entrainment in the polar cap flow and relaxation into smooth patches as they approach the nightside auroral oval.

  4. The Intrinsic Properties of the Stellar Clusters in the M82 Starburst Complex: Propagating Star Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, S.; Watson, Dan M.; Pipher, J. L.; Forrest, W. J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Smith, H. A.; Fischer, J.; Woodward, Charles E.

    1997-07-01

    Near-Infrared spectroscopy combined with high spatial resolution imaging have been used in this work to probe the central 500 pc of M82. Imaging observations in the 2.36 μm CO band head are added to our previously published near-infrared hydrogen recombination line imaging, near-infrared broadband imaging, and 3.29 μm dust feature imaging observations, in order to study the nature of the starburst stellar population. A starburst model is constructed and compared with the observations of the stellar clusters in the starburst complex. Our analysis implies that the typical age for the starburst clusters is 107 yr. In addition, our high spatial resolution observations indicate that there is an age dispersion within the starburst complex that is correlated with projected distance from the center of the galaxy. The inferred age dispersion is 6 × 106 yr. If the starburst in M82 is propagating outward from the center, this age dispersion corresponds to a velocity of propagation, originating in the center, of ~50 km s-1. Our quantitative analysis also reveals that a Salpeter initial mass function, extending from 0.1 to 100 M⊙, can fit the observed properties of M82 without using up more than 30% of the total dynamical mass in the starburst.

  5. THE INTERSTELLAR BUBBLES OF G38.9-0.4 AND THE IMPACT OF STELLAR FEEDBACK ON STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.; Arvidsson, Kim E-mail: chipk@uwyo.edu E-mail: karvidsson@adlerplanetarium.org

    2013-06-10

    We present a study of the star formation (SF) region G38.9-0.4 using publicly available multiwavelength Galactic plane surveys from ground- and space-based observatories. This region is composed of four bright mid-IR bubbles and numerous infrared dark clouds. Two bubbles, N 74 and N 75, each host a star cluster anchored by a single O9.5V star. We identified 162 young stellar objects (YSOs) and classify 54 as stage I, 7 as stage II, 6 as stage III, and 32 as ambiguous. We do not detect the classical signposts of triggered SF, i.e., star-forming pillars or YSOs embedded within bubble rims. We conclude that feedback-triggered SF has not occurred in G38.9-0.4. The YSOs are preferentially coincident with infrared dark clouds. This leads to a strong correlation between areal YSO mass surface density and gas mass surface density with a power law slope near 1.3, which closely matches the Schmidt-Kennicutt Law. The correlation is similar inside and outside the bubbles and may mean that the SF efficiency is neither enhanced nor suppressed in regions potentially influenced by stellar feedback. This suggests that gas density, regardless of how it is collected, is a more important driver of SF than stellar feedback. Larger studies should be able to quantify the fraction of all SF that is feedback-triggered by determining the fraction SF, feedback-compressed gas surrounding H II regions relative to that already present in molecular clouds.

  6. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  7. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  8. Cluster II Mid-Altitude Cusp Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winningham, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Thirty plus years after its discovery the cusp is still an enigma. Questions such as is it open, closed, or mixed; where does it map; what constitutes a cusp etc still abound. Cusps have been defined on the basis of satellite, rocket, and ground based data from single and multiple sensor types. Cartoons and detailed models have been put forward to define what constitutes a cusp. An equal number of questions abound relative to the role the cusp plays in magnetospheric dynamics, mass and momentum transfer, and even energization to populate the rest of the magnetosphere. In a recent series of papers Savin et al have presented both Interball and Prognoz results in the high altitude cusp and sash region. In these papers they divide the high cusp into several new regions. They have an outer throat (OT) exterior to the MP with field lines connected to the earth and heated, stagnant plasma, a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) just at and outside the MP, an outer cusp (OC) that is inside the MP. They state an indentation depth of 1-2 RE. In the TBL large amplitude, low-frequency waves are observed. We will present multi-instrument/satellite Cluster II data that indicates the depth of the OT may be much deeper than thought by Savin. This stems from the higher spatial temporal resolution available from Cluster. Mid altitudes (~5RE) passes will be shown that exhibit the same morphology as Savin. This leads to a new definition of the cusp as the focus of open magnetopause current layer field lines.

  9. Metal-Poor, Strongly Star-Forming Galaxies in the DEEP2 Survey: The Relationship Between Stellar Mass, Temperature-Based Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Chun; Rigby, Jane R.; Cooper, Michael; Yan, Renbin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 28 redshift (z) approximately 0.8 metal-poor galaxies in DEEP2. These galaxies were selected for their detection of the weak [O (sub III)] lambda 4363 emission line, which provides a "direct" measure of the gas-phase metallicity. A primary goal for identifying these rare galaxies is to examine whether the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR) extends to low stellar mass and high SFR. The FMR suggests that higher SFR galaxies have lower metallicity (at fixed stellar mass). To test this trend, we combine spectroscopic measurements of metallicity and dust-corrected SFRs, with stellar mass estimates from modeling the optical photometry. We find that these galaxies are 1.05 plus or minus 0.61 decimal exponent (dex) above the redshift (z) approximately equal to 1 stellar mass-SFR relation, and 0.23 plus or minus 0.23 decimal exponent (dex) below the local mass-metallicity relation. Relative to the FMR, the latter offset is reduced to 0.01 decimal exponent (dex), but significant dispersion remains (0.29 decimal exponent (dex) with 0.16 decimal exponent (dex) due to measurement uncertainties). This dispersion suggests that gas accretion, star formation and chemical enrichment have not reached equilibrium in these galaxies. This is evident by their short stellar mass doubling timescale of approximately 100 (sup plus 310) (sub minus 75) million years that suggests stochastic star formation. Combining our sample with other redshift (z) of approximately 1 metal-poor galaxies, we find a weak positive SFR-metallicity dependence (at fixed stellar mass) that is significant at 97.3 percent confidence. We interpret this positive correlation as recent star formation that has enriched the gas, but has not had time to drive the metal-enriched gas out with feedback mechanisms.

  10. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. III. OBSERVABILITY AND CONNECTION TO HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-12-01

    The early universe hosted a large population of low-mass virialized 'minihalos', that were not massive enough to form stars on their own. While most minihalos were photoevaporated by ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies, these galaxies also drove large outflows, which in some cases would have reached the minihalos in advance of ionization fronts. In the previous papers in this series, we carried out high-resolution, three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions that included non-equilibrium chemistry, radiative cooling, and turbulent mixing. We found that, for a fiducial set of parameters, minihalos were transformed into dense, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Here we conduct a suite of simulations that follow these interactions over a wide range of parameters including minihalo mass, minihalo formation redshift, outflow energy, outflow redshift, distance, concentration, and spin. In almost all cases, the shocked minihalos form molecules through non-equilibrium reactions and then cool rapidly to become compact, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Furthermore, we show that the unique properties of these clusters make them a prime target for direct study with the next generation of telescopes, and that there are many reasons to suspect that their low-redshift counterparts are the observed population of halo globular clusters.

  11. Colliding Clouds: The Star Formation Trigger of the Stellar Cluster around BD +40 4124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looney, Leslie W.; Wang, Shiya; Hamidouche, Murad; Safier, Pedro N.; Klein, Randolf

    2006-05-01

    We present BIMA and SCUBA observations of the young cluster associated with BD +40 4124 in the dense molecular gas tracer CS J=2-->1 and the continuum dust emission at λ=3.1 mm and 850 μm. The dense gas and dust in the system are aligned in a long ridge morphology extending ~0.4 pc with 16 gas clumps of estimated masses ranging from 0.14 to 1.8 Msolar. A north-south variation in the CS center line velocity can be explained with a two-cloud model. We posit that the BD +40 4124 stellar cluster formed from a cloud-cloud collision. The largest line widths occur near V1318 Cyg S, a massive star affecting its natal environment. In contrast, the dense gas near the other, more evolved, massive stars displays no evidence for disruption; the material must either be processed into the star, dissipate, or relax fairly quickly. The more evolved low-mass protostars are more likely to be found near the massive stars. If the majority of low-mass stars are coeval, the seemingly evolved low-mass protostars are not older: the massive stars have eroded their structures. Finally, at the highest resolution, the λ=3.1 mm dust emission is resolved into a flattened structure 3100×1500 AU with an estimated mass of 3.4 Msolar. The continuum and CS emission are offset by 1.1" from the southern binary source. A simple estimate of the extinction due to the continuum emission structure is AV~700 mag. From the offset and because the southern source is detected in the optical, the continuum emission is from a previously unknown very young, intermediate-mass, embedded stellar object.

  12. Excitation of Gravity Waves by Fingering Convection, and the Formation of Compositional Staircases in Stellar Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, P.; Medrano, M.; Brown, J. M.; Mankovich, C.; Moore, K.

    2015-07-01

    Fingering convection (or thermohaline convection) is a weak yet important kind of mixing that occurs in stably stratified stellar radiation zones in the presence of an inverse mean molecular weight gradient. Brown et al. recently proposed a new model for mixing by fingering convection, which contains no free parameter and was found to fit the results of direct numerical simulations in almost all cases. Notably, however, they found that mixing was substantially enhanced above their predicted values in the few cases where large-scale gravity waves, followed by thermo-compositional layering, grew spontaneously from the fingering convection. This effect is well known in the oceanographic context and is attributed to the excitation of the so-called collective instability. In this work, we build on the results of Brown et al. and of Traxler et al. to determine the conditions under which the collective instability may be expected. We find that it is only relevant in stellar regions that have a relatively large Prandtl number (the ratio of the kinematic viscosity to the thermal diffusivity), O({10}-3) or larger. This implies that the collective instability cannot occur in main-sequence stars, where the Prandtl number is always much smaller than this (except in the outer layers of surface convection zones, where fingering is irrelevant anyway). It could in principle be excited in regions of high electron degeneracy, during He core flash, or in the interiors of white dwarfs. We discuss the implications of our findings for these objects, from both a theoretical and an observational point of view.

  13. On the Inconsistency between Cosmic Stellar Mass Density and Star Formation Rate up to z ∼ 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density (SMD) and instantaneous star formation rate in the redshift range 0 < z < 8 using a large observational data sample. We first compile the measurements of SMDs up to z ∼ 8. Comparing the observed SMDs with the time-integral of instantaneous star formation history (SFH), we find that the observed SMDs are lower than that implied from the SFH at z < 4. We also use the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to derive the best-fitting SFH from the observed SMD data. At 0.5 < z < 6, the observed star formation rate densities are larger than the best-fitting one, especially at z ∼ 2 where they are larger by a factor of about two. However, at lower (z < 0.5) and higher redshifts (z > 6), the derived SFH is consistent with the observations. This is the first time that the discrepancy between the observed SMD and instantaneous star formation rate has been tested up to very high redshift z ≈ 8 using the MCMC method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of SMD, initial mass function, and evolution of cosmic metallicity.

  14. Stellar model chromospheres. IV - The formation of the H-epsilon feature in the sun /G2 V/ and Arcturus /K2 III/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the Balmer-series member H-epsilon in the near-red wing of the Ca II H line is discussed for two cases: the sun (H-epsilon absorption profile) and Arcturus (H-epsilon emission profile). It is shown that although the H-epsilon source functions in both stars are dominated by the Balmer-continuum radiation field through photoionizations, the line-formation problems in the two stars are quantitatively different, owing to a substantial difference in the relative importance of the stellar chromosphere temperature inversion as compared with the stellar photosphere.

  15. Friends of Hot Jupiters. IV. Stellar Companions Beyond 50 au Might Facilitate Giant Planet Formation, but Most are Unlikely to Cause Kozai–Lidov Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Bryan, Marta; Crepp, Justin R.; Batygin, Konstantin; Crossfield, Ian; Hansen, Brad; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Wang, Ji

    2016-08-01

    Stellar companions can influence the formation and evolution of planetary systems, but there are currently few observational constraints on the properties of planet-hosting binary star systems. We search for stellar companions around 77 transiting hot Jupiter systems to explore the statistical properties of this population of companions as compared to field stars of similar spectral type. After correcting for survey incompleteness, we find that 47 % +/- 7 % of hot Jupiter systems have stellar companions with semimajor axes between 50 and 2000 au. This is 2.9 times larger than the field star companion fraction in this separation range, with a significance of 4.4σ . In the 1–50 au range, only {3.9}-2.0+4.5 % of hot Jupiters host stellar companions, compared to the field star value of 16.4 % +/- 0.7 % , which is a 2.7σ difference. We find that the distribution of mass ratios for stellar companions to hot Jupiter systems peaks at small values and therefore differs from that of field star binaries which tend to be uniformly distributed across all mass ratios. We conclude that either wide separation stellar binaries are more favorable sites for gas giant planet formation at all separations, or that the presence of stellar companions preferentially causes the inward migration of gas giant planets that formed farther out in the disk via dynamical processes such as Kozai–Lidov oscillations. We determine that less than 20% of hot Jupiters have stellar companions capable of inducing Kozai–Lidov oscillations assuming initial semimajor axes between 1 and 5 au, implying that the enhanced companion occurrence is likely correlated with environments where gas giants can form efficiently.

  16. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup —}dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup –1} in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  17. Jet-induced star formation by accreting black holes: impact on stellar, galaxy, and cosmic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, Igor Felix

    2016-07-01

    Evidence that relativistic jets trigger star formation along their axis has been found associated to low redshift and high redshift accreting supermassive black holes. However, the physical processes by which jet-cloud interaction may trigger star formation has so far not been elucidated. To gain insight into this potentially important star formation mechanism during reionization, when microquasars were form prolifically before AGN, our international team is carrying out a muliwavelength study of a microquasar jet-induced star formation region in the Milky Way using data from space missions (Chandra, Integral, ISO, Herschel) and from the ground (at cm and mm wavelengths with the VLA and IRAM, and IR with Gemini and VLT). I will show that this relative nearby star forming region is an ideal laboratory to test models of jet-induced star formation elsewhere in the universe.

  18. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  19. THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, STAR FORMATION RATE, AND GAS METALLICITY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Yuu

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the relation between stellar mass (M{sub *}), star formation rate (SFR), and metallicity (Z) of galaxies, the so-called fundamental metallicity relation, in the galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We separate the galaxies into narrow redshift bins and compare the relation at different redshifts and find statistically significant (>99%) evolution. We test various observational effects that might cause seeming Z evolution and find it difficult to explain the evolution of the relation only by the observational effects. In the current sample of low-redshift galaxies, galaxies with different M{sub *} and SFR are sampled from different redshifts, and there is degeneracy between M{sub *}/SFR and redshift. Hence, it is not straightforward to distinguish a relation between Z and SFR from a relation between Z and redshift. The separation of the intrinsic relation from the redshift evolution effect is a crucial issue in the understanding of the evolution of galaxies.

  20. Stellar mass assembly and star formation history from z=0.2 out to z=6 in the COSMOS and VIPERS fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    A clear and comprehensive picture describing the physical processes which regulate the stellar mass assembly is still missing in galaxy formation scenario. I will present a measurement of the galaxy stellar mass function and stellar mass density from z=0.2 out to z=6. Our study relies on deep near-infrared imaging over wide fields: the WIRCAM/CFHT coverage of the 20 sq-deg VIPERS fields combined with the new IRAC/Spitzer coverage (the SPLASH survey) of the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field. Our analysis is based on photometric redshifts of 1,5 million of galaxies reaching a precision around 4% at 4stellar mass. I will also use the stellar mass density to infer the cosmic star formation history over 90% of the age of the Universe. I will compare this estimate with the results obtained using direct tracers of the star formation rate as the UV or IR emissivity.

  1. Stellar scattering and the formation of hot Jupiters in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, J. G.; Beaugé, C.

    2015-04-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are usually defined as giant Jovian-size planets with orbital periods P<=10 days. Although they lie close to the star, several have finite eccentricities and significant misalignment angle with respect to the stellar equator, leading to ~20% of HJs in retrograde orbits. More than half, however, seem consistent with near-circular and planar orbits. In recent years, two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the excited and misaligned subpopulation of HJs: Lidov-Kozai migration and planet-planet scattering. Although both are based on completely different dynamical phenomena, at first hand they appear to be equally effective in generating hot planets. Nevertheless, there has been no detailed analysis comparing the predictions of both mechanisms, especially with respect to the final distribution of orbital characteristics. In this paper, we present a series of numerical simulations of Lidov-Kozai trapping of single planets in compact binary systems that suffered a close fly-by of a background star. Both the planet and the binary component are initially placed in coplanar orbits, although the inclination of the impactor is assumed random. After the passage of the third star, we follow the orbital and spin evolution of the planet using analytical models based on the octupole expansion of the secular Hamiltonian. We also include tidal effects, stellar oblateness and post-Newtonian perturbations. The present work aims at the comparison of the two mechanisms (Lidov-Kozai and planet-planet scattering) as an explanation for the excited and inclined HJs in binary systems. We compare the results obtained through this paper with results in Beaugé & Nesvorný (2012), where the authors analyse how the planet-planet scattering mechanisms works in order to form this hot Jovian-size planets. We find that several of the orbital characteristics of the simulated HJs are caused by tidal trapping from quasi-parabolic orbits, independent of the driving mechanism

  2. Evidence of Multiple Reconnection Lines at the Magnetopause from Cusp Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Petrinec, S. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Omidi, N.; Sibeck, David Gary

    2012-01-01

    Recent global hybrid simulations investigated the formation of flux transfer events (FTEs) and their convection and interaction with the cusp. Based on these simulations, we have analyzed several Polar cusp crossings in the Northern Hemisphere to search for the signature of such FTEs in the energy distribution of downward precipitating ions: precipitating ion beams at different energies parallel to the ambient magnetic field and overlapping in time. Overlapping ion distributions in the cusp are usually attributed to a combination of variable ion acceleration during the magnetopause crossing together with the time-of-flight effect from the entry point to the observing satellite. Most "step up" ion cusp structures (steps in the ion energy dispersions) only overlap for the populations with large pitch angles and not for the parallel streaming populations. Such cusp structures are the signatures predicted by the pulsed reconnection model, where the reconnection rate at the magnetopause decreased to zero, physically separating convecting flux tubes and their parallel streaming ions. However, several Polar cusp events discussed in this study also show an energy overlap for parallel-streaming precipitating ions. This condition might be caused by reopening an already reconnected field line, forming a magnetic island (flux rope) at the magnetopause similar to that reported in global MHD and Hybrid simulations

  3. ULF turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1993-03-01

    Results of a spectral analysis of the ULF wave turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp are presented. The activity is characterized as broadbanded, extending up to a maximum frequency of about 0.5 Hz, and having maximum wave amplitudes as large as 6 percent of the dc magnetic field. Activity in the cusp region was particularly intense at its frontside and backside, associated with the magnetopause and cusp/magnetosphere boundaries, respectively. The turbulence, particularly that above f(ci), is tentatively identified as whistler mode. It is argued that such whistler mode turbulence should resonate with electrons having energies in the tens of kiloelectron volts. Observations indicate a very strong correlation of the ULF turbulence with the energetic electrons between 22 and 35 keV measured by Voyager's low-energy charged particle experiment. A vigorous interaction between the two is inferred. ULF wave turbulence in the cusp may represent a significant but not complete power source for the magnetosphere.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  9. Cusped Wilson lines in symmetric representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Diego H.; Massolo, Fidel I. Schaposnik; Trancanelli, Diego

    2015-08-01

    We study the cusped Wilson line operators and Bremsstrahlung functions associated to particles transforming in the rank- k symmetric representation of the gauge group U( N) for super Yang-Mills. We find the holographic D3-brane description for Wilson loops with internal cusps in two different limits: small cusp angle and . This allows for a non-trivial check of a conjectured relation between the Bremsstrahlung function and the expectation value of the 1/2 BPS circular loop in the case of a representation other than the fundamental. Moreover, we observe that in the limit of k ≫ N, the cusped Wilson line expectation value is simply given by the exponential of the 1-loop diagram. Using group theory arguments, this eikonal exponentiation is conjectured to take place for all Wilson loop operators in symmetric representations with large k, independently of the contour on which they are supported.

  10. Modeling Massive Cluster Formation with Stellar Feedback using Flash and AMUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen; Wall, Joshua; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2015-08-01

    Star cluster formation is a complex astrophysical problem combining multiple competing physical processes in a challenging computational environment, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Current simulations still fall short of a realistic description of the physical processes at work in star-forming regions. We are developing a hybrid simulation code to explore the formation and assembly of massive star clusters by combining the magnetohydrodynamics code Flash and the AMUSE software environment. Flash handles gas dynamics and star formation through cloud collapse, while AMUSE manages the dynamics and evolution of stars and binary systems. The gravitational interaction between the gas and the stars is treated via a symplectic gravity bridge between the codes in AMUSE. Radiative, wind, and supernova feedback are followed in FLASH based on information provided by the AMUSE system. We present some early results of this work, focusing on cluster formation and assembly, and including simplified models of feedback to study gas expulsion and cluster survival.

  11. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. I. PLANETESIMAL DYNAMICS IN MASSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-10

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e {sub p} in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ∼1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries.

  12. Constraining the dark cusp in the galactic center by long-period binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Tal; Pfuhl, Oliver

    2014-01-10

    Massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei are believed to be surrounded by a high-density stellar cluster, whose mass is mostly in hard-to-detect faint stars and compact remnants. Such dark cusps dominate the dynamics near the MBH: a dark cusp in the Galactic center (GC) of the Milky Way would strongly affect orbital tests of general relativity there; on cosmic scales, dark cusps set the rates of gravitational wave emission events from compact remnants that spiral into MBHs, and they modify the rates of tidal disruption events, to list only some implications. A recently discovered long-period massive young binary (with period P {sub 12} ≲ 1 yr, total mass M{sub 12}∼O(100 M{sub ⊙}), and age T {sub 12} ∼ 6 × 10{sup 6} yr), only ∼0.1 pc from the Galactic MBH, sets a lower bound on the stellar two-body relaxation timescale there, min t {sub rlx}∝(P {sub 12}/M {sub 12}){sup 2/3} T {sub 12} ∼ 10{sup 7} yr, and, correspondingly, an upper bound on the stellar number density, maxn{sub ⋆}∼few×10{sup 8}/〈M{sub ⋆}{sup 2}〉 pc{sup −3} (〈M{sub ⋆}{sup 2}〉{sup 1/2} is the rms stellar mass), based on the binary's survival against evaporation by the dark cusp. However, a conservative dynamical estimate, the drain limit, implies t{sub rlx}>O(10{sup 8} yr). Such massive binaries are thus too short-lived and tightly bound to constrain a dense relaxed dark cusp. We explore here in detail the use of longer-period, less massive, and longer-lived binaries (P {sub 12} ∼ few yr, M {sub 12} ∼ 2-4 M {sub ☉}, T {sub 12} ∼ 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} yr), presently just below the detection threshold, for probing the dark cusp and develop the framework for translating their future detections among the giants in the GC into dynamical constraints.

  13. The Distribution of Stars and Stellar Remnants at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David

    2010-08-01

    Motivated by recent observations that suggest a low density of old stars around the Milky Way supermassive black hole (SMBH), models for the nuclear star cluster are considered that have not yet reached a steady state under the influence of gravitational encounters. A core of initial radius 1-1.5 pc evolves to a size of approximately 0.5 pc after 10 Gyr, roughly the size of the observed core. The absence of a Bahcall-Wolf cusp is naturally explained in these models, without the need for fine-tuning or implausible initial conditions. In the absence of a cusp, the time for a 10 M sun black hole (BH) to spiral in to the Galactic center from an initial distance of 5 pc can be much greater than 10 Gyr. Assuming that the stellar BHs had the same phase-space distribution initially as the stars, their density after 5-10 Gyr is predicted to rise very steeply going into the stellar core, but could remain substantially below the densities inferred from steady-state models that include a steep density cusp in the stars. Possible mechanisms for the creation of the parsec-scale initial core include destruction of stars on centrophilic orbits in a pre-existing triaxial nucleus, inhibited star formation near the SMBH, or ejection of stars by a massive binary. The implications of these models are discussed for the rates of gravitational-wave inspiral events, as well as other physical processes that depend on a high density of stars or stellar-mass BHs near SgrA*.

  14. THE DISTRIBUTION OF STARS AND STELLAR REMNANTS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, David

    2010-08-01

    Motivated by recent observations that suggest a low density of old stars around the Milky Way supermassive black hole (SMBH), models for the nuclear star cluster are considered that have not yet reached a steady state under the influence of gravitational encounters. A core of initial radius 1-1.5 pc evolves to a size of approximately 0.5 pc after 10 Gyr, roughly the size of the observed core. The absence of a Bahcall-Wolf cusp is naturally explained in these models, without the need for fine-tuning or implausible initial conditions. In the absence of a cusp, the time for a 10 M{sub sun} black hole (BH) to spiral in to the Galactic center from an initial distance of 5 pc can be much greater than 10 Gyr. Assuming that the stellar BHs had the same phase-space distribution initially as the stars, their density after 5-10 Gyr is predicted to rise very steeply going into the stellar core, but could remain substantially below the densities inferred from steady-state models that include a steep density cusp in the stars. Possible mechanisms for the creation of the parsec-scale initial core include destruction of stars on centrophilic orbits in a pre-existing triaxial nucleus, inhibited star formation near the SMBH, or ejection of stars by a massive binary. The implications of these models are discussed for the rates of gravitational-wave inspiral events, as well as other physical processes that depend on a high density of stars or stellar-mass BHs near SgrA*.

  15. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission.

  16. The reconnection site of temporal cusp structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Petrinec, S. M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Escoubet, C. P.; Reme, H.

    2008-07-01

    The strong precipitating particle flux in the cusp regions is the consequence of magnetic reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field and the geomagnetic field. Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the dominant process for mass, energy, and momentum transfer from the magnetosheath into the magnetosphere. Observations of downward precipitating cusp ions by polar orbiting satellites are instrumental in unlocking many questions about magnetic reconnection, e.g., their spatial and temporal nature and the location of the reconnection site at the magnetopause. In this study we combine cusp observations of structures in the precipitating ion-energy dispersion by the Cluster satellites with Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar observations to distinguish between the temporal and spatial magnetic reconnection processes at the magnetopause. The location of the cusp structures relative to the convection cells is interpreted as a temporal phenomenon caused by a change in the reconnection rate at the magnetopause. The 3-D plasma observations of the Cluster Ion Spectrometry instruments onboard the Cluster spacecraft also provide the means to estimate the location of the reconnection site. While an earlier study of a spatial cusp structure event revealed bifurcated reconnection locations in different hemispheres as origins for the precipitating ions creating the cusp structures, the same method applied to the temporal cusp structures in this study shows only a single tilted reconnection line close to the subsolar point. Tracing the distance to the reconnection site provides not only the location of the reconnection line but can also be used to distinguish between spatial and temporal cusp structures.

  17. Thermospheric winds around the cusp region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, C.; Deng, Y.; Wu, Q.; Ridley, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the change of advection, the horizontal winds can be strongly influenced by the large vertical wind in the cusp. Indeed, the sunward wind has been observed by the balloon-borne Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at the equatorward of the cusp on the dayside [Wu et al., 2012], which is caused by the heating added in the cusp and the corresponding changes of the horizontal pressure gradient. However, this phenomenon has not been reproduced by the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) under low resolution (5x5 degrees). The Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) has been run in different cases and different resolutions. First, we compare the simulations with and without the cusp energy inputs to identify the influence on the horizontal dynamics. Both runs are done under high resolution in order to better resolve the cusp region. Then we also compare the simulations with the same cusp energy inputs but different horizontal resolutions to identify the influence of the simulation resolution on the results. This work will significantly advance our understanding of the neutral dynamics and the relationship between winds and upper atmosphere storm time response.

  18. NEAR-INFRARED VARIABILITY AMONG YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE STAR FORMATION REGION CYGNUS OB7

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, Scott J.; Rice, Thomas S.; Aspin, Colin

    2013-08-20

    We present an analysis of near-infrared time-series photometry in J, H, and K bands for about 100 epochs of a 1 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 1 Degree-Sign region of the Lynds 1003/1004 dark cloud in the Cygnus OB7 region. Augmented by data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we identify 96 candidate disk bearing young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region. Of these, 30 are clearly Class I or earlier. Using the Wide-Field Imaging Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, we were able to obtain photometry over three observing seasons, with photometric uncertainty better than 0.05 mag down to J Almost-Equal-To 17. We study detailed light curves and color trajectories of {approx}50 of the YSOs in the monitored field. We investigate the variability and periodicity of the YSOs and find the data are consistent with all YSOs being variable in these wavelengths on timescales of a few years. We divide the variability into four observational classes: (1) stars with periodic variability stable over long timescales, (2) variables which exhibit short-lived cyclic behavior, (3) long-duration variables, and (4) stochastic variables. Some YSO variability defies simple classification. We can explain much of the observed variability as being due to dynamic and rotational changes in the disk, including an asymmetric or changing blocking fraction, changes to the inner disk hole size, as well as changes to the accretion rate. Overall, we find that the Class I:Class II ratio of the cluster is consistent with an age of <1 Myr, with at least one individual, wildly varying source {approx}100, 000 yr old. We have also discovered a Class II eclipsing binary system with a period of 17.87 days.

  19. A pilot study using deep infrared imaging to constrain the star formation history of the XUV stellar populations in NGC 4625

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, Stephanie J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bresolin, Fabio

    2014-09-20

    In a ΛCDM universe, disk galaxies' outer regions are the last to form. Characterizing their contents is critical for understanding the ongoing process of disk formation, but observing outer disk stellar populations is challenging due to their low surface brightness. We present extremely deep 3.6 μm observations (Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera) of NGC 4625, a galaxy known for its radially extended ultraviolet-emitting stellar population. We combine the new imaging with archival UV imaging from the GALEX mission to derive multi-wavelength radial profiles for NGC 4625 and compare them to stellar populations models. The colors can be explained by the young stellar population that is responsible for the UV emission and indicate that the current star formation rates in the outermost disk are recent. Extended star formation in NGC 4625 may have been initiated by an interaction with neighboring galaxies NGC 4618 and NGC 4625a, supporting speculation that minor interactions are a common trigger for outer disk star formation and late stage disk growth.

  20. A long history of star formation in a low mass stellar system, Leo T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, M.; Clementini, G.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Federici, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Tosi, M.; Musella, I.

    Nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies with small masses and low metallicity offer insights into the cosmic history of galaxy assembly. In this framework, we present results from the first combined study of variable stars and star formation history of the Milky Way (MW) "Ultra-Faint" dwarf (UFD) galaxy Leo T, based on F606W and F814W multi-epoch archive observations obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We have detected 14 variable stars in the galaxy, including one fundamental-mode RR Lyrae star and 10 Anomalous Cepheids with periods shorter than 1 day, thus suggesting the occurrence of multiple star formation episodes in this UFD, one of which about 10 Gyr ago produced the RR Lyrae star. A quantitative analysis of the star formation history, based on the comparison of the observed color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with a library of artificially generated CMDs, confirms that Leo T has experienced a complex star formation history dominated by two enhanced periods about 1.5 and 8 Gyr ago, respectively.

  1. CUSP Energetic Particles: Confinement, Acceleration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    The cusp energetic particle (CEP) event is a new magnetospheric phenomenon. The events were detected in the dayside cusp for hours, in which the measured helium ions had energies up to 8 MeV. All of these events were associated with a dramatic decrease and large fluctuations in the local magnetic field strength. During January 1999 - December 1999 covered by this report, I have studied the CEP events by analyzing the POLAR, GEOTAIL, and WIND particle and magnetic field data measured during the geomagnetic quiet periods in 1996 and one geomagnetic storm period in 1998. The simultaneous observations indicated that the ion fluxes in the CEP events were higher than that in both the upstream and the downstream from the bow shock. The pitch angle distribution of the helium ions in the CEP events was found to peak around 90 deg. It was found that the mirror parameter, defined as the ratio of the square root of the integration of the parallel turbulent power spectral component over the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges to the mean field in the cusp, is correlated with the intensity of the cusp MeV helium flux, which is a measure of the influence of mirroring interactions and an indication of local effect. It was also found that the turbulent power of the local magnetic field in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges is correlated with the intensity of the cusp energetic helium ions. Such ULF ranges correspond to periods of about 0.33-500 seconds that cover the gyroperiods, the bounce periods, and the drift periods of the tens keV to MeV charged particles when they are temporarily confined in the high-altitude dayside cusp. These observations represent a discovery that the high-altitude dayside cusp is a new acceleration and dynamic trapping region of the magnetosphere. The cusp geometry is connected via gradient and curvature drift of these energized ions to the equatorial plasma sheet as close as the geostationary orbit at local midnight. It implies that the dayside cusp is

  2. The evolving relation between star formation rate and stellar mass in the VIDEO survey since z = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Russell; Vaccari, Mattia; Jarvis, Matt; Smith, Mathew; Giovannoli, Elodie; Häußler, Boris; Prescott, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass, M*, relation of a star-forming (SF) galaxy (SFG) sample in the XMM-LSS field to z ˜ 3.0 using the near-infrared data from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. Combining VIDEO with broad-band photometry, we use the SED fitting algorithm CIGALE to derive SFRs and M* and have adapted it to account for the full photometric redshift probability-distribution-function uncertainty. Applying an SF selection using the D4000 index, we find evidence for strong evolution in the normalization of the SFR-M* relation out to z ˜ 3 and a roughly constant slope of (SFR ∝ M_*^{α }) α = 0.69 ± 0.02 to z ˜ 1.7. We find this increases close to unity towards z ˜ 2.65. Alternatively, if we apply a colour selection, we find a distinct turnover in the SFR-M* relation between 0.7 ≲ z ≲ 2.0 at the high-mass end, and suggest that this is due to an increased contamination from passive galaxies. We find evolution of the specific SFR ∝ (1 + z)2.60 at log10(M*/M⊙) ˜ 10.5, out to z ≲ 2.4 with an observed flattening beyond z ˜ 2 with increased stellar mass. Comparing to a range of simulations we find the analytical scaling relation approaches, that invoke an equilibrium model, a good fit to our data, suggesting that a continual smooth accretion regulated by continual outflows may be a key driver in the overall growth of SFGs.

  3. The formation of eccentric compact binary inspirals and the role of gravitational wave emission in binary-single stellar encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-03-20

    The inspiral and merger of eccentric binaries leads to gravitational waveforms distinct from those generated by circularly merging binaries. Dynamical environments can assemble binaries with high eccentricity and peak frequencies within the LIGO band. In this paper, we study binary-single stellar scatterings occurring in dense stellar systems as a source of eccentrically inspiraling binaries. Many interactions between compact binaries and single objects are characterized by chaotic resonances in which the binary-single system undergoes many exchanges before reaching a final state. During these chaotic resonances, a pair of objects has a non-negligible probability of experiencing a very close passage. Significant orbital energy and angular momentum are carried away from the system by gravitational wave (GW) radiation in these close passages, and in some cases this implies an inspiral time shorter than the orbital period of the bound third body. We derive the cross section for such dynamical inspiral outcomes through analytical arguments and through numerical scattering experiments including GW losses. We show that the cross section for dynamical inspirals grows with increasing target binary semi-major axis a and that for equal-mass binaries it scales as a {sup 2/7}. Thus, we expect wide target binaries to predominantly contribute to the production of these relativistic outcomes. We estimate that eccentric inspirals account for approximately 1% of dynamically assembled non-eccentric merging binaries. While these events are rare, we show that binary-single scatterings are a more effective formation channel than single-single captures for the production of eccentrically inspiraling binaries, even given modest binary fractions.

  4. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. I. NON-EQUILIBRIUM COOLANT FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-07-20

    We use high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations to investigate the interaction of high-redshift galaxy outflows with low-mass virialized clouds of primordial composition. While atomic cooling allows star formation in objects with virial temperatures above 10{sup 4} K, 'minihalos' below this threshold are generally unable to form stars by themselves. However, these objects are highly susceptible to triggered star formation, induced by outflows from neighboring high-redshift starburst galaxies. Here, we conduct a study of these interactions, focusing on cooling through non-equilibrium molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and hydrogen deuteride (HD) formation. Tracking the non-equilibrium chemistry and cooling of 14 species and including the presence of a dissociating background, we show that shock interactions can transform minihalos into extremely compact clusters of coeval stars. Furthermore, these clusters are all less than {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub sun}, and they are ejected from their parent dark matter halos: properties that are remarkably similar to those of the old population of globular clusters.

  5. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. II. OVERCOMING THE FRAGMENTATION BARRIER IN α CENTAURI AND γ CEPHEI-LIKE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-10

    Planet formation in small-separation (∼20 AU) eccentric binaries such as γ Cephei or α Centauri is believed to be adversely affected by the presence of the stellar companion. Strong dynamical excitation of planetesimals by the eccentric companion can result in collisional destruction (rather than growth) of 1-100 km objects, giving rise to the ''fragmentation barrier'' for planet formation. We revise this issue using a novel description of secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries, which accounts for the gravity of the eccentric, coplanar protoplanetary disk, as well as gas drag. By studying planetesimal collision outcomes, we show, in contrast to many previous studies, that planetesimal growth and subsequent formation of planets (including gas giants) in AU-scale orbits within ∼20 AU separation binaries may be possible, provided that the protoplanetary disks are massive (≳ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}) and only weakly eccentric (disk eccentricity ≲ 0.01). These requirements are compatible with both the existence of massive (several M{sub J} ) planets in γ Cep-like systems and the results of recent simulations of gaseous disks in eccentric binaries. Terrestrial and Neptune-like planets can also form in lower-mass disks at small (sub-AU) radii. We find that the fragmentation barrier is less of a problem in eccentric disks that are apsidally aligned with the binary orbit. Alignment gives rise to special locations, where (1) relative planetesimal velocities are low and (2) the timescale of their drag-induced radial drift is long. This causes planetesimal pileup at such locations in the disk and promotes their growth locally, helping to alleviate the timescale problem for core formation.

  6. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. II. EFFECT OF TURBULENCE AND METAL-LINE COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-06-01

    In the primordial universe, low-mass structures with virial temperatures less than 10{sup 4} K were unable to cool by atomic line transitions, leading to a strong suppression of star formation. On the other hand, these 'minihalos' were highly prone to triggered star formation by interactions from nearby galaxy outflows. In Gray and Scannapieco, we explored the impact of nonequilibrium chemistry on these interactions. Here we turn our attention to the role of metals, carrying out a series of high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include both metal cooling and a subgrid turbulent mixing model. Despite the presence of an additional coolant, we again find that outflow-minihalo interactions produce a distribution of dense, massive stellar clusters. We also find that these clusters are evenly enriched with metals to a final abundance of Z {approx} 10{sup -2} Z{sub sun}. As in our previous simulations, all of these properties suggest that these interactions may have given rise to present-day halo globular clusters.

  7. New open-source approaches to the modeling of stellar collapse and the formation of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, C. D.; O'Connor, E.; Peng, F.; Reisswig, C.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.; Abdikamalov, E.; Diener, P.; Löffler, F.; Hawke, I.; Meakin, C. A.; Burrows, A.

    2011-11-01

    We present new approaches to the simulation of stellar collapse, the formation of black holes, and explosive core-collapse supernova nucleosynthesis that build upon open-source codes and microphysics. We discuss the new spherically-symmetric general-relativistic (GR) collapse code GR1D that is endowed with an approximate 1.5D treatment of rotation, comes with multiple nuclear equations of state, and handles neutrinos with a multi-species leakage scheme. Results from a first set of spinning black hole formation simulations are presented. We go on to discuss the derivative code GR1D+ N which is tuned for calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis and includes a NSE/non-NSE equation of state treatment, and a nuclear reaction network. We present sample results showing GR1D+ N's performance in reproducing previous results with thermal-bomb-driven explosions. Finally, we introduce the 3 + 1 GR Zelmani core collapse simulation package and present first results obtained in its application to the 3D modeling of failing core-collapse supernovae.

  8. Possible planet formation in the young, low-mass, multiple stellar system GG Tau A.

    PubMed

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Boehler, Yann; Bary, Jeff; Beck, Tracy; Beust, Hervé; Chapillon, Edwige; Gueth, Fredéric; Huré, Jean-Marc; Pierens, Arnaud; Piétu, Vincent; Simon, Michal; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2014-10-30

    The formation of planets around binary stars may be more difficult than around single stars. In a close binary star (with a separation of less than a hundred astronomical units), theory predicts the presence of circumstellar disks around each star, and an outer circumbinary disk surrounding a gravitationally cleared inner cavity around the stars. Given that the inner disks are depleted by accretion onto the stars on timescales of a few thousand years, any replenishing material must be transferred from the outer reservoir to fuel planet formation (which occurs on timescales of about one million years). Gas flowing through disk cavities has been detected in single star systems. A circumbinary disk was discovered around the young low-mass binary system GG Tau A (ref. 7), which has recently been shown to be a hierarchical triple system. It has one large inner disk around the single star, GG Tau Aa, and shows small amounts of shocked hydrogen gas residing within the central cavity, but other than a single weak detection, the distribution of cold gas in this cavity or in any other binary or multiple star system has not hitherto been determined. Here we report imaging of gas fragments emitting radiation characteristic of carbon monoxide within the GG Tau A cavity. From the kinematics we conclude that the flow appears capable of sustaining the inner disk (around GG Tau Aa) beyond the accretion lifetime, leaving time for planet formation to occur there. These results show the complexity of planet formation around multiple stars and confirm the general picture predicted by numerical simulations. PMID:25355359

  9. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie; Renzini, Alvio

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  10. Dependency of the Cusp Density Anomaly on the Variability of Forcing Inside and Outside the Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere. These particles produce ionization and kinetic (particle) heating of the atmosphere. The increased ionization coupled with enhanced electric fields in the cusp produces increased Joule heating and ion drag forcing. These energy inputs largely determine the neutral density structure in the cusp region. Measurements by the CHAMP satellite (460-390- km altitude) have shown a region of strong enhanced density attributed to the combination of cusp particle and Joule heating. The Streak mission (325-123 km), on the other hand, observed a relative depletion in density in the cusp. While particle precipitation in the cusp is comparatively well constrained, the characteristics of the steady and fluctuating components of the electric field in the cusp are poorly constrained. Also, the significance of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in particular at lower altitudes has not been addressed as it relates to the cusp density anomaly. We address the response of the cusp region to a range electrodynamical forcing with our high resolution two-dimensional time-dependent nonhydrostatic nonlinear dynamical model. We take advantage of our model's high resolution and focus on a more typical cusp width of 2 degrees in latitude. Earlier simulations have also shown a significant contribution from soft particle precipitation. We simulate the atmospheric response to a range of realizable magnitudes of the fluctuating and steady components of the electric field to examine the dependence of the magnitude of the cusp density anomaly on a large range of observed characteristics of the electrodynamical forcing and examine, in particular, the importance of particle heating relative to Joule heating. In addition we investigate the role of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in determining the lower altitude cusp density and wind structure. We compare

  11. Cusped Density Profiles of Gravitational Lens Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutka, P. T.

    2010-06-01

    We have developed an analytic formulation for axially symmetric GNFW lens model with parametrized cusp slope (α). The lensing theory has several implications, for example strong lensing is very difficult without cusped mass profile. Required cusp strength for strong lensing depends on the lens object mass and concentration. Exceedingly high concentrations are required for profiles, that have α>-1 in order to produce multiple lensed images. We study mass profiles of lens objects with double image lenses, since they are resilient against deviations from axial symmetry, perturbations from microlensing, and halo substructure. The statistics of the observed image flux ratios is connected to the general properties of the of the lens mass density profiles. Our analysis is based on a limiting value for the shallowest cusp slope αCSL able to produce the observed flux ratio with any lens geometry and lens-source alignment. The cusp slope limit (CSL) does not depend on cosmology, total lens mass, concentration or redshifts of the the lens and the lensed object. In case of axial symmetry the limiting value is depending only on the magnification ratio (observed flux ratio of the images). This removes uncertainties in the lens and source distributions from the statistical analysis. Distribution of these threshold values reveals existence of halo population(s) with similar profiles in the sample; most of the halos have cusp slope α = -1.95+/-0.02. We have also found an imprint of a second population with a cusp slope value α = -1.49+/-0.09. There is about 99 per cent estimated probability, that the observed feature in the distribution is produced by the second population of lenses, with their own characteristic density profile. We analyze error sources in our analysis with mock catalogues, and discuss about alternative explanations for the second population signature.

  12. On the distribution of stellar remnants around massive black holes: slow mass segregation, star cluster inspirals, and correlated orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio

    2014-10-20

    We use N-body simulations as well as analytical techniques to study the long-term dynamical evolution of stellar black holes (BHs) at the Galactic center (GC) and to put constraints on their number and mass distribution. Starting from models that have not yet achieved a state of collisional equilibrium, we find that timescales associated with cusp regrowth can be longer than the Hubble time. Our results cast doubts on standard models that postulate high densities of BHs near the GC and motivate studies that start from initial conditions that correspond to well-defined physical models. For the first time, we consider the distribution of BHs in a dissipationless model for the formation of the Milky Way nuclear cluster (NC), in which massive stellar clusters merge to form a compact nucleus. We simulate the consecutive merger of ∼10 clusters containing an inner dense sub-cluster of BHs. After the formed NC is evolved for ∼5 Gyr, the BHs do form a steep central cusp, while the stellar distribution maintains properties that resemble those of the GC NC. Finally, we investigate the effect of BH perturbations on the motion of the GC S-stars as a means of constraining the number of the perturbers. We find that reproducing the quasi-thermal character of the S-star orbital eccentricities requires ≳ 1000 BHs within 0.1 pc of Sgr A*. A dissipationless formation scenario for the GC NC is consistent with this lower limit and therefore could reconcile the need for high central densities of BHs (to explain the S-stars orbits) with the 'missing-cusp' problem of the GC giant star population.

  13. STOCHASTIC STAR FORMATION AND A (NEARLY) UNIFORM STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Michele; Krumholz, Mark R.; Da Silva, Robert L.

    2011-11-10

    Recent observations indicate a lower H{alpha} to FUV ratio in dwarf galaxies than in brighter systems, a trend that could be explained by a truncated and/or steeper initial mass function (IMF) in small galaxies. However, at low star formation rates (SFRs), the H{alpha} to FUV ratio can vary due to stochastic sampling even for a universal IMF, a hypothesis that has, prior to this work, received limited investigation. Using SLUG, a fully stochastic code for synthetic photometry in star clusters and galaxies, we compare the H{alpha} and FUV luminosity in a sample of {approx}450 nearby galaxies with models drawn from a universal Kroupa IMF and a modified IMF, the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF). Once random sampling and time evolution are included, a Kroupa IMF convolved with the cluster mass function (CMF) reproduces the observed H{alpha} distribution at all FUV luminosities, while a truncated IMF as implemented in current IGIMF models underpredicts the H{alpha} luminosity by more than an order of magnitude at the lowest SFRs. We conclude that the observed luminosity is the result of the joint probability distribution function of the SFR, CMF, and a universal IMF, consistent with parts of the IGIMF theory, but that a truncation in the IMF in clusters is inconsistent with the observations. Future work will examine stochastic star formation and its time dependence in detail to study whether random sampling can explain other observations that suggest a varying IMF.

  14. Density variations in the Earth's magnetospheric cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Niehof, J.; Collier, M. R.; Welling, D. T.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mozer, F. S.; Fritz, T. A.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2016-03-01

    Seven years of measurements from the Polar spacecraft are surveyed to monitor the variations of plasma density within the magnetospheric cusps. The spacecraft's orbital precession from 1998 through 2005 allows for coverage of both the northern and southern cusps from low altitude out to the magnetopause. In the mid- and high- altitude cusps, plasma density scales well with the solar wind density (ncusp/nsw˜0.8). This trend is fairly steady for radial distances greater then 4 RE. At low altitudes (r < 4RE) the density increases with decreasing altitude and even exceeds the solar wind density due to contributions from the ionosphere. The density of high charge state oxygen (O>+2) also displays a positive trend with solar wind density within the cusp. A multifluid simulation with the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme MHD model was run to monitor the relative contributions of the ionosphere and solar wind plasma within the cusp. The simulation provides similar results to the statistical measurements from Polar and confirms the presence of ionospheric plasma at low altitudes.

  15. Star Formation in the Central 400 pc of the Milky Way: Evidence for a Population of Massive Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Hewitt, J. W.; Arendt, R. G.; Whitney, B.; Rieke, G.; Wardle, M.; Hinz, J. L.; Stolovy, S.; Lang, C. C.; Burton, M. G.; Ramirez, S.

    2009-09-01

    The central kpc of the Milky Way might be expected to differ significantly from the rest of the Galaxy with regard to gasdynamics and the formation of young stellar objects (YSOs). We probe this possibility with mid-infrared observations obtained with Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer on Spitzer and with Midcourse Space Experiment. We use color-color diagrams and spectral energy distribution (SED) fits to explore the nature of YSO candidates (including objects with 4.5 μm excesses possibly due to molecular emission). There is an asymmetry in the distribution of the candidate YSOs, which tend to be found at negative Galactic longitudes; this behavior contrasts with that of the molecular gas, approximately 2/3 of which is at positive longitudes. The small-scale height of these objects suggests that they are within the Galactic center region and are dynamically young. They lie between two layers of infrared dark clouds and may have originated from these clouds. We identify new sites for this recent star formation by comparing the mid-IR, radio, submillimeter, and methanol maser data. The methanol masers appear to be associated with young, embedded YSOs characterized by 4.5 μm excesses. We use the SEDs of these sources to estimate their physical characteristics; their masses appear to range from ~10 to ~20 M sun. Within the central 400 × 50 pc (|l| < 1fdg3 and |b| < 10') the star formation rate (SFR) based on the identification of Stage I evolutionary phase of YSO candidates is about 0.14 M sun yr-1. Given that the majority of the sources in the population of YSOs are classified as Stage I objects, we suggest that a recent burst of star formation took place within the last 105 yr. This suggestion is also consistent with estimates of SFRs within the last ~107 yr showing a peak around 105 yr ago. Lastly, we find that the Schmidt-Kennicutt Law applies well in the central 400 pc of the Galaxy. This implies that star formation does not appear to be

  16. The IMF and star formation history of the stellar clusters in the Vela D cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Testi, L.; Vanzi, L.

    2006-03-01

    Aims.We present the results of a Near-Infrared deep photometric survey of a sample of six embedded star clusters in the Vela-D molecular cloud, all associated with luminous (˜ 103 L⊙) IRAS sources. The clusters are unlikely to be older than a few 106 yrs, since all are still associated with molecular gas.Methods.We employed the fact that all clusters lie at the same distance and were observed with the same instrumental setting to derive their properties in a consistent way, being affected by the same instrumental and observational biases. We extracted the clusters' K Luminosity Functions and developed a simple method to correct them for extinction, based on colour-magnitude diagrams. The reliability of the method has been tested by constructing synthetic clusters from theoretical tracks for pre-main sequence stars and a standard Initial Mass Function. The clusters' Initial Mass Functions have been derived from the dereddened K Luminosity Functions by adopting a set of pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks and assuming coeval star formation.Results.All clusters are small (˜ 100 members) and compact (radius ˜ 0.1-0.2 pc); their most massive stars are intermediate-mass (˜ 2-10 M⊙) ones. The dereddened K Luminosity Functions are likely to arise from the same distribution, suggesting that the selected clusters have quite similar Initial Mass Functions and star formation histories. The Initial Mass Functions are consistent with those derived for field stars and clusters. Adding them together we found that the "global" Initial Mass Function appears steeper at the high-mass end and exhibits a drop-off at ˜ 10 M⊙. In fact, a standard Initial Mass Function would predict a star with M > 22.5 M⊙ within one of the clusters, which is not found. Hence, either high-mass stars need larger clusters to be formed, or the Initial Mass Function of the single clusters is steeper at the high-mass end because of the physical conditions in the parental gas.

  17. The ASACUSA CUSP: an antihydrogen experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, N.; Ulmer, S.; Murtagh, D. J.; Van Gorp, S.; Nagata, Y.; Diermaier, M.; Federmann, S.; Leali, M.; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Michishio, K.; Mizutani, T.; Mohri, A.; Nagahama, H.; Ohtsuka, M.; Radics, B.; Sakurai, S.; Sauerzopf, C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Torii, H. A.; Venturelli, L.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-11-01

    In order to test CPT symmetry between antihydrogen and its counterpart hydrogen, the ASACUSA collaboration plans to perform high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen atom in-flight. We have developed an apparatus ("cusp trap") which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and multiple ring electrodes. For the preparation of slow antiprotons and positrons, Penning-Malmberg type traps were utilized. The spectrometer line was positioned downstream of the cusp trap. At the end of the beamline, an antihydrogen beam detector was located, which comprises an inorganic Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) single-crystal scintillator housed in a vacuum duct and surrounding plastic scintillators. A significant fraction of antihydrogen atoms flowing out the cusp trap were detected.

  18. Atomic nitrogen densities near the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Nelson, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition spectrometer on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft sampled several major and minor thermospheric gases including atomic nitrogen. A selection of passes over the polar cusp that provide a quantitative measure of N densities in this region and provide evidence of localized density increases due to soft particle precipitation is presented. Increases in N densities are frequently observed but are smaller than accompanying increases in N2 densities. The observations support earlier studies suggesting that N densities increase more rapidly than O densities during periods of high solar EUV flux and N densities are larger in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere. A series of passes in February 1983, late in the lifetime of DE 2, indicated N densities at 200 km altitude were a factor of 2 larger near the southern cusp than near the northern cusp.

  19. Atomic nitrogen densities near the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Nelson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition spectrometer on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft sampled several major and minor thermospheric gases including atomic nitrogen. A selection of passes over the polar cusp that provide a quantitative measure of N densities in this region and provide evidence of localized density increases due to soft particle precipitation is presented. Increases in N densities are frequently observed but are smaller than accompanying increases in N2 densities. The observations support earlier studies suggesting that (1) N densities increase more rapidly than O densities during periods of high solar EUV flux and (2) N densities are larger in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere. A series of passes in February 1983, late in the lifetime of DE 2, indicated N densities at 200 km altitude were a factor of 2 larger near the southern cusp than near the northern cusp.

  20. Cusps, self-organization, and absorbing states.

    PubMed

    Bonachela, Juan A; Alava, Mikko; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2009-05-01

    Elastic interfaces embedded in (quenched) random media exhibit metastability and stick-slip dynamics. These nontrivial dynamical features have been shown to be associated with cusp singularities of the coarse-grained disorder correlator. Here we show that annealed systems with many absorbing states and a conservation law but no quenched disorder exhibit identical cusps. On the other hand, similar nonconserved systems in the directed percolation class are also shown to exhibit cusps but of a different type. These results are obtained both by a recent method to explicitly measure disorder correlators and by defining an alternative new protocol inspired by self-organized criticality, which opens the door to easily accessible experimental realizations. PMID:19518401

  1. Cusp-points and current sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, S. I.

    1990-04-01

    Cusp points are produced in magnetic streamers of the solar corona. They may also be produced in the tail region of the earth's magnetosphere. This paper makes an analysis of such points in an equilibrium plasma. It is found that the very presence of a cusp point is inevitably associated with current sheets; these are the site of magnetic-field line reconnection. Special attention is paid to two examples. One examines a current sheet in a very much rarefield plasma (a problem formulated by Syrovatskii, 1966). The other one investigates the rosette structure of two merging magnetic islands. Analysis of the plasma behavior in the vicinity of the cusp points shows that, in the latter case, equilibrium cannot be realized. Therefore reconnection must proceed violently, at the high rates observed in numerical simulations.

  2. THE RELATION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS FOR GALAXIES AT 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 IN CANDELS

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Brett; Papovich, Casey; Tilvi, Vithal; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finlator, Kristian; Behroozi, Peter; Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H.; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Davé, Romeel; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark; Giavalisco, Mauro; Long, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Reddy, Naveen; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2015-02-01

    Distant star-forming galaxies show a correlation between their star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, and this has deep implications for galaxy formation. Here, we present a study on the evolution of the slope and scatter of the SFR-stellar mass relation for galaxies at 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 using multi-wavelength photometry in GOODS-S from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. We describe an updated, Bayesian spectral-energy distribution fitting method that incorporates effects of nebular line emission, star formation histories that are constant or rising with time, and different dust-attenuation prescriptions (starburst and Small Magellanic Cloud). From z = 6.5 to z = 3.5 star-forming galaxies in CANDELS follow a nearly unevolving correlation between stellar mass and SFR that follows SFR ∼ M{sub ⋆}{sup a} with a =0.54 ± 0.16 at z ∼ 6 and 0.70 ± 0.21 at z ∼ 4. This evolution requires a star formation history that increases with decreasing redshift (on average, the SFRs of individual galaxies rise with time). The observed scatter in the SFR-stellar mass relation is tight, σ(log SFR/M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) < 0.3-0.4 dex, for galaxies with log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} > 9 dex. Assuming that the SFR is tied to the net gas inflow rate (SFR ∼ M-dot {sub gas}), then the scatter in the gas inflow rate is also smaller than 0.3–0.4 dex for star-forming galaxies in these stellar mass and redshift ranges, at least when averaged over the timescale of star formation. We further show that the implied star formation history of objects selected on the basis of their co-moving number densities is consistent with the evolution in the SFR-stellar mass relation.

  3. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION RATES ON STELLAR MASS AND ENVIRONMENT AT z approx 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shannon G.; Holden, Bradford P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Franx, Marijn

    2009-11-01

    We examine the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies in a redshift slice encompassing the z = 0.834 cluster RX J0152.7 - 1357. We used a low-dispersion prism in the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph to identify galaxies with z {sub AB} < 23.3 mag in diverse environments around the cluster out to projected distances of approx8 Mpc from the cluster center. We utilize a mass-limited sample (M > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) of 330 galaxies that were imaged by Spitzer MIPS at 24 mum to derive SFRs and study the dependence of specific SFR (SSFR) on stellar mass and environment. We find that the SFR and SSFR show a strong decrease with increasing local density, similar to the relation at z approx 0. Our result contrasts with other work at z approx 1 that finds the SFR-density trend to reverse for luminosity-limited samples. These other results appear to be driven by star formation (SF) in lower mass systems (M approx 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). Our results imply that the processes that shut down SF are present in groups and other dense regions in the field. Our data also suggest that the lower SFRs of galaxies in higher density environments may reflect a change in the ratio of star-forming to non-star-forming galaxies, rather than a change in SFRs. As a consequence, the SFRs of star-forming galaxies, in environments ranging from small groups to clusters, appear to be similar and largely unaffected by the local processes that truncate SF at z approx 0.8.

  4. Dual Stellar Halos in the Standard Elliptical Galaxy M105 and Formation of Massive Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-05-01

    M105 is a standard elliptical galaxy, located in the Leo I Group. We present photometry of the resolved stars in its inner region at R ≈ 4‧ ≈ 4R eff, obtained from F606W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. We combine this with photometry of the outer region at R ≈ 12‧ ≈ 12R eff from archival imaging data. Color–magnitude diagrams of the resolved stars in the inner region show a prominent red giant branch (RGB) with a large color range, while those for the outer region show better a narrow blue RGB. The metallicity distribution function (MDF) of the RGB stars shows the existence of two distinct subpopulations: a dominant metal-rich population (with a peak at [M/H] ≈ 0.0) and a much weaker metal-poor population (with a peak at [M/H] ≈ ‑1.1). The radial number density profiles of the metal-rich and metal-poor RGB stars are fit well by a Sérsic law with n = 2.75 ± 0.10 and n = 6.89 ± 0.94, and by a single power law (σ ∝ R ‑3.8 and σ ∝ R ‑2.6), respectively. The MDFs of the inner and outer regions can be described well by accretion gas models of chemical evolution with two components. These provide strong evidence that there are two distinct stellar halos in this galaxy, blue metal-poor and red metal-rich halos, consistent with the results based on globular cluster systems in bright early-type galaxies (ETGs). We discuss the implications of these results with regard to the formation of massive ETGs in the dual halo mode formation scenario.

  5. Opening the cusp. [using magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic field topology (determined by the superposition of dipole, image, and uniform fields) for mapping the cusp to the ionosphere. The model results are compared to both new and published observations and are then used to map the footprint of a flux transfer event caused by a time variation in the merging rate. It is shown that the cusp geometry distorts the field lines mapped from the magnetopause to yield footprints with dawn and dusk protrusions into the region of closed magnetic flux.

  6. Cusp Kernels for Velocity-Changing Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, B. H.; Marsland, R., III; Olsen, B. A.; Happer, W.

    2012-05-01

    We introduce an analytical kernel, the “cusp” kernel, to model the effects of velocity-changing collisions on optically pumped atoms in low-pressure buffer gases. Like the widely used Keilson-Storer kernel [J. Keilson and J. E. Storer, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 243 (1952)QAMAAY0033-569X], cusp kernels are characterized by a single parameter and preserve a Maxwellian velocity distribution. Cusp kernels and their superpositions are more useful than Keilson-Storer kernels, because they are more similar to real kernels inferred from measurements or theory and are easier to invert to find steady-state velocity distributions.

  7. Self-bending symmetric cusp beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Lu, Yao; Li, Yin-Mei; Ren, Yu-Xuan

    2015-12-07

    A type of self-bending symmetric cusp beams with four accelerating intensity maxima is theoretically and experimentally presented. Distinguished from the reported regular polygon beams, the symmetric cusp beams simultaneously exhibit peculiar features of natural autofocusing and self-acceleration during propagation. Further, such beams take the shape of a fine longitudinal needle-like structure at the focal region and possess the strong ability of self-healing over obstacles. All these intriguing properties were verified experimentally. Particularly, the spatial profile of the reconstructed beam exhibits spatially sculpted optical structure with four siamesed curved arms. Thus, we anticipate that the structured beam will benefit optical guiding and optofluidics in surprising ways.

  8. Self-bending symmetric cusp beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Lu, Yao; Li, Yin-Mei

    2015-12-01

    A type of self-bending symmetric cusp beams with four accelerating intensity maxima is theoretically and experimentally presented. Distinguished from the reported regular polygon beams, the symmetric cusp beams simultaneously exhibit peculiar features of natural autofocusing and self-acceleration during propagation. Further, such beams take the shape of a fine longitudinal needle-like structure at the focal region and possess the strong ability of self-healing over obstacles. All these intriguing properties were verified experimentally. Particularly, the spatial profile of the reconstructed beam exhibits spatially sculpted optical structure with four siamesed curved arms. Thus, we anticipate that the structured beam will benefit optical guiding and optofluidics in surprising ways.

  9. The HORUS Observatory - a Next Generation Mission to Study Planetary, Stellar and Galactic Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowen, Paul A.; Beasley, M.; Cooke, B.; Woodruff, B.; Calzetti, D.; Desch, S.; Fullerton, A.; Gallagher, J.; Hartigan, P.; Jansen, R.; Lauer, T.; O'Connell, R.; Oey, S.; Padgett, D.; Roberge, A.; Siegmund, O.; Smith, N.; Stern, D.; Tumlinson, J.; Windhorst, R.

    2010-01-01

    The High-ORbit Ultraviolet-visible Satellite (HORUS) is a 2.4-meter class space telescope that will conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the astrophysical processes and environments relevant for the births and life cycles of stars and their planetary systems, to investigate and understand the range of environments, feedback mechanisms, and other factors that most affect the outcome of the star and planet formation process. To do so, HORUS will provide 100 times greater imaging efficiency and more than 10 times greater UV spectroscopic sensitivity than has existed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HORUS mission will contribute vital information on how solar systems form and whether habitable planets should be common or rare. It also will investigate the structure, evolution, and destiny of galaxies and universe. This program relies on focused capabilities unique to space that no other planned NASA mission will provide: near-UV/visible (200-1075nm) wide-field, diffraction-limited imaging; and high-sensitivity, high-resolution UV (100-170nm) spectroscopy. HORUS is designed to be launched into a semi-stable orbit at Earth-Sun L2. From this vantage HORUS will enjoy a stable environment for thermal and pointing control, and long-duration target visibility. The core HORUS design will provide wide field of view (WFOV) imagery and high efficiency point source FUV spectroscopy using a novel combination of spectral selection and field sharing. The HORUS Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) design is based on modern light weight mirror technology with a faster primary mirror to shorten the overall package and thereby reduce mass. The OTA uses a three-mirror anastigmat configuration to provide excellent imagery over a large FOV. The UV/optical Imaging Cameras use two 21k x 21k Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) consisting of thirty-six Si 3.5k x 3.5k CCD elements each. The FUV spectrometer uses cross strip anode based MCPs improved from HST-COS technology.

  10. Non-syndromic multiple talon cusps in siblings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Mutneja, Anudeep R; Nagpal, Archna; Mutneja, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Talon's cusp is an anomalous structure that projects palatally from the cingulum areas of maxillary or mandibular anterior teeth. This dental anomaly may pose several pathological, functional and esthetic problems. Talon cusps usually affect a single tooth, but may rarely affect an entire sextant. Such multiple talon cusps may not always occur in association with a syndrome. Furthermore, they may exhibit a genetic pattern of inheritance. This article emphasizes rare occurrence of such nonsyndromic multiple talon cusps in two siblings. PMID:24992868

  11. The effect of extra dimensions on gravity wave bursts from cosmic string cusps

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: ggeshnizjani@perimeterinstitute.ca E-mail: zavala@th.physik.uni-bonn.de

    2010-09-01

    We explore the kinematical effect of having extra dimensions on the gravitational wave emission from cosmic strings. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, and reduce the probability of their formation. We recompute the gravitational wave burst, taking into account these two factors, and find a potentially significant damping on the gravitational waves of the strings.

  12. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  17. WIDESPREAD PRESENCE OF SHALLOW CUSPS IN THE SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS PROFILE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Vesperini, Enrico; Trenti, Michele E-mail: trenti@colorado.ed

    2010-09-10

    Surface-brightness profiles of globular clusters with shallow central cusps ({Sigma} {approx} R {sup {nu}} with -0.3 {approx_lt} {nu} {approx_lt} -0.05) have been associated by several recent studies with the presence of a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). Such shallow slopes are observed in several globular clusters thanks to the high angular resolution of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. In this Letter, we evaluate whether shallow cusps are a unique signature of a central IMBH by analyzing a sample of direct N-body simulations of star clusters with and without a central IMBH. We 'observe' the simulations as if they were HST images. Shallow cusps are common in our simulation sample: star clusters without an IMBH have {nu} {approx_gt} -0.3 in the pre-core-collapse and core-collapse phases. Post-core-collapse clusters without an IMBH transition to steeper cusps, -0.7 {approx_lt} {nu} {approx_lt} -0.4, only if the primordial binary fraction is very small, f {sub bin} < 3%, and if there are few stellar-mass BHs remaining. Otherwise {nu} values overlap the range usually ascribed to the presence of an IMBH throughout the entire duration of the simulations. In addition, measuring {nu} is intrinsically prone to significant uncertainty, therefore typical measurement errors may lead to {nu} {>=} -0.3 even when ({nu}) {approx_lt} -0.4. Overall our analysis shows that a shallow cusp is not an unequivocal signature of a central IMBH and casts serious doubts on the usefulness of measuring {nu} in the context of the hunt for IMBHs in globular clusters.

  18. Near-infrared mass-to-light ratios in galaxies - Stellar mass and star formation in the heart of the Whirlpool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.

    1988-01-01

    The observed stellar population in the solar neighborhood is used to derive a relationship between the local stellar mass density and the visual and near-IR brightness, which is then extended to a wide range of galaxies. This technique is applied to near-IR (J, H, and K) images of the central 2.3 kpc (50 arcsec) of the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51, NGC 5194). It is estimated that the current high rate of star formation can last no more than about another 10-million years, and that, if a large fraction of the stars in the nucleus of M51 was created in periods of enhanced formation, the duty cycle for such events is about 5 percent.

  19. Cusp catastrophe model of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, J E; Abelson, M A

    1983-09-01

    A cusp catastrophe model is developed to explain job turnover of nursing employees. The temporal dynamics of the catastrophe model suggest that leavers experience lower organization commitment than do stayers prior to termination. Leavers' perceptions of job tension and commitment appear to cross the threshold levels prior to the termination dates. PMID:10262614

  20. Cusp relation for the Pauli potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levämäki, H.; Nagy, Á.; Kokko, K.; Vitos, L.

    2014-12-01

    In orbital-free density functional theory, only a Schrödinger-like equation has to be solved for the square root of the electron density. In this equation, however, there is an extra potential in addition to the Kohn-Sham potential, the so-called Pauli potential. Cusp relations are now presented for this Pauli potential for spherically symmetric systems.

  1. Stellar Ontogeny: From Dust...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of star formation. Infrared and radio astronomy, particularly microwave astronomy is used to provide information on different stages of stellar formation. The role of dust and gas which swirl through the interstellar regions of a galaxy and the collapse of a cloud in star formation are also presented. (HM)

  2. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  3. Stellar Winds and Embedded Star Formation in the Galactic Center Quintuplet and Arches Clusters: Multifrequency Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Cornelia C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Goss, W. M.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2005-11-01

    A multifrequency, multiconfiguration study has been made of the compact radio sources in the Galactic center Quintuplet and Arches stellar clusters using the Very Large Array. Ten radio sources have been detected in the Quintuplet cluster. The majority of these radio sources have rising spectral indices and are positionally coincident with young massive stars that are known to have powerful stellar winds. We conclude that the three most compact of these sources are produced by stellar wind emission; thus, mass-loss rates can be derived and have an average value of 3×10-5 Msolar yr-1. The remainder of the sources are likely to be a combination of stellar wind emission and free-free emission from surrounding ionized gas. In three cases, the radio sources have no stellar counterpart, and the radio emission is thought to arise from compact or ultracompact H II regions. If so, these sources would be the first detections of embedded massive stars to be discovered in the Galactic center clusters. The radio nebula associated with the Pistol star resembles the nebula surrounding the luminous blue variable star η Car and may be related to the stellar wind of the Pistol star. Ten compact radio sources are also detected in the Arches cluster and are interpreted to be stellar wind sources, consistent with previous findings. Several of the sources show moderate variability (10%-30%) in their flux density, possibly related to a nonthermal component in the wind emission. A number of radio sources in both clusters have X-ray counterparts, which have been interpreted to be the shocked, colliding winds of massive binary systems.

  4. Failures no More: The Radical Consequences of Realistic Stellar Feedback for Dwarf Galaxies, the Milky Way, and Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-06-01

    Many of the most fundamental unsolved questions in star and galaxy formation revolve around star formation and "feedback" from massive stars, in-extricably linking galaxy formation and stellar evolution. I'll present simulations with un-precedented resolution of Milky-Way (MW) mass galaxies, followed cosmologically to redshift zero. For the first time, these simulations resolve the internal structure of small dwarf satellites around a MW-like host, with detailed models for stellar evolution including radiation pressure, supernovae, stellar winds, and photo-heating. I'll show that, without fine-tuning, these feedback processes naturally resolve the "missing satellites," "too big to fail," and "cusp-core" problems, and produce realistic galaxy populations. At high redshifts however, the realistic ISM structure predicted, coupled to standard stellar population models, naively leads to the prediction that only ~1-2% of ionizing photons can ever escape galaxies, insufficient to ionize the Universe. But these models assume all stars are single: if we account for binary evolution, the escape fraction increases dramatically to ~20% for the small, low-metallicity galaxies believed to ionize the Universe.

  5. DWARFS GOBBLING DWARFS: A STELLAR TIDAL STREAM AROUND NGC 4449 AND HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION ON SMALL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Delgado, David; Rix, Hans-Walter; Maccio, Andrea V.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Annibali, Francesca; Fliri, Juergen; Zibetti, Stefano; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Chonis, Taylor S.; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Gallego-Laborda, J.; Merrifield, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A candidate diffuse stellar substructure was previously reported in the halo of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4449 by Karachentsev et al. We map and analyze this feature using a unique combination of deep integrated-light images from the BlackBird 0.5 m telescope, and high-resolution wide-field images from the 8 m Subaru Telescope, which resolve the nebulosity into a stream of red giant branch stars, and confirm its physical association with NGC 4449. The properties of the stream imply a massive dwarf spheroidal progenitor, which after complete disruption will deposit an amount of stellar mass that is comparable to the existing stellar halo of the main galaxy. The stellar mass ratio between the two galaxies is {approx}1:50, while the indirectly measured dynamical mass ratio, when including dark matter, may be {approx}1:10-1:5. This system may thus represent a 'stealth' merger, where an infalling satellite galaxy is nearly undetectable by conventional means, yet has a substantial dynamical influence on its host galaxy. This singular discovery also suggests that satellite accretion can play a significant role in building up the stellar halos of low-mass galaxies, and possibly in triggering their starbursts.

  6. On the evolution and environmental dependence of the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation since z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yusei; Smail, Ian; Kurk, Jaron; Geach, James E.; Sobral, David; Kodama, Tadayuki; Nakata, Fumiaki; Swinbank, A. M.; Best, Philip N.; Hayashi, Masao; Tadaki, Ken-ichi

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of the correlation between galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar mass (M*) over the last ˜10 Gyr, particularly focusing on its environmental dependence. We first present the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of the Hα-selected galaxies in a rich cluster Cl 0939+4713 at z = 0.4. We use wide-field Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm data to show that the optically red Hα emitters, which are most prevalent in group-scale environments, tend to have higher SFRs and higher dust extinction than the majority population of blue Hα sources. With an MIR stacking analysis, we find that the median SFR of Hα emitters is higher in higher density environment at z = 0.4. We also find that star-forming galaxies in high-density environment tend to have higher specific SFR (SSFR), although the trend is much less significant compared to that of SFR. This increase of SSFR in high-density environment is not visible when we consider the SFR derived from Hα alone, suggesting that the dust attenuation in galaxies depends on environment; galaxies in high-density environment tend to be dustier (by up to ˜0.5 mag), probably reflecting a higher fraction of nucleated, dusty starbursts in higher density environments at z = 0.4. We then discuss the environmental dependence of the SFR-M* relation for star-forming galaxies since z ˜ 2, by compiling our comparable, narrow-band-selected, large Hα emitter samples in both distant cluster environments and field environments. We find that the SSFR of Hα-selected galaxies (at the fixed mass of log (M*/M⊙) = 10) rapidly evolves as (1 + z)3, but the SFR-M* relation is independent of the environment since z ˜ 2, as far as we rely on the Hα-based SFRs (with M*-dependent extinction correction). Even if we consider the possible environmental variation in the dust attenuation, we conclude that the difference in the SFR-M* relation between cluster and field star-forming galaxies is always small (≲0.2 dex level) at any time

  7. GEM Workshop on Intercalibrating Cusp Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    On October 9, 1990, a lively group of more than 60 scientists from around the world gathered at Northeastern University's Henderson House in Weston, Mass., to spend 4 days in concentrated efforts to unravel the complexities of cusp/cleft theory and observations.Plans for the National Science Foundation-sponsored workshop were formulated at the previous GEM workshop convened by Ted Rosenberg at the University of Maryland in October 1989, where participants agreed that the first task of the first GEM campaign—attacking problems of the magnetopause, boundary layers, and their signatures in the ionosphere—should be the identification of cusp signatures in ground-based and airborne data by intercalibrating with spacecraft data on direct overflights.

  8. Talon Cusp Type I: Restorative Management

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Rafael Alberto dos Santos; de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine; Mei, Raul Sampaio; Lamers, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The teeth are formed during intrauterine life (i.e., gestation) during the odontogenesis stage. During this period, the teeth move until they enter the oral cavity. This course covers various stages of dental development, namely, initiation, proliferation, histodifferentiation, morphodifferentiation, and apposition. The talon cusp is an anomaly that occurs during morphodifferentiation, and this anomaly may have numerous adverse clinical effects on oral health. The objective of this study was to report a case of “Talon Cusp Type I” and to discuss diagnostic methods, treatment options for this anomaly, and the importance of knowledge of this morphological change among dental professionals so that it is not confused with other morphological changes; such knowledge is required to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures, to perform treatments that prevent caries and malocclusions as well as enhancing aesthetics, and to improve the oral health and quality of life of the patient. PMID:26064698

  9. Resurgence of the cusp anomalous dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigoni, Daniele; Hatsuda, Yasuyuki

    2015-09-01

    We revisit the strong coupling limit of the cusp anomalous dimension in planar N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. It is known that the strong coupling expansion is asymptotic and non-Borel summable. As a consequence, the cusp anomalous dimension receives non-perturbative corrections, and the complete strong coupling expansion should be a resurgent transseries. We reveal that the perturbative and non-perturbative parts in the transseries are closely interrelated. Solving the Beisert-Eden-Staudacher equation systematically, we analyze in detail the large order behavior in the strong coupling pertur- bative expansion and show that the non-perturbative information is indeed encoded there. An ambiguity of (lateral) Borel resummations of the perturbative expansion is precisely canceled by the contributions from the non-perturbative sectors, and the final result is real and unambiguous.

  10. Ion observations at Mercury's Magnetospheric Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Jamie; Raines, Jim; Slavin, James

    2016-04-01

    The magnetospheric cusp is a region of direct entry for solar wind mass, energy and momentum into a planetary magnetosphere. Dayside magnetic reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field and the planetary field allows shocked solar wind plasma to flow down open magnetospheric field lines. Whilst this is occurring these magnetic field lines convect poleward. For a spacecraft travelling through the high latitudes, this causes a velocity filter effect to be observed in the ion data, whereby higher energy ions are observed at lower latitudes. Here we present the ion observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft at Mercury's cusp, specifically focusing on ions latitudinally dispersed in energy. From these dispersions, the distance to the reconnection site is calculated and used to better understand the process of reconnection at Mercury's dayside magnetopause.