Science.gov

Sample records for stellar cusp formation

  1. Beach-cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

  2. HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION INTEGRAL-FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF THE GALAXY'S NUCLEAR CLUSTER: A MISSING STELLAR CUSP?

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Larkin, J.; Lu, J. R.; Matthews, K.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the structure of the nuclear star cluster in the innermost 0.16 pc of the Galaxy as measured by the number density profile of late-type giants. Using laser guide star adaptive optics in conjunction with the integral field spectrograph, OSIRIS, at the Keck II telescope, we are able to differentiate between the older, late-type (approx 1 Gyr) stars, which are presumed to be dynamically relaxed, and the unrelaxed young (approx 6 Myr) population. This distinction is crucial for testing models of stellar cusp formation in the vicinity of a black hole, as the models assume that the cusp stars are in dynamical equilibrium in the black hole potential. In the survey region, we classified 60 stars as early-type (22 newly identified) and 74 stars as late-type (61 newly identified). We find that contamination from young stars is significant, with more than twice as many young stars as old stars in our sensitivity range (K' < 15.5) within the central arcsecond. Based on the late-type stars alone, the surface stellar number density profile, SIGMA(R) propor to R {sup -G}AMMA, is flat, with GAMMA = -0.27 +- 0.19. Monte Carlo simulations of the possible de-projected volume density profile, n(r) propor tor {sup -g}amma, show that gamma is less than 1.0 at the 99.7% confidence level. These results are consistent with the nuclear star cluster having no cusp, with a core profile that is significantly flatter than that predicted by most cusp formation theories, and even allows for the presence of a central hole in the stellar distribution. Of the possible dynamical interactions that can lead to the depletion of the red giants observable in this survey-stellar collisions, mass segregation from stellar remnants, or a recent merger event-mass segregation is the only one that can be ruled out as the dominant depletion mechanism. The lack of a stellar cusp around a supermassive black hole would have important implications for black hole growth models and inferences on the

  3. Cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, T.; Sekiguchi, T.

    1983-12-01

    The Institute of Plasma Physics at Nagoya and the Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, discuss the Radio-Frequency-Plugged-Cusp (RFC-XX). The objective of the Radio-Frequency-Confinement Program is to study high-beta plasma confinement in a linear, axisymmetric, impurity-free double-cusp geometry, as an extension of its predecessor TPD-III, a single-cusp device. The apparatus of the RFC-XX is described and shown in a schematic diagram. Main results and major physical achievments are listed and experimental subjects in progress and a program plan are given. The High-Beta Double and Triple Cusp plasma confinement experiments are giving new results by substantially lengthening the period of high beta.

  4. The Stellar Cusp in the Galactic Center: Three-Dimensional Orbits of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Samantha; Ghez, Andrea M.; Boehle, Anna; Yelda, Sylvana; Sitarski, Breann; Witzel, Gunther; Do, Tuan; Lu, Jessica R.; Morris, Mark; Becklin, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    We present new findings from our long term study of the nuclear star cluster around the Galaxy's central supermassive blackhole (SMBH). Measurements where made using speckle and laser guided adaptive optics imaging and integral field spectroscopy on the Keck telescopes. We report 13 new measurable accelerating sources around the SMBH, down to ~17 mag in K band, only 4 of which are known to be young stars, the rest are either known to be old stars or have yet to be spectral typed. Thus we more than double the number of measured accelerations for the known old stars and unknown spectral type population (increasing the number from 6 to 15). Previous observations suggest a flat density profile of late-type stars, contrary to the theorized Bahcall-Wolf cusp (Bahcall & Wolf 1976, 1977; Buchholz et al. 2009; Do et al. 2009; Bartko et al. 2010). With three-dimensional orbits of significantly accelerating sources, we will be able to better characterize the stellar cusp in the Galactic center, including the slope of the stellar density profile.

  5. A field data assessment of contemporary models of beach cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.R.; Psuty, N.P.; Bauer, B.O.; Carter, R.W.G.

    1996-01-01

    Cusp formation was observed during an instrumented, daily profiled, time series of a reflective beach in Canaveral National Seashore, Florida on January 5, 1988. The monitored cusp embayment formed by erosion of the foreshore and the cusp series had a mean spacing of approximately 28 m. During this time, inshore fluid flows were dominated by two standing edge waves at frequencies of 0.06 Hz (primary) and 0.035 Hz (secondary) whereas incident waves were broadbanded at 0.12-0.16 Hz. Directly measured flows (and indirectly estimated swash excursion) data support both the standing wave subharmonic model and the self-organization model of cusp formation in this study.

  6. The removal of cusps from galaxy centres by stellar feedback in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Couchman, H M P; Wadsley, James

    2006-08-01

    The standard cosmological model, now strongly constrained by direct observations of the Universe at early epochs, is very successful in describing the evolution of structure on large and intermediate scales. Unfortunately, serious contradictions remain on smaller, galactic scales. Among the main small-scale problems is a significant and persistent discrepancy between observations of nearby galaxies, which imply that galactic dark matter haloes have a density profile with a flat core, and the cosmological model, which predicts that the haloes should have divergent density (a cusp) at the centre. Here we report numerical simulations that show that random bulk motions of gas in small primordial galaxies, of the magnitude expected in these systems, will result in a flattening of the central dark matter cusp on relatively short timescales (approximately 10(8) years). Gas bulk motions in early galaxies are driven by supernova explosions that result from ongoing star formation. Our mechanism is general, and would have operated in all star-forming galaxies at redshifts z > or = 10. Once removed, the cusp cannot be reintroduced during the subsequent mergers involved in the build-up of larger galaxies. As a consequence, in the present Universe both small and large galaxies would have flat dark matter core density profiles, in agreement with observations. PMID:16885978

  7. Beach cusp destruction, formation, and evolution during and subsequent to an extratropical storm, Duck, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Miller, S.M.O.; Torzynski, C.A.; Kochel, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Many studies have debated whether beach cusps are erosional or depositional features. The April 12-14, 1988, extratropical storm provided an opportunity to view the direct effects of one of the largest storms of the past decade upon beach sedimentology and morphology on barrier islands near Duck, North Carolina. Prior to the storm, the beach at Duck was characterized by a well-defined pattern of beach cusps with horn-to-horn spacings averaging 35 m. Storm-induced alterations were dominated by an initial period of beach erosion that remobilized the upper 30 to 50 cm of beach sediment, followed by aggradation. Net aggradation was most prominent along the middle beachface and within the pre-storm cusp bays. These morphologic adjustments resulted in the destruction of cusps, which were replaced with a post-storm planar beachface composed of horizontally bedded fine- to coarse-grained sediments. Within 24 hrs of storm subsidence, new beach cusps formed sequentially along the coast in the direction of longshore transport. Initial cusp formation resulted from beach erosion and the creation of bays in the planar storm-beach surface at positions of preferential post-storm runup. The initial cusp horns were composed of truncated horizontal beds of the planar beach accreted during the storm. After their formation, the cusps sequentially migrated downdrift. Migrating horns were composed of a coarse-grained sediment wedge that thickened toward horn crests, suggesting formation by deposition. It is concluded from these observations that beach cusps are both erosional and depositional in nature.

  8. Study of the electric field formation in a multi-cusped magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui Yu, Daren; Wu, Huan; Zhao, Yinjian; Ma, Chengyu; Wang, Di; Wei, Haoyu

    2014-09-15

    The multi-cusped field thruster is a kind of electric thruster adopting a cusped magnetic field to achieve a potentially longer lifetime. It is observed in some experiments that the main electric potential drop forms near the exhaust plane, but the formation mechanism of the electric field in this kind of thrusters is not fully clear yet. Based on the analysis of the electron movement, a 2D Particle-in-Cell plus Monte Carlo model is built to reveal the difference of the constraint to electrons between the central leak path and the lateral region of the thruster. Electron trajectories from cathode are analyzed furthermore. It is found that the central leak path inside the discharge channel may play a significant role in the formation of the main electric potential drop near the exhaust plane.

  9. Formation of molecular lines in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkle, K. H.; Lambert, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Statistical equilibrium of electronic states of diatomic molecules in stellar atmospheres is examined. Atmospheres discussed are representative of the sun, Arcturus (K-giant) and Betelgeuse (M-supergiant). A comparison of the relative collisional and radiative contributions to the equilibrium of the ground electronic state shows that this state is collisionally controlled and that the line source function for vibration-rotation transitions within this state is equivalent to the Planck function. Examination of the equilibrium for excited electronic states demonstrates that the exchange between these states and the ground electronic state is most probably determined by radiative excitation. This result implies that scattering rather than pure absorption is the appropriate mechanism for the formation of lines belonging to these electronic transitions. The scattering hypothesis is given a preliminary check against solar observations. Areas for future investigations are outlined.

  10. FUEL EFFICIENT GALAXIES: SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Samuel N.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2011-06-10

    We examine the importance of secular stellar mass loss for fueling ongoing star formation in disk galaxies during the late stages of their evolution. For a galaxy of a given stellar mass, we calculate the total mass loss rate of its entire stellar population using star formation histories derived from the observed evolution of the M{sub *}-star formation rate (SFR) relation, along with the predictions of standard stellar evolution models for stellar mass loss for a variety of initial stellar mass functions. Our model shows that recycled gas from stellar mass loss can provide most or all of the fuel required to sustain the current level of star formation in late-type galaxies. Stellar mass loss can therefore remove the tension between the low gas infall rates that are derived from observations and the relatively rapid star formation occurring in disk galaxies. For galaxies where cold gas infall rates have been estimated, we demonstrate explicitly that stellar mass loss can account for most of the deficit between their SFR and infall rate.

  11. Stellar halos: a rosetta stone for galaxy formation and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis Read, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos make up about a percent of the total stellar mass in galaxies. Yet their old age and long phase mixing times make them living fossil records of galactic history. In this talk, I review the latest simulations of structure formation in our standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmology. I discuss the latest predictions for stellar halos and the relationship between the stellar halo light and the underlying dark matter. Finally, I discuss how these simulations compare to observations of the Milky Way and Andromeda and, ultimately, what this means for our cosmological model and the formation history of the Galaxy.

  12. Stellar feedback in dwarf galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P

    2008-01-11

    Dwarf galaxies pose substantial challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark-matter density that is divergent at the center, which is in sharp contrast with observations that indicate a core of roughly constant density. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motions of the interstellar gas, resulting in substantial gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations. PMID:18048653

  13. Stellar Chemical Signatures and Hierarchical Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Irwin, Mike; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Tout, Christopher A.; Hill, Vanessa; Tolstoy, Eline

    2004-09-01

    To compare the chemistries of stars in the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxies with stars in the Galaxy, we have compiled a large sample of Galactic stellar abundances from the literature. When kinematic information is available, we have assigned the stars to standard Galactic components through Bayesian classification based on Gaussian velocity ellipsoids. As found in previous studies, the [α/Fe] ratios of most stars in the dSph galaxies are generally lower than similar metallicity Galactic stars in this extended sample. Our kinematically selected stars confirm this for the Galactic halo, thin-disk, and thick-disk components. There is marginal overlap in the low [α/Fe] ratios between dSph stars and Galactic halo stars on extreme retrograde orbits (V<-420 km s-1), but this is not supported by other element ratios. Other element ratios compared in this paper include r- and s-process abundances, where we find a significant offset in the [Y/Fe] ratios, which results in a large overabundance in [Ba/Y] in most dSph stars compared with Galactic stars. Thus, the chemical signatures of most of the dSph stars are distinct from the stars in each of the kinematic components of the Galaxy. This result rules out continuous merging of low-mass galaxies similar to these dSph satellites during the formation of the Galaxy. However, we do not rule out very early merging of low-mass dwarf galaxies, since up to one-half of the most metal-poor stars ([Fe/H]<=-1.8) have chemistries that are in fair agreement with Galactic halo stars. We also do not rule out merging with higher mass galaxies, although we note that the LMC and the remnants of the Sgr dwarf galaxy are also chemically distinct from the majority of the Galactic halo stars. Formation of the Galaxy's thick disk by heating of an old thin disk during a merger is also not ruled out; however, the Galaxy's thick disk itself cannot be comprised of the remnants from a low-mass (dSph) dwarf galaxy, nor of a high

  14. Formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dengkai

    2014-09-01

    Observations reveal the presence of multiple stellar populations (MSPs) in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in their Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams. We present a scenario for the formation of MSPs in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the anomalous-abundance stars observed in GCs are the merged and accreted stars produced by binary interactions, which are rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation. A stellar population with binaries can reproduce two important observational pieces of evidence of MSPs, the Na-O anticorrelation and the multiple sequences in the HR diagram.

  15. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ∼ 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  16. Evidences for Black Hole Formation by Complete Stellar Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, Igor Felix

    2016-07-01

    One of the most critical parameters that determines the formation of binary black holes is the range of masses of black holes that may form by direct collapse, namely, with no energetic supernova kicks that would unbound the stellar binary. Theoretical models set mass ranges and limits for black hole formation through the complete collapse of the stellar progenitor. However, observational constraints for those mass limits have been elusive. Since the velocity of a stellar black hole encodes the history of its formation and evolution, it may provide observational constraints on the strength of kicks by natal supernova explosions in the formation of the black hole. Based on the motion in three dimensions of five black hole binaries in our Galaxy it is found that the three black holes with < 10 solar masses are runaway black hole binaries due to kicks from natal supernovae, whereas the two black holes with 10 to 15 solar masses remained in their birth place and must have been form by complete or almost complete collapse of the progenitor star. These observations show that there may be binary black holes with components having masses as low as 10 solar masses, which suggests that a significant fraction of massive stellar binaries would end as black hole binaries that would produce a large stochastic gravitational-wave background.

  17. Stellar halos and the link to galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmi, Amina

    2016-08-01

    I present a brief overview of how stellar halos may be used to constrain the process of galaxy formation. In particular, streams and substructure in stellar halos trace merger events but can also be used to determine the mass distribution of the host galaxy and hence put constraints on the nature of dark matter. Much of the focus of this contribution is on the Milky Way, but I also present an attempt to understand the kinematics of the globular cluster system of M31.

  18. Galaxies on FIRE: Stellar Feedback Explains Inefficient Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-06-01

    Many of the most fundamental unsolved questions in star and galaxy formation revolve around star formation and "feedback" from both massive stars and accretion onto super-massive black holes. I'll present new simulations which attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from stellar radiation pressure, supernovae, stellar winds, and photo-ionization. These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law and the global inefficiency of star formation -- the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, their behavior in galaxy mergers, and structure of the inter-galactic medium: these winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches.

  19. Stellar velocity dispersion in dissipative galaxy mergers with star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Stickley, Nathaniel R.; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    In order to better understand stellar dynamics in merging systems, such as NGC 6240, we examine the evolution of central stellar velocity dispersion (σ{sub *}) in dissipative galaxy mergers using a suite of binary disk merger simulations that include feedback from stellar formation and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that σ{sub *} undergoes the same general stages of evolution that were observed in our previous dissipationless simulations: coherent oscillation, then phase mixing, followed by dynamical equilibrium. We also find that measurements of σ{sub *} that are based only upon the youngest stars in simulations consistently yield lower values than measurements based upon the total stellar population. This finding appears to be consistent with the so-called 'σ{sub *} discrepancy', observed in real galaxies. We note that quasar-level AGN activity is much more likely to occur when σ{sub *} is near its equilibrium value rather than during periods of extreme σ{sub *}. Finally, we provide estimates of the scatter inherent in measuring σ{sub *} in ongoing mergers.

  20. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Center super-massive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. Following an analytical approach, we explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of identical stellar winds via the Non-Linear Thin Shell Instability. We have found that the collision of relatively slow (<750 km s^{-1}) and strong (˜10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<2000 AU) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, however close binaries, such as IRS 16SW, are promising clump sources (see Calderón et al. 2016). We also present the first results of 2D models of colliding wind systems using the hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, aiming to obtain a clump mass function, and the rate of clump formation and ejection to the ISM. We study the effect of parameters such as wind properties, stellar separation and orbital motion, in order to understand how likely the formation of G2 is in this context.

  1. Galactic flows and the formation of stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the formation of stellar clusters from a Galactic scale SPH simulation. The simulation traces star formation over a 5 Myr timescale, with local gravitational instabilities resulting in ˜ 105 solar masses of star formation in the form of sink particles. The large scale flow dominates the compression from low densities before self-gravity takes over in higher density regions. We investigate the time evolution of the physical properties of the forming clusters including their half-mass radii, their energies and the depletion time of the gas.We show that the more massive clusters (up to ˜ 2 × 104 solar masses) gather their material from of order 10 pc due to the large scale motions associated with the spiral arm passage and shock. The bulk of the gas becomes gravitationally bound near 1-2 Myr before sink formation, and in the absence of feedback, significant accretion ongoing on longer timescales.

  2. The Energetics of Cusp Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Aaron J.; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2015-06-01

    We present a new analytic estimate for the energy required to create a constant density core within a dark matter halo that, based on more realistic assumptions, leads to demands that are orders of magnitude lower than claimed in earlier works. We define a core size based on the logarithmic slope of the dark matter density profile as it is insensitive to the functional form used to fit observed data. The energy required to form a core sensitively depends on the radial scale over which dark matter within the cusp is redistributed within the halo. Simulations indicate that within a region in size comparable to the active star forming regions of the central galaxy inhabiting a halo, dark matter particles have their orbits radially increased by a factor of 2-3 during core formation. Thus, the inner properties of the dark matter halo set the energy requirements. The energy cost increases slowly with halo mass as {M}{h} {}0.3{-0.7} for core sizes ≲1 kpc. We use the expected star formation history for a given halo mass to predict dwarf galaxy core sizes. We find that supernovae alone would create well over 4 kpc cores in 1010 M{}⊙ galaxies if 100% of the energy were transferred to dark matter particle orbits. We can directly constrain the efficiency factor by studying galaxies with known stellar content and core size. We find that the efficiency of coupling between stellar feedback and dark matter orbital energy need only be ≲1% to explain Fornax’s 1 kpc core.

  3. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  4. STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J. E.

    2010-11-20

    The solar photosphere is depleted in refractory elements compared to most solar twins, with the degree of depletion increasing with an element's condensation temperature. Here, I show that adding 4 Earth masses of Earth-like and carbonaceous-chondrite-like material to the solar convection zone brings the Sun's composition into line with the mean value for the solar twins. The observed solar composition could have arisen if the Sun's convection zone accreted material from the solar nebula that was depleted in refractory elements due to the formation of the terrestrial planets and ejection of rocky protoplanets from the asteroid belt. Most solar analogs are missing 0-10 Earth masses of rocky material compared to the most refractory-rich stars, providing an upper limit to the mass of rocky terrestrial planets that they possess. The missing mass is correlated with stellar metallicity. This suggests that the efficiency of planetesimal formation increases with stellar metallicity. Stars with and without known giant planets show a similar distribution of abundance trends. If refractory depletion is a signature of the presence of terrestrial planets, this suggests that there is not a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial and giant planets in the same system.

  5. ON THE FORMATION OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Charlie, Conroy; Spergel, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all globular clusters (GCs) studied to date show evidence for multiple stellar populations, in stark contrast to the conventional view that GCs are a mono-metallic, coeval population of stars. This generic feature must therefore emerge naturally within massive star cluster formation. Building on earlier work, we propose a simple physical model for the early evolution (several 10{sup 8} yr) of GCs. We consider the effects of stellar mass loss, Type II supernovae (SNe II) and prompt Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), ram pressure, and accretion from the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) on the development of a young GC's own gas reservoir. In our model, SNe II from a first generation of star formation clears the GC of its initial gas reservoir. Over the next several 10{sup 8} yr, mass lost from asymptotic giant branch stars and matter accreted from the ambient ISM collect at the center of the GC. This material must remain quite cool (T {approx} 10{sup 2} K), but does not catastrophically cool on a crossing time because of the high Lyman-Werner flux density in young GCs. The collection of gas within the GC must compete with ram pressure from the ambient ISM. After several 10{sup 8} yr, the Lyman-Werner photon flux density drops by more than three orders of magnitude, allowing molecular hydrogen and then stars to form. After this second generation of star formation, SNe II from the second generation and then prompt SNe Ia associated with the first generation maintain a gas-free GC, thereby ending the cycle of star formation events. Our model makes clear predictions for the presence or absence of multiple stellar populations within GCs as a function of GC mass and formation environment. While providing a natural explanation for the approximately equal number of first- and second-generation stars in GCs, substantial accretion from the ambient ISM may produce fewer chemically peculiar second-generation stars than are observed. Analyzing intermediate-age LMC clusters, we

  6. Influence of pions and hyperons on stellar black hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Bruno; Oertel, Micaela; Novak, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    We present numerical simulations of stellar core collapse with spherically symmetric, general relativistic hydrodynamics up to black hole formation. Using the CoCoNuT code, with a newly developed grey leakage scheme for the neutrino treatment, we investigate the effects of including pions and Λ hyperons into the equation of state at high densities and temperatures on the black hole formation process. Results show non-negligible differences between the models with reference equation of state without any additional particles and models with the extended ones. For the latter, the maximum masses supported by the proto-neutron star are smaller and the collapse to a black hole occurs earlier. A phase transition to hyperonic matter is observed when the progenitor allows for a high enough accretion rate onto the proto-neutron star. Rough estimates of neutrino luminosity from these collapses are given, too.

  7. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, D.; Ballone, A.; Cuadra, J.; Schartmann, M.; Burkert, A.; Gillessen, S.

    2016-02-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Centre supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. We explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of stellar winds via the non-linear thin shell instability. Following an analytical approach, we study the thermal evolution of slabs formed in the symmetric collision of winds, evaluating whether instabilities occur, and estimating possible clump masses. We find that the collision of relatively slow (≲750 km s-1) and strong (˜10-5 M⊙ yr-1) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<10 mpc) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their known orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, making this process a possible but unlikely origin for G2. We also discuss clump formation in close binaries such as IRS 16SW and in asymmetric encounters as promising alternatives that deserve further numerical study.

  8. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  9. Effect of Stellar Encounters on Comet Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, A.; Kokubo, E.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated the effect of stellar encounters on the formation and disruption of the Oort cloud using the classical impulse approximation. We calculate the evolution of a planetesimal disk into a spherical Oort cloud due to the perturbation from passing stars for 10 Gyr. We obtain the empirical fits of the e-folding time for the number of Oort cloud comets using the standard exponential and Kohlrausch formulae as functions of the stellar parameters and the initial semimajor axes of planetesimals. The e-folding time and the evolution timescales of the orbital elements are also analytically derived. In some calculations, the effect of the Galactic tide is additionally considered. We also show the radial variations of the e-folding times to the Oort cloud. From these timescales, we show that if the initial planetesimal disk has the semimajor axes distribution {dn}/{da}\\propto {a}-2, which is produced by planetary scattering, the e-folding time for planetesimals in the Oort cloud is ∼10 Gyr at any heliocentric distance r. This uniform e-folding time over the Oort cloud means that the supply of comets from the inner Oort cloud to the outer Oort cloud is sufficiently effective to keep the comet distribution as {dn}/{dr}\\propto {r}-2. We also show that the final distribution of the semimajor axes in the Oort cloud is approximately proportional to {a}-2 for any initial distribution.

  10. Why stellar feedback promotes disc formation in simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übler, Hannah; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Aumer, Michael; Sales, Laura V.; White, Simon D. M.

    2014-09-01

    We study how feedback influences baryon infall on to galaxies using cosmological, zoom-in simulations of haloes with present mass Mvir = 6.9 × 1011 to 1.7 × 1012 M⊙. Starting at z = 4 from identical initial conditions, implementations of weak and strong stellar feedback produce bulge- and disc-dominated galaxies, respectively. Strong feedback favours disc formation: (1) because conversion of gas into stars is suppressed at early times, as required by abundance matching arguments, resulting in flat star formation histories and higher gas fractions; (2) because 50 per cent of the stars form in situ from recycled disc gas with angular momentum only weakly related to that of the z = 0 dark halo; (3) because late-time gas accretion is typically an order of magnitude stronger and has higher specific angular momentum, with recycled gas dominating over primordial infall; (4) because 25-30 per cent of the total accreted gas is ejected entirely before z ˜ 1, removing primarily low angular momentum material which enriches the nearby intergalactic medium. Most recycled gas roughly conserves its angular momentum, but material ejected for long times and to large radii can gain significant angular momentum before re-accretion. These processes lower galaxy formation efficiency in addition to promoting disc formation.

  11. Formation and stellar spin-orbit misalignment of hot Jupiters from Lidov-Kozai oscillations in stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kassandra R.; Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Observed hot Jupiter (HJ) systems exhibit a wide range of stellar spin-orbit misalignment angles. This paper investigates the inward migration of giant planets due to Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations induced by a distant stellar companion. We conduct a large population synthesis study, including the octupole gravitational potential from the stellar companion, mutual precession of the host stellar spin axis and planet orbital axis, tidal dissipation in the planet and stellar spin-down in the host star due to magnetic braking. We consider a range of planet masses (0.3-5 MJ) and initial semimajor axes (1-5 au), different properties for the host star, and varying tidal dissipation strengths. The fraction of systems that result in HJs depends on planet mass and stellar type, with fHJ = 1-4 per cent (depending on tidal dissipation strength) for Mp = 1 MJ, and larger (up to 8 per cent) for more massive planets. The production efficiency of `hot Saturns' (Mp = 0.3MJ) is much lower, because most migrating planets are tidally disrupted. We find that the fraction of systems that result in either HJ formation or tidal disruption, fmig ≃ 11-14 per cent is roughly constant, having little variation with planet mass, stellar type and tidal dissipation strength. The distribution of final HJ stellar obliquities exhibits a complex dependence on the planet mass and stellar type. For Mp = (1-3)MJ, the distribution is always bimodal, with peaks around 30° and 130°. The distribution for 5MJ planets depends on host stellar type, with a preference for low obliquities for solar-type stars, and higher obliquities for more massive (1.4 M⊙) stars.

  12. Planet formation in multiple stellar systems: GG Tau A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Köhler, R.; Piétu, V.

    2014-12-01

    GG Tau is a hierarchical quadruple system of young, low-mass stars. Because of its well-studied bright circumbinary ring of dust and gas surrounding the main binary GG Tau A, it is a unique laboratory to study planet formation in the disturbed environment of binary/multiple stellar systems. We have started a large observing program of GG Tau A that combines several high-resolution instruments in a multi-wavelength approach. We have recently reported the detection of a new low-mass companion in GG Tau A that turns out to itself be a triple system. This discovery was possible thanks to the very high angular resolution of the near-IR instrument PIONIER on the VLT interferometer, and was confirmed with sub-aperture masking techniques on VLT/NaCo. The detected close binary GG Tau Ab (ρ = 0.032'', or about 5 AU) provides a natural explanation for two enigmas: the discrepancy between the dynamical mass and the spectral type estimates in GG Tau A, and the absence of dust thermal emission in the vicinity of the Ab component. GRAVITY will provide the adequate angular resolution to complete the astrometric characterization of the close binary in the next 10 years. With now 5 coeval low-mass stars, GG Tau is an ideal laboratory to calibrate stellar evolution tracks at young ages (few Myr). Beyond this peculiar system, GRAVITY also has a strong potential to study the impact of multiplicity on the existence of disks, and in fine on planet formation mechanisms in multiple systems.

  13. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history. PMID:25302375

  14. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Fayolle, Edith C.; Reiter, John B.; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-02-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T ≈ 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics - CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO - in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history.

  15. Formation of the first galaxies under Population III stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Myoungwon

    2015-01-01

    will discuss key physical quantities of the first galaxies derived from our simulations, such as their stellar population mix, star formation rates, metallicities, and resulting broad-band color and recombination spectra.

  16. The Role of Stellar Feedback in the Formation of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Klypin, Anatoly

    2009-04-01

    Although supernova (SN) explosions and stellar winds happen at very small scales, they affect the interstellar medium (ISM) at galactic scales and regulate the formation of a whole galaxy. Previous attempts of mimicking these effects in simulations of galaxy formation use very simplified assumptions. We develop a much more realistic prescription for modeling the feedback, which minimizes any ad hoc subgrid physics. We start with developing high-resolution models of the ISM and formulate the conditions required for its realistic functionality: formation of multiphase medium with hot chimneys, superbubbles, cold molecular phase, and very slow consumption of gas. We find that this can be achieved only by doing what the real universe does: formation of dense (>10 H atoms cm-3), cold (T ≈ 100 K) molecular phase, where the star formation happens, and which young stars disrup. Another important ingredient is the effect of runaway stars: massive binary stars ejected from molecular clouds when one of the companions becomes an SN. Those stars can move to 10-100 pc away from molecular clouds before exploding themselves as SNe. This greatly facilitates the feedback. Once those effects are implemented into cosmological simulations, galaxy formation proceeds more realistically. For example, we do not have the overcooling problem. The angular momentum problem (resulting in a too massive bulge) is also reduced substantially: the rotation curves are nearly flat. The galaxy formation also becomes more violent. Just as often observed in quasar absorption lines, there are substantial outflows from forming and active galaxies. At high redshifts we routinely find gas with few hundred km s-1 and occasionally 1000-2000 km s-1. The gas has high metallicity, which may exceed the solar metallicity. The temperature of the gas in the outflows and in chimneys can be very high: T = 107-108 K. The density profile of dark matter is still consistent with a cuspy profile. The simulations reproduce

  17. Initiating solar system formation through stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Myhill, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and other meteoritical components require nucleosynthesis in stellar interiors, condensation into dust grains in stellar envelopes, transport of the grains through the interstellar medium by stellar outflows, and finally injection of the grains into the presolar nebula. The proximity of the presolar cloud to these energetic stellar events suggests that a shock wave from a stellar outflow might have initiated the collapse of an otherwise stable presolar cloud. We have begun to study the interactions of stellar shock waves with thermally supported, dense molecular cloud cores, using a three spatial dimension (3D) radiative hydrodynamics code. Supernova shock waves have been shown by others to destroy quiescent clouds, so we are trying to determine if the much smaller shock speeds found in, e.g., asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star winds, are strong enough to initiate collapse in an otherwise stable, rotating, solar-mass cloud core, without leading to destruction of the cloud.

  18. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  19. Prevalence and characteristics of talon cusps in Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Yeliz; Kasimoglu, Yelda; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Gencay, Koray; Aktoren, Oya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Talon cusp is a rare dental anomaly characterized by a cusp-like projection, often including the palatal surface of the affected tooth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of talon cusps in a group of Turkish children. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 14,400 subjects who attended the clinics of the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. Subjects ranged in age from 1 to 14 years with a mean age of 10.5 ± 2.55 years. Talon cusps were mainly categorized by visual examination according to the classification of Hattab et al. The distribution and frequency of talon cusps were calculated with respect to dentition type, tooth type, talon type, the affected surface, associated dental anomalies, and clinical complications. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, frequencies, and crosstabs with Chi-square analysis. Results: Talon cusps were detected in 49 subjects (26 males and 23 females) of 14,400 (0.34%). A total of 108 teeth showed talon cusps. Distribution of talon cusps according to gender showed no statistically significant differences. The incidence of talon cusps was found to be greater in maxillary lateral incisors (53.7%) than central incisors (29.62%). Regarding the type of talon cusp, 47.22% of teeth showed a Type III talon cusp, whereas 30.55% of teeth demonstrated a Type II talon and 22.22% of teeth demonstrated a Type I talon cusp. Nine patients (18.36%) with talon cups also exhibited other developmental dental anomalies. Clinical complications associated with talon cusps were detected as caries formation and occlusal interference. Conclusion: This is the most comprehensive study of the prevalence of talon cusps in Turkish population using the largest sample size to date. Also, taurodontism associated with a talon cusp has been reported here for the 1st time. Clinical complications associated with talon cusps need more

  20. Cusps and spouts in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duboin, Aurélien; Malloggi, Florent; Monti, Fabrice; Tabeling, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    By injecting mineral oil (inner phase) and polymer solutions (outer phase), in a microfluidic flow focusing geometry, we observed the formation of cusps. These cusps undergo a transition from a steady state, to a thin cylindrical spout (oil in polymer). These oil spouts, do not touch the walls, and are surprisingly stable (they do not break into droplets). We study the nature of the cusp-spout transition, and find it is of first order. By taking advantage of the stability of the jet, we expect to synthesize micro-wires with this approach.

  1. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPIC STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF NEARBY DISKS: HINTS OF STELLAR MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yoachim, Peter; Roskar, Rok; Debattista, Victor P.

    2012-06-20

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) to observe 12 nearby disk galaxies. We successfully measure ages in the outer disk in six systems. In three cases (NGC 2684, NGC 6155, and NGC 7437), we find that a downward break in the disk surface brightness profile corresponds with a change in the dominant stellar population with the interior being dominated by active star formation and the exterior having older stellar populations that are best fit with star formation histories that decline with time. The observed increase in average stellar ages beyond a profile break is similar to theoretical models that predict surface brightness breaks are caused by stellar migration, with the outer disk being populated from scattered old interior stars. In three more cases (IC 1132, NGC 4904, and NGC 6691), we find no significant change in the stellar population as one crosses the break radius. In these galaxies, both the inner and outer disks are dominated by active star formation and younger stellar populations. While radial migration can contribute to the stellar populations beyond the break, it appears that more than one mechanism is required to explain all of our observed stellar profile breaks.

  2. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsi, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the absolute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional `box-in-a-star' model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI 777 nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  3. The study of electromagnetic cusp solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Deepa; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    2015-01-15

    The formation of a cusp structure in the envelope of electromagnetic solitons for electron-ion plasma at the ion wave breaking point has been shown by Farina and Bulanov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5289 (2001)]. The analytical form of the cusp structure has been obtained here. The analytical form of the cusp is shown to compare well with the exact numerically obtained solutions. Such cusp solitons occurring at the ion wave breaking point may have relevance to ion acceleration mechanism. In an effort towards studying the dynamical stability of such structures, the time evolution studies have been carried out which show that the structure survives for several plasma periods. However, ultimately it breaks apart due to the instability associated with the forward Raman scattering.

  4. Stellar collapse and the formation of black holes.

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, C. L.; Dupuis, R.

    2003-01-01

    We review the engines behind neutrino-driven supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. Combined with our understanding of the convection-enhanced, neutrino-driven supernova mechanism, the stellar collapse can explain all of the supernova-like explosions observed from normal supernovae, to weak explosions and jet-like hypernovae. Combining this theoretical understanding with observations suggests that the collapsar rate is roughly 1/1000th that of normal supernovae.

  5. Stellar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation.' As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules.' The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly-ionized oxygen atoms.

  6. Axion dark matter, solitons and the cusp-core problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, David J. E.; Pop, Ana-Roxana

    2015-08-01

    Self-gravitating bosonic fields can support stable and localized (solitonic) field configurations. Such solitons should be ubiquitous in models of axion dark matter, with their characteristic mass and size depending on some inverse power of the axion mass, ma. Using a scaling symmetry and the uncertainty principle, the soliton core size can be related to the central density and axion mass in a universal way. Solitons have a constant central density due to pressure support, unlike the cuspy profile of cold dark matter (CDM). Consequently, solitons composed of ultralight axions (ULAs) may resolve the `cusp-core' problem of CDM. In dark matter (DM) haloes, thermodynamics will lead to a CDM-like Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile at large radii, with a central soliton core at small radii. Using Monte Carlo techniques to explore the possible density profiles of this form, a fit to stellar kinematical data of dwarf spheroidal galaxies is performed. The data favour cores, and show no preference concerning the NFW part of the halo. In order for ULAs to resolve the cusp-core problem (without recourse to baryon feedback, or other astrophysical effects) the axion mass must satisfy ma < 1.1 × 10-22 eV at 95 per cent C.L. However, ULAs with ma ≲ 1 × 10-22 eV are in some tension with cosmological structure formation. An axion solution to the cusp-core problem thus makes novel predictions for future measurements of the epoch of reionization. On the other hand, improved measurements of structure formation could soon impose a Catch 22 on axion/scalar field DM, similar to the case of warm DM.

  7. THE STELLAR POPULATION AND STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu; Gu Qiusheng E-mail: yugao@pmo.ac.cn

    2011-02-15

    We study stellar populations, star formation histories (SFHs), and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6. The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range of galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive stellar populations and reconstruct SFHs for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation, but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be up to 10 Gyr, while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to approximately three orders of magnitude younger ({approx}10 Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multiwavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The star formation rate (SFR) for our sample galaxies spans nearly three orders of magnitude, from a few 10{sup -3} to {approx}1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, with a median value of {approx}0.1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We find that about 90% of BCDs in our sample have their birthrate parameter (the ratio of the current SFR to the averaged past SFR) b>2-3. We further discuss correlations of the current SFR with the integrated galactic stellar mass and explore the connection between SFR and metallicity.

  8. On the configuration of the polar cusps in earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, G.-H.; Wolf, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and the earth's vacuum dipole field leads to the formation of a discontinuity called the magnetopause. In the standard picture, the magnetopause confines the magnetic field in such a manner that the polar cusp field lines originate from high latitudes in the dayside ionosphere and end at the two magnetic neutral points. Wu (1983, 1984) has questioned this standard picture of the polar cusp. MHD simulations indicate the existence of a current sheet above the polar cusp region, called 'the cusp current sheet' by Wu. Wu (1983) concluded that the difference between his cusp configuration and the standard picture is due to the fact that his geometry results from a plasma model, whereas the standard picture is based on a vacuum concept. In the present investigation, Wu's conclusion is questioned, and it is demonstrated that the standard cusp configuration is not restricted to the vacuum magnetosphere.

  9. A new methodology to test galaxy formation models using the dependence of clustering on stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, David J. R.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Mitchell, Peter D.; Helly, John C.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Simha, Vimal; Farrow, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    We present predictions for the two-point correlation function of galaxy clustering as a function of stellar mass, computed using two new versions of the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model. These models make use of a high resolution, large volume N-body simulation, set in the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmology. One model uses a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF), while the other assumes different IMFs for quiescent star formation and bursts. Particular consideration is given to how the assumptions required to estimate the stellar masses of observed galaxies (such as the choice of IMF, stellar population synthesis model, and dust extinction) influence the perceived dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass. Broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting is carried out to estimate stellar masses for the model galaxies in the same manner as in observational studies. We show clear differences between the clustering signals computed using the true and estimated model stellar masses. As such, we highlight the importance of applying our methodology to compare theoretical models to observations. We introduce an alternative scheme for the calculation of the merger time-scales for satellite galaxies in GALFORM, which takes into account the dark matter subhalo information from the simulation. This reduces the amplitude of small-scale clustering. The new merger scheme offers improved or similar agreement with observational clustering measurements, over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.7. We find reasonable agreement with clustering measurements from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly Survey, but find larger discrepancies for some stellar mass ranges and separation scales with respect to measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey, depending on the GALFORM model used.

  10. Galaxies on FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments): stellar feedback explains cosmologically inefficient star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan; Oñorbe, José; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman; Bullock, James S.

    2014-11-01

    We present a series of high-resolution cosmological simulations1 of galaxy formation to z = 0, spanning halo masses ˜108-1013 M⊙, and stellar masses ˜104-1011 M⊙. Our simulations include fully explicit treatment of the multiphase interstellar medium and stellar feedback. The stellar feedback inputs (energy, momentum, mass, and metal fluxes) are taken directly from stellar population models. These sources of feedback, with zero adjusted parameters, reproduce the observed relation between stellar and halo mass up to Mhalo ˜ 1012 M⊙. We predict weak redshift evolution in the M*-Mhalo relation, consistent with current constraints to z > 6. We find that the M*-Mhalo relation is insensitive to numerical details, but is sensitive to feedback physics. Simulations with only supernova feedback fail to reproduce observed stellar masses, particularly in dwarf and high-redshift galaxies: radiative feedback (photoheating and radiation pressure) is necessary to destroy giant molecular clouds and enable efficient coupling of later supernovae to the gas. Star formation rates (SFRs) agree well with the observed Kennicutt relation at all redshifts. The galaxy-averaged Kennicutt relation is very different from the numerically imposed law for converting gas into stars, and is determined by self-regulation via stellar feedback. Feedback reduces SFRs and produces reservoirs of gas that lead to rising late-time star formation histories, significantly different from halo accretion histories. Feedback also produces large short-time-scale variability in galactic SFRs, especially in dwarfs. These properties are not captured by common `sub-grid' wind models.

  11. Chromospheric dust formation, stellar masers and mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A multistep scenario which describes a plausible mass loss mechanism associated with red giant and related stars is outlined. The process involves triggering a condensation instability in an extended chromosphere, leading to the formation of cool, dense clouds which are conducive to the formation of molecules and dust grains. Once formed, the dust can be driven away from the star by radiation pressure. Consistency with various observed phenomena is discussed.

  12. The star formation main sequence and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparre, Martin; Hayward, Christopher C.; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the physical processes that drive star formation is a key challenge for galaxy formation models. In this paper, we study the tight correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of galaxies at a given redshift, how halo growth influences star formation, and star formation histories of individual galaxies. We study these topics using Illustris, a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulation of galaxy formation. Illustris reproduces the observed relation (the star formation main sequence, SFMS) between SFR and stellar mass at redshifts z = 0 and 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ≃ 1-2, the simulated SFMS has a significantly lower normalization than reported by observations. The scatter in the relation is consistent with the observed scatter. However, the fraction of outliers above the SFR-stellar mass relation in Illustris is less than that observed. Galaxies with halo masses of ˜1012 M⊙ dominate the SFR density of the Universe, in agreement with the results of abundance matching. Furthermore, more-massive galaxies tend to form the bulk of their stars at high redshift, which indicates that `downsizing' occurs in Illustris. We also studied the star formation histories of individual galaxies, including the use of a principal component analysis decomposition. We find that for fixed stellar mass, galaxies that form earlier have more-massive black holes at z = 0, indicating that star formation and black hole growth are tightly linked processes in Illustris. While many of the properties of normal star-forming galaxies are well reproduced in the Illustris simulation, forming a realistic population of starbursts will likely require higher resolution and probably a more sophisticated treatment of star formation and feedback from stars and black holes.

  13. ARE THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES JUST CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth

    2011-01-20

    We develop a technique to investigate the possibility that some of the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way might be cusp caustics rather than gravitationally self-bound systems. Such cusps can form when a stream of stars folds, creating a region where the projected two-dimensional surface density is enhanced. In this work, we construct a Poisson maximum likelihood test to compare the cusp and exponential models of any substructure on an equal footing. We apply the test to the Hercules dwarf (d {approx} 113 kpc, M{sub V} {approx} -6.2, e {approx} 0.67). The flattened exponential model is strongly favored over the cusp model in the case of Hercules, ruling out at high confidence that Hercules is a cusp catastrophe. This test can be applied to any of the Milky Way dwarfs, and more generally to the entire stellar halo population, to search for the cusp catastrophes that might be expected in an accreted stellar halo.

  14. THE TRIPLE EVOLUTION DYNAMICAL INSTABILITY: STELLAR COLLISIONS IN THE FIELD AND THE FORMATION OF EXOTIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Hagai B.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2012-12-01

    Physical collisions and close approaches between stars play an important role in the formation of exotic stellar systems. Standard theories suggest that collisions are rare, occurring only via random encounters between stars in dense clusters. We present a different formation pathway, the triple evolution dynamical instability (TEDI), in which mass loss in an evolving triple star system causes orbital instability. The subsequent chaotic orbital evolution of the stars triggers close encounters, collisions, exchanges between the stellar components, and the dynamical formation of eccentric compact binaries (including Sirius-like binaries). We demonstrate that the rate of stellar collisions due to the TEDI is approximately 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1} per Milky Way Galaxy, which is nearly 30 times higher than the total collision rate due to random encounters in the Galactic globular clusters. Moreover, we find that the dominant type of stellar collision is qualitatively different; most collisions involve asymptotic giant branch stars, rather than main sequence or slightly evolved stars, which dominate collisions in globular clusters. The TEDI mechanism should lead us to revise our understanding of collisions and the formation of compact, eccentric binaries in the field.

  15. Binary Interactions as a Possible Scenario for the Formation of Multiple Stellar Populations in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen; Li, Lifang

    2014-07-01

    Observations have revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the stars with anomalous abundances observed in GCs are merged stars and accretor stars produced by binary interactions—rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation—and that these stars are more massive than normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. We find that, due to their own evolution, these rapidly rotating stars have surface abundances, effective temperatures, and luminosities that are different from normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. This stellar population of binaries reproduces two important points of observational evidence of multiple stellar populations: a Na-O anticorrelation and multiple sequences in the HR diagram. This evidence suggests that binary interactions may be a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs.

  16. Binary interactions as a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen; Li, Lifang E-mail: zhanwenhan@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-07-01

    Observations have revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the stars with anomalous abundances observed in GCs are merged stars and accretor stars produced by binary interactions—rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation—and that these stars are more massive than normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. We find that, due to their own evolution, these rapidly rotating stars have surface abundances, effective temperatures, and luminosities that are different from normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. This stellar population of binaries reproduces two important points of observational evidence of multiple stellar populations: a Na-O anticorrelation and multiple sequences in the HR diagram. This evidence suggests that binary interactions may be a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs.

  17. On the Incorporation of Metallicity Data into Measurements of Star Formation History from Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of spectroscopic stellar metallicities and resolved star color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) has the potential to constrain the entire star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy better than fitting CMDs alone (as is most common in SFH studies using resolved stellar populations). In this paper, two approaches to incorporating external metallicity information into CMD-fitting techniques are presented. Overall, the joint fitting of metallicity and CMD information can increase the precision of measured age–metallicity relationships (AMRs) and star formation rates by 10% over CMD fitting alone. However, systematics in stellar isochrones and mismatches between spectroscopic and photometric determinations of metallicity can reduce the accuracy of the recovered SFHs. I present a simple mitigation of these systematics that can reduce their amplitude to the level obtained from CMD fitting alone, while ensuring that the AMR is consistent with spectroscopic metallicities. As is the case in CMD-fitting analysis, improved stellar models and calibrations between spectroscopic and photometric metallicities are currently the primary impediment to gains in SFH precision from jointly fitting stellar metallicities and CMDs.

  18. Internal Structure of Stellar Clusters: Geometry of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Emilio J.; Sánchez, Néstor

    2011-04-01

    The study of the internal structure of star clusters provides important clues concerning their formation mechanism and dynamical evolution. There are both observational and numerical evidences indicating that open clusters evolve from an initial clumpy structure, presumably a direct consequence of the formation in a fractal medium, toward a centrally condensed state. This simple picture has, however, several drawbacks. There can be very young clusters exhibiting radial patterns maybe reflecting the early effect of gravity on primordial gas. There can be also very evolved clusters showing fractal patterns that either have survived through time or have been generated subsequently by some (unknown) mechanism. Additionally, the fractal structure of some open clusters is much clumpier than the average structure of the interstellar medium in the Milky Way, although in principle a very similar structure should be expected. Here we summarize and discuss observational and numerical results concerning this subject.

  19. TOWARD A COMPLETE ACCOUNTING OF ENERGY AND MOMENTUM FROM STELLAR FEEDBACK IN GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-10

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  20. Toward a Complete Accounting of Energy and Momentum from Stellar Feedback in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping

    2012-07-10

    Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

  2. Dual Stellar Halos in Early-type Galaxies and Formation of Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-08-01

    M105 in the Leo I Group is a textbook example of a standard elliptical galaxy. It is only one of the few elliptical galaxies for which we can study their stellar halos using the resolved stars. It is an ideal target to study the structure and composition of stellar halos in elliptical galaxies. We present photometry and metallicity of the resolved stars in the inner and outer regions of M105. These provide strong evidence that there are two distinct stellar halos in this galaxy, a metal-poor (blue) halo and a metal-rich (red) halo. Then we compare them with those in other early-type galaxies and use the dual halo mode formation scenario to describe how massive galaxies formed.

  3. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does Stellar Feedback Result in Cloud Death?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation, and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localized thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series, which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback, and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localized thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the lower bound expected for a supernova may play a relatively minor role in the galactic structure of quiescent Milky-Way-type galaxies, compared to gravitational interactions and disk shear.

  4. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. PMID:26819043

  5. Long-term star formation at the Galactic center and its effect on the stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, E.

    Although the central kpc-scale bulge of our Galaxy consists predominantly of old stars, the central parsec, in contrast, is host to a sizable number of very young stars. At intermediate scales, the nature of the stellar population remains very uncertain because high extinction has thus far limited observations. This talk will attempt to bridge these two regimes. As several other young stellar clusters are present in the central few hundred parsecs, star-formation is in fact quite widespread in our Galaxy's nucleus. Based on the current distribution of dense nuclear interstellar gas, and the current rate of star-formation, the hypothesis of our Galactic nucleus as a site of sustained, low-level star formation then emerges. The result of a long-term star formation rate of a few tenths of a solar mass per year would be a flattened central cluster of intermediate-age stars, amounting to about a billion solar masses. A stellar cluster of the requisite mass and linear scale is indeed present in our Galactic nucleus, and arguments will be presented that our Galaxy's central ``1 over r-squared' ' cluster is in fact an intermediate age population resulting from long-term star formation, and not simply the innermost part of the more elderly bulge.

  6. The dynamic cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J. ); Arnoldy, R.L. ); Woch, J. ); Friis-Christensen, E. )

    1992-03-01

    A unique alignment of the Viking satellite with respect to a network of magnetometers in Greenland has provided the opportunity to study the relationship of pulsations and plasma characteristics in the dayside cusp. The presence of Pc 1 bursts, Pc 4-5 pulsations, and a tailward traveling twin vortex pattern of ionospheric convection suggests that the magnetosphere may have been temporarily compressed. Magnetic field data acquired at synchrotrons altitude from GOES 5 and on the ground from Huancayo support this suggestion. Plasma with ion dispersion characteristics associated with a cusp during southward IMF was detected by Viking over a 3.5{degree} range of latitude. The presence of standing Alfven waves and ring current ions suggest that this cusplike plasma was observed on closed geomagnetic field lines. As Viking moved further poleward, it detected a different region of plasma with characteristics associated with a cusp during northward IMF. The presence of plasma on closed field lines with southward IMF ion dispersion characteristics can be explained with a poleward moving plasma source. The authors suggest that the magnetosphere, during a northward IMF, is temporarily compressed by a solar wind pressure enhancement that produces the Pc 1 bursts, Pc 4-5 pulsations, and ionospheric vortices. As the magnetosphere recovers to its precompressed shape, the source of cusp plasma will move poleward until it reaches an equilibrium position for northward IMF. The Viking satellite, following in the wake of this source, will detect plasma with southward IMF characteristics until it reaches the latitude of the actual northward IMF cusp.

  7. Alternative cosmology from cusp geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Reinaldo; Herbin Stalder Díaz, Diego

    We study an alternative geometrical approach on the problem of classical cosmological singularity. It is based on a generalized function f(x,y)=x(2+y^2=(1-z)z^n) which consists of a cusped projected coupled isosurface. Such a projected geometry is computed and analized into the context of Friedmann singularity-free cosmology where a pre-big bang scenario is considered. Assuming that the mechanism of cusp formation is described by non-linear oscillations of a pre- big bang extended very high energy density field (>3x10^{94} kg/m^3$), we show that the action under the gravitational field follows a tautochrone of revolution, understood here as the primary projected geometry that alternatively replaces the Friedmann singularity in the standard big bang theory. As shown here this new approach allows us to interpret the nature of both matter and dark energy from first geometric principles [1]. [1] Rosa et al. DOI: 10.1063/1.4756991

  8. THE AGE, STELLAR CONTENT, AND STAR FORMATION TIMESCALE OF THE B59 DENSE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, K. R.; Lada, C. J.; Muench, A. A.; Forbrich, J.; Ascenso, J.; Roman-Zuniga, C.

    2010-10-20

    We have investigated the stellar content of Barnard 59 (B59), the most active star-forming core in the Pipe Nebula. Using the SpeX spectrograph on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, we obtained moderate resolution, near-infrared (NIR) spectra for 20 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in B59 and a representative sample of NIR and mid-IR bright sources distributed throughout the Pipe. Measuring luminosity and temperature sensitive features in these spectra, we identified likely background giant stars and measured each star's spectral type, extinction, and NIR continuum excess. To measure B59's age, we place its candidate YSOs in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and compare their location to YSOs in several well-studied star-forming regions, as well as predictions of pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models. We find that B59 is composed of late-type (K4-M6) low-mass (0.9-0.1 M{sub sun}) YSOs whose median stellar age is comparable to, if not slightly older than, that of YSOs within the {rho} Oph, Taurus, and Chameleon star-forming regions. Deriving absolute age estimates from PMS models computed by D'Antona et al., and accounting only for statistical uncertainties, we measure B59's median stellar age to be 2.6 {+-} 0.8 Myr. Including potential systematic effects increases the error budget for B59's median (DM98) stellar age to 2.6{sup +4.1}{sub -2.6} Myr. We also find that the relative age orderings implied by PMS evolutionary tracks depend on the range of stellar masses sampled, as model isochrones possess significantly different mass dependences. The maximum likelihood median stellar age we measure for B59, and the region's observed gas properties, suggests that the B59 dense core has been stable against global collapse for roughly six dynamical timescales and is actively forming stars with a star formation efficiency per dynamical time of {approx}6%. While the {approx}150% uncertainties associated with our age measurement propagate directly into these

  9. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.; Bothwell, Matt S.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Hα to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Hα luminosities. Using the UV and Hα fluxes of a sample of ∼300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and 80-130 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270{sub −80}{sup +110} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, suggesting a tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with the directly estimated SFR, the local supernova discoveries strongly constrain any physical effects that might increase the energy output of massive stars, including, but not limited to, stellar rotation. The cosmic SFR and cosmic supernova rate data, on the other hand, show the opposite trend, with the cosmic SFR higher than that inferred from cosmic supernovae, constraining a significant decrease in the energy output of massive stars. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that the true SFR calibration factors cannot be too far from their canonical values.

  10. Ages, chemistry, and type 1A supernovae: Clues to the formation of the galactic stellar halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    We endeavor to resolve two conflicting constraints on the duration of the formation of the Galactic stellar halo - 2-3 Gyr age differences in halo stars, and the time scale inferred from the observed constant values of chemical element abundance ratios characteristic of enrichment by Type II supernovae - by investigating the time scale for the onset of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in the currently favored progenitor model - mergers of carbon and oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs).

  11. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG STELLAR CONTENT IN THE W3 GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-10

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the 'Class' scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  12. Star Formation and Young Stellar Content in the W3 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the "Class" scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  13. Star formation in early-type galaxies: the role of stellar winds and kinematics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Early-Type galaxies (ETGs) host a hot ISM produced mainly by stellar winds, and heated by Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and the thermalization of stellar motions. Recent high resolution 2D hydrodynamical simulations (Negri et al. 2014) showed that ordered rotation in the stellar component alters significantly the evolution of the hot ISM, and results in the formation of a centrifugally supported cold equatorial disc. This agrees well with the recent evidence that approximately 50% of massive ETGs host significant quantities of cold gas (Morganti et al. 2006; Young et al. 2014), often in settled configurations, sharing the same kinematics of the stars. In particular, in a systematic investigation of the ATLAS3D sample, the most massive fast-rotating ETGs always have kinematically aligned gas, which suggests an internal origin for it, and molecular gas is detected only in fast rotators (Davis et al. 2011). The observed cold gas seems also to provide material for low level star formation (SF) activity (Combes et al. 2007, Davis et al. 2014). Interestingly, in the ATLAS3D sample, SF and young stellar populations are detected only in fast rotators (Sarzi et al. 2013). In a recent work we investigated whether and how SF takes place in the cold gas disc typically produced in rotating ETGs by our previous 2D simulations, by adding to them the possibility for the gas to form stars (Negri et al. 2015). We also inserted the injection of mass, momentum and energy appropriate for the newly (and continuously) forming stellar population. We found that subsequent generations of stars are formed, and that most of the extended and massive cold disc is consumed by this process, leaving at the present epoch cold gas masses that compare well with those observed. The mass in secondary generations of stars resides mostly in a disc, and could be related to a younger, more metal rich disky stellar component indeed observed in fast rotator ETGs (Cappellari et al. 2013). Most of the mass in

  14. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  15. Brightest group galaxies: stellar mass and star formation rate (paper I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozaliasl, Ghassem; Finoguenov, Alexis; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Mirkazemi, Mohammad; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    We study the distribution and evolution of the stellar mass and the star formation rate (SFR) of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) over 0.04 < z < 1.3 using a large sample of 407 X-ray galaxy groups selected from the COSMOS, AEGIS, and XMM-LSS fields. We compare our results with predictions from the semi-analytic models based on the Millennium simulation. In contrast to model predictions, we find that, as the Universe evolves, the stellar mass distribution evolves towards a normal distribution. This distribution tends to skew to low-mass BGGs at all redshifts implying the presence of a star-forming population of the BGGs with MS ˜ 1010.5 M⊙ which results in the shape of the stellar mass distribution deviating from a normal distribution. In agreement with the models and previous studies, we find that the mean stellar mass of BGGs grows with time by a factor of ˜2 between z = 1.3 and z = 0.1, however, the significant growth occurs above z = 0.4. The BGGs are not entirely a dormant population of galaxies, as low-mass BGGs in low-mass haloes are more active in forming stars than the BGGs in more massive haloes, over the same redshift range. We find that the average SFR of the BGGs evolves steeply with redshift and fraction of the passive BGGs increases as a function of increasing stellar mass and halo mass. Finally, we show that the specific SFR of the BGGs within haloes with M200 ≤ 1013.4 M⊙ decreases with increasing halo mass at z < 0.4.

  16. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Maciel, Tamela E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  17. GG Tau: the ringworld and beyond. Mass accretion and planetary formation in young multiple stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Beck, Tracy; Guilloteau, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In binary stellar systems, exoplanet searches have revealed planetary mass companions orbiting both in circumstellar and in circumbinary orbits. Modelling studies suggest increased dynamical complexity around the young stars that form such systems. Circumstellar and circumbinary disks likely exhibit different physical conditions for planet formation, which also depends on the stellar separation. Although binaries and higher order multiple stars are relatively common in nearby star-forming regions, surprisingly few systems with circumbinary distributions of proto-planetary material have been found. With its spectacular ring of dust and gas encircling the central triple star, one such system, GG Tau A, has become a unique laboratory for investigating the physics of circumsystem gas and dust evolution. We review here its physical properties.

  18. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass–metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ∼130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%–55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  19. Planet formation in a triple stellar system: implications of the third star's orbital inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingos, R. C.; Winter, O. C.; Izidoro, A.

    2015-04-01

    Planets have been revealed both in binary and triple stellar systems. Although there have been several studies of the late stages of planet formation in binary stars this process does not appear to have been studied in triple stellar systems. To understand how the late stage of planetary accretion is affected by a third companion, in this work we have numerically investigated the formation of planets in a hypothetical triple stellar system. The system is composed by an inner binary formed by two half-solar-mass components orbited by a solar-mass star. In our experiments, lunar and Mars-sized planetary embryos are distributed around the centre of mass of the inner binary system. Our main goal is to analyse how the formation of planets evolves depending on the orbital configuration of the massive distant companion. We have performed an extensive number of numerical simulations considering different orbital configurations for the third star. All simulations were numerically integrated for at least 107 years. The results show that when the protoplanetary disc and the stars are initially on coplanar orbits, one or two planets are quickly formed between 6 and 8 AU. In general such planets have also small eccentricities with values about 10-2. On the other hand, when the third star is considered initially on inclined orbits (even tiny values), there tends to occur a significant increase in the inclination of bodies of protoplanetary disc, which prevents the collisions between these objects and their growth. As a result, in this latter case we do not evidence the formation of planets during the timescale of our integrations but note the existence of several leftover objects that can survive for longer than 10 Myr, moving in orbits with semi-major axes ranging between ~6 and 8 AU. Thus, our results do not rule out the planet formation in this kind of stellar arrangements at all, but they indicate that, if planetary bodies keep stable orbits, the late stage of planet

  20. The Spatially-Resolved Star Formation History of the M31 Disk from Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alexia R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-02-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program that has mapped the resolved stellar populations of ~1/3 of the disk of M31 from the UV through the near-IR. This data provides color and luminosity information for more than 150 million stars. Using stellar evolution models, we model the optical color-magnitude diagram to derive spatially-resolved recent star formation histories (SFHs) over large areas of M31 with 100 pc resolution. These include individual star-forming regions as well as quiescent portions of the disk. With these gridded SFHs, we create movies of star formation activity to study the evolution of individual star-forming events across the disk. We analyze the structure of star formation and examine the relation between star formation and gas throughout the disk and particularly in the 10-kpc star-forming ring. We find that the ring has been continuously forming stars for at least 500 Myr. As the only large disk galaxy that is close enough to obtain the photometry for this type of spatially-resolved SFH mapping, M31 plays an important role in our understanding of the evolution of an L* galaxy.

  1. Star Cluster Formation with Stellar Feedback and Large-scale Inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzner, Christopher D.; Jumper, Peter H.

    2015-12-01

    During star cluster formation, ongoing mass accretion is resisted by stellar feedback in the form of protostellar outflows from the low-mass stars and photo-ionization and radiation pressure feedback from the massive stars. We model the evolution of cluster-forming regions during a phase in which both accretion and feedback are present and use these models to investigate how star cluster formation might terminate. Protostellar outflows are the strongest form of feedback in low-mass regions, but these cannot stop cluster formation if matter continues to flow in. In more massive clusters, radiation pressure and photo-ionization rapidly clear the cluster-forming gas when its column density is too small. We assess the rates of dynamical mass ejection and of evaporation, while accounting for the important effect of dust opacity on photo-ionization. Our models are consistent with the census of protostellar outflows in NGC 1333 and Serpens South and with the dust temperatures observed in regions of massive star formation. Comparing observations of massive cluster-forming regions against our model parameter space, and against our expectations for accretion-driven evolution, we infer that massive-star feedback is a likely cause of gas disruption in regions with velocity dispersions less than a few kilometers per second, but that more massive and more turbulent regions are too strongly bound for stellar feedback to be disruptive.

  2. SuperMassive Blackholes grow from stellar BHs of star formation history?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    The origin of the supermassive black hole masses M SMBH discovered at the highest redshifts is still actively debated. Moreover the statistically significant relation of M SMBH with bulge luminosities L V , extended on several magnitude orders, confirms a common physical process linking small (<= 1pc) to large (kpcs) size scales. The Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of two z=3.8 radio galaxies 4C41.17 and TN J2007-1316, best-fitted by evolved early type galaxy and starburst scenarios also imply masses of stellar remnants. Computed with the evolutionary code Pegase.3, the cumulated stellar black hole mass M sBH reach up to several 109M⊙, similar to M SMBH at same z. We propose the SMBH growth is due to the migration of the stellar dense residues (sBH) towards the galaxy core by dynamical friction. Discussed in terms of time-scales, this process which is linking AGN and star formation, also fully justifies the famous relation M SMBH -L V .

  3. The Dual Origin of Stellar Halos. II. Chemical Abundances as Tracers of Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Governato, Fabio; Hogg, David W.; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2010-09-01

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [α/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local Lsstarf galaxies.

  4. UVMag: stellar formation, evolution, structure and environment with space UV and visible spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Baade, D.; Fullerton, A.; Gry, C.; Hussain, G.; Lèbre, A.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.; Sundqvist, J. O.; ud-Doula, A.; Vidotto, A. A.; Wade, G. A.

    2014-11-01

    Important insights into the formation, structure, evolution and environment of all types of stars can be obtained through the measurement of their winds and possible magnetospheres. However, this has hardly been done up to now mainly because of the lack of UV instrumentation available for long periods of time. To reach this aim, we have designed UVMag, an M-size space mission equipped with a high-resolution spectropolarimeter working in the UV and visible spectral range. The UV domain is crucial in stellar physics as it is very rich in atomic and molecular lines and contains most of the flux of hot stars. Moreover, covering the UV and visible spectral domains at the same time will allow us to study the star and its environment simultaneously. Adding polarimetric power to the spectrograph will multiply tenfold the capabilities of extracting information on stellar magnetospheres, winds, disks, and magnetic fields. Examples of science objectives that can be reached with UVMag are presented for pre-main sequence, main sequence and evolved stars. They will cast new light onto stellar physics by addressing many exciting and important questions. UVMag is currently undergoing a Research & Technology study and will be proposed at the forthcoming ESA call for M-size missions. This spectropolarimeter could also be installed on a large UV and visible observatory (e.g. NASA's LUVOIR project) within a suite of instruments.

  5. THE DUAL ORIGIN OF STELLAR HALOS. II. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AS TRACERS OF FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James E-mail: bwillman@haverford.ed

    2010-09-20

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [{alpha}/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local L{sup *} galaxies.

  6. A FORMATION SCENARIO OF YOUNG STELLAR GROUPS IN THE REGION OF THE SCORPIO CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, V. G.; Jilinski, E.; De la Reza, R.; Bazzanella, B.

    2009-04-15

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the role played by Lower Centaurus Crux (LCC) and Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL), both subcomponents of the Scorpio Centaurus OB association (Sco-Cen), in the formation of the groups {beta} Pictoris, TW Hydrae, and the {eta} Chamaeleontis cluster. The dynamical evolution of all the stellar groups involved and of the bubbles and shells blown by LCC and UCL are calculated, and followed from the past to the present. This leads to a formation scenario in which (1) the groups {beta} Pictoris, TW Hydrae were formed in the wake of the shells created by LCC and UCL, (2) the young cluster {eta} Chamaeleontis was born as a consequence of the collision of the shells of LCC and UCL, and (3) the formation of Upper Scorpius (US), the other main subcomponent of the Sco-Cen association, may have been started by the same process that created {eta} Chamaeleontis.

  7. Saturn's Magnetospheric Cusp: Cassini Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, J. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Sergis, N.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    The first in-situ analysis of the high-latitude magnetospheric cusp region at Saturn is presented using data from the Cassini spacecraft. The cusp is a funnel-shaped region where shocked solar wind plasma is able to enter the magnetosphere via the process of magnetic reconnection. The analysis is presented in three sections: Firstly, a high-latitude spacecraft trajectory is shown to cross the northern cusp where magnetosheath plasma is observed in-situ. The ion observations are shown to be a result of `bursty' reconnection occurring at the dayside magnetopause. A different interval is also presented where the southern cusp is observed to oscillate with a period the same as Saturn's rotational period. Secondly, the locations of all the cusp crossings are shown. The field-aligned distances (calculated from observed ion energy-pitch angle dispersions) from the reconnection site are presented. The cusp events are also compared to solar wind propagation models to investigate any correlations. Finally, the magnetic field observations of the cusps are analysed focusing on the diamagnetic depressions. The data are subtracted from a magnetic field model, and the calculated magnetic pressure deficits are compared to the particle pressures. A high plasma pressure layer in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp is discovered to also depress the magnetic field.

  8. Extremely Large Cusp Diamagnetic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, which is unexpected by the current MHD (or ISM) models, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash, which provides a challenge to the existing MHD (or ISM) models. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. During high solar wind pressure period on April 21, 1999, the POLAR spacecraft observed lower ion flux in the dayside high-latitude magnetosheath than that in the neighbouring cusp cavities. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity have significant global impacts on the geospace environment research and will be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in upstream ion events.

  9. THE COUPLING BETWEEN THE CORE/CUSP AND MISSING SATELLITE PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Penarrubia, Jorge; Pontzen, Andrew; Walker, Matthew G.; Koposov, Sergey E.

    2012-11-10

    We calculate the energy that baryons must inject into cold dark matter (CDM) halos in order to remove centrally divergent DM cusps on scales relevant to observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We estimate that the CDM halos often associated with the Milky Way's dSphs (M{sub vir}/M{sub Sun} {approx} 10{sup 9-10}) require {Delta}E {approx} 10{sup 53-55} erg in order to form cores on scales comparable to the luminous size of these galaxies. While supernova Type II (SNeII) explosions can in principle generate this energy, the actual contribution is limited by the low star formation efficiency implied by the abundance of luminous satellites. Considering that CDM's well-known 'core/cusp' and 'missing satellite' problems place opposing demands on star formation efficiencies, existing observational evidences for large cores in the most luminous dSphs require that CDM models invoke some combination of the following: (1) efficient (of the order of unity) coupling of SNeII energy into dark matter particles, (2) star formation histories peaking at unexpectedly high redshifts (z {approx}> 6), (3) a top-heavy stellar initial mass function, and/or (4) substantial satellite disruption or other stochastic effects to ease the substructure abundance constraints. Our models show that the tension between CDM problems on small scales would increase if cored DM profiles were to be found in fainter dwarfs.

  10. A Backwards Approach to the Formation of Disk Galaxies. I. Stellar and Gas Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Silk, Joseph

    2001-08-01

    A simple chemical enrichment code is described where the two basic mechanisms driving the evolution of the ages and metallicities of the stellar populations are the star formation efficiency and the fraction of gas ejected from the galaxy. Using the observed Tully-Fisher relation in different passbands as a constraint, it is found that a steep correlation between the maximum disk rotational velocity (vROT) and star formation efficiency (Ceff) must exist-Ceff~v4ROT-either for a linear or a quadratic Schmidt law. Outflows do not play a major role. This result is in contrast with what we have found for early-type systems, where the Faber-Jackson constraint in different bands allows a significant range of outflows and requires a large star formation efficiency regardless of galaxy mass. The extremely low efficiencies found at low masses translate into a large spread in the distribution of stellar ages in these systems, as well as a large gas mass fraction independently of the star formation law. The model predictions are consistent with the star formation rates in low-mass local galaxies. However, our predictions for gas mass are in apparent conflict with the estimates of atomic hydrogen content observed through the flux of the 21 cm line of H I. The presence of large masses of cold molecular hydrogen-especially in systems with low mass and metallicity-is predicted, up to ratios M(H2)/M(H I)~4, in agreement with a recent tentative detection of warm H2. The redshift evolution of disk galaxies is explored, showing that a significant change in the slope of the Tully-Fisher relation (L~vγROT) is expected because of the different age distributions of the stellar components in high and low-mass disk galaxies. The slope measured in the rest frame B,K-bands is found to change from γB~3,γK~4 at z=0 up to ~4.5, 5 at z~1, with a slight dependence on formation redshift.

  11. Reassessing the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Olivia Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies depends on a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The observed strength of this dependence varies substantially depending on the choice of metallicity calibration, but has significant implications for theories of galaxy evolution, as it constrains the interplay between infall of pristine gas, metal production due to star formation, and ejection of enriched gas from galaxies. We present a new analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity and SFR for ~140,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a new set of theoretically calibrated abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013), we find a weaker dependence of metallicity on SFR at fixed stellar mass than was found by previous studies using different calibration techniques for gas phase metallicity. We analyze possible biases in the derivation of mass, metallicity, and SFR that could cause the observed strength of the metallicity dependence on SFR to differ from reality, as the calculation of each of these quantities is subject to systematic errors. Chemical evolution models must carefully consider these sources of potential bias when accounting for metallicity dependence on SFR.

  12. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  13. Recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation and implications for the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segers, Marijke C.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-02-01

    We use cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments and OverWhelmingly Large Simulations projects to assess the significance of recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation. The fractional contributions of stellar mass-loss to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass densities increase with time, reaching 35 and 19 per cent, respectively, at z = 0. The importance of recycling increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass for M* < 1010.5 M⊙, and decreases mildly at higher mass. This trend arises from the mass dependence of feedback associated with star formation and AGN, which preferentially suppresses star formation fuelled by recycling. Recycling is more important for satellites than centrals and its contribution decreases with galactocentric radius. The relative contribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars increases with time and towards galaxy centres. This is a consequence of the more gradual release of AGB ejecta compared to that of massive stars, and the preferential removal of the latter by star formation-driven outflows and by lock up in stellar remnants. Recycling-fuelled star formation exhibits a tight, positive correlation with galaxy metallicity, with a secondary dependence on the relative abundance of alpha elements (which are predominantly synthesized in massive stars), that is insensitive to the subgrid models for feedback. Hence, our conclusions are directly relevant for the origin of the mass-metallicity relation and metallicity gradients. Applying the relation between recycling and metallicity to the observed mass-metallicity relation yields our best estimate of the mass-dependent contribution of recycling. For centrals with a mass similar to that of the Milky Way, we infer the contributions of recycled stellar ejecta to the SFR and stellar mass to be 35 and 20 per cent, respectively.

  14. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first metal-enriched stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Montgomery, Michael H.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low-metallicity (10-2 Z⊙) stellar cluster at redshift z ˜ 14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 M⊙. Their masses range from ˜0.1 to 14.4 M⊙ with a median mass ˜0.5-1 M⊙. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while lower mass protostars are stunted in growth by close encounters and many-body ejections. In the regime explored here, the characteristic mass scale is determined by the cosmic microwave background temperature floor and the onset of efficient dust-gas coupling. It seems unlikely that host galaxies of the first bursts of metal-enriched star formation will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope or other next-generation infrared observatories. Instead, the most promising access route to the dawn of cosmic star formation may lie in the scrutiny of metal-poor, ancient stellar populations in the Galactic neighbourhood. The observable targets corresponding to the system simulated here are ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies such as Boötes II and Willman I.

  15. WINGS-SPE II: A catalog of stellar ages and star formation histories, stellar masses and dust extinction values for local clusters galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; Bressan, A.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.

    2011-02-01

    Context. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (wings) is a project whose primary goal is to study the galaxy populations in clusters in the local universe (z < 0.07) and of the influence of environment on their stellar populations. This survey has provided the astronomical community with a high quality set of photometric and spectroscopic data for 77 and 48 nearby galaxy clusters, respectively. Aims: In this paper we present the catalog containing the properties of galaxies observed by the wings SPEctroscopic (wings-spe) survey, which were derived using stellar populations synthesis modelling approach. We also check the consistency of our results with other data in the literature. Methods: Using a spectrophotometric model that reproduces the main features of observed spectra by summing the theoretical spectra of simple stellar populations of different ages, we derive the stellar masses, star formation histories, average age and dust attenuation of galaxies in our sample. Results: ~ 5300 spectra were analyzed with spectrophotometric techniques, and this allowed us to derive the star formation history, stellar masses and ages, and extinction for the wings spectroscopic sample that we present in this paper. Conclusions: The comparison with the total mass values of the same galaxies derived by other authors based on sdss data, confirms the reliability of the adopted methods and data. Based on observations taken at the Anglo Australian Telescope (3.9 m- AAT), and at the William Herschel Telescope (4.2 m- WHT).Full Table 2 is available in electronic form both at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A45, and by querying the wings database at http://web.oapd.inaf.it/wings/new/index.html

  16. The physics of the accretion process in the formation and evolution of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, C. F.

    2014-07-01

    The formation of planets is thought to happen in protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars during the first few Myrs of their pre-main-sequence evolution. In order to understand planet formation a detailed knowledge of the disk evolution process is needed. By studying the interaction of the disk with the central star, which includes accretion of matter due to viscous processes in the disk, we can constrain the physical conditions of the inner gaseous disk in which planet formation takes place. With the recent advent of the X-Shooter spectrograph, a second generation instrument of the ESO/VLT, the excess emission due to accretion in the ultraviolet can be studied simultaneously with the accretion signatures in the visible and in the near-infrared, finally giving a complete view of this phenomenon. In this Thesis I have studied various X-Shooter datasets of young stars to determine the intensity and the properties of the accretion process at various phases of disk evolution and as a function of the central star mass and age. To fully exploit the potential of the X-Shooter spectra, I have developed an innovative method of analysis to derive accretion and stellar parameters with an automatic algorithm. This is based on a set of models, composed of a set of photospheric templates of young stars that I gathered and characterized, a set of slab models, that I have coded, to reproduce the emission due to the accretion shock, and a reddening law to take into account extinction effects. This method allows to accurately determine for the first time the stellar and accretion parameters of the targets self-consistently and with no prior assumptions, a significant improvement with respect to previous studies. I have applied this methodology to determine the correct stellar parameters of two objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster that were reported in the literature to have an anomalous old age. My analysis has shown why previous investigations could not resolve the degeneracy

  17. Galaxy Formation From A Local Perspective: Constraints from the Resolved Stellar Populations of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.

    2008-09-01

    I present a capsulized summary of the exciting field of the study of galaxy formation and evolution based on inspection of the local neighborhood-the stars of the Milky Way (and its dwarf galaxy populations). After a brief overview of the topic, I discuss previous surveys of the stellar populations of the Milky Way, in particular those directed at the identification of stars in the halo. I then present a discussion of current surveys, and consider what has already been revealed by examination of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several examples of detailed analyses for stars of particular importance for constraining the early epochs of chemical evolution are then discussed. Efforts to model the formation and evolution of the Milky Way, based on such data, are then presented. Finally, I consider the next steps to be taken on this journey of understanding.

  18. Extremely large cusp diamagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T.; Siscoe, G.

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities are always there day by day. Some of the diamagnetic cavities have been observed in the morningside during intervals when the IMF By component was positive (duskward), suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity to the entire magnetopause may have significant global impacts on the geospace environment. They will possibly be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in the regions upstream of the subsolar magnetopause where energetic ion events frequently are observed.

  19. Recovering star formation histories: Integrated-light analyses vs. stellar colour-magnitude diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lara, T.; Pérez, I.; Gallart, C.; Alloin, D.; Monelli, M.; Koleva, M.; Pompei, E.; Beasley, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Florido, E.; Aparicio, A.; Fleurence, E.; Hardy, E.; Hidalgo, S.; Raimann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Accurate star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies are fundamental for understanding the build-up of their stellar content. However, the most accurate SFHs - those obtained from colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stars reaching the oldest main-sequence turnoffs (oMSTO) - are presently limited to a few systems in the Local Group. It is therefore crucial to determine the reliability and range of applicability of SFHs derived from integrated light spectroscopy, as this affects our understanding of unresolved galaxies from low to high redshift. Aims: We evaluate the reliability of current full spectral fitting techniques in deriving SFHs from integrated light spectroscopy by comparing SFHs from integrated spectra to those obtained from deep CMDs of resolved stars. Methods: We have obtained a high signal-to-noise (S/N ~ 36.3 per Å) integrated spectrum of a field in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using EFOSC2 at the 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla Observatory. For this same field, resolved stellar data reaching the oMSTO are available. We have compared the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time and the age-metallicity relation (AMR) obtained from the integrated spectrum using STECKMAP, and the CMD using the IAC-star/MinnIAC/IAC-pop set of routines. For the sake of completeness we also use and discuss other synthesis codes (STARLIGHT and ULySS) to derive the SFR and AMR from the integrated LMC spectrum. Results: We find very good agreement (average differences ~4.1%) between the SFR (t) and the AMR obtained using STECKMAP on the integrated light spectrum, and the CMD analysis. STECKMAP minimizes the impact of the age-metallicity degeneracy and has the advantage of preferring smooth solutions to recover complex SFHs by means of a penalized χ2. We find that the use of single stellar populations (SSPs) to recover the stellar content, using for instance STARLIGHT or ULySS codes, hampers the reconstruction of the SFR (t) and AMR

  20. The role of stellar relaxation in the formation and evolution of the first massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2016-04-01

    We present calculations on the formation of massive black holes of 105 M⊙ at z > 6, which can be the seeds of supermassive black holes at z ≳ 6. Under the assumption of compact star cluster formation in merging galaxies, star clusters in haloes of ˜ 108-109 M⊙ can undergo rapid core collapse, leading to the formation of very massive stars (VMSs) of ˜ 1000 M⊙ that collapse directly into black holes with similar masses. Star clusters in haloes of ≳ 109 M⊙ experience Type II supernovae before the formation of VMSs, due to long core-collapse time-scales. We also model the subsequent growth of black holes via accretion of residual stars in clusters. Two-body relaxation refills the loss cones of stellar orbits efficiently at larger radii and resonant relaxation at small radii is the main driver for accretion of stars on to black holes. As a result, more than 90 percent of stars in the initial cluster are swallowed by the central black holes before z = 6. Using dark matter merger trees, we derive black hole mass functions at z = 6-20. The mass function ranges from 103-105 M⊙ at z ≲ 15. Major merging of galaxies of ≳ 4 × 108 M⊙ at z ˜ 20 leads successfully to the formation of ≳ 105 M⊙ black holes by z ≳ 10, which could be the potential seeds of supermassive black holes seen today.

  1. Ultraviolet to infrared emission of z > 1 galaxies: Can we derive reliable star formation rates and stellar masses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Morrison, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our knowledge of the cosmic mass assembly relies on measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar), of galaxies as a function of redshift. These parameters must be estimated in a consistent way with a good knowledge of systematics before studying their correlation and the variation of the specific SFR. Constraining these fundamental properties of galaxies across the Universe is of utmost importance if we want to understand galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We seek to derive SFRs and stellar masses in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of infrared emission originating from dust. Results: We build a sample of galaxies with z > 1, all observed from the ultraviolet to the infrared in their rest frame. The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different star formation histories are introduced: an exponentially decreasing or increasing SFR and a more complex one coupling a decreasing SFR with a younger burst of constant star formation. We define different sets of data, with or without a good sampling of the ultraviolet range, near-infrared, and thermal infrared data. Variations of the metallicity are also investigated. The impact of these different cases on the determination of stellar mass and SFR are analysed. Conclusions: Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population zf ≃ 8 cannot fit the data correctly. All the other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter, especially for the exponentially decreasing models. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As

  2. The formation and gravitational-wave detection of massive stellar black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Buonanno, Alessandra; Cantiello, Matteo; Fryer, Chris L.; Holz, Daniel E.; Mandel, Ilya; Miller, M. Coleman

    2014-07-10

    If binaries consisting of two ∼100 M{sub ☉} black holes exist, they would serve as extraordinarily powerful gravitational-wave sources, detectable to redshifts of z ∼ 2 with the advanced LIGO/Virgo ground-based detectors. Large uncertainties about the evolution of massive stars preclude definitive rate predictions for mergers of these massive black holes. We show that rates as high as hundreds of detections per year, or as low as no detections whatsoever, are both possible. It was thought that the only way to produce these massive binaries was via dynamical interactions in dense stellar systems. This view has been challenged by the recent discovery of several ≳ 150 M{sub ☉} stars in the R136 region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Current models predict that when stars of this mass leave the main sequence, their expansion is insufficient to allow common envelope evolution to efficiently reduce the orbital separation. The resulting black hole-black hole binary remains too wide to be able to coalesce within a Hubble time. If this assessment is correct, isolated very massive binaries do not evolve to be gravitational-wave sources. However, other formation channels exist. For example, the high multiplicity of massive stars, and their common formation in relatively dense stellar associations, opens up dynamical channels for massive black hole mergers (e.g., via Kozai cycles or repeated binary-single interactions). We identify key physical factors that shape the population of very massive black hole-black hole binaries. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors will provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of very massive stars.

  3. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN LYNDS 1641: DISKS, ACCRETION, AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Flaherty, Kevin; Van Boekel, Roy; Henning, Thomas; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Lynds 1641 (L1641) cloud using multi-wavelength data including Spitzer, WISE, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and XMM covering {approx}1390 YSOs across a range of evolutionary stages. In addition, we targeted a sub-sample of YSOs for optical spectroscopy with the MMT/Hectospec and the MMT/Hectochelle. We use these data, along with archival photometric data, to derive spectral types, extinction values, masses, ages, and accretion rates. We obtain a disk fraction of {approx}50% in L1641. The disk frequency is almost constant as a function of stellar mass with a slight peak at log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) Almost-Equal-To -0.25. The analysis of multi-epoch spectroscopic data indicates that the accretion variability of YSOs cannot explain the two orders of magnitude of scatter for YSOs with similar masses. Forty-six new transition disk (TD) objects are confirmed in this work, and we find that the fraction of accreting TDs is lower than for optically thick disks (40%-45% versus 77%-79%, respectively). We confirm our previous result that the accreting TDs have a median accretion rate similar to normal optically thick disks. We confirm that two star formation modes (isolated versus clustered) exist in L1641. We find that the diskless YSOs are statistically older than the YSOs with optically thick disks and the TD objects have a median age that is intermediate between those of the other two populations. We tentatively study the star formation history in L1641 based on the age distribution and find that star formation started to be active 2-3 Myr ago.

  4. Characterizing Extragalactic Star Formation with GALEX Legacy Photometric Analysis of UV-Bright Stellar Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David

    At the close of nearly a decade of observing, GALEX has accumulated an unprecedented archive of ultraviolet (UV) images revealing both the scope and intricacy of star formation (SF) in many thousands of galaxies inhabiting the local universe. If the observed hierarchical SF morphology can be quantified systematically, and physically interpreted with multi-wavelength ancillary data and modeling, then the low redshift GALEX legacy will approach completion. However, the GALEX GR6 pipeline database contains a highly incomplete census of young stellar complexes even for very well-studied galaxies. We propose to apply a dedicated photometry algorithm that has been optimized for measuring the properties of irregularly shaped sources in crowded galaxy images containing spatially variant, diffuse intra-clump emission. Structures will be selected in the UV, but we will compile UV-visible-MIR SEDs for each detection utilizing Pan-STARRS1+SDSS and WISE data. These SEDs will then be fit using population-synthesis models to derive estimated stellar mass, age, and extinction. Processing will be completed for the entire diameter-limited GALEX Large Galaxy Atlas (GLGA) sample of 20,000+ galaxies, at a variety of standardized spatial resolutions. Although the precise categorization of the cataloged substructures will depend on galaxy distance, the outcome of our analysis will be a catalog similar to the stellar association surveys of past decades for very nearby galaxies based on resolved stars (e.g. van den Bergh 1964, Hodge 1986, Efremov et al. 1987), except that our investigation will probe a galaxy sample of dramatically larger size using the integrated UV light from such groupings of young stars. Our algorithm is multi-scale in nature and will thus preserve the hierarchical properties of the stellar distribution, by linking sub-clumps to their larger-scale parent feature(s). The resulting database will be a fundamental resource for follow-up multi-wavelength studies probing SF

  5. The Stellar Populations in the Outer Regions of M33. III. Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Sarajedini, Ata; Geisler, Doug; Harding, Paul; Schommer, Robert

    2007-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of three fields in M33 located approximately four to six visual scale lengths from its nucleus. These fields were imaged with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope and reach ~2.5 mag below the red clump of core helium-burning stars. The observed color-magnitude diagrams are modeled as linear combinations of individual synthetic populations with different ages and metallicities. To gain a better understanding of the systematic errors, we have conducted the analysis with two different sets of stellar evolutionary tracks, which we designate as Padova and Teramo. The precise details of the results depend on which tracks are used, but we can make several conclusions that are fairly robust despite the differences. Both sets of tracks predict the mean age to increase and the mean metallicity to decrease with radius. Allowing age and metallicity to be free parameters and assuming that star formation began ~14 Gyr ago, we find that the mean age of all stars and stellar remnants increases from ~6 to ~8 Gyr, and the mean global metallicity decreases from approximately -0.7 to approximately -0.9. The fraction of stars formed by 4.5 Gyr ago increases from ~65% to ~80%. The mean star formation rate 80-800 Myr ago decreases from ~30% of the lifetime average to just ~5%. The random errors on these estimates are ~10%, 1.0 Gyr, and 0.1 dex. By comparing the results of the two sets of stellar tracks for the real data and for test populations with known SFHs, we have estimated the systematic errors to be 15%, 1.0 Gyr, and 0.2 dex. These do not include uncertainties in the bolometric corrections or variations in α-element abundance, which deserve future study. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5

  6. Dual Stellar Halos in the Standard Elliptical Galaxy M105 and Formation of Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2015-08-01

    M105 in the Leo I Group is a textbook example of a standard elliptical galaxy. Old red giant stars in the halo of M105 are easily resolved in the HST images so that it is an ideal target to study the structure and composition of stellar halos in elliptical galaxies. It is only one of the few elliptical galaxies for which we can study their stellar halos using the resolved stars. We present photometry of the resolved stars in its inner region at R~4 arcmin, obtained from F606W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. Then we combine this with photometry of the remote outer region at R~12 arcmin studied before. Deep color-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stars in the inner region show a prominent red giant branch (RGB) with a large color range, while those for the outer region show better a narrow blue RGB. We derive the metallicity of the RGB stars using the isochrones. The metallicity distribution function of the RGB stars shows the existence of two distinct subpopulations: a dominant metal-rich population and a much weaker metal-poor population. The peak metallicity of the metal-rich population changes little as galactocentric distance increases, while the fraction of the metal-poor population increases. The radial number density profile of the metal-poor RGB stars is flatter in the outer region than that of the metal-rich RGB stars. These provide strong evidence that there are two distinct stellar halos in this galaxy, blue (metal-poor) and red (metal-rich) halos, which is consistent with the results based on the study of the globular cluster systems in bright early-type galaxies (Park \\& Lee 2013,ApJ,773, 27). We discuss the implications of these results with regard to the formation of massive early-type galaxies in the dual halo mode formation scenario as well as in the two-phase formation scenario based on similuations.

  7. Building a predictive model of galaxy formation - I. Phenomenological model constrained to the z = 0 stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Andrew J.

    2014-11-01

    We constrain a highly simplified semi-analytic model of galaxy formation using the z ≈ 0 stellar mass function of galaxies. Particular attention is paid to assessing the role of random and systematic errors in the determination of stellar masses, to systematic uncertainties in the model, and to correlations between bins in the measured and modelled stellar mass functions, in order to construct a realistic likelihood function. We derive constraints on model parameters and explore which aspects of the observational data constrain particular parameter combinations. We find that our model, once constrained, provides a remarkable match to the measured evolution of the stellar mass function to z = 1, although fails dramatically to match the local galaxy H I mass function. Several `nuisance parameters' contribute significantly to uncertainties in model predictions. In particular, systematic errors in stellar mass estimate are the dominant source of uncertainty in model predictions at z ≈ 1, with additional, non-negligble contributions arising from systematic uncertainties in halo mass functions and the residual uncertainties in cosmological parameters. Ignoring any of these sources of uncertainties could lead to viable models being erroneously ruled out. Additionally, we demonstrate that ignoring the significant covariance between bins the observed stellar mass function leads to significant biases in the constraints derived on model parameters. Careful treatment of systematic and random errors in the constraining data, and in the model being constrained, is crucial if this methodology is to be used to test hypotheses relating to the physics of galaxy formation.

  8. Observational Constraints on Low-Mass Stellar Evolution and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne Louise

    2011-07-01

    Low-mass stars (? < 1.0M⊙) account for more than 70% of the galactic stellar population yet models describing the evolution of their fundamental properties lack stringent observational constraints, especially at early ages. Furthermore, recent observations indicate a significant discrepancy between model predictions and the precise (2 - 3%) observed, dynamical masses and radii measured using low-mass eclipsing binary systems (EBs). Additionally, the theory of planet formation via core accretion predicts notably less hot-Jupiter formation around M-dwarfs (Mdot ? ≤ 0.6M⊙), but as yet, no large enough study exists to robustly test it. Further still, it is predicted that the dynamic environment of stellar clusters, in which most stars are believed to form, hampers planet formation, but again, current null detections of planets in stellar clusters are not statistically significant to test the theory. More observations are required to cement both the theory of low-mass stellar evolution and planet formation. This thesis aims to provide the necessary constraints by uncovering new low-mass EBs and transiting exoplanets in time-series photometry and follow-up spectroscopy from the Monitor project, a photometric monitoring campaign of low-mass stars in nine young open clusters, and in the WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS), a photometric monitoring campaign of ∼10,000 field M-dwarfs. Chapters 3 and 4 present my study of the young (130 Myr) cluster, M 50. I confirm three EB candidates as cluster members, including evidence that one of these is in a triple system with a wide-separation, low-mass tertiary component. The derived masses and radii for this system and one further double-lined, non-cluster member are presented, but these objects required dedicated, single-slit spectroscopic follow-up to yield the accuracy required to test pre-main sequence models. My non-detection of planets in this cluster is consistent with the results of all other cluster transit surveys. The

  9. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF Bz component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF BZ is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION- 4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF By component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere.

  10. Constraints on Stellar Grain Formation from Presolar Graphite in the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Cowsik, Ramanath; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Amari, Sachiko; Lewis, Roy S.

    1996-12-01

    We report the results of isotopic, chemical, structural, and crystallographic micro analyses of graphitic spherules (0.3-9 μm) extracted from the Murchison meteorite. The spherules have 12C/13C ratios ranging over 3 orders of magnitude (from 0.02 to 80 times solar), clearly establishing their presolar origin as stellar condensates. These and other isotopic constraints point to a variety of stellar types as sources of the carbon, including low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and supernovae. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of ultrathin sections of the spherules revealed that many have a composite structure consisting of a core of nanocrystalline carbon surrounded by a mantle of well-graphitized carbon. The nanocrystalline cores are compact masses consisting of randomly oriented graphene sheets, from PAH-sized units up to sheets 3-4 nm in diameter, with little graphitic layering order. These sheets probably condensed as isolated particles that subsequently coalesced to form the cores, after which the surrounding graphitic mantles were added by vapor deposition. We also detected internal crystals of metal carbides in one-third of the spherules. These crystals (5-200 nm) have compositions ranging from nearly pure TiC to nearly pure Zr-Mo carbide. Some of these car- bides occur at the centers of the spherules and are surrounded by well-graphitized carbon, having evidently served as heterogeneous nucleation centers for condensation of carbon. Others were entrained by carbon as the spherules grew. The chemical and textural evidence indicates that these carbides formed prior to carbon condensation, which indicates that the C/O ratios in the stellar sources were very close to unity. Only one of the 67 spherules studied in the TEM contained SiC, from which we infer that carbon condensation nearly always preceded SiC formation. This observation places stringent limits on the possible delay of graphite formation and is consistent with the predictions of

  11. Blast wave formation of the extended stellar shells surrounding elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. E.; Christiansen, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The existence of stellar shells at large distances from isolated elliptical galaxies is explained in terms of a blast wave associated with an active nucleus phase early in the history of the galaxy. The blast wave sweeps the initial interstellar medium out of the galaxy into an expanding shell which radiatively cools behind its leading shock front. Cooling of the shell following turnoff of the nucleus activity, which keeps the shell photoionized, leads to a brief epoch of star formation which is terminated by heating of the shell from supernovae and UV radiation from massive stars. The stars so formed follow similar, highly radial, bound orbits, moving in phase with each other and spending much of their time near apogalacteum, thus taking on the appearance of a shell. Multiple shells may be produced when conditions allow repeated episodes of shell cooling and supernovae heating to occur in the blast wave.

  12. Star Formation in W3—AFGL 333: Young Stellar Content, Properties, and Roles of External Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jessy; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Samal, Manash R.; Bieging, John H.; Meyer, Michael R.; Sherry, William H.

    2016-05-01

    One of the key questions in the field of star formation is the role of stellar feedback on the subsequent star formation process. The W3 giant molecular cloud complex at the western border of the W4 super bubble is thought to be influenced by the massive stars in W4. This paper presents a study of the star formation activity within AFGL 333, a ˜104 M ⊙ cloud within W3, using deep JHK s photometry obtained from the NOAO Extremely Wide Field Infrared Imager combined with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry. Based on the infrared excess, we identify 812 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the complex, of which 99 are Class I and 713 are Class II sources. The stellar density analysis of YSOs reveals three major stellar aggregates within AFGL 333, namely AFGL 333 Main, AFGL 333 NW1 and AFGL 333 NW2. The disk fraction within AFGL 333 is estimated to be ˜50%–60%. We use the extinction map made from the H-{K}s colors of the background stars and CO data to understand the cloud structure and to estimate the cloud mass. From the stellar and cloud mass associated with AFGL 333, we infer that the region is currently forming stars with an efficiency of ˜4.5% and at a rate of ˜2–3 M ⊙ Myr‑1 pc‑2. In general, the star formation activity within AFGL 333 is comparable to that of nearby low mass star-forming regions. We do not find any strong evidence to suggest that the stellar feedback from the massive stars of nearby W4 super bubble has affected the global star formation properties of the AFGL 333 region.

  13. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  14. Star Formation in W3—AFGL 333: Young Stellar Content, Properties, and Roles of External Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jessy; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Samal, Manash R.; Bieging, John H.; Meyer, Michael R.; Sherry, William H.

    2016-05-01

    One of the key questions in the field of star formation is the role of stellar feedback on the subsequent star formation process. The W3 giant molecular cloud complex at the western border of the W4 super bubble is thought to be influenced by the massive stars in W4. This paper presents a study of the star formation activity within AFGL 333, a ∼104 M ⊙ cloud within W3, using deep JHK s photometry obtained from the NOAO Extremely Wide Field Infrared Imager combined with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry. Based on the infrared excess, we identify 812 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the complex, of which 99 are Class I and 713 are Class II sources. The stellar density analysis of YSOs reveals three major stellar aggregates within AFGL 333, namely AFGL 333 Main, AFGL 333 NW1 and AFGL 333 NW2. The disk fraction within AFGL 333 is estimated to be ∼50%–60%. We use the extinction map made from the H-{K}s colors of the background stars and CO data to understand the cloud structure and to estimate the cloud mass. From the stellar and cloud mass associated with AFGL 333, we infer that the region is currently forming stars with an efficiency of ∼4.5% and at a rate of ∼2–3 M ⊙ Myr‑1 pc‑2. In general, the star formation activity within AFGL 333 is comparable to that of nearby low mass star-forming regions. We do not find any strong evidence to suggest that the stellar feedback from the massive stars of nearby W4 super bubble has affected the global star formation properties of the AFGL 333 region.

  15. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG STELLAR POPULATION IN BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD SFO 38

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Rumpa; Bhatt, H. C.; Mookerjea, Bhaswati E-mail: hcbhatt@iiap.res.i

    2010-07-10

    We have investigated the young stellar population in and around SFO 38, one of the massive globules located in the northern part of the Galactic H II region IC 1396, using the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations (3.6-24 {mu}m), and followed up with ground-based optical photometric and spectroscopic observations. Based on the IRAC and MIPS colors and H{alpha} emission, we identify {approx}45 young stellar objects (Classes 0/I/II) and 13 probable pre-main-sequence candidates. We derive the spectral types (mostly K- and M-type stars), effective temperatures, and individual extinction of the relatively bright and optically visible Class II objects. Most of the Class II objects show variable H{alpha} emission as well as optical and near-infrared photometric variability, which confirm their 'youth'. Based on optical photometry and theoretical isochrones, we estimate the spread in stellar ages to be between 1 and 8 Myr with a median age of 3 Myr and a mass distribution of 0.3-2.2 M{sub sun} with a median value around 0.5 M{sub sun}. Using the width of the H{alpha} emission line measured at 10% peak intensity, we derive the mass accretion rates of individual objects to be between 10{sup -10} and 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. From the continuum-subtracted H{alpha} line image, we find that the H{alpha} emission of the globule is not spatially symmetric with respect to the O-type ionizing star HD 206267, and the interstellar extinction toward the globule is also anomalous. We clearly detect an enhanced concentration of YSOs closer to the southern rim of SFO 38 and identify an evolutionary sequence of YSOs from the rim to the dense core of the cloud, with most of the Class II objects located at the bright rim. The YSOs appear to be aligned along two different directions toward the O6.5V type star HD 206267 and the B0V type star HD 206773. This is consistent with the Radiation Driven Implosion (RDI) model for triggered star formation. Further, the apparent speed of

  16. Star-formation and stellar feedback recipes in galaxy evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone; Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Kuehtreiber, Matthias; Steyrleithner, Patrick; Liu, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Modeling galaxy formation and evolution is critically depending on star formation (SF). Since cosmological and galaxy-scale simulations cannot resolve the spatial and density scales on which SF acts, a large variety of methods are developed and applied over the last decades. Nonetheless, we are still in the test phase how the choice of parameters affects the models and how they agree with observations.As a simple ansatz, recipes are based on power-law SF dependences on gas density as justified by gas cooling and collapse timescales. In order to prevent SF spread throughout the gas, temperature and density thresholds are also used, although gas dynamical effects, like e.g. gas infall, seem to trigger SF significantly.The formed stars influence their environment immediately by energetic and materialistic feedback. It has been experienced in numerical models that supernova typeII explosions act with a too long time delay to regulate the SF, but that winds and ionizing radiation by massive stars must be included. The implementation of feedback processes, their efficiencies and timescales, is still in an experimental state, because they depend also on the physical state of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).Combining a SF-gas density relation with stellar heating vs. gas cooling and taking the temperature dependence into account, we have derived an analytical expression of self-regulated SF which is free of arbitrary parameters. We have performed numerical models to study this recipe and different widely used SF criteria in both, particle and grid codes. Moreover, we compare the SF behavior between single-gas phase and multi-phase treatments of the ISM.Since dwarf galaxies (DGs) are most sensitive to environmental influences and contain only low SF rates, we explore two main affects on their models: 1. For external effects we compare SF rates of isolated and ram-pressure suffering DGs. Moreover, we find a SF enhancement in tidal-tail DGs by the compressive tidal

  17. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. I. Evidence of suppressed planet formation due to stellar companions within 20 au and validation of four planets from the Kepler multiple planet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Barclay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The planet occurrence rate for multiple stars is important in two aspects. First, almost half of stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are multiple systems. Second, the comparison of the planet occurrence rate for multiple stars to that for single stars sheds light on the influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation and evolution. We developed a method of distinguishing planet occurrence rates for single and multiple stars. From a sample of 138 bright (K{sub P} < 13.5) Kepler multi-planet candidate systems, we compared the stellar multiplicity rate of these planet host stars to that of field stars. Using dynamical stability analyses and archival Doppler measurements, we find that the stellar multiplicity rate of planet host stars is significantly lower than field stars for semimajor axes less than 20 AU, suggesting that planet formation and evolution are suppressed by the presence of a close-in companion star at these separations. The influence of stellar multiplicity at larger separations is uncertain because of search incompleteness due to a limited Doppler observation time baseline and a lack of high-resolution imaging observation. We calculated the planet confidence for the sample of multi-planet candidates and find that the planet confidences for KOI 82.01, KOI 115.01, KOI 282.01, and KOI 1781.02 are higher than 99.7% and thus validate the planetary nature of these four planet candidates. This sample of bright Kepler multi-planet candidates with refined stellar and orbital parameters, planet confidence estimation, and nearby stellar companion identification offers a well-characterized sample for future theoretical and observational study.

  18. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disc morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Masters, Karen L.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O. Ivy; Nichol, Robert C.; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-05-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate (SFR) relation in star-forming disc galaxies at z ≤ 0.085, using Galaxy Zoo morphologies to examine different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. We examine the number of spiral arms, their relative pitch angle, and the presence of a galactic bar in the disc, and show that both the slope and dispersion of the M⋆-SFR relation is constant when varying all the above parameters. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by ˜0.3 dex; this is significantly smaller than the increase seen in merging systems at z > 1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M⋆-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50 per cent are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  19. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  20. Core-halo age gradients and star formation in the Orion Nebula and NGS 2024 young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze age distributions of two nearby rich stellar clusters, the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) and Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Our analysis is based on samples from the MYStIX survey and a new estimator of pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar ages, Age{sub JX} , derived from X-ray and near-infrared photometric data. To overcome the problem of uncertain individual ages and large spreads of age distributions for entire clusters, we compute median ages and their confidence intervals of stellar samples within annular subregions of the clusters. We find core-halo age gradients in both the NGC 2024 cluster and ONC: PMS stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than PMS stars in cluster peripheries. These findings are further supported by the spatial gradients in the disk fraction and K-band excess frequency. Our age analysis is based on Age{sub JX} estimates for PMS stars and is independent of any consideration of OB stars. The result has important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. One basic implication is that clusters form slowly and the apparent age spreads in young stellar clusters, which are often controversial, are (at least in part) real. The result further implies that simple models where clusters form inside-out are incorrect and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  1. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  2. CHARACTERIZING THE FORMATION HISTORY OF MILKY WAY LIKE STELLAR HALOS WITH MODEL EMULATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Facundo A.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Coleman-Smith, Christopher E.; Tumlinson, Jason; Wolpert, Robert L.

    2012-12-01

    We use the semi-analytic model ChemTreeN, coupled to cosmological N-body simulations, to explore how different galaxy formation histories can affect observational properties of Milky Way like galaxies' stellar halos and their satellite populations. Gaussian processes are used to generate model emulators that allow one to statistically estimate a desired set of model outputs at any location of a p-dimensional input parameter space. This enables one to explore the full input parameter space orders of magnitude faster than could be done otherwise. Using mock observational data sets generated by ChemTreeN itself, we show that it is possible to successfully recover the input parameter vectors used to generate the mock observables if the merger history of the host halo is known. However, our results indicate that for a given observational data set, the determination of 'best-fit' parameters is highly susceptible to the particular merger history of the host. Very different halo merger histories can reproduce the same observational data set, if the 'best-fit' parameters are allowed to vary from history to history. Thus, attempts to characterize the formation history of the Milky Way using these kind of techniques must be performed statistically, analyzing large samples of high-resolution N-body simulations.

  3. Explaining the Three-decade Correlation between Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass in Galaxies at z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawiser, Eric J.; Kurczynski, Peter; Acquaviva, Viviana; UVUDF Team, CANDELS Team

    2016-01-01

    In star-forming galaxies across cosmic time, a correlation has been found between the mass of stars already assembled and its time derivative, the star formation rate. This surprising correlation was not predicted by theory, but it can be reproduced within cosmological hydrodynamics simulations and semi-analytical models of galaxy formation. Here we use SpeedyMC, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code for Spectral Energy Distribution fitting, to measure the star formation rates and stellar masses of 800 galaxies from the Ultraviolet Ultradeep Field (UVUDF) and CANDELS/GOODS-S field at redshift 1 < z < 1.5. This galaxy sample leverages the deepest images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope to extend the SFR-M* correlation a factor of 10-100X lower in M* than previous studies, down to values of 10^7 M_sun comparable to present-day dwarf galaxies. Accounting for each galaxy's parameter uncertainties, including their covariances, yields a power-law correlation across three decades with intrinsic scatter of 0.2 dex. Having assumed realistic star formation histories that can rise and fall with time, we are able to measure star formation rates on timescales varying from instantaneous to the "lifetime" average for each galaxy. As the timescale over which star formation rate is averaged increases, the power-law exponent of the correlation with stellar mass increases to unity, and the scatter decreases to 0.05 dex. We conclude that the observed correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass results from a tight correlation between recent and lifetime-average star formation rates and a narrow spread of galaxy ages at a given star formation rate. The resulting correlation provides crucial evidence that galaxy formation proceeds through self-regulated star formation. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant AST-1055919 and grants from NASA via the Space Telescope Science Institute in support of programs 12060.57, 12445.56, and GO-12534.

  4. Determining the mechanism of cusp proton aurora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; He, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Zhonglei

    2013-01-01

    Earth's cusp proton aurora occurs near the prenoon and is primarily produced by the precipitation of solar energetic (2–10 keV) protons. Cusp auroral precipitation provides a direct source of energy for the high-latitude dayside upper atmosphere, contributing to chemical composition change and global climate variability. Previous studies have indicated that magnetic reconnection allows solar energetic protons to cross the magnetopause and enter the cusp region, producing cusp auroral precipitation. However, energetic protons are easily trapped in the cusp region due to a minimum magnetic field existing there. Hence, the mechanism of cusp proton aurora has remained a significant challenge for tens of years. Based on the satellite data and calculations of diffusion equation, we demonstrate that EMIC waves can yield the trapped proton scattering that causes cusp proton aurora. This moves forward a step toward identifying the generation mechanism of cusp proton aurora. PMID:23575366

  5. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean; Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines: the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF B(sub Z) component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF B(sub Z) is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION-4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF B(sub y) component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere. The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly

  6. The most distant galaxies: star formation rates, stellar populations and contribution to reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Andrew; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Wilkins, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decade we have identified the first galaxies at redshift 6 and beyond, within the first billion years when the Gunn-Peterson absorption produces significant Lyman breaks in the spectra. Since the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) was imaged with HST/ACS, the advent of sensitive near-infrared imaging on HST with WFC3 has enabled us to push the use of the Lyman break technique to redshifts between 7 and 12, within the epoch of reionization. Rest-frame UV luminosity functions derived from various deep HST fields such as the HUDF and Frontier Fields, wider field imaging such as CANDELS, and ground-based imaging such as UltraVISTA, can be used to constrain the contribution of ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies. I will review what we have learned about the role of galaxies in the reionization of the IGM, and discuss the implications of the observed blue spectral slopes at these epochs and the redshift evolution of the fraction of strong Lyman-alpha emitters. Coupled with observations from Spitzer/IRAC, we can estimate the stellar masses as well as star formation rates for this population of proto-galaxies. I will look ahead to the prospects with JWST, in particular our NIRSpec GTO programme to obtain spectra of star-forming galaxies within the epoch of reionization.

  7. The stellar content and formation history of the Giant HII region W51 using IRMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; MacKenty, John; Clark, Simon; Figer, Don

    2007-08-01

    The W51 Giant Molecular Cloud is amongst the most massive within the Galaxy, and harbours widespread and significant massive star formation (SF). However this activity appears qualitatively different from the spatially segregated, sequentially triggered SF occuring in e.g. the G305 and the 30 Dor star forming regions, apparently being quasi- simultaneous and multi-seeded. We propose to obtain near-IR spectroscopy of selected regions within W51 to complement planned deep imaging observations, in order to (i) determine if SF at these sites is proceeding independently or instead is triggered by older, adjacent activity and (ii) to investigate the claims of Okumura et al. (2000) for a top heavy IMF and hence to investigate if the IMF shows an environmental dependence. Finally, a measurement of the total stellar mass in W51 will enable the SF efficiency to be determined and compared to other star forming regions, to investigate potential dependencies on environment or the mode of SF, e.g triggered or multi-seeded.

  8. Gravoturbulent star formation: Effects of the equation of state on stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klessen, Ralf S.; Spaans, Marco; Jappsen, Anne-Katharina

    Stars form by gravoturbulent fragmentation of interstellar gas clouds. The supersonic turbulence ubiquitously observed in Galactic molecular gas generates strong density fluctuations with gravity taking over in the densest and most massive regions. Collapse sets in to build up stars and star clusters.Turbulence plays a dual role. On global scales it provides support, while at the same time it can promote local collapse. Stellar birth is thus intimately linked to the dynamic behavior of parental gas clouds, which governs when and where protostellar cores form, and how they contract and grow in mass via accretion from the surrounding cloud material to build up stars. The equation of state plays a pivotal role in the fragmentation process. Under typical cloud conditions, massive stars form as part of dense clusters following the "normal" mass function observed, e.g. in the solar neighborhood. However, for gas with an effective polytropic index greater than unity star formation becomes biased towards isolated massive stars. This is relevant for understanding the properties of zero-metallicity stars (Population III) or stars that form under extreme environmental conditions like in the Galactic center or in luminous starbursts.

  9. Formation of warped disks by galactic flyby encounters. I. Stellar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeonghwan H.; An, Sung-Ho; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Peirani, Sebastien; Kim, Sungsoo; Ann, Hong Bae

    2014-07-01

    Warped disks are almost ubiquitous among spiral galaxies. Here we revisit and test the 'flyby scenario' of warp formation, in which impulsive encounters between galaxies are responsible for warped disks. Based on N-body simulations, we investigate the morphological and kinematical evolution of the stellar component of disks when galaxies undergo flyby interactions with adjacent dark matter halos. We find that the so-called 'S'-shaped warps can be excited by flybys and sustained for even up to a few billion years, and that this scenario provides a cohesive explanation for several key observations. We show that disk warp properties are governed primarily by the following three parameters: (1) the impact parameter, i.e., the minimum distance between two halos; (2) the mass ratio between two halos; and (3) the incident angle of the flyby perturber. The warp angle is tied up with all three parameters, yet the warp lifetime is particularly sensitive to the incident angle of the perturber. Interestingly, the modeled S-shaped warps are often non-symmetric depending on the incident angle. We speculate that the puzzling U- and L-shaped warps are geometrically superimposed S-types produced by successive flybys with different incident angles, including multiple interactions with a satellite on a highly elongated orbit.

  10. Beach Cusps: Spatial distribution and time evolution at Massaguaçú beach (SP), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, H. H.; Siegle, E.; Sousa, P. H.

    2013-05-01

    Beach cusps are crescentic morphological structures observed on the foreshore of beaches characterized by steep seaward protruding extensions, called cusp horns, and gently sloped landward extensions, called cusp embayments. Their formation depends on the grain size, beach slope, tidal range and incoming waves. Cusps are best developed on gravel or shingle beaches, small tidal range with a large slope for incoming waves generate a well-developed swash excursion. These structures are quickly responding to wave climate and tidal range, changing the position of the rhythmic features on the beach face. Beach cusps are favored by normal incoming waves, while oblique waves tend to wash these features out. This study aims to analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of rhythmic features such as beach cusps in Massaguaçú embayment (Caraguatatuba, northern coast of São Paulo, Brazil). This embayment has an extension of 7.5 km with reflective beaches cusped mainly in its more exposed central portion. The data set for this study consists of a series of video images (Argus system), covering a stretch of the beach. Visible beach cusps were digitalized from these rectified images. Results obtained from the images were related to the wave climate, water level and the storm surges. Results show that the cusps on the upper portion of the foreshore were more regular and present than the cusps on the lower portion of the foreshore due to the tidal modulation of wave action. The cusp spacing on the upper portion of the foreshore is of about 38 m and the lower portion of the foreshore is of about 28 m and their presence was correlated with the wave direction and water elevation. As expected, waves approaching with shore-normal angles (southeast direction) were favorable to the formation of beach cusps while the waves from the southwest, south, east and northeast generated a longshore current that reduced or destroyed any rhythmic feature. Other important forcing was

  11. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  12. Constraining the Dark Cusp in the Galactic Center by Long-period Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Tal; Pfuhl, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei are believed to be surrounded by a high-density stellar cluster, whose mass is mostly in hard-to-detect faint stars and compact remnants. Such dark cusps dominate the dynamics near the MBH: a dark cusp in the Galactic center (GC) of the Milky Way would strongly affect orbital tests of general relativity there; on cosmic scales, dark cusps set the rates of gravitational wave emission events from compact remnants that spiral into MBHs, and they modify the rates of tidal disruption events, to list only some implications. A recently discovered long-period massive young binary (with period P 12 <~ 1 yr, total mass M_{12}\\sim {\\cal O}(100\\, M_{\\odot }), and age T 12 ~ 6 × 106 yr), only ~0.1 pc from the Galactic MBH, sets a lower bound on the stellar two-body relaxation timescale there, min t rlxvprop(P 12/M 12)2/3 T 12 ~ 107 yr, and, correspondingly, an upper bound on the stellar number density, \\max n_{\\star }\\sim {few\\times }10^{8}/\\langle M_{\\star }^{2}\\rangle \\,{pc^{-3}} (\\langle M_{\\star }^{2}\\rangle ^{1/2} is the rms stellar mass), based on the binary's survival against evaporation by the dark cusp. However, a conservative dynamical estimate, the drain limit, implies t_{{rlx}} \\gt {\\cal O}({10^{8}}\\,{yr}). Such massive binaries are thus too short-lived and tightly bound to constrain a dense relaxed dark cusp. We explore here in detail the use of longer-period, less massive, and longer-lived binaries (P 12 ~ few yr, M 12 ~ 2-4 M ⊙, T 12 ~ 108-1010 yr), presently just below the detection threshold, for probing the dark cusp and develop the framework for translating their future detections among the giants in the GC into dynamical constraints.

  13. SIMULTANEOUS MODELING OF THE STELLAR AND DUST EMISSION IN DISTANT GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAR FORMATION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Utomo, Dyas; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-03-10

    We have used near-ultraviolet (NUV) to mid-infrared (MIR) composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to simultaneously model the attenuated stellar and dust emission of 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 2.0 galaxies. These composite SEDs were previously constructed from the photometric catalogs of the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey by stacking the observed photometry of galaxies that have similar rest-frame NUV-to-NIR SEDs. In this work, we include a stacked MIPS 24 μm measurement for each SED type to extend the SEDs to rest-frame MIR wavelengths. Consistent with previous studies, the observed MIR emission for most SED types is higher than expected from only the attenuated stellar emission. We fit the NUV-to-MIR composite SEDs with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis (FSPS) models, which include both stellar and dust emission. We compare the best-fit star formation rates (SFRs) to the SFRs based on simple UV+IR estimators. Interestingly, the UV and IR luminosities overestimate SFRs—compared to the model SFRs—by more than ∼1 dex for quiescent galaxies, while for the highest star-forming galaxies in our sample the two SFRs are broadly consistent. The difference in specific SFRs also shows a gradually increasing trend with declining specific SFR, implying that quiescent galaxies have even lower specific SFRs than previously found. Contributions from evolved stellar populations to both the UV and the MIR SEDs most likely explain the discrepancy. Based on this work, we conclude that SFRs should be determined from modeling the attenuated stellar and dust emission simultaneously, instead of employing simple UV+IR-based SFR estimators.

  14. Stellar Masses and Start Formation Rates of Lensed Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies from the SPT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Gonzalez, Anthony; SPT SMG Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift (2.8 ≤ z ≤ 5.7) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using HST, Spitzer, Herschel and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution HST/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in Spitzer/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses, IR luminosities, and star formation rates (SFRs). The SED fits of six SPT sources show that the intrinsic stellar masses span a range more than one order of magnitude with a median value ˜ 5 ×1010M⊙. The intrinsic IR luminosities range from 4×1012L⊙ to 4×1013L⊙. They all have prodigious intrinsic star formation rates of 510 to 4800 M⊙yr-1. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these six DSFGs have specific SFRs that all lie above the MS, including two galaxies that are a factor of 10 higher than the MS. Our results suggest that we are witnessing the ongoing strong starburst events which may be driven by major mergers.

  15. The Role of Bulge Formation in the Homogenization of Stellar Populations at z~2 as revealed by Internal Color Dispersion in CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boada, Steven; Tilvi, V.; Papovich, C.; Quadri, R. F.; Hilton, M.; Finkelstein, S.; Guo, Yicheng; Bond, N.; Conselice, C.; Dekel, A.; Ferguson, H.; Giavalisco, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.

    2015-04-01

    We use data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey to study how the spatial variation in the stellar populations of galaxies relates to the formation of galaxies at 1.5\\lt z\\lt 3.5. We use the internal color dispersion (ICD), measured between the rest-frame UV and optical bands, which is sensitive to age (and dust attenuation) variations in stellar populations. The ICD shows a relation with the stellar masses and morphologies of the galaxies. Galaxies with the largest variation in their stellar populations as evidenced by high ICD have disk-dominated morphologies (with Sérsic indexes \\lt 2) and stellar masses between 10\\lt log (M/{{M}⊙ })\\lt 11. There is a marked decrease in the ICD as the stellar mass and/or the Sérsic index increases. By studying the relations between the ICD and other galaxy properties including size, total color, star formation rate, and dust attenuation, we conclude that the largest variations in stellar populations occur in galaxies where the light from newly, high star-forming clumps contrasts older stellar disk populations. This phase reaches a peak for galaxies only with a specific stellar mass range, 10 \\lt log (M/{{M}⊙ }) \\lt 11, and prior to the formation of a substantial bulge/spheroid. In contrast, galaxies at higher or lower stellar masses and/or higher Sérsic index (n\\gt 2) show reduced ICD values, implying a greater homogeneity of their stellar populations. This indicates that if a galaxy is to have a quiescent bulge along with a star-forming disk, typical of Hubble sequence galaxies, this is most common for stellar masses 10 \\lt log (M/{{M}⊙ }) \\lt 11 and when the bulge component remains relatively small (n\\lt 2).

  16. The statistics of triggered star formation: an overdensity of massive young stellar objects around Spitzer bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. A.; Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Morgan, L. K.

    2012-03-01

    We present a detailed statistical study of massive star formation in the environment of 322 Spitzer mid-infrared bubbles by using the Red MSX Source (RMS) survey for massive young stellar objects (YSOs). Using a combination of simple surface density plots and a more sophisticated angular cross-correlation function analysis, we show that there is a statistically significant overdensity of RMS YSOs towards the bubbles. There is a clear peak in the surface density and angular cross-correlation function of YSOs projected against the rim of the bubbles. By investigating the autocorrelation function of the RMS YSOs, we show that this is not due to intrinsic clustering of the RMS YSO sample. RMS YSOs and Spitzer bubbles are essentially uncorrelated with each other beyond a normalized angular distance of two bubble radii. The bubbles associated with RMS YSOs tend to be both smaller and thinner than those that are not associated with YSOs. We interpret this tendency to be due to an age effect, with YSOs being preferentially found around smaller and younger bubbles. We find no evidence to suggest that the YSOs associated with the bubbles are any more luminous than the rest of the RMS YSO population, which suggests that the triggering process does not produce a top-heavy luminosity function or initial mass function. We suggest that it is likely that the YSOs were triggered by the expansion of the bubbles and estimate that the fraction of massive stars in the Milky Way formed by this process could be between 14 and 30 per cent.

  17. The Relation between Star-Formation Rate and Stellar Mass of Galaxies at z ~ 1-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    The relation between the star-formation Rate and stellar mass (M ⋆) of galaxies represents a fundamental constraint on galaxy formation, and has been studied extensively both in observations and cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. However, the observed amplitude of the star-formation rate-stellar mass relation has not been successfully reproduced in simulations, indicating either that the halo accretion history and baryonic physics are poorly understood/modelled or that observations contain biases. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the SFR - M ⋆ relation of z ~ 1-4 galaxies and display the inconsistency between observed relations that are obtained using different techniques. We employ cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from various groups which are tuned to reproduce a range of observables and compare these with a range of observed SFR - M ⋆ relations. We find that numerical results are consistent with observations that use Spectral Energy Distribution techniques to estimate star-formation rates, dust corrections, and stellar masses. On the contrary, simulations are not able to reproduce results that were obtained by combining only UV and IR luminosities (UV+IR). These imply star-formation rates at a fixed stellar mass that are larger almost by a factor of 5 than those of Spectral Energy Distribution measurements for z ~ 1.5-4. For z < 1.5, the results from simulations, Spectral Energy Distribution fitting techniques and IR+UV conversion agree well. We find that surveys that preferably select star-forming galaxies (e.g. by adopting Lyman-break or blue selection) typically predict a larger median/average star-formation rate at a fixed stellar mass especially for high mass objects, with respect to mass selected samples and hydrodynamic simulations. Furthermore, we find remarkable agreement between the numerical results from various authors who have employed different cosmological codes and run simulations with different resolutions. This is

  18. Stellar contents and star formation in the young star cluster Be 59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ogura, K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chen, W. P.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We present UBV Ic CCD photometry of the young open cluster Be 59 with the aim to study the star formation scenario in the cluster. The radial extent of the cluster is found to be ~10 arcmin (2.9 pc). The interstellar extinction in the cluster region varies between E(B - V) ~= 1.4 to 1.8 mag. The ratio of total-to-selective extinction in the cluster region is estimated as 3.7 +/- 0.3. The distance of the cluster is found to be 1.00 +/- 0.05 kpc. Using near-infrared (NIR) colours and slitless spectroscopy, we have identified young stellar objects (YSOs) in the open cluster Be 59 region. The ages of these YSOs range between <1 and ~2 Myr, whereas the mean age of the massive stars in the cluster region is found to be ~2 Myr. There is evidence for second-generation star formation outside the boundary of the cluster, which may be triggered by massive stars in the cluster. The slope of the initial mass function, Γ, in the mass range 2.5 < M/Msolar <= 28 is found to be -1.01 +/- 0.11 which is shallower than the Salpeter value (-1.35), whereas in the mass range 1.5 < M/Msolar <= 2.5 the slope is almost flat. The slope of the K-band luminosity function is estimated as 0.27 +/- 0.02, which is smaller than the average value (~0.4) reported for young embedded clusters. Approximately 32 per cent of Hα emission stars of Be 59 exhibit NIR excess indicating that inner discs of the T Tauri star (TTS) population have not dissipated. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) and IRAS-HIRES images around the cluster region are also used to study the emission from unidentified infrared bands and to estimate the spatial distribution of optical depth of warm and cold interstellar dust.

  19. Improved Constraints on the Milky Way’s Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass from Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licquia, Timothy; Newman, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method for improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by building upon the previous measurements found in the literature, combining the information contained in each of them using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical analysis that allows us to account for the possibility that any one of them may be incorrect or have underestimated its errors. In this application, the HB method yields similar estimates to a weighted average, but with more realistic error estimates. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about potential problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields a SFR for the Galaxy of 1.66 ± 0.20 M⊙ yr-1. When calculating the stellar mass contained in each component of the Milky Way, we incorporate Monte Carlo simulations to reflect the latest estimates of the galactocentric radius of the sun and stellar mass surface density of the local neighborhood. We show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is M*B = 0.91 ± 0.08 × 1010 M⊙, the disk mass is M*D = 4.89+0.98-0.82 × 1010 M⊙, and their combination yields a total stellar mass of M* = 5.76+0.98-0.82 × 1010 M⊙. This work displays the advantage of using HB meta-analysis to robustly combine a set of measurements that are prone to numerous systematic errors, while simultaneously providing information on the level of systematics that may be having an impact.

  20. Improved Estimates of the Milky Way's Stellar Mass and Star Formation Rate from Hierarchical Bayesian Meta-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    We present improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by combining previous measurements from the literature using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical method that allows us to account for the possibility that any value may be incorrect or have underestimated errors. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about the nature of problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields an SFR for the Galaxy of {{\\dot{M}}\\star }=1.65+/- 0.19 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1}, assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF). By combining HB methods with Monte Carlo simulations that incorporate the latest estimates of the Galactocentric radius of the Sun, R0, the exponential scale length of the disk, Ld, and the local surface density of stellar mass, {{Σ}\\star }({{R}0}), we show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is M\\star B=0.91+/- 0.07× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ }, the disk mass is M\\star D=5.17+/- 1.11× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ }, and their combination yields a total stellar mass of {{M}\\star }=6.08+/- 1.14× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ } (assuming a Kroupa IMF and an exponential disk profile). This analysis is based upon a new compilation of literature bulge mass estimates, normalized to common assumptions about the stellar IMF and Galactic disk properties, presented herein. We additionally find a bulge-to-total mass ratio for the Milky Way of B/T=0.150-0.019+0.028 and a specific SFR of {{\\dot{M}}\\star }/{{M}\\star }=2.71+/- 0.59× {{10}-11} yr-1.

  1. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Context. Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. Aims: To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808 B, which is in the process of PR formation. Methods: We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging in the F450W, F555W, or F606W and F814W filters. Extensive completeness tests, PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Results: Both PRGs contain young CSSs (<1 Gyr) with masses of up to 5 × 106M⊙, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive CSSs may be progenitors of metal-rich globular clusters or ultra compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies. We identify one such young UCD candidate, NGC 3808 B-8, and measure its size of reff = 25.23+1.43-2.01 pc. We reconstruct the star formation history of the two PRGs and find strong peaks in the star formation rate (SFR, ≃200 M⊙/yr) in NGC 3808 B, while NGC 4650 A shows milder (declining) star formation (SFR< 10 M⊙/yr). This difference may support different evolutionary paths between these PRGs. Conclusions: The spatial distribution, masses, and peak star formation epoch of the clusters in NGC 3808 suggest for a tidally triggered star formation. Incompleteness at old ages prevents us from probing the SFR at earlier epochs of NGC 4650 A, where we observe the fading tail of CSS formation. This also impedes us from testing the formation scenarios of this PRG.

  2. Missing Mass Measurement Using Kinematic Cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ian-Woo

    2010-02-10

    We propose a new method for mass measurement of missing energy particle using cusp structure in the kinematic distribution. We consider a resonance particle decay into a pair of missing energy particles and a pair of visible particles and show invariant mass and angular distribution have non-smooth profiles. The cusp location only depends on mass parameters. Invariant mass and angular distribution are complementary in visibility of the cusp.

  3. The CUSP as a Source of Magnetospheric Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, Theodore A.; Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    Observations made by the Polar satellite have shown that plasma of solar wind magnetosheath origin is rammed into the high altitude polar cusp creating a diamagnetic cavity of large dimensions. The Earth's dipole field can be excluded from this region in it turbulent manner with the magnitude of the field strength reaching close to zero nT at times. At such times energetic particles are produced in this region in intensities which exceed those measured in the trapping regions of the magnetosphere beyond L = 6.5. These particles can then flow back out of the cusp along field lines that form the magnetopause. A fraction of these particles can enter the magnetosphere along the magnetopause on the dusk and dawn flanks. Due to existing gradients in the geomagnetic field, cusp accelerated ions can enter the magnetosphere along the dawn flank and electrons along the dusk flank. For those particles entering near the geomagnetic equatorial plane with pitch angles close to ninety degrees they will drift along contours of constant magnetic field strength reaching deep into the nightside inner magnetosphere. From observations made by the Polar ATS-6, and ISEE satellites it is argued that this cusp source appears to be capable of providing energetic ions to the magnetosphere and possibly energetic electrons which form the source population of the Subsequent radial diffusion and formation of the radiation belts.

  4. Detailed requirements document for the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer decommutation and formatting programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brose, J. F.; Bourgeois, V.

    1975-01-01

    The requirements are defined for developing a decommutation and a data reformat program to process test data obtained by the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer used in a joint experiment with the Space Research Laboratory in the Netherlands. Background information and objectives are discussed.

  5. Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-10-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on nearby galaxies, which are best suited to study this theme. Of course, the understanding of stellar populations is intimately connected to understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies, one of the great outstanding problems of astronomy. We are currently in a situation where very large observational advances have been made in recent years. Galaxies have been detected up to a redshift of ten. A huge effort has to be made so that stellar population theory can catch up with observations. Since most galaxies are far away, information about them has to come from stellar population synthesis of integrated light. Here I will discuss how stellar evolution theory, together with observations in our Milky Way and Local Group, are used as building blocks to analyse these integrated stellar populations.

  6. FORMATION OF LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXIES: GAS RETURN FROM STELLAR POPULATIONS REGULATES DISK DESTRUCTION AND BULGE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Martig, Marie; Bournaud, Frederic

    2010-05-10

    Spiral galaxies have most of their stellar mass in a large rotating disk, and only a modest fraction in a central spheroidal bulge. This challenges present models of galaxy formation: galaxies form at the center of dark matter halos through a combination of hierarchical merging and gas accretion along cold streams. Cosmological simulations thus predict that galaxies rapidly grow their bulge through mergers and instabilities and end up with most of their mass in the bulge and an angular momentum much below the observed level, except in dwarf galaxies. We propose that the continuous return of gas by stellar populations over cosmic times could help to solve this issue. A population of stars formed at a given instant typically returns half of its initial mass in the form of gas over 10 billion years, and the process is not dominated by supernovae explosions but by the long-term mass-loss from low- and intermediate-mass stars. Using simulations of galaxy formation, we show that this gas recycling can strongly affect the structural evolution of massive galaxies, potentially solving the bulge fraction issue, as the bulge-to-disk ratio of a massive galaxy can be divided by a factor of 3. The continuous recycling of baryons through star formation and stellar mass loss helps the growth of disks and their survival to interactions and mergers. Instead of forming only early-type, spheroid-dominated galaxies (S0 and ellipticals), the standard cosmological model can successfully account for massive late-type, disk-dominated spiral galaxies (Sb-Sc).

  7. Metallofullerene and fullerene formation from condensing carbon gas under conditions of stellar outflows and implication to stardust

    PubMed Central

    Dunk, Paul W.; Adjizian, Jean-Joseph; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Quinn, John P.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Ewels, Christopher P.; Marshall, Alan G.; Kroto, Harold W.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous presolar grains of supernovae origin have long been isolated and are determined to be the carrier of anomalous 22Ne in ancient meteorites. That exotic 22Ne is, in fact, the decay isotope of relatively short-lived 22Na formed by explosive nucleosynthesis, and therefore, a selective and rapid Na physical trapping mechanism must take place during carbon condensation in supernova ejecta. Elucidation of the processes that trap Na and produce large carbon molecules should yield insight into carbon stardust enrichment and formation. Herein, we demonstrate that Na effectively nucleates formation of Na@C60 and other metallofullerenes during carbon condensation under highly energetic conditions in oxygen- and hydrogen-rich environments. Thus, fundamental carbon chemistry that leads to trapping of Na is revealed, and should be directly applicable to gas-phase chemistry involving stellar environments, such as supernova ejecta. The results indicate that, in addition to empty fullerenes, metallofullerenes should be constituents of stellar/circumstellar and interstellar space. In addition, gas-phase reactions of fullerenes with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated to probe “build-up” and formation of carbon stardust, and provide insight into fullerene astrochemistry. PMID:24145444

  8. Metallofullerene and fullerene formation from condensing carbon gas under conditions of stellar outflows and implication to stardust.

    PubMed

    Dunk, Paul W; Adjizian, Jean-Joseph; Kaiser, Nathan K; Quinn, John P; Blakney, Gregory T; Ewels, Christopher P; Marshall, Alan G; Kroto, Harold W

    2013-11-01

    Carbonaceous presolar grains of supernovae origin have long been isolated and are determined to be the carrier of anomalous (22)Ne in ancient meteorites. That exotic (22)Ne is, in fact, the decay isotope of relatively short-lived (22)Na formed by explosive nucleosynthesis, and therefore, a selective and rapid Na physical trapping mechanism must take place during carbon condensation in supernova ejecta. Elucidation of the processes that trap Na and produce large carbon molecules should yield insight into carbon stardust enrichment and formation. Herein, we demonstrate that Na effectively nucleates formation of Na@C60 and other metallofullerenes during carbon condensation under highly energetic conditions in oxygen- and hydrogen-rich environments. Thus, fundamental carbon chemistry that leads to trapping of Na is revealed, and should be directly applicable to gas-phase chemistry involving stellar environments, such as supernova ejecta. The results indicate that, in addition to empty fullerenes, metallofullerenes should be constituents of stellar/circumstellar and interstellar space. In addition, gas-phase reactions of fullerenes with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated to probe "build-up" and formation of carbon stardust, and provide insight into fullerene astrochemistry. PMID:24145444

  9. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  10. Mapping a stellar disk into a boxy bulge: The outside-in part of the Milky Way bulge formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.; Gómez, A.; van Damme, L.; Combes, F.; Hallé, A.; Semelin, B.; Lehnert, M. D.; Katz, D.

    2014-07-01

    By means of idealized, dissipationless N-body simulations that follow the formation and subsequent buckling of a stellar bar, we study the characteristics of boxy/peanut-shaped bulges and compare them with the properties of the stellar populations in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. The main results of our modeling, valid for the general family of boxy/peanut shaped bulges, are the following: (i) Because of the spatial redistribution in the disk initiated at the epoch of bar formation, stars from the innermost regions to the outer Lindblad resonance (OLR) of the stellar bar are mapped into a boxy bulge. (ii) The contribution of stars to the local bulge density depends on their birth radius: stars born in the innermost disk tend to dominate the innermost regions of the boxy bulge, while stars originating closer to the OLR are preferably found in the outer regions of the boxy/peanut structure. (iii) Stellar birth radii are imprinted in the bulge kinematics: the larger the birth radii of stars ending up in the bulge, the greater their rotational support and the higher their line-of-sight velocity dispersions (but note that this last trend depends on the bar viewing angle). (iv) The higher the classical bulge-over-disk ratio, the larger its fractional contribution of stars at large vertical distance from the galaxy midplane. Comparing these results with the properties of the stellar populations of the MW bulge recently revealed by the ARGOS survey, we conclude that (I) the two most metal-rich populations of the MW bulge, labeled A and B in the ARGOS survey, originate in the disk, with the population of A having formed on average closer to the Galaxy center than the population of component B; (II) a massive (B/D ~ 0.25) classical spheroid can be excluded for the MW, thus confirming previous findings that the MW bulge is composed of populations that mostly have a disk origin. On the basis of their chemical and kinematic characteristics, the results of our modeling suggest that

  11. Influence of Stellar Multiplicity on Planet Formation. II. Planets are Less Common in Multiple-star Systems with Separations Smaller than 1500 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-01

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  12. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  13. Cassini observations of Saturn's southern polar cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Jasinski, J. M.; Achilleos, N.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Bunce, E. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Khurana, K. K.; Lamy, L.; Leisner, J. S.; Roussos, E.; Russell, C. T.; Zarka, P.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jones, G. H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetospheric cusps are important sites of the coupling of a magnetosphere with the solar wind. The combination of both ground- and space-based observations at Earth has enabled considerable progress to be made in understanding the terrestrial cusp and its role in the coupling of the magnetosphere to the solar wind via the polar magnetosphere. Voyager 2 fully explored Neptune's cusp in 1989, but highly inclined orbits of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn present the most recent opportunity to repeatedly study the polar magnetosphere of a rapidly rotating planet. In this paper we discuss observations made by Cassini during two passes through Saturn's southern polar magnetosphere. Our main findings are that (i) Cassini directly encounters the southern polar cusp with evidence for the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp via magnetopause reconnection, (ii) magnetopause reconnection and entry of plasma into the cusp can occur over a range of solar wind conditions, and (iii) double cusp morphologies are consistent with the position of the cusp oscillating in phase with Saturn's global magnetospheric periodicities.

  14. The Specific Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass Fraction of Low-mass Central Galaxies in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Reese, V.; Colín, P.; González-Samaniego, A.; Valenzuela, O.; Firmani, C.; Velázquez, H.; Ceverino, D.

    2011-08-01

    By means of cosmological N-body + hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies in the context of the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario we explore the specific star formation rates (SSFR = SFR/Ms , Ms is the stellar mass) and stellar mass fractions (Fs ≡ Ms /Mh , Mh is the halo mass) for sub-M* field galaxies at different redshifts (0 <~ z <~ 1.5). Distinct low-mass halos (2.5 <~ Mh /1010 M sun <~ 50 at z = 0) were selected for the high-resolution re-simulations. The Hydrodynamics Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code was used and some variations of the sub-grid parameters were explored. Most simulated galaxies, specially those with the highest resolutions, have significant disk components and their structural and dynamical properties are in reasonable agreement with observations of sub-M* field galaxies. However, the SSFRs are 5-10 times smaller than the averages of several (compiled and homogenized here) observational determinations for field blue/star-forming galaxies at z < 0.3 (at low masses, most observed field galaxies are actually blue/star forming). This inconsistency seems to remain even at z ~ 1-1.5, although it is less drastic. The Fs of simulated galaxies increases with Mh as semi-empirical inferences show. However, the values of Fs at z ≈ 0 are ~5-10 times larger in the simulations than in the inferences; these differences increases probably to larger factors at z ~ 1-1.5. The inconsistencies reported here imply that simulated low-mass galaxies (0.2 <~ Ms /109 M sun <~ 30 at z = 0) assembled their stellar masses much earlier than observations suggest. Our results confirm the predictions found by means of ΛCDM-based models of disk galaxy formation and evolution for isolated low-mass galaxies, and highlight that our understanding and implementation of astrophysics into simulations and models are still lacking vital ingredients.

  15. Forged in FIRE: cusps, cores and baryons in low-mass dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oñorbe, Jose; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-12-01

    We present multiple ultrahigh resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of M⋆ ≃ 104-6.3 M⊙ dwarf galaxies that form within two Mvir = 109.5-10 M⊙ dark matter halo initial conditions. Our simulations rely on the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) implementation of star formation feedback and were run with high enough force and mass resolution to directly resolve structure on the ˜200 pc scales. The resultant galaxies sit on the M⋆ versus Mvir relation required to match the Local Group stellar mass function via abundance matching. They have bursty star formation histories and also form with half-light radii and metallicities that broadly match those observed for local dwarfs at the same stellar mass. We demonstrate that it is possible to create a large (˜1 kpc) constant-density dark matter core in a cosmological simulation of an M⋆ ≃ 106.3 M⊙ dwarf galaxy within a typical Mvir = 1010 M⊙ halo - precisely the scale of interest for resolving the `too big to fail' problem. However, these large cores are not ubiquitous and appear to correlate closely with the star formation histories of the dwarfs: dark matter cores are largest in systems that form their stars late (z ≲ 2), after the early epoch of cusp building mergers has ended. Our M⋆ ≃ 104 M⊙ dwarf retains a cuspy dark matter halo density profile that matches that of a dark-matter-only run of the same system. Though ancient, most of the stars in our ultrafaint form after reionization; the ultraviolet field acts mainly to suppress fresh gas accretion, not to boil away gas that is already present in the protodwarf.

  16. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  17. Gas retention and accumulation in stellar clusters and galaxies: Implications for star formation and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naiman, Jill

    Star formation cannot proceed without the existence of an extensive gas reservoir. In particular, the supply of gas to form stars in dwarf galaxies and star clusters requires overcoming a variety of difficulties - namely, the effectiveness of different feedback mechanisms in removing gas from these shallow gravitational potentials. In addition, the supply of external gas to these systems is determined by the large scale galactic structure in which they reside. This thesis employs computational hydrodynamics coupled with physically realistic subgrid feedback prescriptions to resolve the interplay between the small scale feedback mechanisms and larger scale gas flows to determine the amount of gas a shallow potential can accumulate. First, we consider the flow of gas external to dwarf galaxies and star clusters into their cores as a generalized accretion process. Second, we explore the enhancement of gas accretion rates onto the compact members of young star clusters when the flow of external gas into the cluster cores is large. Third, we discuss how external gas flows initiated by the presence of a massive nuclear star cluster can enhance central massive black hole accretion rates during galaxy mergers. Fourth, we change our focus to exploring internal stellar wind retention in proto-globular clusters as a mechanism to supply gas for multiple episodes of star formation. Finally, the implications of stellar wind retention on the current gas reservoir in globular clusters is discussed.

  18. Double Cusp Observed By The Cluster Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Bosqued, J. M.; Berchem, J.; Anderson, P. C.; Fehringer, M.; Laakso, H.; Reme, H.

    The polar cusp is characterised by a direct entry of solar wind plasma into the magne- tosphere. Depending on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), Bz positive or negative, the precipitation of the ions in the cusp presents a dispersion in energy directed poleward or equatorward. In addition the polar cusp moves in latitude according to the IMF, from about 75 deg. ILAT for Bz negative to about 82 deg. ILAT for Bz positive. The Cluster spacecraft are crossing the mid-altitude polar cusp, in a "string of pearl" configuration, and are therefore the ideal tool to study the motion and evolution of the cusp on time scale of a few minutes up to 45 min. On 30 August 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft crossed the mid-altitude polar cusp (4-6 Re) around 12.5 H local time with SC4 entering the cusp at 1532 UT, SC2 following 1.5 min later, SC1, 3 min later and finally SC3, 45 min later. SC4 and SC1 observed a typical poleward dispersion associated with Bz negative. SC3 observed first the same disper- sion starting at about 74 deg. ILAT, however at 81 deg. ILAT a second dispersion was observed. The IMF was southward during the dispersion and became slightly positive during the second dispersion. Two hypothesis can be proposed, a fast motion of the cusp poleward during the SC3 crossing or a double injection in the cusp. Preliminary analysis of DMSP satellites, although not exactly in the same sector, indicates that the cusp moved poleward around that time. Cluster observations will be compared with the results from a global MHD simulation model to investigate the geometry of the reconnection between the IMF and the Earth magnetic field.

  19. Recent cusp and cleft results from interball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandahl, Ingrid

    The Interball project has given important contributions to our understanding of the morphology and the physical processes in the cusp and cleft. Interball Tail and Magion-4 have performed more extensive measurements in the high altitude cusp than any previous spacecraft. Interball has also been a part in the ISTP program and data have been used in many multipoint studies. In this paper recent cusp and cleft studies based entirely or partly on Interball data will be reviewed. Interball data show that processes at high latitudes are very important for plasma entry into the magnetosphere. A case study for southward IMF conditions agrees with a model in which the mantle is populated via entry along open high-latitude field lines. A statistical study of events dominated by IMF B y shows that merging in anti-parallel fields, rather than subsolar point reconnection, populates the mantle. Plasma entry also takes place through the turbulent boundary layer, TBL, a region of strong, Alfvenic ULF turbulence above the cusp and cleft. The TBL is almost always present. It extends tailward from the cusp and is proposed to be related to the magnetospheric sash. For the overall magnetosheath plasma entry into the magnetosphere the magnetotail boundary is probably more important than the cusp. The position of the cusp is controlled by the solar wind in a similar way as the low altitude cusp. The mid-altitude cusp was found to maintain its fine structure over periods of the order of one hour. A suprathermal proton population not previously described has been detected in the mid-altitude cusp.

  20. Formation of S0 galaxies through mergers. Antitruncated stellar discs resulting from major mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlaff, Alejandro; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Rodríguez-Pérez, Cristina; Querejeta, Miguel; Tapia, Trinidad; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Zamorano, Jaime; Gallego, Jesús; Beckman, John

    2014-10-01

    Context. Lenticular galaxies (S0s) are more likely to host antitruncated (Type III) stellar discs than galaxies of later Hubble types. Major mergers are popularly considered too violent to make these breaks. Aims: We have investigated whether major mergers can result into S0-like remnants with realistic antitruncated stellar discs or not. Methods: We have analysed 67 relaxed S0 and E/S0 remnants resulting from dissipative N-body simulations of major mergers from the GalMer database. We have simulated realistic R-band surface brightness profiles of the remnants to identify those with antitruncated stellar discs. Their inner and outer discs and the breaks have been quantitatively characterized to compare with real data. Results: Nearly 70% of our S0-like remnants are antitruncated, meaning that major mergers that result in S0s have a high probability of producing Type III stellar discs. Our remnants lie on top of the extrapolations of the observational trends (towards brighter magnitudes and higher break radii) in several photometric diagrams, because of the higher luminosities and sizes of the simulations compared to observational samples. In scale-free photometric diagrams, simulations and observations overlap and the remnants reproduce the observational trends, so the physical mechanism after antitruncations is highly scalable. We have found novel photometric scaling relations between the characteristic parameters of the antitruncations in real S0s, which are also reproduced by our simulations. We show that the trends in all the photometric planes can be derived from three basic scaling relations that real and simulated Type III S0s fulfill: hi ∝ RbrkIII, ho ∝ RbrkIII, and μbrkIII ∝ RbrkIII, where hi and ho are the scalelengths of the inner and outer discs, and μbrkIII and RbrkIII are the surface brightness and radius of the breaks. Bars and antitruncations in real S0s are structurally unrelated phenomena according to the studied photometric planes

  1. A LINK BETWEEN STAR FORMATION QUENCHING AND INNER STELLAR MASS DENSITY IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CENTRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.

    2013-10-10

    We study the correlation between galaxy structure and the quenching of star formation using a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey central galaxies with stellar masses 9.75 < log M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} < 11.25 and redshifts z < 0.075. Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV data are used to cleanly divide the sample into star-forming and quenched galaxies and to identify galaxies in transition (the green valley). Despite a stark difference in visual appearance between blue and red galaxies, their average radial stellar mass density profiles are remarkably similar (especially in the outer regions) at fixed mass. The inner stellar mass surface density within a radius of 1 kpc, Σ{sub 1}, is used to quantify the growth of the bulge as galaxies evolve. When galaxies are divided into narrow mass bins, their distribution in the color-Σ{sub 1} plane at fixed mass forms plausible evolutionary tracks. Σ{sub 1} seems to grow as galaxies evolve through the blue cloud, and once it crosses a threshold value, galaxies are seen to quench at fixed Σ{sub 1}. The Σ{sub 1} threshold for quenching grows with stellar mass, Σ{sub 1}∝M{sub *}{sup 0.64}. However, the existence of some star-forming galaxies above the threshold Σ{sub 1} implies that a dense bulge is necessary but not sufficient to quench a galaxy fully. This would be consistent with a two-step quenching process in which gas within a galaxy is removed or stabilized against star formation by bulge-driven processes (such as a starburst, active galactic nucleus feedback, or morphological quenching), whereas external gas accretion is suppressed by separate halo-driven processes (such as halo gas shock heating). Quenching thus depends on an interplay between the inner structure of a galaxy and its surrounding dark matter halo, and lack of perfect synchrony between the two could produce the observed scatter in color versus Σ{sub 1}.

  2. Connection between cusp-core problem and too-big-to-fail problem in CDM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kazuki; Mori, Masao; Ogiya, Go

    2016-08-01

    The standard paradigm of structure formation in the universe, the cold dark matter cosmology, contains several crucial unsolved problems such as ``cusp-core problem'' and ``too-big-to-fail problem''. To solve these problems, we study about the dynamical response of a virialized system with a central cusp to the energy feedback driven by periodic supernova feedback using collisionless N-body simulations with the Nested-Particle-Mesh code. The resonance between dark matter particles and the density wave excited by the oscillating potential plays a significant role in the cusp-core transition of dark matter halos. Furthermore, we show that the cusp-core transition with periodic supernova feedback can solve the too-big-to-fail problem.

  3. Swarm in situ observations of F region polar cap patches created by cusp precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L. V.; Iserhienrhien, B.; Miles, D. M.; Patra, S.; Meeren, C.; Buchert, S. C.; Burchill, J. K.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Knudsen, D. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Moen, J.

    2015-02-01

    High-resolution in situ measurements from the three Swarm spacecraft, in a string-of-pearls configuration, provide new insights about the combined role of flow channel events and particle impact ionization in creating F region electron density structures in the northern Scandinavian dayside cusp. We present a case of polar cap patch formation where a reconnection-driven low-density relative westward flow channel is eroding the dayside solar-ionized plasma but where particle impact ionization in the cusp dominates the initial plasma structuring. In the cusp, density features are observed which are twice as dense as the solar-ionized background. These features then follow the polar cap convection and become less structured and lower in amplitude. These are the first in situ observations tracking polar cap patch evolution from creation by plasma transport and enhancement by cusp precipitation, through entrainment in the polar cap flow and relaxation into smooth patches as they approach the nightside auroral oval.

  4. The Intrinsic Properties of the Stellar Clusters in the M82 Starburst Complex: Propagating Star Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, S.; Watson, Dan M.; Pipher, J. L.; Forrest, W. J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Smith, H. A.; Fischer, J.; Woodward, Charles E.

    1997-07-01

    Near-Infrared spectroscopy combined with high spatial resolution imaging have been used in this work to probe the central 500 pc of M82. Imaging observations in the 2.36 μm CO band head are added to our previously published near-infrared hydrogen recombination line imaging, near-infrared broadband imaging, and 3.29 μm dust feature imaging observations, in order to study the nature of the starburst stellar population. A starburst model is constructed and compared with the observations of the stellar clusters in the starburst complex. Our analysis implies that the typical age for the starburst clusters is 107 yr. In addition, our high spatial resolution observations indicate that there is an age dispersion within the starburst complex that is correlated with projected distance from the center of the galaxy. The inferred age dispersion is 6 × 106 yr. If the starburst in M82 is propagating outward from the center, this age dispersion corresponds to a velocity of propagation, originating in the center, of ~50 km s-1. Our quantitative analysis also reveals that a Salpeter initial mass function, extending from 0.1 to 100 M⊙, can fit the observed properties of M82 without using up more than 30% of the total dynamical mass in the starburst.

  5. THE INTERSTELLAR BUBBLES OF G38.9-0.4 AND THE IMPACT OF STELLAR FEEDBACK ON STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.; Arvidsson, Kim E-mail: chipk@uwyo.edu E-mail: karvidsson@adlerplanetarium.org

    2013-06-10

    We present a study of the star formation (SF) region G38.9-0.4 using publicly available multiwavelength Galactic plane surveys from ground- and space-based observatories. This region is composed of four bright mid-IR bubbles and numerous infrared dark clouds. Two bubbles, N 74 and N 75, each host a star cluster anchored by a single O9.5V star. We identified 162 young stellar objects (YSOs) and classify 54 as stage I, 7 as stage II, 6 as stage III, and 32 as ambiguous. We do not detect the classical signposts of triggered SF, i.e., star-forming pillars or YSOs embedded within bubble rims. We conclude that feedback-triggered SF has not occurred in G38.9-0.4. The YSOs are preferentially coincident with infrared dark clouds. This leads to a strong correlation between areal YSO mass surface density and gas mass surface density with a power law slope near 1.3, which closely matches the Schmidt-Kennicutt Law. The correlation is similar inside and outside the bubbles and may mean that the SF efficiency is neither enhanced nor suppressed in regions potentially influenced by stellar feedback. This suggests that gas density, regardless of how it is collected, is a more important driver of SF than stellar feedback. Larger studies should be able to quantify the fraction of all SF that is feedback-triggered by determining the fraction SF, feedback-compressed gas surrounding H II regions relative to that already present in molecular clouds.

  6. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  7. Cluster II Mid-Altitude Cusp Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winningham, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Thirty plus years after its discovery the cusp is still an enigma. Questions such as is it open, closed, or mixed; where does it map; what constitutes a cusp etc still abound. Cusps have been defined on the basis of satellite, rocket, and ground based data from single and multiple sensor types. Cartoons and detailed models have been put forward to define what constitutes a cusp. An equal number of questions abound relative to the role the cusp plays in magnetospheric dynamics, mass and momentum transfer, and even energization to populate the rest of the magnetosphere. In a recent series of papers Savin et al have presented both Interball and Prognoz results in the high altitude cusp and sash region. In these papers they divide the high cusp into several new regions. They have an outer throat (OT) exterior to the MP with field lines connected to the earth and heated, stagnant plasma, a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) just at and outside the MP, an outer cusp (OC) that is inside the MP. They state an indentation depth of 1-2 RE. In the TBL large amplitude, low-frequency waves are observed. We will present multi-instrument/satellite Cluster II data that indicates the depth of the OT may be much deeper than thought by Savin. This stems from the higher spatial temporal resolution available from Cluster. Mid altitudes (~5RE) passes will be shown that exhibit the same morphology as Savin. This leads to a new definition of the cusp as the focus of open magnetopause current layer field lines.

  8. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  9. Metal-Poor, Strongly Star-Forming Galaxies in the DEEP2 Survey: The Relationship Between Stellar Mass, Temperature-Based Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Chun; Rigby, Jane R.; Cooper, Michael; Yan, Renbin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 28 redshift (z) approximately 0.8 metal-poor galaxies in DEEP2. These galaxies were selected for their detection of the weak [O (sub III)] lambda 4363 emission line, which provides a "direct" measure of the gas-phase metallicity. A primary goal for identifying these rare galaxies is to examine whether the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR) extends to low stellar mass and high SFR. The FMR suggests that higher SFR galaxies have lower metallicity (at fixed stellar mass). To test this trend, we combine spectroscopic measurements of metallicity and dust-corrected SFRs, with stellar mass estimates from modeling the optical photometry. We find that these galaxies are 1.05 plus or minus 0.61 decimal exponent (dex) above the redshift (z) approximately equal to 1 stellar mass-SFR relation, and 0.23 plus or minus 0.23 decimal exponent (dex) below the local mass-metallicity relation. Relative to the FMR, the latter offset is reduced to 0.01 decimal exponent (dex), but significant dispersion remains (0.29 decimal exponent (dex) with 0.16 decimal exponent (dex) due to measurement uncertainties). This dispersion suggests that gas accretion, star formation and chemical enrichment have not reached equilibrium in these galaxies. This is evident by their short stellar mass doubling timescale of approximately 100 (sup plus 310) (sub minus 75) million years that suggests stochastic star formation. Combining our sample with other redshift (z) of approximately 1 metal-poor galaxies, we find a weak positive SFR-metallicity dependence (at fixed stellar mass) that is significant at 97.3 percent confidence. We interpret this positive correlation as recent star formation that has enriched the gas, but has not had time to drive the metal-enriched gas out with feedback mechanisms.

  10. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. III. OBSERVABILITY AND CONNECTION TO HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-12-01

    The early universe hosted a large population of low-mass virialized 'minihalos', that were not massive enough to form stars on their own. While most minihalos were photoevaporated by ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies, these galaxies also drove large outflows, which in some cases would have reached the minihalos in advance of ionization fronts. In the previous papers in this series, we carried out high-resolution, three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions that included non-equilibrium chemistry, radiative cooling, and turbulent mixing. We found that, for a fiducial set of parameters, minihalos were transformed into dense, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Here we conduct a suite of simulations that follow these interactions over a wide range of parameters including minihalo mass, minihalo formation redshift, outflow energy, outflow redshift, distance, concentration, and spin. In almost all cases, the shocked minihalos form molecules through non-equilibrium reactions and then cool rapidly to become compact, chemically homogenous stellar clusters. Furthermore, we show that the unique properties of these clusters make them a prime target for direct study with the next generation of telescopes, and that there are many reasons to suspect that their low-redshift counterparts are the observed population of halo globular clusters.

  11. Excitation of Gravity Waves by Fingering Convection, and the Formation of Compositional Staircases in Stellar Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, P.; Medrano, M.; Brown, J. M.; Mankovich, C.; Moore, K.

    2015-07-01

    Fingering convection (or thermohaline convection) is a weak yet important kind of mixing that occurs in stably stratified stellar radiation zones in the presence of an inverse mean molecular weight gradient. Brown et al. recently proposed a new model for mixing by fingering convection, which contains no free parameter and was found to fit the results of direct numerical simulations in almost all cases. Notably, however, they found that mixing was substantially enhanced above their predicted values in the few cases where large-scale gravity waves, followed by thermo-compositional layering, grew spontaneously from the fingering convection. This effect is well known in the oceanographic context and is attributed to the excitation of the so-called collective instability. In this work, we build on the results of Brown et al. and of Traxler et al. to determine the conditions under which the collective instability may be expected. We find that it is only relevant in stellar regions that have a relatively large Prandtl number (the ratio of the kinematic viscosity to the thermal diffusivity), O({10}-3) or larger. This implies that the collective instability cannot occur in main-sequence stars, where the Prandtl number is always much smaller than this (except in the outer layers of surface convection zones, where fingering is irrelevant anyway). It could in principle be excited in regions of high electron degeneracy, during He core flash, or in the interiors of white dwarfs. We discuss the implications of our findings for these objects, from both a theoretical and an observational point of view.

  12. Colliding Clouds: The Star Formation Trigger of the Stellar Cluster around BD +40 4124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looney, Leslie W.; Wang, Shiya; Hamidouche, Murad; Safier, Pedro N.; Klein, Randolf

    2006-05-01

    We present BIMA and SCUBA observations of the young cluster associated with BD +40 4124 in the dense molecular gas tracer CS J=2-->1 and the continuum dust emission at λ=3.1 mm and 850 μm. The dense gas and dust in the system are aligned in a long ridge morphology extending ~0.4 pc with 16 gas clumps of estimated masses ranging from 0.14 to 1.8 Msolar. A north-south variation in the CS center line velocity can be explained with a two-cloud model. We posit that the BD +40 4124 stellar cluster formed from a cloud-cloud collision. The largest line widths occur near V1318 Cyg S, a massive star affecting its natal environment. In contrast, the dense gas near the other, more evolved, massive stars displays no evidence for disruption; the material must either be processed into the star, dissipate, or relax fairly quickly. The more evolved low-mass protostars are more likely to be found near the massive stars. If the majority of low-mass stars are coeval, the seemingly evolved low-mass protostars are not older: the massive stars have eroded their structures. Finally, at the highest resolution, the λ=3.1 mm dust emission is resolved into a flattened structure 3100×1500 AU with an estimated mass of 3.4 Msolar. The continuum and CS emission are offset by 1.1" from the southern binary source. A simple estimate of the extinction due to the continuum emission structure is AV~700 mag. From the offset and because the southern source is detected in the optical, the continuum emission is from a previously unknown very young, intermediate-mass, embedded stellar object.

  13. On the Inconsistency between Cosmic Stellar Mass Density and Star Formation Rate up to z ∼ 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density (SMD) and instantaneous star formation rate in the redshift range 0 < z < 8 using a large observational data sample. We first compile the measurements of SMDs up to z ∼ 8. Comparing the observed SMDs with the time-integral of instantaneous star formation history (SFH), we find that the observed SMDs are lower than that implied from the SFH at z < 4. We also use the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to derive the best-fitting SFH from the observed SMD data. At 0.5 < z < 6, the observed star formation rate densities are larger than the best-fitting one, especially at z ∼ 2 where they are larger by a factor of about two. However, at lower (z < 0.5) and higher redshifts (z > 6), the derived SFH is consistent with the observations. This is the first time that the discrepancy between the observed SMD and instantaneous star formation rate has been tested up to very high redshift z ≈ 8 using the MCMC method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of SMD, initial mass function, and evolution of cosmic metallicity.

  14. Stellar model chromospheres. IV - The formation of the H-epsilon feature in the sun /G2 V/ and Arcturus /K2 III/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the Balmer-series member H-epsilon in the near-red wing of the Ca II H line is discussed for two cases: the sun (H-epsilon absorption profile) and Arcturus (H-epsilon emission profile). It is shown that although the H-epsilon source functions in both stars are dominated by the Balmer-continuum radiation field through photoionizations, the line-formation problems in the two stars are quantitatively different, owing to a substantial difference in the relative importance of the stellar chromosphere temperature inversion as compared with the stellar photosphere.

  15. Friends of Hot Jupiters. IV. Stellar Companions Beyond 50 au Might Facilitate Giant Planet Formation, but Most are Unlikely to Cause Kozai–Lidov Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Bryan, Marta; Crepp, Justin R.; Batygin, Konstantin; Crossfield, Ian; Hansen, Brad; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Wang, Ji

    2016-08-01

    Stellar companions can influence the formation and evolution of planetary systems, but there are currently few observational constraints on the properties of planet-hosting binary star systems. We search for stellar companions around 77 transiting hot Jupiter systems to explore the statistical properties of this population of companions as compared to field stars of similar spectral type. After correcting for survey incompleteness, we find that 47 % +/- 7 % of hot Jupiter systems have stellar companions with semimajor axes between 50 and 2000 au. This is 2.9 times larger than the field star companion fraction in this separation range, with a significance of 4.4σ . In the 1–50 au range, only {3.9}-2.0+4.5 % of hot Jupiters host stellar companions, compared to the field star value of 16.4 % +/- 0.7 % , which is a 2.7σ difference. We find that the distribution of mass ratios for stellar companions to hot Jupiter systems peaks at small values and therefore differs from that of field star binaries which tend to be uniformly distributed across all mass ratios. We conclude that either wide separation stellar binaries are more favorable sites for gas giant planet formation at all separations, or that the presence of stellar companions preferentially causes the inward migration of gas giant planets that formed farther out in the disk via dynamical processes such as Kozai–Lidov oscillations. We determine that less than 20% of hot Jupiters have stellar companions capable of inducing Kozai–Lidov oscillations assuming initial semimajor axes between 1 and 5 au, implying that the enhanced companion occurrence is likely correlated with environments where gas giants can form efficiently.

  16. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup —}dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup –1} in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  17. Jet-induced star formation by accreting black holes: impact on stellar, galaxy, and cosmic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, Igor Felix

    2016-07-01

    Evidence that relativistic jets trigger star formation along their axis has been found associated to low redshift and high redshift accreting supermassive black holes. However, the physical processes by which jet-cloud interaction may trigger star formation has so far not been elucidated. To gain insight into this potentially important star formation mechanism during reionization, when microquasars were form prolifically before AGN, our international team is carrying out a muliwavelength study of a microquasar jet-induced star formation region in the Milky Way using data from space missions (Chandra, Integral, ISO, Herschel) and from the ground (at cm and mm wavelengths with the VLA and IRAM, and IR with Gemini and VLT). I will show that this relative nearby star forming region is an ideal laboratory to test models of jet-induced star formation elsewhere in the universe.

  18. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  19. THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, STAR FORMATION RATE, AND GAS METALLICITY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Yuu

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the relation between stellar mass (M{sub *}), star formation rate (SFR), and metallicity (Z) of galaxies, the so-called fundamental metallicity relation, in the galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We separate the galaxies into narrow redshift bins and compare the relation at different redshifts and find statistically significant (>99%) evolution. We test various observational effects that might cause seeming Z evolution and find it difficult to explain the evolution of the relation only by the observational effects. In the current sample of low-redshift galaxies, galaxies with different M{sub *} and SFR are sampled from different redshifts, and there is degeneracy between M{sub *}/SFR and redshift. Hence, it is not straightforward to distinguish a relation between Z and SFR from a relation between Z and redshift. The separation of the intrinsic relation from the redshift evolution effect is a crucial issue in the understanding of the evolution of galaxies.

  20. Stellar mass assembly and star formation history from z=0.2 out to z=6 in the COSMOS and VIPERS fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    A clear and comprehensive picture describing the physical processes which regulate the stellar mass assembly is still missing in galaxy formation scenario. I will present a measurement of the galaxy stellar mass function and stellar mass density from z=0.2 out to z=6. Our study relies on deep near-infrared imaging over wide fields: the WIRCAM/CFHT coverage of the 20 sq-deg VIPERS fields combined with the new IRAC/Spitzer coverage (the SPLASH survey) of the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field. Our analysis is based on photometric redshifts of 1,5 million of galaxies reaching a precision around 4% at 4stellar mass. I will also use the stellar mass density to infer the cosmic star formation history over 90% of the age of the Universe. I will compare this estimate with the results obtained using direct tracers of the star formation rate as the UV or IR emissivity.

  1. Evidence of Multiple Reconnection Lines at the Magnetopause from Cusp Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Petrinec, S. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Omidi, N.; Sibeck, David Gary

    2012-01-01

    Recent global hybrid simulations investigated the formation of flux transfer events (FTEs) and their convection and interaction with the cusp. Based on these simulations, we have analyzed several Polar cusp crossings in the Northern Hemisphere to search for the signature of such FTEs in the energy distribution of downward precipitating ions: precipitating ion beams at different energies parallel to the ambient magnetic field and overlapping in time. Overlapping ion distributions in the cusp are usually attributed to a combination of variable ion acceleration during the magnetopause crossing together with the time-of-flight effect from the entry point to the observing satellite. Most "step up" ion cusp structures (steps in the ion energy dispersions) only overlap for the populations with large pitch angles and not for the parallel streaming populations. Such cusp structures are the signatures predicted by the pulsed reconnection model, where the reconnection rate at the magnetopause decreased to zero, physically separating convecting flux tubes and their parallel streaming ions. However, several Polar cusp events discussed in this study also show an energy overlap for parallel-streaming precipitating ions. This condition might be caused by reopening an already reconnected field line, forming a magnetic island (flux rope) at the magnetopause similar to that reported in global MHD and Hybrid simulations

  2. Stellar scattering and the formation of hot Jupiters in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, J. G.; Beaugé, C.

    2015-04-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are usually defined as giant Jovian-size planets with orbital periods P<=10 days. Although they lie close to the star, several have finite eccentricities and significant misalignment angle with respect to the stellar equator, leading to ~20% of HJs in retrograde orbits. More than half, however, seem consistent with near-circular and planar orbits. In recent years, two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the excited and misaligned subpopulation of HJs: Lidov-Kozai migration and planet-planet scattering. Although both are based on completely different dynamical phenomena, at first hand they appear to be equally effective in generating hot planets. Nevertheless, there has been no detailed analysis comparing the predictions of both mechanisms, especially with respect to the final distribution of orbital characteristics. In this paper, we present a series of numerical simulations of Lidov-Kozai trapping of single planets in compact binary systems that suffered a close fly-by of a background star. Both the planet and the binary component are initially placed in coplanar orbits, although the inclination of the impactor is assumed random. After the passage of the third star, we follow the orbital and spin evolution of the planet using analytical models based on the octupole expansion of the secular Hamiltonian. We also include tidal effects, stellar oblateness and post-Newtonian perturbations. The present work aims at the comparison of the two mechanisms (Lidov-Kozai and planet-planet scattering) as an explanation for the excited and inclined HJs in binary systems. We compare the results obtained through this paper with results in Beaugé & Nesvorný (2012), where the authors analyse how the planet-planet scattering mechanisms works in order to form this hot Jovian-size planets. We find that several of the orbital characteristics of the simulated HJs are caused by tidal trapping from quasi-parabolic orbits, independent of the driving mechanism

  3. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3360 - Preformed cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be used as a temporary cusp (a projection on the chewing...

  8. ULF turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1993-03-01

    Results of a spectral analysis of the ULF wave turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp are presented. The activity is characterized as broadbanded, extending up to a maximum frequency of about 0.5 Hz, and having maximum wave amplitudes as large as 6 percent of the dc magnetic field. Activity in the cusp region was particularly intense at its frontside and backside, associated with the magnetopause and cusp/magnetosphere boundaries, respectively. The turbulence, particularly that above f(ci), is tentatively identified as whistler mode. It is argued that such whistler mode turbulence should resonate with electrons having energies in the tens of kiloelectron volts. Observations indicate a very strong correlation of the ULF turbulence with the energetic electrons between 22 and 35 keV measured by Voyager's low-energy charged particle experiment. A vigorous interaction between the two is inferred. ULF wave turbulence in the cusp may represent a significant but not complete power source for the magnetosphere.

  9. Cusped Wilson lines in symmetric representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Diego H.; Massolo, Fidel I. Schaposnik; Trancanelli, Diego

    2015-08-01

    We study the cusped Wilson line operators and Bremsstrahlung functions associated to particles transforming in the rank- k symmetric representation of the gauge group U( N) for super Yang-Mills. We find the holographic D3-brane description for Wilson loops with internal cusps in two different limits: small cusp angle and . This allows for a non-trivial check of a conjectured relation between the Bremsstrahlung function and the expectation value of the 1/2 BPS circular loop in the case of a representation other than the fundamental. Moreover, we observe that in the limit of k ≫ N, the cusped Wilson line expectation value is simply given by the exponential of the 1-loop diagram. Using group theory arguments, this eikonal exponentiation is conjectured to take place for all Wilson loop operators in symmetric representations with large k, independently of the contour on which they are supported.

  10. Modeling Massive Cluster Formation with Stellar Feedback using Flash and AMUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen; Wall, Joshua; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2015-08-01

    Star cluster formation is a complex astrophysical problem combining multiple competing physical processes in a challenging computational environment, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Current simulations still fall short of a realistic description of the physical processes at work in star-forming regions. We are developing a hybrid simulation code to explore the formation and assembly of massive star clusters by combining the magnetohydrodynamics code Flash and the AMUSE software environment. Flash handles gas dynamics and star formation through cloud collapse, while AMUSE manages the dynamics and evolution of stars and binary systems. The gravitational interaction between the gas and the stars is treated via a symplectic gravity bridge between the codes in AMUSE. Radiative, wind, and supernova feedback are followed in FLASH based on information provided by the AMUSE system. We present some early results of this work, focusing on cluster formation and assembly, and including simplified models of feedback to study gas expulsion and cluster survival.

  11. Constraining the dark cusp in the galactic center by long-period binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Tal; Pfuhl, Oliver

    2014-01-10

    Massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei are believed to be surrounded by a high-density stellar cluster, whose mass is mostly in hard-to-detect faint stars and compact remnants. Such dark cusps dominate the dynamics near the MBH: a dark cusp in the Galactic center (GC) of the Milky Way would strongly affect orbital tests of general relativity there; on cosmic scales, dark cusps set the rates of gravitational wave emission events from compact remnants that spiral into MBHs, and they modify the rates of tidal disruption events, to list only some implications. A recently discovered long-period massive young binary (with period P {sub 12} ≲ 1 yr, total mass M{sub 12}∼O(100 M{sub ⊙}), and age T {sub 12} ∼ 6 × 10{sup 6} yr), only ∼0.1 pc from the Galactic MBH, sets a lower bound on the stellar two-body relaxation timescale there, min t {sub rlx}∝(P {sub 12}/M {sub 12}){sup 2/3} T {sub 12} ∼ 10{sup 7} yr, and, correspondingly, an upper bound on the stellar number density, maxn{sub ⋆}∼few×10{sup 8}/〈M{sub ⋆}{sup 2}〉 pc{sup −3} (〈M{sub ⋆}{sup 2}〉{sup 1/2} is the rms stellar mass), based on the binary's survival against evaporation by the dark cusp. However, a conservative dynamical estimate, the drain limit, implies t{sub rlx}>O(10{sup 8} yr). Such massive binaries are thus too short-lived and tightly bound to constrain a dense relaxed dark cusp. We explore here in detail the use of longer-period, less massive, and longer-lived binaries (P {sub 12} ∼ few yr, M {sub 12} ∼ 2-4 M {sub ☉}, T {sub 12} ∼ 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} yr), presently just below the detection threshold, for probing the dark cusp and develop the framework for translating their future detections among the giants in the GC into dynamical constraints.

  12. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. I. PLANETESIMAL DYNAMICS IN MASSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-10

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e {sub p} in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ∼1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries.

  13. THE DISTRIBUTION OF STARS AND STELLAR REMNANTS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, David

    2010-08-01

    Motivated by recent observations that suggest a low density of old stars around the Milky Way supermassive black hole (SMBH), models for the nuclear star cluster are considered that have not yet reached a steady state under the influence of gravitational encounters. A core of initial radius 1-1.5 pc evolves to a size of approximately 0.5 pc after 10 Gyr, roughly the size of the observed core. The absence of a Bahcall-Wolf cusp is naturally explained in these models, without the need for fine-tuning or implausible initial conditions. In the absence of a cusp, the time for a 10 M{sub sun} black hole (BH) to spiral in to the Galactic center from an initial distance of 5 pc can be much greater than 10 Gyr. Assuming that the stellar BHs had the same phase-space distribution initially as the stars, their density after 5-10 Gyr is predicted to rise very steeply going into the stellar core, but could remain substantially below the densities inferred from steady-state models that include a steep density cusp in the stars. Possible mechanisms for the creation of the parsec-scale initial core include destruction of stars on centrophilic orbits in a pre-existing triaxial nucleus, inhibited star formation near the SMBH, or ejection of stars by a massive binary. The implications of these models are discussed for the rates of gravitational-wave inspiral events, as well as other physical processes that depend on a high density of stars or stellar-mass BHs near SgrA*.

  14. The Distribution of Stars and Stellar Remnants at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David

    2010-08-01

    Motivated by recent observations that suggest a low density of old stars around the Milky Way supermassive black hole (SMBH), models for the nuclear star cluster are considered that have not yet reached a steady state under the influence of gravitational encounters. A core of initial radius 1-1.5 pc evolves to a size of approximately 0.5 pc after 10 Gyr, roughly the size of the observed core. The absence of a Bahcall-Wolf cusp is naturally explained in these models, without the need for fine-tuning or implausible initial conditions. In the absence of a cusp, the time for a 10 M sun black hole (BH) to spiral in to the Galactic center from an initial distance of 5 pc can be much greater than 10 Gyr. Assuming that the stellar BHs had the same phase-space distribution initially as the stars, their density after 5-10 Gyr is predicted to rise very steeply going into the stellar core, but could remain substantially below the densities inferred from steady-state models that include a steep density cusp in the stars. Possible mechanisms for the creation of the parsec-scale initial core include destruction of stars on centrophilic orbits in a pre-existing triaxial nucleus, inhibited star formation near the SMBH, or ejection of stars by a massive binary. The implications of these models are discussed for the rates of gravitational-wave inspiral events, as well as other physical processes that depend on a high density of stars or stellar-mass BHs near SgrA*.

  15. The reconnection site of temporal cusp structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Petrinec, S. M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Escoubet, C. P.; Reme, H.

    2008-07-01

    The strong precipitating particle flux in the cusp regions is the consequence of magnetic reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field and the geomagnetic field. Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the dominant process for mass, energy, and momentum transfer from the magnetosheath into the magnetosphere. Observations of downward precipitating cusp ions by polar orbiting satellites are instrumental in unlocking many questions about magnetic reconnection, e.g., their spatial and temporal nature and the location of the reconnection site at the magnetopause. In this study we combine cusp observations of structures in the precipitating ion-energy dispersion by the Cluster satellites with Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar observations to distinguish between the temporal and spatial magnetic reconnection processes at the magnetopause. The location of the cusp structures relative to the convection cells is interpreted as a temporal phenomenon caused by a change in the reconnection rate at the magnetopause. The 3-D plasma observations of the Cluster Ion Spectrometry instruments onboard the Cluster spacecraft also provide the means to estimate the location of the reconnection site. While an earlier study of a spatial cusp structure event revealed bifurcated reconnection locations in different hemispheres as origins for the precipitating ions creating the cusp structures, the same method applied to the temporal cusp structures in this study shows only a single tilted reconnection line close to the subsolar point. Tracing the distance to the reconnection site provides not only the location of the reconnection line but can also be used to distinguish between spatial and temporal cusp structures.

  16. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission.

  17. Thermospheric winds around the cusp region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, C.; Deng, Y.; Wu, Q.; Ridley, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the change of advection, the horizontal winds can be strongly influenced by the large vertical wind in the cusp. Indeed, the sunward wind has been observed by the balloon-borne Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at the equatorward of the cusp on the dayside [Wu et al., 2012], which is caused by the heating added in the cusp and the corresponding changes of the horizontal pressure gradient. However, this phenomenon has not been reproduced by the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) under low resolution (5x5 degrees). The Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) has been run in different cases and different resolutions. First, we compare the simulations with and without the cusp energy inputs to identify the influence on the horizontal dynamics. Both runs are done under high resolution in order to better resolve the cusp region. Then we also compare the simulations with the same cusp energy inputs but different horizontal resolutions to identify the influence of the simulation resolution on the results. This work will significantly advance our understanding of the neutral dynamics and the relationship between winds and upper atmosphere storm time response.

  18. NEAR-INFRARED VARIABILITY AMONG YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE STAR FORMATION REGION CYGNUS OB7

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, Scott J.; Rice, Thomas S.; Aspin, Colin

    2013-08-20

    We present an analysis of near-infrared time-series photometry in J, H, and K bands for about 100 epochs of a 1 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 1 Degree-Sign region of the Lynds 1003/1004 dark cloud in the Cygnus OB7 region. Augmented by data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we identify 96 candidate disk bearing young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region. Of these, 30 are clearly Class I or earlier. Using the Wide-Field Imaging Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, we were able to obtain photometry over three observing seasons, with photometric uncertainty better than 0.05 mag down to J Almost-Equal-To 17. We study detailed light curves and color trajectories of {approx}50 of the YSOs in the monitored field. We investigate the variability and periodicity of the YSOs and find the data are consistent with all YSOs being variable in these wavelengths on timescales of a few years. We divide the variability into four observational classes: (1) stars with periodic variability stable over long timescales, (2) variables which exhibit short-lived cyclic behavior, (3) long-duration variables, and (4) stochastic variables. Some YSO variability defies simple classification. We can explain much of the observed variability as being due to dynamic and rotational changes in the disk, including an asymmetric or changing blocking fraction, changes to the inner disk hole size, as well as changes to the accretion rate. Overall, we find that the Class I:Class II ratio of the cluster is consistent with an age of <1 Myr, with at least one individual, wildly varying source {approx}100, 000 yr old. We have also discovered a Class II eclipsing binary system with a period of 17.87 days.

  19. A pilot study using deep infrared imaging to constrain the star formation history of the XUV stellar populations in NGC 4625

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, Stephanie J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bresolin, Fabio

    2014-09-20

    In a ΛCDM universe, disk galaxies' outer regions are the last to form. Characterizing their contents is critical for understanding the ongoing process of disk formation, but observing outer disk stellar populations is challenging due to their low surface brightness. We present extremely deep 3.6 μm observations (Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera) of NGC 4625, a galaxy known for its radially extended ultraviolet-emitting stellar population. We combine the new imaging with archival UV imaging from the GALEX mission to derive multi-wavelength radial profiles for NGC 4625 and compare them to stellar populations models. The colors can be explained by the young stellar population that is responsible for the UV emission and indicate that the current star formation rates in the outermost disk are recent. Extended star formation in NGC 4625 may have been initiated by an interaction with neighboring galaxies NGC 4618 and NGC 4625a, supporting speculation that minor interactions are a common trigger for outer disk star formation and late stage disk growth.

  20. A long history of star formation in a low mass stellar system, Leo T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, M.; Clementini, G.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Federici, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Tosi, M.; Musella, I.

    Nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies with small masses and low metallicity offer insights into the cosmic history of galaxy assembly. In this framework, we present results from the first combined study of variable stars and star formation history of the Milky Way (MW) "Ultra-Faint" dwarf (UFD) galaxy Leo T, based on F606W and F814W multi-epoch archive observations obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We have detected 14 variable stars in the galaxy, including one fundamental-mode RR Lyrae star and 10 Anomalous Cepheids with periods shorter than 1 day, thus suggesting the occurrence of multiple star formation episodes in this UFD, one of which about 10 Gyr ago produced the RR Lyrae star. A quantitative analysis of the star formation history, based on the comparison of the observed color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with a library of artificially generated CMDs, confirms that Leo T has experienced a complex star formation history dominated by two enhanced periods about 1.5 and 8 Gyr ago, respectively.

  1. CUSP Energetic Particles: Confinement, Acceleration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    The cusp energetic particle (CEP) event is a new magnetospheric phenomenon. The events were detected in the dayside cusp for hours, in which the measured helium ions had energies up to 8 MeV. All of these events were associated with a dramatic decrease and large fluctuations in the local magnetic field strength. During January 1999 - December 1999 covered by this report, I have studied the CEP events by analyzing the POLAR, GEOTAIL, and WIND particle and magnetic field data measured during the geomagnetic quiet periods in 1996 and one geomagnetic storm period in 1998. The simultaneous observations indicated that the ion fluxes in the CEP events were higher than that in both the upstream and the downstream from the bow shock. The pitch angle distribution of the helium ions in the CEP events was found to peak around 90 deg. It was found that the mirror parameter, defined as the ratio of the square root of the integration of the parallel turbulent power spectral component over the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges to the mean field in the cusp, is correlated with the intensity of the cusp MeV helium flux, which is a measure of the influence of mirroring interactions and an indication of local effect. It was also found that the turbulent power of the local magnetic field in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges is correlated with the intensity of the cusp energetic helium ions. Such ULF ranges correspond to periods of about 0.33-500 seconds that cover the gyroperiods, the bounce periods, and the drift periods of the tens keV to MeV charged particles when they are temporarily confined in the high-altitude dayside cusp. These observations represent a discovery that the high-altitude dayside cusp is a new acceleration and dynamic trapping region of the magnetosphere. The cusp geometry is connected via gradient and curvature drift of these energized ions to the equatorial plasma sheet as close as the geostationary orbit at local midnight. It implies that the dayside cusp is

  2. The formation of eccentric compact binary inspirals and the role of gravitational wave emission in binary-single stellar encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-03-20

    The inspiral and merger of eccentric binaries leads to gravitational waveforms distinct from those generated by circularly merging binaries. Dynamical environments can assemble binaries with high eccentricity and peak frequencies within the LIGO band. In this paper, we study binary-single stellar scatterings occurring in dense stellar systems as a source of eccentrically inspiraling binaries. Many interactions between compact binaries and single objects are characterized by chaotic resonances in which the binary-single system undergoes many exchanges before reaching a final state. During these chaotic resonances, a pair of objects has a non-negligible probability of experiencing a very close passage. Significant orbital energy and angular momentum are carried away from the system by gravitational wave (GW) radiation in these close passages, and in some cases this implies an inspiral time shorter than the orbital period of the bound third body. We derive the cross section for such dynamical inspiral outcomes through analytical arguments and through numerical scattering experiments including GW losses. We show that the cross section for dynamical inspirals grows with increasing target binary semi-major axis a and that for equal-mass binaries it scales as a {sup 2/7}. Thus, we expect wide target binaries to predominantly contribute to the production of these relativistic outcomes. We estimate that eccentric inspirals account for approximately 1% of dynamically assembled non-eccentric merging binaries. While these events are rare, we show that binary-single scatterings are a more effective formation channel than single-single captures for the production of eccentrically inspiraling binaries, even given modest binary fractions.

  3. The evolving relation between star formation rate and stellar mass in the VIDEO survey since z = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Russell; Vaccari, Mattia; Jarvis, Matt; Smith, Mathew; Giovannoli, Elodie; Häußler, Boris; Prescott, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass, M*, relation of a star-forming (SF) galaxy (SFG) sample in the XMM-LSS field to z ˜ 3.0 using the near-infrared data from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. Combining VIDEO with broad-band photometry, we use the SED fitting algorithm CIGALE to derive SFRs and M* and have adapted it to account for the full photometric redshift probability-distribution-function uncertainty. Applying an SF selection using the D4000 index, we find evidence for strong evolution in the normalization of the SFR-M* relation out to z ˜ 3 and a roughly constant slope of (SFR ∝ M_*^{α }) α = 0.69 ± 0.02 to z ˜ 1.7. We find this increases close to unity towards z ˜ 2.65. Alternatively, if we apply a colour selection, we find a distinct turnover in the SFR-M* relation between 0.7 ≲ z ≲ 2.0 at the high-mass end, and suggest that this is due to an increased contamination from passive galaxies. We find evolution of the specific SFR ∝ (1 + z)2.60 at log10(M*/M⊙) ˜ 10.5, out to z ≲ 2.4 with an observed flattening beyond z ˜ 2 with increased stellar mass. Comparing to a range of simulations we find the analytical scaling relation approaches, that invoke an equilibrium model, a good fit to our data, suggesting that a continual smooth accretion regulated by continual outflows may be a key driver in the overall growth of SFGs.

  4. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. I. NON-EQUILIBRIUM COOLANT FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-07-20

    We use high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations to investigate the interaction of high-redshift galaxy outflows with low-mass virialized clouds of primordial composition. While atomic cooling allows star formation in objects with virial temperatures above 10{sup 4} K, 'minihalos' below this threshold are generally unable to form stars by themselves. However, these objects are highly susceptible to triggered star formation, induced by outflows from neighboring high-redshift starburst galaxies. Here, we conduct a study of these interactions, focusing on cooling through non-equilibrium molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and hydrogen deuteride (HD) formation. Tracking the non-equilibrium chemistry and cooling of 14 species and including the presence of a dissociating background, we show that shock interactions can transform minihalos into extremely compact clusters of coeval stars. Furthermore, these clusters are all less than {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub sun}, and they are ejected from their parent dark matter halos: properties that are remarkably similar to those of the old population of globular clusters.

  5. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. II. OVERCOMING THE FRAGMENTATION BARRIER IN α CENTAURI AND γ CEPHEI-LIKE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-10

    Planet formation in small-separation (∼20 AU) eccentric binaries such as γ Cephei or α Centauri is believed to be adversely affected by the presence of the stellar companion. Strong dynamical excitation of planetesimals by the eccentric companion can result in collisional destruction (rather than growth) of 1-100 km objects, giving rise to the ''fragmentation barrier'' for planet formation. We revise this issue using a novel description of secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries, which accounts for the gravity of the eccentric, coplanar protoplanetary disk, as well as gas drag. By studying planetesimal collision outcomes, we show, in contrast to many previous studies, that planetesimal growth and subsequent formation of planets (including gas giants) in AU-scale orbits within ∼20 AU separation binaries may be possible, provided that the protoplanetary disks are massive (≳ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}) and only weakly eccentric (disk eccentricity ≲ 0.01). These requirements are compatible with both the existence of massive (several M{sub J} ) planets in γ Cep-like systems and the results of recent simulations of gaseous disks in eccentric binaries. Terrestrial and Neptune-like planets can also form in lower-mass disks at small (sub-AU) radii. We find that the fragmentation barrier is less of a problem in eccentric disks that are apsidally aligned with the binary orbit. Alignment gives rise to special locations, where (1) relative planetesimal velocities are low and (2) the timescale of their drag-induced radial drift is long. This causes planetesimal pileup at such locations in the disk and promotes their growth locally, helping to alleviate the timescale problem for core formation.

  6. New open-source approaches to the modeling of stellar collapse and the formation of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, C. D.; O'Connor, E.; Peng, F.; Reisswig, C.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.; Abdikamalov, E.; Diener, P.; Löffler, F.; Hawke, I.; Meakin, C. A.; Burrows, A.

    2011-11-01

    We present new approaches to the simulation of stellar collapse, the formation of black holes, and explosive core-collapse supernova nucleosynthesis that build upon open-source codes and microphysics. We discuss the new spherically-symmetric general-relativistic (GR) collapse code GR1D that is endowed with an approximate 1.5D treatment of rotation, comes with multiple nuclear equations of state, and handles neutrinos with a multi-species leakage scheme. Results from a first set of spinning black hole formation simulations are presented. We go on to discuss the derivative code GR1D+ N which is tuned for calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis and includes a NSE/non-NSE equation of state treatment, and a nuclear reaction network. We present sample results showing GR1D+ N's performance in reproducing previous results with thermal-bomb-driven explosions. Finally, we introduce the 3 + 1 GR Zelmani core collapse simulation package and present first results obtained in its application to the 3D modeling of failing core-collapse supernovae.

  7. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. II. EFFECT OF TURBULENCE AND METAL-LINE COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-06-01

    In the primordial universe, low-mass structures with virial temperatures less than 10{sup 4} K were unable to cool by atomic line transitions, leading to a strong suppression of star formation. On the other hand, these 'minihalos' were highly prone to triggered star formation by interactions from nearby galaxy outflows. In Gray and Scannapieco, we explored the impact of nonequilibrium chemistry on these interactions. Here we turn our attention to the role of metals, carrying out a series of high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include both metal cooling and a subgrid turbulent mixing model. Despite the presence of an additional coolant, we again find that outflow-minihalo interactions produce a distribution of dense, massive stellar clusters. We also find that these clusters are evenly enriched with metals to a final abundance of Z {approx} 10{sup -2} Z{sub sun}. As in our previous simulations, all of these properties suggest that these interactions may have given rise to present-day halo globular clusters.

  8. Dependency of the Cusp Density Anomaly on the Variability of Forcing Inside and Outside the Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere. These particles produce ionization and kinetic (particle) heating of the atmosphere. The increased ionization coupled with enhanced electric fields in the cusp produces increased Joule heating and ion drag forcing. These energy inputs largely determine the neutral density structure in the cusp region. Measurements by the CHAMP satellite (460-390- km altitude) have shown a region of strong enhanced density attributed to the combination of cusp particle and Joule heating. The Streak mission (325-123 km), on the other hand, observed a relative depletion in density in the cusp. While particle precipitation in the cusp is comparatively well constrained, the characteristics of the steady and fluctuating components of the electric field in the cusp are poorly constrained. Also, the significance of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in particular at lower altitudes has not been addressed as it relates to the cusp density anomaly. We address the response of the cusp region to a range electrodynamical forcing with our high resolution two-dimensional time-dependent nonhydrostatic nonlinear dynamical model. We take advantage of our model's high resolution and focus on a more typical cusp width of 2 degrees in latitude. Earlier simulations have also shown a significant contribution from soft particle precipitation. We simulate the atmospheric response to a range of realizable magnitudes of the fluctuating and steady components of the electric field to examine the dependence of the magnitude of the cusp density anomaly on a large range of observed characteristics of the electrodynamical forcing and examine, in particular, the importance of particle heating relative to Joule heating. In addition we investigate the role of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in determining the lower altitude cusp density and wind structure. We compare

  9. Possible planet formation in the young, low-mass, multiple stellar system GG Tau A.

    PubMed

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Boehler, Yann; Bary, Jeff; Beck, Tracy; Beust, Hervé; Chapillon, Edwige; Gueth, Fredéric; Huré, Jean-Marc; Pierens, Arnaud; Piétu, Vincent; Simon, Michal; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2014-10-30

    The formation of planets around binary stars may be more difficult than around single stars. In a close binary star (with a separation of less than a hundred astronomical units), theory predicts the presence of circumstellar disks around each star, and an outer circumbinary disk surrounding a gravitationally cleared inner cavity around the stars. Given that the inner disks are depleted by accretion onto the stars on timescales of a few thousand years, any replenishing material must be transferred from the outer reservoir to fuel planet formation (which occurs on timescales of about one million years). Gas flowing through disk cavities has been detected in single star systems. A circumbinary disk was discovered around the young low-mass binary system GG Tau A (ref. 7), which has recently been shown to be a hierarchical triple system. It has one large inner disk around the single star, GG Tau Aa, and shows small amounts of shocked hydrogen gas residing within the central cavity, but other than a single weak detection, the distribution of cold gas in this cavity or in any other binary or multiple star system has not hitherto been determined. Here we report imaging of gas fragments emitting radiation characteristic of carbon monoxide within the GG Tau A cavity. From the kinematics we conclude that the flow appears capable of sustaining the inner disk (around GG Tau Aa) beyond the accretion lifetime, leaving time for planet formation to occur there. These results show the complexity of planet formation around multiple stars and confirm the general picture predicted by numerical simulations. PMID:25355359

  10. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie; Renzini, Alvio

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  11. Cusped Density Profiles of Gravitational Lens Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutka, P. T.

    2010-06-01

    We have developed an analytic formulation for axially symmetric GNFW lens model with parametrized cusp slope (α). The lensing theory has several implications, for example strong lensing is very difficult without cusped mass profile. Required cusp strength for strong lensing depends on the lens object mass and concentration. Exceedingly high concentrations are required for profiles, that have α>-1 in order to produce multiple lensed images. We study mass profiles of lens objects with double image lenses, since they are resilient against deviations from axial symmetry, perturbations from microlensing, and halo substructure. The statistics of the observed image flux ratios is connected to the general properties of the of the lens mass density profiles. Our analysis is based on a limiting value for the shallowest cusp slope αCSL able to produce the observed flux ratio with any lens geometry and lens-source alignment. The cusp slope limit (CSL) does not depend on cosmology, total lens mass, concentration or redshifts of the the lens and the lensed object. In case of axial symmetry the limiting value is depending only on the magnification ratio (observed flux ratio of the images). This removes uncertainties in the lens and source distributions from the statistical analysis. Distribution of these threshold values reveals existence of halo population(s) with similar profiles in the sample; most of the halos have cusp slope α = -1.95+/-0.02. We have also found an imprint of a second population with a cusp slope value α = -1.49+/-0.09. There is about 99 per cent estimated probability, that the observed feature in the distribution is produced by the second population of lenses, with their own characteristic density profile. We analyze error sources in our analysis with mock catalogues, and discuss about alternative explanations for the second population signature.

  12. On the distribution of stellar remnants around massive black holes: slow mass segregation, star cluster inspirals, and correlated orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio

    2014-10-20

    We use N-body simulations as well as analytical techniques to study the long-term dynamical evolution of stellar black holes (BHs) at the Galactic center (GC) and to put constraints on their number and mass distribution. Starting from models that have not yet achieved a state of collisional equilibrium, we find that timescales associated with cusp regrowth can be longer than the Hubble time. Our results cast doubts on standard models that postulate high densities of BHs near the GC and motivate studies that start from initial conditions that correspond to well-defined physical models. For the first time, we consider the distribution of BHs in a dissipationless model for the formation of the Milky Way nuclear cluster (NC), in which massive stellar clusters merge to form a compact nucleus. We simulate the consecutive merger of ∼10 clusters containing an inner dense sub-cluster of BHs. After the formed NC is evolved for ∼5 Gyr, the BHs do form a steep central cusp, while the stellar distribution maintains properties that resemble those of the GC NC. Finally, we investigate the effect of BH perturbations on the motion of the GC S-stars as a means of constraining the number of the perturbers. We find that reproducing the quasi-thermal character of the S-star orbital eccentricities requires ≳ 1000 BHs within 0.1 pc of Sgr A*. A dissipationless formation scenario for the GC NC is consistent with this lower limit and therefore could reconcile the need for high central densities of BHs (to explain the S-stars orbits) with the 'missing-cusp' problem of the GC giant star population.

  13. STOCHASTIC STAR FORMATION AND A (NEARLY) UNIFORM STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Michele; Krumholz, Mark R.; Da Silva, Robert L.

    2011-11-10

    Recent observations indicate a lower H{alpha} to FUV ratio in dwarf galaxies than in brighter systems, a trend that could be explained by a truncated and/or steeper initial mass function (IMF) in small galaxies. However, at low star formation rates (SFRs), the H{alpha} to FUV ratio can vary due to stochastic sampling even for a universal IMF, a hypothesis that has, prior to this work, received limited investigation. Using SLUG, a fully stochastic code for synthetic photometry in star clusters and galaxies, we compare the H{alpha} and FUV luminosity in a sample of {approx}450 nearby galaxies with models drawn from a universal Kroupa IMF and a modified IMF, the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF). Once random sampling and time evolution are included, a Kroupa IMF convolved with the cluster mass function (CMF) reproduces the observed H{alpha} distribution at all FUV luminosities, while a truncated IMF as implemented in current IGIMF models underpredicts the H{alpha} luminosity by more than an order of magnitude at the lowest SFRs. We conclude that the observed luminosity is the result of the joint probability distribution function of the SFR, CMF, and a universal IMF, consistent with parts of the IGIMF theory, but that a truncation in the IMF in clusters is inconsistent with the observations. Future work will examine stochastic star formation and its time dependence in detail to study whether random sampling can explain other observations that suggest a varying IMF.

  14. Density variations in the Earth's magnetospheric cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Niehof, J.; Collier, M. R.; Welling, D. T.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mozer, F. S.; Fritz, T. A.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2016-03-01

    Seven years of measurements from the Polar spacecraft are surveyed to monitor the variations of plasma density within the magnetospheric cusps. The spacecraft's orbital precession from 1998 through 2005 allows for coverage of both the northern and southern cusps from low altitude out to the magnetopause. In the mid- and high- altitude cusps, plasma density scales well with the solar wind density (ncusp/nsw˜0.8). This trend is fairly steady for radial distances greater then 4 RE. At low altitudes (r < 4RE) the density increases with decreasing altitude and even exceeds the solar wind density due to contributions from the ionosphere. The density of high charge state oxygen (O>+2) also displays a positive trend with solar wind density within the cusp. A multifluid simulation with the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme MHD model was run to monitor the relative contributions of the ionosphere and solar wind plasma within the cusp. The simulation provides similar results to the statistical measurements from Polar and confirms the presence of ionospheric plasma at low altitudes.

  15. Star Formation in the Central 400 pc of the Milky Way: Evidence for a Population of Massive Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Hewitt, J. W.; Arendt, R. G.; Whitney, B.; Rieke, G.; Wardle, M.; Hinz, J. L.; Stolovy, S.; Lang, C. C.; Burton, M. G.; Ramirez, S.

    2009-09-01

    The central kpc of the Milky Way might be expected to differ significantly from the rest of the Galaxy with regard to gasdynamics and the formation of young stellar objects (YSOs). We probe this possibility with mid-infrared observations obtained with Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer on Spitzer and with Midcourse Space Experiment. We use color-color diagrams and spectral energy distribution (SED) fits to explore the nature of YSO candidates (including objects with 4.5 μm excesses possibly due to molecular emission). There is an asymmetry in the distribution of the candidate YSOs, which tend to be found at negative Galactic longitudes; this behavior contrasts with that of the molecular gas, approximately 2/3 of which is at positive longitudes. The small-scale height of these objects suggests that they are within the Galactic center region and are dynamically young. They lie between two layers of infrared dark clouds and may have originated from these clouds. We identify new sites for this recent star formation by comparing the mid-IR, radio, submillimeter, and methanol maser data. The methanol masers appear to be associated with young, embedded YSOs characterized by 4.5 μm excesses. We use the SEDs of these sources to estimate their physical characteristics; their masses appear to range from ~10 to ~20 M sun. Within the central 400 × 50 pc (|l| < 1fdg3 and |b| < 10') the star formation rate (SFR) based on the identification of Stage I evolutionary phase of YSO candidates is about 0.14 M sun yr-1. Given that the majority of the sources in the population of YSOs are classified as Stage I objects, we suggest that a recent burst of star formation took place within the last 105 yr. This suggestion is also consistent with estimates of SFRs within the last ~107 yr showing a peak around 105 yr ago. Lastly, we find that the Schmidt-Kennicutt Law applies well in the central 400 pc of the Galaxy. This implies that star formation does not appear to be

  16. The IMF and star formation history of the stellar clusters in the Vela D cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Testi, L.; Vanzi, L.

    2006-03-01

    Aims.We present the results of a Near-Infrared deep photometric survey of a sample of six embedded star clusters in the Vela-D molecular cloud, all associated with luminous (˜ 103 L⊙) IRAS sources. The clusters are unlikely to be older than a few 106 yrs, since all are still associated with molecular gas.Methods.We employed the fact that all clusters lie at the same distance and were observed with the same instrumental setting to derive their properties in a consistent way, being affected by the same instrumental and observational biases. We extracted the clusters' K Luminosity Functions and developed a simple method to correct them for extinction, based on colour-magnitude diagrams. The reliability of the method has been tested by constructing synthetic clusters from theoretical tracks for pre-main sequence stars and a standard Initial Mass Function. The clusters' Initial Mass Functions have been derived from the dereddened K Luminosity Functions by adopting a set of pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks and assuming coeval star formation.Results.All clusters are small (˜ 100 members) and compact (radius ˜ 0.1-0.2 pc); their most massive stars are intermediate-mass (˜ 2-10 M⊙) ones. The dereddened K Luminosity Functions are likely to arise from the same distribution, suggesting that the selected clusters have quite similar Initial Mass Functions and star formation histories. The Initial Mass Functions are consistent with those derived for field stars and clusters. Adding them together we found that the "global" Initial Mass Function appears steeper at the high-mass end and exhibits a drop-off at ˜ 10 M⊙. In fact, a standard Initial Mass Function would predict a star with M > 22.5 M⊙ within one of the clusters, which is not found. Hence, either high-mass stars need larger clusters to be formed, or the Initial Mass Function of the single clusters is steeper at the high-mass end because of the physical conditions in the parental gas.

  17. Atomic nitrogen densities near the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Nelson, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition spectrometer on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft sampled several major and minor thermospheric gases including atomic nitrogen. A selection of passes over the polar cusp that provide a quantitative measure of N densities in this region and provide evidence of localized density increases due to soft particle precipitation is presented. Increases in N densities are frequently observed but are smaller than accompanying increases in N2 densities. The observations support earlier studies suggesting that N densities increase more rapidly than O densities during periods of high solar EUV flux and N densities are larger in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere. A series of passes in February 1983, late in the lifetime of DE 2, indicated N densities at 200 km altitude were a factor of 2 larger near the southern cusp than near the northern cusp.

  18. Atomic nitrogen densities near the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Nelson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition spectrometer on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft sampled several major and minor thermospheric gases including atomic nitrogen. A selection of passes over the polar cusp that provide a quantitative measure of N densities in this region and provide evidence of localized density increases due to soft particle precipitation is presented. Increases in N densities are frequently observed but are smaller than accompanying increases in N2 densities. The observations support earlier studies suggesting that (1) N densities increase more rapidly than O densities during periods of high solar EUV flux and (2) N densities are larger in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere. A series of passes in February 1983, late in the lifetime of DE 2, indicated N densities at 200 km altitude were a factor of 2 larger near the southern cusp than near the northern cusp.

  19. Cusps, self-organization, and absorbing states.

    PubMed

    Bonachela, Juan A; Alava, Mikko; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2009-05-01

    Elastic interfaces embedded in (quenched) random media exhibit metastability and stick-slip dynamics. These nontrivial dynamical features have been shown to be associated with cusp singularities of the coarse-grained disorder correlator. Here we show that annealed systems with many absorbing states and a conservation law but no quenched disorder exhibit identical cusps. On the other hand, similar nonconserved systems in the directed percolation class are also shown to exhibit cusps but of a different type. These results are obtained both by a recent method to explicitly measure disorder correlators and by defining an alternative new protocol inspired by self-organized criticality, which opens the door to easily accessible experimental realizations. PMID:19518401

  20. The ASACUSA CUSP: an antihydrogen experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, N.; Ulmer, S.; Murtagh, D. J.; Van Gorp, S.; Nagata, Y.; Diermaier, M.; Federmann, S.; Leali, M.; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Michishio, K.; Mizutani, T.; Mohri, A.; Nagahama, H.; Ohtsuka, M.; Radics, B.; Sakurai, S.; Sauerzopf, C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Torii, H. A.; Venturelli, L.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-11-01

    In order to test CPT symmetry between antihydrogen and its counterpart hydrogen, the ASACUSA collaboration plans to perform high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen atom in-flight. We have developed an apparatus ("cusp trap") which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and multiple ring electrodes. For the preparation of slow antiprotons and positrons, Penning-Malmberg type traps were utilized. The spectrometer line was positioned downstream of the cusp trap. At the end of the beamline, an antihydrogen beam detector was located, which comprises an inorganic Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) single-crystal scintillator housed in a vacuum duct and surrounding plastic scintillators. A significant fraction of antihydrogen atoms flowing out the cusp trap were detected.

  1. Cusp-points and current sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, S. I.

    1990-04-01

    Cusp points are produced in magnetic streamers of the solar corona. They may also be produced in the tail region of the earth's magnetosphere. This paper makes an analysis of such points in an equilibrium plasma. It is found that the very presence of a cusp point is inevitably associated with current sheets; these are the site of magnetic-field line reconnection. Special attention is paid to two examples. One examines a current sheet in a very much rarefield plasma (a problem formulated by Syrovatskii, 1966). The other one investigates the rosette structure of two merging magnetic islands. Analysis of the plasma behavior in the vicinity of the cusp points shows that, in the latter case, equilibrium cannot be realized. Therefore reconnection must proceed violently, at the high rates observed in numerical simulations.

  2. THE RELATION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS FOR GALAXIES AT 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 IN CANDELS

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Brett; Papovich, Casey; Tilvi, Vithal; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finlator, Kristian; Behroozi, Peter; Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H.; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Davé, Romeel; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark; Giavalisco, Mauro; Long, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Reddy, Naveen; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2015-02-01

    Distant star-forming galaxies show a correlation between their star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, and this has deep implications for galaxy formation. Here, we present a study on the evolution of the slope and scatter of the SFR-stellar mass relation for galaxies at 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 using multi-wavelength photometry in GOODS-S from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. We describe an updated, Bayesian spectral-energy distribution fitting method that incorporates effects of nebular line emission, star formation histories that are constant or rising with time, and different dust-attenuation prescriptions (starburst and Small Magellanic Cloud). From z = 6.5 to z = 3.5 star-forming galaxies in CANDELS follow a nearly unevolving correlation between stellar mass and SFR that follows SFR ∼ M{sub ⋆}{sup a} with a =0.54 ± 0.16 at z ∼ 6 and 0.70 ± 0.21 at z ∼ 4. This evolution requires a star formation history that increases with decreasing redshift (on average, the SFRs of individual galaxies rise with time). The observed scatter in the SFR-stellar mass relation is tight, σ(log SFR/M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) < 0.3-0.4 dex, for galaxies with log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} > 9 dex. Assuming that the SFR is tied to the net gas inflow rate (SFR ∼ M-dot {sub gas}), then the scatter in the gas inflow rate is also smaller than 0.3–0.4 dex for star-forming galaxies in these stellar mass and redshift ranges, at least when averaged over the timescale of star formation. We further show that the implied star formation history of objects selected on the basis of their co-moving number densities is consistent with the evolution in the SFR-stellar mass relation.

  3. Dual Stellar Halos in the Standard Elliptical Galaxy M105 and Formation of Massive Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-05-01

    M105 is a standard elliptical galaxy, located in the Leo I Group. We present photometry of the resolved stars in its inner region at R ≈ 4‧ ≈ 4R eff, obtained from F606W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. We combine this with photometry of the outer region at R ≈ 12‧ ≈ 12R eff from archival imaging data. Color–magnitude diagrams of the resolved stars in the inner region show a prominent red giant branch (RGB) with a large color range, while those for the outer region show better a narrow blue RGB. The metallicity distribution function (MDF) of the RGB stars shows the existence of two distinct subpopulations: a dominant metal-rich population (with a peak at [M/H] ≈ 0.0) and a much weaker metal-poor population (with a peak at [M/H] ≈ ‑1.1). The radial number density profiles of the metal-rich and metal-poor RGB stars are fit well by a Sérsic law with n = 2.75 ± 0.10 and n = 6.89 ± 0.94, and by a single power law (σ ∝ R ‑3.8 and σ ∝ R ‑2.6), respectively. The MDFs of the inner and outer regions can be described well by accretion gas models of chemical evolution with two components. These provide strong evidence that there are two distinct stellar halos in this galaxy, blue metal-poor and red metal-rich halos, consistent with the results based on globular cluster systems in bright early-type galaxies (ETGs). We discuss the implications of these results with regard to the formation of massive ETGs in the dual halo mode formation scenario.

  4. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION RATES ON STELLAR MASS AND ENVIRONMENT AT z approx 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shannon G.; Holden, Bradford P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Franx, Marijn

    2009-11-01

    We examine the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies in a redshift slice encompassing the z = 0.834 cluster RX J0152.7 - 1357. We used a low-dispersion prism in the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph to identify galaxies with z {sub AB} < 23.3 mag in diverse environments around the cluster out to projected distances of approx8 Mpc from the cluster center. We utilize a mass-limited sample (M > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) of 330 galaxies that were imaged by Spitzer MIPS at 24 mum to derive SFRs and study the dependence of specific SFR (SSFR) on stellar mass and environment. We find that the SFR and SSFR show a strong decrease with increasing local density, similar to the relation at z approx 0. Our result contrasts with other work at z approx 1 that finds the SFR-density trend to reverse for luminosity-limited samples. These other results appear to be driven by star formation (SF) in lower mass systems (M approx 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). Our results imply that the processes that shut down SF are present in groups and other dense regions in the field. Our data also suggest that the lower SFRs of galaxies in higher density environments may reflect a change in the ratio of star-forming to non-star-forming galaxies, rather than a change in SFRs. As a consequence, the SFRs of star-forming galaxies, in environments ranging from small groups to clusters, appear to be similar and largely unaffected by the local processes that truncate SF at z approx 0.8.

  5. Cusp Kernels for Velocity-Changing Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, B. H.; Marsland, R., III; Olsen, B. A.; Happer, W.

    2012-05-01

    We introduce an analytical kernel, the “cusp” kernel, to model the effects of velocity-changing collisions on optically pumped atoms in low-pressure buffer gases. Like the widely used Keilson-Storer kernel [J. Keilson and J. E. Storer, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 243 (1952)QAMAAY0033-569X], cusp kernels are characterized by a single parameter and preserve a Maxwellian velocity distribution. Cusp kernels and their superpositions are more useful than Keilson-Storer kernels, because they are more similar to real kernels inferred from measurements or theory and are easier to invert to find steady-state velocity distributions.

  6. Self-bending symmetric cusp beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Lu, Yao; Li, Yin-Mei; Ren, Yu-Xuan

    2015-12-07

    A type of self-bending symmetric cusp beams with four accelerating intensity maxima is theoretically and experimentally presented. Distinguished from the reported regular polygon beams, the symmetric cusp beams simultaneously exhibit peculiar features of natural autofocusing and self-acceleration during propagation. Further, such beams take the shape of a fine longitudinal needle-like structure at the focal region and possess the strong ability of self-healing over obstacles. All these intriguing properties were verified experimentally. Particularly, the spatial profile of the reconstructed beam exhibits spatially sculpted optical structure with four siamesed curved arms. Thus, we anticipate that the structured beam will benefit optical guiding and optofluidics in surprising ways.

  7. Opening the cusp. [using magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic field topology (determined by the superposition of dipole, image, and uniform fields) for mapping the cusp to the ionosphere. The model results are compared to both new and published observations and are then used to map the footprint of a flux transfer event caused by a time variation in the merging rate. It is shown that the cusp geometry distorts the field lines mapped from the magnetopause to yield footprints with dawn and dusk protrusions into the region of closed magnetic flux.

  8. Self-bending symmetric cusp beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Lu, Yao; Li, Yin-Mei

    2015-12-01

    A type of self-bending symmetric cusp beams with four accelerating intensity maxima is theoretically and experimentally presented. Distinguished from the reported regular polygon beams, the symmetric cusp beams simultaneously exhibit peculiar features of natural autofocusing and self-acceleration during propagation. Further, such beams take the shape of a fine longitudinal needle-like structure at the focal region and possess the strong ability of self-healing over obstacles. All these intriguing properties were verified experimentally. Particularly, the spatial profile of the reconstructed beam exhibits spatially sculpted optical structure with four siamesed curved arms. Thus, we anticipate that the structured beam will benefit optical guiding and optofluidics in surprising ways.

  9. The HORUS Observatory - a Next Generation Mission to Study Planetary, Stellar and Galactic Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowen, Paul A.; Beasley, M.; Cooke, B.; Woodruff, B.; Calzetti, D.; Desch, S.; Fullerton, A.; Gallagher, J.; Hartigan, P.; Jansen, R.; Lauer, T.; O'Connell, R.; Oey, S.; Padgett, D.; Roberge, A.; Siegmund, O.; Smith, N.; Stern, D.; Tumlinson, J.; Windhorst, R.

    2010-01-01

    The High-ORbit Ultraviolet-visible Satellite (HORUS) is a 2.4-meter class space telescope that will conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the astrophysical processes and environments relevant for the births and life cycles of stars and their planetary systems, to investigate and understand the range of environments, feedback mechanisms, and other factors that most affect the outcome of the star and planet formation process. To do so, HORUS will provide 100 times greater imaging efficiency and more than 10 times greater UV spectroscopic sensitivity than has existed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HORUS mission will contribute vital information on how solar systems form and whether habitable planets should be common or rare. It also will investigate the structure, evolution, and destiny of galaxies and universe. This program relies on focused capabilities unique to space that no other planned NASA mission will provide: near-UV/visible (200-1075nm) wide-field, diffraction-limited imaging; and high-sensitivity, high-resolution UV (100-170nm) spectroscopy. HORUS is designed to be launched into a semi-stable orbit at Earth-Sun L2. From this vantage HORUS will enjoy a stable environment for thermal and pointing control, and long-duration target visibility. The core HORUS design will provide wide field of view (WFOV) imagery and high efficiency point source FUV spectroscopy using a novel combination of spectral selection and field sharing. The HORUS Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) design is based on modern light weight mirror technology with a faster primary mirror to shorten the overall package and thereby reduce mass. The OTA uses a three-mirror anastigmat configuration to provide excellent imagery over a large FOV. The UV/optical Imaging Cameras use two 21k x 21k Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) consisting of thirty-six Si 3.5k x 3.5k CCD elements each. The FUV spectrometer uses cross strip anode based MCPs improved from HST-COS technology.

  10. Non-syndromic multiple talon cusps in siblings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Mutneja, Anudeep R; Nagpal, Archna; Mutneja, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Talon's cusp is an anomalous structure that projects palatally from the cingulum areas of maxillary or mandibular anterior teeth. This dental anomaly may pose several pathological, functional and esthetic problems. Talon cusps usually affect a single tooth, but may rarely affect an entire sextant. Such multiple talon cusps may not always occur in association with a syndrome. Furthermore, they may exhibit a genetic pattern of inheritance. This article emphasizes rare occurrence of such nonsyndromic multiple talon cusps in two siblings. PMID:24992868

  11. The effect of extra dimensions on gravity wave bursts from cosmic string cusps

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: ggeshnizjani@perimeterinstitute.ca E-mail: zavala@th.physik.uni-bonn.de

    2010-09-01

    We explore the kinematical effect of having extra dimensions on the gravitational wave emission from cosmic strings. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, and reduce the probability of their formation. We recompute the gravitational wave burst, taking into account these two factors, and find a potentially significant damping on the gravitational waves of the strings.

  12. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  17. WIDESPREAD PRESENCE OF SHALLOW CUSPS IN THE SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS PROFILE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Vesperini, Enrico; Trenti, Michele E-mail: trenti@colorado.ed

    2010-09-10

    Surface-brightness profiles of globular clusters with shallow central cusps ({Sigma} {approx} R {sup {nu}} with -0.3 {approx_lt} {nu} {approx_lt} -0.05) have been associated by several recent studies with the presence of a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). Such shallow slopes are observed in several globular clusters thanks to the high angular resolution of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. In this Letter, we evaluate whether shallow cusps are a unique signature of a central IMBH by analyzing a sample of direct N-body simulations of star clusters with and without a central IMBH. We 'observe' the simulations as if they were HST images. Shallow cusps are common in our simulation sample: star clusters without an IMBH have {nu} {approx_gt} -0.3 in the pre-core-collapse and core-collapse phases. Post-core-collapse clusters without an IMBH transition to steeper cusps, -0.7 {approx_lt} {nu} {approx_lt} -0.4, only if the primordial binary fraction is very small, f {sub bin} < 3%, and if there are few stellar-mass BHs remaining. Otherwise {nu} values overlap the range usually ascribed to the presence of an IMBH throughout the entire duration of the simulations. In addition, measuring {nu} is intrinsically prone to significant uncertainty, therefore typical measurement errors may lead to {nu} {>=} -0.3 even when ({nu}) {approx_lt} -0.4. Overall our analysis shows that a shallow cusp is not an unequivocal signature of a central IMBH and casts serious doubts on the usefulness of measuring {nu} in the context of the hunt for IMBHs in globular clusters.

  18. Near-infrared mass-to-light ratios in galaxies - Stellar mass and star formation in the heart of the Whirlpool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.

    1988-01-01

    The observed stellar population in the solar neighborhood is used to derive a relationship between the local stellar mass density and the visual and near-IR brightness, which is then extended to a wide range of galaxies. This technique is applied to near-IR (J, H, and K) images of the central 2.3 kpc (50 arcsec) of the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51, NGC 5194). It is estimated that the current high rate of star formation can last no more than about another 10-million years, and that, if a large fraction of the stars in the nucleus of M51 was created in periods of enhanced formation, the duty cycle for such events is about 5 percent.

  19. Cusp catastrophe model of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, J E; Abelson, M A

    1983-09-01

    A cusp catastrophe model is developed to explain job turnover of nursing employees. The temporal dynamics of the catastrophe model suggest that leavers experience lower organization commitment than do stayers prior to termination. Leavers' perceptions of job tension and commitment appear to cross the threshold levels prior to the termination dates. PMID:10262614

  20. Cusp relation for the Pauli potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levämäki, H.; Nagy, Á.; Kokko, K.; Vitos, L.

    2014-12-01

    In orbital-free density functional theory, only a Schrödinger-like equation has to be solved for the square root of the electron density. In this equation, however, there is an extra potential in addition to the Kohn-Sham potential, the so-called Pauli potential. Cusp relations are now presented for this Pauli potential for spherically symmetric systems.

  1. Stellar Ontogeny: From Dust...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of star formation. Infrared and radio astronomy, particularly microwave astronomy is used to provide information on different stages of stellar formation. The role of dust and gas which swirl through the interstellar regions of a galaxy and the collapse of a cloud in star formation are also presented. (HM)

  2. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  3. Stellar Winds and Embedded Star Formation in the Galactic Center Quintuplet and Arches Clusters: Multifrequency Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Cornelia C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Goss, W. M.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2005-11-01

    A multifrequency, multiconfiguration study has been made of the compact radio sources in the Galactic center Quintuplet and Arches stellar clusters using the Very Large Array. Ten radio sources have been detected in the Quintuplet cluster. The majority of these radio sources have rising spectral indices and are positionally coincident with young massive stars that are known to have powerful stellar winds. We conclude that the three most compact of these sources are produced by stellar wind emission; thus, mass-loss rates can be derived and have an average value of 3×10-5 Msolar yr-1. The remainder of the sources are likely to be a combination of stellar wind emission and free-free emission from surrounding ionized gas. In three cases, the radio sources have no stellar counterpart, and the radio emission is thought to arise from compact or ultracompact H II regions. If so, these sources would be the first detections of embedded massive stars to be discovered in the Galactic center clusters. The radio nebula associated with the Pistol star resembles the nebula surrounding the luminous blue variable star η Car and may be related to the stellar wind of the Pistol star. Ten compact radio sources are also detected in the Arches cluster and are interpreted to be stellar wind sources, consistent with previous findings. Several of the sources show moderate variability (10%-30%) in their flux density, possibly related to a nonthermal component in the wind emission. A number of radio sources in both clusters have X-ray counterparts, which have been interpreted to be the shocked, colliding winds of massive binary systems.

  4. Failures no More: The Radical Consequences of Realistic Stellar Feedback for Dwarf Galaxies, the Milky Way, and Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-06-01

    Many of the most fundamental unsolved questions in star and galaxy formation revolve around star formation and "feedback" from massive stars, in-extricably linking galaxy formation and stellar evolution. I'll present simulations with un-precedented resolution of Milky-Way (MW) mass galaxies, followed cosmologically to redshift zero. For the first time, these simulations resolve the internal structure of small dwarf satellites around a MW-like host, with detailed models for stellar evolution including radiation pressure, supernovae, stellar winds, and photo-heating. I'll show that, without fine-tuning, these feedback processes naturally resolve the "missing satellites," "too big to fail," and "cusp-core" problems, and produce realistic galaxy populations. At high redshifts however, the realistic ISM structure predicted, coupled to standard stellar population models, naively leads to the prediction that only ~1-2% of ionizing photons can ever escape galaxies, insufficient to ionize the Universe. But these models assume all stars are single: if we account for binary evolution, the escape fraction increases dramatically to ~20% for the small, low-metallicity galaxies believed to ionize the Universe.

  5. DWARFS GOBBLING DWARFS: A STELLAR TIDAL STREAM AROUND NGC 4449 AND HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION ON SMALL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Delgado, David; Rix, Hans-Walter; Maccio, Andrea V.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Annibali, Francesca; Fliri, Juergen; Zibetti, Stefano; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Chonis, Taylor S.; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Gallego-Laborda, J.; Merrifield, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A candidate diffuse stellar substructure was previously reported in the halo of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4449 by Karachentsev et al. We map and analyze this feature using a unique combination of deep integrated-light images from the BlackBird 0.5 m telescope, and high-resolution wide-field images from the 8 m Subaru Telescope, which resolve the nebulosity into a stream of red giant branch stars, and confirm its physical association with NGC 4449. The properties of the stream imply a massive dwarf spheroidal progenitor, which after complete disruption will deposit an amount of stellar mass that is comparable to the existing stellar halo of the main galaxy. The stellar mass ratio between the two galaxies is {approx}1:50, while the indirectly measured dynamical mass ratio, when including dark matter, may be {approx}1:10-1:5. This system may thus represent a 'stealth' merger, where an infalling satellite galaxy is nearly undetectable by conventional means, yet has a substantial dynamical influence on its host galaxy. This singular discovery also suggests that satellite accretion can play a significant role in building up the stellar halos of low-mass galaxies, and possibly in triggering their starbursts.

  6. On the evolution and environmental dependence of the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation since z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yusei; Smail, Ian; Kurk, Jaron; Geach, James E.; Sobral, David; Kodama, Tadayuki; Nakata, Fumiaki; Swinbank, A. M.; Best, Philip N.; Hayashi, Masao; Tadaki, Ken-ichi

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of the correlation between galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar mass (M*) over the last ˜10 Gyr, particularly focusing on its environmental dependence. We first present the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of the Hα-selected galaxies in a rich cluster Cl 0939+4713 at z = 0.4. We use wide-field Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm data to show that the optically red Hα emitters, which are most prevalent in group-scale environments, tend to have higher SFRs and higher dust extinction than the majority population of blue Hα sources. With an MIR stacking analysis, we find that the median SFR of Hα emitters is higher in higher density environment at z = 0.4. We also find that star-forming galaxies in high-density environment tend to have higher specific SFR (SSFR), although the trend is much less significant compared to that of SFR. This increase of SSFR in high-density environment is not visible when we consider the SFR derived from Hα alone, suggesting that the dust attenuation in galaxies depends on environment; galaxies in high-density environment tend to be dustier (by up to ˜0.5 mag), probably reflecting a higher fraction of nucleated, dusty starbursts in higher density environments at z = 0.4. We then discuss the environmental dependence of the SFR-M* relation for star-forming galaxies since z ˜ 2, by compiling our comparable, narrow-band-selected, large Hα emitter samples in both distant cluster environments and field environments. We find that the SSFR of Hα-selected galaxies (at the fixed mass of log (M*/M⊙) = 10) rapidly evolves as (1 + z)3, but the SFR-M* relation is independent of the environment since z ˜ 2, as far as we rely on the Hα-based SFRs (with M*-dependent extinction correction). Even if we consider the possible environmental variation in the dust attenuation, we conclude that the difference in the SFR-M* relation between cluster and field star-forming galaxies is always small (≲0.2 dex level) at any time

  7. Talon Cusp Type I: Restorative Management

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Rafael Alberto dos Santos; de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine; Mei, Raul Sampaio; Lamers, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The teeth are formed during intrauterine life (i.e., gestation) during the odontogenesis stage. During this period, the teeth move until they enter the oral cavity. This course covers various stages of dental development, namely, initiation, proliferation, histodifferentiation, morphodifferentiation, and apposition. The talon cusp is an anomaly that occurs during morphodifferentiation, and this anomaly may have numerous adverse clinical effects on oral health. The objective of this study was to report a case of “Talon Cusp Type I” and to discuss diagnostic methods, treatment options for this anomaly, and the importance of knowledge of this morphological change among dental professionals so that it is not confused with other morphological changes; such knowledge is required to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures, to perform treatments that prevent caries and malocclusions as well as enhancing aesthetics, and to improve the oral health and quality of life of the patient. PMID:26064698

  8. Resurgence of the cusp anomalous dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigoni, Daniele; Hatsuda, Yasuyuki

    2015-09-01

    We revisit the strong coupling limit of the cusp anomalous dimension in planar N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. It is known that the strong coupling expansion is asymptotic and non-Borel summable. As a consequence, the cusp anomalous dimension receives non-perturbative corrections, and the complete strong coupling expansion should be a resurgent transseries. We reveal that the perturbative and non-perturbative parts in the transseries are closely interrelated. Solving the Beisert-Eden-Staudacher equation systematically, we analyze in detail the large order behavior in the strong coupling pertur- bative expansion and show that the non-perturbative information is indeed encoded there. An ambiguity of (lateral) Borel resummations of the perturbative expansion is precisely canceled by the contributions from the non-perturbative sectors, and the final result is real and unambiguous.

  9. GEM Workshop on Intercalibrating Cusp Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    On October 9, 1990, a lively group of more than 60 scientists from around the world gathered at Northeastern University's Henderson House in Weston, Mass., to spend 4 days in concentrated efforts to unravel the complexities of cusp/cleft theory and observations.Plans for the National Science Foundation-sponsored workshop were formulated at the previous GEM workshop convened by Ted Rosenberg at the University of Maryland in October 1989, where participants agreed that the first task of the first GEM campaign—attacking problems of the magnetopause, boundary layers, and their signatures in the ionosphere—should be the identification of cusp signatures in ground-based and airborne data by intercalibrating with spacecraft data on direct overflights.

  10. Ion observations at Mercury's Magnetospheric Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Jamie; Raines, Jim; Slavin, James

    2016-04-01

    The magnetospheric cusp is a region of direct entry for solar wind mass, energy and momentum into a planetary magnetosphere. Dayside magnetic reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field and the planetary field allows shocked solar wind plasma to flow down open magnetospheric field lines. Whilst this is occurring these magnetic field lines convect poleward. For a spacecraft travelling through the high latitudes, this causes a velocity filter effect to be observed in the ion data, whereby higher energy ions are observed at lower latitudes. Here we present the ion observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft at Mercury's cusp, specifically focusing on ions latitudinally dispersed in energy. From these dispersions, the distance to the reconnection site is calculated and used to better understand the process of reconnection at Mercury's dayside magnetopause.

  11. Low pressure hugoniot cusp in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Bloomquist, D. D.

    1982-04-01

    It has previously been shown that polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) exhibits a cusp in the shock Hugoniot at about 2.0 GPa which corresponds with the beginning of shock-induced polarization and the beginning of an exothermic reaction measured in thermocouple and resistivity gauge temperature studies. We now report results we have recently obtained from an ongoing study which indicate that other polymers have similar behavior at about the same pressure. Quartz gauge impact experiments have been performed using polypyro-ellitimide (Vespel) and polysulfone impactors to obtain Hugoniot information and the stress history at the impact plane. In the case of Vespel a slight Hugoniot cusp was observed at about 1.8 GPa which coincides with the start of shock-induced polarization. Polysulfone does not appear to have a cusp but does show stress relaxation at the impact plane beginning at about 1.8 GPa, again coinciding with the start of shock-induced polarization. It has been suggested earlier that the abnormal behavior in PMMA is the result of a shock-induced chemical reaction. This new information suggests that a stress of about 2 GPa is a threshold for shock-induced chemical reaction in several polymers.

  12. Low pressure Hugoniot cusp in polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Bloomquist, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    It has previously been shown that polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) exhibits a cusp in the shock Hugoniot at about 2.0 GPa which corresponds with the beginning of shock-induced polarization and the beginning of an exothermic reaction measured in thermocouple and resistivity gauge temperature studies. We now report results we have recently obtained from an ongoing study which indicate that other polymers have similar behavior at about the same pressure. Quartz gauge impact experiments have been performed using polypyromellitimide (Vespel) and polysulfone impactors to obtain Hugoniot information and the stress history at the impact plane. In the case of Vespel a slight Hugoniot cusp was observed at about 1.8 GPa which coincides with the start of shock-induced polarization. Polysulfone does not appear to have a cusp but does show stress relaxation at the impact plant beginning at about 1.8 GPa, again coinciding with the start of shock-induced polarization. It has been suggested that the abnormal behavior in PMMA is the result of a shock-induced chemical reaction. This new information suggests that a stress of about 2 GPa is a threshold for shock-induced chemical reaction in several polymers.

  13. Frontiers of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses theoretical and observational views of star formation, spectroscopic constraints on the evolution of massive stars, very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, asteroseismology, globular clusters as tests of stellar evolution, observational tests of stellar evolution, and mass loss from cool evolved giant stars. Also discussed are white dwarfs and hot subdwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, supernovae from single stars, close binaries with evolved components, accretion disks in interacting binaries, supernovae in binary systems, stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution, and interacting binaries containing compact components.

  14. TESTING GALAXY FORMATION MODELS WITH THE GHOSTS SURVEY: THE COLOR PROFILE OF M81's STELLAR HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Bailin, Jeremy; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Vlajic, Marija; De Jong, Roelof S.; Streich, David; Holwerda, Benne W.

    2013-04-01

    We study the properties of the stellar populations in M81's outermost part, which hereafter we will call the stellar halo, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of 19 fields from the GHOSTS survey. The observed fields probe the stellar halo out to a projected distance of {approx}50 kpc from the galactic center. Each field was observed in both F606W and F814W filters. The 50% completeness levels of the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are typically at 2 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). Fields at distances closer than 15 kpc show evidence of disk-dominated populations whereas fields at larger distances are mostly populated by halo stars. The red giant branch (RGB) of the M81's halo CMDs is well matched with isochrones of {approx}10 Gyr and metallicities [Fe/H] {approx} - 1.2 dex, suggesting that the dominant stellar population of M81's halo has a similar age and metallicity. The halo of M81 is characterized by a color distribution of width {approx}0.4 mag and an approximately constant median value of (F606W - F814W) {approx}1 mag measured using stars within the magnitude range 23.7 {approx}< F814W {approx}< 25.5. When considering only fields located at galactocentric radius R > 15 kpc, we detect no color gradient in the stellar halo of M81. We place a limit of 0.03 {+-} 0.11 mag difference between the median color of RGB M81 halo stars at {approx}15 and at 50 kpc, corresponding to a metallicity difference of 0.08 {+-} 0.35 dex over that radial range for an assumed constant age of 10 Gyr. We compare these results with model predictions for the colors of stellar halos formed purely via accretion of satellite galaxies. When we analyze the cosmologically motivated models in the same way as the HST data, we find that they predict no color gradient for the stellar halos, in good agreement with the observations.

  15. Understanding the formation and evolution of early-type galaxies based on newly developed single-burst stellar population synthesis models in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeck, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    whole optical and infrared wavelength range between 3500 and 50000Å which are almost completely based on spectra of observed stars (apart from two gaps which were fitted with theoretical stellar spectra) . We analyze the behaviour of the near-infrared (J - K) and the Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colour calculated from our models. For ages older than 3 Gyr, both colours depend only slightly on age and metallicity. However, for younger ages, both colours become redder which is caused by the asymptotic giant branch stars contributing significantly to the light in the infrared at ages between 0.1 and 3 Gyr. Furthermore, we find a satisfactory agreement between the optical and near-infrared colours measured from our models and the colours observed from various samples of globular clusters and early-type x galaxies. However, our model predictions are only able to reproduce correctly the Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colours of older, more massive galaxies that resemble a single-burst population. Younger, less massive and more metal-poor galaxies show redder colours than our models. This mismatch can be explained by a more extended star formation history of these galaxies which includes a metal-poor or/and young population. The Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colours derived from our models also agree very well with those from most other models available in this wavelength range as long as they also correctly take into account a strong CO absorption band situated at 4.5 μm. The model predictions for colours in the near-infrared, such as (J - K), differ more between the different sets of models, depending on the underlying prescriptions for the asymptotic giant branch stellar evolutionary phase. Compared to other authors, we adopt only a moderate contribution of asymptotic giant branch stars to our models. Our stellar population models allow us also to determine mass-to-light ratios in different infrared bands. Consequently, we can confirm that the massto- light ratio determined in the Spitzer [3

  16. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. III. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND CONSTRAINTS ON FORMATION SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Peletier, R. F.; Emsellem, E.; Lisker, T.; Van de Ven, G.; Simon, J. D.; Adams, J. J.; Benson, A. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.; Gorgas, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Paudel, S.

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum λ{sub Re} and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo Cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner 3° (D < 1 Mpc) of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disk-like structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotators do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo Cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between λ{sub Re} and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram-pressure stripping, although some of it can be retained in their core, their star formation is quenched but their stellar kinematics are preserved. After a long time in the cluster and several passes through its center, the galaxies are heated up and transformed into slow rotating dEs.

  17. Temporal Cusp Ion Signatures and Magnetopause Reconnection during Northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, H. K.; Sibeck, D. G.; Raeder, J.; Trattner, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Dispersed ion signatures observed in the magnetospheric cusps have been used to understand the locations and properties of magnetopause reconnection. Whether a cusp structure is spatial or temporal is an important question because these structures reveal the spatial and temporal nature of magnetopause reconnection. We study temporal cusp ion signatures and their relation to the magnetopause processes during northward IMF using the Open Global Geospace Circulation Model (OpenGGCM) and the Liouville Theorem Particle Tracer (LTPT). OpenGGCM produces dayside reconnection within the framework of resistive MHD, while the LTPT calculates cusp ion signatures caused by the simulated reconnection. Our model produces temporal cusp ion dispersions with ion energies that increase with decreasing latitude during northward IMF, although these signatures are commonly associated with subsolar reconnection during southward IMF. We investigate which magnetopause process is responsible for the temporal cusp signatures.

  18. High resolution modeling of the cusp density anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere causing an ionization anomaly. The energy from these particles along with Joule heating, and ion drag forcing play a direct role in determining the neutral density structure in the cusp region. Measurements by the CHAMP (390-460 km altitudes) have shown a region of strong enhanced density attributed to upwelling caused by the combination of particle and Joule heating. The Streak mission (325-123 km) observed a relative depletion in density in the cusp which was attributed to soft particle precipitation not being adequate to cause upwelling at the lower altitudes sampled by Streak and relatively harder precipitation in adjacent areas. Recent attempts to model the cusp density anomaly with Global Circulation Models (GCM) have focused on extreme cases with forcing extending over latitudinal cusp widths of 4 degrees or more which are at the extreme upper end of the observations. Even at one degree latitudinal resolution the cusp features are marginally captured. More typical cusps widths of 1-2 degrees in latitude require finer resolution to resolve. We use a high-resolution numerical model of the thermosphere to simulate the atmospheric response to the relevant forcing by realistically specifying the particle heating, Joule heating, and ion drag forcing to examine the dependence of the magnitude of the cusp density anomaly and the corresponding wind structure on the characteristics of the forcing in the cusp. We ran simulations for cusp widths of 4 and 2 degrees latitude using a model resolution of 20 km. We found that reducing the cusp width by half reduced the density response in the cusp by half, but that the wind response was only slightly decreased. We compare the model results to CHAMP and Streak observations and assess the relative contributions of these mechanisms in explaining the distinctive features of the observations. Acknowledgements: This research was

  19. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  20. Plasma Instability Growth Rates in the F-Region Cusp Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J. I.; Daabakk, Y.; Oksavik, K.; Clausen, L.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Abe, T.; Saito, Y.; Baddeley, L. J.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Sigernes, F.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    There are at least two different micro-instability processes that applies to the F-region cusp/polar cap ionosphere. These are the Gradient Drift Instability (GDI) and the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI). Due to space weather effects on radio communication and satellite signals it is of practical interest to assess the relative importance of these two instability modes and to quantify their growth rates. The Investigation of Cusp Irregularities (ICI) rocket program has been developed to investigate these plasma instabilities and formation scintillation irregularities. High resolution measurements are critical to get realistic quantities on the growth rates. The results achieved so far demonstrates that cusp ionosphere precipitation can give rise to km scale plasma structures on which grow rates are down to a few tens of seconds compared to earlier measures of ten minutes based on ground observations. This has to do with the spatial resolution required for these measurements. Growth rates for the KHI instability is found to be of the same order, which is consistent with growth rates calculated from the EISCAT Svalbard Radar. I.e. both instability modes can be highly efficient in the cusp ionosphere.

  1. Polar cap arcs: Sun-aligned or cusp-aligned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Qinghe; Xing, Zanyang

    2016-08-01

    Polar cap arcs are often called sun-aligned arcs. Satellite observations reveal that polar cap arcs join together at the cusp and are actually cusp aligned. Strong ionospheric plasma velocity shears, thus field aligned currents, were associated with polar arcs and they were likely caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves around the low-latitude magnetopause under a northward IMF Bz. The magnetic field lines around the magnetopause join together in the cusp region so are the field aligned currents and particle precipitation. This explains why polar arcs are cusp aligned.

  2. Particle Detectors and Data Analysis for Cusp Transient Features Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Grant NAG5-5084 was awarded to support the participation of South West Research Institute (SwRI) in building the energy per unit charge particle detectors for the Cusp Transient Features Campaign and analysis of flight data from these instruments. The detectors are part of an instrumented payload (Rocket 36.152, Dr. R. Pfaff, P.I.) launched from Svalbard on December 3, 1997, into the dark cusp. The particle instruments, a Cusp Electron Detector (CED) and a Cusp Ion Detector (CID), built on this project, provided differential energy and angular measurements along the rocket trajectory throughout the flight.

  3. Predicting cusps or kinks in Nambu-Goto dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Aldrin; García-Aspeitia, Miguel A.

    2015-11-01

    It is known that Nambu-Goto extended objects present some pathological structures, such as cusps and kinks, during their evolution. In this paper, we propose a model through the generalized Raychaudhuri (Rh) equation for membranes to determine if there are cusps and kinks in the worldsheet. We extend the generalized Rh equation for membranes to allow the study of the effect of higher order curvature terms in the action on the issue of cusps and kinks, using it as a tool for determining when a Nambu-Goto string generates cusps or kinks in its evolution. Furthermore, we present three examples where we test graphically this approach.

  4. Evolution of the mass, size, and star formation rate in high redshift merging galaxies. MIRAGE - A new sample of simulations with detailed stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, V.; Renaud, F.; Epinat, B.; Amram, P.; Bournaud, F.; Contini, T.; Teyssier, R.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2014-02-01

    Context. In Λ-CDM models, galaxies are thought to grow both through continuous cold gas accretion coming from the cosmic web and episodic merger events. The relative importance of these different mechanisms at different cosmic epochs is nevertheless not yet understood well. Aims: We aim to address questions related to galaxy mass assembly through major and minor wet merging processes in the redshift range 1 < z < 2, an epoch that corresponds to the peak of cosmic star formation history. A significant fraction of Milky Way-like galaxies are thought to have undergone an unstable clumpy phase at this early stage. We focus on the behavior of the young clumpy disks when galaxies are undergoing gas-rich galaxy mergers. Methods: Using the adaptive mesh-refinement code RAMSES, we build the Merging and Isolated high redshift Adaptive mesh refinement Galaxies (MIRAGE) sample. It is composed of 20 mergers and 3 isolated idealized disks simulations, which sample disk orientations and merger masses. Our simulations can reach a physical resolution of 7 parsecs, and include star formation, metal line cooling, metallicity advection, and a recent physically-motivated implementation of stellar feedback that encompasses OB-type stars radiative pressure, photo-ionization heating, and supernovae. Results: The star formation history of isolated disks shows a stochastic star formation rate, which proceeds from the complex behavior of the giant clumps. Our minor and major gas-rich merger simulations do not trigger starbursts, suggesting a saturation of the star formation due to the detailed accounting of stellar feedback processes in a turbulent and clumpy interstellar medium fed by substantial accretion from the circumgalactic medium. Our simulations are close to the normal regime of the disk-like star formation on a Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram. The mass-size relation and its rate of evolution in the redshift range 1 < z < 2 matches observations, suggesting that the inside-out growth

  5. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF 3 < z < 7 FAINT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: THE IMPORTANCE OF NEBULAR EMISSION IN UNDERSTANDING THE SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Daniel P.; Robertson, Brant; Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard; McLure, Ross; Dunlop, James

    2013-02-15

    The physical properties inferred from the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of z > 3 galaxies have been influential in shaping our understanding of early galaxy formation and the role galaxies may play in cosmic reionization. Of particular importance is the stellar mass density at early times, which represents the integral of earlier star formation. An important puzzle arising from the measurements so far reported is that the specific star formation rates (sSFRs) evolve far less rapidly than expected in most theoretical models. Yet the observations underpinning these results remain very uncertain, owing in part to the possible contamination of rest-optical broadband light from strong nebular emission lines. To quantify the contribution of nebular emission to broadband fluxes, we investigate the SEDs of 92 spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in the redshift range 3.8 < z < 5.0 chosen because the H{alpha} line lies within the Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 {mu}m filter. We demonstrate that the 3.6 {mu}m flux is systematically in excess of that expected from stellar continuum alone, which we derive by fitting the SED with population synthesis models. No such excess is seen in a control sample of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies with 3.1 < z < 3.6 in which there is no nebular contamination in the IRAC filters. From the distribution of our 3.6 {mu}m flux excesses, we derive an H{alpha} equivalent width distribution and consider the implications for both the derived stellar masses and the sSFR evolution. The mean rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width we infer at 3.8 < z < 5.0 (270 A) indicates that nebular emission contributes at least 30% of the 3.6 {mu}m flux and, by implication, nebular emission is likely to have a much greater impact for galaxies with z {approx_equal} 6-7 where both warm IRAC filters are contaminated. Via our empirically derived equivalent width distribution, we correct the available stellar mass densities and show that the sSFR evolves more rapidly at z

  6. The role of stellar mass and environment for cluster blue fraction, AGN fraction and star formation indicators from a targeted analysis of Abell 1691

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jensen, Peter C.

    2012-10-01

    We present an analysis of the galaxy population of the intermediate X-ray luminosity galaxy cluster, Abell 1691, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Zoo data to elucidate the relationships between environment and galaxy stellar mass for a variety of observationally important cluster populations that include the Butcher-Oemler blue fraction, the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and other spectroscopic classifications of galaxies. From 342 cluster members, we determine a cluster recession velocity of 21257 ± 54 km s-1 and velocity dispersion of 1009-36+40 km s-1 and show that although the cluster is fed by multiple filaments of galaxies it does not possess significant sub-structure in its core. We identify the AGN population of the cluster from a Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich diagram and show that there is a mild increase in the AGN fraction with radius from the cluster centre that appears mainly driven by high-mass galaxies [log(stellar mass) > 10.8]. Although the cluster blue fraction follows the same radial trend, it is caused primarily by lower mass galaxies [log(stellar mass) < 10.8]. Significantly, the galaxies that have undergone recent starbursts or are presently starbursting but dust-shrouded [spectroscopic e(a) class galaxies] are also nearly exclusively driven by low-mass galaxies. We therefore suggest that the Butcher-Oemler effect may be a mass-dependent effect. We also examine red and passive spiral galaxies and show that the majority are massive galaxies, much like the rest of the red and spectroscopically passive cluster population. We further demonstrate that the velocity dispersion profiles of low- and high-mass cluster galaxies are different. Taken together, we infer that the duty cycle of high- and low-mass cluster galaxies is markedly different, with a significant departure in star formation and specific star formation rates observed beyond r200 and we discuss these findings.

  7. Plasma Structure and Behavior of Miniature Ring-Cusp Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hann-Shin

    Miniature ring-cusp ion thrusters provide a unique blend of high efficiencies and millinewton level thrust for future spacecraft. These thrusters are attractive as a primary propulsion for small satellites that require a high delta V, and as a secondary propulsion for larger spacecraft that require precision formation flying, disturbance rejection, or attitude control. To ensure desirable performance throughout the life of such missions, an advancement in the understanding of the plasma structure and behavior of miniature ring-cusp discharges is required. A research model was fabricated to provide a simplified experimental test bed for the analysis of the plasma discharge chamber of a miniature ion thruster. The plasma source allowed for spatially resolved measurements with a Langmuir probe along a meridian plane. Probe measurements yielded plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential data. The magnetic field strength was varied along with the discharge current to determine the plasma behavior under various conditions. The structure of the plasma properties were found to be independent of the discharge power under the proper scaling. It was concluded that weaker magnetic fields can improve the overall performance for ion thruster operation. To further analyze the experimental measurements, a framework was developed based on the magnetic field. A flux aligned coordinate system was developed to decouple the perpendicular and parallel plasma motion with respect to the magnetic field. This was done using the stream function and magnetic scalar potential. Magnetic formulae provided intuition on the field profiles dependence on magnet dimensions. The flux aligned coordinate system showed that the plasma was isopycnic along constant stream function values. This was used to develop an empirical relation suitable for estimating the spatial behavior and to determine the plasma volume and loss areas. The plasma geometry estimates were applied to a control volume

  8. Limit Theorems for Dispersing Billiards with Cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálint, P.; Chernov, N.; Dolgopyat, D.

    2011-12-01

    Dispersing billiards with cusps are deterministic dynamical systems with a mild degree of chaos, exhibiting "intermittent" behavior that alternates between regular and chaotic patterns. Their statistical properties are therefore weak and delicate. They are characterized by a slow (power-law) decay of correlations, and as a result the classical central limit theorem fails. We prove that a non-classical central limit theorem holds, with a scaling factor of {sqrt{nlog n}} replacing the standard {sqrt{n}} . We also derive the respective Weak Invariance Principle, and we identify the class of observables for which the classical CLT still holds.

  9. Corners, Cusps, and Pearls in Running Drops

    SciTech Connect

    Podgorski, T.; Flesselles, J.-M.; Limat, L.

    2001-07-16

    Small drops sliding down a partially wetting substrate bifurcate between different shapes depending on their capillary number Ca . At low Ca , they are delimited by a rounded, smooth contact line. At intermediate values they develop a corner at the trailing edge, the angle of which evolves from flat to 60{sup o} with increasing velocity. Further up, they exhibit a cusped tail that emits smaller drops (''pearls''). These bifurcations may be qualitatively and quantitatively recovered by considering the dynamic contact angle along the contact line.

  10. Ultraluminous Infrared Mergers: Elliptical Galaxies in Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Lutz, D.; Tecza, M.

    2001-12-01

    We report high-quality near-IR spectroscopy of 12 ultraluminous infrared galaxy mergers (ULIRGs). Our new VLT and Keck data provide ~0.5" resolution, stellar and gas kinematics of these galaxies, most of which are compact systems in the last merger stages. We confirm that ULIRG mergers are ``ellipticals in formation.'' Random motions dominate their stellar dynamics, but significant rotation is common. Gasdynamics and stellar dynamics are decoupled in most systems. ULIRGs fall on or near the fundamental plane of hot stellar systems, and especially on its less evolution-sensitive, reff-σ projection. The ULIRG velocity dispersion distribution, their location in the fundamental plane, and their distribution of vrotsini/σ closely resemble those of intermediate-mass (~L*), elliptical galaxies with moderate rotation. As a group ULIRGs do not resemble giant ellipticals with large cores and little rotation. Our results are in good agreement with other recent studies indicating that disky ellipticals with compact cores or cusps can form through dissipative mergers of gas-rich disk galaxies while giant ellipticals with large cores have a different formation history. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO 65.N-0266, 65.N-0289), and on observations at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, The University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Keck Observatory was made possible by the general financial support by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  11. The relationship between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate for Hα-selected galaxies at z ≈ 0.8 from the NewHα survey

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Mithi A. de los; Ly, Chun; Lee, Janice C.; Peeples, Molly S.; Feddersen, Jesse; Salim, Samir; Momcheva, Ivelina; Dale, Daniel A.; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Finn, Rose

    2015-02-01

    Using a sample of 299 Hα-selected galaxies at z≈0.8, we study the relationship between galaxy stellar mass, gas-phase metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR), and compare to previous results. We use deep optical spectra obtained with the IMACS spectrograph at the Magellan telescope to measure strong oxygen lines. We combine these spectra and metallicities with (1) rest-frame UV-to-optical imaging, which allows us to determine stellar masses and dust attenuation corrections, and (2) Hα narrowband imaging, which provides a robust measurement of the instantaneous SFR. Our sample spans stellar masses of ∼10{sup 9}–6 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙}, SFRs of 0.4–270 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, and metal abundances of 12+log(O/H)≈8.3–9.1 (≈0.4–2.6 Z{sub ⊙}). The correlations that we find between the Hα-based SFR and stellar mass (i.e., the star-forming “main sequence”) and between the stellar mass and metallicity are both consistent with previous z∼1 studies of star-forming galaxies. We then study the relationship between the three properties using various plane-fitting techniques and a curve-fitting projection. In all cases, we exclude strong dependence of the M{sub ⋆}–Z relation on SFR, but are unable to distinguish between moderate and no dependence. Our results are consistent with previous mass–metallicity–SFR studies. We check whether data set limitations may obscure a strong dependence on the SFR by using mock samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These experiments reveal that the adopted signal-to-noise ratio cuts may have a significant effect on the measured dependence. Further work is needed to investigate these results, and to test whether a “fundamental metallicity relation” or a “fundamental plane” describes star-forming galaxies across cosmic time.

  12. Under the sword of Damocles: plausible regeneration of dark matter cusps at the smallest galactic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Chervin F. P.; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    We study the evolution of the dark matter (DM) halo profiles of dwarf galaxies driven by the accretion of DM substructures through controlled N-body experiments. Our initial conditions assume that early supernova feedback erases the primordial DM cusps of haloes with z = 0 masses of 109 - 1010 M⊙. The orbits and masses of the infalling substructures are borrowed from the Aquarius cosmological simulations. Our experiments show that a fraction of haloes that undergo 1:3 down to 1:30 mergers are susceptible to reform a DM cusp by z ≈ 0. Cusp regrowth is driven by the accretion of DM substructures that are dense enough to reach the central regions of the main halo before being tidally disrupted. The infall of substructures on the mean of the reported mass-concentration relation and a mass ratio above 1:6 systematically leads to cusp regrowth. Substructures with 1:6-1:8, and 1:8-1:30 only reform DM cusps if their densities are 1σ and 2σ above the mean, respectively. The merging time-scales of these dense, low-mass substructures is relatively long (5 - 11 Gyr), which may pose a time-scale problem for the longevity of DM cores in dwarfs galaxies and possibly explain the existence of dense dwarfs-like Draco. These results suggest that within cold dark matter a non-negligible level of scatter in the mass profiles of galactic haloes acted on by feedback is to be expected given the stochastic mass accretion histories of low-mass haloes and the diverse star formation histories observed in the Local Group dwarfs.

  13. THE CORE-CUSP PROBLEM IN COLD DARK MATTER HALOS AND SUPERNOVA FEEDBACK: EFFECTS OF MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Ogiya, Go; Mori, Masao

    2011-07-20

    The core-cusp problem remains as one of the unsolved discrepancies between observations and theories predicted by the standard paradigm of cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology. To solve this problem, we perform N-body simulations to study the nonlinear response of CDM halos to the variance of the gravitational potential induced by gas removal from galaxy centers. In this study, we focus on the timescale of the gas ejection, which is strongly correlated with stellar activities, and demonstrate that it is one of the key factors in determining the dynamical response of CDM halos. The results of simulations show that the power-law index of the mass-density profile of the dark matter (DM) halo is correlated with the timescale of the mass loss and it is flatter when the mass loss occurs over a short time than when it occurs over a long time. However, it is still larger than typical observational values; in other words, the central cusp remains in the simulations for any mass-loss model. Moreover, for the slow mass-loss case, the final density profile of the DM halo recovers the universal density profiles predicted by the CDM cosmology. Therefore, the mass loss driven by stellar feedback may not be an effective mechanism to flatten the central cusp.

  14. On the evolutionary advantage of multi-cusped teeth.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Paul J; Bush, Mark B; Barani, Amir; Lawn, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    A hallmark of mammalian evolution is a progressive complexity in postcanine tooth morphology. However, the driving force for this complexity remains unclear: whether to expand the versatility in diet source, or to bolster tooth structural integrity. In this study, we take a quantitative approach to this question by examining the roles of number, position and height of multiple cusps in determining sustainable bite forces. Our approach is to use an extended finite-element methodology with due provision for step-by-step growth of an embedded crack to determine how fracture progresses with increasing occlusal load. We argue that multi-cusp postcanine teeth are well configured to withstand high bite forces provided that multiple cusps are contacted simultaneously to share the load. However, contact on a single near-wall cusp diminishes the strength. Location of the load points and cusp height, rather than cusp number or radius, are principal governing factors. Given these findings, we conclude that while complex tooth structures can enhance durability, increases in cusp number are more likely to be driven by the demands of food manipulation. Structural integrity of complex teeth is maintained when individual cusps remain sufficiently distant from the side walls and do not become excessively tall relative to tooth width. PMID:27558851

  15. Energetic ions, large diamagnetic cavities, and Chapman-Ferraro cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Theodore A.; Chen, Jiasheng; Siscoe, George L.

    2003-01-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 RE have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities were associated with strong magnetic field turbulence. Associated with these cavities are >40 keV ions that are more typical of the trapped ring current and radiation belt populations than the solar wind. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of ionospheric and solar wind particles. In April 1999, the cusp diamagnetic cavities were observed by the Polar spacecraft almost in every orbit, indicating that such cavities are always there day by day. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the interplanetary magnetic field directions, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. During a high solar wind pressure period on 21 April 1999, the Polar spacecraft observed lower energetic (>20 keV/e) ion fluxes in the dayside high-latitude magnetosheath than that in the neighboring cusp cavities. By their geometry cusp magnetic field lines are connected to all of the magnetopause boundary layers. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity probably have significant global impacts on the geospace environment.

  16. Ring cusp discharge chamber performance optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiatt, J. M.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of discharge chamber length and the locations of the anode, cathode and ring cusp within the chamber on the performance of an 8 cm dia. ring cusp thruster is described. As these lengths and positions are varied the changes induced in plasma ion energy costs, extracted ion fractions and ion beam profiles are measured. Results show that the anode may be positioned at any location along an 'optimum virtual anode' magnetic field line and minimum plasma ion energy costs will result. The actual location of this field line is related to a 'virtual cathode' magnetic field line that is defined by the cathode position. The magnetic field has to be such that the virtual anode field line intersects the grids at the outermost ring of grid holes to maximize the extracted ion fraction and flatten the ion beam profile. Discharge chamber lengths that were as small as possible in the test apparatus yielded the lowest extracted ion fractions.

  17. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Study Of Crown Dilaceration With a Talon Cusp in an Unerupted Permanent Maxillary Tooth.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Donyavi, Zakiyeh; Shokri, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    This article describes a rare case of crown dilaceration with a talon cusp in an unerupted permanent maxillary central incisor. Our patient was a 7-year-old boy with a history of trauma to his primary maxillary teeth (#51 and 52), at 3 years of age complaining of failure of eruption of tooth #11. Periapical radiography showed incomplete formation of tooth root #11 and more superior position of tooth bud #11 relative to tooth bud #12. A cone-beam computed tomography was ordered, which revealed crown dilaceration with a talon cusp in tooth bud #11. The patient was scheduled for follow-up at 6 months. PMID:26854775

  18. Pixel Color Magnitude Diagrams for Semi-resolved Stellar Populations: The Star Formation History of Regions within the Disk and Bulge of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of stellar populations has, by and large, been developed for two limiting cases: spatially resolved stellar populations in the color–magnitude diagram, and integrated light observations of distant systems. In between these two extremes lies the semi-resolved regime, which encompasses a rich and relatively unexplored realm of observational phenomena. Here we develop the concept of pixel color–magnitude diagrams (pCMDs) as a powerful technique for analyzing stellar populations in the semi-resolved regime. pCMDs show the distribution of imaging data in the plane of pixel luminosity versus pixel color. A key feature of pCMDs is that they are sensitive to all stars, including both the evolved giants and the unevolved main sequence stars. An important variable in this regime is the mean number of stars per pixel, {N}{{pix}}. Simulated pCMDs demonstrate a strong sensitivity to the star formation history (SFH) and have the potential to break degeneracies between age, metallicity and dust based on two filter data for values of {N}{{pix}} up to at least 104. We extract pCMDs from Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging of M31 and derive SFHs with seven independent age bins from 106 to 1010 year for both the crowded disk and bulge regions (where {N}{{pix}}≈ 30{--}{10}3). From analyzing a small region of the disk we find a SFH that is smooth and consistent with an exponential decay timescale of 4 Gyr. The bulge SFH is also smooth and consistent with a 2 Gyr decay timescale. pCMDs will likely play an important role in maximizing the science returns from next generation ground and space-based facilities.

  19. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VIII. EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS IN GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yoshikawa, T.; Onodera, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the evolution of star formation activity of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3.5 as a function of stellar mass, using very deep NIR data taken with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope in the GOODS-North region. The NIR imaging data reach K{approx} 23-24 Vega magnitude and they allow us to construct a nearly stellar-mass-limited sample down to {approx}10{sup 9.5-10} M{sub sun} even at z {approx} 3. We estimated star formation rates (SFRs) of the sample with two indicators, namely, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m flux and the rest-frame 2800 A luminosity. The SFR distribution at a fixed M{sub star} shifts to higher values with increasing redshift at 0.5 < z < 3.5. More massive galaxies show stronger evolution of SFR at z {approx}> 1. We found galaxies at 2.5 < z < 3.5 show a bimodality in their SSFR distribution, which can be divided into two populations by a constant SSFR of {approx}2 Gyr{sup -1}. Galaxies in the low-SSFR group have SSFRs of {approx}0.5-1.0 Gyr{sup -1}, while the high-SSFR population shows {approx}10 Gyr{sup -1}. The cosmic SFR density (SFRD) is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11} M{sub sun} at 0.5 < z < 3.5, while the contribution of massive galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 11-11.5} M{sub sun} shows a strong evolution at z>1 and becomes significant at z {approx} 3, especially in the case with the SFR based on MIPS 24 {mu}m. In galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11.5} M{sub sun}, those with a relatively narrow range of SSFR ({approx}<1 dex) dominates the cosmic SFRD at 0.5 < z < 3.5. The SSFR of galaxies that dominate the SFRD systematically increases with redshift. At 2.5 < z < 3.5, the high-SSFR population, which is relatively small in number, dominates the SFRD. Major star formation in the universe at higher redshift seems to be associated with a more rapid growth of stellar mass of galaxies.

  20. The effect of stellar feedback on the formation and evolution of gas and dust tori in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartmann, M.; Meisenheimer, K.; Klahr, H.; Camenzind, M.; Wolf, S.; Henning, Th.

    2009-03-01

    Recently, the existence of geometrically thick dust structures in active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been directly proven with the help of interferometric methods in the mid-infrared. The observations are consistent with a two-component model made up of a geometrically thin and warm central disc, surrounded by a colder, fluffy torus component. Within the framework of an exploratory study, we investigate one possible physical mechanism, which could produce such a structure, namely the effect of stellar feedback from a young nuclear star cluster on the interstellar medium in centres of AGN. The model is realized by numerical simulations with the help of the hydrodynamics code TRAMP. We follow the evolution of the interstellar medium by taking discrete mass-loss and energy ejection due to stellar processes, as well as optically thin radiative cooling into account. In a post-processing step, we calculate observable quantities like spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and surface brightness distributions with the help of the radiative transfer code MC3D. The interplay between injection of mass, supernova explosions and radiative cooling leads to a two-component structure made up of a cold geometrically thin, but optically thick and very turbulent disc residing in the vicinity of the angular momentum barrier, surrounded by a filamentary structure. The latter consists of cold long radial filaments flowing towards the disc and a hot tenuous medium in between, which shows both inwards and outwards directed motions. With the help of this modelling, we are able to reproduce the range of observed neutral hydrogen column densities of a sample of Seyfert galaxies as well as the relation between them and the strength of the silicate 10μm spectral feature. Despite being quite crude, our mean Seyfert galaxy model is even able to describe the SEDs of two intermediate type Seyfert galaxies observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  1. The relation between star formation and active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Three questions relevant to the relation between an active nucleus and surrounding star formation are discussed. The infrared stellar CO absorption bands can be used to identify galaxies with large populations of young, massive stars and thus can identify strong starburst unambiguously, such as in NGC 6240, and can help identify composite active/starburst systems such as Arp 220. An active nucleus is probably not required for LINER spectral characteristics; dusty starburst galaxies, particularly if they are nearly edge-on, can produce LINER spectra through the shock heating of their interstellar media by supernovae combined with the obscuration of their nuclei in the optical. The Galactic Center would be an ideal laboratory for studying the interaction of starbursts and active nuclei, if both could be demonstrated to occur there. Failure to detect a cusp in the stellar distribution raises questions about the presence of an active nucleus, which should be answered by additional observations in the near future.

  2. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF z ∼ 8 GALAXIES FROM THE IRAC ULTRA DEEP FIELDS: EMISSION LINES, STELLAR MASSES, AND SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATES AT 650 MYR

    SciTech Connect

    Labbé, I.; Bouwens, R. J.; Franx, M.; Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; González, V.; Trenti, M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Stiavelli, M.

    2013-11-10

    Using new ultradeep Spitzer/InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) photometry from the IRAC Ultra Deep Field program, we investigate the stellar populations of a sample of 63 Y-dropout galaxy candidates at z ∼ 8, only 650 Myr after the big bang. The sources are selected from HST/ACS+WFC3/IR data over the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), two HUDF parallel fields, and wide area data over the CANDELS/GOODS-South. The new Spitzer/IRAC data increase the coverage in [3.6] and [4.5] to ∼120h over the HUDF reaching depths of ∼28 (AB,1σ). The improved depth and inclusion of brighter candidates result in direct ≥3σ InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) detections of 20/63 sources, of which 11/63 are detected at ≥5σ. The average [3.6]-[4.5] colors of IRAC detected galaxies at z ∼ 8 are markedly redder than those at z ∼ 7, observed only 130 Myr later. The simplest explanation is that we witness strong rest-frame optical emission lines (in particular [O III] λλ4959, 5007 + Hβ) moving through the IRAC bandpasses with redshift. Assuming that the average rest-frame spectrum is the same at both z ∼ 7 and z ∼ 8 we estimate a rest-frame equivalent width of contributing 0.56{sup +0.16}{sub -0.11} mag to the [4.5] filter at z ∼ 8. The corresponding W{sub Hα}=430{sup +160}{sub -110} Å implies an average specific star formation rate of sSFR=11{sub -5}{sup +11} Gyr{sup –1} and a stellar population age of 100{sub -50}{sup +100} Myr. Correcting the spectral energy distribution for the contribution of emission lines lowers the average best-fit stellar masses and mass-to-light ratios by ∼3 ×, decreasing the integrated stellar mass density to ρ{sup *}(z=8,M{sub UV}<-18)=0.6{sup +0.4}{sub -0.3}×10{sup 6} M{sub sun} Mpc{sup –3}.

  3. PRIMUS: Constraints on Star Formation Quenching and Galaxy Merging, and the Evolution of the Stellar Mass Function from z = 0-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun; Arnouts, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    We measure the evolution of the stellar mass function (SMF) from z = 0-1 using multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From PRIMUS we construct an i < 23 flux-limited sample of ~40, 000 galaxies at z = 0.2-1.0 over five fields totaling ≈5.5 deg2, and from the SDSS we select ~170, 000 galaxies at z = 0.01-0.2 that we analyze consistently with respect to PRIMUS to minimize systematic errors in our evolutionary measurements. We find that the SMF of all galaxies evolves relatively little since z = 1, although we do find evidence for mass assembly downsizing; we measure a ≈30% increase in the number density of ~1010 {M}_{\\odot } galaxies since z ≈ 0.6, and a <~ 10% change in the number density of all >~ 1011 {M}_{\\odot } galaxies since z ≈ 1. Dividing the sample into star-forming and quiescent using an evolving cut in specific star formation rate, we find that the number density of ~1010 {M}_{\\odot } star-forming galaxies stays relatively constant since z ≈ 0.6, whereas the space density of >~ 1011 {M}_{\\odot } star-forming galaxies decreases by ≈50% between z ≈ 1 and z ≈ 0. Meanwhile, the number density of ~1010 {M}_{\\odot } quiescent galaxies increases steeply toward low redshift, by a factor of ~2-3 since z ≈ 0.6, while the number of massive quiescent galaxies remains approximately constant since z ≈ 1. These results suggest that the rate at which star-forming galaxies are quenched increases with decreasing stellar mass, but that the bulk of the stellar mass buildup within the quiescent population occurs around ~1010.8 {M}_{\\odot }. In addition, we conclude that mergers do not appear to be a dominant channel for the stellar mass buildup of galaxies at z < 1, even among massive (gsim 1011 {M}_{\\odot }) quiescent galaxies.

  4. PRIMUS: CONSTRAINTS ON STAR FORMATION QUENCHING AND GALAXY MERGING, AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTION FROM z = 0-1

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun; Arnouts, Stephane

    2013-04-10

    We measure the evolution of the stellar mass function (SMF) from z = 0-1 using multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From PRIMUS we construct an i < 23 flux-limited sample of {approx}40, 000 galaxies at z = 0.2-1.0 over five fields totaling Almost-Equal-To 5.5 deg{sup 2}, and from the SDSS we select {approx}170, 000 galaxies at z = 0.01-0.2 that we analyze consistently with respect to PRIMUS to minimize systematic errors in our evolutionary measurements. We find that the SMF of all galaxies evolves relatively little since z = 1, although we do find evidence for mass assembly downsizing; we measure a Almost-Equal-To 30% increase in the number density of {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} galaxies since z Almost-Equal-To 0.6, and a {approx}< 10% change in the number density of all {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} galaxies since z Almost-Equal-To 1. Dividing the sample into star-forming and quiescent using an evolving cut in specific star formation rate, we find that the number density of {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} star-forming galaxies stays relatively constant since z Almost-Equal-To 0.6, whereas the space density of {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} star-forming galaxies decreases by Almost-Equal-To 50% between z Almost-Equal-To 1 and z Almost-Equal-To 0. Meanwhile, the number density of {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} quiescent galaxies increases steeply toward low redshift, by a factor of {approx}2-3 since z Almost-Equal-To 0.6, while the number of massive quiescent galaxies remains approximately constant since z Almost-Equal-To 1. These results suggest that the rate at which star-forming galaxies are quenched increases with decreasing stellar mass, but that the bulk of the stellar mass buildup within the quiescent population occurs around {approx}10{sup 10.8} M{sub sun}. In addition, we conclude that mergers do not appear to be a dominant channel for the stellar mass

  5. Stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Hui; Li, Li-Fang; Han, Zhan-Wen

    In this paper we review the study of stellar population synthesis. So far there exist three methods in the study of the integrated light of stellar population-trail-and error, automated, and evolutionary population synthesis (EPS). We have discussed advantages and disadvantages for these methods. Among the three methods the EPS is the most direct approach to model galaxies. In this scheme, the model builder starts with knowledge of stellar evolution and attempts to build a model galaxy with physical input parameters such as star formation rate (SFR) and the initial mass function (IMF) slope. Therefore we have discussed emphatically the EPS method. First we have described and given the often used grids of several key ingredients in the EPS studies: (1) the library of evolutionary tracks used to calculate isochrones in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD), (2) the libraries of spectra adopted, which include empirical and theoretical stellar spectral libraries, star cluster library, active galactic nuclear (AGN) library and galaxy library, to derive the integrated spectral energy distributions (ISED) or magnitudes and colors in the suitable passbands, (3) the IMF used to evaluate the relative proportions of stars in the various evolutionary phases, and (4) the assumption for the underlying star formation rate (SFR) and chemical enrichment. Then we have listed several population synthesis criterions, i.e. broadband color indices, the integrated spectral energy distribution (ISED) and narrow band color indices, given the basic method of calculating broadband colors and flux-distribution for a simple stellar population (SSP). At last we have discussed simply the existed limitations, which are caused by some uncertainties in its two principal building blocks: stellar evolution models and spectral libraries in the studies of the EPS. Stellar evolution models are often subject to limitations in the following areas: the atomic data (radiative opacities, heavy element mixture

  6. Stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the understanding and use of chromospheric diagnostics are discussed with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) trends emerging from semiempirical models of single stars; (2) the validity of claims that theoretical models of chromospheres are becoming realistic; (3) the correlation between the widths of Ca 2 H and K line emission cores and stellar absolute luminosity extending over 15 magnitudes (Wilson-Bappu relation); and (4) the existence of systematic flow patterns in stellar chromospheres.

  7. The evolution of stellar metallicity gradients of the Milky Way disk from LSS-GAC main sequence turn-off stars: a two-phase disk formation history?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Huang, Yang; Wang, Chun; Ren, Juan-Juan; Chen, Bing-Qiu; Sun, Ning-Chen; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Huo, Zhi-Ying; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Accurate measurements of stellar metallicity gradients in the radial and vertical directions of the disk and their temporal variations provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of the Milky Way disk. We use 297 042 main sequence turn-off stars selected from the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (LSS-GAC) to determine the radial and vertical gradients of stellar metallicity, Δ[Fe/H]/ΔR and Δ[Fe/H]/Δ|Z| of the Milky Way disk in the direction of the anticenter. We determine ages of those turn-off stars by isochrone fitting and measure the temporal variations of metallicity gradients. We have carried out a detailed analysis of the selection effects resulting from the selection, observation and data reduction of LSS-GAC targets and the potential biases of a magnitude limited sample on the determinations of metallicity gradients. Our results show that the gradients, both in the radial and vertical directions, exhibit significant spatial and temporal variations. The radial gradients yielded by stars with the oldest ages (≳ 11 Gyr) are essentially zero at all heights from the disk midplane, while those given by younger stars are always negative. The vertical gradients deduced from stars with the oldest ages (≳ 11 Gyr) are negative and only show very weak variations with Galactocentric distance in the disk plane, R, while those yielded by younger stars show strong variations with R. After being essentially flat at the earliest epochs of disk formation, the radial gradients steepen as age decreases, reaching a maximum (steepest) at age 7-8 Gyr, and then they flatten again. Similar temporal trends are also found for the vertical gradients. We infer that the assembly of the Milky Way disk may have experienced at least two distinct phases. The earlier phase is probably related to a slow, pressure-supported collapse of gas, when the gas settles down to the disk mainly in the vertical direction. In the later phase, there are

  8. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the <0.5% level at the collector mirror location using the cusp magnetic field alone. Plasma also is rejected using a low argon density (<1x1014cm-3). We have measured the tin ion flow pattern toward the large area annular beam dump. Scaling of the cusp design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  9. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  10. Global dust attenuation in disc galaxies: strong variation with specific star formation and stellar mass, and the importance of sample selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devour, Brian M.; Bell, Eric F.

    2016-06-01

    We study the relative dust attenuation-inclination relation in 78 721 nearby galaxies using the axis ratio dependence of optical-near-IR colour, as measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In order to avoid to the greatest extent possible attenuation-driven biases, we carefully select galaxies using dust attenuation-independent near- and mid-IR luminosities and colours. Relative u-band attenuation between face-on and edge-on disc galaxies along the star-forming main sequence varies from ˜0.55 mag up to ˜1.55 mag. The strength of the relative attenuation varies strongly with both specific star formation rate and galaxy luminosity (or stellar mass). The dependence of relative attenuation on luminosity is not monotonic, but rather peaks at M3.4 μm ≈ -21.5, corresponding to M* ≈ 3 × 1010 M⊙. This behaviour stands seemingly in contrast to some older studies; we show that older works failed to reliably probe to higher luminosities, and were insensitive to the decrease in attenuation with increasing luminosity for the brightest star-forming discs. Back-of-the-envelope scaling relations predict the strong variation of dust optical depth with specific star formation rate and stellar mass. More in-depth comparisons using the scaling relations to model the relative attenuation require the inclusion of star-dust geometry to reproduce the details of these variations (especially at high luminosities), highlighting the importance of these geometrical effects.

  11. The MOSDEF Survey: Dissecting the Star Formation Rate versus Stellar Mass Relation Using Hα and Hβ Emission Lines at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona H.; de Groot, Laura; Azadi, Mojegan

    2015-12-01

    We present results on the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass (M*) relation (i.e., the "main sequence") among star-forming galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 using the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. Based on a sample of 261 galaxies with Hα and Hβ spectroscopy, we have estimated robust dust-corrected instantaneous SFRs over a large range in M* (˜109.5-1011.5 M⊙). We find a correlation between log(SFR(Hα)) and log(M*) with a slope of 0.65 ± 0.08 (0.58 ± 0.10) at 1.4 < z < 2.6 (2.1 < z < 2.6). We find that different assumptions for the dust correction, such as using the color excess of the stellar continuum to correct the nebular lines, sample selection biases against red star-forming galaxies, and not accounting for Balmer absorption, can yield steeper slopes of the log(SFR)-log(M*) relation. Our sample is immune from these biases as it is rest-frame optically selected, Hα and Hβ are corrected for Balmer absorption, and the Hα luminosity is dust corrected using the nebular color excess computed from the Balmer decrement. The scatter of the log(SFR(Hα))-log(M*) relation, after accounting for the measurement uncertainties, is 0.31 dex at 2.1 < z < 2.6, which is 0.05 dex larger than the scatter in log(SFR(UV))-log(M*). Based on comparisons to a simulated SFR-M* relation with some intrinsic scatter, we argue that in the absence of direct measurements of galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the attenuation/extinction curves and the initial mass function, one cannot use the difference in the scatter of the SFR(Hα)- and SFR(UV)-M* relations to constrain the stochasticity of star formation in high-redshift galaxies.

  12. A CONSTRAINT ON BROWN DWARF FORMATION VIA EJECTION: RADIAL VARIATION OF THE STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION OF THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER IC 2391

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreault, S.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2009-12-01

    We present the stellar and substellar mass function (MF) of the open cluster IC 2391, plus its radial dependence, and use this to put constraints on the formation mechanism of brown dwarfs (BDs). Our multi-band optical and infrared photometric survey with spectroscopic follow-up covers 11 deg{sup 2}, making it the largest survey of this cluster to date. We observe a radial variation in the MF over the range 0.072-0.3 M {sub sun}, but no significant variation in the MF below the substellar boundary at the three cluster radius intervals is analyzed. This lack of radial variation for low masses is what we would expect with the ejection scenario for BD formation, although considering that IC 2391 has an age about three times older than its crossing time, we expect that BDs with a velocity greater than the escape velocity have already escaped the cluster. Alternatively, the variation in the MF of the stellar objects could be an indication that they have undergone mass segregation via dynamical evolution. We also observe a significant variation across the cluster in the color of the (background) field star locus in color-magnitude diagrams and conclude that this is due to variable background extinction in the Galactic plane. From our preliminary spectroscopic follow-up, to confirm BD status and cluster membership, we find that all candidates are M dwarfs (in either the field or the cluster), demonstrating the efficiency of our photometric selection method in avoiding contaminants (e.g., red giants). About half of our photometric candidates for which we have spectra are spectroscopically confirmed as cluster members; two are new spectroscopically confirmed BD members of IC 2391.

  13. Genetic integration of molar cusp size variation in baboons.

    PubMed

    Koh, Christina; Bates, Elizabeth; Broughton, Elizabeth; Do, Nicholas T; Fletcher, Zachary; Mahaney, Michael C; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2010-06-01

    Many studies of primate diversity and evolution rely on dental morphology for insight into diet, behavior, and phylogenetic relationships. Consequently, variation in molar cusp size has increasingly become a phenotype of interest. In 2007 we published a quantitative genetic analysis of mandibular molar cusp size variation in baboons. Those results provided more questions than answers, as the pattern of genetic integration did not fit predictions from odontogenesis. To follow up, we expanded our study to include data from the maxillary molar cusps. Here we report on these later analyses, as well as inter-arch comparisons with the mandibular data. We analyzed variation in two-dimensional maxillary molar cusp size using data collected from a captive pedigreed breeding colony of baboons, Papio hamadryas, housed at the Southwest National Primate Research Center. These analyses show that variation in maxillary molar cusp size is heritable and sexually dimorphic. We also estimated additive genetic correlations between cusps on the same crown, homologous cusps along the tooth row, and maxillary and mandibular cusps. The pattern for maxillary molars yields genetic correlations of one between the paracone-metacone and protocone-hypocone. Bivariate analyses of cuspal homologues on adjacent teeth yield correlations that are high or not significantly different from one. Between dental arcades, the nonoccluding cusps consistently yield high genetic correlations, especially the metaconid-paracone and metaconid-metacone. This pattern of genetic correlation does not immediately accord with the pattern of development and/or calcification, however these results do follow predictions that can be made from the evolutionary history of the tribosphenic molar. PMID:20034010

  14. Genetic integration of molar cusp size variation in baboons

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Christina; Bates, Elizabeth; Broughton, Elizabeth; Do, Nicholas T.; Fletcher, Zachary; Mahaney, Michael C.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies of primate diversity and evolution rely on dental morphology for insight into diet, behavior, and phylogenetic relationships. Consequently, variation in molar cusp size has increasingly become a phenotype of interest. In 2007 we published a quantitative genetic analysis of mandibular molar cusp size variation in baboons. Those results provided more questions than answers, as the pattern of genetic integration did not fit predictions from odontogenesis. To follow up, we expanded our study to include data from the maxillary molar cusps. Here we report on these later analyses, as well as inter-arch comparisons with the mandibular data. We analyzed variation in two-dimensional maxillary molar cusp size using data collected from a captive pedigreed breeding colony of baboons, Papio hamadryas, housed at the Southwest National Primate Research Center. These analyses show that variation in maxillary molar cusp size is heritable and sexually dimorphic. We also estimated additive genetic correlations between cusps on the same crown, homologous cusps along the tooth row, and maxillary and mandibular cusps. The pattern for maxillary molars yields genetic correlations of one between the paracone-metacone and protocone-hypocone. Bivariate analyses of cuspal homologues on adjacent teeth yield correlations that are high or not significantly different from one. Between dental arcades, the non-occluding cusps consistently yield high genetic correlations, especially the metaconid-paracone and metaconid-metacone. This pattern of genetic correlation does not immediately accord with the pattern of development and/or calcification, however these results do follow predictions that can be made from the evolutionary history of the tribosphenic molar. PMID:20034010

  15. Mg line formation in late-type stellar atmospheres. II. Calculations in a grid of 1D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Y.; Barklem, P. S.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Mg is the α element of choice for Galactic population and chemical evolution studies because it is easily detectable in all late-type stars. Such studies require precise elemental abundances, and thus departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) need to be accounted for. Aims: Our goal is to provide reliable departure coefficients and equivalent widths in non-LTE, and for reference in LTE, for diagnostic lines of Mg studied in late-type stars. These can be used, for example, to correct LTE spectra and abundances. Methods: Using the model atom built and tested in the preceding paper in this series, we performed non-LTE radiative transfer calculations in a grid of 3945 stellar 1D atmospheric models. We used a sub-grid of 86 models to explore the propagation of errors in the recent atomic collision calculations to the radiative transfer results. Results: We obtained departure coefficients for all the levels and equivalent widths (in LTE and non-LTE) for all the radiative transitions included in the "final" model atom presented in Paper I. Here we present and describe our results and show some examples of applications of the data. The errors that result from uncertainties in the collisional data are investigated and tabulated. The results for equivalent widths and departure coefficients are made freely available. Conclusions: Giants tend to have negative abundance corrections while dwarfs have positive, though small, corrections. Error analysis results show that uncertainties related to the atomic collision data are typically on the order of 0.01 dex or less, although for few stellar models in specific lines uncertainties can be as large as 0.03 dex. As these errors are less than or on the same order as typical corrections, we expect that we can use these results to extract Mg abundances from high-quality spectra more reliably than from classical LTE analysis. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130

  16. COMBINED CO AND DUST SCALING RELATIONS OF DEPLETION TIME AND MOLECULAR GAS FRACTIONS WITH COSMIC TIME, SPECIFIC STAR-FORMATION RATE, AND STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Burkert, A.; Saintonge, A.; Magnelli, B.; Combes, F.; García-Burillo, S.; Neri, R.; Boissier, J.; Bolatto, A.; Contini, T.; Boone, F.; Bouché, N.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, M.; Bournaud, F.; and others

    2015-02-10

    We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) between z = 0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2, and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion timescale (t {sub depl}) and gas to stellar mass ratio (M {sub mol} {sub gas}/M{sub *} ) of SFGs near the star formation ''main-sequence'' with redshift, specific star-formation rate (sSFR), and stellar mass (M{sub *} ). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO → H{sub 2} mass conversion factor varies little within ±0.6 dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms, z, M {sub *})), and less than 0.3 dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that t {sub depl} scales as (1 + z){sup –0.3} × (sSFR/sSFR(ms, z, M {sub *})){sup –0.5}, with little dependence on M {sub *}. The resulting steep redshift dependence of M {sub mol} {sub gas}/M {sub *} ≈ (1 + z){sup 3} mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M{sub *} are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M {sub *} relation. Throughout the probed redshift range a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion timescale causes a larger sSFR at constant M {sub *}. As a result, galaxy integrated samples of the M {sub mol} {sub gas}-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine M {sub mol} {sub gas} with an accuracy of ±0.1 dex in relative terms, and ±0.2 dex including systematic uncertainties.

  17. The statistical cusp - A flux transfer event model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. F.; Lockwood, M.; Cowley, S. W. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we predict the precipitation signatures which are associated with transient magnetopause reconnection, following recent observations of the dependence of dayside ionospheric convection on the orientation of the IMF. We then employ a simple model of the longitudinal motion of flux-transfer-event signatures to show how such events can easily reproduce the local time distribution of cusp occurrence probabilities, as observed by low-altitude satellites. This is true even in the limit where the cusp is a series of discrete events. Furthermore, we investigate the existence of double cusp patches predicted by the simple model and show how these events may be identified in the data.

  18. A TREND BETWEEN COLD DEBRIS DISK TEMPERATURE AND STELLAR TYPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ballering, Nicholas P.; Rieke, George H.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Montiel, Edward

    2013-09-20

    Cold debris disks trace the limits of planet formation or migration in the outer regions of planetary systems, and thus have the potential to answer many of the outstanding questions in wide-orbit planet formation and evolution. We characterized the infrared excess spectral energy distributions of 174 cold debris disks around 546 main-sequence stars observed by both the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. We found a trend between the temperature of the inner edges of cold debris disks and the stellar type of the stars they orbit. This argues against the importance of strictly temperature-dependent processes (e.g., non-water ice lines) in setting the dimensions of cold debris disks. Also, we found no evidence that delayed stirring causes the trend. The trend may result from outward planet migration that traces the extent of the primordial protoplanetary disk, or it may result from planet formation that halts at an orbital radius limited by the efficiency of core accretion.

  19. Stellar feedback efficiencies: supernovae versus stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierlinger, Katharina M.; Burkert, Andreas; Ntormousi, Evangelia; Fierlinger, Peter; Schartmann, Marc; Ballone, Alessandro; Krause, Martin G. H.; Diehl, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds and supernova (SN) explosions of massive stars (`stellar feedback') create bubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM) and insert newly produced heavy elements and kinetic energy into their surroundings, possibly driving turbulence. Most of this energy is thermalized and immediately removed from the ISM by radiative cooling. The rest is available for driving ISM dynamics. In this work we estimate the amount of feedback energy retained as kinetic energy when the bubble walls have decelerated to the sound speed of the ambient medium. We show that the feedback of the most massive star outweighs the feedback from less massive stars. For a giant molecular cloud (GMC) mass of 105 M⊙ (as e.g. found in the Orion GMCs) and a star formation efficiency of 8 per cent the initial mass function predicts a most massive star of approximately 60 M⊙. For this stellar evolution model we test the dependence of the retained kinetic energy of the cold GMC gas on the inclusion of stellar winds. In our model winds insert 2.34 times the energy of an SN and create stellar wind bubbles serving as pressure reservoirs. We find that during the pressure-driven phases of the bubble evolution radiative losses peak near the contact discontinuity (CD), and thus the retained energy depends critically on the scales of the mixing processes across the CD. Taking into account the winds of massive stars increases the amount of kinetic energy deposited in the cold ISM from 0.1 per cent to a few per cent of the feedback energy.

  20. Linking Galaxies to Dark Matter Halos at z ~ 1 : Dependence of Galaxy Clustering on Stellar Mass and Specific Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Seong-Kook; Edge, Alastair C.; Wake, David A.; Merson, Alexander I.; Jeon, Yiseul

    2015-06-01

    We study the dependence of angular two-point correlation functions on stellar mass (M*) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of {M}*\\gt {10}10{M}ȯ galaxies at z∼ 1. The data from the UK Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey Deep eXtragalactic Survey and Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey cover 8.2 deg2 sample scales larger than 100 {h}-1 {Mpc} at z∼ 1, allowing us to investigate the correlation between clustering, M*, and star formation through halo modeling. Based on halo occupation distributions (HODs) of M* threshold samples, we derive HODs for M* binned galaxies, and then calculate the {M}*/{M}{halo} ratio. The ratio for central galaxies shows a peak at {M}{halo}∼ {10}12{h}-1{M}ȯ , and satellites predominantly contribute to the total stellar mass in cluster environments with {M}*/{M}{halo} values of 0.01–0.02. Using star-forming galaxies split by sSFR, we find that main sequence galaxies ({log} {sSFR}/{{yr}}-1∼ -9) are mainly central galaxies in ∼ {10}12.5{h}-1{M}ȯ halos with the lowest clustering amplitude, while lower sSFR galaxies consist of a mixture of both central and satellite galaxies where those with the lowest M* are predominantly satellites influenced by their environment. Considering the lowest {M}{halo} samples in each M* bin, massive central galaxies reside in more massive halos with lower sSFRs than low mass ones, indicating star-forming central galaxies evolve from a low M*–high sSFR to a high M*–low sSFR regime. We also find that the most rapidly star-forming galaxies ({log} {sSFR}/{{yr}}-1\\gt -8.5) are in more massive halos than main sequence ones, possibly implying galaxy mergers in dense environments are driving the active star formation. These results support the conclusion that the majority of star-forming galaxies follow secular evolution through the sustained but decreasing formation of stars.

  1. Theory and modelling of ion cusp particle signatures at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, J. M.; Arridge, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Cassini observations of Saturn's polar magnetosphere have revealed a variety of cusp-like particle signatures suggesting the presence of magnetopause reconnection. Some of these signatures display evidence of bursty unsteady reconnection. The presence of rapid planetary rotation and large Parker-spiral IMF conditions lead to unique effects on cusp signatures and we explore these aspects in this presentation. We present theoretical considerations of the cusp. We pay particular attention to the structure of energy-time ion dispersions and their generation by poleward and azimuthal convection of newly opened flux tubes, and the effect of periodicities in the Saturn system. This study is relevant to ongoing data exploitation from Cassini and to future observations from Juno. Comparisons will be made to Cassini observations of Saturn's cusp. We also present predicted signatures along Juno's trajectory.

  2. Spatially resolved study of primary electron transport in magnetic cusps

    SciTech Connect

    Hubble, Aimee A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-15

    Spatially resolved primary electron current density profiles were measured using a planar Langmuir probe in the region above a magnetic cusp in a small ion thruster discharge chamber. The probe current maps obtained were used to study the electron collection mechanics in the cusp region in the limit of zero gas flow and no plasma production, and they allowed for the visualization of primary electron transport through the cusp. Attenuation coefficients and loss widths were calculated as a function of probe distance above the anode at various operating conditions. Finally, the collection mechanics between two magnetic cusps were studied and compared. It was found that primary electron collection was dominated by the upstream magnet ring.

  3. Enhanced Discharge Performance in a Ring Cusp Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    There is a need for a lightweight, low power ion thruster for space science missions. Such an ion thruster is under development at NASA Glenn Research Center. In an effort to better understand the discharge performance of this thruster, a thruster discharge chamber with an anode containing electrically isolated electrodes at the cusps was fabricated and tested. Characteristics of this ring cusp ion discharge were measured without ion beam extraction. Discharge current was measured at collection electrodes located at the magnetic cusps and at the anode body itself. Discharge performance and plasma properties were measured as a function of power, which was varied between 20 and 50 W. It was found that ion production costs decreased by as much as 20 percent when the two most downstream cusp electrodes were allowed to float. Floating the electrodes did not give rise to a significant increase in discharge power even though the plasma density increased markedly. The improved performance is attributed to enhanced electron containment.

  4. Polar cusp: optical and particle characteristics-dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sandholt, P.E.; Egeland, A.; Asheim, S.; Lybekk, B.; Hardy, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Photometric observations from two stations on Svalbard, Norway, were used to map the location and dynamics of polar-cusp auroras. Coordinated observations of low-energy electron precipitation from satellite HILAT and optical observations from the ground are discussed. Cases are presented showing the dynamical behavior of cusp auroras and the local magnetic field related to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and irregularities in the solar wind plasma. Dynamical phenomena with different time scales are studied. South and northward expansions of the midday sector of the auroral oval are discussed in relation to IMF variations and geomagnetic substorm activity. Intensifications and rapid poleward motions of discrete auroral structures in the cusp region are shown to be associated with local Pi type magnetic pulsations, each event lasting a few minutes. These small scale dynamical phenomena are discussed in relation to different models of plasma penetration across the dayside magnetopause, from the magnetosheath to the polar cusp region of the magnetosphere.

  5. Evolving surface cusps during strained-layer epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Jesson, D.E.; Pennycook, S.J.; Baribeau, J.M.; Houghton, D.C.

    1993-04-01

    We have combined Z-contrast imaging and Ge marker layer experiments to study the evolving surface morphology of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Surface cusps are seen to arise as the intersection lines between coherent islands. The potential implications of stress concentrations associated with cusps are considered with a view to strain relaxation in the film via dislocation nucleation.

  6. Connection between cusp-core problem and too-big- to-fail problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kazuki; Mori, Masao; Ogiya, Go

    2015-08-01

    The standard paradigm of structure formation in the universe, the cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology, contains several crucial unsolved problems. Recent observation of nearby dwarf galaxies has revealed that the density profile of dark matter (DM) halo is constant at the center of these galaxies. However, cosmological N-body simulations always show steep power-law mass-density distribution at their centers. This discrepancy is a well-known unresolved problem in the CDM model, and so-called the ``cusp-core problem''. In addition, "too-big-to-fail problem" is another issue. Recent observations of nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies show that the masses of dark matter subhaloes in observed galaxies is significantly lower than those of the most massive subhaloes expected around Milky Way sized galaxies.To solve these problems, we study about the dynamical response of a virialized system with a central cusp to the energy feedback driven by supernova explosions using collisionless N-body simulations by the Nested-Particle-Mesh code. The galactic wind driven by supernova feedbacks loses energy by radiative cooling, and then falls back toward the galactic center. Subsequently, the starburst is enhanced again. This cycle of expansion and contraction of the interstellar gas leads to a recursive change in the gravitational potential. The resonance between DM particles and the density wave excited by the oscillating potential plays a significant role in the cusp-core transition of DM halos. Furthermore, we show that the cusp-core transition with the periodic supernova feedback solves the too-big-to-fail problem.

  7. Mergers and Star Formation: The Environment and Stellar Mass Growth of the Progenitors of Ultra-massive Galaxies since z = 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Marchesini, Danilo; De Lucia, Gabriella; Muzzin, Adam; Stefanon, Mauro; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Labbé, Ivo; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Milvang-Jensen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The growth of galaxies is a key problem in understanding the structure and evolution of the universe. Galaxies grow their stellar mass by a combination of star formation and mergers, with a relative importance that is redshift dependent. Theoretical models predict quantitatively different contributions from the two channels; measuring these from the data is a crucial constraint. Exploiting the UltraVISTA catalog and a unique sample of progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies selected with an abundance matching approach, we quantify the role of the two mechanisms from z = 2 to 0. We also compare our results to two independent incarnations of semi-analytic models. At all redshifts, progenitors are found in a variety of environments, ranging from being isolated to having 5-10 companions with mass ratio at least 1:10 within a projected radius of 500 kpc. In models, progenitors have a systematically larger number of companions, entailing a larger mass growth for mergers than in observations, at all redshifts. Generally, in both observations and models, the inferred and the expected mass growth roughly agree, within the uncertainties. Overall, our analysis confirms the model predictions, showing how the growth history of massive galaxies is dominated by in situ star formation at z ˜ 2, both star formation and mergers at 1 < z < 2, and by mergers alone at z < 1. Nonetheless, detailed comparisons still point out tensions between the expected mass growth and our results, which might be due to either an incorrect progenitors-descendants selection, uncertainties on star-formation rate and mass estimates, or the adopted assumptions on merger rates.

  8. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - IX. Akari mapping of an externally heated pre-stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, D.; Stamatellos, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2009-07-01

    We present observations of L1155 and L1148 in the Cepheus molecular cloud, taken using the Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument on the Akari satellite. We compare these data to submillimetre data taken using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and far-infrared data taken with the imaging photo-polarimeter (ISOPHOT) camera on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite. The Akari data cover a similar spectral window and are consistent with the ISO data. All of the data show a relation between the position of the peak of emission and the wavelength for the core of L1155. We interpret this as a temperature gradient. We fit modified blackbody curves to the spectral energy distributions at two positions in the core and see that the central core in L1155 (L1155C) is approximately 2° warmer at one edge than it is in the centre. We consider a number of possible heating sources and conclude that the A6V star BD+67 1263 is the most likely candidate. This star is at a distance of 0.7pc from the front of L1155C in the plane of the sky. We carry out radiative transfer modelling of the L1155C core including the effects from the nearby star. We find that we can generate a good fit to the observed data at all wavelengths, and demonstrate that the different morphologies of the core at different wavelengths can be explained by the observed 2° temperature gradient. The L1148 core exhibits a similar morphology to that of L1155C, and the data are also consistent with a temperature gradient across the core. In this case, the most likely heating source is the star BD197053. Our findings illustrate very clearly that the apparent observed morphology of a pre-stellar core can be highly dependent on the wavelength of the observation, and that temperature gradients must be taken into account before converting images into column density distributions. This is important to note when interpreting Akari and Spitzer data

  9. Cusp-related Pc3-5 Wave Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kozlovsky, A.; Belakhovsky, V.; Lessard, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    Pc3-5 pulsations were found to be an ubiquitous element of dayside ULF wave activity at the cusp region. We examine observations of Pc3-5 wave activity by search coil and flux-gate magnetometers at three locations on Svalbard, covering geomagnetic latitudes 74o-76o. To identify the ionospheric projections of the cusp, we use the width of the return signal from the SuperDARN Finland radar covering the Svalbard archipelago. The ULF meridional spatial structure is examined using the amplitude-phase gradient technique. This analysis shows no specific mode conversion pattern near the cusp region. The amplitude gradient mainly has the same direction at all frequencies, and only during periods when the cusp is shifted to very high latitudes, the gradient may change sign. The phase delay is chaotic and does not show any consistent pattern. This behavior corresponds to the occurrence of a localized peak in the latitudinal distribution of Pc3-5 power, but not under the cusp proper as was previously thought, but about several degrees southward from the equatorward cusp boundary. We suppose that compressional Pc3 fluctuations leaking from the magnetosheath into the entry layer of the magnetosphere can modulate the precipitating electron fluxes, which produce the ground response.

  10. Are dayside long-period pulsations related to the cusp?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kozlovsky, A.; Yeoman, T.

    2015-03-01

    We compare simultaneous observations of long-period ultra-low-frequency (ULF) wave activity from a Svalbard/IMAGE fluxgate magnetometer latitudinal profile covering the expected cusp geomagnetic latitudes. Irregular Pulsations at Cusp Latitudes (IPCL) and narrowband Pc5 waves are found to be a ubiquitous element of ULF activity in the dayside high-latitude region. To identify the ionospheric projections of the cusp, we use the width of return signal of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar covering the Svalbard archipelago, predictions of empirical cusp models, augmented whenever possible by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) identification of magnetospheric boundary domains. The meridional spatial structure of broadband dayside Pc5-6 pulsation spectral power has been found to have a localized latitudinal peak, not under the cusp proper as was previously thought, but several degrees southward from the equatorward cusp boundary. The earlier claims of the dayside monochromatic Pc5 wave association with the open-closed boundary also seems doubtful. Transient currents producing broadband Pc5-6 probably originate at the low-latitude boundary layer/central plasma sheet (LLBL/CPS) interface, though such identification with available DMSP data is not very precise. The occurrence of broadband Pc5-6 pulsations in the dayside boundary layers is a challenge to modelers because so far their mechanism has not been firmly identified.

  11. Long-Period ULF Wave Activity in the Cusp Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2013-12-01

    We compare simultaneous observations of long-period ULF wave activity from the Svalbard/IMAGE and Greenland fluxgate magnetometer profiles covering the expected cusp geomagnetic latitudes. Irregular Pulsations at Cusp Latitudes (IPCL) and narrow-band Pc5 waves are found to be a ubiquitous element of ULF activity in the dayside high-latitude region. To identify the ionospheric projections of the cusp, we use the width of the return signal of the SuperDARN radar covering the Svalbard archipelago, predictions of empirical cusp models, and augmented whenever possible by DMSP identification of magnetospheric boundary domains. The meridional spatial structure of IPCL/Pc5 pulsation spectral power has been found to have a localized latitudinal peak, but not under the cusp proper as was previously thought, but several degrees southward from the equatorward cusp boundary. Possible mechanisms and their relevance to observational data are discussed. The occurrence of IPCL and Pc5 waves in the dayside boundary layers is a challenge to modelers, because so far their mechanism has not been firmly identified.

  12. Latitudinal variation of the polar cusp during a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, C.

    1982-01-01

    Large amplitude latitudinal variation of the polar cusp position was observed during the intense geomagnetic storm of 15--16 February 1980. The observation of the polar cusp, identified as the region of intense but extremely soft electron precipitation, was made by two nearly noon-midnight orbit DMSP satellites over both northern and southern hemispheres. The latitudinal shift of the polar cusp is observed to be related to the intensity variation of the ring current indicated by the hourly Dst values. The polar cusp region moved from its normal location at approx.76/sup 0/ gm lat down to approx.62/sup 0/ gm lat at the peak of this storm. This movement took about 5 hours and was detected over both hemispheres. A drastic variation in the width of the cusp region was also observed; it is very narrow (approx.1/sup 0/) during the equatorial shift and expands to > or approx. =5/sup 0/ during the poleward recovery. Variation of the polar cusp latitude with that of the Dst index was also seen during the period before the intense storm.

  13. The Spectral Energy Distributions of z ~ 8 Galaxies from the IRAC Ultra Deep Fields: Emission Lines, Stellar Masses, and Specific Star Formation Rates at 650 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbé, I.; Oesch, P. A.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; González, V.; Carollo, C. M.; Franx, M.; Trenti, M.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Stiavelli, M.

    2013-11-01

    Using new ultradeep Spitzer/InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) photometry from the IRAC Ultra Deep Field program, we investigate the stellar populations of a sample of 63 Y-dropout galaxy candidates at z ~ 8, only 650 Myr after the big bang. The sources are selected from HST/ACS+WFC3/IR data over the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), two HUDF parallel fields, and wide area data over the CANDELS/GOODS-South. The new Spitzer/IRAC data increase the coverage in [3.6] and [4.5] to ~120h over the HUDF reaching depths of ~28 (AB,1σ). The improved depth and inclusion of brighter candidates result in direct >=3σ InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) detections of 20/63 sources, of which 11/63 are detected at >=5σ. The average [3.6]-[4.5] colors of IRAC detected galaxies at z ~ 8 are markedly redder than those at z ~ 7, observed only 130 Myr later. The simplest explanation is that we witness strong rest-frame optical emission lines (in particular [O III] λλ4959, 5007 + Hβ) moving through the IRAC bandpasses with redshift. Assuming that the average rest-frame spectrum is the same at both z ~ 7 and z ~ 8 we estimate a rest-frame equivalent width of {W}_{[O\\,\\scriptsize{III}]\\ \\lambda \\lambda 4959,5007+H\\beta }=670^{+260}_{-170} Å contributing 0.56^{+0.16}_{-0.11} mag to the [4.5] filter at z ~ 8. The corresponding {W}_{H\\alpha }=430^{+160}_{-110} Å implies an average specific star formation rate of sSFR=11_{-5}^{+11} Gyr-1 and a stellar population age of 100_{-50}^{+100} Myr. Correcting the spectral energy distribution for the contribution of emission lines lowers the average best-fit stellar masses and mass-to-light ratios by ~3 ×, decreasing the integrated stellar mass density to \\rho ^*(z=8,M_{\\rm{UV}}<-18)=0.6^{+0.4}_{-0.3}\\times 10^6 \\,M_\\odot Mpc-3. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated

  14. ON THE ROLE OF DISKS IN THE FORMATION OF STELLAR SYSTEMS: A NUMERICAL PARAMETER STUDY OF RAPID ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.

    2010-01-10

    We study rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks with a series of idealized global, numerical experiments using the code ORION. Our numerical parameter study focuses on protostellar disks, showing that one can predict disk behavior and the multiplicity of the accreting star system as a function of two dimensionless parameters which compare the infall rate to the disk sound speed and orbital period. Although gravitational instabilities become strong, we find that fragmentation into binary or multiple systems occurs only when material falls in several times more rapidly than the canonical isothermal limit. The disk-to-star accretion rate is proportional to the infall rate and governed by gravitational torques generated by low-m spiral modes. We also confirm the existence of a maximum stable disk mass: disks that exceed approx50% of the total system mass are subject to fragmentation and the subsequent formation of binary companions.

  15. The UV colours of high-redshift early-type galaxies: evidence for recent star formation and stellar mass assembly over the last 8 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, S.; Khochfar, S.; Schawinski, K.; Yi, S. K.; Gawiser, E.; Silk, J.; Virani, S. N.; Cardamone, C. N.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Urry, C. M.

    2008-07-01

    We combine deep optical and NIR (UBVRIzJK) photometry from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) with redshifts from the COMBO-17 survey to perform a large-scale study of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) properties of 674 high-redshift (0.5 < z < 1) early-type galaxies, drawn from the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDFS). Galaxy morphologies are determined through visual inspection of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken from the GEMS survey. We harness the sensitivity of the UV to young (<1-Gyr old) stars to quantify the recent star formation history of early-type galaxies across a range of luminosities [-23.5 < M(V) < -18]. Comparisons to simple stellar populations forming at high redshift indicate that ~1.1 per cent of early-types in this sample are consistent with purely passive ageing since z = 2 - this value drops to ~0.24 per cent and ~0.15 per cent for z = 3 and 5, respectively. Parametrizing the recent star formation (RSF) in terms of the mass fraction of stars less than a Gyr old, we find that the early-type population as a whole shows a typical RSF between 5 and 13 per cent in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1. Early-types on the broad UV `red sequence' show RSF values less than 5 per cent, while the reddest early-types (which are also the most luminous) are virtually quiescent with RSF values of ~1 per cent. In contrast to their low-redshift (z < 0.1) counterparts, the high-redshift early-types in this sample show a pronounced bimodality in the rest-frame UV-optical colour, with a minor but significant peak centred on the blue cloud. Furthermore, star formation in the most active early-types is a factor of 2 greater at z ~ 0.7 than in the local universe. Given that evolved sources of UV flux (e.g. horizontal branch stars) should be absent at z > 0.5, implying that the UV is dominated by young stars, we find compelling evidence that early-types of all luminosities form stars over the lifetime of the Universe, although the bulk of their

  16. Axisymmetric collapse simulations of rotating massive stellar cores in full general relativity: Numerical study for prompt black hole formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Yu-ichirou; Shibata, Masaru

    2005-04-15

    We perform axisymmetric simulations for gravitational collapse of a massive iron core to a black hole in full general relativity. The iron cores are modeled by {gamma}=4/3 equilibrium polytrope for simplicity. The hydrodynamic equations are solved using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme with a parametric equation of state. The Cartoon method is adopted for solving the Einstein equations. Simulations are performed for a wide variety of initial conditions changing the mass ({approx_equal}2.0-3.0M{sub {center_dot}}), the angular momentum, the rotational velocity profile of the core, and the parameters of the equations of state which are chosen so that the maximum mass of the cold spherical polytrope is {approx_equal}1.6M{sub {center_dot}}. Then, the criterion for the prompt black hole formation is clarified in terms of the mass and the angular momentum for several rotational velocity profile of the core and equations of state. It is found that (i) with the increase of the thermal energy generated by shocks, the threshold mass for the prompt black hole formation is increased by 20-40%, (ii) the rotational centrifugal force increases the threshold mass by < or approx. 25%, (iii) with the increase of the degree of differential rotation, the threshold mass is also increased, and (iv) the amplification factors shown in the results (i)-(iii) depend sensitively on the equation of state. We also find that the collapse dynamics and the structure of the shock formed at the bounce depend strongly on the stiffness of the adopted equation of state. In particular, as a new feature, a strong bipolar explosion is observed for the collapse of rapidly rotating iron cores with an equation of state which is stiff in subnuclear density and soft in supranuclear density. Gravitational waves are computed in terms of a quadrupole formula. It is also found that the waveform depends sensitively on the equations of state.

  17. MESSENGER Observations of Cusp Plasma Filaments at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Gangkai; Slavin, James; Jia, Xianzhe; DiBraccio, Gina; Raines, Jim; Imber, Suzanne; Gershman, Daniel; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; McNutt, Ralph; Solomon, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft, in orbit about Mercury, has documented highly localized, ~1-2-s-long reductions in the dayside magnetospheric magnetic field of the planet with amplitudes up to 90% of the ambient intensity. These magnetic field depressions which we have termed cusp filaments are observed from just poleward of the magnetospheric cusp to mid-latitudes, i.e., from ~55 to 85oN. Minimum variance analysis and superposed epoch analysis of the Magnetometer (MAG) data indicate that the filaments are simple two dimensional flux tubes. If the filaments move over the spacecraft at the polar convection speed, then these filaments have a mean diameter of ~230km, which is an order of magnitude larger than the gyro-radius of a 1 keV H+ ion, i.e., ~ 23 km. During these events, MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) measured H+ ions with magnetosheath-like energies consistent with the view that the magnetic field depressions are diamagnetic and most probably the low-altitude extensions of flux transfer events (FTEs) that form at the magnetopause as a result of reconnection. Here we analyze 349 filaments identified in MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma data to determine the physical properties of these structures. MESSENGER observations during the spacecraft's final low-altitude campaign confirm that these cusp filaments extend down to very low altitudes. We calculate an average particle precipitation rate onto the surface from all of the filaments at any given time of ~ 2x1025 #s-1. This precipitation rate is comparable to published estimates of the total precipitation rate in the cusp proper. The existence of these cusp filaments has important implications for surface sputtering and our understanding of Mercury's northern cusp. Overall, the MAG and FIPS observations analyzed here appear consistent with an origin for cusp plasma filaments by the inflow of magnetosheath plasma associated with the localized magnetopause reconnection process that produces FTEs

  18. How does tooth cusp radius of curvature affect brittle food item processing?

    PubMed Central

    Berthaume, Michael A.; Dumont, Elizabeth R.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Grosse, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth cusp sharpness, measured by radius of curvature (RoC), has been predicted to play a significant role in brittle/hard food item fracture. Here, we set out to test three existing hypotheses about this relationship: namely, the Blunt and Strong Cusp hypotheses, which predict that dull cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture, and the Pointed Cusp hypothesis, which predicts that sharp cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture using a four cusp bunodont molar. We also put forth and test the newly constructed Complex Cusp hypothesis, which predicts that a mixture of dull and sharp cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture. We tested the four hypotheses using finite-element models of four cusped, bunodont molars. When testing the three existing hypotheses, we assumed all cusps had the same level of sharpness (RoC), and gained partial support for the Blunt Cusp hypotheses. We found no support for the Pointed Cusp or Strong Cusp hypotheses. We used the Taguchi sampling method to test the Complex Cusps hypothesis with a morphospace created by independently varying the radii of curvature of the four cusps in the buccolingual and mesiodistal directions. The optimal occlusal morphology for fracturing brittle food items consists of a combination of sharp and dull cusps, which creates high stress concentrations in the food item while stabilizing the food item and keeping the stress concentrations in the enamel low. This model performed better than the Blunt Cusp hypothesis, suggesting a role for optimality in the evolution of cusp form. PMID:23635495

  19. Massive Stars: Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2007-07-01

    Massive stars dominate the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM, and ultimately of their parent galaxy and the universe, because of their fast evolution and intense supersonic winds. Four decades ago, the first rocket UV spectra of massive stars revealed the importance of mass loss and began to change our understanding of their evolution. Recently, advances in stellar modeling, and the observation of crucial ions in the far-UV spectral range, led to the resolution of long-standing issues in our understanding of massive star atmospheres. A revised (downwards) calibration of Teff for early spectral types is emerging as a result. Meanwhile, HST imaging, and large ground-based telescopes with multislit spectroscopic capabilities, had opened the possibility of resolved studies of stellar populations in Local Group galaxies, which sample a variety of metallicity and environment conditions. More recently, GALEX is providing a global, deep view of the young stellar populations for hundreds of nearby galaxies, revealing their recent star-formation history and modalities. The wide-field coverage and sensitivity of the GALEX UV imaging, easily detecting extremely low levels of star formation, is again changing some of our views on massive star formation in galaxies.

  20. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  1. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  2. The initial conditions for stellar protocluster formation. III. The Herschel counterparts of the Spitzer Dark Cloud catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretto, N.; Lenfestey, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Traficante, A.; Molinari, S.; Thompson, M. A.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galactic plane surveys of pristine molecular clouds are key for establishing a Galactic-scale view of star formation. For this reason, an unbiased sample of infrared dark clouds in the 10° < | l | < 65°, | b | < 1° region of the Galactic plane was built using Spitzer 8 μm extinction. However, intrinsic fluctuations in the mid-infrared background can be misinterpreted as foreground clouds. Aims: The main goal of this study is to disentangle real clouds in the Spitzer Dark Cloud (SDC) catalogue from artefacts due to fluctuations in the mid-infrared background. Methods: We constructed H2 column density maps at ~18″ resolution using the 160 μm and 250 μm data from the Herschel Galactic plane survey Hi-GAL. We also developed an automated detection scheme that confirms the existence of a SDC through its association with a peak on these Herschel column density maps. Detection simulations, along with visual inspection of a small sub-sample of SDCs, have been performed to get more insight into the limitations of our automated identification scheme. Results: Our analysis shows that 76( ± 19)% of the catalogued SDCs are real. This fraction drops to 55( ± 12)% for clouds with angular diameters larger than ~1 arcmin. The contamination of the PF09 catalogue by large spurious sources reflects the large uncertainties associated to the construction of the 8 μm background emission, a key stage in identiying SDCs. A comparison of the Herschel confirmed SDC sample with the BGPS and ATLASGAL samples shows that SDCs probe a unique range of cloud properties, reaching down to more compact and lower column density clouds than any of these two (sub-)millimetre Galactic plane surveys. Conclusions: Even though about half of the large SDCs are spurious sources, the vast majority of the catalogued SDCs do have a Herschel counterpart. The Herschel-confirmed sample of SDCs offers a unique opportunity to study the earliest stages of both low- and high-mass star formation across

  3. Herschel-ATLAS: the far-infrared properties and star formation rates of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao Orjales, J. M.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Smith, D. J. B.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Coppin, K.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Hopwood, R.; Hoyos, C.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Page, M. J.; Valiante, E.

    2012-12-01

    We have used data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) at 250, 350 and 500 μm to determine the far-infrared (FIR) properties of 50 broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs). Our sample contains 49 high-ionization BAL QSOs (HiBALs) and one low-ionization BAL QSO (LoBAL) which are compared against a sample of 329 non-BAL QSOs. These samples are matched over the redshift range 1.5 ≤ z < 2.3 and in absolute i-band magnitude over the range -28 ≤ Mi ≤ -24. Of these, three BAL QSOs (HiBALs) and 27 non-BAL QSOs are detected at the >5 σ level. We calculate star formation rates (SFRs) for our individually detected HiBAL QSOs and the non-detected LoBAL QSO as well as average SFRs for the BAL and non-BAL QSO samples based on stacking the Herschel data. We find no difference between the HiBAL and non-BAL QSO samples in the FIR, even when separated based on differing BAL QSO classifications. Using Mrk 231 as a template, the weighted mean SFR is estimated to be ≈240 ± 21 M⊙ yr-1 for the full sample, although this figure should be treated as an upper limit if active galactic nucleus (AGN)-heated dust makes a contribution to the FIR emission. Despite tentative claims in the literature, we do not find a dependence of C IV equivalent width on FIR emission, suggesting that the strength of any outflow in these objects is not linked to their FIR output. These results strongly suggest that BAL QSOs (more specifically HiBALs) can be accommodated within a simple AGN unified scheme in which our line of sight to the nucleus intersects outflowing material. Models in which HiBALs are caught towards the end of a period of enhanced spheroid and black hole growth, during which a wind terminates the star formation activity, are not supported by the observed FIR properties. The Herschel-ATLAS is a project with Herschel, which is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important

  4. Difficulty in the Formation of Counter-orbiting Hot Jupiters from Near-coplanar Hierarchical Triple Systems: A Sub-stellar Perturber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuxin; Suto, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    Among 100 transiting planets with a measured projected spin-orbit angle λ, several systems are suggested to be counter-orbiting. While these cases may be due to the projection effect, the mechanism that produces a counter-orbiting planet has not been established. A promising scenario for counter-orbiting planets is the extreme eccentricity evolution in near-coplanar hierarchical triple systems with eccentric inner and outer orbits. We examine this scenario in detail by performing a series of systematic numerical simulations, and consider the possibility of forming hot Jupiters (HJs), especially a counter-orbiting one under this mechanism with a distant sub-stellar perturber. We incorporate quadrupole and octupole secular gravitational interaction between the two orbits, and also short-range forces (correction for general relativity, star and inner planetary tide, and rotational distortion) simultaneously. We find that most systems are tidally disrupted and that a small fraction of the surviving planets turn out to be prograde. The formation of counter-orbiting HJs in this scenario is possible only in a very restricted parameter region, and thus is very unlikely in practice.

  5. Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Ion Velocity in Magnetic Cusped Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Natalia; Cappelli, Mark; Hargus, William, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Cusped Field Thrusters (CFTs) are magnetized plasma accelerators that use strong cusps to shape the magnetic field and hence the electrostatic potential. The cusped magnetic field lines meter the electron transport to the anode and reduce the energetic ion flux towards the dielectric channel walls, thereby reducing the effects of erosion. This work presents time averaged laser induced fluorescence velocity measurements of the ions in the plumes of three CFT variants. These include the Cylindrical Hall Thruster (CHT), Cylindrical Cusped Field Thruster (CCFT), and Diverging Cusped Field Thruster (DCFT). Results indicate that magnetic cusps form equipotential surfaces, and that the majority of ion acceleration occurs outside of the thruster channels.

  6. The Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: The role of galaxy group environment in the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation and quiescent fraction out to z ∼ 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lihwai; Chen, Chin-Wei; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Jian, Hung-Yu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Norberg, Peder; Bower, R. G.; Cole, Shaun; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Draper, P.; Heinis, Sebastien; Phleps, Stefanie; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Burgett, William; Chambers, K. C.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; and others

    2014-02-10

    Using a large optically selected sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS), we present a detailed analysis of the specific star formation rate (SSFR)—stellar mass (M {sub *}) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M {sub *} relation in different environments. While both the SSFR and the quiescent fraction depend strongly on stellar mass, the environment also plays an important role. Using this large galaxy sample, we confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments (M > 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star-forming sequence of 17% at 4σ confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of the quiescent fraction seen in field galaxies, the excess in the quiescent fraction due to the environment quenching in groups and clusters is found to increase with stellar mass, although deeper and larger data from the full PS1/MDS will be required to draw firm conclusions. We argue that these results are in favor of galaxy mergers to be the primary environment quenching mechanism operating in galaxy groups whereas strangulation is able to reproduce the observed trend in the environment quenching efficiency and stellar mass relation seen in clusters. Our results also suggest that the relative importance between mass quenching and environment quenching depends on stellar mass—the mass quenching plays a dominant role in producing quiescent

  7. Freja observations of multiple injection events in cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, O.; Yamauchi, M.; Eliasson, L.; Lundin, R.

    The TICS (Three-dimensional Ion Composition Spectrometer) instrument on board the Freja satellite provides particle data with high spatial, temporal, spectral, and mass resolution. The Freja orbit (inclination 63°) is suitable for studies of the cusp since the satellite traverses this region longitudinally when the cusp is located lower than 75° geomagnetic latitude, i.e. when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) points southward. The satellite traverses the dayside polar region during two weeks every 100 days due to orbit precession, and nearly 50 cusp traversals were recorded during the first year of operation. Both multiple injections and single injections are clearly identified and distinguished, the former being more frequently observed than the latter. Freja has also resolved overlapping injections (special cases of multiple injections), for the first time at low altitudes.

  8. The concave cusp as a determiner of figure-ground.

    PubMed

    Stevens, K A; Brookes, A

    1988-01-01

    The tendency to interpret as figure, relative to background, those regions that are lighter, smaller, and, especially, more convex is well known. Wherever convex opaque objects abut or partially occlude one another in an image, the points of contact between the silhouettes form concave cusps, each indicating the local assignment of figure versus ground across the contour segments. It is proposed that this local geometric feature is a preattentive determiner of figure-ground perception and that it contributes to the previously observed tendency for convexity preference. Evidence is presented that figure-ground assignment can be determined solely on the basis of the concave cusp feature, and that the salience of the cusp derives from local geometry and not from adjacent contour convexity. PMID:3205668

  9. STELLAR TRANSITS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence E-mail: bkocsis@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10{sup 6} solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or {approx}10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  10. Stellar Transits in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 106 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ~10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  11. Observational Characteristics of the Dayside High-Altitude Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, T. A.; Chen, J.; Zong, Q -

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities have been observed on many successive passes when the POLAR spacecraft was crossing through the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities were associated with an extended region of solar wind plasma inside the magnetopause coincident with a depressed and turbulent magnetic field. These observations argue that the cusp in a region of very broad extent, and not the funnel-shaped feature depicted in schematic drawings to date. The size of the cavities was found to be as large as 6 Re. There is an energetic component of ions associated nearly always with these cavities that have energies more typical of the trapped ring current and radiation belt populations than the solar wind. The intensities of the energetic ions were observed to increase by many orders of the magnitudes during the cavity crossings, indicating the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. Use of the variation of the charge state of solar wind Fe ions at the ACE spacecraft and at Polar has indicated that energization of ions to these high energies is a rapid process. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles in many cases. Taken together these facts argue for a local acceleration of plasma within the cusp to 10s and 100s of keV. By their geometry cusp magnetic field lines are connected to all of the magnetopause boundary layers and these cavity charged particles will form an energetic particle layer on the magnetopause.

  12. Star formation history of Canis Major R1. I. Wide-Field X-ray study of the young stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio-Hetem, J.; Montmerle, T.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Marciotto, E.; Preibisch, T.; Zinnecker, H.

    2009-11-01

    Aims: The CMa R1 star-forming region contains several compact clusters as well as many young early-B stars. It is associated with a well-known bright rimmed nebula, the nature of which is unclear (fossil HII region or supernova remnant). To help elucidate the nature of the nebula, our goal was to reconstruct the star-formation history of the CMa R1 region, including the previously unknown older, fainter low-mass stellar population, using X-rays. Methods: We analyzed images obtained with the ROSAT satellite, covering 5 sq. deg. Complementary VRI photometry was performed with the Gemini South telescope. Colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams were used in conjunction with pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks to derive the masses and ages of the X-ray sources. Results: The ROSAT images show two distinct clusters. One is associated with the known optical clusters near Z CMa, to which 40 members are added. The other, which we name the “GU CMa” cluster, is new, and contains 60 members. The ROSAT sources are young stars with masses down to M_star 0.5 M_⊙, and ages up to 10 Myr. The mass functions of the two clusters are similar, but the GU CMa cluster is older than the cluster around Z CMa by at least a few Myr. Also, the GU CMa cluster is away from any molecular cloud, implying that star formation must have ceased; on the contrary (as already known), star formation is very active in the Z CMa region. Based in part on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  13. Cusp Dynamics-Particle Acceleration by Alfven Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ergun, Robert E.; Parker, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Successful results were obtained from this research project. This investigation answered and/or made progresses on each of the four important questions that were proposed: (1) How do Alfven waves propagate on dayside open field lines? (2) How are precipitating electrons influenced by propagating Alfven waves? (3) How are various cusp electron distributions generated? (4) How are Alfven waves modified by electrons? During the first year of this investigation, the input parameters, such as density and temperature altitude profiles, of the gyrofluid code on the cusp field lines were constructed based on 3-point satellite observations. The initial gyrofluid result was presented at the GEM meeting by Dr. Samuel Jones.

  14. Bounding sup-norms of cusp forms of large level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomer, Valentin; Holowinsky, Roman

    2009-12-01

    Let f be an $L^2$-normalized weight zero Hecke-Maass cusp form of square-free level N, character $\\chi$ and Laplacian eigenvalue $\\lambda\\geq 1/4$. It is shown that $\\| f \\|_{\\infty} \\ll_{\\lambda} N^{-1/37}$, from which the hybrid bound $\\|f \\|_{\\infty} \\ll \\lambda^{1/4} (N\\lambda)^{-\\delta}$ (for some $\\delta > 0$) is derived. The first bound holds also for $f = y^{k/2}F$ where F is a holomorphic cusp form of weight k with the implied constant now depending on k.

  15. Observational Constraints on Stellar Flares and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    Multi-wavelength surveys have catalogued a wealth of stellar flare data for stars representing a broad range of masses and ages. Young solar analogs inform our understanding of the Sun's evolution and the influence of its activity on early solar system formation, while field star observations allow us to place its current activity into context within a statistical ensemble of main-sequence G-type stars. At the same time, stellar observations probe a variety of interior and coronal conditions, providing constraints on models of equilibrium (and loss thereof!) for magnetic structures. In this review, I will focus on our current understanding of stellar flares, prominences, and coronal mass ejections as a function of stellar parameters. As our interpretation of stellar data relies heavily on solar-stellar analogy, I will explore how far into extreme stellar parameter spaces this comparison can be invoked.

  16. A UV-to-MIR Monitoring of DR Tau: Exploring How Water Vapor in the Planet Formation Region is Affected by Stellar Accretion Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, A.; Meyer, M. R.; Manara, C. F.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Testi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Young stars are known to show variability due to non-steady mass accretion rate from their circumstellar disks. Accretion flares can produce strong energetic irradiation and heating that may affect the disk in the planet formation region, close to the central star. During an extreme accretion outburst in the young star EX Lupi, the prototype of EXor variables, remarkable changes in molecular gas emission from ~1 AU in the disk have recently been observed. Here, we focus on water vapor and explore how it is affected by variable accretion luminosity in T Tauri stars. We monitored a young highly variable solar-mass star, DR Tau, using simultaneously two high/medium-resolution spectrographs at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope: VISIR at 12.4 μm to observe water lines from the disk and X-shooter covering from 0.3 to 2.5 μm to constrain the stellar accretion. Three epochs spanning timescales from several days to several weeks were obtained. The accretion luminosity was estimated to change within a factor of ~2 and no change in water emission was detected at a significant level. In comparison with EX Lupi and EXor outbursts, DR Tau suggests that the less long-lived and weaker variability phenomena typical of T Tauri stars may leave water at planet-forming radii in the disk mostly unaffected. We propose that these systems may provide evidence for two processes that act over different timescales: ultraviolet photochemistry in the disk atmosphere (faster) and heating of the deeper disk layers (slower).

  17. A UV-to-MIR monitoring of DR Tau: Exploring how water vapor in the planet formation region is affected by stellar accretion variability

    SciTech Connect

    Banzatti, A.; Meyer, M. R.; Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.; Pontoppidan, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    Young stars are known to show variability due to non-steady mass accretion rate from their circumstellar disks. Accretion flares can produce strong energetic irradiation and heating that may affect the disk in the planet formation region, close to the central star. During an extreme accretion outburst in the young star EX Lupi, the prototype of EXor variables, remarkable changes in molecular gas emission from ∼1 AU in the disk have recently been observed. Here, we focus on water vapor and explore how it is affected by variable accretion luminosity in T Tauri stars. We monitored a young highly variable solar-mass star, DR Tau, using simultaneously two high/medium-resolution spectrographs at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope: VISIR at 12.4 μm to observe water lines from the disk and X-shooter covering from 0.3 to 2.5 μm to constrain the stellar accretion. Three epochs spanning timescales from several days to several weeks were obtained. The accretion luminosity was estimated to change within a factor of ∼2 and no change in water emission was detected at a significant level. In comparison with EX Lupi and EXor outbursts, DR Tau suggests that the less long-lived and weaker variability phenomena typical of T Tauri stars may leave water at planet-forming radii in the disk mostly unaffected. We propose that these systems may provide evidence for two processes that act over different timescales: ultraviolet photochemistry in the disk atmosphere (faster) and heating of the deeper disk layers (slower).

  18. He II emitters in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Population III star formation or peculiar stellar populations in galaxies at 2 < z < 4.6?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; Maccagni, D.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to identify He II emitters at 2 < z < 4.6 and to constrain the source of the hard ionizing continuum that powers the He II emission. Methods: We assembled a sample of 277 galaxies with a highly reliable spectroscopic redshift at 2 < z < 4.6 from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) Deep and Ultra-Deep data, and we identified 39 He II λ1640 emitters. We studied their spectral properties, measuring the fluxes, equivalent widths (EW), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) for most relevant lines, including He II λ1640, Lyα line, Si II λ1527, and C IV λ1549. Results: About 10% of galaxies at z ~ 3 and iAB ≤ 24.75 show He II in emission, with rest frame equivalent widths EW0 ~ 1-7 Å, equally distributed between galaxies with Lyα in emission or in absorption. We find 11 (3.9% of the global population) reliable He II emitters with unresolved He II lines (FWHM0 < 1200 km s-1), 13 (4.6% of the global population) reliable emitters with broad He II emission (FWHM0 > 1200 km s-1), 3 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and an additional 12 possible He II emitters. The properties of the individual broad emitters are in agreement with expectations from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) model. Instead, the properties of the narrow emitters are not compatible with this model, nor with predictions of gravitational cooling radiation produced by gas accretion, unless this is severely underestimated by current models by more than two orders of magnitude. Rather, we find that the EW of the narrow He II line emitters are in agreement with expectations for a Population III (PopIII) star formation, if the episode of star formation is continuous, and we calculate that a PopIII star formation rate (SFR) of 0.1-10 M⊙ yr-1 alone is enough to sustain the observed He II flux. Conclusions: We conclude that narrow He II emitters are powered either by the ionizing flux from a stellar population rare at z ~ 0 but much more common at z ~ 3, or by PopIII star formation. As proposed by

  19. STELLARATOR INJECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1962-09-01

    A method and means are described for injecting energetic neutral atoms or molecular ions into dense magnetically collimated plasma columns of stellarators and the like in such a manner that the atoms or ions are able to significantly penetrate the column before being ionized by collision with the plasma constituent particles. Penetration of the plasma column by the neutral atoms or molecular ions is facilitated by superposition of two closely spaced magnetic mirrors on the plasma confinement field. The mirrors are moved apart to magnetically sweep plasma from a region between the mirrors and establish a relatively low plasma density therein. By virture of the low density, neutral atoms or molecular ions injected into the region significantly penetrate the plasma column before being ionized. Thereafter, the mirrors are diminished to permit the injected material to admix with the plasma in the remainder of the column. (AEC)

  20. Observations of reconnected flux tubes within the midaltitude cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saflekos, N. A.; Burch, J. L.; Sugiura, M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents three events interpreted as reconnected flux tubes that correspond to the extensions of FTEs which have penetrated deep into the magnetosphere down to the midaltitudes of the polar cusp. Low-energy plasma, high-energy plasma, magnetic fields, and electric fields are used to identify the signatures of reconnected flux tubes. Characteristics of spatial scale, time duration, and frequency of occurrence between flux transfer events and midaltitude cusp reconnected flux tubes are shown to be consistent, although they differ in the direction of motion. However, the merging cell topology and the interplanetary magnetic field effect can explain this difference. Larger-scale events can be explained by motion of the cusp resulting from a quasi-steady reconnection process. The field-aligned currents associated with reconnected flux tubes at midaltitudes within the cusp are shown to be consistent with twisting of magnetic field lines and with closure by Pedersen currents. It is considered possible that what appears to be field-aligned currents closing by Pedersen ionospheric currents may also be interpreted as currents carried by Alfven waves.

  1. Synthesis of Cold Antihydrogen in a Cusp Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Kuroda, N.; Kim, C. H.; Torii, H. A.; Fujii, K.; Ohtsuka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Michishio, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Higaki, H.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.

    2010-12-10

    We report here the first successful synthesis of cold antihydrogen atoms employing a cusp trap, which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and a stack of multiple ring electrodes. This success opens a new path to make a stringent test of the CPT symmetry via high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms.

  2. Oxygen Ion Heat Rate within Alfvenic Turbulence in the Cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Singh, Nagendra; Chandler, Michael O.

    2009-01-01

    The role that the cleft/cusp has in ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling makes it a dynamic and important region. It is directly exposed to the solar wind, making it possible for the entry of electromagnetic energy and precipitating electrons and ions from dayside reconnection and other dayside events. It is also a significant source of ionospheric plasma, contributing largely to the mass loading of the magnetosphere with large fluxes of outflowing ions. Crossing the cusp/cleft near 5100 km, the Polar instruments observe the common correlation of downward Poynting flux, ion energization, soft electron precipitation, broadband extremely low-frequency (BB-ELF) emissions, and density depletions. The dominant power in the BB-ELF emissions is now identified to be from spatially broad, low frequency Alfv nic structures. For a cusp crossing, we determine using the Electric Field Investigation (EFI), that the electric and magnetic field fluctuations are Alfv nic and the electric field gradients satisfy the inequality for stochastic acceleration. With all the Polar 1996 horizontal crossings of the cusp, we determine the O+ heating rate using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI). We then compare this heating rate to other heating rates assuming the electric field gradient criteria exceeds the limit for stochastic acceleration for the remaining crossings. The comparison suggests that a stochastic acceleration mechanism is operational and the heating is controlled by the transverse spatial scale of the Alfvenic waves.

  3. Behavioral cusps: a developmental and pragmatic concept for behavior analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Ruiz, J; Baer, D M

    1997-01-01

    Most concepts of development explain certain behavior changes as products or markers of the invariable succession of emerging periods, stages, refinements, or achievements that define and order much of an individual's life. A different but comparable concept can be derived from the most basic mechanisms of behavior analysis, which are its environmental contingencies, and from its most basic strategy, which is to study behavior as its subject matter. From a behavior-analytic perspective, the most fundamental developmental questions are (a) whether these contingencies vary in any systematic way across the life span, and thus make behavior change in a correspondingly systematic way; (b) whether some of these contingencies and their changes have more far-reaching consequences than others, in terms of the importance to the organism and others, of the behavior classes they change. Certain behavior changes open the door to especially broad or especially important further behavior change, leading to the concept of the behavioral cusp. A behavioral cusp, then, is any behavior change that brings the organism's behavior into contact with new contingencies that have even more far-reaching consequences. Of all the environmental contingencies that change or maintain behavior, those that accomplish cusps are developmental. Behavior change remains the fundamental phenomenon of development for a behavior-analytic view; a cusp is a special instance of behavior change, a change crucial to what can come next. PMID:9316263

  4. The impact of realistic models of mass segregation on the event rate of extreme-mass ratio inspirals and cusp re-growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Preto, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    One of the most interesting sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for LISA is the inspiral of compact objects on to a massive black hole (MBH), commonly referred to as an 'extreme-mass ratio inspiral' (EMRI). The small object, typically a stellar black hole, emits significant amounts of GW along each orbit in the detector bandwidth. The slowly, adiabatic inspiral of these sources will allow us to map spacetime around MBHs in detail, as well as to test our current conception of gravitation in the strong regime. The event rate of this kind of source has been addressed many times in the literature and the numbers reported fluctuate by orders of magnitude. On the other hand, recent observations of the Galactic centre revealed a dearth of giant stars inside the inner parsec relative to the numbers theoretically expected for a fully relaxed stellar cusp. The possibility of unrelaxed nuclei (or, equivalently, with no or only a very shallow cusp, or core) adds substantial uncertainty to the estimates. Having this timely question in mind, we run a significant number of direct-summation N-body simulations with up to half a million particles to calibrate a much faster orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck code. We show that, under quite generic initial conditions, the time required for the growth of a relaxed, mass segregated stellar cusp is shorter than a Hubble time for MBHs with M• <~ 5 × 106 Modot (i.e. nuclei in the range of LISA). We then investigate the regime of strong mass segregation (SMS) for models with two different stellar mass components. Given the most recent stellar mass normalization for the inner parsec of the Galactic centre, SMS has the significant impact of boosting the EMRI rates by a factor of ~10 in comparison to what would result from a 7/4-Bahcall and Wolf cusp resulting in ~250 events per Gyr per Milky Way type galaxy. Such an intrinsic rate should translate roughly into ~102-7 × 102 sbh's (EMRIs detected by LISA over a mission lifetime of 2 or 5 years

  5. Introduction to stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scilla, Degl’Innocenti

    2016-04-01

    This contribution is meant as a first brief introduction to stellar physics. First I shortly describe the main physical processes active in stellar structures then I summarize the most important features during the stellar life-cycle.

  6. Observations of reconnected flux tubes within the midaltitude cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Saflekos, N.A. ); Burch, J.L. ); Sugiura, M. ); Gurnett, D.A. ); Horwitz, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Dynamics Explorer 1 observations within the midaltitude polar cusp provide indirect evidence of reconnected flux tubes (RFT) envisioned to be extensions of the flux transfer events reportedly found near the magnetopause. In this study, low-energy plasma, high-energy plasma, magnetic fields, and electric fields were used to identify the signatures of reconnected flux tubes in the midaltitude cusp. Inside isolated flux tubes, low-energy plasma was observed to be transferred from the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere, and relatively hot plasma was observed to be transferred from the magnetosphere to the magnetosheath. The cool magnetosheath plasma and the relatively hot magnetospheric plasma shared the same magnetic flux tube. The RFT signature is most easily identified in electron and ion energy fluxes plotted versus time for all pitch angles. The characteristics of spatial scale, time duration, and frequency of occurrence between flux transfer events and midaltitude cusp reconnected flux tubes are consistent, although they differ in the direction of motion. However, the merging cell topology and the interplanetary magnetic field B{sub y} effect can explain this difference. Larger-scale (space and time) events can be explained by motion of the cusp resulting from a quasi-steady reconnection process. The field-aligned currents associated with reconnected flux tubes are midaltitudes within the cusp are consistent with twisting of magnetic field lines and with closure by Pedersen currents. It is possible that what appear to be field-aligned currents closing by Pedersen ionospheric currents may also be interpreted as currents carried by Alfven waves.

  7. Stellar Vampires Unmasked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    Astronomers have found possible proofs of stellar vampirism in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, they found that some hot, bright, and apparently young stars in the cluster present less carbon and oxygen than the majority of their sisters. This indicates that these few stars likely formed by taking their material from another star. "This is the first detection of a chemical signature clearly pointing to a specific scenario to form so-called 'Blue straggler stars' in a globular cluster", said Francesco Ferraro, from the Astronomy Department of Bologna University (Italy) and lead-author of the paper presenting the results. Blue stragglers are unexpectedly young-looking stars found in stellar aggregates, such as globular clusters, which are known to be made up of old stars. These enigmatic objects are thought to be created in either direct stellar collisions or through the evolution and coalescence of a binary star system in which one star 'sucks' material off the other, rejuvenating itself. As such, they provide interesting constraints on both binary stellar evolution and star cluster dynamics. To date, the unambiguous signatures of either stellar traffic accidents or stellar vampirism have not been observed, and the formation mechanisms of Blue stragglers are still a mystery. The astronomers used ESO's Very Large Telescope to measure the abundance of chemical elements at the surface of 43 Blue straggler stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae [1]. They discovered that six of these Blue straggler stars contain less carbon and oxygen than the majority of these peculiar objects. Such an anomaly indicates that the material at the surface of the blue stragglers comes from the deep interiors of a parent star [2]. Such deep material can reach the surface of the blue straggler only during the mass transfer process occurring between two stars in a binary system. Numerical simulations indeed show that the coalescence of stars should not

  8. Magnetosheath-ionspheric plasma interactions in the cusp/cleft. 2: Mesoscale particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Lin, C. S.

    1993-11-01

    Ionospheric plasma flowing out from the cusp can be an important source of plasma to the magnetosphere. One source of free energy that can drive this outflow is the injection of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp. Two-dimensional (three velocity) mesoscale particle simulations are used to investigate the particle dynamics in the cusp during southward interplanetary magnetic field. This mesoscale model self-consistently incorporates (1) global influences such as the convection of plasma across the cusp, the action of the mirror force, and the injection of the magnetosheath plasma, and (2) wave-particle interactions which produce the actual coupling between the magnetosheath and ionospheric plasmas. It is shown that, because the thermal speed of the electrons is higher than the bulk motion of the magnetosheath plasma, an upward current is formed on the equatorward edge of the injection region with return currents on either side. However, the poleward return currents are the stronger due to the convection and mirroring of many of the magnetosheath electrons. The electron distribution in this latter region evolves from upward directed streams to single-sided loss cones or possibly electron conics. The ion distribution also shows a variety of distinct features that are produced by spatial and/or temporal effects associated with varying convection patterns and wave-particle interactions. On the equatorward edge the distribution has a downflowing magnetosheath component and an upflowing cold ionospheric component due to continuous convection of ionospheric plasma into the region. In the center of the magnetosheath region, heating from the development of an ion-ion streaming instability causes the suppression of the cold ionospheric component and the formation of downward ionospheric streams. Further poleward there is velocity filtering of ions with low pitch angles, so that the magnetosheath ions develop a ring-beam distribution and the ensuing wave instabilities generate

  9. Magnetosheath-ionspheric plasma interactions in the cusp/cleft. 2: Mesoscale particle simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Lin, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma flowing out from the cusp can be an important source of plasma to the magnetosphere. One source of free energy that can drive this outflow is the injection of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp. Two-dimensional (three velocity) mesoscale particle simulations are used to investigate the particle dynamics in the cusp during southward interplanetary magnetic field. This mesoscale model self-consistently incorporates (1) global influences such as the convection of plasma across the cusp, the action of the mirror force, and the injection of the magnetosheath plasma, and (2) wave-particle interactions which produce the actual coupling between the magnetosheath and ionospheric plasmas. It is shown that, because the thermal speed of the electrons is higher than the bulk motion of the magnetosheath plasma, an upward current is formed on the equatorward edge of the injection region with return currents on either side. However, the poleward return currents are the stronger due to the convection and mirroring of many of the magnetosheath electrons. The electron distribution in this latter region evolves from upward directed streams to single-sided loss cones or possibly electron conics. The ion distribution also shows a variety of distinct features that are produced by spatial and/or temporal effects associated with varying convection patterns and wave-particle interactions. On the equatorward edge the distribution has a downflowing magnetosheath component and an upflowing cold ionospheric component due to continuous convection of ionospheric plasma into the region. In the center of the magnetosheath region, heating from the development of an ion-ion streaming instability causes the suppression of the cold ionospheric component and the formation of downward ionospheric streams. Further poleward there is velocity filtering of ions with low pitch angles, so that the magnetosheath ions develop a ring-beam distribution and the ensuing wave instabilities generate

  10. Stellar Mass Distributions in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, D.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2011-01-01

    We present the radial distributions of the stellar mass and the star formation histories for a large sample of dwarf irregular galaxies assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/index.html). Specifically, utilizing the multi-band data including FUV/NUV/UBV/Hα/3.6μm, and with the CB07 stellar population synthesis models, we analyze the variations of the SEDs as a function of radius. By studying the relationship between the stellar mass, star formation histories, star formation and HI gas, we will discuss the possible star formation modes and the roles played by the stellar mass and gas in determining the star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies in general. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation (AST-0707563).

  11. Computational Study of Primary Electrons in the Cusp Region of an Ion Engine's Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Deshpande, Shirin S.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a computer code called PRIMA is used to study the motion of primary electrons in the magnetic cusp region of the discharge chamber of an ion engine. Even though the amount of wall area covered by the cusps is very small, the cusp regions are important because prior computational analyses have indicated that most primary electrons leave the discharge chamber through the cusps. The analysis presented here focuses on the cusp region only. The affects of the shape and size of the cusp region on primary electron travel are studied as well as the angle and location at which the electron enters the cusp region. These affects are quantified using the confinement length and the number density distributions of the primary electrons. In addition to these results comparisons of the results from PRIMA are made to experimental results for a cylindrical discharge chamber with two magnetic rings. These comparisons indicate the validity of the computer code called PRIMA.

  12. How chameleons core dwarfs with cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    The presence of a scalar field that couples nonminimally and universally to matter can enhance gravitational forces on cosmological scales while restoring general relativity in the Solar neighborhood. In the intermediate regime, kinematically inferred masses experience an additional radial dependence with respect to the underlying distribution of matter, which is caused by the increment of gravitational forces with increasing distance from the Milky Way center. The same effect can influence the internal kinematics of subhalos and cause cuspy matter distributions to appear core-like. Specializing to the chameleon model as a worked example, we demonstrate this effect by tracing the scalar field from the outskirts of the Milky Way halo to its interior, simultaneously fitting observed velocity dispersions of chemo-dynamically discriminated red giant populations in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. Whereas in standard gravity these observations suggest that the matter distribution of the dwarfs is cored, we find that in the presence of a chameleon field the assumption of a cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White profile becomes perfectly compatible with the data. Importantly, chameleon models also predict the existence of slopes between two stellar subcomponents that in Newtonian gravity would be interpreted as a decline of matter density toward the dwarf center. Hence, an observation of such an apparently pathological scenario may serve as a smoking gun for the presence of a chameleon field or a similar modification of gravity, independent of baryonic feedback effects. In general, measuring the dynamic mass profiles of the Milky Way dwarfs provides stronger constraints than those inferred from the screening scale of the Solar System since these are located at greater distances from the halo center.

  13. Stellar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Paul

    This chapter steps finally away from the sun and towards the stars, the idea being to apply the physical insight gained so far to see how much of stellar magnetism can be understood in terms of dynamo action. Dynamo action in the convective core of massive main-sequence stars is first considered and shown viable. For intermediate-mass main-sequence stars the fossil field hypothesis will carry the day, although possible dynamo alternatives are also briefly discussed. The extension of the solar dynamo models investigated in Chap. 3 (10.1007/978-3-642-32093-4_3) to other solar-type stars will first take us through an important detour in first having to understand rotational evolution in response to angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind. Dynamo action in fully convective stars comes next, and the chapter closes with an overview of the situation for pre- and post-main-sequence stars and compact objects, leading finally to the magnetic fields of galaxies and beyond.

  14. Introduction to stellar astrophysics. Volume 1 - Basic stellar observations and data. Volume 2 - Stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    Volume 1: The global properties of stars and the observational techniques used to determine them are examined in an introduction for undergraduate students. Chapters are devoted to stellar positions, proper motions, brightness, color-magnitude diagrams, luminosities, angular radii, and effective temperatures. Also considered are stellar masses and radii, spectral classification, population II stars, stellar rotation, magnetic fields, peculiar spectra, pulsating stars, explosive stars, the sun, and interstellar absorption. Diagrams, graphs, sample images and spectra, tables of numerical constants, and a set of problems are provided. Volume 2: The basic principles used in the study of the outer layers of a star are discussed. The subjects addressed include stellar magnitudes, colors, and spectra; temperature estimates for stars; radiative transfer; depth dependence of the source function; the continuous absorption coefficient; the influence of the nongreyness of the absorption coefficient; pressure stratification; theory of line formation; hydrogen lines; spectrum analysis; nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium; the hydrogen convection zone; stellar chromospheres, transition layers, and coronae; and stellar winds.

  15. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  16. Cusped magnetic field mercury ion thruster. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of a uniform current density profile in the exhaust beam of an electrostatic ion thruster is discussed in terms of thrust level and accelerator system lifetime. A residence time approach is used to explain the nonuniform beam current density profile of the divergent magnetic field thruster. Mathematical expressions are derived which relate the thruster discharge power loss, propellant utilization, and double to single ion density ratio to the geometry and plasma properties of the discharge chamber. These relationships are applied to a cylindrical discharge chamber model of the thruster. Experimental results are presented for a wide range of the discharge chamber length. The thruster designed for this investigation was operated with a cusped magnetic field as well as a divergent field geometry, and the cusped field geometry is shown to be superior from the standpoint of beam profile uniformity, performance, and double ion population.

  17. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Results show that the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid and that the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline. Moreover, the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  18. Topological properties of the interaction between focusing regions kind cusped.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Niconoff, G; Santos-García, S I De Los; Torres-Rodríguez, M A; Xique, R Suárez; Vargas-Morales, M; Vara, P Martinez; Carbajal-Domínguez, A

    2016-06-27

    We study here the cusped-cusped interaction between two kinds of Pearcey optical fields by analyzing its topological structure. We do it in two steps; the first one is an irradiance interaction that allows us to identify organization regions. The second one is an amplitude interaction, where it is shown that the interference fringes are organized around the irradiance distribution. The topological behavior of the optical field is analyzed identifying regions with different phase functions, one of them, corresponds with a catastrophe function which has associated a focusing region, the other region can be approximated by a quadratic function. The main consequence heritage from the phase structure is interference fringes emerge from focusing regions having similar features like a topological charges. We show computational and experimental results which are in very well agreement with the theoretical model. PMID:27410617

  19. Cusps in the quench dynamics of a Bloch state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. M.; Yang, Hua-Tong

    2016-06-01

    We report some nonsmooth dynamics of a Bloch state in a one-dimensional tight binding model with the periodic boundary condition. After a sudden change of the potential of an arbitrary site, quantities like the survival probability of the particle in the initial Bloch state show cusps periodically, with the period being the Heisenberg time associated with the energy spectrum. This phenomenon is a nonperturbative counterpart of the nonsmooth dynamics observed previously (Zhang J. M. and Haque M., arXiv:1404.4280) in a periodically driven tight binding model. Underlying the cusps is an exactly solvable model, which consists of equally spaced levels extending from -∞ to +∞ , between which two arbitrary levels are coupled to each other by the same strength.

  20. Field aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F-region which are interpreted as being caused by the payload's passage through a structured field aligned current system. The field aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of one kilometer. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of 0.0001 amp/m sq.

  1. TIDE Observations of Cusp and Cleft Multiple Ion Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    The southern pole pass of Polar/TIDe at 5000 km allows a study of the distributions of the cusp and cleft. We discuss observations of TIDE (Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment) as it passes the southern pole on March 29, 1999. A mixture of several cold outflowing ions (0.3-10 eV) are measured simultaneously with magnetospheric precipitation (greater than 100 eV). We will show a study of these multiple plasma distributions, their source, and their interaction.

  2. Particle Detectors and Data Analysis for Cusp Transient Features Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, James R.

    1999-01-01

    On December 3, 1997, a rocket payload (36.152) was launched from N(sub y) Alesund into the dark cusp at 0906:00 U (1206:00 LT) during an interval of southward B(sub z) and positive B(sub y). Launch occurred during a time interval of northeastward moving auroral forms observed between 0845 and 0945 UT by ground-based meridian scanning photometers. Ground photometric measurements during the flight show that the payload passed over the poleward portion of the most intense 6300 A emissions of the dayside cusp/cleft region. Electrons of energy up to a few hundred eV were detected immediately upon instrument turn-on at an altitude of 205 km and throughout the flight until the payload reached an altitude of -197 km on the downleg. Electron spectra were either quasithermal with peak energies -100 eV or showed evidence of acceleration along the magnetic field line by potentials of 100-200 V. Precipitating ions were observed throughout much of the flight. Their spectra were broadly peaked in energy with the peak energy decreasing from -500 eV to -250 eV as the payload flew approximately westward over the dayside precipitation region. Structure (spatial or temporal intensity variation) was observed between T + 180 s and T + -400 s. At the rocket altitudes (<450 km) the ions were observed to be precipitating. During the flight, the DMSP F-13 satellite passed through the all-sky imager field-of-view just poleward of the brightest dayside emissions enabling the identification of plasma sheet and boundary layer regions along the orbit. We thus conclude that particle fluxes detected by the rocket flight were either cusp plasma or boundary layer/mantle plasma just poleward of the dayside cusp/cleft. A paper describing the fields and plasmas observed during the flight is now being prepared for publication.

  3. Particle Detectors and Data Analysis for Cusp Transient Features Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, James R.

    1998-01-01

    On December 3, 1997, a rocket payload (36.152) was launched from Ny Alesund into the dark cusp at 0906:00 U (1206:00 LT) during an interval of southward B(sub Z), and positive B(sub y). Launch occurred during a time interval of northeastward moving auroral forms observed between 0845 and 0945 UT by ground-based meridian scanning photometers. Ground photometric measurements during the flight show that the payload passed over the poleward portion of the most intense 6300 A emissions of the dayside cusp/cleft region. Electrons of energy up to a few hundred eV were detected immediately upon instrument turn-on at an altitude of 205 km and throughout the flight until the payload reached an altitude of approximately 197 km on the downleg. Electron spectra were either quasithermal with peak energies approximately 100 eV or showed evidence of acceleration along the magnetic field line by potentials of 100-200 V. Precipitating ions were observed throughout much of the flight. Their spectra were broadly peaked in energy with the peak energy decreasing from approximately 500 eV to approximately 250 eV as the payload flew approximately westward over the dayside precipitationregion. Structure(spatial or temporal intensity variation) was observed between T + 180 s and T + approximately 400 s. At the rocket altitudes(less than 450km) the ions were observed to be precipitating. During the flight, the DMSPF-13 satellite passed through the all-sky imager field-of-view just poleward of the brightest dayside emissions enabling the identification of plasma sheet and boundary layer regions along the orbit. We thus conclude that particle fluxes detected by the rocket flight were either cusp plasma or boundary layer/mantle plasmajust poleward of the dayside cusp/cleft. Further investigation of the particle characteristics and their relationship to ionospheric convection patterns is continuing.

  4. MESSENGER Observations of Cusp Plasma Filaments at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, G. K.; Slavin, J. A.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jia, X.; Raines, J. M.; Imber, S. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Gershman, D. J.; Zurbuchen, T.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    At Mercury, MESSENGER has documented ~1-2-s-long reductions in the dayside magnetospheric magnetic field with amplitudes up to 90% of the ambient intensity. These field reductions which we have termed cusp filaments are observed from just poleward of the magnetospheric cusp to mid-latitudes. During these events, MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) measured H+ ions with magnetosheath-like energies. Minimum variance analysis of the Magnetometer (MAG) data indicates that the filaments are simple two dimensional flux tubes filled with magnetosheath plasma that has a diamagnetic effect on the local background field. Here we analyze 139 filaments identified in 3 years of MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma data to determine the physical properties of these structures. Our results indicate that cusp filaments are common phenomena for all solar wind conditions. They occur over a range of magnetic latitudes from ~50 to 80oN, with durations of ~0.1-2.5s and magnetic field decreases of ~50-300 nT. If the filaments are associated with flux transfer events (FTEs) and move over the spacecraft at speeds comparable to the flank magnetosheath flow speed of 300 km/s, then these filaments have dimensions of ~30-750 km, which is larger than the gyro-radius of a 1 keV H+ ion, i.e., ~ 23 km. Correlation analyses show no obvious dependence of the duration or magnitude of the diamagnetic decrease on magnetic latitude. Overall, the MAG and FIPS observations analyzed here appear consistent with an origin for cusp plasma filaments by the inflow of magnetosheath plasma associated with the localized magnetopause reconnection process that produces FTEs. Further analysis will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. Cusp diffraction catastrophe from spheroids: generalized rainbows and inverse scattering.

    PubMed

    Marston, P L

    1985-12-01

    The angular location of the recently discovered cusp pattern in the far-field scattering from an oblate spheroid is calculated as a function of the aspect ratio D/H. The calculation assumes the diameter D > lambda and is limited to illumination perpendicular to the short axis of the spheroid. It agrees with observations for water drops in the range 1.22 < D/H < 1.37 with D ~ 1 mm. PMID:19730494

  6. Sex assessment efficacy of permanent maxillary first molar cusp dimensions in Indians

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Achla Bharti; Angadi, Punnya V.; Yadav, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The human first maxillary molar provides clues about evolution and is functionally important. It has four main cusps, and each cusp has an independent growth pattern and different evolutionary background. Though less explored, the analysis based on measurement of each cusp appears to be more meaningful biologically than conventional measurements of the whole crown. Aim: This study aimed to demonstrate the extent of sexual dimorphism in permanent maxillary first molar cusp diameters and their potential utility in sex prediction among Indians using logistic regression analysis (LRA). Materials and Methods: The mesiodistal and buccolingual (BL) crown diameters along with cusp dimensions and cusp indices of right maxillary first molar were measured in an Indian sample (149 males, 151 females; age range of 18–30 years). The possible sex dimorphism in these parameters was evaluated, and LRA was performed to ascertain their usefulness in sex prediction. Results: BL crown dimension and the hypocone (distolingual) cusp showed the highest sexual dimorphism. The combination of metacone and hypocone, i.e., distal cusp diameters among cusp parameters showed the highest accuracy (61.3%). While, on combining all the crown and cusp diameters together the overall accuracy was raised (64.3%). Conclusion: This study supports the ontogeny hypothesis suggesting that early-forming mesial cusps demonstrate less sexual variation as compared to subsequently formed distal cusps in the maxillary molar. Though the sex identification accuracy for cusp diameters of the permanent maxillary first molar in Indians is relatively moderate (≈61%), it can be used as an adjunct for sexing of adult Indians in forensic contexts. PMID:26681853

  7. A super-cusp divertor configuration for tokamaks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryutov, D. D.

    2015-08-26

    Our study demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of advanced divertor configurations created with the remote poloidal field coils. The emphasis here is on the configurations with three poloidal field nulls in the divertor area. We are seeking the structures where all three nulls lie on the same separatrix, thereby creating two zones of a very strong flux expansion, as envisaged in the concept of Takase’s cusp divertor. It turns out that the set of remote coils can produce a cusp divertor, with additional advantages of: (i) a large stand-off distance between the divertor and the coils and (ii) a thorough controlmore » that these coils exert over the fine features of the configuration. In reference to these additional favourable properties acquired by the cusp divertor, the resulting configuration could be called ‘a super-cusp’. General geometrical features of the three-null configurations produced by remote coils are described. Furthermore, issues on the way to practical applications include the need for a more sophisticated control system and possible constraints related to excessively high currents in the divertor coils.« less

  8. A super-cusp divertor configuration for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.

    2015-08-26

    Our study demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of advanced divertor configurations created with the remote poloidal field coils. The emphasis here is on the configurations with three poloidal field nulls in the divertor area. We are seeking the structures where all three nulls lie on the same separatrix, thereby creating two zones of a very strong flux expansion, as envisaged in the concept of Takase’s cusp divertor. It turns out that the set of remote coils can produce a cusp divertor, with additional advantages of: (i) a large stand-off distance between the divertor and the coils and (ii) a thorough control that these coils exert over the fine features of the configuration. In reference to these additional favourable properties acquired by the cusp divertor, the resulting configuration could be called ‘a super-cusp’. General geometrical features of the three-null configurations produced by remote coils are described. Furthermore, issues on the way to practical applications include the need for a more sophisticated control system and possible constraints related to excessively high currents in the divertor coils.

  9. Driving mechanisms for the cusp region density anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere causing an ionization anomaly. The energy from these particles along with Joule heating, and ion drag forcing play a direct role in determining the neutral density structure in the cusp region. Recent measurements at different altitudes by the CHAMP (390-460 km altitudes) and Streak (325-123 km altitudes) spacecraft have provided new information on the mesoscale structure in the cusp region. They have shown, respectively, a region of strong enhanced density and a region of depleted density relative to the surrounding area. This has led to conflicting explanations of the mechanism or mechanisms driving the density structure. For CHAMP, the observations (strong enhanced density) were attributed to upwelling of the neutral gas due to Joule heating associated with observed field-aligned currents. For Streak, the observations (relative depleted density) were attributed to soft particle precipitation not being adequate to cause upwelling at the lower altitudes sampled by Streak and relatively harder precipitation in adjacent areas. We use a high-resolution numerical model of the thermosphere to simulate the atmospheric response to the relevant forcing by realistically specifying the particle heating, Joule heating, ion drag, and other forcing. We compare the model results to the Streak and CHAMP observations and assess the relative contributions of these mechanisms in explaining the distinctive features of the observations. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by The Aerospace Corporation's Technical Investment program

  10. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  11. Performance characteristics of ring-cusp thrusters with xenon propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The performance characteristics and operating envelope of several 30-cm ring-cusp ion thrusters with xenon propellant were investigated. Results indicate a strong performance dependence on the discharge chamber boundary magnetic fields and resultant distribution of electron currents. Significant improvements in discharge performance over J-series divergent-field thrusters were achieved for large throttling ranges, which translate into reduced cathode emission currents and reduced power dissipation which should be of significant benefit for operation at thruster power levels in excess of 10 kW. Mass spectrometry of the ion beam was documented for both the ring-cusp and J-series thrusters with xenon propellant for determination of overall thruster efficiency, and lifetime. Based on the lower centerline values of doubly charged ions in the ion beam and the lower operating discharge voltage, the screen grid erosion rate of the ring-cusp thruster is expected to be lower than the divergent-field J-series thruster by a factor of 2.

  12. Electron density in the cusp ionosphere: increase or depletion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitout, Frédéric; Blelly, Pierre-Louis

    2003-07-01

    Radar observations indicate that the electron density may decrease significantly in the cusp ionosphere, despite the intense precipitation of low-energy electrons originating from the magnetosheath. We have modeled the ionospheric footprints of the cusp and mantle regions, and we focus on the two rival processes acting pro and con the electron density build-up in those regions of intense precipitation, which also happened to be regions of strong electric field. On one hand, the precipitation provides the ionosphere with electrons; on the other hand, the strong electric field heats up the ion population, stimulating the production of NO+. A fraction of the NO+ produced then feeds the electron-consuming chemical reaction NO+ + e- -> NO in the F1-region, although this reaction is not favored in presence of a high electron temperature. We investigate various combinations of E-field and initial electron densities. Our simulations clearly show that the overall result depends on the origin of the flux tube, which eventually opens in the cusp region. We interpret our results in terms of seasonal effects, IMF-By and MLT dependence.

  13. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae

  14. The Cusp/Core problem: supernovae feedback versus the baryonic clumps and dynamical friction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.; Pace, F.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we compare the predictions of two well known mechanisms considered able to solve the cusp/core problem (a. supernova feedback; b. baryonic clumps-DM interaction) by comparing their theoretical predictions to recent observations of the inner slopes of galaxies with masses ranging from dSphs to normal spirals. We compare the α-V_{rot} and the α-M_{ast} relationships, predicted by the two models with high resolution data coming from Adams et al. (Astrophys. J. 789, 63, 2014), Simon et al. (Astrophys. J. 621, 757, 2005), LITTLE THINGS (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), THINGS dwarves (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 141, 193, 2011a; Oh et al. in Astron. J. 142, 224, 2011b), THINGS spirals (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), Sculptor, Fornax and the Milky Way. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the complete set of data shows that the two models perform similarly, while when we restrict the analysis to a smaller subsample of higher quality, we show that the method presented in this paper (baryonic clumps-DM interaction) performs better than the one based on supernova feedback. We also show that, contrarily to the first model prediction, dSphs of small mass could have cored profiles. This means that observations of cored inner profiles in dSphs having a stellar mass <106 M_{⊙} not necessarily imply problems for the ΛCDM model.

  15. High-altitude cusp: The tremendous large and extremely dynamic region in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2003-04-01

    High-altitude dayside cusps (both northern and southern) are the tremendous large and extremely dynamic regions in geospace. They have a size of as large as 6 Re and are always there day after day. Turbulent diamagnetic cavities have been observed there. Associated with these cavities are charged particles with energies from 20 keV up to 10 MeV. The intensities of the cusp energetic ions are observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitude when compared to regions adjacent to the cusp which includes the magnetosheath. Their seed populations is a mixture of ionospheric and solar wind particles. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Turbulent electrical field with an amplitude of about 10 mV/m also presents in the cusp, and a cusp resonant acceleration mechanism is suggested.

  16. The Anemic Stellar Halo of M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, Benne

    2014-10-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context predict that massive disk galaxies should have richly-structured extended stellar halos, containing ~10% of a galaxy's stars, originating in large part from the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies. Observations of a number of nearby disk galaxies have generally agreed with these expectations. Recent new observations in integrated light with a novel array of low scattered-light telephoto lenses have failed to convincingly detect a stellar halo in the nearby massive face-on disk galaxy M101 (van Dokkum et al. 2014). They argue that any halo has to have <0.3% of the mass of the galaxy. This halo would be the least massive of any massive disk galaxy in the local Universe (by factors of several) -- such a halo is not predicted or naturally interpreted by the models, and would present a critical challenge to the picture of ubiquitous stellar halos formed from the debris of disrupting dwarf galaxies.We propose to resolve the stellar populations of this uniquely anemic stellar halo for 6 orbits with HST (ACS and WFC3), allowing us to reach surface brightness limits sufficient to clearly detect and characterize M101's stellar halo if it carries more than 0.1% of M101's mass. With resolved stellar populations, we can use the gradient of stellar populations as a function of radius to separate stellar halo from disk, which is impossible using integrated light observations. The resolved stellar populations will reveal the halo mass to much greater accuracy, measure the halo radial profile, constrain any halo lopsidedness, estimate the halo's stellar metallicity, and permit an analysis of outer disk stellar populations.

  17. Early science from the Pan-STARRS1 Optical Galaxy Survey (POGS): Maps of stellar mass and star formation rate surface density obtained from distributed-computing pixel-SED fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David A.; Vinsen, K.; Galaxy Properties Key Project, PS1

    2014-01-01

    To measure resolved galactic physical properties unbiased by the mask of recent star formation and dust features, we are conducting a citizen-scientist enabled nearby galaxy survey based on the unprecedented optical (g,r,i,z,y) imaging from Pan-STARRS1 (PS1). The PS1 Optical Galaxy Survey (POGS) covers 3π steradians (75% of the sky), about twice the footprint of SDSS. Whenever possible we also incorporate ancillary multi-wavelength image data from the ultraviolet (GALEX) and infrared (WISE, Spitzer) spectral regimes. For each cataloged nearby galaxy with a reliable redshift estimate of z < 0.05 - 0.1 (dependent on donated CPU power), publicly-distributed computing is being harnessed to enable pixel-by-pixel spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, which in turn provides maps of key physical parameters such as the local stellar mass surface density, crude star formation history, and dust attenuation. With pixel SED fitting output we will then constrain parametric models of galaxy structure in a more meaningful way than ordinarily achieved. In particular, we will fit multi-component (e.g. bulge, bar, disk) galaxy models directly to the distribution of stellar mass rather than surface brightness in a single band, which is often locally biased. We will also compute non-parametric measures of morphology such as concentration, asymmetry using the POGS stellar mass and SFR surface density images. We anticipate studying how galactic substructures evolve by comparing our results with simulations and against more distant imaging surveys, some of which which will also be processed in the POGS pipeline. The reliance of our survey on citizen-scientist volunteers provides a world-wide opportunity for education. We developed an interactive interface which highlights the science being produced by each volunteer’s own CPU cycles. The POGS project has already proven popular amongst the public, attracting about 5000 volunteers with nearly 12,000 participating computers, and is

  18. Three-loop cusp anomalous dimension and a conjecture for n loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidonakis, Nikolaos

    2016-05-01

    I present analytical expressions for the massive cusp anomalous dimension in QCD through three loops, first calculated in 2014, in terms of elementary functions and ordinary polylogarithms. I observe interesting relations between the results at different loops and provide a conjecture for the n-loop cusp anomalous dimension in terms of the lower-loop results. I also present numerical results and simple approximate formulas for the cusp anomalous dimension relevant to top-quark production.

  19. Features of polar cusp electron precipitation associated with a large magnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berko, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of precipitating electrons made by the OGO-4 satellite reveal several interesting phenomena in the polar cusp. Extremely high fluxes of 0.7 keV electrons were observed in the polar cusp ninety minutes following the sudden commencement of a very large magnetic storm. Structured, fairly high fluxes of 7.3 keV electrons were also observed in the cusp region, accompanied by very strong search coil magnetometer fluctuations, indicative of strong field-aligned currents. The observations confirm previously reported latitudinal shifts in the location of the polar cusp in response to southward interplanetary magnetic fields.

  20. Wave intensifications near the electron cyclotron frequency within the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Wong, H. K.; Lin, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    As DE 1 flew through the polar cusp, enhanced narrowband electrostatic waves were sometimes observed just above the electron cyclotron frequency. Here, wave and particle measurements from three representative cusp transits are presented in order to characterize these signals and understand the conditions that favor their generation. It was found that the form of the local cusp electron velocity distribution had a direct influence on the wave spectral character. A preliminary study indicates that electron beams in the cusp can generate the enhanced signals, although generation by an anisotropic warm component cannot be ruled out.

  1. Novel Matricing Technique for Management of Fractured Cusp Conundrum – A Clinician’s Corner

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Priya Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal tooth fracture can be classified as craze lines, fractured cusp, cracked tooth, split tooth and vertical root fracture based on extent and severity of the fracture line. The most common type of longitudinal tooth fracture is fractured cusp that poses the treatment dilemma. Retention of the fractured cusp segment temporarily with matrix band followed by permanent bonded restoration and finally removal of tooth fragment during crown preparation is a novel technique. This paper throws light on a matricing and holding technique for the management of supra-crestally fractured palatal cusp of maxillary first premolar in a 29-year-old Asian male. PMID:27190970

  2. History of Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of stellar interferometry from the suggestion of Fizeau that stellar interferometry was possible,to the use of the Mark I, II and III for astrometry. Photographs, and parts of original articles are presented.

  3. Stellar halos around Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2016-08-01

    The Local Group is now home to 102 known galaxies and candidates, with many new faint galaxies continuing to be discovered. The total stellar mass range spanned by this population covers a factor of close to a billion, from the faintest systems with stellar masses of order a few thousand to the Milky Way and Andromeda, with stellar masses of order 1011 M ⊙. Here, I discuss the evidence for stellar halos surrounding Local Group galaxies spanning from dwarf scales (with the case of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal), though to intermediate mass systems (M33) and finishing with M31. Evidence of extended stellar populations and merging is seen across the luminosity function, indicating that the processes that lead to halo formation are common at all mass scales.

  4. Early stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the formation and early evolution of stars is currently an area of great interest and activity. The theoretical and observational foundations for this development are reviewed in this paper. By now, the basic physics governing cloud collapse is well understood, as is the structure of the resulting protostars. However, the theory predicts protostellar luminosities that are greater than those of most infrared sources. Observationally, it is thought that protostars emit powerful winds that push away remnant cloud gas, but both the origin of these winds and the nature of their interaction with ambient gas are controversial. Finally, the theory of pre-main-sequence stars has been modified to incorporate more realistic initial conditions. This improvement helps to explain the distribution of such stars in the H-R diagram. Many important issues, such as the origin of binary stars and stellar clusters, remain as challenges for future research.

  5. The impact of dark matter cusps and cores on the satellite galaxy population around spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge; Benson, Andrew J.; Walker, Matthew G.; Gilmore, Gerard; McConnachie, Alan W.; Mayer, Lucio

    2010-08-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the effects that a divergent (i.e. `cuspy') dark matter profile introduces on the tidal evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our models assume cosmologically motivated initial conditions where dSphs are dark-matter-dominated systems on eccentric orbits about a host galaxy composed of a dark halo and a baryonic disc. We find that the resilience of dSphs to tidal stripping is extremely sensitive to the cuspiness of the inner halo profile; whereas dwarfs with a cored profile can be easily destroyed by the disc component, those with cusps always retain a bound remnant, even after losing more than 99.99 per cent of the original mass. For a given halo profile, the evolution of the structural parameters as driven by tides is controlled solely by the total amount of mass lost. This information is used to construct a semi-analytic code that follows the tidal evolution of individual satellites as they fall into a more massive host, which allows us to simulate the hierarchical build-up of spiral galaxies assuming different halo profiles and disc masses. We find that tidal encounters with discs tend to decrease the average mass of satellite galaxies at all galactocentric radii. Of all satellites, those accreted before re-ionization (z >~ 6), which may be singled out by anomalous metallicity patterns, provide the strongest constraints on the inner profile of dark haloes. These galaxies move on orbits that penetrate the disc repeatedly and survive to the present day only if haloes have an inner density cusp. We show that the size-mass relationship established from Milky Way (MW) dwarfs strongly supports the presence of cusps in the majority of these systems, as cored models systematically underestimate the masses of the known ultra-faint dSphs. Our models also indicate that a massive M31 disc may explain why many of its dSphs with suitable kinematic data fall below the size-mass relationship derived from MW dSphs. We also examine

  6. The Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) Database - III. Analysis of enrichment histories for elements and two modes of star formation during the early evolution of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shimako; Suda, Takuma; Komiya, Yutaka; Aoki, Wako; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-12-01

    We study the enrichment histories for nine elements, namely C, the four α-elements Mg, Si, Ca and Ti, Sc, and the three iron-peak elements Co, Ni and Zn, by using a large amount of stellar data collected in the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database. We find statistically significant changes, or breaks, of the mean abundance ratios to iron at the three metallicities [Fe/H] ≃ -1.8, -2.2 and -3.3. Across the first break, the mean abundance ratios decrease with metallicity by similar amounts for all elements with sufficient data. Across the latter two, downward trends with metallicity are also detected but for only some elements, namely for C, Co, Zn and possibly Sc for the second break, and for Co and Zn for the third. The breaks define four stellar populations with different abundance patterns that are dominant in each metallicity range divided by the breaks, namely Populations IIa, IIb, IIc and IId in order of increasing metallicity. We also explore their spatial distributions with spectroscopic distances to demonstrate that Populations IIa and IIb are spread over the Galactic halo, while Populations IIc and IId are observed near the Galactic plane. In particular, Population IIc stars emerge around [Fe/H] ≃ -2.6 and coexist with Population IIb stars, segregated by the spatial distributions. Our results reveal two distinct modes of star formation during the early stages of Galaxy formation, which are associated with variations of the initial mass function (IMF) and the spatial distribution of remnant low-mass stars. For the two lower-metallicity populations, the enhancements of Zn and Co indicate a high-mass and top-heavy IMF, in addition to large fraction of the carbon-enhanced stars. For the two higher-metallicity populations, on the other hand, the difference in the abundance patterns is attributable to the delayed contribution of Type Ia supernovae, indicative of a low-mass IMF and a specific star formation rate comparable to that in

  7. Three-dimensional Stellar Kinematics at the Galactic Center: Measuring the Nuclear Star Cluster Spatial Density Profile, Black Hole Mass, and Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, T.; Martinez, G. D.; Yelda, S.; Ghez, A.; Bullock, J.; Kaplinghat, M.; Lu, J. R.; Peter, A. H. G.; Phifer, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic observations of stars within the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way (MW) nuclear star cluster (NSC) using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy from the Keck telescopes. Recent observations have shown that the cluster has a shallower surface density profile than expected for a dynamically relaxed cusp, leading to important implications for its formation and evolution. However, the true 3D profile of the cluster is unknown due to the difficulty in de-projecting the stellar number counts. Here, we use spherical Jeans modeling of individual proper motions and radial velocities to constrain, for the first time, the de-projected spatial density profile, cluster velocity anisotropy, black hole mass (M BH), and distance to the Galactic center (R 0) simultaneously. We find that the inner stellar density profile of the late-type stars, ρ(r)vpropr -γ, have a power law slope \\gamma =0.05_{-0.60}^{+0.29}, much more shallow than the frequently assumed Bahcall-Wolf slope of γ = 7/4. The measured slope will significantly affect dynamical predictions involving the cluster, such as the dynamical friction time scale. The cluster core must be larger than 0.5 pc, which disfavors some scenarios for its origin. Our measurement of M_{BH}=5.76_{-1.26}^{+1.76}\\times 10^6 M ⊙ and R_0=8.92_{-0.55}^{+0.58} kpc is consistent with that derived from stellar orbits within 1'' of Sgr A*. When combined with the orbit of S0-2, the uncertainty on R 0 is reduced by 30% (8.46_{-0.38}^{+0.42}\\ kpc). We suggest that the MW NSC can be used in the future in combination with stellar orbits to significantly improve constraints on R 0.

  8. [Atrial tachycardia ablated from the non-coronary aortic cusp].

    PubMed

    Baszko, Artur; Krzyzanowski, Krzysztof; Zinka, Elzbieta; Grajek, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    We present a case of a patient with drug resistant atrial tachycardia which was ablated from the noncoronary aortic cusp. Tachycardia was adenosine-sensitive and was characterized by a long RP' interval and low amplitude P waves (biphasic in II, III, aVF and V1-V2 leads, and positive in aVL). The earliest atrial activation during tachycardia was recorded at His region and from non-coronary aortic sinus of Valsalva. RF ablation at this area terminated tachycardia and did not impair atrio-ventricular conduction. PMID:17366369

  9. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan Liu, Hui Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-15

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  10. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huan; Liu, Hui; Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-01

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  11. Ion cyclotron waves observed in the polar cusp.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Russell, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    During the penetration by Ogo 5 of the low-latitude disturbed polar cusp region on Nov. 1, 1968, while a major magnetic storm was in progress, a variety of plasma wave activity was observed. Observations of waves with amplitudes less than 2% of the background magnetic field intensity and having frequencies between approximately 0.67 and 0.87 times the local proton gyrofrequency are described. The polarization of these waves indicates that they are propagating at an appreciable angle to the local geomagnetic field line direction. The source of these waves has not been determined, but currents and gradient drifts are suggested as possible agents.

  12. Stellar Evolution in NGC 6791: Mass Loss on the Red Giant Branch and the Formation of Low-Mass White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalirai, Jasonjot S.; Bergeron, P.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Reitzel, David B.; Rich, R. Michael; Richer, Harvey B.

    2007-12-01

    We present the first detailed study of the properties (temperatures, gravities, and masses) of the NGC 6791 white dwarf population. This unique stellar system is both one of the oldest (8 Gyr) and most metal-rich ([Fe/H]~+0.4) open clusters in our Galaxy and has a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) that exhibits both a red giant clump and a much hotter extreme horizontal branch. Fitting the Balmer lines of the white dwarfs in the cluster using Keck/LRIS spectra suggests that most of these stars are undermassive, =0.43+/-0.06 Msolar, and therefore could not have formed from canonical stellar evolution involving the helium flash at the tip of the red giant branch. We show that at least 40% of NGC 6791's evolved stars must have lost enough mass on the red giant branch to avoid the flash and therefore did not convert helium into carbon-oxygen in their core. Such increased mass loss in the evolution of the progenitors of these stars is consistent with the presence of the extreme horizontal branch in the CMD. This unique stellar evolutionary channel also naturally explains the recent finding of a very young age (2.4 Gyr) for NGC 6791 from white dwarf cooling theory; helium-core white dwarfs in this cluster will cool ~3 times slower than carbon-oxygen-core stars, and therefore the corrected white dwarf cooling age is in fact >~7 Gyr, consistent with the well-measured main-sequence turnoff age. These results provide direct empirical evidence that mass loss is much more efficient in high-metallicity environments and therefore may be critical in interpreting the ultraviolet upturn in elliptical galaxies. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Based on observations obtained at the

  13. Upstream-generated Pc3 ULF wave signatures observed near the Earth's cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoman, T. K.; Wright, D. M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Lessard, M. R.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Kim, H.

    2012-03-01

    Pc3 pulsations (frequency ˜20-100 mHz) which originate in the ion foreshock upstream of the Earth's bow shock due to the interaction between reflected ions and the solar wind are frequently observed in ground-based pulsation magnetometer data. Previous studies have noted increased Pc3 wave power in the vicinity of the dayside cusp and inferred that the upstream waves gained entry via the cusp, although more recent studies have revealed a more complex picture. Here, we examine Pc3 wave power near local noon observed by search coil magnetometers at three closely-spaced stations on Svalbard, during times when an extended interval of HF radar backscatter indicative of the cusp is detected by the Hankasalmi SuperDARN radar. The location of the equatorward edge of the HF radar cusp may then be directly compared with the Pc3 wave power measured at three latitudes as the cusp migrates across the stations on a statistical basis. These observations are more consistent with wave entry to the magnetosphere along closed field lines equatorward of the cusp via the ionospheric transistor mechanism of Engebretson et al. (1991a), or weakly coupled fast and Alfvén wave modes, which then map to the low-latitude boundary layer or outer magnetosphere, rather than with wave entry into the magnetosphere via the cusp proper or exterior cusp.

  14. ULF cusp pulsations: Diurnal variations and interplanetary magnetic field correlations with ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect

    McHarg, M.G.; Olson, J.V.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper the authors establish the Pc 5 magnetic pulsation signatures of the cusp and boundary regions for the high-latitude dayside cusp region. These signatures were determined by comparing spectrograms of the magnetic pulsations with optical observations of particle precipitation regions observed at the cusp. The ULF pulsations have a diurnal variation, and a cusp discriminant is proposed using a particular narrow-band feature in the pulsation spectrograms. The statistical distribution of this pattern over a 253-day period resembles the statistical cusp description using particle precipitation data from the Defense Meterological Satellite Program (DMSP). The distribution of the ground-based cusp discriminant is found to peak 1 hour earlier than the DMSP cusp distribution. This offset is due to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) being predominantly negative B{sub y} for the period when the data were collected. The authors find the diurnal variations so repeatable that only three main categories have statistically different IMF distributions. The identification of the signatures in the magnetic spectrograms of the boundary regions and central cusp allows the spectrogram to be used as a {open_quotes}time line{close_quotes} that shows when the station passed under different regions of the dayside oval. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Average spatial distributions of energetic particles in the midaltitude cusp/cleft region observed by Viking

    SciTech Connect

    Kremser, G.; Lundin, R. )

    1990-05-01

    The cusp/cleft region provides an entrance for magnetosheath particles into the magnetosphere and a sink for magnetospheric particles. In addition, strong acceleration and/or scattering of particles takes place. The Swedish satellite Viking crossed this region at midaltitudes. Measurements from this spacecraft were used to determine the average spatial distributions of H{sup +} and He{sup ++} ions in the energy/charge range 2 keV/e {le} E/Q {le} 60 keV/e and of electrons with 7 keV {le} E {le} 97 keV. The data supply information on the structure of the midaltitude cusp/cleft region, the particle sources, and dynamical processes. Four different parts can be distinguished: (1) The cusp extends from about 76{degree} to 82{degree} invariant latitude (INL) and from 0800 to 1400 MLT. It is characterized by the presence of magnetosheath origin particles and important electron acceleration signatures. (2) A smaller region inside the cusp (77{degree}-82{degree} INL, 1000-1330 MLT) contains magnetosheath origin ions without electron acceleration. This is regarded as the cusp proper connected to the exterior cusp. (3) Poleward of the cusp magnetosheath origin ions are still present, but no magnetosheath electrons. This region is related to the plasma mantle. (4) Another region without magnetosheath origin ions but with strong electron acceleration extends equatorward of the cusp and probably constitutes part of the cleft, likely to be connected to the low-altitude boundary layer.

  16. [Case report: idiopathic ventricular tachycardia from the aortic sinus cusp].

    PubMed

    Tejera-Jurado, Luis Carlos; Nava, Santiago; Colín-Lizalde, Luis; Márquez, Manlio F; Gómez-Flores, Jorge; González-Hermosillo, Jesús Antonio; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia is identified in 10% of the patients presenting with ventricular tachycardia, and they consist of various subtypes that can originate from different areas, including the aortic cusps which represent 0.7% of the total. Electrocardiographically, these ventricular tachycardias display a left bundle branch block pattern and inferior axis, and although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis with tachycardias originating from the septal region of the right ventricular outflow tract, which comprise 80% of the idiopathic ventricular tachycardias. Despite the vicinity of the left coronary artery ostium, radiofrequency catheter ablation can be curative in more than 90% of cases with a low risk (< 1% of serious complication). Therefore, it must be considered first-line therapy in patients who have failed or are intolerant to therapy with antiarrhythmic agents. The aim of this article is to describe the first case reported in Mexico of a successful ablation idiopathic ventricular tachycardia from the aortic sinus cusp in a patient with incessant ventricular tachycardia. PMID:19902669

  17. Cusps and cuspidal edges at fluid interfaces: Existence and application.

    PubMed

    Krechetnikov, R

    2015-04-01

    One of the intriguing questions in fluid dynamics is on the interrelation between dynamic singularities in the solutions of fluid dynamic equations - unboundedness of the velocity field in an appropriate norm - and the geometric ones - divergence of curvature at fluid interfaces. The present work focuses on two generic interfacial singularities - genuine cusps and cuspidal edges - found here in both two and three dimensions thus establishing a relation between real fluid interfaces and geometric singularity theory. The key finding is the necessary condition for the existence of geometric singularities, which is a variation of surface tension. It is also established here that the dynamic and geometric singularities entail each other only in the case of three-dimensional cusps. Explicit asymptotic solutions for the flow field and interface shape near steady-state singularities at fluid interfaces are developed as well. The practical motivation for the present study comes from the fundamental role interfacial singularities play in sustaining self-driven conversion of chemical into mechanical energy. PMID:25974592

  18. Ionospheric signatures of cusp-latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Arnoldy, R.L. )

    1988-01-01

    It has been well established that many of the disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere, such as auroral substorms, are a response to variations in the solar wind that continually sweeps from the Sun past the Earth and other planets. Studies over the past several years, most recently reviewed by Odera (1986) and Arnoldy at el. (1988), have shown that Pc 3 pulsations, a class of ultra-low-frequency waves in the Earth's magnetic field with periods between 15 and 40 seconds, are also directly related to activity in the solar wind just upstream of the Earth. The authors present in this report new observations from South Pole Station, Antarctica, which during certain hours every day is located under the nominal position of the magnetospheric cleft/cusp region. There has been ample evidence that plasmas from interplanetary space can penetrate to ionospheric altitudes in the cusp region. Two earlier papers based on South Pole data noted that large-amplitude, narrowband Pc 3 magnetic pulsations occurred at South Pole Station near local magnetic noon when the interplanetary magnetic field was aligned near the Earth-Sun direction (low interplanetary magnetic field cone angle). They have now found evidence of these pulsations in data from other South Pole instruments as well.

  19. Evidence of Component Merging Equatorward of the Cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, M. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Lockwood, M.; Moore, T. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Polar spacecraft passed through a region near the dayside magnetopause on May 29, 1996, at a geocentric distance of approx. 8 R (sub E) and high, northern magnetic latitudes. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was northward during the pass. Data from the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment revealed the existence of low-speed (approx. 50 km s (exp-1)) ion D-shaped distributions mixed with cold ions (approx. 2 eV) over a period of 2.5 hours. These ions were traveling parallel to the magnetic field toward the Northern Hemisphere ionosphere and were convecting primarily eastward. The D-shaped distributions are distinct from a convecting Maxwellian and, along with the magnetic field direction, are taken as evidence that the spacecraft was inside the magnetosphere and not in the magnetosheath. Furthermore, the absence of ions in the antiparallel direction is taken as evidence that low-shear merging was occurring at a location southward of the spacecraft and equatorward of the Southern Hemisphere cusp. The cold ions were of ionospheric origin, with initially slow field-aligned speeds, which were accelerated upon reflection from the magnetopause. These observations provide significant new evidence consistent with component magnetic merging sites equatorward of the cusp for northward IMF.

  20. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty: repair with an extracellular patch

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Szymon; Śliwka, Joanna; Urlik, Maciej; Maruszewski, Marcin; Kukulski, Tomasz; Nożyński, Jerzy; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of valve repair procedures is increasing in experienced centers. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes after aortic valve reconstruction with a novel surgical technique. Material and methods The study group consisted of 30 patients (23 male and 7 female) at a mean age of 35 ± 14 years. In patients with aortic root aneurysm the reimplantation or Florida sleeve technique was used. A sub-commissural annuloplasty, plication of the free edge of the cusp, shaving, and commissurotomy were performed. At this stage of surgery aortic repair was then attempted by cusp extension. Since 2013 the strips have been tailored from extracellular matrix. Results The mean aortic cross-clamp time was 90 ± 32 min. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 126 ± 38 min. There was no in-hospital death. Re-exploration for bleeding was required in 1 patient. During follow-up, 1 patient needed reoperation at 1 year due to endocarditis. All patients remained alive in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I. The echocardiographic findings remained unchanged in all cases during follow-up. Conclusions Our modification of aortic valve repair results in a good outcome. PMID:26855646

  1. Cusps and cuspidal edges at fluid interfaces: Existence and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechetnikov, R.

    2015-04-01

    One of the intriguing questions in fluid dynamics is on the interrelation between dynamic singularities in the solutions of fluid dynamic equations - unboundedness of the velocity field in an appropriate norm - and the geometric ones - divergence of curvature at fluid interfaces. The present work focuses on two generic interfacial singularities - genuine cusps and cuspidal edges - found here in both two and three dimensions thus establishing a relation between real fluid interfaces and geometric singularity theory. The key finding is the necessary condition for the existence of geometric singularities, which is a variation of surface tension. It is also established here that the dynamic and geometric singularities entail each other only in the case of three-dimensional cusps. Explicit asymptotic solutions for the flow field and interface shape near steady-state singularities at fluid interfaces are developed as well. The practical motivation for the present study comes from the fundamental role interfacial singularities play in sustaining self-driven conversion of chemical into mechanical energy.

  2. Cusps and cuspidal edges at fluid interfaces: existence and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2015-11-01

    One of the intriguing questions in fluid dynamics is on the interrelation between dynamic singularities in the solutions of fluid dynamic equations - unboundedness of the velocity field in an appropriate norm - and the geometric ones - divergence of curvature at fluid interfaces. The present talk focuses on two generic interfacial singularities - genuine cusps and cuspidal edges - found here in both two and three dimensions thus establishing a relation between real fluid interfaces and geometric singularity theory. The key new finding is the necessary condition for the existence of geometric singularities, which is a variation of surface tension. It is also established here that the dynamic and geometric singularities entail each other only in the case of three-dimensional cusps. Explicit asymptotic solutions for the flow field and interface shape near steady-state singularities at fluid interfaces are developed as well. The practical motivation for the present study comes from the fundamental role interfacial singularities play in sustaining self-driven conversion of chemical into mechanical energy.

  3. Characterization of a Diverging Cusped Field Thruster Operating on Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald-Tenenbaum, Natalia; Tango, Landon; Hargus, William, Jr.; Nakles, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The Diverging Cusped Field Thruster (DCFT) is a low-power plasma with a cusped magnetic field profile. The magnetic fields have strong gradients that cause energetic electrons to mirror back and forth within the discharge chamber, enhancing propellant ionization. Radial portions of the magnetic field are seen only at magnet interfaces, thereby mitigating the ion impingement and heat flux to the channel walls that reduces thruster lifetime. The DCFT has been studied extensively while operating on xenon. This work represents the initial efforts at characterizing the DCFT operating on krypton. Krypton has gained interest in recent years as an alternate propellant for plasma propulsion, mainly because its lower cost has the potential to provide great savings for satellite missions. The results presented include a mapping of changes in the DCFT's discharge current with varying applied anode voltages and propellant mass flow rates, and frequency analysis of the discharge current oscillations. Additionally, time-averaged and time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence velocimetry are used to examine the ionization and acceleration regions of the discharge channel in an effort to better understand the dynamics of the thruster operation on krypton.

  4. On the thrashing cusp in slotted Aloha systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onozato, Y.; Noguchi, S.

    1985-11-01

    A new tool for performance evaluation of a multiaccess communication system was developed, and an explicit detailed analytic description of a cusp catastrophe in a computer communication is presented. An approximate model is formulated for a slotted Aloha system assuming a single buffer, based on the Markovian model studied by Lam (1974), and Carleial and Hellman (1975). Next, the research on quantitative processing of thrashing, and its results are outlined. Sudden changes, which can be observed in the throughput rate, the average delay, and the average number of backlogged users, are induced by smooth alterations of control parameters in the behavior of a slotted Aloha system. These catastrophic phenomena, such as long-lasting periods of vanishing throughput rate and very high delays, are analyzed in line with catastrophe theory. The system behavior in a slotted Aloha system is characterized by the cusp catastrophe. In particular, introducing a new parameter sigma in the model, it is made clear why and in what cases these catastrophic phenomena occur. The amount of change is also estimated.

  5. Talon cusp affecting primary dentition in two siblings: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mallineni, S K; Manan, N M; Lee, C K; King, N M

    2013-01-01

    The term talon cusp refers to a rare developmental dental anomaly characterized by a cusp-like structure projecting from the cingulum area or cement-enamel junction. This condition can occur in the maxillary and mandibular arches of the primary and permanent dentitions. The purpose of this paper is to report on the presence of talon cusps in the primary dentition of two southern Chinese siblings. The 4 years and 2 months old girl had a talon cusp on her maxillary right primary central incisor, while her 2 years and 9 months old brother had bilateral talon cusps on the maxillary primary central incisors. The presence of this rare dental anomaly in two siblings has scarcely been reported in the literature and this may provide further evidence of a hereditary etiology. PMID:23529333

  6. Stellar coronae from Einstein - Observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    Einstein Observatory observations of stellar X-ray emission are presented and their implications for the formation of stellar coronae and the problem of stellar angular momentum loss are discussed. Solar coronal X-ray observations and observations of stellar coronae made prior to Einstein are reviewed, and it is noted that they already suggest that the standard theory of acoustic coronal heating is inadequate. The principal results of the Einstein/CfA stellar survey are summarized, with attention given to variations of the level of X-ray flux detected along the main sequence, the decline of X-ray flux with increasing age of giants and supergiants, and indications of a large range of X-ray emission levels within a given type, which are clearly incompatible with models for acoustic flux generation. A new theory to explain stellar coronae and hence X-ray emission from them is then proposed in which stellar magnetic fields play the key role in determining the level of coronal emission, and the modulation of the surface magnetic flux level and the level of stressing of surface magnetic fields essentially determine the variation of mean coronal activity in the H-R diagram.

  7. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar-Mass Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morscher, Maggie

    Globular clusters are gravitationally bound systems containing up to millions of stars, and are found ubiquitously in massive galaxies, including the Milky Way. With densities as high as a million stars per cubic parsec, they are one of the few places in the Universe where stars interact with one another. They therefore provide us with a unique laboratory for studying how gravitational interactions can facilitate the formation of exotic systems, such as X-ray binaries containing black holes, and merging double black hole binaries, which are produced much less efficiently in isolation. While telescopes can provide us with a snapshot of what these dense clusters look like at present, we must rely on detailed numerical simulations to learn about their evolution. These simulations are quite challenging, however, since dense star clusters are described by a complicated set of physical processes occurring on many different length and time scales, including stellar and binary evolution, weak gravitational scattering encounters, strong resonant binary interactions, and tidal stripping by the host galaxy. Until very recently, it was not possible to model the evolution of systems with millions of stars, the actual number contained in the largest clusters, including all the relevant physics required describe these systems accurately. The Northwestern Group's Henon Monte Carlo code, CMC, which has been in development for over a decade, is a powerful tool that can be used to construct detailed evolutionary models of large star clusters. With its recent parallelization, CMC is now capable of addressing a particularly interesting unsolved problem in astrophysics: the dynamical evolution of stellar black holes in dense star clusters. Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes, the remnants of stars with initial masses from 20 - 100

  8. Transport of transient solar wind particles in Earth's cusps

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Teste, A.; Wilber, M.; Lin, N.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Reme, H.; Fu, S. Y.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2008-08-15

    An important problem in space physics still not understood well is how the solar wind enters the Earth's magnetosphere. Evidence is presented that transient solar wind particles produced by solar disturbances can appear in the Earth's mid-altitude ({approx}5 R{sub E} geocentric) cusps with densities nearly equal to those in the magnetosheath. That these are magnetosheath particles is established by showing they have the same ''flattop'' electron distributions as magnetosheath electrons behind the bow shock. The transient ions are moving parallel to the magnetic field (B) toward Earth and often coexist with ionospheric particles that are flowing out. The accompanying waves include electromagnetic and broadband electrostatic noise emissions and Bernstein mode waves. Phase-space distributions show a mixture of hot and cold electrons and multiple ion species including field-aligned ionospheric O{sup +} beams.

  9. Interobserver error involved in independent attempts to measure cusp base areas of Pan M1s.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Shara E; Pilbrow, Varsha C; Wood, Bernard A

    2004-10-01

    Cusp base areas measured from digitized images increase the amount of detailed quantitative information one can collect from post-canine crown morphology. Although this method is gaining wide usage for taxonomic analyses of extant and extinct hominoids, the techniques for digitizing images and taking measurements differ between researchers. The aim of this study was to investigate interobserver error in order to help assess the reliability of cusp base area measurement within extant and extinct hominoid taxa. Two of the authors measured individual cusp base areas and total cusp base area of 23 maxillary first molars (M(1)) of Pan. From these, relative cusp base areas were calculated. No statistically significant interobserver differences were found for either absolute or relative cusp base areas. On average the hypocone and paracone showed the least interobserver error (< 1%) whereas the protocone and metacone showed the most (2.6-4.5%). We suggest that the larger measurement error in the metacone/protocone is due primarily to either weakly defined fissure patterns and/or the presence of accessory occlusal features. Overall, levels of interobserver error are similar to those found for intraobserver error. The results of our study suggest that if certain prescribed standards are employed then cusp and crown base areas measured by different individuals can be pooled into a single database. PMID:15447691

  10. Quasistatic electric field structures and field-aligned currents in the polar cusp region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Knut; Moen, Joran; Pedersen, Arne

    2010-05-01

    Quasistatic electric field structures in the vicinity of the cusp have been studied using Cluster data. There are two categories of electric potential structures, S-shaped and U-shaped. In previous studies in the nightside auroral region, the S-shaped potential was uniquely related to the boundary transition between low density and high density plasma regimes, leading to the conclusion that the electric field profile depends on whether the plasma populations on each side of the boundary can support intense field-aligned and Pedersen currents. In this study in the dayside cusp this is not the case, and a different explanation has to be sought. Most electric field structures are associated with the start of the cusp ion dispersion or with injection signatures within the cusp, and the field-aligned currents associated with these structures are found to be consistent with the cusp currents expected for the IMF By polarity at the time. This indicates that the electric field structures are generated by the cusp current system, or modified by the cusp current system to be consistent with the required currents. Furthermore, we provide firm evidence for the dayside Region 1 current to be located on open field lines, which have been postulated but to our knowledge heretofore not experimentally verified.

  11. Wave intensifications near the electron cyclotron frequency within the polar cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Gurnett, D.A. ); Menietti, J.D.; Wong, H.K.; Lin, C.S.; Burch, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    As DE 1 flew through the polar cusp, enhanced narrowband electrostatic waves were sometimes observed just above the electron cyclotron frequency, f{sub ce}. In this report, the authors present wave and particle measurements from three representative cusp transits in order to characterize these signals and understand the conditions that favor their generation. In these representative cases, narrowband emission intensifications occurred at frequencies between 1.1 to 1.3 f{sub ce}. The emission intensities ranged between 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}12} V{sup 2}/(m{sup 2} Hz), such waves being 50 to 1,000 times greater than the narrowbanded cyclotron-related signal levels detected in adjacent regions. Simultaneously occurring with the wave enhancements were energetic cusp electrons with energies extending up to about 500 eV. It was found that the form of the local cusp electron velocity distribution had a direct influence on the wave spectral character. A preliminary study indicates that electron beams in the cusp can generate the enhanced signals, although generation by an anisotropic warm component cannot be ruled out. Based on an examination of many cusp transits, the occurrence of these enhanced signals appeared to have some dependency on Kp index, indicating that increased particle flows seem to affect their generation. Although the exact wave/particle coupling mechanism resonsible for these enhancements is difficult to identify, it is evident that the generation is directly related to the energetic cusp electrons.

  12. Cusp observation at Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere by the Cassini spacecraft

    PubMed Central

    Jasinski, J M; Arridge, C S; Lamy, L; Leisner, J S; Thomsen, M F; Mitchell, D G; Coates, A J; Radioti, A; Jones, G H; Roussos, E; Krupp, N; Grodent, D; Dougherty, M K; Waite, J H

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first analysis of magnetospheric cusp observations at Saturn by multiple in situ instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Using this we infer the process of reconnection was occurring at Saturn's magnetopause. This agrees with remote observations that showed the associated auroral signatures of reconnection. Cassini crossed the northern cusp around noon local time along a poleward trajectory. The spacecraft observed ion energy-latitude dispersions—a characteristic signature of the terrestrial cusp. This ion dispersion is “stepped,” which shows that the reconnection is pulsed. The ion energy-pitch angle dispersions suggest that the field-aligned distance from the cusp to the reconnection site varies between ∼27 and 51 RS. An intensification of lower frequencies of the Saturn kilometric radiation emissions suggests the prior arrival of a solar wind shock front, compressing the magnetosphere and providing more favorable conditions for magnetopause reconnection. Key Points We observe evidence for reconnection in the cusp plasma at Saturn We present evidence that the reconnection process can be pulsed at Saturn Saturn's cusp shows similar characteristics to the terrestrial cusp PMID:25821276

  13. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer

    Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments.

    The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster.

    Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more.

    While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster.

    Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image.

    This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming

  14. Sequential Star Formation in RCW 34: A Spectroscopic Census of the Stellar Content of High-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, A.; Puga, E.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Horrobin, M.; Henning, Th.; Vasyunina, T.; Beuther, H.; Linz, H.; Kaper, L.; van den Ancker, M.; Lenorzer, A.; Churchwell, E.; Kurtz, S.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Stolte, A.; de Koter, A.; Thi, W. F.; Comerón, F.; Waelkens, Ch.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy of RCW 34 along with Spitzer/IRAC photometry of the surroundings. RCW 34 consists of three different regions. A large bubble has been detected in the IRAC images in which a cluster of intermediate- and low-mass class II objects is found. At the northern edge of this bubble, an H II region is located, ionized by 3 OB stars, of which the most massive star has spectral type O8.5V. Intermediate-mass stars (2-3 M sun) are detected of G- and K-spectral type. These stars are still in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. North of the H II region, a photon-dominated region is present, marking the edge of a dense molecular cloud traced by H2 emission. Several class 0/I objects are associated with this cloud, indicating that star formation is still taking place. The distance to RCW 34 is revised to 2.5 ± 0.2 kpc and an age estimate of 2 ± 1 Myr is derived from the properties of the PMS stars inside the H II region. Between the class II sources in the bubble and the PMS stars in the H II region, no age difference could be detected with the present data. The presence of the class 0/I sources in the molecular cloud, however, suggests that the objects inside the molecular cloud are significantly younger. The most likely scenario for the formation of the three regions is that star formation propagated from south to north. First the bubble is formed, produced by intermediate- and low-mass stars only, after that, the H II region is formed from a dense core at the edge of the molecular cloud, resulting in the expansion similar to a champagne flow. More recently, star formation occurred in the rest of the molecular cloud. Two different formation scenarios are possible. (1) The bubble with the cluster of low- and intermediate-mass stars triggered the formation of the O star at the edge of the molecular cloud, which in its turn induces the current star formation in the molecular cloud. (2) An external triggering is

  15. Gravitational-wave stochastic background from kinks and cusps on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Oelmez, S.; Mandic, V.; Siemens, X.

    2010-05-15

    We compute the contribution of kinks on cosmic string loops to stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGW). We find that kinks contribute at the same order as cusps to the SBGW. We discuss the accessibility of the total background due to kinks as well as cusps to current and planned gravitational-wave detectors, as well as to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and pulsar timing constraints. As in the case of cusps, we find that current data from interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, are sensitive to areas of parameter space of cosmic string models complementary to those accessible to pulsar, BBN, and CMB bounds.

  16. Stellar duplicity and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, Rob

    2014-09-01

    Half or more of all stars more massive than our Sun are orbited by one (or more) companion stars. Many companions are close enough that the evolution of both stars is greatly altered by the transfer of mass and angular momentum from one star to the other. Such mass transfer is highly likely during the late stages of evolution, such as on the giant branches, which are quite coincidentally also when stars undergo interesting nucleosynthesis. Direct mass transfer truncates the (A)GB prematurely compared to single stars and the ensuing stellar envelope is ejected perhaps to form a (chemically peculiar?) planetary nebula. In wider binaries, where one star has captured material from a long-dead companion, we can probe the nucleosynthesis that happened in ancient stars as well as fundamental astrophysical phenomena like wind accretion and circumbinary disc formation. I will focus on recent quantitative work on nucleosynthesis in mass-transfer systems, such as carbon-enhanced metal-poor and barium stars, and highlight some of the key open questions - and opportunities - that will dominate the next decade of duplicitous nucleosynthesis.

  17. SI: The Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager (SI) will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 milliarcsec resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and simple snapshots into spellbinding evolving views. SI s science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI s prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era by imaging a sample of magnetically active stars with enough resolution to map their evolving dynamo patterns and their internal flows. By exploring the Universe at ultra-high resolution, SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magnetohydrodynamically controlled structures and processes in the Universe.

  18. Survey of MAgellanic Stellar History - SMASH!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidever, D.; Smash Team

    2015-05-01

    Over the last several years, various discoveries have drastically altered our view of the iconic Magellanic Clouds (MCs), the nearest interacting galaxy system. The best evidence is now that they are on first infall into the Milky Way, that their stellar populations extend much further than previously thought, and that they suffered a close collision that tore out both the well-known Magellanic Stream and a large amount of still undetected stellar debris. Here we propose a community DECam survey of the Clouds mapping 480 deg2 (distributed over ˜2400 deg2 at ˜20% filling factor) to 24th mag in griz (and u 23 mag) that will supplement the 5000 deg2 Dark Energy Surveys partial coverage of the Magellanic periphery, allowing us to map the expected stellar debris and extended populations with unprecedented fidelity. We have already conducted a pilot project demonstrating that DECam will allow us to carry out the following: (1) Map the stellar periphery of the MCs with old main sequence turnoff stars to a surface brightness limit of ˜35 mag/arcsec2, revealing relics of their formation and past interactions. (2) Identify the stellar component of the Magellanic Stream and Leading Arm for the first time, if they exist, making them the only Galactic halo tracers with both gaseous and stellar components. (3) Derive spatially-resolved star formation histories covering all ages out to large radii of the MCs that will further complement our understanding of their formation. The combination of this survey and the DES data will allow us to uncover a multitude of stellar structure that will unveil the complex and dramatic history of these two dwarf galaxies, while enabling a broad spectrum of community-led projects. SMASH has obtained initial data through DECam Science Verification (data public now) and through first observing runs in 2013A. Subsequent observations to fulfill the science goals described below have been proposed through the NOAO Survey program.

  19. Simulations on the influence of the spatial distribution of source electrons on the plasma in a cusped-field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Tim; Trottenberg, Thomas; Groll, Rodion; Jansen, Frank; Hey, Franz Georg; Johann, Ulrich; Kersten, Holger; Braxmaier, Claus

    2015-06-01

    We present results from simulations on the influence of source electrons on the plasma properties in a magnetic cusps environment. Our simulations are based on the VSim/Vorpal particle-in-cell plasma simulation package. Magnetic cusps are a typical feature of High Efficiency Multistage Plasma Thrusters (HEMPTs). This research is part of an effort to downscale a HEMPT to thrust levels in the μN and sub- μN regime. The aim is to fulfill the requirements of upcoming formation flight satellites and probes. Those missions demand very precise attitude control. In order to get the necessary insight, the plasma of a section of the HEMPT discharge chamber is simulated with idealized boundary conditions. The results for such a section at two different distributions of source electrons are shown. A significant increase of the overall ion number is recognized for one of the distributions. Comparisons with published similar simulations are made. Factors that should be important for improvements of this thruster type are highlighted.

  20. Binary interactions and multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dengkai

    2015-08-01

    Observations revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the abundance anomalous stars observed in GCs are the merged stars and the accretor stars produced by binary interactions, which are rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation. The stellar population with binaries can reproduce two important observational evidences of multiple stellar populations, the Na-O anticorrelation and the multiple sequences in HR diagram. This suggests that binary interactions may be a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs.

  1. Complete Aortic Valve Cusp Replacement in the Pediatric Population Using Tissue-Engineered Bovine Pericardium.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Rankin, J Scott; Vogt, Manfred; Lange, Rüdiger; Schreiber, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Three clinical cases of severe pediatric aortic valve defects undergoing complete aortic valve cusp replacement using tissue-engineered bovine pericardium are reported. All patients achieved excellent early results, and are being followed without complications. PMID:26522549

  2. Magnetic field structure influence on primary electron cusp losses for micro-scale discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Dankongkakul, Ben; Araki, Samuel J.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2014-04-15

    An experimental effort was used to examine the primary electron loss behavior for micro-scale (≲3 cm diameter) discharges. The experiment uses an electron flood gun source and an axially aligned arrangement of ring-cusps to guide the electrons to a downstream point cusp. Measurements of the electron current collected at the point cusp show an unexpectedly complex loss pattern with azimuthally periodic structures. Additionally, in contrast to conventional theory for cusp losses, the overall radii of the measured collection areas are over an order of magnitude larger than the electron gyroradius. Comparing these results to Monte Carlo particle tracking simulations and a simplified analytical analysis shows that azimuthal asymmetries of the magnetic field far upstream of the collection surface can substantially affect the electron loss structure and overall loss area.

  3. Stability studies of a hollow plasma in the double cusp experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.R.; Garner, H.R.; Parks, P.B.; Sleeper, A.M.; Okamura, S.; Adati, K.; Aoki, T.; Fujita, H.; Hidekuma, S.; Hattori, K.

    1984-11-01

    Axisymmetric cusp end cells have application for the stabilization and plugging of a tandem-mirror-type reactor. Experiments have been performed on the RFC-XX double cusp in Nagoya, Japan to measure the stability of the hollow plasma in the adiabatically confined region of the device. Experiments were performed with both a uniform field central section and with a mirror central section connecting the two cusps. The plasma is produced by an rf discharge of gas puffed into the vessel. Plasma fluctuations were measured by Langmuir probes and magnetic probes. Stable regions of operation with a hollow plasma in the cusp are found for both magnetic configurations. Various types of instabilities are observed: electrostatic drift type waves with m> or =1, lower-frequency waves with a magnetic perturbation associated with the density perturbation, an m = 0 ion-acoustic mode, and a large amplitude relaxation oscillation.

  4. Plasma waves in the dayside polar cusp. II - Magnetopause and polar magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Fredricks, R. W.; Neugebauer, M.; Russell, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    During the outbound pass of Nov. 1, 1968, Ogo 5 sporadically encountered the low-altitude polar cusp at low magnetic latitudes. The spacecraft remained in the cusp beyond six earth radii, and it then traversed the interface region between the magnetospheric cusp and the magnetosheath. Two large scale discontinuities were detected in this sheath-cusp transition region, and several possible interpretations are evaluated here. At 1427 UT, local changes in magnetic field orientation and the variation in ULF magnetic power spectral density were typical of shifts detected at the magnetopause, although the spacecraft did not traverse a true boundary of warm plasma at this point. The second discontinuity, detected at 1456 UT, resembled a collisionless shock, and it was characterized by observations of intense, impulsive VLF electric field bursts and rapid local variations in both total ion flux and differential electron flux. The simplest interpretation is that Ogo 5 had traversed a standing shock within the sheath.

  5. The distribution of stellar populations within galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Novais, Patricia M.; Sodre, Laerte

    2015-08-01

    Stellar populations are a fossil record of several physical processes which occur in galaxies and their distribution within these objects may provide important clues on how they form and evolve. In this work we present some initial results of our approach to study the spatial distribution of stellar populations inside galaxies from their SDSS images. We used colours to estimate the age and then to obtain pixel-by-pixel proxies of the stellar populations and their distributions inside each galaxy. Our approach aims to obtain quantitative estimates on how the different stellar populations are distributed within a galaxy, bringing hints on how galaxies grow and evolve. The pixel-by-pixel analysis of a small sample shows that the stellar populations tend to evolve inside-out in spiral and late spiral galaxies, while the stellar populations of elliptical galaxies appear to have undergone other process of formation and evolution. These first results show that this approach is effective and will be explored and improved in future works, with the IFU-like data provided by the J-PAS and APLUS surveys.

  6. Lower bounds to energies for cusped-gaussian wavefunctions. [hydrogen atom ground state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaves, J. O.; Walsh, B. C.; Steiner, E.

    1974-01-01

    Calculations for the ground states of H, He, and Be, conducted by Steiner and Sykes (1972), show that the inclusion of a very small number of cusp functions can lead to a substantial enhancement of the quality of the Gaussian basis used in molecular wavefunction computations. The properties of the cusped-Gaussian basis are investigated by a calculation of lower bounds concerning the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom.

  7. Quasistatic electric field structures and field-aligned currents in the polar cusp region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K. S.; Moen, J. I.; Pedersen, A.

    2010-10-01

    Cluster data have been examined for quasi-stationary electric field structures and field-aligned currents (FACs) in the vicinity of the dayside cusp region. We have related the measurements to the Region 1/Region 2 (R1/R2) current system and the cusp current system. It has been theoretically proposed that the dayside R1 current may be located on open field lines, and experimental evidence has been shown for R1 currents partially on open field lines. We document that R1 currents may flow entirely on open field lines. The electric field structures are found to occur at plasma density gradients in the cusp. They are associated with strong FACs with current directions that are consistent with the cusp currents. This indicates that the electric field structures are closely coupled to the cusp current system. The electric equipotential structures linking the perpendicular electric fields seen at Cluster altitudes to field-aligned electric fields at lower altitudes fall into one of two categories: S shape or U shape. Both types are found at both the equatorward edge of the cusp ion dispersion and at the equatorward edge of injection events within the cusp. Previous studies in the nightside auroral region attributed the S-shaped potential structures to the boundary transition between the low-density polar cap and the high-density plasma sheet, concluding that the shape of the electric potential structure depends on whether the plasma populations on each side of the structure can support intense currents. This explanation is not applicable for the S-shaped structures observed in the dayside cusp region.

  8. Unusual occurrence of accessory central cusp in the maxillary second primary molar.

    PubMed

    Nirmala, S V S G; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Velpula, Lalitha; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2011-04-01

    Accessory cusp present on the occlusal surface may seldom pose problems. While its presence may not be a cause for alarm in most instances, it can sometimes lead to serious consequences if it is damaged. This case presents a rare finding of unilateral central accessory cusp seen on the occlusal surface of the maxillary left second primary molar and discusses the need for continuous dental surveillance and preventive measures. PMID:21957391

  9. Unusual occurrence of accessory central cusp in the maxillary second primary molar

    PubMed Central

    Nirmala, S.V.S.G; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Velpula, Lalitha; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    Accessory cusp present on the occlusal surface may seldom pose problems. While its presence may not be a cause for alarm in most instances, it can sometimes lead to serious consequences if it is damaged. This case presents a rare finding of unilateral central accessory cusp seen on the occlusal surface of the maxillary left second primary molar and discusses the need for continuous dental surveillance and preventive measures. PMID:21957391

  10. Simulating Convection in Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Joel

    sensitive to changes in opacity which are in response to adjustments to the metallicity and helium abundance. We find that increasing the metallicity forces the location of the transition region to lower densities and pressures, and results in larger mean and turbulent velocities throughout the superadiabatic region. We also quantify the degree of convective overshoot in the atmosphere, and show that it increases with metallicity as well. The signature of helium differs from that of metallicity in the manner in which the photospheric velocity distribution is affected. We also find that helium abundance and surface gravity behave largely in similar ways, but differ in the way they affect the mean molecular weight. A simple model for spectral line formation suggests that the bisectors and absolute Doppler shifts of spectral lines depend on the helium abundance. We look at the effect of alpha-element enhancement and find that it has a considerably smaller effect on the convective dynamics in the superadiabatic layer compared to that of helium abundance. Improving the treatment of convection in stellar models remains one of the primary applications of RHD simulations. A simple and direct way to introduce the effect of 3D convection into 1D stellar models is through the surface boundary condition. Usually the atmospheric structure of a stellar model is defined beforehand in the form of a T-tau relation, and is kept fixed at chemical compositions and stages of evolution. Extracting mean atmospheric stratifications from simulations provides a means of introducing surface boundary conditions to stellar models that self-consistently include the effects of realistic convection and overshoot. We apply data from simulations to stellar models in this manner to measure how realistic atmospheric stratifications relate to the value of the mixing length parameter in calibrated stellar models. Moving beyond improving the surface boundary condition, we also explore a method for calibrating

  11. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  12. Stellarator-Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-03-01

    A novel concept for magnetic plasma confinement, Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP), is proposed. Numerical analysis with the classical-stellarator-type outboard stellarator windings demonstrates a number of potential advantages of SSP for controlled nuclear fusion. Among the main ones are: simple and compact magnet coil configuration, absence of material structures (e.g. magnet coils or conducting walls) in the center of the torus, high rotational transform, and a possibility of MHD equilibria with very high {beta} (pressure/magnetic pressure) of the confined plasma.

  13. The impact of stellar evolution on planetary system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The connection between stellar evolution and planet formation is investigated. Particular attention is given to the problem posed by the fact that the formation of Jupiter occurred before the formation of Mars and that the formation of the solid core of Saturn was completed before the dissipation of the gas in the nebula. Several possible solutions to this problem are suggested.

  14. A Classification Scheme for Young Stellar Objects Using the WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER ALLWISE Catalog: Revealing Low-Density Star Formation in the Outer Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koening, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.

    2014-01-01

    We present an assessment of the performance of WISE and the AllWISE data release in a section of the Galactic Plane. We lay out an approach to increasing the reliability of point source photometry extracted from the AllWISE catalog in Galactic Plane regions using parameters provided in the catalog. We use the resulting catalog to construct a new, revised young star detection and classification scheme combining WISE and 2MASS near and mid-infrared colors and magnitudes and test it in a section of the Outer Milky Way. The clustering properties of the candidate Class I and II stars using a nearest neighbor density calculation and the two-point correlation function suggest that the majority of stars do form in massive star forming regions, and any isolated mode of star formation is at most a small fraction of the total star forming output of the Galaxy. We also show that the isolated component may be very small and could represent the tail end of a single mechanism of star formation in line with models of molecular cloud collapse with supersonic turbulence and not a separate mode all to itself.

  15. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the High-Altitude Cusp: Polar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Zhou, X.-W.; Mozer, F.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic field data from the Polar Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) show that narrow-band waves at frequencies approx. 0.2-3 Hz are a permanent feature in the vicinity of the polar cusp. The waves have been found in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp (both poleward and equatorward of the cusp) and in the cusp itself. The occurrence of waves is coincident with depression of magnetic field strength associated with enhanced plasma density, indicating the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp region. The wave frequencies are generally scaled by the local proton cyclotron frequency and vary between 0.2 and 1.7 times local proton cyclotron frequency. This suggests that the waves are generated in the cusp region by the precipitating magnetosheath plasma. The properties of the waves are highly variable. The waves exhibit both left-handed and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame. The propagation angles vary from nearly parallel to nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find no correlation among wave frequency, propagation angle, and polarization. Combined magnetic field and electric field data for the waves indicate that the energy flux of the waves is guided by the background magnetic field and points downward toward the ionosphere.

  16. FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF WEAKENED TEETH RESTORED WITH CONDENSABLE RESIN WITH AND WITHOUT CUSP COVERAGE

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; de Oliveira, Otávio; Mondelli, José

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the fracture resistance of weakened human premolars (MOD cavity preparation and pulp chamber roof removal) restored with condensable resin composite with and without cusp coverage. Material and Methods: Thirty human maxillary premolars were divided into three groups: Group A (control), sound teeth; Group B, wide MOD cavities prepared and the pulp chamber roof removed and restored with resin composite without cusp coverage; Group C, same as Group B with 2.0 mm of buccal and palatal cusps reduced and restored with the same resin. The teeth were included in metal rings with self-curing acrylic resin, stored in water for 24 h and thereafter subjected to a compressive axial load in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Results: The mean fracture resistance values ± standart deviation (kgf) were: group A: 151.40 ± 55.32, group B: 60.54 ± 12.61, group C: 141.90 ± 30.82. Statistically significant differences were found only between Group B and the other groups (p<0.05). The condensable resin restoration of weakened human premolars with cusp coverage significantly increased the fracture resistance of the teeth as compared to teeth restored without cusp coverage. Conclusion: The results showed that cusp coverage with condensable resin might be a safe option for restoring weakened endodontically treated teeth. PMID:19466244

  17. Design of a cusped field thruster for drag-free flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Chen, P. B.; Sun, Q. Q.; Hu, P.; Meng, Y. C.; Mao, W.; Yu, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    Drag-free flight has played a more and more important role in many space missions. The thrust control system is the key unit to achieve drag-free flight by providing a precise compensation for the disturbing force except gravity. The cusped field thruster has shown a significant potential to be capable of the function due to its long life, high efficiency, and simplicity. This paper demonstrates a cusped field thruster's feasibility in drag-free flight based on its instinctive characteristics and describes a detailed design of a cusped field thruster made by Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). Furthermore, the performance test is conducted, which shows that the cusped field thruster can achieve a continuously variable thrust from 1 to 20 mN with a low noise and high resolution below 650 W, and the specific impulse can achieve 1800 s under a thrust of 18 mN and discharge voltage of 1000 V. The thruster's overall performance indicates that the cusped field thruster is quite capable of achieving drag-free flight. With the further optimization, the cusped field thruster will exhibit a more extensive application value.

  18. Talon cusp from two archaic period cemeteries in North America: implications for comparative evolutionary morphology.

    PubMed

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Johnson, Kent M; Doran, Glen H; Ricklis, Robert A

    2011-03-01

    Talon cusps are rare morphological features of the anterior dentition that represent a spectrum of lingual cingulum diversity. In this paper, talon cusp prevalence is described in two Archaic period North American samples, Windover Pond (Florida) and Buckeye Knoll (Texas). Given the early date of these cemeteries (~7500 BP), these specimens represent the oldest reported cases of lingual talon cusp in the New World, and perhaps globally. Windover preserves three cases of talon cusp (representing three different individuals) affecting the permanent maxillary lateral incisors. The sample frequencies were 1.8% and 3.1% for the left and right maxillary lateral incisors, respectively. Buckeye Knoll preserves four cases of talon cusp representing three individuals. Talon cusps at this site were distributed throughout the maxillary anterior dentition, including a permanent maxillary central incisor, bilateral permanent maxillary lateral incisors, and a deciduous maxillary lateral incisor. The multicomponent nature of this site complicates sample frequency calculation with by-tooth estimates ranging from 3.6% to 25%. This paper discusses the difficulties with comparative frequency estimation, resulting from a proliferation of terminology that is discipline-specific. Understanding the evolutionary basis and significance of dental morphological variation requires an inclusive approach to the comparative literature that focuses on homology within the context of odontogenetic process. PMID:21302267

  19. Cusp Catastrophe Model: A Nonlinear Model for Health Outcomes in Nursing Research

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ding-Geng(Din); Lin, Feng; Chen, Xinguang (Jim); Tang, Wan; Kitzman, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Background Although health outcomes may have fundamentally nonlinearly relationships with relevant behavioral, psychological, cognitively, or biological predictors, most analytical models assume a linear relationship. Further, some health outcomes may have multimodal distributions but most statistical models in commun use assume a unimodal, normal distribution. Suitable nonlinear models should be developed to explain health outcomes. Objective The aim of this study is to provide an overview of a cusp catastrophe model for examining health outcomes, and to present an example using grip strength as an indicator of a physical functioning outcome to illustrate how the technique may be used. Results using linear regression, nonlinear logistic model and the cusp catastrophe model were compared. Methods Data from 935 participants from the Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) were analyzed. The outcome was grip strength; executive function (EF) and the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) were predictor variables. Results Grip strength was bimodally distributed. Based on fit and model selection criteria, the cusp model was superior to the linear model and the nonlinear logistic regression model. The cusp catastrophe model identified IL-6 as a significant asymmetry factor and EF as a significant bifurcation factor. Conclusion The cusp catastrophe model is a useful alternative for for explaining the nonlinear relationships commonly seen between health outcome and its predictors. Considerations for the use of cusp catastrophe model in nursing research are discussed and recommended. PMID:24785249

  20. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the High Altitude Cusp: Polar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Zhou, X.-W.; Mozer, F.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic field data from the Polar Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) show that narrow band waves at frequencies approximately 0.2 to 3 Hz are a permanent feature in the vicinity of the polar cusp. The waves have been found in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp (both poleward and equatorward of the cusp) and in the cusp itself. The occurrence of waves is coincident with depression of magnetic field strength associated with enhanced plasma density, indicating the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp region. The wave frequencies are generally scaled by the local proton cyclotron frequency, and vary between 0.2 and 1.7 times local proton cyclotron frequency. This suggests that the waves are generated in the cusp region by the precipitating magnetosheath plasma. The properties of the waves are highly variable. The waves exhibit both lefthanded and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame. The propagation angles vary from nearly parallel to nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find no correlation among wave frequency, propagation angle and polarization. Combined magnetic field and electric field data for the waves indicate that the energy flux of the waves is guided by the background magnetic field and points downward toward the ionosphere.

  1. Experimental and analytical investigation of a modified ring cusp NSTAR engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita

    2005-01-01

    A series of experimental measurements on a modified laboratory NSTAR engine were used to validate a zero dimensional analytical discharge performance model of a ring cusp ion thruster. The model predicts the discharge performance of a ring cusp NSTAR thruster as a function the magnetic field configuration, thruster geometry, and throttle level. Analytical formalisms for electron and ion confinement are used to predict the ionization efficiency for a given thruster design. Explicit determination of discharge loss and volume averaged plasma parameters are also obtained. The model was used to predict the performance of the nominal and modified three and four ring cusp 30-cm ion thruster configurations operating at the full power (2.3 kW) NSTAR throttle level. Experimental measurements of the modified engine configuration discharge loss compare well with the predicted value for propellant utilizations from 80 to 95%. The theory, as validated by experiment, indicates that increasing the magnetic strength of the minimum closed reduces maxwellian electron diffusion and electrostatically confines the ion population and subsequent loss to the anode wall. The theory also indicates that increasing the cusp strength and minimizing the cusp area improves primary electron confinement increasing the probability of an ionization collision prior to loss at the cusp.

  2. The three-loop cusp anomalous dimension in QCD and its supersymmetric extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozin, Andrey G.; Henn, Johannes M.; Korchemsky, Gregory P.; Marquard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present the details of the analytic calculation of the three-loop angle-dependent cusp anomalous dimension in QCD and its supersymmetric extensions, including the maximally supersymmetric N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. The three-loop result in the latter theory is new and confirms a conjecture made in our previous paper. We study various physical limits of the cusp anomalous dimension and discuss its relation to the quark-antiquark potential including the effects of broken conformal symmetry in QCD. We find that the cusp anomalous dimension viewed as a function of the cusp angle and the new effective coupling given by light-like cusp anomalous dimension reveals a remarkable universality property — it takes the same form in QCD and its supersymmetric extensions, to three loops at least. We exploit this universality property and make use of the known result for the three-loop quark-antiquark potential to predict the special class of nonplanar corrections to the cusp anomalous dimensions at four loops. Finally, we also discuss in detail the computation of all necessary Wilson line integrals up to three loops using the method of leading singularities and differential equations.

  3. Influence of inelastic collisions with hydrogen atoms on the formation of AlI and SiI lines in stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L. I.; Belyaev, A. K.; Shi, J.-R.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed calculations by abandoning the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (within the so-called non-LTE approach) for Al I and Si I with model atmospheres corresponding to stars of spectral types F-G-Kwith differentmetal abundances. To take into account inelastic collisions with hydrogen atoms, for the first time we have applied the cross sections calculated by Belyaev et al. using model approaches within the formalism of the Born-Oppenheimer quantum theory. We show that for Al I non-LTE leads to higher ionization (overionization) than in LTE in the spectral line formation region and to a weakening of spectral lines, which is consistent with earlier non-LTE studies. However, our results, especially for the subordinate lines, differ quantitatively from the results of predecessors. Owing to their large cross sections, the ion-pair production and mutual neutralization processes Al I( nl) + HI(1 s) ↔ Al II(3 s 2) + H- provide a close coupling of highly excited Al I levels with the Al II ground state, which causes the deviations from the equilibrium level population to decrease compared to the calculations where the collisions only with electrons are taken into account. For three moderately metal-deficient dwarf stars, the aluminum abundance has been determined from seven Al I lines in different models of their formation. Under the assumption of LTE and in non-LTE calculations including the collisions only with electrons, the Al I 3961 ˚A resonance line gives a systematically lower abundance than the mean abundance from the subordinate lines, by 0.25-0.45 dex. The difference for each star is removed by taking into account the collisions with hydrogen atoms, and the rms error of the abundance derived from all seven Al I lines decreases by a factor of 1.5-3 compared to the LTE analysis. We have calculated the non- LTE corrections to the abundance for six subordinate Al I lines as a function of the effective temperature (4500 K ≤ T eff ≤ 6500 K

  4. Structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetospheric cusp: MESSENGER measurements of protons and planetary ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raines, Jim M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-08-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has observed the northern magnetospheric cusp of Mercury regularly since the probe was inserted into orbit about the innermost planet in March 2011. Observations from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) made at altitudes < 400 km in the planet's cusp have shown average proton densities (>10 cm-3) that are exceeded only by those observed in the magnetosheath. These high plasma densities are also associated with strong diamagnetic depressions observed by MESSENGER's Magnetometer. Plasma in the cusp may originate from several sources: (1) Direct inflow from the magnetosheath, (2) locally produced planetary photoions and ions sputtered off the surface from solar wind impact and then accelerated upward, and (3) flow of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma accelerated from dayside reconnection X-lines. We surveyed 518 cusp passes by MESSENGER, focusing on the spatial distribution, energy spectra, and pitch-angle distributions of protons and Na+-group ions. Of those, we selected 77 cusp passes during which substantial Na+-group ion populations were present for a more detailed analysis. We find that Mercury's cusp is a highly dynamic region, both in spatial extent and plasma composition and energies. From the three-dimensional plasma distributions observed by FIPS, protons with mean energies of 1 keV were found flowing down into the cusp (i.e., source (1) above). The distribution of pitch angles of these protons showed a depletion in the direction away from the surface, indicating that ions within 40° of the magnetic field direction are in the loss cone, lost to the surface rather than being reflected by the magnetic field. In contrast, Na+-group ions show two distinct behaviors depending on their energy. Low-energy (100-300 eV) ions appear to be streaming out of the cusp, showing pitch-angle distributions with a strong component antiparallel to the magnetic field (away

  5. THE DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Rodriguez, Carl; Rasio, Frederic A.; Umbreit, Stefan

    2015-02-10

    Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters (GCs) may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), the remnants of stars with initial masses from ∼20-100 M {sub ☉}. Birth kicks from supernova explosions may eject some BHs from their birth clusters, but most should be retained. Using a Monte Carlo method we investigate the long-term dynamical evolution of GCs containing large numbers of stellar BHs. We describe numerical results for 42 models, covering a broad range of realistic initial conditions, including up to 1.6 × 10{sup 6} stars. In almost all models we find that significant numbers of BHs (up to ∼10{sup 3}) are retained all the way to the present. This is in contrast to previous theoretical expectations that most BHs should be ejected dynamically within a few gigayears The main reason for this difference is that core collapse driven by BHs (through the Spitzer {sup m}ass segregation instability{sup )} is easily reverted through three-body processes, and involves only a small number of the most massive BHs, while lower-mass BHs remain well-mixed with ordinary stars far from the central cusp. Thus the rapid segregation of stellar BHs does not lead to a long-term physical separation of most BHs into a dynamically decoupled inner core, as often assumed previously. Combined with the recent detections of several BH X-ray binary candidates in Galactic GCs, our results suggest that stellar BHs could still be present in large numbers in many GCs today, and that they may play a significant role in shaping the long-term dynamical evolution and the present-day dynamical structure of many clusters.

  6. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar Black Holes in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Rodriguez, Carl; Rasio, Frederic A.; Umbreit, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters (GCs) may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), the remnants of stars with initial masses from ~20-100 M ⊙. Birth kicks from supernova explosions may eject some BHs from their birth clusters, but most should be retained. Using a Monte Carlo method we investigate the long-term dynamical evolution of GCs containing large numbers of stellar BHs. We describe numerical results for 42 models, covering a broad range of realistic initial conditions, including up to 1.6 × 106 stars. In almost all models we find that significant numbers of BHs (up to ~103) are retained all the way to the present. This is in contrast to previous theoretical expectations that most BHs should be ejected dynamically within a few gigayears The main reason for this difference is that core collapse driven by BHs (through the Spitzer "mass segregation instability") is easily reverted through three-body processes, and involves only a small number of the most massive BHs, while lower-mass BHs remain well-mixed with ordinary stars far from the central cusp. Thus the rapid segregation of stellar BHs does not lead to a long-term physical separation of most BHs into a dynamically decoupled inner core, as often assumed previously. Combined with the recent detections of several BH X-ray binary candidates in Galactic GCs, our results suggest that stellar BHs could still be present in large numbers in many GCs today, and that they may play a significant role in shaping the long-term dynamical evolution and the present-day dynamical structure of many clusters.

  7. Finding the Orientation of the Stellar Spin Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Tessa D.; Lesage, Anna-Lea

    2016-01-01

    The stellar position angle is defined as the projection of the stellar spin axis on the night sky, as measured from North to East. Measuring the stellar position angle gives information that can be used for stellar spin axis evolution and binary formation theories. Current methods to find this angle use imaging with long baseline interferometry for fast rotating stars. There is a lack of observational techniques to find the orientation of the stellar rotation axis for slow rotating stars, which make up the vast majority of stellar population. We developed a new method for determining the absolute stellar position angle for slow rotating stars using a spectro-astrometric analysis of high resolution long-slit spectra. We used the 2m Thueringer Landessternwarte (TLS) telescope to obtain high resolution spectra (R=60,000) with multiple slit orientations to test this method. The stellar rotation causes a tilt in the stellar lines, and the angle of this tilt depends on the stellar position angle and the orientation of the slit. We used a cross-correlation method to compare the subpixel displacements of the position of the photocenter at each slit orientation with telluric lines to obtain the tilt amplitude. We report the results of finding the position angle of the slow rotating K giant Aldebaran and fast rotating reference stars like Vega.

  8. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  9. Electrostatic acceleration of helicon plasma using a cusped magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, S.; Baba, T.; Uchigashima, A.; Yokota, S.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.; Yamazaki, T.; Shimizu, H.

    2014-11-01

    The electrostatic acceleration of helicon plasma is investigated using an electrostatic potential exerted between the ring anode at the helicon source exit and an off-axis hollow cathode in the downstream region. In the downstream region, the magnetic field for the helicon source, which is generated by a solenoid coil, is modified using permanent magnets and a yoke, forming an almost magnetic field-free region surrounded by an annular cusp field. Using a retarding potential analyzer, two primary ion energy peaks, where the lower peak corresponds to the space potential and the higher one to the ion beam, are detected in the field-free region. Using argon as the working gas with a helicon power of 1.5 kW and a mass flow rate of 0.21 mg/s, the ion beam energy is on the order of the applied acceleration voltage. In particular, with an acceleration voltage lower than 150 V, the ion beam energy even exceeds the applied acceleration voltage by an amount on the order of the electron thermal energy at the exit of the helicon plasma source. The ion beam energy profile strongly depends on the helicon power and the applied acceleration voltage. Since by this method the whole working gas from the helicon plasma source can, in principle, be accelerated, this device can be applied as a noble electrostatic thruster for space propulsion.

  10. Electrostatic acceleration of helicon plasma using a cusped magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, S.; Baba, T.; Uchigashima, A.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.; Yokota, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Shimizu, H.

    2014-11-10

    The electrostatic acceleration of helicon plasma is investigated using an electrostatic potential exerted between the ring anode at the helicon source exit and an off-axis hollow cathode in the downstream region. In the downstream region, the magnetic field for the helicon source, which is generated by a solenoid coil, is modified using permanent magnets and a yoke, forming an almost magnetic field-free region surrounded by an annular cusp field. Using a retarding potential analyzer, two primary ion energy peaks, where the lower peak corresponds to the space potential and the higher one to the ion beam, are detected in the field-free region. Using argon as the working gas with a helicon power of 1.5 kW and a mass flow rate of 0.21 mg/s, the ion beam energy is on the order of the applied acceleration voltage. In particular, with an acceleration voltage lower than 150 V, the ion beam energy even exceeds the applied acceleration voltage by an amount on the order of the electron thermal energy at the exit of the helicon plasma source. The ion beam energy profile strongly depends on the helicon power and the applied acceleration voltage. Since by this method the whole working gas from the helicon plasma source can, in principle, be accelerated, this device can be applied as a noble electrostatic thruster for space propulsion.

  11. Turbulence in the Earth's cusp region: k-filtering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Cao, J.; Fu, H.; Liu, W.

    2013-12-01

    On April 13 2002, four Cluster spacecraft with separation up to 127 km measured similar turbulence in the Earth's mid-altitude cusp region during southward IMF Bz. Using the k-filtering technique, we obtain the propagation angle and dispersion relation of the turbulence. The propagation angle is quite large and ranges from 80° to 92°, meaning that the turbulence propagates perpendicularly to the background magnetic field. By comparing the dispersion relationship with the linear solution of the Vlasov kinetic theory obtained by WHAMP, we conclude that the turbulence is Kinetic Alfvén mode (KAWs). The regions of KAWs are located within an inhomogeneous high density plasma background, suggesting that it is the ion drift, not field aligned ion beam that plays an important role in the wave generation. The magnetic flied fluctuation spectrum resembles the classical Kolmogorov power law under the proton gyrofrequency ωci, but breaks and steepens near ωci, indicating that the KAW may be powered by a turbulent cascade transverse to the magnetic field from large MHD scales to proton gyroradius scales.

  12. Nonlinear focusing of acoustic shock waves at a caustic cusp.

    PubMed

    Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2005-02-01

    The present study investigates the focusing of acoustical weak shock waves incoming on a cusped caustic. The theoretical model is based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation and its specific boundary conditions. Based on the so-called Guiraud's similitude law for a step shock, a new explanation about the wavefront unfolding due to nonlinear self-refraction is proposed. This effect is shown to be associated not only to nonlinearities, as expected by previous authors, but also to the nonlocal geometry of the wavefront. Numerical simulations confirm the sensitivity of the process to wavefront geometry. Theoretical modeling and numerical simulations are substantiated by an original experiment. This one is carried out in two steps. First, the canonical Pearcey function is synthesized in linear regime by the inverse filter technique. In the second step, the same wavefront is emitted but with a high amplitude to generate shock waves during the propagation. The experimental results are compared with remarkable agreement to the numerical ones. Finally, applications to sonic boom are briefly discussed. PMID:15759678

  13. Hot electron confinement in a microwave heated spindle cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelas, M. A.

    1991-08-01

    The Plasma Research Laboratory at the University of Missouri-Columbia was established with awards from the McDonnell Douglas Foundation, ARMCO, Union Electric, Black and Vetch, Kansas City Power and Light, the National Science Foundation, and DOE. The Plasma Research Lab's major effort is the Missouri Magnetic Mirror (MMM or M(exp 3)) Project. The technical goals of MMM have been (1) Diagnostic Development, (2) Plasma Physics in the Cusp geometry, (3) plasma-wall interactions, (4) impurity effects in a steady-state plasma, and (5) Development of Diagnostics for use in harsh plasma processing environments. The other major goal of MMM has remained providing a facility for hands-on training in experimental plasma physics. The major experimental facility of MMM is the MMM Modified Experiment (M4X). Other research efforts in the Plasma Research Laboratory include small efforts in cold fusion, toroidal magnetic confinement, and inertial confinement and a potentially major effort in direct conversion of nuclear energy.

  14. Hot electron confinement in a microwave heated spindle cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Prelas, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Plasma Research Laboratory at the University of Missouri-Columbia was established with awards from the McDonnel Douglas Foundation, ARMCO, Union Electric, Black and Vetch, Kansas City Power and Light, the National Science Foundation, and DOE. The Plasma Research Lab's major effort is the Missouri Magnetic Mirror (MMM or M{sup 3}) Project. The technical goals of MMM have been (1) Diagnostic Development, (2) Plasma Physics in the Cusp geometry, (3) plasma-wall interactions, (4) impurity effects in a steady-state plasma, and (5) Development of Diagnostics for use in harsh plasma processing environments. The other major goal of MMM has remained providing a facility for hands-on training in experimental plasma physics. The major experimental facility of MMM is the MMM Modified Experiment (M4X). Other research efforts in the Plasma Research Laboratory include small efforts in cold fusion, toroidal magnetic confinement, and inertial confinement and a potentially major effort in direct conversion of nuclear energy.

  15. Ionospheric signatures of cusp latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    Search coil magnetometer, riometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver data obtained at South Pole Station and McMurdo, Antarctica during selected days in March and April 1986 are compared. Narrow-band magnetic pulsations in the Pc 3 period range are observed simultaneously at both stations in the dayside sector during times of low IMF cone angle, but are considerably stronger at South Pole, which is located at a latitude near the nominal foot point of the dayside cusp/cleft region. Pulsations in auroral light at 427.8 nm wavelength are often observed with magnetic pulsations at South Pole, but such optical pulsations are not observed at McMurdo. The observations suggest that precipitating magnetosheathlike electrons at nominal dayside cleft latitudes are at times modulated with frequencies similar to those of upstream waves. These particles may play an important role, via modification of ionospheric currents and conductivities, in the transmission of upstream wave signals into the magnetosphere and in the generation of dayside high-latitude Pc 3 pulsations.

  16. On the cusp of change: new therapeutic modalities for HCV.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel

    2010-01-01

    We are at the cusp of significant new alternatives for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Among more than 100 drugs in development, some are ready to be approved and in the market as soon as next year. The protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, will change the SOC treatment to triple therapy, (combined with peg IFN and RBV), with duration of treatment guided by rapid virological response. In this article we present the data supporting the approval of telaprevir and boceprevir, and information on polymerase inhibitors and IFN free proof of concept trials. Finally we discuss which patients should wait for DAA based therapies and which should be considered for peg IFN/RBV now. In the next 5 years our patients can expect higher response rates and truncated duration of therapy. They can expect drug cocktails or combos but for the next years these novel drugs will still require peg IFN and RBV. Also, a new era of resistance as a barrier to therapy will require sub typing and more viral monitoring. Overall, improved outcomes will come at the expense of more adverse events and increased costs of treatment. PMID:20714009

  17. Evolution of stellar entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. A.; de Avellar, M. G. B.; Horvath, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    An appraisal of the behavior of stellar entropy along stellar evolution is made. It is shown that the entropy per baryon of a star of a fixed baryon number decreases monotonically with increasing compactness of the star. The same entropy per baryon increases only whenever an irreversible collapse of the star happens. The recent proposals for a gravitational entropy related to curvature may justify the huge increase of the entropy in the ultimate collapse to a black hole.

  18. Stellar Populations. A User Guide from Low to High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Renzini, Alvio

    2011-09-01

    This textbook is meant to illustrate the specific role played by stellar population diagnostics in our attempt to understand galaxy formation and evolution. The book starts with a rather unconventional summary of the results of stellar evolution theory (Chapter 1), as they provide the basis for the construction of synthetic stellar populations. Current limitations of stellar models are highlighted, which arise from the necessity to parametrize all those physical processes that involve bulk mass motions, such as convection, mixing, mass loss, etc. Chapter 2 deals with the foundations of the theory of synthetic stellar populations, and illustrates their energetics and metabolic functions, providing basic tools that will be used in subsequent chapters. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with resolved stellar populations, first addressing some general problems encountered in photometric studies of stellar fields. Then some highlights are presented illustrating our current capacity of measuring stellar ages in Galactic globular clusters, in the Galactic bulge and in nearby galaxies. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the exemplification of synthetic spectra of simple as well as composite stellar populations, drawing attention to those spectral features that may depend on less secure results of stellar evolution models. Chapter 6 illustrates how synthetic stellar populations are used to derive basic galaxy properties, such as star formation rates, stellar masses, ages and metallicities, and does so for galaxies at low as well as at high redshifts. Chapter 7 is dedicated to supernovae, distinguishing them in core collapse and thermonuclear cases, describing the evolution of their rates for various star formation histories, and estimating the supernova productivity of stellar populations and their chemical yields. In Chapter 8 the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is discussed, first showing how even apparently small IMF variations may have large effects on the demo! graphy of stellar

  19. Evolution of M1 crown size and cusp proportions in the genus Homo

    PubMed Central

    Quam, Rolf; Bailey, Shara; Wood, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Previous research into tooth crown dimensions and cusp proportions has proved to be a useful way to identify taxonomic differences in Pliocene and Pleistocene fossil hominins. The present study has identified changes in both M1 crown size and cusp proportions within the genus Homo, with M1 overall crown size reduction apparently occurring in two main stages. The first stage (a reduction of ca. 17%) is associated with the emergence of Homo ergaster and Homo erectus sensu stricto. The second stage (a reduction of ca. 10%) occurs in Homo sapiens, but the reduced modern human M1 tooth crown size was only attained in Upper Paleolithic times. The absolute sizes of the individual cusps are highly positively correlated with overall crown size and dental reduction produces a reduction in the absolute size of each of the cusps. Most of the individual cusps scale isometrically with crown size, but the paracone shows a negative allometric relationship, indicating that the reduction in paracone size is less than in the other M1 cusps. Thus, the phylogenetically oldest cusp in the upper molars also seems to be the most stable cusp (at least in the M1). The most striking change in M1 cusp proportions is a change in the relative size of the areas of the paracone and metacone. The combination of a small relative paracone and a large relative metacone generally characterizes specimens attributed to early Homo, and the presence of this character state in Australopithecus andParanthropus suggests it may represent the primitive condition for the later part of the hominin clade. In contrast, nearly all later Homo taxa, with the exception of Homo antecessor, show the opposite condition (i.e. a relatively large paracone and a relatively small metacone). This change in the relationship between the relative sizes of the paracone and metacone is related to an isometric reduction of the absolute size of the metacone. This metacone reduction occurs in the context of relative stability in the

  20. Evolution of M1 crown size and cusp proportions in the genus Homo.

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Bailey, Shara; Wood, Bernard

    2009-05-01

    Previous research into tooth crown dimensions and cusp proportions has proved to be a useful way to identify taxonomic differences in Pliocene and Pleistocene fossil hominins. The present study has identified changes in both M(1) crown size and cusp proportions within the genus Homo, with M(1) overall crown size reduction apparently occurring in two main stages. The first stage (a reduction of ca. 17%) is associated with the emergence of Homo ergaster and Homo erectus sensu stricto. The second stage (a reduction of ca. 10%) occurs in Homo sapiens, but the reduced modern human M(1) tooth crown size was only attained in Upper Paleolithic times. The absolute sizes of the individual cusps are highly positively correlated with overall crown size and dental reduction produces a reduction in the absolute size of each of the cusps. Most of the individual cusps scale isometrically with crown size, but the paracone shows a negative allometric relationship, indicating that the reduction in paracone size is less than in the other M(1) cusps. Thus, the phylogenetically oldest cusp in the upper molars also seems to be the most stable cusp (at least in the M(1)). The most striking change in M(1) cusp proportions is a change in the relative size of the areas of the paracone and metacone. The combination of a small relative paracone and a large relative metacone generally characterizes specimens attributed to early Homo, and the presence of this character state in Australopithecus and Paranthropus suggests it may represent the primitive condition for the later part of the hominin clade. In contrast, nearly all later Homo taxa, with the exception of Homo antecessor, show the opposite condition (i.e. a relatively large paracone and a relatively small metacone). This change in the relationship between the relative sizes of the paracone and metacone is related to an isometric reduction of the absolute size of the metacone. This metacone reduction occurs in the context of relative

  1. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    younger clusters. The O abundances in the younger clusters are significantly larger than those seen in H II regions, planetary nebulae, and supergiants. It is suggested, and supported with observational evidence, that this may be due to incomplete stellar models and the possibility that a significant fraction of O in gaseous nebulae is locked up in dust grains. Examining our results in a broader sense, we suggest that: a) the formation of the Galactic halo was a slow process but b) did not involve the merger of independent "fragments" c) Type Ia supernovae are dominated by CO-He white dwarf systems having Fe production timescales of a few Gyr d) The hiatus between the end of halo formation and the beginning of star formation in the disk, possibly required if CO-He white dwarfs are the dominant source of Type Ia supernovae, may be confirmed as the observed gap in the [O/H] distribution e) The long timescale (10^9 - 10^10 yr) of Fe production by CO-He white dwarf systems is also seen to be consistent with the lack of any correlation between age and [Fe/H] in our open cluster sample and the large scatter present in the [Fe/H] vs. age relations for field stars. (SECTION: Dissertation Summaries)

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Wen Xiaoqing; Xu Jianying; Ding Yingping; Huang Tong

    2010-06-10

    At a stellar mass of 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub {Theta}} we divide the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) into two distinct families and explore the environmental dependence of galaxy properties for High Stellar Mass (HSM) and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that for HSM and LSM galaxies, the environmental dependence of some typical galaxy properties, such as color, morphologies, and star formation activities, is still very strong, which at least shows that the stellar mass is not fundamental in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment. We also note that the environmental dependence of the size for HSM and LSM galaxies is fairly weak, which is mainly due to the galaxy size being insensitive to environment.

  3. On the universal stellar law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander

    stars. In this connection, comparison with estimations of temperatures using of the regression dependences for multi-planet extrasolar systems [8] testifies the obtained results entirely. References 1. Krot, A.M.:2009, A statistical approach to investigate the formation of the solar system. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals41(3), 1481-1500. 2. Krot, A.M.:2012, A models of forming planets and distribution of planetary distances and orbits in the solar system based on the statistical theory of spheroidal bodies. In:Solar System: Structure, Formation and Exploration, ch.9 (Ed. by Matteo de Rossi). New York, Nova Science Publishers, pp. 201-264. - ISBN: 978-1-62100-057-0. 3. Krot, A. M.:2012, A statistical theory of formation of gravitating cosmogonicbodies. Minsk,Bel. Navuka, 4. 448 p. - ISBN 978-985-08-1442-5 [monograph in Russian]. 5. Eddington, A.S.: 1916,On the radiative equilibrium of the stars.Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc.84 (7), 525-528. 6. Jeans, J.: 1929, Astronomy and cosmogony. Cambridge, University Press. 7. Chandrasekhar, S.:1939, An introduction to the study of stellar structure.Cambridge, University Press. 8. Pintr, P., Peřinová, V., Lukš, A., Pathak, A.:2013, Statistical and regression analyses of detected extrasolar systems. Planetary and Space Science, 75(1), 37-45.

  4. The age structure of stellar populations in the solar vicinity. Clues of a two-phase formation history of the Milky Way disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Misha; Di Matteo, Paola; Lehnert, Matthew D.; Katz, David; Gómez, Ana

    2013-12-01

    We analyze a sample of solar neighborhood stars that have high-quality abundance determinations and show that there are two distinct regimes of [α/Fe] versus age, which we identify as the epochs of the thick and thin disk formation. A tight correlation between metallicity and [α/Fe] versus age is clearly identifiable for thick disk stars, implying that this population formed from a well mixed interstellar medium, probably initially in starburst and then more quiescently, over a time scale of 4-5 Gyr. Thick disk stars have vertical velocity dispersions which correlate with age, with the youngest objects of this population having small scale heights similar to those of thin disk stars. A natural consequence of these two results is that a vertical metallicity gradient is expected in this population. We suggest that the youngest thick disk set the initial conditions from which the inner thin disk started to form about 8 Gyr ago, at [Fe/H] in the range of (-0.1, +0.1) dex and [α/Fe] ~ 0.1 dex. This also provides an explanation for the apparent coincidence between the existence of a step in metallicity at 7-10 kpc in the thin disk and the confinement of the thick disk within R < 10 kpc. We suggest that the outer thin disk developed outside the influence of the thick disk, giving rise to a separate structure, but also that the high alpha-enrichment of those regions may originate from a primordial pollution of the outer regions by the gas expelled from the forming thick disk. Metal-poor thin disk stars ([Fe/H] < -0.4 dex) in the solar vicinity, whose properties are best explained by them originating in the outer disk, are shown to be as old as the youngest thick disk (9-10 Gyr). This implies that the outer thin disk started to form while the thick disk was still forming stars in the inner parts of the Galaxy. Hence, while the overall inner (thick+thin) disk is comprised of two structures with different scale lengths and whose combination may give the impression of an

  5. The HORUS Observatory - A Next Generation 2.4m UV-Optical Mission To Study Planetary, Stellar And Galactic Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowen, Paul A.; SDT, HORUS

    2013-01-01

    The High-ORbit Ultraviolet-visible Satellite (HORUS) is a 2.4-meter class UV-optical space telescope that will conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the astrophysical processes and environments relevant for the births and life cycles of stars and their planetary systems, to investigate and understand the range of environments, feedback mechanisms, and other factors that most affect the outcome of the star and planet formation process. To do so, HORUS will provide 100 times greater imaging efficiency and more than 10 times greater UV spectroscopic sensitivity than has existed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HORUS mission will contribute vital information on how solar systems form and whether habitable planets should be common or rare. It also will investigate the structure, evolution, and destiny of galaxies and universe. This program relies on focused capabilities unique to space that no other planned NASA mission will provide: near-UV/visible (200-1075nm) wide-field, diffraction-limited imaging; and high-sensitivity, high-resolution UV (100-170nm) spectroscopy. The core HORUS design will provide wide field of view imagery and high efficiency point source FUV spectroscopy using a novel combination of spectral selection and field sharing. The HORUS Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) design is based on modern light weight mirror technology with a faster primary mirror to shorten the overall package and thereby reduce mass. The OTA uses a three-mirror anastigmat configuration to provide excellent imagery over a large FOV - and is exactly aligned to use one of the recently released f/1.2 NRO OTAs as part of its design. The UV/optical Imaging Cameras use two 21k x 21k Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs). The FUV spectrometer uses cross strip anode based MCPs. This poster presents results from a 2010 design update requested by the NRC Decadal Survey, and reflects updated costs and technology to the original 2004 study. It is now one of the most mature 2.4m UVOIR

  6. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  7. On the cusp anomalous dimension in the ladder limit of mathcal{N}=4 SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, Matteo; Fachechi, Alberto; Macorini, Guido

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the cusp anomalous dimension in the (leading) ladder limit of mathcal{N}=4 SYMandpresentnewresultsforitshigher-orderperturbativeexpansion. Westudy two different limits with respect to the cusp angle ϕ. The first is the light-like regime where x = e iϕ → 0. This limit is characterised by a non-trivial expansion of the cusp anomaly as a sum of powers of log x, where the maximum exponent increases with the loop order. The coefficients of this expansion have remarkable transcendentality features and can be expressed by products of single zeta values. We show that the whole logarithmic expansion is fully captured by a solvable Woods-Saxon like one-dimensional potential. From the exact solution, we extract generating functions for the cusp anomaly as well as for the various specific transcendental structures appearing therein. The second limit that we discuss is the regime of small cusp angle. In this somewhat simpler case, we show how to organise the quantum mechanical perturbation theory in a novel efficient way by means of a suitable all-order Ansatz for the ground state of the associated Schrödinger problem. Our perturbative setup allows to systematically derive higher-order perturbative corrections in powers of the cusp angle as explicit non-perturbative functions of the effective coupling. This series approximation is compared with the numerical solution of the Schrödinger equation to show that we can achieve very good accuracy over the whole range of coupling and cusp angle. Our results have been obtained by relatively simple techniques. Nevertheless, they provide several non-trivial tests useful to check the application of Quantum Spectral Curve methods to the ladder approximation at non zero ϕ, in the two limits we studied.

  8. Studying Stellar Halos with Future Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Falomo, Renato; Uslenghi, Michela

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos around galaxies retain fundamental evidence of the processes which lead to their build up. Sophisticated models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context yield quantitative predictions about various observable characteristics, including the amount of substructure, the slope of radial mass profiles and three dimensional shapes, and the properties of the stellar populations in the galaxies halos. The comparison of such models with the observations leads to constraints on the general picture of galaxy formation in the hierarchical Universe, as well as on the physical processes taking place in the halos formation. With the current observing facilities, stellar halos can be effectively probed only for a limited number of nearby galaxies. In this contribution we illustrate the progress which we expect in this field with the future large aperture ground based telescopes (E-ELT and TNT), and with JWST. In particular we adress the following issues: (I) the characterization of the stellar populations in the halos innermost regions and substructures, (ii) the measurement of the halos profiles and shapes , and the halos mass content, (iii) the study of Globular Clusters inhabiting the halos of distant galaxies. In order to assess the expected capabilities of future facilities we present the results of a set of simulated images to evaluate to which level of accuracy it will be possible to probe the halos of distant galaxies.

  9. Bifurcation of the cusp: Implications for understanding boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Burke, W. J.; Moen, J.; Sandholt, P. E.; Lester, M.; Ober, D. M.; Weimer, D. R.; White, W. E.

    Event analyses and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling provide complementary insights into solar-wind/magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a stronger Y than Z component. The sources for convection and particle precipitation within the cusp become spatially bifurcated. Incoming surfaces of constant phase in the interplanetary electric field (IEF) can be tilted with respect to the Sun-Earth line. This forces the two hemispheres to respond to the same elements of the solar wind stream at significantly different times. We consider a case in which ground and rocket measurements indicate that IEF phase planes interacted first with the magnetopause in the Southern Hemisphere at lag times significantly less than the simple adjection time between an L1 monitor and Earth. Magnetic merging on the Northern Hemisphere magnetopause occurred later. The timing differences are related to the phase-plane tilts and the strong IMF BX. Auroral emissions created by electrons injected from the Southern Hemisphere merging line can appear in close proximity to those from Northern Hemisphere sites, within an all-sky imager's field-of-view. Bifurcation is driven by IMF BY, while BX controls differences in the timing of interactions with the two hemispheres. Detailed harmonization of auroral features with interplanetary drivers strongly supports the utility of the antiparallel merging criterion for estimating when and where the IMF-magnetosphere interactions occur. We compare empirical results with MHD simulations to help constrain interpretations of magnetospheric boundary layers. Merging at high latitudes creates layers of open field lines that drape over the dayside magnetosphere to form an open boundary layer. MHD modeling suggests that open boundary layers may become quite thick along the magnetospheric flank equatorward of the sash. Simulations and the empirical results indicate that merging in the conjugate hemisphere drives the smaller

  10. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  11. The Stellar Imager (SI) "Vision Mission"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K.; Danchi, W.; Leitner, J.; Liu, A.; Lyon, R.; Mazzuca, L.; Moe, R.; Chenette, D.; Schrijver, C.; Kilston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a Vision Mission in the Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) NASA Roadmap, conceived for the purpose of understanding the effects of stellar magnetic fields, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best possible forecasting of solar/stellar activity and its impact on life in the Universe. The science goals of SI require an ultra-high angular resolution, at ultraviolet wavelengths, on the order of 100 micro-arcsec and baselines on the order of 0.5 km. These requirements call for a large, multi-spacecraft (greater than 20) imaging interferometer, utilizing precision formation flying in a stable environment, such as in a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L2 point. In this paper, we present an update on the ongoing SI mission concept and technology development studies.

  12. The Stellar Imager (SI) "Vision Mission"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K.; Danchi, W.; Leitner, J.; Liu, A.; Lyon, R.; Mazzuca, L.; Moe, R.; Chenette, D.; Schrijver, C.; Kilston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a Vision Mission in the Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) NASA Roadmap, conceived for the purpose of understanding the effects of stellar magnetic fields, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best possible forecasting of solar/stellar activity and its impact on life in the Universe. The science goals of SI require an ultra-high angular resolution, a t ultraviolet wavelengths, on the order of 100 micro-arcsec and baselines on the order of 0.5 km. These requirements call for a large, multi-spacecraft (>20) imaging interferometer, utilizing precision formation flying in a stable environment, such as in a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L2 point. In this paper, we present an update on the ongoing SI mission concept and technology development studies.

  13. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  14. Las Campanas Stellar Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan; Beletsky, Yuri; Worthey, Guy

    2015-08-01

    Stellar libraries are fundamental tools required to understand stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies as well as properties of individual stars. Comprehensive libraries exist in the optical domain, but the near-infrared (NIR) domain stays a couple of decades behind. Here we present the Las Campanas Stellar Library project aiming at obtaining high signal-to-noise intermediate-resolution (R=8000) NIR spectra (0.83<λ<2.5μm) for a sample of 1200 stars in the Southern sky using the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph at the 6.5-m Magellan Baade telescope. We developed a dedicated observing strategy and customized the telescope control software in order to achieve the highest possible level of data homogeniety. As of 2015, we observed about 600 stars of all spectral types and luminosity classes making our library the largest homogeneous collection of stellar spectra covering the entire NIR domain. We also re-calibrated in flux and wavelength the two existing optical stellar libraries, INDO-US and UVES-POP and followed up about 400 non-variable stars in the NIR in order to get complete optical-NIR coverage. Worth mentioning that our current sample includes about 80 AGB stars and a few dozens of bulge/LMC/SMC stars.

  15. Stellar population in LLAGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2004-11-01

    LLAGN that include low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), and transition-type objects (TOs) represent the most common type of nuclear activity. Here, a study of the central stellar population of LLAGN is presented. Our goal is to search for spectroscopic signatures of young and intermediate age stars, and to investigate their relationship with the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the UV-optical continuum of the innermost (20-100 pc) regions in these galaxies. Half of the LINERs and TOs of the Palomar catalogue are analysed. It is found that weak-[OI] ([OI]/Hα≤0.25) LLAGN have an intermediate age stellar population that dominates the optical light. But young stellar clusters dominate the UV continuum in these objects. These clusters can co-exist with a black-hole in spatial scales of a few pc. Most of the strong-[OI] LLAGN have a predominantly old stellar population. These results suggest that young and intermediate age stars do not play a significant role in the ionization of LLAGN with strong [OI].

  16. FAST Observations of Acceleration Processes in the Cusp--Evidence for Parallel Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.. Jr.; Carlson, C.; McFadden, J.; Ergun, R.; Clemmons, J.; Klumpar D.; Strangeway, R.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of precipitating keV ions in the Earth's cusp originating at the magnetosheath provide unique means to test our understanding of particle acceleration and parallel electric fields in the lower altitude acceleration region. On numerous occasions, the FAST (The Fast Auroral Snapshot) spacecraft has encountered the Earth's cusp regions near its apogee of 4175 km which are characterized by their signatures of dispersed keV ion injections. The FAST instruments also reveal a complex microphysics inherent to many, but not all, of the cusp regions encountered by the spacecraft, that include upgoing ion beams and conics, inverted-V electrons, upgoing electron beams, and spikey DC-coupled electric fields and plasma waves. Detailed inspection of the FAST data often show clear modulation of the precipitating magnetosheath ions that indicate that they are affected by local electric potentials. For example, the magnetosheath ion precipitation is sometimes abruptly shut off precisely in regions where downgoing localized inverted-V electrons are observed. Such observations support the existence of a localized process, such as parallel electric fields, above the spacecraft which accelerate the electrons downward and consequently impede the precipitating ion precipitation. Other acceleration events in the cusp are sometimes organized with an apparent cellular structure that suggests Alfven waves or other large-scale phenomena are controlling the localized potentials. We examine several cusp encounters by the FAST satellite where the modulation of energetic session on acceleration particle populations reveals evidence of localized acceleration, most likely by parallel electric fields.

  17. Observations of EMIC Waves in the Exterior Cusp Region and in the Nearby Magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grison, B.; Escoubet, C. P.; Santolik, O.; Lavraud, B.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2014-12-01

    In the early years (2000-2004) of the mission, Cluster crossed the most distant part of the polar cusps. On 05/01/2002, Cluster enters the distant cusp region on the duskside of the southern hemisphere (inbound). The spacecraft are successively crossing the magnetopause between 19:50 UT (SC4) and 20:15 UT (SC3). The interplanetary conditions during the crossing were stable with a dominant negative By. The magnetometer (FGM) data indicates that the entry into the cusp takes place in a region where the magnetic field lines in the magnetosheath are anti-parallel with the field lines in the magnetosphere. Despite this clear picture, the global encounter is rather complex: one can notice partial magnetopause crossings, magnetic null points, and intense monochromatic waves on both sides of the magnetopause.We investigate electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed in the cusp and in the nearby magnetosheath, just before the magnetopause crossing by the spacecraft. Left-handed monochromatic waves observed in the cusp display different duration and frequency (below and above the local proton gyrofrequency) on each spacecraft. Both the Poynting flux of these emissions and the simultaneously recorded ion flows propagate in the same direction - toward the Earth. The wavenumber are determined in two ways: considering the Doppler shift and from direct measurements of the refractive index. We analyze these wave parameters and the local plasma conditions to explain the wave generation process on each side of the magnetopause.

  18. The Cusp Ion Outflow up to 6 Re: Statistical Study on Polar and FAST Conjunction Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; McFadden, J. P.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    We examine Polar and FAST conjunction events along the cusp magnetic flux tubes to study the energization process of ion outflows in the mid- and low-altitude cusp, after these ions leave the upper ionosphere. FAST provides information on the boundary conditions at low-altitudes (~1.6 Re geocentric distance). Polar traverses cusp flux tubes at radial distances of 2 to 9 Re, providing good coverage of the low- and mid-altitude cusp. We compare the wave Poynting flux in the 1 mHz to 1 Hz range and the kinetic energy fluxes of the electrons and ions. The comparisons of these quantities between Polar and FAST determine the energy gain of the particles, especially the ion outflows between the two spacecraft. The Poynting flux is binned into major frequency bands, because it is important to understand the frequency spectrum of the wave energy, and which frequency bands energize the ions. Based on the conjunction events, altitude profiles of various quantities can be obtained. These altitude profiles will reveal the energy conversion between wave and particle in the low- and mid-altitude cusp. Determining the altitude where the most intense energy conversion occurs and what wave frequency bands provide the energy are important to explaining the physics of the heating and acceleration of the ion outflows.

  19. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  20. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  1. The stellar populations of massive galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.

    2013-07-01

    I present a brief review of the stellar population properties of massive galaxies, focusing on early-type galaxies in particular, with emphasis on recent results from the ATLAS3D Survey. I discuss the occurence of young stellar ages, cold gas, and ongoing star formation in early-type galaxies, the presence of which gives important clues to the evolutionary path of these galaxies. Consideration of empirical star formation histories gives a meaningful picture of galaxy stellar population properties, and allows accurate comparison of mass estimates from populations and dynamics. This has recently provided strong evidence of a non-universal IMF, as supported by other recent evidences. Spatially-resolved studies of stellar populations are also crucial to connect distinct components within galaxies to spatial structures seen in other wavelengths or parameters. Stellar populations in the faint outer envelopes of early-type galaxies are a formidable frontier for observers, but promise to put constraints on the ratio of accreted stellar mass versus that formed `in situ' - a key feature of recent galaxy formation models. Galaxy environment appears to play a key role in controlling the stellar population properties of low mass galaxies. Simulations remind us, however, that current day galaxies are the product of a complex assembly and environment history, which gives rise to the trends we see. This has strong implications for our interpretation of environmental trends.

  2. Holographic cusped Wilson loops in q-deformed AdS5 × S5 spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Nan; Chen, Hui-Huang; Wu, Jun-Bao

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a minimal surface in q-deformed AdS5×S5 with a cusp boundary is studied in detail. This minimal surface is dual to a cusped Wilson loop in dual field theory. We find that the area of the minimal surface has both logarithmic squared divergence and logarithmic divergence. The logarithmic squared divergence cannot be removed by either Legendre transformation or the usual geometric subtraction. We further make an analytic continuation to the Minkowski signature, taking the limit such that the two edges of the cusp become light-like, and extract the anomalous dimension from the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence. This anomalous dimension goes back smoothly to the results in the undeformed case when we take the limit that the deformation parameter goes to zero. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105154, 11222549, 11275207), K. C. Wong Education Foundation and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS

  3. Multi-lobed mesiodens with a palatal talon cusp: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Nagaveni, Nayaka Basavanthappa; Umashankara, Kagathur Veerbadrappa; Sreedevi; Reddy, Bokka Praveen; Radhika, Nayaka Basavanthappa; Satisha, Tirumala Suryaprakash

    2010-01-01

    Mesiodens is a midline supernumerary tooth commonly seen in the maxillary arch and the talon cusp is a rare dental developmental anomaly seen on the lingual surface of anterior teeth. This paper presents a rare clinical case of development of talon cusp in a mesiodens with multiple lobes, which interfered with both occlusion and appearance of an 11-year-old patient. During clinical interview, the patient reported difficulty on mastication. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed that a supernumerary tooth with completely formed root was causing an occlusal interference. The supernumerary tooth was diagnosed as multi-lobed mesiodens associated with a palatal talon cusp. The treatment plan consisted in the extraction of the supernumerary tooth followed by orthodontic treatment for diastema closure and tooth alignment. PMID:20976392

  4. A Cusp Catastrophe Model for Team Learning, Team Potency and Team Culture.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Teresa; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Lourenco, Paulo Renato; Dimas, Isabel; Pinheiro, Margarida

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines team learning behaviors within a nonlinear dynamical system (NDS) perspective. The present research is based on a sample of 36 project workgroups, where data were collected at two moments of their life cycle, with visual analogue scales. Using both the least squares method and maximum likelihood, it proposes a cusp catastrophe model for explaining team learning. The cusp model is superior to its linear alternatives and implements team culture as the asymmetry variable and team potency as bifurcation. The findings of cusp structure in the data support the existence of discontinuous shifts in learning behavior and furthermore a proposition that the punctuated equilibrium model (PEM) might be a reasonable model for describing group functioning, since it encompasses such sudden changes between distinct stages (attractors). A discussion on small group research is also provided by highlighting the nonlinear dynamics of team processes, along with further implications for research and practice. PMID:27550707

  5. The variation of reconnection rate at the dayside magnetopause and