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Sample records for stellar mass functions

  1. Galactic Stellar and Substellar Initial Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2003-07-01

    We review recent determinations of the present-day mass function (PDMF) and initial mass function (IMF) in various components of the Galaxy-disk, spheroid, young, and globular clusters-and in conditions characteristic of early star formation. As a general feature, the IMF is found to depend weakly on the environment and to be well described by a power-law form for m>~1 Msolar and a lognormal form below, except possibly for early star formation conditions. The disk IMF for single objects has a characteristic mass around mc~0.08 Msolar and a variance in logarithmic mass σ~0.7, whereas the IMF for multiple systems has mc~0.2 Msolar and σ~0.6. The extension of the single MF into the brown dwarf regime is in good agreement with present estimates of L- and T-dwarf densities and yields a disk brown dwarf number density comparable to the stellar one, nBD~n*~0.1 pc-3. The IMF of young clusters is found to be consistent with the disk field IMF, providing the same correction for unresolved binaries, confirming the fact that young star clusters and disk field stars represent the same stellar population. Dynamical effects, yielding depletion of the lowest mass objects, are found to become consequential for ages >~130 Myr. The spheroid IMF relies on much less robust grounds. The large metallicity spread in the local subdwarf photometric sample, in particular, remains puzzling. Recent observations suggest that there is a continuous kinematic shear between the thick-disk population, present in local samples, and the genuine spheroid one. This enables us to derive only an upper limit for the spheroid mass density and IMF. Within all the uncertainties, the latter is found to be similar to the one derived for globular clusters and is well represented also by a lognormal form with a characteristic mass slightly larger than for the disk, mc~0.2-0.3 Msolar, excluding a significant population of brown dwarfs in globular clusters and in the spheroid. The IMF characteristic of early star

  2. Radial Variation in the Stellar Mass Functions of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    A number of recent observational studies of Galactic globular clusters have measured the variation in the slope of a cluster's stellar mass function α with clustercentric distance r. In order to gather a deeper understanding of the information contained in such observations, we have explored the evolution of α(r) for star clusters with a variety of initial conditions using a large suite of N-body simulations. We have specifically studied how the time evolution of α(r) is affected by initial size, mass, binary fraction, primordial mass segregation, black hole retention, an external tidal field, and the initial mass function itself. Previous studies have shown that the evolution of αG is closely related to the amount of mass loss suffered by a cluster. Hence for each simulation we have also followed the evolution of the slope of the cluster's global stellar mass function, αG, and have shown that clusters follow a well-defined track in the αG-dα(r)/d(ln(r/rm)) plane. The location of a cluster on the αG - dα(r)/d(ln(r/rm)) plane can therefore constrain its dynamical history and, in particular, constrain possible variations in the stellar initial mass function. The αG-dα(r)/d(ln(r/rm)) plane thus serves as a key tool for fully exploiting the information contained in wide field studies of cluster stellar mass functions.

  3. Constraining the Initial Mass Function of unresolved stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, I.; La Barbera, F.; Vazdekis, A.

    2015-05-01

    All studies of unresolved stellar populations rely on a proper characterization of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), i.e. the distribution of stellar masses at birth. Over the past few years, several avenues of research have suggested a systematic variation of the IMF in early-type galaxies, with a departure from the standard IMF in the most massive systems towards both an enhanced contribution from low-mass dwarves (derived from line strength constraints); and an excess of stellar M/L (from galaxy dynamics and gravitational lensing constraints). We present here some of the recent results, focusing on constraints based on spectral line strengths and the consequences derived from galactic chemical enrichment.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR TWO DISTINCT STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.

    2012-12-20

    We present velocity dispersion measurements of 20 Local Group stellar clusters (7 < log(age [yr]) <10.2) from integrated light spectra and examine the evolution of the stellar mass-to-light ratio, Y{sub *}. We find that the clusters deviate from the evolutionary tracks corresponding to simple stellar populations drawn from standard stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). The nature of this failure, in which Y{sub *} is at first underestimated and then overestimated with age, invalidates potential simple solutions involving a rescaling of either the measured masses or modeled luminosities. A range of possible shortcomings in the straightforward interpretation of the data, including subtleties arising from cluster dynamical evolution on the present-day stellar mass functions and from stellar binarity on the measured velocity dispersions, do not materially affect this conclusion given the current understanding of those effects. Independent of further conjectures regarding the origin of this problem, this result highlights a basic failing of our understanding of the integrated stellar populations of these systems. We propose the existence of two distinct IMFs, one primarily, but not exclusively, valid for older, metal-poor clusters and the other for primarily, but not exclusively, younger, metal-rich clusters. The young (log(age [yr]) < 9.5) clusters are well described by a bottom-heavy IMF, such as a Salpeter IMF, while the older clusters are better described by a top-heavy IMF, such as a light-weighted Kroupa IMF, although neither of these specific forms is a unique solution. The sample is small, with the findings currently depending on the results for four key clusters, but doubling the sample is within reach.

  5. The Origin and Universality of the Stellar Initial Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, S. S. R.; Clark, P. C.; Hennebelle, P.; Bastian, N.; Bate, M. R.; Hopkins, P. F.; Moraux, E.; Whitworth, A. P.

    We review current theories for the origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) with particular focus on the extent to which the IMF can be considered universal across various environments. To place the issue in an observational context, we summarize the techniques used to determine the IMF for different stellar populations, the uncertainties affecting the results, and the evidence for systematic departures from universality under extreme circumstances. We next consider theories for the formation of prestellar cores by turbulent fragmentation and the possible impact of various thermal, hydrodynamic, and magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. We address the conversion of prestellar cores into stars and evaluate the roles played by different processes: competitive accretion, dynamical fragmentation, ejection and starvation, filament fragmentation and filamentary accretion flows, disk formation and fragmentation, critical scales imposed by thermodynamics, and magnetic braking. We present explanations for the characteristic shapes of the present-day prestellar core mass function (CMF) and the IMF and consider what significance can be attached to their apparent similarity. Substantial computational advances have occurred in recent years, and we review the numerical simulations that have been performed to predict the IMF directly and discuss the influence of dynamics, time-dependent phenomena, and initial conditions.

  6. THE LOW-MASS STELLAR POPULATION IN L1641: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Hartmann, Lee; Allen, Lori; Hernandez, Jesus; Megeath, S. T.; Mosby, Gregory; Tobin, John J.; Espaillat, Catherine

    2012-06-10

    We present results from an optical photometric and spectroscopic survey of the young stellar population in L1641, the low-density star-forming region of the Orion A cloud south of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). Our goal is to determine whether L1641 has a large enough low-mass population to make the known lack of high-mass stars a statistically significant demonstration of environmental dependence of the upper mass stellar initial mass function (IMF). Our spectroscopic sample consists of IR-excess objects selected from the Spitzer/IRAC survey and non-excess objects selected from optical photometry. We have spectral confirmation of 864 members, with another 98 probable members; of the confirmed members, 406 have infrared excesses and 458 do not. Assuming the same ratio of stars with and without IR excesses in the highly extincted regions, L1641 may contain as many as {approx}1600 stars down to {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, comparable within a factor of two to the ONC. Compared to the standard models of the IMF, L1641 is deficient in O and early B stars to a 3{sigma}-4{sigma} significance level, assuming that we know of all the massive stars in L1641. With a forthcoming survey of the intermediate-mass stars, we will be in a better position to make a direct comparison with the neighboring, dense ONC, which should yield a stronger test of the dependence of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF on environment.

  7. RESOLVE and ECO: The Halo Mass-dependent Shape of Galaxy Stellar and Baryonic Mass Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Norris, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present galaxy stellar and baryonic (stars plus cold gas) mass functions (SMF and BMF) and their halo mass dependence for two volume-limited data sets. The first, RESOLVE-B, coincides with the Stripe 82 footprint and is extremely complete down to baryonic mass M bary ∼ 109.1 M ⊙, probing the gas-rich dwarf regime below M bary ∼ 1010 M ⊙. The second, ECO, covers a ∼40× larger volume (containing RESOLVE-A) and is complete to M bary ∼ 109.4 M ⊙. To construct the SMF and BMF we implement a new “cross-bin sampling” technique with Monte Carlo sampling from the full likelihood distributions of stellar or baryonic mass. Our SMFs exhibit the “plateau” feature starting below M star ∼ 1010 M ⊙ that has been described in prior work. However, the BMF fills in this feature and rises as a straight power law below ∼1010 M ⊙, as gas-dominated galaxies become the majority of the population. Nonetheless, the low-mass slope of the BMF is not as steep as that of the theoretical dark matter halo MF. Moreover, we assign group halo masses by abundance matching, finding that the SMF and BMF, separated into four physically motivated halo mass regimes, reveal complex structure underlying the simple shape of the overall MFs. In particular, the satellite MFs are depressed below the central galaxy MF “humps” in groups with mass <1013.5 M ⊙ yet rise steeply in clusters. Our results suggest that satellite destruction and stripping are active from the point of nascent group formation. We show that the key role of groups in shaping MFs enables reconstruction of a given survey’s SMF or BMF based on its group halo mass distribution.

  8. RESOLVE and ECO: The Halo Mass-dependent Shape of Galaxy Stellar and Baryonic Mass Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Norris, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present galaxy stellar and baryonic (stars plus cold gas) mass functions (SMF and BMF) and their halo mass dependence for two volume-limited data sets. The first, RESOLVE-B, coincides with the Stripe 82 footprint and is extremely complete down to baryonic mass M bary ˜ 109.1 M ⊙, probing the gas-rich dwarf regime below M bary ˜ 1010 M ⊙. The second, ECO, covers a ˜40× larger volume (containing RESOLVE-A) and is complete to M bary ˜ 109.4 M ⊙. To construct the SMF and BMF we implement a new “cross-bin sampling” technique with Monte Carlo sampling from the full likelihood distributions of stellar or baryonic mass. Our SMFs exhibit the “plateau” feature starting below M star ˜ 1010 M ⊙ that has been described in prior work. However, the BMF fills in this feature and rises as a straight power law below ˜1010 M ⊙, as gas-dominated galaxies become the majority of the population. Nonetheless, the low-mass slope of the BMF is not as steep as that of the theoretical dark matter halo MF. Moreover, we assign group halo masses by abundance matching, finding that the SMF and BMF, separated into four physically motivated halo mass regimes, reveal complex structure underlying the simple shape of the overall MFs. In particular, the satellite MFs are depressed below the central galaxy MF “humps” in groups with mass <1013.5 M ⊙ yet rise steeply in clusters. Our results suggest that satellite destruction and stripping are active from the point of nascent group formation. We show that the key role of groups in shaping MFs enables reconstruction of a given survey’s SMF or BMF based on its group halo mass distribution.

  9. Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton accretion and the upper-mass stellar initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Hartmann, Lee W.; Pérez-Goytia, Nadia; Kuznetsova, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    We report on a series of numerical simulations of gas clouds with self-gravity forming sink particles, adopting an isothermal equation of state to isolate the effects of gravity from thermal physics on the resulting sink mass distributions. Simulations starting with supersonic velocity fluctuations develop sink mass functions with a high-mass power-law tail dN/d log M ∝ MΓ, Γ = -1 ± 0.1, independent of the initial Mach number of the velocity field. Similar results but with weaker statistical significance hold for a simulation starting with initial density fluctuations. This mass function power-law dependence agrees with the asymptotic limit found by Zinnecker assuming Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton (BHL) accretion, even though the mass accretion rates of individual sinks show significant departures from the predicted dot{M}∝ M^2 behaviour. While BHL accretion is not strictly applicable due to the complexity of the environment, we argue that the final mass functions are the result of a relative M2 dependence resulting from gravitationally focused accretion. Our simulations may show the power-law mass function particularly clearly compared with others because our adoption of an isothermal equation of state limits the effects of thermal physics in producing a broad initial fragmentation spectrum; Γ → -1 is an asymptotic limit found only when sink masses grow well beyond their initial values. While we have purposely eliminated many additional physical processes (radiative transfer, feedback) which can affect the stellar mass function, our results emphasize the importance of gravitational focusing for massive star formation.

  10. Cosmological implications of a stellar initial mass function that varies with the Jeans mass in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika; Davé, Romeel

    2012-07-01

    Observations of star-forming galaxies at high z have suggested discrepancies in the inferred star formation rates (SFRs) either between data and models or between complementary measures of the SFR. These putative discrepancies could all be alleviated if the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is systematically weighted towards more high-mass star formation in rapidly star-forming galaxies. Here, we explore how the IMF might vary under the central assumption that the turnover mass in the IMF, ?, scales with the Jeans mass in giant molecular clouds (GMCs), ?. We employ hydrodynamic simulations of galaxies coupled with radiative transfer models to predict how the typical GMC Jeans mass, and hence the IMF, varies with galaxy properties. We then study the impact of such an IMF on the star formation law, the SFR-M* relation, sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) and the cosmic SFR density. Our main results are: the H2 mass-weighted Jeans mass in a galaxy scales well with the SFR when the SFR is greater than a few M⊙ yr-1. Stellar population synthesis modelling shows that this results in a non-linear relation between SFR and Lbol, such that SFR ?. Using this model relation, the inferred SFR of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies decreases by a factor of ˜2, and that of high-z SMGs decreases by a factor of ˜3-5. At z˜ 2, this results in a lowered normalization of the SFR-M* relation in better agreement with models, a reduced discrepancy between the observed cosmic SFR density and stellar mass density evolution, and SMG SFRs that are easier to accommodate in current hierarchical structure formation models. It further results in a Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law with a slope of ˜1.6 when utilizing a physically motivated form for the CO-H2 conversion factor that varies with galaxy physical property. While each of the discrepancies considered here could be alleviated without appealing to a varying IMF, the modest variation implied by assuming ? is a plausible solution

  11. Stellar mass functions of galaxies, discs and spheroids at z ˜ 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanjavur, Karun; Simard, Luc; Bluck, Asa F. L.; Mendel, Trevor

    2016-06-01

    We present the stellar mass functions (SMFs) and mass densities of galaxies, and their spheroid and disc components in the local (z ˜ 0.1) Universe over the range 8.9 ≤ log(M/M⊙) ≤ 12 from spheroid+disc decompositions and corresponding stellar masses of a sample of over 600 000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven spectroscopic sample. The galaxy SMF is well represented by a single Schechter function (M* = 11.116 ± 0.011, α = -1.145 ± 0.008), though with a hint of a steeper faint end slope. The corresponding stellar mass densities are (2.670 ± 0.110), (1.687 ± 0.063) and (0.910 ± 0.029)× 108 M⊙ Mpc-3 for galaxies, spheroids and discs, respectively. We identify a crossover stellar mass of log(M/M⊙) = 10.3 ± 0.030 at which the spheroid and disc SMFs are equal. Relative contributions of four distinct spheroid/disc dominated sub-populations to the overall galaxy SMF are also presented. The mean disc-to-spheroid stellar mass ratio shows a five-fold disc dominance at the low-mass end, decreasing monotonically with a corresponding increase in the spheroidal fraction till the two are equal at a galaxy stellar mass, log(M/M⊙) = 10.479 ± 0.013; the dominance of spheroids then grows with increasing stellar mass. The relative numbers of composite disc and spheroid-dominated galaxies show peaks in their distributions, perhaps indicative of a preferred galaxy mass. Our characterization of the low-redshift galaxy population provides stringent constraints for numerical simulations to reproduce.

  12. Systematic variation of the stellar initial mass function in early-type galaxies.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Michele; McDermid, Richard M; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M; Crocker, Alison F; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2012-04-26

    Much of our knowledge of galaxies comes from analysing the radiation emitted by their stars, which depends on the present number of each type of star in the galaxy. The present number depends on the stellar initial mass function (IMF), which describes the distribution of stellar masses when the population formed, and knowledge of it is critical to almost every aspect of galaxy evolution. More than 50 years after the first IMF determination, no consensus has emerged on whether it is universal among different types of galaxies. Previous studies indicated that the IMF and the dark matter fraction in galaxy centres cannot both be universal, but they could not convincingly discriminate between the two possibilities. Only recently were indications found that massive elliptical galaxies may not have the same IMF as the Milky Way. Here we report a study of the two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the large representative ATLAS(3D) sample of nearby early-type galaxies spanning two orders of magnitude in stellar mass, using detailed dynamical models. We find a strong systematic variation in IMF in early-type galaxies as a function of their stellar mass-to-light ratios, producing differences of a factor of up to three in galactic stellar mass. This implies that a galaxy's IMF depends intimately on the galaxy's formation history. PMID:22538610

  13. The impact of Spitzer infrared data on stellar mass estimates - and a revised galaxy stellar mass function at 0 < z < 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, F.; Feulner, G.; Hopp, U.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:We estimate stellar masses of galaxies in the high redshift universe with the intention of determining the influence of newly available Spitzer/IRAC infrared data on the analysis. Based on the results, we probe the mass assembly history of the universe. Methods: We use the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, which provides multiband photometry from the U-filter to the 8 μm Spitzer band for almost 15 000 galaxies with either spectroscopic (for ≈7% of the sample) or photometric redshifts, and apply a standard model fitting technique to estimate stellar masses. We than repeat our calculations with fixed photometric redshifts excluding Spitzer photometry and directly compare the outcomes to look for systematic deviations. Finally we use our results to compute stellar mass functions and mass densities up to redshift z = 5. Results: We find that stellar masses tend to be overestimated on average if further constraining Spitzer data are not included into the analysis. Whilst this trend is small up to intermediate redshifts z ⪉ 2.5 and falls within the typical error in mass, the deviation increases strongly for higher redshifts and reaches a maximum of a factor of three at redshift z ≈ 3.5. Thus, up to intermediate redshifts, results for stellar mass density are in good agreement with values taken from literature calculated without additional Spitzer photometry. At higher redshifts, however, we find a systematic trend towards lower mass densities if Spitzer/IRAC data are included.

  14. Stellar mass functions: methods, systematics and results for the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Anna K.; Schawinski, Kevin; Bruderer, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    We present a comprehensive method for determining stellar mass functions, and apply it to samples in the local Universe. We combine the classical 1/Vmax approach with STY, a parametric maximum likelihood method and step-wise maximum likelihood, a non-parametric maximum likelihood technique. In the parametric approach, we are assuming that the stellar mass function can be modelled by either a single or a double Schechter function and we use a likelihood ratio test to determine which model provides a better fit to the data. We discuss how the stellar mass completeness as a function of z biases the three estimators and how it can affect, especially the low-mass end of the stellar mass function. We apply our method to Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 data in the redshift range from 0.02 to 0.06. We find that the entire galaxy sample is best described by a double Schechter function with the following parameters: log (M*/M⊙) = 10.79 ± 0.01, log (Φ ^{{ast }}_1/h^3 Mpc^{-3}) = -3.31 ± 0.20, α1 = -1.69 ± 0.10, log (Φ ^{{ast }}_2/h^3 Mpc^{-3}) = -2.01 ± 0.28 and α2 = -0.79 ± 0.04. We also use morphological classifications from Galaxy Zoo and halo mass, overdensity, central/satellite, colour and specific star formation rate measurements to split the galaxy sample into over 130 subsamples. We determine and present the stellar mass functions and the best-fitting Schechter function parameters for each of these subsamples.

  15. The High-mass Stellar Initial Mass Function in M31 Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Beerman, Lori C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Hogg, David W.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bell, Eric F.; Boyer, Martha L.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kalirai, Jason S.; Lewis, Alexia R.; Seth, Anil C.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2015-06-01

    We have undertaken the largest systematic study of the high-mass stellar initial mass function (IMF) to date using the optical color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of 85 resolved, young (4 {Myr}\\lt t\\lt 25 {Myr}), intermediate mass star clusters (103-104 M⊙), observed as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury program. We fit each cluster’s CMD to measure its mass function (MF) slope for stars ≳2 M⊙. By modeling the ensemble of clusters, we find the distribution of MF slopes is best described by Γ = +{1.45}-0.06+0.03 with a very small intrinsic scatter and no drastic outliers. This model allows the MF slope to depend on cluster mass, size, and age, but the data imply no significant dependencies within this regime of cluster properties. The lack of an age dependence suggests that the MF slope has not significantly evolved over the first ˜25 Myr and provides direct observational evidence that the measured MF represents the IMF. Taken together, this analysis—based on an unprecedented large sample of young clusters, homogeneously constructed CMDs, well-defined selection criteria, and consistent principled modeling—implies that the high-mass IMF slope in M31 clusters is universal. The IMF has a slope (Γ = +{1.45}-0.06+0.03; statistical uncertainties) that is slightly steeper than the canonical Kroupa (+1.30) and Salpeter (+1.35) values, and our measurement of it represents a factor of ˜20 improvement in precision over the Kroupa IMF (+1.30 ± 0.7). Using our inference model on select Milky Way (MW) and LMC high-mass IMF studies from the literature, we find {Γ }{MW}˜ +1.15+/- 0.1 and {Γ }{LMC}˜ +1.3+/- 0.1, both with intrinsic scatter of ˜0.3-0.4 dex. Thus, while the high-mass IMF in the Local Group may be universal, systematics in the literature of IMF studies preclude any definitive conclusions; homogenous investigations of the high-mass IMF in the local universe are needed to overcome this limitation. Consequently, the present study

  16. DYNAMICAL VERSUS STELLAR MASSES IN COMPACT EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR SYSTEMATIC VARIATION IN THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2013-10-20

    Several independent lines of evidence suggest that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies becomes increasingly 'bottom-heavy' with increasing galaxy mass and/or velocity dispersion, σ. Here we consider evidence for IMF variation in a sample of relatively compact early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These galaxies are of sufficiently high stellar density that a dark halo likely makes a minor contribution to the total dynamical mass, M {sub dyn}, within one effective radius. We fit our detailed stellar population synthesis models to the stacked absorption line spectra of these galaxies in bins of σ and find evidence from IMF-sensitive spectral features for a bottom-heavy IMF at high σ. We also apply simple 'mass-follows-light' dynamical models to the same data and find that M {sub dyn} is significantly higher than what would be expected if these galaxies were stellar dominated and had a universal Milky Way IMF. Adopting M {sub dyn} ≈ M {sub *} therefore implies that the IMF is 'heavier' at high σ. Most importantly, the quantitative amount of inferred IMF variation is very similar between the two techniques, agreeing to within ∼< 0.1 dex in mass. The agreement between two independent techniques, when applied to the same data, provides compelling evidence for systematic variation in the IMF as a function of early-type galaxy velocity dispersion. Any alternative explanations must reproduce both the results from dynamical and stellar population-based techniques.

  17. EVOLUTION OF THE HIGH-MASS END OF THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS IN STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji; Meurer, Gerhardt R.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the time evolution and spatial variation of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in star-forming disk galaxies by using chemodynamical simulations with an IMF model depending both on local densities and metallicities ([Fe/H]) of the interstellar medium (ISM). We find that the slope ({alpha}) of a power-law IMF (N(m){proportional_to}m {sup -{alpha}}) for stellar masses larger than 1 M{sub Sun} evolves from the canonical Salpeter IMF ({alpha} Almost-Equal-To 2.35) to be moderately top-heavy one ({alpha} Almost-Equal-To 1.9) in the simulated disk galaxies with starbursts triggered by galaxy interaction. We also find that {alpha} in star-forming regions correlates with star formation rate densities ({Sigma}{sub SFR} in units of M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). Feedback effects of Type Ia and II supernovae are found to prevent IMFs from being too top-heavy ({alpha} < 1.5). The simulation predicts {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 0.23log {Sigma}{sub SFR} + 1.7 for log {Sigma}{sub SFR} {>=} -2 (i.e., more top-heavy in higher {Sigma}{sub SFR}), which is reasonably consistent with corresponding recent observational results. The present study also predicts that inner regions of starburst disk galaxies have smaller {alpha} and thus are more top-heavy (d{alpha}/dR {approx} 0.07 kpc{sup -1} for R {<=} 5 kpc). The predicted radial {alpha} gradient can be tested against future observational studies of the {alpha} variation in star-forming galaxies.

  18. RECONCILING THE OBSERVED STAR-FORMING SEQUENCE WITH THE OBSERVED STELLAR MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Franx, Marijn; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2015-01-10

    We examine the connection between the observed star-forming sequence (SFR ∝ M {sup α}) and the observed evolution of the stellar mass function in the range 0.2 < z < 2.5. We find that the star-forming sequence cannot have a slope α ≲ 0.9 at all masses and redshifts because this would result in a much higher number density at 10 < log (M/M {sub ☉}) < 11 by z = 1 than is observed. We show that a transition in the slope of the star-forming sequence, such that α = 1 at log (M/M {sub ☉}) < 10.5 and α = 0.7-0.13z (Whitaker et al.) at log (M/M {sub ☉}) > 10.5, greatly improves agreement with the evolution of the stellar mass function. We then derive a star-forming sequence that reproduces the evolution of the mass function by design. This star-forming sequence is also well described by a broken power law, with a shallow slope at high masses and a steep slope at low masses. At z = 2, it is offset by ∼0.3 dex from the observed star-forming sequence, consistent with the mild disagreement between the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and recent observations of the growth of the stellar mass density. It is unclear whether this problem stems from errors in stellar mass estimates, errors in SFRs, or other effects. We show that a mass-dependent slope is also seen in other self-consistent models of galaxy evolution, including semianalytical, hydrodynamical, and abundance-matching models. As part of the analysis, we demonstrate that neither mergers nor hidden low-mass quiescent galaxies are likely to reconcile the evolution of the mass function and the star-forming sequence. These results are supported by observations from Whitaker et al.

  19. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. IV. EVOLUTION OF GALAXY STELLAR MASS FUNCTION BACK TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Tokoku, C.; Yoshikawa, T.; Tanaka, I.; Suzuki, R.; Konishi, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Ouchi, M.; Iwata, I.; Hamana, T.; Onodera, M.

    2009-09-10

    We use very deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging data obtained in MOIRCS Deep Survey (MODS) to investigate the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function back to z {approx} 3. The MODS data reach J = 24.2, H = 23.1, and K = 23.1 (5{sigma}, Vega magnitude) over 103 arcmin{sup 2} (wide) and J = 25.1, H = 23.7, and K = 24.1 over 28 arcmin{sup 2} (deep) in the GOODS-North region. The wide and very deep NIR data allow us to measure the number density of galaxies down to low stellar mass (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) even at high redshift with high statistical accuracy. The normalization of the mass function decreases with redshift, and the integrated stellar mass density becomes {approx}8%-18% of the local value at z {approx} 2 and {approx}4%-9% at z {approx} 3, which are consistent with results of previous studies in general fields. Furthermore, we found that the low-mass slope becomes steeper with redshift from {alpha} {approx} -1.3 at z {approx} 1 to {alpha} {approx} -1.6 at z {approx} 3 and that the evolution of the number density of low-mass (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) galaxies is weaker than that of M* ({approx}10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies. This indicates that the contribution of low-mass galaxies to the total stellar mass density has been significant at high redshift. The steepening of the low-mass slope with redshift is an opposite trend expected from the stellar mass dependence of the specific star formation rate reported in previous studies. The present result suggests that the hierarchical merging process overwhelmed the effect of the stellar mass growth by star formation and was very important for the stellar mass assembly of these galaxies at 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.

  20. THE DARK MATTER HALO CONCENTRATION AND STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF A CASSOWARY GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, A. J.; Auger, M. W.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W.

    2013-08-10

    We exploit the group environment of the CAmbridge Sloan Survey Of Wide ARcs in the skY z = 0.3 lens J2158+0257 to measure the group dynamical mass as a complement to the central dynamical and lensing mass constraints. Follow-up spectroscopy of candidate group members is performed using VLT/FORS2. From the resulting N = 21 confirmed members, we measure the group dynamical mass by calibrating an analytic tracer mass estimator with cosmological simulations. The luminosity-weighted line-of-sight velocity dispersion and the Einstein radius of the lens are used as mass probes in the inner regions of the galaxy. Combining these three observational probes allows us to independently constrain the mass and concentration of the dark matter halo, in addition to the total stellar mass of the central galaxy. We find a dark matter halo in remarkably good agreement with simulations (log{sub 10} M{sub 200}/M{sub Sun} = 14.2 {+-} 0.2, c{sub 200}= 4.4{sup +1.6}{sub -1.4}) and a stellar mass-to-light ratio which favors a Salpeter initial mass function ((M/L)* = 5.7 {+-} 1.2). Our measurement of a normal halo concentration suggests that there is no discrepancy between simulations and observations at the group mass scale. This is in contrast to the cluster mass scale for which a number of studies have claimed over-concentrated halos. While the halo mass is robustly determined, and the halo concentration is not significantly affected by systematics, the resulting stellar mass-to-light ratio is sensitive to the choice of stellar parameters, such as density profile and velocity anisotropy.

  1. SALPETER NORMALIZATION OF THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION FOR MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Shravan; Cappellari, Michele

    2014-05-10

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key parameter for studying galaxy evolution. Here we measure the IMF mass normalization for a sample of 68 field galaxies in the redshift range 0.7-0.9 within the Extended Groth Strip. To do this we derive the total (stellar + dark matter) mass-to-light [(M/L)] ratio using axisymmetric dynamical models. Within the region where we have kinematics (about one half-light radius), the models assume (1) that mass follows light, implying negligible differences between the slope of the stellar and total density profiles, (2) constant velocity anisotropy (β{sub z}≡1−σ{sub z}{sup 2}/σ{sub R}{sup 2}=0.2), and (3) that galaxies are seen at the average inclination for random orientations (i.e., i = 60°, where i = 90° represents edge-on). The dynamical models are based on anisotropic Jeans equations, constrained by Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging and the central velocity dispersion of the galaxies, extracted from good-quality spectra taken by the DEEP2 survey. The population (M/L) are derived from full-spectrum fitting of the same spectra with a grid of simple stellar population models. Recent dynamical modeling results from the ATLAS{sup 3D} project and numerical simulations of galaxy evolution indicate that the dark matter fraction within the central regions of our galaxies should be small. This suggests that our derived total (M/L) should closely approximate the stellar M/L. Our comparison of the dynamical (M/L) and the population (M/L) then implies that for galaxies with stellar mass M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, the average normalization of the IMF is consistent with a Salpeter slope, with a substantial scatter. This is similar to what is found within a similar mass range for nearby galaxies.

  2. CONNECTION BETWEEN DYNAMICALLY DERIVED INITIAL MASS FUNCTION NORMALIZATION AND STELLAR POPULATION PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDermid, Richard M.; Cappellari, Michele; Bayet, Estelle; Bureau, Martin; Davies, Roger L.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Kuntschner, Harald; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Naab, Thorsten; and others

    2014-09-10

    We report on empirical trends between the dynamically determined stellar initial mass function (IMF) and stellar population properties for a complete, volume-limited sample of 260 early-type galaxies from the ATLAS{sup 3D} project. We study trends between our dynamically derived IMF normalization α{sub dyn} ≡ (M/L){sub stars}/(M/L){sub Salp} and absorption line strengths, and interpret these via single stellar population-equivalent ages, abundance ratios (measured as [α/Fe]), and total metallicity, [Z/H]. We find that old and alpha-enhanced galaxies tend to have on average heavier (Salpeter-like) mass normalization of the IMF, but stellar population does not appear to be a good predictor of the IMF, with a large range of α{sub dyn} at a given population parameter. As a result, we find weak α{sub dyn}-[α/Fe] and α{sub dyn} –Age correlations and no significant α{sub dyn} –[Z/H] correlation. The observed trends appear significantly weaker than those reported in studies that measure the IMF normalization via the low-mass star demographics inferred through stellar spectral analysis.

  3. Connection between Dynamically Derived Initial Mass Function Normalization and Stellar Population Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Cappellari, Michele; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2014-09-01

    We report on empirical trends between the dynamically determined stellar initial mass function (IMF) and stellar population properties for a complete, volume-limited sample of 260 early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D project. We study trends between our dynamically derived IMF normalization αdyn ≡ (M/L)stars/(M/L)Salp and absorption line strengths, and interpret these via single stellar population-equivalent ages, abundance ratios (measured as [α/Fe]), and total metallicity, [Z/H]. We find that old and alpha-enhanced galaxies tend to have on average heavier (Salpeter-like) mass normalization of the IMF, but stellar population does not appear to be a good predictor of the IMF, with a large range of αdyn at a given population parameter. As a result, we find weak αdyn-[α/Fe] and αdyn -Age correlations and no significant αdyn -[Z/H] correlation. The observed trends appear significantly weaker than those reported in studies that measure the IMF normalization via the low-mass star demographics inferred through stellar spectral analysis.

  4. The initial mass function and global rates of mass, momentum, and energy input to the interstellar medium via stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, D.

    1985-01-01

    Published observational data are compiled and analyzed, using theoretical stellar-evolution models to determine the global rates of mass, momentum, and energy injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) by stellar winds. Expressions derived include psi = 0.00054 x (M to the -1.03) stars formed/sq kpc yr log M (where M is the initial mass function in solar mass units) and mass-loss = (2 x 10 to the -13th) x (L to the 1.25) solar mass/yr (with L in solar luminosity units). It is found that the wind/supernova injection of energy into the ISM and the mass loss from stars of 5 solar mass or more are approximately balanced by the dissipation of energy by cloud-cloud collisions and the formation of stars, respectively.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE UPPER STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN ORION A

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Hartmann, Lee; Tobin, John J.; Ingleby, Laura; Allen, Lori; Hernandez, Jesus; Megeath, S. T.

    2013-02-20

    We extend our previous study of the stellar population of L1641, the lower-density star-forming region of the Orion A cloud south of the dense Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), with the goal of testing whether there is a statistically significant deficiency of high-mass stars in low-density regions. Previously, we compared the observed ratio of low-mass stars to high-mass stars with theoretical models of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) to infer a deficiency of the highest-mass stars in L1641. We expand our population study to identify the intermediate-mass (late B to G) L1641 members in an attempt to make a more direct comparison with the mass function of the nearby ONC. The spectral-type distribution and the K-band luminosity function of L1641 are similar to those of the ONC, but problems of incompleteness and contamination prevent us from making a detailed test for differences. We limit our analysis to statistical tests of the ratio of high-mass to low-mass stars, which indicate a probability of only 3% that the ONC and the southern region of L1641 were drawn from the same population, supporting the hypothesis that the upper-mass end of the IMF is dependent on environmental density.

  6. Evidence for two distinct stellar initial mass functions: probing for clues to the dichotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Pessev, Peter M.

    2014-12-01

    We present new measurements of the velocity dispersions of 11 Local Group globular clusters using spatially integrated spectra, to expand our sample of clusters with precise integrated-light velocity dispersions to 29, over 4 different host galaxies. This sample allows us to further our investigation of the stellar mass function among clusters, with a particular emphasis on a search for the driver of the apparent bimodal nature of the inferred stellar initial mass function (IMF). We confirm our previous result that clusters fall into two classes. If, as we argue, this behavior reflects a variation in the stellar IMF, the cause of that variation is not clear. The variations do not correlate with formation epoch as quantified by age, metallicity quantified by [Fe/H], host galaxy, or internal structure as quantified by velocity dispersion, physical size, relaxation time, or luminosity. The stellar mass-to-light ratios, Y{sub *}, of the high and low Y{sub *} cluster populations are well-matched to those found in recent studies of early and late type galaxies, respectively.

  7. Building a predictive model of galaxy formation - I. Phenomenological model constrained to the z = 0 stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Andrew J.

    2014-11-01

    We constrain a highly simplified semi-analytic model of galaxy formation using the z ≈ 0 stellar mass function of galaxies. Particular attention is paid to assessing the role of random and systematic errors in the determination of stellar masses, to systematic uncertainties in the model, and to correlations between bins in the measured and modelled stellar mass functions, in order to construct a realistic likelihood function. We derive constraints on model parameters and explore which aspects of the observational data constrain particular parameter combinations. We find that our model, once constrained, provides a remarkable match to the measured evolution of the stellar mass function to z = 1, although fails dramatically to match the local galaxy H I mass function. Several `nuisance parameters' contribute significantly to uncertainties in model predictions. In particular, systematic errors in stellar mass estimate are the dominant source of uncertainty in model predictions at z ≈ 1, with additional, non-negligble contributions arising from systematic uncertainties in halo mass functions and the residual uncertainties in cosmological parameters. Ignoring any of these sources of uncertainties could lead to viable models being erroneously ruled out. Additionally, we demonstrate that ignoring the significant covariance between bins the observed stellar mass function leads to significant biases in the constraints derived on model parameters. Careful treatment of systematic and random errors in the constraining data, and in the model being constrained, is crucial if this methodology is to be used to test hypotheses relating to the physics of galaxy formation.

  8. ACCESS: NIR luminosity function and stellar mass function of galaxies in the Shapley supercluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merluzzi, P.; Mercurio, A.; Haines, C. P.; Smith, R. J.; Busarello, G.; Lucey, J. R.

    2010-02-01

    We present the near-infrared luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) of galaxies in the core of the Shapley supercluster at z = 0.048, based on new K-band observations carried out at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope with the Wide Field Infrared Camera in conjunction with B- and R-band photometry from the Shapley Optical Survey, and including a subsample (~650 galaxies) of spectroscopically confirmed supercluster members. These data sets allow us to investigate the supercluster galaxy population down to M*K + 6 and . For the overall 3deg2 field, the K-band luminosity function (LF) is described by a Schechter function with M*K = -24.96 +/- 0.10 and α = -1.42 +/- 0.03, a significantly steeper faint-end slope than that observed in field regions. We investigate the effect of environment by deriving the LF in three regions selected according to the local galaxy density and observe a significant (2σ) increase in the faint-end slope going from high-density (α = -1.33) to low-density (α = -1.49) environments, while a faint-end upturn at MK > -21 becomes increasingly apparent in the lower density regions. The galaxy SMF is fitted well by a Schechter function with and α = -1.20 +/- 0.02. The SMF of supercluster galaxies is also characterized by an excess of massive galaxies that are associated with the brightest cluster galaxies. While the value of depends on the environment, increasing by 0.2dex from low- to high-density regions, the slope of the galaxy SMF does not vary with the environment. By comparing our findings with cosmological simulations, we conclude that the environmental dependences of the LF are not primarily due to variations in the merging histories, but to processes which are not treated in the semi-analytical models, such as tidal stripping or harassment. In field regions, the SMF shows a sharp upturn below , close to our mass limit, suggesting that the upturns seen in our K-band LFs, but not in the SMF, are due to this dwarf population. The

  9. M dwarfs in the Local Milky Way: The Field Low-Mass Stellar Luminosity and Mass Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J., Jr.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2006-06-01

    Modern sky surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two-Micron All Sky Survey, have revolutionized how Astronomy is done. With millions of photometric and spectroscopic observations, global observational properties can be studied with unprecedented statistical significance. Low-mass stars dominate the local Milky Way, with tens of millions observed by SDSS within a few kpc. Thus, they make ideal tracers of the Galactic potential, and the thin and thick disks. In this thesis dissertation, I present my efforts to characterize the local low-mass stellar population, using a collection of observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). First, low-mass stellar template spectra were constructed from the co-addition of thousands of SDSS spectroscopic observations. These template spectra were used to quantify the observable changes introduced by chromospheric activity and metallicity. Furthermore, the average ugriz colors were measured as a function of spectral type. Next, the local kinematic structure of the Milky Way was quantified, using a special set of SDSS spectroscopic observations. Combining proper motions and radial velocities (measured using the spectral templates), along with distances, the full UVW space motions of over 7000 low-mass stars along one line of sight were computed. These stars were also separated kinematically to investigate other observational differences between the thin and thick disks. Finally, this dissertation details a project designed to measure the luminosity and mass functions of low-mass stars. Using a new technique optimized for large surveys, the field luminosity function (LF) and local stellar density profile are measured simultaneously. The sample size used to estimate the LF is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than any previous study, offering a definitive measurement of this quantity. The observed LF is transformed into a mass function (MF) and compared to previous studies.

  10. Insights into the origin of the stellar initial mass function from Herschel Gould Belt survey observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Philippe; Roy, Arabindo; Arzoumanian, Doris

    2015-08-01

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is one of the most debated issues in astrophysics. Two major features of the IMF are 1) a fairly robust power-law slope at the high-mass end known since Salpeter (1955), and 2) a broad peak below 1 Mo corresponding to a characteristic stellar mass scale. In recent years, the dominant theoretical model proposed to account for these features has been the "gravo-turbulent fragmentation" picture, whereby the properties of interstellar turbulence lead to the Salpeter power law and gravity sets the characteristic mass scale (Jeans mass). I will discuss modifications to this picture based on extensive submillimeter imaging observations of nearby molecular clouds with the Herschel Space Observatory which set strong constraints on the formation process of prestellar cores.The Herschel results point to the key role of the quasi-universal filamentary structure pervading the cold interstellar medium and support a scenario in which star formation occurs in two main steps: first, the dissipation of kinetic energy in large-scale MHD flows (turbulent or not) generates ~ 0.1 pc-wide filaments in the cold ISM; second, the densest filaments grow and fragment into prestellar cores (and ultimately protostars) by gravitational instability above a critical threshold ~ 16 Mo/pc in mass per unit length or ~ 160 Mo/pc2 in gas surface density (AV ~ 8).In our observationally-driven scenario, the dense cores making up the peak of the prestellar core mass function (CMF) - likely responsible for the characteristic IMF mass scale - result from gravitational fragmentation of filaments near the critical threshold for global gravitational instability. The power-law tail of the CMF/IMF arises either from the characteristic power spectrum of initial density fluctuations measured along the Herschel filaments (Roy et al. submitted) or from the power-law distribution of masses per unit length observed for supercritical filaments.

  11. CLASH-VLT: The stellar mass function and stellar mass density profile of the z = 0.44 cluster of galaxies MACS J1206.2-0847

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziatella, M.; Biviano, A.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Presotto, V.; Girardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Grillo, C.; Kelson, D.; Medezinski, E.; Postman, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Brescia, M.; Demarco, R.; Fritz, A.; Koekemoer, A.; Lemze, D.; Lombardi, M.; Sartoris, B.; Umetsu, K.; Vanzella, E.; Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Donahue, M.; Infante, L.; Kuchner, U.; Maier, C.; Regős, E.; Verdugo, M.; Ziegler, B.

    2014-11-01

    Context. The study of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) in relation to the galaxy environment and the stellar mass density profile, ρ⋆(r), is a powerful tool to constrain models of galaxy evolution. Aims: We determine the SMF of the z = 0.44 cluster of galaxies MACS J1206.2-0847 separately for passive and star-forming (SF) galaxies, in different regions of the cluster, from the center out to approximately 2 virial radii. We also determine ρ⋆(r) to compare it to the number density and total mass density profiles. Methods: We use the dataset from the CLASH-VLT survey. Stellar masses are obtained by spectral energy distribution fitting with the MAGPHYS technique on 5-band photometric data obtained at the Subaru telescope. We identify 1363 cluster members down to a stellar mass of 109.5 M⊙, selected on the basis of their spectroscopic (~1/3 of the total) and photometric redshifts. We correct our sample for incompleteness and contamination by non members. Cluster member environments are defined using either the clustercentric radius or the local galaxy number density. Results: The whole cluster SMF is well fitted by a double Schechter function, which is the sum of the two Schechter functions that provide good fits to the SMFs of, separately, the passive and SF cluster populations. The SMF of SF galaxies is significantly steeper than the SMF of passive galaxies at the faint end. The SMF of the SF cluster galaxies does not depend on the environment. The SMF of the passive cluster galaxies has a significantly smaller slope (in absolute value) in the innermost (≤ 0.50 Mpc, i.e., ~0.25 virial radii), and in the highest density cluster region than in more external, lower density regions. The number ratio of giant/subgiant galaxies is maximum in this innermost region and minimum in the adjacent region, but then gently increases again toward the cluster outskirts. This is also reflected in a decreasing radial trend of the average stellar mass per cluster galaxy

  12. Perspectives on Intracluster Enrichment and the Stellar Initial Mass Function in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenstein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The amount of metals in the Intracluster Medium (ICM) in rich galaxy clusters exceeds that expected based on the observed stellar population by a large factor. We quantify this discrepancy--which we term the "cluster elemental abundance paradox"--and investigate the required properties of the ICM-enriching population. The necessary enhancement in metal enrichment may, in principle, originate in the observed stellar population if a larger fraction of stars in the supernova-progenitor mass range form from an initial mass function (IMF) that is either bottom-light or top-heavy, with the latter in some conflict with observed ICM abundance ratios. Other alternatives that imply more modest revisions to the IMF, mass return and remnant fractions, and primordial fraction, posit an increase in the fraction of 3-8 solar mass stars that explode as SNIa or assume that there are more stars than conventionally thought--although the latter implies a high star formation efficiency. We discuss the feasibility of these various solutions and the implications for the diversity of star formation, the process of elliptical galaxy formation, and the nature of this hidden source of ICM metal enrichment in light of recent evidence of an elliptical galaxy IMF that, because it is skewed to low masses, deepens the paradox.

  13. What do simulations predict for the galaxy stellar mass function and its evolution in different environments?

    SciTech Connect

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Bundy, Kevin; More, Surhud; De Lucia, Gabriella; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Calvi, Rosa

    2014-06-10

    We present a comparison between the observed galaxy stellar mass function and the one predicted from the De Lucia and Blaizot semi-analytic model applied to the Millennium Simulation, for cluster satellites and galaxies in the field (meant as a wide portion of the sky, including all environments), in the local universe (z ∼ 0.06), and at intermediate redshift (z ∼ 0.6), with the aim to shed light on the processes which regulate the mass distribution in different environments. While the mass functions in the field and in its finer environments (groups, binary, and single systems) are well matched in the local universe down to the completeness limit of the observational sample, the model overpredicts the number of low-mass galaxies in the field at z ∼ 0.6 and in clusters at both redshifts. Above M {sub *} = 10{sup 10.25} M {sub ☉}, it reproduces the observed similarity of the cluster and field mass functions but not the observed evolution. Our results point out two shortcomings of the model: an incorrect treatment of cluster-specific environmental effects and an overefficient galaxy formation at early times (as already found by, e.g., Weinmann et al.). Next, we consider only simulations. Also using the Guo et al. model, we find that the high-mass end of the mass functions depends on halo mass: only very massive halos host massive galaxies, with the result that their mass function is flatter. Above M {sub *} = 10{sup 9.4} M {sub ☉}, simulations show an evolution in the number of the most massive galaxies in all environments. Mass functions obtained from the two prescriptions are different, however, results are qualitatively similar, indicating that the adopted methods to model the evolution of central and satellite galaxies still have to be better implemented in semi-analytic models.

  14. Origin of a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function in elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the origin of a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) recently observed in elliptical galaxies by using chemical evolution models with a non-universal IMF. We adopt the variable Kroupa IMF with the three slopes (α{sub 1}, α{sub 2}, and α{sub 3}) dependent on metallicities ([Fe/H]) and densities (ρ{sub g}) of star-forming gas clouds and thereby search for the best IMF model that can reproduce (1) the observed steep IMF slope (α{sub 2} ∼ 3, i.e., bottom-heavy) for low stellar masses (m ≤ 1 M {sub ☉}) and (2) the correlation of α{sub 2} with chemical properties of elliptical galaxies in a self-consistent manner. We find that if the IMF slope α{sub 2} depends on both [Fe/H] and ρ{sub g}, then elliptical galaxies with higher [Mg/Fe] can have steeper α{sub 2} (∼3) in our models. We also find that the observed positive correlation of stellar mass-to-light ratios (M/L) with [Mg/Fe] in elliptical galaxies can be quantitatively reproduced in our models with α{sub 2}∝β[Fe/H] + γlog ρ{sub g}, where β ∼ 0.5 and γ ∼ 2. We discuss whether the IMF slopes for low-mass (α{sub 2}) and high-mass stars (α{sub 3}) need to vary independently from each other to explain a number of IMF-related observational results self-consistently. We also briefly discuss why α{sub 2} depends differently on [Fe/H] in dwarf and giant elliptical galaxies.

  15. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM ABSORPTION LINE SPECTROSCOPY. II. RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2012-11-20

    The spectral absorption lines in early-type galaxies contain a wealth of information regarding the detailed abundance pattern, star formation history, and stellar initial mass function (IMF) of the underlying stellar population. Using our new population synthesis model that accounts for the effect of variable abundance ratios of 11 elements, we analyze very high quality absorption line spectra of 38 early-type galaxies and the nuclear bulge of M31. These data extend to 1 {mu}m and they therefore include the IMF-sensitive spectral features Na I, Ca II, and FeH at 0.82 {mu}m, 0.86 {mu}m, and 0.99 {mu}m, respectively. The models fit the data well, with typical rms residuals {approx}< 1%. Strong constraints on the IMF and therefore the stellar mass-to-light ratio, (M/L){sub stars}, are derived for individual galaxies. We find that the IMF becomes increasingly bottom-heavy with increasing velocity dispersion and [Mg/Fe]. At the lowest dispersions and [Mg/Fe] values the derived IMF is consistent with the Milky Way (MW) IMF, while at the highest dispersions and [Mg/Fe] values the derived IMF contains more low-mass stars (is more bottom-heavy) than even a Salpeter IMF. Our best-fit (M/L){sub stars} values do not exceed dynamically based M/L values. We also apply our models to stacked spectra of four metal-rich globular clusters in M31 and find an (M/L){sub stars} that implies fewer low-mass stars than a MW IMF, again agreeing with dynamical constraints. We discuss other possible explanations for the observed trends and conclude that variation in the IMF is the simplest and most plausible.

  16. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AT 0.9 < z < 1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Trujillo, Ignacio; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Barro, Guillermo; Charlot, Stéphane; Cava, Antonio; Ferreras, Ignacio; Barbera, Francesco La; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Cenarro, A. Javier

    2015-01-01

    We explore the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of a sample of 49 massive quiescent galaxies (MQGs) at 0.9 < z < 1.5. We base our analysis on intermediate resolution spectro-photometric data in the GOODS-N field taken in the near-infrared and optical with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 G141 grism and the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources. To constrain the slope of the IMF, we have measured the TiO{sub 2} spectral feature, whose strength depends strongly on the content of low-mass stars, as well as on stellar age. Using ultraviolet to near-infrared individual and stacked spectral energy distributions, we have independently estimated the stellar ages of our galaxies. Knowing the age of the stellar population, we interpret the strong differences in the TiO{sub 2} feature as an IMF variation. In particular, for the heaviest z ∼ 1 MQGs (M > 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}), we find an average age of 1.7 ± 0.3 Gyr and a bottom-heavy IMF (Γ {sub b} = 3.2 ± 0.2). Lighter MQGs (2 × 10{sup 10} < M < 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) at the same redshift are younger on average (1.0 ± 0.2 Gyr) and present a shallower IMF slope (Γ{sub b}=2.7{sub −0.4}{sup +0.3}). Our results are in good agreement with the findings about the IMF slope in early-type galaxies of similar mass in the present-day universe. This suggests that the IMF, a key characteristic of the stellar populations in galaxies, is bottom-heavier for more massive galaxies and has remained unchanged in the last ∼8 Gyr.

  17. A hierarchical Bayesian approach for reconstructing the Initial Mass Function of Single Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dries, M.; Trager, S. C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies based on the integrated light of distant galaxies suggest that the initial mass function (IMF) might not be universal. Variations of the IMF with galaxy type and/or formation time may have important consequences for our understanding of galaxy evolution. We have developed a new stellar population synthesis (SPS) code specifically designed to reconstruct the IMF. We implement a novel approach combining regularization with hierarchical Bayesian inference. Within this approach we use a parametrized IMF prior to regulate a direct inference of the IMF. This direct inference gives more freedom to the IMF and allows the model to deviate from parametrized models when demanded by the data. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques to reconstruct the best parameters for the IMF prior, the age, and the metallicity of a single stellar population. We present our code and apply our model to a number of mock single stellar populations with different ages, metallicities, and IMFs. When systematic uncertainties are not significant, we are able to reconstruct the input parameters that were used to create the mock populations. Our results show that if systematic uncertainties do play a role, this may introduce a bias on the results. Therefore, it is important to objectively compare different ingredients of SPS models. Through its Bayesian framework, our model is well-suited for this.

  18. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Environmental effects shaping the galaxy stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidzon, I.; Cucciati, O.; Bolzonella, M.; De Lucia, G.; Zamorani, G.; Arnouts, S.; Moutard, T.; Ilbert, O.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; de la Torre, S.; Di Porto, C.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Guennou, L.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.

    2016-02-01

    We exploit the first public data release of VIPERS to investigate environmental effects in the evolution of galaxies between z ~ 0.5 and 0.9. The large number of spectroscopic redshifts (more than 50 000) over an area of about 10 deg2 provides a galaxy sample with high statistical power. The accurate redshift measurements (σz = 0.00047(1 + zspec)) allow us to robustly isolate galaxies living in the lowest and highest density environments (δ< 0.7 and δ> 4, respectively) as defined in terms of spatial 3D density contrast δ. We estimate the stellar mass function of galaxies residing in these two environments and constrain the high-mass end (ℳ ≳ 1011 ℳ⊙) with unprecedented precision. We find that the galaxy stellar mass function in the densest regions has a different shape than was measured at low densities, with an enhancement of massive galaxies and a hint of a flatter (less negative) slope at z< 0.8. We normalise each mass function to the comoving volume occupied by the corresponding environment and relate estimates from different redshift bins. We observe an evolution of the stellar mass function of VIPERS galaxies in high densities, while the low-density one is nearly constant. We compare these results to semi-analytical models and find consistent environmental signatures in the simulated stellar mass functions. We discuss how the halo mass function and fraction of central/satellite galaxies depend on the environments considered, making intrinsic and environmental properties of galaxies physically coupled, hence difficult to disentangle. The evolution of our low-density regions is described well by the formalism introduced by Peng et al. (2010, ApJ, 721, 193), and is consistent with the idea that galaxies become progressively passive because of internal physical processes. The same formalism could also describe the evolution of the mass function in the high density regions, but only if a significant contribution from dry mergers is considered. Based on

  19. Stochastic stellar cluster initial mass functions: Models and impact on integrated cluster parameter determination

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, P.; Kotulla, R.; De Grijs, R.; Wicker, J.

    2013-12-01

    Stellar clusters are regularly used to study the evolution of their host galaxy. Except for a few nearby galaxies, these studies rely on the interpretation of integrated cluster properties, especially integrated photometry observed using multiple filters (i.e., the spectral energy distribution, SED). To allow interpretation of such observations, we present a large set of GALEV cluster models using the realistic approach of adopting stochastically sampled stellar initial mass functions. We provide models for a wide range of cluster masses (10{sup 3}-2 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), metallicities (–2.3 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.18 dex), foreground extinction, and 184 regularly used filters. We analyze various sets of stochastic cluster SEDs by fitting them with non-stochastic models, which is the procedure commonly used in this field. We identify caveats and quantify the fitting uncertainties associated with this standard procedure. We show that this can yield highly unreliable fitting results, especially for low-mass clusters.

  20. An Inventory of the Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Napolitano, N. R.

    2013-03-01

    Given a flurry of recent claims for systematic variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF), we carry out the first inventory of the observational evidence using different approaches. This includes literature results, as well as our own new findings from combined stellar population synthesis (SPS) and Jeans dynamical analyses of data on ~4500 early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the SPIDER project. We focus on the mass-to-light ratio mismatch relative to the Milky Way IMF, δIMF, correlated against the central stellar velocity dispersion, σsstarf. We find a strong correlation between δIMF and σsstarf, for a wide set of dark matter (DM) model profiles. These results are robust if a uniform halo response to baryons is adopted across the sample. The overall normalization of δIMF and the detailed DM profile are less certain, but the data are consistent with standard cold DM halos and a central DM fraction that is roughly constant with σsstarf. For a variety of related studies in the literature, using SPS, dynamics, and gravitational lensing, similar results are found. Studies based solely on spectroscopic line diagnostics agree on a Salpeter-like IMF at high σsstarf but differ at low σsstarf. Overall, we find that multiple independent lines of evidence appear to be converging on a systematic variation in the IMF, such that high-σsstarf ETGs have an excess of low-mass stars relative to spirals and low-σsstarf ETGs. Robust verification of super-Salpeter IMFs in the highest-σsstarf galaxies will require additional scrutiny of scatter and systematic uncertainties. The implications for the distribution of DM are still inconclusive.

  1. AN INVENTORY OF THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tortora, C.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Napolitano, N. R.

    2013-03-01

    Given a flurry of recent claims for systematic variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF), we carry out the first inventory of the observational evidence using different approaches. This includes literature results, as well as our own new findings from combined stellar population synthesis (SPS) and Jeans dynamical analyses of data on {approx}4500 early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the SPIDER project. We focus on the mass-to-light ratio mismatch relative to the Milky Way IMF, {delta}{sub IMF}, correlated against the central stellar velocity dispersion, {sigma}{sub *}. We find a strong correlation between {delta}{sub IMF} and {sigma}{sub *}, for a wide set of dark matter (DM) model profiles. These results are robust if a uniform halo response to baryons is adopted across the sample. The overall normalization of {delta}{sub IMF} and the detailed DM profile are less certain, but the data are consistent with standard cold DM halos and a central DM fraction that is roughly constant with {sigma}{sub *}. For a variety of related studies in the literature, using SPS, dynamics, and gravitational lensing, similar results are found. Studies based solely on spectroscopic line diagnostics agree on a Salpeter-like IMF at high {sigma}{sub *} but differ at low {sigma}{sub *}. Overall, we find that multiple independent lines of evidence appear to be converging on a systematic variation in the IMF, such that high-{sigma}{sub *} ETGs have an excess of low-mass stars relative to spirals and low-{sigma}{sub *} ETGs. Robust verification of super-Salpeter IMFs in the highest-{sigma}{sub *} galaxies will require additional scrutiny of scatter and systematic uncertainties. The implications for the distribution of DM are still inconclusive.

  2. An analytic explanation of the stellar initial mass function from the theory of spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klishin, Andrei; Chilingarian, Igor

    2015-08-01

    The distribution of stars by mass or the stellar initial mass function (IMF) that has been intensively studied in the Milky Way and other galaxies is the key property regulating star formation and galaxy evolution. The mass function of prestellar dense cores (DCMF) is an IMF precursor that has a similar shape, a broken power law with a sharp decline at low masses, but offset to higher masses. Results from numerical simulations of star formation qualitatively resemble an observed IMF/DCMF, however, most analytic IMF theories critically depend on the empirically chosen input spectrum of mass fluctuations which evolve into dense cores and, subsequently, stars. Here we propose an analytic approach by representing a system of dense cores accreting gas from the surrounding diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) as a spatial network growing by preferential attachment and assuming that the ISM density has a self-similar fractal distribution following the Kolmogorov turbulence theory. We obtain a scale free power law with the exponent that is not related to the input fluctuation mass spectrum but depends only on the fractal distribution dimensionalities of infalling gas (Dp) and turbulent ISM (Dm=2.35). It can be as steep as -3.24 (uniform volume density Dp=3) and becomes Salpeter (α=-2.35) for Dp=2.5 that corresponds to a variety of Brownian processes in physics. Our theory reproduces the observed DCMF shape over three orders of magnitude in mass, and it rules out a low mass star dominated "bottom-heavy" IMF shape unless the same steep slope holds at the higher masses.

  3. Habitable zones exposed: astrosphere collapse frequency as a function of stellar mass.

    PubMed

    Smith, David S; Scalo, John M

    2009-09-01

    Stellar astrospheres--the plasma cocoons carved out of the interstellar medium by stellar winds--are one of several buffers that partially screen planetary atmospheres and surfaces from high-energy radiation. Screening by astrospheres is continually influenced by the passage of stars through the fluctuating density field of the interstellar medium (ISM). The most extreme events occur inside dense interstellar clouds, where the increased pressure may compress an astrosphere to a size smaller than the liquid-water habitable-zone distance. Habitable planets then enjoy no astrospheric buffering from exposure to the full flux of galactic cosmic rays and interstellar dust and gas, a situation we call "descreening" or "astrospheric collapse." Under such conditions the ionization fraction in the atmosphere and contribution to radiation damage of putative coding organisms at the surface would increase significantly, and a series of papers have suggested a variety of global responses to descreening. These possibilities motivate a more careful calculation of the frequency of descreening events. Using a ram-pressure balance model, we compute the size of the astrosphere in the apex direction as a function of parent-star mass and velocity and ambient interstellar density, emphasizing the importance of gravitational focusing of the interstellar flow. The interstellar densities required to descreen planets in the habitable zone of solar- and subsolar-mass stars are found to be about 600(M/M[middle dot in circle])(-2) cm(-3) for the Sun's velocity relative to the local ISM. Such clouds are rare and small, indicating that descreening encounters are rare. We use statistics from two independent catalogues of dense interstellar clouds to derive a dependence of descreening frequency on the parent-star mass that decreases strongly with decreasing stellar mass, due to the weaker gravitational focusing and smaller habitable-zone distances for lower-mass stars. We estimate an uncertain

  4. Habitable Zones Exposed: Astrosphere Collapse Frequency as a Function of Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David S.; Scalo, John M.

    2009-09-01

    Stellar astrospheres -- the plasma cocoons carved out of the interstellar medium by stellar windsâ -- are one of several buffers that partially screen planetary atmospheres and surfaces from high-energy radiation. Screening by astrospheres is continually influenced by the passage of stars through the fluctuating density field of the interstellar medium (ISM). The most extreme events occur inside dense interstellar clouds, where the increased pressure may compress an astrosphere to a size smaller than the liquid-water habitable-zone distance. Habitable planets then enjoy no astrospheric buffering from exposure to the full flux of galactic cosmic rays and interstellar dust and gas, a situation we call "descreening" or "astrospheric collapse." Under such conditions the ionization fraction in the atmosphere and contribution to radiation damage of putative coding organisms at the surface would increase significantly, and a series of papers have suggested a variety of global responses to descreening. These possibilities motivate a more careful calculation of the frequency of descreening events. Using a ram-pressure balance model, we compute the size of the astrosphere in the apex direction as a function of parent-star mass and velocity and ambient interstellar density, emphasizing the importance of gravitational focusing of the interstellar flow. The interstellar densities required to descreen planets in the habitable zone of solar- and subsolar-mass stars are found to be about 600(M/M⊙)-2 cm-3 for the Sun's velocity relative to the local ISM. Such clouds are rare and small, indicating that descreening encounters are rare. We use statistics from two independent catalogues of dense interstellar clouds to derive a dependence of descreening frequency on the parent-star mass that decreases strongly with decreasing stellar mass, due to the weaker gravitational focusing and smaller habitable-zone distances for lower-mass stars. We estimate an uncertain upper limit to the

  5. ON THE TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTION IN GALACTIC CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, Francesco; Portegies Zwart, Simon E-mail: paresce@iasfbo.inaf.i

    2010-07-20

    We show that we can obtain a good fit to the present-day stellar mass functions (MFs) of a large sample of young and old Galactic clusters in the range 0.1-10 M{sub sun} with a tapered power-law distribution function with an exponential truncation of the form dN/dm{proportional_to}m{sup {alpha}} [1 -e{sup -}(m/m{sub c}){sup {beta}}]. The average value of the power-law index {alpha} is {approx}-2, that of {beta} is {approx}2.5, whereas the characteristic mass m{sub c} is in the range 0.1-0.8 M {sub sun} and does not seem to vary in any systematic way with the present cluster parameters such as metal abundance, total cluster mass, or central concentration. However, m{sub c} shows a remarkable correlation with the dynamical age of the cluster, namely, m{sub c} /M {sub sun} {approx_equal} 0.15 + 0.5 x {tau}{sup 3/4}{sub dyn}, where {tau}{sub dyn} is the dynamical age taken as the ratio of cluster age and dissolution time. The small scatter seen around this correlation is consistent with the uncertainties in the estimated value of {tau}{sub dyn}. We attribute the observed trend to the onset of mass segregation via two-body relaxation in a tidal environment, causing the preferential loss of low-mass stars from the cluster and hence a drift of the characteristic mass m{sub c} toward higher values. If dynamical evolution is indeed at the origin of the observed trend, it would seem plausible that high-concentration globular clusters, now with median m{sub c} {approx_equal} 0.33 M{sub sun}, were born with a stellar MF very similar to that measured today in the youngest Galactic clusters and with a value of m{sub c} {approx_equal} 0.15 M{sub sun}. This hypothesis is consistent with the absence of a turnover in the MF of the Galactic bulge down to the observational limit at {approx}0.2 M{sub sun} and, if correct, it would carry the implication that the characteristic mass is not set by the thermal Jeans mass of the cloud.

  6. PERSPECTIVES ON INTRACLUSTER ENRICHMENT AND THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenstein, Michael

    2013-08-10

    Stars formed in galaxy cluster potential wells must be responsible for the high level of enrichment measured in the intracluster medium (ICM); however, there is increasing tension between this truism and the parsimonious assumption that the stars in the generally old population studied optically in cluster galaxies emerged from the same formation sites at the same epochs. We construct a phenomenological cluster enrichment model to demonstrate that ICM elemental abundances are underestimated by a factor >2 for standard assumptions about the stellar population-a discrepancy we call the ''cluster elemental abundance paradox''. Recent evidence of an elliptical galaxy initial mass function (IMF) skewed to low masses deepens the paradox. We quantify the adjustments to the star formation efficiency and IMF, and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) production efficiency, required to resolve this while being consistent with the observed ICM abundance pattern. The necessary enhancement in metal enrichment may, in principle, originate in the observed stellar population if a larger fraction of stars in the supernova-progenitor mass range form from an IMF that is either bottom-light or top-heavy, with the latter in some conflict with observed ICM abundance ratios. Other alternatives that imply more modest revisions to the IMF, mass return and remnant fractions, and primordial fraction, posit an increase in the fraction of 3-8 M{sub Sun} stars that explode as SNIa or assume that there are more stars than conventionally thought-although the latter implies a high star formation efficiency. We discuss the feasibility of these various solutions and the implications for the diversity of star formation in the universe, the process of elliptical galaxy formation, and the origin of this ''hidden'' source of ICM metal enrichment.

  7. The MLP distribution: a modified lognormal power-law model for the stellar initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shantanu; Gil, M.; Auddy, Sayantan

    2015-05-01

    This work explores the mathematical properties of a distribution introduced by Basu & Jones (2004), and applies it to model the stellar initial mass function (IMF). The distribution arises simply from an initial lognormal distribution, requiring that each object in it subsequently undergoes exponential growth but with an exponential distribution of growth lifetimes. This leads to a modified lognormal with a power-law (MLP) distribution, which can in fact be applied to a wide range of fields where distributions are observed to have a lognormal-like body and a power-law tail. We derive important properties of the MLP distribution, like the cumulative distribution, the mean, variance, arbitrary raw moments, and a random number generator. These analytic properties of the distribution can be used to facilitate application to modelling the IMF. We demonstrate how the MLP function provides an excellent fit to the IMF compiled by Chabrier and how this fit can be used to quickly identify quantities like the mean, median, and mode, as well as number and mass fractions in different mass intervals.

  8. Biases in the inferred mass-to-light ratio of globular clusters: no need for variations in the stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Rosemary L.; Gieles, Mark

    2015-03-01

    From a study of the integrated light properties of 200 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, Strader et al. found that the mass-to-light ratios are lower than what is expected from simple stellar population models with a `canonical' stellar initial mass function (IMF), with the discrepancy being larger at high metallicities. We use dynamical multimass models, that include a prescription for equipartition, to quantify the bias in the inferred dynamical mass as the result of the assumption that light follows mass. For a universal IMF and a metallicity-dependent present-day mass function, we find that the inferred mass from integrated light properties systematically underestimates the true mass, and that the bias is more important at high metallicities, as was found for the M31 GCs. We show that mass segregation and a flattening of the mass function have opposing effects of similar magnitude on the mass inferred from integrated properties. This makes the mass-to-light ratio as derived from integrated properties an inadequate probe of the low-mass end of the stellar mass function. There is, therefore, no need for variations in the IMF, nor the need to invoke depletion of low-mass stars, to explain the observations. Finally, we find that the retention fraction of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is an equally important parameter in understanding the mass segregation bias. We speculatively put forward to idea that kinematical data of GCs can in fact be used to constrain the total mass in stellar-mass BHs in GCs.

  9. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. IV. A PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO INFERRING THE HIGH-MASS STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND OTHER POWER-LAW FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Clifton Johnson, L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel T.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Lang, Dustin; Bell, Eric F.; Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2013-01-10

    We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present-day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (1) fully exploits the information content of a given data set; (2) can account for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (3) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (4) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (5) can be applied to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high-mass stellar MF (M {approx}> 1 M {sub Sun }). Using simulated clusters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, {alpha}, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, {Delta}{alpha}, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and on the range of stellar masses they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are both well characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the theoretical precision, i.e., lower limits, on {alpha}, and provide an analytic approximation for {Delta}{alpha} as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. Comparison with literature studies shows that {approx}3/4 of quoted uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find that the literature studies yield ({alpha}) = 2.46, with a 1{sigma} dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the initial mass function, beyond the lower bound of the most massive star actually observed. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates, (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses, and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the

  10. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. IV. A Probabilistic Approach to Inferring the High-mass Stellar Initial Mass Function and Other Power-law Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hogg, David W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel T.; Lang, Dustin; Johnson, L. Clifton; Beerman, Lori C.; Bell, Eric F.; Gordon, Karl D.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Kalirai, Jason S.; Skillman, Evan D.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present-day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (1) fully exploits the information content of a given data set; (2) can account for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (3) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (4) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (5) can be applied to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high-mass stellar MF (M >~ 1 M ⊙). Using simulated clusters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, α, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, Δα, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and on the range of stellar masses they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are both well characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the theoretical precision, i.e., lower limits, on α, and provide an analytic approximation for Δα as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. Comparison with literature studies shows that ~3/4 of quoted uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find that the literature studies yield langαrang = 2.46, with a 1σ dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the initial mass function, beyond the lower bound of the most massive star actually observed. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates, (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses, and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the completeness for stars of a given mass. The precision on MF

  11. AN EMPIRICAL CONNECTION BETWEEN THE ULTRAVIOLET COLOR OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AND THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Gil de Paz, Armando; Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    Using new UV magnitudes for a sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) with published stellar mass-to-light ratios, Y{sub *}, we find a correlation between UV color and Y{sub *} that is tighter than those previously identified between Y{sub *} and either the central stellar velocity dispersion, metallicity, or alpha enhancement. The sense of the correlation is that galaxies with larger Y{sub *} are bluer in the UV. We conjecture that differences in the lower mass end of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) are related to the nature of the extreme horizontal branch populations that are generally responsible for the UV flux in ETGs. If so, then UV color can be used to identify ETGs with particular IMF properties and to estimate Y{sub *}.

  12. DARK MATTER CONTRACTION AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DISFAVORING 'LIGHT' INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M. W.; Treu, T.; Gavazzi, R.; Bolton, A. S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Marshall, P. J.

    2010-10-01

    We use stellar dynamics, strong lensing, stellar population synthesis models, and weak lensing shear measurements to constrain the dark matter (DM) profile and stellar mass in a sample of 53 massive early-type galaxies. We explore three DM halo models (unperturbed Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW) halos and the adiabatic contraction models of Blumenthal and Gnedin) and impose a model for the relationship between the stellar and virial mass (i.e., a relationship for the star formation efficiency as a function of halo mass). We show that, given our model assumptions, the data clearly prefer a Salpeter-like initial mass function (IMF) over a lighter IMF (e.g., Chabrier or Kroupa), irrespective of the choice of DM halo. In addition, we find that the data prefer at most a moderate amount of adiabatic contraction (Blumenthal adiabatic contraction is strongly disfavored) and are only consistent with no adiabatic contraction (i.e., an NFW halo) if a mass-dependent IMF is assumed, in the sense of a more massive normalization of the IMF for more massive halos.

  13. VARIATIONS IN THE MASS FUNCTIONS OF CLUSTERED AND ISOLATED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, Philip C.

    2012-02-01

    We analyze high-quality, complete stellar catalogs for four young (roughly 1 Myr) and nearby (within {approx}300 pc) star-forming regions: Taurus, Lupus3, ChaI, and IC348, which have been previously shown to have stellar groups whose properties are similar to those of larger clusters such as the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). We find that stars at higher stellar surface densities within a region or belonging to groups tend to have a relative excess of more massive stars, over a wide range of masses. We find statistically significant evidence for this result in Taurus and IC348 as well as in the ONC. These differences correspond to having typically a {approx}10%-20% higher mean mass in the more clustered environment. Stars in ChaI show no evidence for a trend with either surface density or grouped status, and there are too few stars in Lupus3 to make any definitive interpretation. Models of clustered star formation do not typically extend to sufficiently low masses or small group sizes in order for their predictions to be tested, but our results suggest that this regime is important to consider.

  14. THE GALEX ARECIBO SDSS SURVEY. VII. THE BIVARIATE NEUTRAL HYDROGEN-STELLAR MASS FUNCTION FOR MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonias, Jenna J.; Schiminovich, David; Catinella, Barbara; Heckman, Timothy M.; Moran, Sean M.

    2013-10-20

    We present the bivariate neutral atomic hydrogen (H I)-stellar mass function (HISMF) φ(M{sub H{sub I}}, M{sub *}) for massive (log M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} \\gt 10) galaxies derived from a sample of 480 local (0.025 < z < 0.050) galaxies observed in H I at Arecibo as part of the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey. We fit six different models to the HISMF and find that a Schechter function that extends down to a 1% H I gas fraction, with an additional fractional contribution below that limit, is the best parameterization of the HISMF. We calculate Ω{sub H{sub I,{sub M{sub *>10{sup 1}{sup 0}}}}} and find that massive galaxies contribute 41% of the H I density in the local universe. In addition to the binned HISMF, we derive a continuous bivariate fit, which reveals that the Schechter parameters only vary weakly with stellar mass: M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}}, the characteristic H I mass, scales as M{sub *}{sup 0.39}; α, the slope of the HISMF at moderate H I masses, scales as M{sub *}{sup 0.07}; and f, the fraction of galaxies with H I gas fraction greater than 1%, scales as M{sub *}{sup -0.24}. The variation of f with stellar mass should be a strong constraint for numerical simulations. To understand the physical mechanisms that produce the shape of the HISMF, we redefine the parameters of the Schechter function as explicit functions of stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) to produce a trivariate fit. This analysis reveals strong trends with SFR. While M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}} varies weakly with stellar mass and SFR (M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}} ∝ M{sub *}{sup 0.22}, M{sub H{sub I}{sup *}} ∝ SFR{sup –0.03}), α is a stronger function of both stellar mass and especially SFR (α ∝ M{sub *}{sup 0.47}, α ∝ SFR{sup 0.95}). The HISMF is a crucial tool that can be used to constrain cosmological galaxy simulations, test observational predictions of the H I content of populations of galaxies, and identify galaxies whose properties deviate from average trends.

  15. TRENDS IN MOLECULAR EMISSION FROM DIFFERENT EXTRAGALACTIC STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, M.; Viti, S.; Williams, D. A.

    2009-10-01

    Banerji et al. suggested that top-heavy stellar initial mass functions (IMFs) in galaxies may arise when the interstellar physical conditions inhibit low-mass star formation, and they determined the physical conditions under which this suppression may or may not occur. In this work, we explore the sensitivity of the chemistry of interstellar gas under a wide range of conditions. We use these results to predict the relative velocity-integrated antenna temperatures of the CO rotational spectrum for several models of high-redshift active galaxies which may produce both top-heavy and unbiased IMFs. We find that while active galaxies with solar metallicity (and top-heavy IMFs) produce higher antenna temperatures than those with subsolar metallicity (and unbiased IMFs), the actual rotational distribution is similar. The high-J to peak CO ratio however may be used to roughly infer the metallicity of a galaxy provided we know whether it is active or quiescent. The metallicity strongly influences the shape of the IMF. High-order CO transitions are also found to provide a good diagnostic for high far-UV intensity and low metallicity counterparts of Milky Way type systems both of which show some evidence for having top-heavy IMFs. We also compute the relative abundances of molecules known to be effective tracers of high-density gas in these galaxy models. We find that the molecules CO and CS may be used to distinguish between solar and subsolar metallicities in active galaxies at high redshift whereas HCN, HNC, and CN are found to be relatively insensitive to the IMF shape at the large visual magnitudes typically associated with extragalactic sources.

  16. Stellar mass and color dependence of the three-point correlation function of galaxies in the local universe

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hong; Li, Cheng; Jing, Y. P.; Börner, Gerhard

    2014-01-10

    The three-point correlation function (3PCF) for galaxies provides an opportunity to measure the non-Gaussianity generated from nonlinear structure formation and also probes information about galaxy formation and evolution that is generally not available from the two-point correlation function (2PCF). We measure the 3PCF of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 main sample galaxies in both redshift and projected spaces on scales up to 40 h {sup –1} Mpc. We explore the dependence of the 3PCF on galaxy stellar mass and color in order to constrain the formation and evolution for galaxies of different properties. The study of the dependence on these properties also helps better constrain the relation between galaxy stellar mass and color and the properties of their hosting dark-matter halos. We focus on the study of the reduced 3PCF, Q, defined as the ratio between the 3PCF and the sum of the products of the 2PCFs. We find a very weak stellar-mass dependence of Q in both redshift and projected spaces. On small scales, more massive galaxies tend to have slightly higher amplitudes of Q. The shape dependence of Q is also weak on these small scales, regardless of stellar mass and color. The reduced 3PCF has a strong color dependence for the low-mass galaxies, while no significant dependence on color is found for the high-mass galaxies. Low-mass red galaxies have higher amplitudes and stronger shape dependence of the reduced 3PCF than the blue galaxies, implying that these low-mass red galaxies tend to populate filamentary structures. The linear galaxy bias model fails to interpret the color dependence of Q, emphasizing the importance of a nonvanishing quadratic bias parameter in the correct modeling of the galaxy color distribution.

  17. Color-magnitude relations within globular cluster systems of giant elliptical galaxies: The effects of globular cluster mass loss and the stellar initial mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik E-mail: kruijssen@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have provided evidence for a 'bottom-heavy' stellar initial mass function (IMF) in massive elliptical galaxies. Here we investigate the influence of the IMF shape on the recently discovered color-magnitude relation (CMR) among globular clusters (GCs) in such galaxies. To this end we use calculations of GC mass loss due to stellar and dynamical evolution to evaluate (1) the shapes of stellar mass functions in GCs after 12 Gyr of evolution as a function of current GC mass along with their effects on integrated-light colors and mass-to-light ratios, and (2) their impact on the effects of GC self-enrichment using the 2009 'reference' model of Bailin and Harris. As to the class of metal-poor GCs, we find the observed shape of the CMR (often referred to as the 'blue tilt') to be very well reproduced by Bailin and Harris's reference self-enrichment model once 12 Gyr of GC mass loss is taken into account. The influence of the IMF on this result is found to be insignificant. However, we find that the observed CMR among the class of metal-rich GCs (the 'red tilt') can only be adequately reproduced if the IMF was bottom-heavy (–3.0 ≲ α ≲ –2.3 in dN/dM∝M{sup α}), which causes the stellar mass function at subsolar masses to depend relatively strongly on GC mass. This constitutes additional evidence that the metal-rich stellar populations in giant elliptical galaxies were formed with a bottom-heavy IMF.

  18. The local stellar luminosity function and mass-to-light ratio in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, A.; Fuchs, B.; Jahreiß, H.; Flynn, C.; Dettbarn, C.; Rybizki, J.

    2015-07-01

    A new sample of stars, representative of the solar neighbourhood luminosity function (LF), is constructed from the Hipparcos catalogue and the Fifth Catalogue of Nearby Stars. We have cross-matched to sources in the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalogue so that for all stars individually determined near-infrared (NIR) photometry is available on a homogeneous system (typically Ks). The spatial completeness of the sample has been carefully determined by statistical methods, and the NIR LF of the stars has been derived by direct star counts. We find a local volume luminosity of 0.121 ± 0.004 LK⊙ pc-3, corresponding to a volumetric mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of M/L_K = 0.31 ± 0.02 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}, where giants contribute 80 per cent to the light but less than 2 per cent to the stellar mass. We derive the surface brightness of the solar cylinder with the help of a vertical disc model. We find a surface brightness of 99 LK⊙ pc-2 with an uncertainty of approximately 10 per cent. This corresponds to an M/L for the solar cylinder of M/L_K = 0.34 {M}_{⊙}/L_{K⊙}. The M/L for the solar cylinder is only 10 per cent larger than the local value despite the fact that the local population has a much larger contribution of young stars. It turns out that the effective scaleheights of the lower main sequence carrying most of the mass is similar to that of the giants, which are dominating the NIR light. The corresponding colour for the solar cylinder is V - K = 2.89 mag compared to the local value of V - K = 2.46 mag. An extrapolation of the local surface brightness to the whole Milky Way yields a total luminosity of MK = -24.2 mag. The Milky Way falls in the range of K band Tully-Fisher relations from the literature.

  19. Dead, Undead, and Zombie Zones in Protostellar Disks as a Function of Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Ercolano, Barbara; Turner, Neal J.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the viability of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in X-ray ionized viscous accretion disks around both solar-type stars and very low mass stars. In particular, we determine the disk regions where the MRI can be shut off either by Ohmic resistivity (the so-called dead and undead zones) or by ambipolar diffusion (a region we term the zombie zone). We consider two stellar masses: M * = 0.7 M ⊙ and 0.1 M ⊙. In each case, we assume that: the disk surface density profile is that of a scaled Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, with M disk/M * = 0.01 as suggested by current data; disk ionization is driven primarily by stellar X-rays, complemented by cosmic rays and radionuclides; and the stellar X-ray luminosity scales with bolometric luminosity as LX /L * ≈ 10-3.5, as observed. Ionization rates are calculated with the MOCCASIN Monte Carlo X-ray transport code, and ionization balance determined using a simplified chemical network, including well-mixed 0.1 μm grains at various levels of depletion. We find that (1) ambipolar diffusion is the primary factor controlling MRI activity in disks around both solar-type and very low mass classical T Tauri stars. Assuming that the MRI yields the maximum possible field strength at each radius, we further find that: (2) the MRI-active layer constitutes only ~5%-10% of the total disk mass; (3) the accretion rate (\\dot{M}) varies radially in both magnitude and sign (inward or outward), implying time-variable accretion as well as the creation of disk gaps and overdensities, with consequences for planet formation and migration; (4) achieving the empirical accretion rates in solar-type and very low mass stars requires a depletion of well-mixed small grains (via grain growth and/or settling) by a factor of 10-1000 relative to the standard dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10-2 and (5) the current non-detection of polarized emission from field-aligned grains in the outer disk regions is consistent with active MRI at those radii.

  20. DEAD, UNDEAD, AND ZOMBIE ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Ercolano, Barbara; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: ercolano@usm.lmu.de

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the viability of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in X-ray ionized viscous accretion disks around both solar-type stars and very low mass stars. In particular, we determine the disk regions where the MRI can be shut off either by Ohmic resistivity (the so-called dead and undead zones) or by ambipolar diffusion (a region we term the zombie zone). We consider two stellar masses: M {sub *} = 0.7 M {sub Sun} and 0.1 M {sub Sun }. In each case, we assume that: the disk surface density profile is that of a scaled Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, with M {sub disk}/M {sub *} = 0.01 as suggested by current data; disk ionization is driven primarily by stellar X-rays, complemented by cosmic rays and radionuclides; and the stellar X-ray luminosity scales with bolometric luminosity as L{sub X} /L {sub *} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3.5}, as observed. Ionization rates are calculated with the MOCCASIN Monte Carlo X-ray transport code, and ionization balance determined using a simplified chemical network, including well-mixed 0.1 {mu}m grains at various levels of depletion. We find that (1) ambipolar diffusion is the primary factor controlling MRI activity in disks around both solar-type and very low mass classical T Tauri stars. Assuming that the MRI yields the maximum possible field strength at each radius, we further find that: (2) the MRI-active layer constitutes only {approx}5%-10% of the total disk mass; (3) the accretion rate ( M-dot ) varies radially in both magnitude and sign (inward or outward), implying time-variable accretion as well as the creation of disk gaps and overdensities, with consequences for planet formation and migration; (4) achieving the empirical accretion rates in solar-type and very low mass stars requires a depletion of well-mixed small grains (via grain growth and/or settling) by a factor of 10-1000 relative to the standard dust-to-gas mass ratio of 10{sup -2}; and (5) the current non-detection of polarized emission from field

  1. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts. I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Pozzetti, L.; Cucciati, O.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Measuring environment for large numbers of galaxies in the distant Universe is an open problem in astrophysics, as environment is important in determining many properties of galaxies during their formation and evolution. In order to measure galaxy environments, we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic redshifts. Aims: We study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how the reconstruction of the density field may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Methods: Through the use of mock galaxy catalogues, we measured galaxy environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the parameters defining the fixed aperture volume and explored different configurations. We also used photometric redshifts with different uncertainties to simulate the case of various surveys. We then computed GSMF of the mock galaxy catalogues as a function of redshift and environment to see how the environmental estimate based on photometric redshifts affects their analysis. Results: We found that the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with σΔz/ (1 + z) ≲ 0.01, with a fraction ≥ 60 ÷ 80% of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of ≤10% by opposite quartile interlopers. A length of the volume in the radial direction comparable to the ±1.5σ error of photometric redshifts and a fixed aperture radius of a size similar to the physical scale of the studied environment grant a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using this kind of an estimate of the density field, we found that any difference between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment

  2. THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTION OF GALAXIES FROM z = 4.0 AND THE FIRST COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF ITS UNCERTAINTIES: EVIDENCE FOR MASS-DEPENDENT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Danilo; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Wuyts, Stijn

    2009-08-20

    We present the evolution of the stellar mass function (SMF) of galaxies from z = 4.0 to z = 1.3 measured from a sample constructed from the deep near-infrared Multi-wavelength Survey by Yale-Chile, the Faint Infrared Extragalactic Survey, and the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-Chandra Deep Field South surveys, all having very high-quality optical to mid-infrared data. This sample, unique in that it combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowed us to (1) minimize the uncertainty due to cosmic variance and empirically quantify its contribution to the total error budget; (2) simultaneously probe the high-mass end and the low-mass end (down to {approx}0.05 times the characteristic stellar mass) of the SMF with good statistics; and (3) empirically derive the redshift-dependent completeness limits in stellar mass. We provide, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of random and systematic uncertainties affecting the derived SMFs, including the effect of metallicity, extinction law, stellar population synthesis model, and initial mass function. We find that the mass density evolves by a factor of {approx}17{sup +7}{sub -10} since z = 4.0, mostly driven by a change in the normalization {phi}*. If only random errors are taken into account, we find evidence for mass-dependent evolution, with the low-mass end evolving more rapidly than the high-mass end. However, we show that this result is no longer robust when systematic uncertainties due to the SED-modeling assumptions are taken into account. Another significant uncertainty is the contribution to the overall stellar mass density of galaxies below our mass limit; future studies with WFC3 will provide better constraints on the SMF at masses below 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} at z>2. Taking our results at face value, we find that they are in conflict with semianalytic models of galaxy formation. The models predict SMFs that are in general too steep, with too many

  3. Ages of young star clusters, massive blue stragglers, and the upper mass limit of stars: Analyzing age-dependent stellar mass functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, F. R. N.; Izzard, R. G.; Langer, N.; Stolte, A.; Hußmann, B.; De Mink, S. E.; De Koter, A.; Sana, H.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Liermann, A.

    2014-01-10

    Massive stars rapidly change their masses through strong stellar winds and mass transfer in binary systems. The latter aspect is important for populations of massive stars as more than 70% of all O stars are expected to interact with a binary companion during their lifetime. We show that such mass changes leave characteristic signatures in stellar mass functions of young star clusters that can be used to infer their ages and to identify products of binary evolution. We model the observed present-day mass functions of the young Galactic Arches and Quintuplet star clusters using our rapid binary evolution code. We find that the shaping of the mass function by stellar wind mass loss allows us to determine the cluster ages as 3.5 ± 0.7 Myr and 4.8 ± 1.1 Myr, respectively. Exploiting the effects of binary mass exchange on the cluster mass function, we find that the most massive stars in both clusters are rejuvenated products of binary mass transfer, i.e., the massive counterpart of classical blue straggler stars. This resolves the problem of an apparent age spread among the most luminous stars exceeding the expected duration of star formation in these clusters. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to probe stochastic sampling, which support the idea of the most massive stars being rejuvenated binary products. We find that the most massive star is expected to be a binary product after 1.0 ± 0.7 Myr in Arches and after 1.7 ± 1.0 Myr in Quintuplet. Today, the most massive 9 ± 3 stars in Arches and 8 ± 3 in Quintuplet are expected to be such objects. Our findings have strong implications for the stellar upper mass limit and solve the discrepancy between the claimed 150 M {sub ☉} limit and observations of four stars with initial masses of 165-320 M {sub ☉} in R136 and of supernova 2007bi, which is thought to be a pair-instability supernova from an initial 250 M {sub ☉} star. Using the stellar population of R136, we revise the upper mass limit to values in the range

  4. Stellar Mass Distributions in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, D.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2011-01-01

    We present the radial distributions of the stellar mass and the star formation histories for a large sample of dwarf irregular galaxies assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/index.html). Specifically, utilizing the multi-band data including FUV/NUV/UBV/Hα/3.6μm, and with the CB07 stellar population synthesis models, we analyze the variations of the SEDs as a function of radius. By studying the relationship between the stellar mass, star formation histories, star formation and HI gas, we will discuss the possible star formation modes and the roles played by the stellar mass and gas in determining the star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies in general. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation (AST-0707563).

  5. Explaining the Stellar Initial Mass Function with the Theory of Spatial Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klishin, Andrei A.; Chilingarian, Igor

    2016-06-01

    The distributions of stars and prestellar cores by mass (initial and dense core mass functions, IMF/DCMF) are among the key factors regulating star formation and are the subject of detailed theoretical and observational studies. Results from numerical simulations of star formation qualitatively resemble an observed mass function, a scale-free power law with a sharp decline at low masses. However, most analytic IMF theories critically depend on the empirically chosen input spectrum of mass fluctuations which evolve into dense cores and, subsequently, stars, and on the scaling relation between the amplitude and mass of a fluctuation. Here we propose a new approach exploiting techniques from the field of network science. We represent a system of dense cores accreting gas from the surrounding diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) as a spatial network growing by preferential attachment and assume that the ISM density has a self-similar fractal distribution following the Kolmogorov turbulence theory. We effectively combine gravoturbulent and competitive accretion approaches and predict the accretion rate to be proportional to the dense core mass: {dM}/{dt}\\propto M. Then we describe the dense core growth and demonstrate that the power-law core mass function emerges independently of the initial distribution of density fluctuations by mass. Our model yields a power law solely defined by the fractal dimensionalities of the ISM and accreting gas. With a proper choice of the low-mass cut-off, it reproduces observations over three decades in mass. We also rule out a low-mass star dominated “bottom-heavy” IMF in a single star-forming region.

  6. The VMC Survey. XVIII. Radial Dependence of the Low-mass, 0.55--0.82 M Stellar Mass Function in the Galactic Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chaoli; Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Bekki, Kenji; Deng, Licai; Zaggia, Simone; Rubele, Stefano; Piatti, Andrés E.; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; Emerson, Jim; For, Bi-Qing; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Chen, Li

    2015-12-01

    We use near-infrared observations obtained as part of the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) Survey of the Magellanic Clouds (VMC), as well as two complementary Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data sets, to study the luminosity and mass functions (MFs) as a function of clustercentric radius of the main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae. The HST observations indicate a relative deficit in the numbers of faint stars in the central region of the cluster compared with its periphery, for 18.75 ≤ mF606W ≤ 20.9 mag (corresponding to a stellar mass range of 0.55 < m*/M⊙ < 0.73). The stellar number counts at 6.‧7 from the cluster core show a deficit for 17.62 ≤ mF606W ≤ 19.7 mag (i.e., 0.65 < m*/M⊙ < 0.82), which is consistent with expectations from mass segregation. The VMC-based stellar MFs exhibit power-law shapes for masses in the range 0.55 < m*/M⊙ < 0.82. These power laws are characterized by an almost constant slope, α. The radial distribution of the power-law slopes α thus shows evidence of the importance of both mass segregation and tidal stripping, for both the first- and second-generation stars in 47 Tuc.

  7. Significantly improving stellar mass and radius estimates: a new reference function for the Δν scaling relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Bellinger, Earl

    2016-08-01

    The scaling relations between global asteroseismic observables and stellar properties are widely used to estimate masses and radii of stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. Since the mass and radius of the Sun are known independently, the Sun is commonly used as a reference to scale to. However, the validity of the scaling relations depends on the homology between the star under study and the reference star. Solar-like oscillators span a wide range of masses and metallicities, as well as evolutionary phases. Most of these stars are therefore not homologous to the Sun. This leads to errors of up to 10% (5%) in mass (radius) when using the asteroseismic scaling relations with the Sun as the reference. In this paper we derive a reference function to replace the solar-reference value used in the large-frequency-separation scaling relation. Our function is the first that depends on both effective temperature and metallicity, and is applicable from the end of the main sequence to just above the bump on the red giant branch. This reference function improves the estimates of masses and radii determined through scaling relations by a factor of 2, i.e. allows masses and radii to be recovered with an accuracy of 5% and 2%, respectively.

  8. Significantly improving stellar mass and radius estimates: a new reference function for the Δν scaling relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Bellinger, Earl

    2016-08-01

    The scaling relations between global asteroseismic observables and stellar properties are widely used to estimate masses and radii of stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. Since the mass and radius of the Sun are known independently, the Sun is commonly used as a reference to scale to. However, the validity of the scaling relations depends on the homology between the star under study and the reference star. Solar-like oscillators span a wide range of masses and metallicities, as well as evolutionary phases. Most of these stars are therefore not homologous to the Sun. This leads to errors of up to 10 per cent (5 per cent) in mass (radius) when using the asteroseismic scaling relations with the Sun as the reference. In this paper, we derive a reference function to replace the solar-reference value used in the large-frequency separation scaling relation. Our function is the first that depends on both effective temperature and metallicity, and is applicable from the end of the main sequence to just above the bump on the red giant branch. This reference function improves the estimates of masses and radii determined through scaling relations by a factor of 2, i.e. allows masses and radii to be recovered with an accuracy of 5 per cent and 2 per cent, respectively.

  9. Significantly improving stellar mass and radius estimates: A new reference function for the Δν scaling relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Bellinger, Earl

    2016-06-01

    The scaling relations between global asteroseismic observables and stellar properties are widely used to estimate masses and radii of stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. Since the mass and radius of the Sun are known independently, the Sun is commonly used as a reference to scale to. However, the validity of the scaling relations depends on the homology between the star under study and the reference star. Solar-like oscillators span a wide range of masses and metallicities, as well as evolutionary phases. Most of these stars are therefore not homologous to the Sun. This leads to errors of up to 10% (5%) in mass (radius) when using the asteroseismic scaling relations with the Sun as the reference. In this paper we derive a reference function to replace the solar-reference value used in the large-frequency-separation scaling relation. Our function is the first that depends on both effective temperature and metallicity, and is applicable from the end of the main sequence to just above the bump on the red giant branch. This reference function improves the estimates of masses and radii determined through scaling relations by a factor of 2, i.e. allows masses and radii to be recovered with an accuracy of 5% and 2%, respectively.

  10. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR IMF VARIATIONS WITH GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Geha, Marla; Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Simon, Joshua D.; Kirby, Evan N.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Guhathakurta, Puragra E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu

    2013-07-01

    We present constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in two ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Hercules and Leo IV, based on deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. The Hercules and Leo IV galaxies are extremely low luminosity (M{sub V} = -6.2, -5.5), metal-poor (([Fe/H]) = -2.4, -2.5) systems that have old stellar populations (>11 Gyr). Because they have long relaxation times, we can directly measure the low-mass stellar IMF by counting stars below the main-sequence turnoff without correcting for dynamical evolution. Over the stellar mass range probed by our data, 0.52-0.77 M{sub Sun }, the IMF is best fit by a power-law slope of {alpha}= 1.2{sub -0.5}{sup +0.4} for Hercules and {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.8 for Leo IV. For Hercules, the IMF slope is more shallow than a Salpeter ({alpha} = 2.35) IMF at the 5.8{sigma} level, and a Kroupa ({alpha} = 2.3 above 0.5 M{sub Sun }) IMF slope at 5.4{sigma} level. We simultaneously fit for the binary fraction, f{sub binary}, finding f{sub binary}= 0.47{sup +0.16}{sub -0.14} for Hercules, and 0.47{sup +0.37}{sub -0.17} for Leo IV. The UFD binary fractions are consistent with that inferred for Milky Way stars in the same mass range, despite very different metallicities. In contrast, the IMF slopes in the UFDs are shallower than other galactic environments. In the mass range 0.5-0.8 M{sub Sun }, we see a trend across the handful of galaxies with directly measured IMFs such that the power-law slopes become shallower (more bottom-light) with decreasing galactic velocity dispersion and metallicity. This trend is qualitatively consistent with results in elliptical galaxies inferred via indirect methods and is direct evidence for IMF variations with galactic environment.

  11. STOCHASTIC STAR FORMATION AND A (NEARLY) UNIFORM STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Michele; Krumholz, Mark R.; Da Silva, Robert L.

    2011-11-10

    Recent observations indicate a lower H{alpha} to FUV ratio in dwarf galaxies than in brighter systems, a trend that could be explained by a truncated and/or steeper initial mass function (IMF) in small galaxies. However, at low star formation rates (SFRs), the H{alpha} to FUV ratio can vary due to stochastic sampling even for a universal IMF, a hypothesis that has, prior to this work, received limited investigation. Using SLUG, a fully stochastic code for synthetic photometry in star clusters and galaxies, we compare the H{alpha} and FUV luminosity in a sample of {approx}450 nearby galaxies with models drawn from a universal Kroupa IMF and a modified IMF, the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF). Once random sampling and time evolution are included, a Kroupa IMF convolved with the cluster mass function (CMF) reproduces the observed H{alpha} distribution at all FUV luminosities, while a truncated IMF as implemented in current IGIMF models underpredicts the H{alpha} luminosity by more than an order of magnitude at the lowest SFRs. We conclude that the observed luminosity is the result of the joint probability distribution function of the SFR, CMF, and a universal IMF, consistent with parts of the IGIMF theory, but that a truncation in the IMF in clusters is inconsistent with the observations. Future work will examine stochastic star formation and its time dependence in detail to study whether random sampling can explain other observations that suggest a varying IMF.

  12. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM ABSORPTION LINE SPECTROSCOPY. I. DATA AND EMPIRICAL TRENDS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Conroy, Charlie

    2012-11-20

    The strength of gravity-sensitive absorption lines in the integrated light of old stellar populations is one of the few direct probes of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) outside of the Milky Way. Owing to the advent of fully depleted CCDs with little or no fringing it has recently become possible to obtain accurate measurements of these features. Here, we present spectra covering the wavelength ranges 0.35-0.55 {mu}m and 0.72-1.03 {mu}m for the bulge of M31 and 34 early-type galaxies from the SAURON sample, obtained with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer on Keck. The signal-to-noise ratio is {approx}> 200 A{sup -1} out to 1 {mu}m, which is sufficient to measure gravity-sensitive features for individual galaxies and to determine how they depend on other properties of the galaxies. Combining the new data with previously obtained spectra for globular clusters in M31 and the most massive elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster, we find that the dwarf-sensitive Na I {lambda}8183, 8195 doublet and the FeH {lambda}9916 Wing-Ford band increase systematically with velocity dispersion, while the giant-sensitive Ca II {lambda}8498, 8542, 8662 triplet decreases with dispersion. These trends are consistent with a varying IMF, such that galaxies with deeper potential wells have more dwarf-enriched mass functions. In a companion paper, we use a comprehensive stellar population synthesis model to demonstrate that IMF effects can be separated from age and abundance variations and quantify the IMF variation among early-type galaxies.

  13. The Luminosity and Stellar Mass Functions of Red W1-W2 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. A.; Rosenberg, J. L.; Satyapal, S.; Secrest, N. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of nearby galaxies as a function of their [3.4]-[4.6] colour. Galaxies that are red in their [3.4]-[4.6] colour contain heated dust and the reddest systems ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.5) are classified as AGN by some selection criteria. The sample discussed here includes nearby galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that are also in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogue. We calculate the number density of galaxies, in the form of the luminosity and mass functions, using the V/Vmax method and a Stepwise Maximum Likelihood method that has been modified to account for the additional colour selection. The reddest galaxies which have [3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8 and are sometimes classified as AGN by their colour, make up 0.2% of nearby galaxies. However, the reddest galaxies are a rising fraction of the low mass galaxy population. Identifying the lowest mass (M < 108M⊙) red ([3.4]-[4.6] > 0.8) galaxies as AGN is surprising given that none are optical AGN or composites, in contrast with their more massive (M > 1010M⊙) red galaxy counterparts that are dominated by optical AGN and composites (86.4%). We also show that these low mass red galaxies are associated with higher specific star formation rates than their bluer counterparts. While the properties of this relatively rare segment of nearby low-mass galaxies are intriguing, particularly if they are associated with AGN activity, there is not yet enough evidence to determine whether it is AGN or unusual star formation that is driving red colours in these systems.

  14. SPIDER VIII - constraints on the stellar initial mass function of early-type galaxies from a variety of spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Barbera, F.; Ferreras, I.; Vazdekis, A.; de la Rosa, I. G.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ricciardelli, E.

    2013-08-01

    We perform a spectroscopic study to constrain the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by using a large sample of 24 781 early-type galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-based Spheroids Panchromatic Investigation in Different Environmental Regions survey. Clear evidence is found of a trend between IMF and central velocity dispersion (σ0), evolving from a standard Kroupa/Chabrier IMF at σ0 ˜ 100 km s-1 towards a more bottom-heavy IMF with increasing σ0, becoming steeper than the Salpeter function at σ0 ≳ 220 km s-1. We analyse a variety of spectral indices, combining gravity-sensitive features, with age- and metallicity-sensitive indices, and we also consider the effect of non-solar abundance variations. The indices, corrected to solar scale by means of semi-empirical correlations, are fitted simultaneously with the (nearly solar-scaled) extended MILES (MIUSCAT) stellar population models. Similar conclusions are reached when analysing the spectra with a hybrid approach, combining constraints from direct spectral fitting in the optical with those from IMF-sensitive indices. Our analysis suggests that σ0, rather than [α/Fe], drives the variation of the IMF. Although our analysis cannot discriminate between a single power-law (unimodal) IMF and a low-mass (≲0.5 M⊙) tapered (bimodal) IMF, robust constraints can be inferred for the fraction in low-mass stars at birth. This fraction (by mass) is found to increase from ˜20 per cent at σ0 ˜ 100 km s-1, up to ˜80 per cent at σ0 ˜ 300 km s-1. However, additional constraints can be provided with stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratios: unimodal models predict M/L significantly larger than dynamical M/L, across the whole σ0 range, whereas a bimodal IMF is compatible. Our results are robust against individual abundance variations. No significant variation is found in Na and Ca in addition to the expected change from the correlation between [α/Fe] and σ0.

  15. The Evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function at z = 4–8: A Steepening Low-mass-end Slope with Increasing Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mimi; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Grazian, A.; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey; Salmon, Brett; Somerville, Rachel S.; Dickinson, Mark; Duncan, K.; Faber, Sandy M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Lee, Seong-Kook; Merlin, Emiliano; Willner, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) at z = 4–8 from a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) selected sample of ∼4500 galaxies, found via photometric redshifts over an area of ∼280 arcmin2 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS)/Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deepest Spitzer/IRAC data to date and the relatively large volume allow us to place a better constraint at both the low- and high-mass ends of the GSMFs compared to previous space-based studies from pre-CANDELS observations. Supplemented by a stacking analysis, we find a linear correlation between the rest-frame UV absolute magnitude at 1500 Å ({M}{{UV}}) and logarithmic stellar mass ({log}{M}* ) that holds for galaxies with {log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )≲ 10. We use simulations to validate our method of measuring the slope of the {log}{M}* –M UV relation, finding that the bias is minimized with a hybrid technique combining photometry of individual bright galaxies with stacked photometry for faint galaxies. The resultant measured slopes do not significantly evolve over z = 4–8, while the normalization of the trend exhibits a weak evolution toward lower masses at higher redshift. We combine the {log}{M}* –M UV distribution with observed rest-frame UV luminosity functions at each redshift to derive the GSMFs, finding that the low-mass-end slope becomes steeper with increasing redshift from α =-{1.55}-0.07+0.08 at z = 4 to α =-{2.25}-0.35+0.72 at z = 8. The inferred stellar mass density, when integrated over {M}* ={10}8–1013 M ⊙, increases by a factor of {10}-2+30 between z = 7 and z = 4 and is in good agreement with the time integral of the cosmic star formation rate density.

  16. The Evolution of the Stellar Mass Function of Galaxies from z = 4.0 and the First Comprehensive Analysis of its Uncertainties: Evidence for Mass-Dependent Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, Danilo; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo; Wuyts, Stijn

    2009-08-01

    We present the evolution of the stellar mass function (SMF) of galaxies from z = 4.0 to z = 1.3 measured from a sample constructed from the deep near-infrared Multi-wavelength Survey by Yale-Chile, the Faint Infrared Extragalactic Survey, and the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-Chandra Deep Field South surveys, all having very high-quality optical to mid-infrared data. This sample, unique in that it combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowed us to (1) minimize the uncertainty due to cosmic variance and empirically quantify its contribution to the total error budget; (2) simultaneously probe the high-mass end and the low-mass end (down to ~0.05 times the characteristic stellar mass) of the SMF with good statistics; and (3) empirically derive the redshift-dependent completeness limits in stellar mass. We provide, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of random and systematic uncertainties affecting the derived SMFs, including the effect of metallicity, extinction law, stellar population synthesis model, and initial mass function. We find that the mass density evolves by a factor of ~17+7 -10 since z = 4.0, mostly driven by a change in the normalization Φsstarf. If only random errors are taken into account, we find evidence for mass-dependent evolution, with the low-mass end evolving more rapidly than the high-mass end. However, we show that this result is no longer robust when systematic uncertainties due to the SED-modeling assumptions are taken into account. Another significant uncertainty is the contribution to the overall stellar mass density of galaxies below our mass limit; future studies with WFC3 will provide better constraints on the SMF at masses below 1010 M sun at z>2. Taking our results at face value, we find that they are in conflict with semianalytic models of galaxy formation. The models predict SMFs that are in general too steep, with too many low-mass galaxies and too few high-mass

  17. Perspectives on Intracluster Enrichment and the Stellar Initial Mass Function in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stars born in galaxy cluster potential wells must be responsible for the high level of enrichment measured in the intracluster medium; however, there is increasing tension between this truism and the parsimonious assumption that the stars in the generally old population studied optically in cluster galaxies emerged from the same formation sites at the same epochs. We show that star formation that produces a stellar population with a canonical IMF and standard efficiency in producing SNIa, and comprises 10% of the current overall cluster baryon content, falls short by a factor of >2 of explaining a typical rich cluster ICM Fe abundance. This is true even for extreme assumptions about the level and relative amount of SNIa and SNII products locked up in the stellar population that conflict with spectroscopic studies of cluster galaxies. We construct and utilize a simple evolutionary model of an old, simple stellar population to quantify the changes in the IMF shape required to bring the ICM and stars into concordance. While in some cases the required departure from the canonical IMF is modest, optical determinations of the IMF from kinematic and population studies in elliptical galaxies are driving the inferred IMF in the opposite direction. This recent evidence of a steep IMF in elliptical galaxies that conflicts with the nucleosynthetic requirements of the ICM may therefore indicate the need for an additional source of enrichment, or a higher stellar fraction than is usually assumed.

  18. Galaxy stellar mass functions from ZFOURGE/CANDELS: An excess of low-mass galaxies since z = 2 and the rapid buildup of quiescent galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, Adam R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Mehrtens, Nicola; Spitler, Lee R.; Tilvi, Vithal; Quadri, Ryan F.; Kelson, Daniel D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Monson, Andrew J.; Persson, S. Eric; Labbé, Ivo; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Allen, Rebecca; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Van Dokkum, Pieter

    2014-03-10

    Using observations from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE), we obtain the deepest measurements to date of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) at 0.2 < z < 3. ZFOURGE provides well-constrained photometric redshifts made possible through deep medium-bandwidth imaging at 1-2 μm. We combine this with Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, allowing for the efficient selection of both blue and red galaxies down to stellar masses of ∼10{sup 9.5} M {sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The total surveyed area is 316 arcmin{sup 2} distributed over three independent fields. We supplement these data with the wider and shallower NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey to provide stronger constraints at high masses. Several studies at z ≤ 1.5 have revealed a steepening of the slope at the low-mass end of the SMF, leading to an upturn at masses <10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} that is not well described by a standard single-Schechter function. We find evidence that this feature extends to at least z ∼ 2 and that it can be found in both the star-forming and quiescent populations individually. The characteristic mass (M*) and slope at the lowest masses (α) of a double-Schechter function fit to the SMF stay roughly constant at Log(M/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 10.65 and ∼ – 1.5, respectively. The SMF of star-forming galaxies has evolved primarily in normalization, while the change in shape is relatively minor. Our data allow us, for the first time, to observe a rapid buildup at the low-mass end of the quiescent SMF. Since z = 2.5, the total stellar mass density of quiescent galaxies (down to 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) has increased by a factor of ∼12, whereas the mass density of star-forming galaxies only increases by a factor of ∼2.2.

  19. A PHYSICAL MODEL FOR THE 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 8 REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY AND STELLAR MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tacchella, Sandro; Carollo, C. Marcella; Trenti, Michele

    2013-05-10

    We present a model to understand the redshift evolution of the UV luminosity and stellar mass functions of Lyman break galaxies. Our approach is based on the assumption that the luminosity and stellar mass of a galaxy is related to its dark-matter (DM) halo assembly and gas infall rate. Specifically, galaxies experience a burst of star formation at the halo assembly time, followed by a constant star formation rate, representing a secular star formation activity sustained by steady gas accretion. Star formation from steady gas accretion is the dominant contribution to the galaxy UV luminosity at all redshifts. The model is calibrated by constructing a galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation at z = 4 via abundance matching. After this luminosity calibration, the model naturally fits the z = 4 stellar mass function, and correctly predicts the evolution of both luminosity and stellar mass functions from z = 0 to z = 8. While the details of star formation efficiency and feedback are hidden within our calibrated luminosity versus halo mass relation, our study highlights that the primary driver of galaxy evolution across cosmic time is the buildup of DM halos, without the need to invoke a redshift-dependent efficiency in converting gas into stars.

  20. Estimates of the Planet Yield from Ground-based High-contrast Imaging Observations as a Function of Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, β Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether multiple

  1. ESTIMATES OF THE PLANET YIELD FROM GROUND-BASED HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OBSERVATIONS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, {beta} Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether

  2. Evidence for a non-universal stellar initial mass function in low-redshift high-density early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Aaron A.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Simard, Luc

    2012-05-01

    We determine an absolute calibration of stellar mass-to-light ratios for the densest ≃3 per cent of early-type galaxies in the local Universe (redshift z≃ 0.08) from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. This sample of ˜4000 galaxies has, assuming a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), effective stellar surface densities Σe > 2500 M⊙ pc-2, stellar population synthesis (SPS) stellar masses log10(MSPS/M⊙) < 10.8 and aperture velocity dispersions of ? (68 per cent range). In contrast to typical early-type galaxies, we show that these dense early-type galaxies follow the virial Fundamental Plane, which suggests that mass follows light. With the additional assumption that any dark matter does not follow the light, the dynamical masses of dense galaxies provide a direct measurement of stellar masses. Our dynamical masses (Mdyn), obtained from the spherical Jeans equations, are only weakly sensitive to the choice of anisotropy (β) due to the relatively large aperture of the SDSS fibre for these galaxies: Rap≃ 1.5Re. Assuming isotropic orbits (β= 0), we find a median log10(Mdyn/MSPS) = 0.233 ± 0.003, consistent with a Salpeter IMF, while more bottom-heavy IMFs and standard Milky Way IMFs are strongly disfavoured. Our results are consistent with, but do not require, a dependence of the IMF on dynamical mass or velocity dispersion. We find evidence for a colour dependence to the IMF such that redder galaxies have heavier IMFs with Mdyn/MSPS∝ (g-r)1.13 ± 0.09. This may reflect a more fundamental dependence of the IMF on the age or metallicity of a stellar population, or the density at which the stars formed.

  3. The massive end of the luminosity and stellar mass functions and clustering from CMASS to SDSS: evidence for and against passive evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, M.; Meert, A.; Sheth, R. K.; Huertas-Company, M.; Maraston, C.; Shankar, F.; Vikram, V.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the luminosity function, based on Sérsic fits to the light profiles, of CMASS galaxies at z ˜ 0.55. Compared to previous estimates, our Sérsic-based reductions imply more luminous, massive galaxies, consistent with the effects of Sérsic- rather than Petrosian or de Vaucouleur-based photometry on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main galaxy sample at z ˜ 0.1. This implies a significant revision of the high-mass end of the correlation between stellar and halo mass. Inferences about the evolution of the luminosity and stellar mass functions depend strongly on the assumed, and uncertain, k + e corrections. In turn, these depend on the assumed age of the population. Applying k + e corrections taken from fitting the models of Maraston et al. to the colours of both SDSS and CMASS galaxies, the evolution of the luminosity and stellar mass functions appears impressively passive, provided that the fits are required to return old ages. However, when matched in comoving number- or luminosity-density, the SDSS galaxies are less strongly clustered compared to their counterparts in CMASS. This rules out the passive evolution scenario, and, indeed, any minor merger scenarios which preserve the rank ordering in stellar mass of the population. Potential incompletenesses in the CMASS sample would further enhance this mismatch. Our analysis highlights the virtue of combining clustering measurements with number counts.

  4. The Efficiency of Stellar Reionization: Effects of Rotation, Metallicity, and Initial Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, Michael W.; Shull, J. Michael

    2015-02-01

    We compute the production rate of photons in the ionizing Lyman continua (LyC) of H I (λ <= 912 Å), He I (λ <= 504 Å), and He II (λ <= 228 Å) using recent stellar evolutionary tracks coupled to a grid of non-LTE, line-blanketed WM-basic model atmospheres. The median LyC production efficiency is Q LyC = (6 ± 2) × 1060 LyC photons per M ⊙ of star formation (range [3.1-9.4] × 1060), corresponding to a revised calibration of 1053.3 ± 0.2 photons s-1 per M ⊙ yr-1. Efficiencies in the helium continua are QHe \\scriptsize{I} ≈ 1060 photons M⊙ -1 and QHe \\scriptsize{II} ≈ 1056 photons M⊙ -1 at solar metallicity and larger at low metallicity. The critical star formation rate needed to maintain reionization against recombinations at z ≈ 7 is \\dot{ρ }_SFR = (0.012 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3) [(1+z) / 8]3 (CH / 3) (0.2/ f_esc) for fiducial values of the intergalactic medium (IGM) clumping factor C H ≈ 3 and LyC escape fraction f esc ≈ 0.2. The boost in LyC production efficiency is an important ingredient, together with metallicity, C H, and f esc, in assessing whether IGM reionization was complete by z ≈ 7. Monte Carlo sampled spectra of coeval starbursts during the first 5 Myr have intrinsic flux ratios of F(1500)/F(900) ≈ 0.4-0.5 and F(912-)/F(912+) ≈ 0.4-0.7 in the far-UV (1500 Å), the LyC (900 Å), and at the Lyman edge (912 Å). These ratios can be used to calibrate the LyC escape fractions in starbursts.

  5. FUEL EFFICIENT GALAXIES: SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Samuel N.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2011-06-10

    We examine the importance of secular stellar mass loss for fueling ongoing star formation in disk galaxies during the late stages of their evolution. For a galaxy of a given stellar mass, we calculate the total mass loss rate of its entire stellar population using star formation histories derived from the observed evolution of the M{sub *}-star formation rate (SFR) relation, along with the predictions of standard stellar evolution models for stellar mass loss for a variety of initial stellar mass functions. Our model shows that recycled gas from stellar mass loss can provide most or all of the fuel required to sustain the current level of star formation in late-type galaxies. Stellar mass loss can therefore remove the tension between the low gas infall rates that are derived from observations and the relatively rapid star formation occurring in disk galaxies. For galaxies where cold gas infall rates have been estimated, we demonstrate explicitly that stellar mass loss can account for most of the deficit between their SFR and infall rate.

  6. Variation of galactic cold gas reservoirs with stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Natasha; Hess, Kelley M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Jarvis, M. J.; Blyth, S.-L.

    2015-02-01

    The stellar and neutral hydrogen (H I) mass functions at z ˜ 0 are fundamental benchmarks for current models of galaxy evolution. A natural extension of these benchmarks is the two-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the plane spanned by stellar and H I mass, which provides a more stringent test of simulations, as it requires the H I to be located in galaxies of the correct stellar mass. Combining H I data from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey, with optical data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we find a distinct envelope in the H I-to-stellar mass distribution, corresponding to an upper limit in the H I fraction that varies monotonically over five orders of magnitude in stellar mass. This upper envelope in H I fraction does not favour the existence of a significant population of dark galaxies with large amounts of gas but no corresponding stellar population. The envelope shows a break at a stellar mass of ˜109 M⊙, which is not reproduced by modern models of galaxy populations tracing both stellar and gas masses. The discrepancy between observations and models suggests a mass dependence in gas storage and consumption missing in current galaxy evolution prescriptions. The break coincides with the transition from galaxies with predominantly irregular morphology at low masses to regular discs at high masses, as well as the transition from cold to hot accretion of gas in simulations.

  7. NEW ISOLATED PLANETARY-MASS OBJECTS AND THE STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION OF THE {sigma} ORIONIS CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Pena Ramirez, K.; Bejar, V. J. S.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G. E-mail: vbejar@iac.es E-mail: ege@cab.inta-csic.es

    2012-07-20

    We report on our analysis of the VISTA Orion ZY JHK{sub s} photometric data (completeness magnitudes of Z = 22.6 and J = 21.0 mag) focusing on a circular area of 2798.4 arcmin{sup 2} around the young {sigma} Orionis star cluster ({approx}3 Myr, {approx}352 pc, and solar metallicity). The combination of the VISTA photometry with optical, WISE and Spitzer data allows us to identify a total of 210 {sigma} Orionis member candidates with masses in the interval 0.25-0.004 M{sub Sun }, 23 of which are new planetary-mass object findings. These discoveries double the number of cluster planetary-mass candidates known so far. One object has colors compatible with a T spectral type. The {sigma} Orionis cluster harbors about as many brown dwarfs (69, 0.072-0.012 M{sub Sun }) and planetary-mass objects (37, 0.012-0.004 M{sub Sun }) as very low mass stars (104, 0.25-0.072 M{sub Sun }). Based on Spitzer data, we derive a disk frequency of {approx}40% for very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary-mass objects in {sigma} Orionis. The radial density distributions of these three mass intervals are alike: all are spatially concentrated within an effective radius of 12' (1.2 pc) around the multiple star {sigma} Ori, and no obvious segregation between disk-bearing and diskless objects is observed. Using the VISTA data and the Mayrit catalog, we derive the cluster mass spectrum ({Delta}N/{Delta}M {approx} M{sup -{alpha}}) from {approx}19 to 0.006 M{sub Sun} (VISTA ZJ completeness), which is reasonably described by two power-law expressions with indices of {alpha} = 1.7 {+-} 0.2 for M > 0.35 M{sub Sun }, and {alpha} = 0.6 {+-} 0.2 for M < 0.35 M{sub Sun }. The {sigma} Orionis mass spectrum smoothly extends into the planetary-mass regime down to 0.004 M{sub Sun }. Our findings of T-type sources (<0.004 M{sub Sun }) in the VISTA {sigma} Orionis exploration appear to be smaller than what is predicted by the extrapolation of the cluster mass spectrum down to the survey J

  8. The Arches cluster out to its tidal radius: dynamical mass segregation and the effect of the extinction law on the stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Stolte, A.; Brandner, W.; Hußmann, B.; Motohara, K.

    2013-08-01

    The Galactic center is the most active site of star formation in the Milky Way, where particularly high-mass stars have formed very recently and are still forming today. However, since we are looking at the Galactic center through the Galactic disk, knowledge of extinction is crucial when studying this region. The Arches cluster is a young, massive starburst cluster near the Galactic center. We observed the Arches cluster out to its tidal radius using Ks-band imaging obtained with NAOS/CONICA at the VLT combined with Subaru/CISCO J-band data to gain a full understanding of the cluster mass distribution. We show that the determination of the mass of the most massive star in the Arches cluster, which had been used in previous studies to establish an upper mass limit for the star formation process in the Milky Way, strongly depends on the assumed slope of the extinction law. Assuming the two regimes of widely used infrared extinction laws, we show that the difference can reach up to 30% for individually derived stellar masses and ΔAKs ~ 1 magnitude in acquired Ks-band extinction, while the present-day mass function slope changes by ~ 0.17 dex. The present-day mass function slope derived assuming the more recent extinction law increases from a flat slope of αNishi = -1.50 ± 0.35 in the core (r < 0.2 pc) to αNishi = -2.21 ± 0.27 in the intermediate annulus (0.2 < r < 0.4 pc), where the Salpeter slope is -2.3. The mass function steepens to αNishi = -3.21 ± 0.30 in the outer annulus (0.4 < r < 1.5 pc), indicating that the outer cluster region is depleted of high-mass stars. This picture is consistent with mass segregation owing to the dynamical evolution of the cluster. Based on observations collected at the ESO/VLT under Program ID 081.D-0572(B) (PI: Brandner) and ID 71.C-0344(A) (PI: Eisenhauer, retrieved from the ESO archive). Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.Full Table 5 is

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTIONS OF STAR-FORMING AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES TO z = 4 FROM THE COSMOS/UltraVISTA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; McCracken, Henry J.; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Dunlop, James S.; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95,675 K{sub s} -selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar mass density of the universe was only 50%, 10%, and 1% of its current value at z ∼ 0.75, 2.0, and 3.5, respectively. The quiescent population drives most of the overall growth, with the stellar mass density of these galaxies increasing as ρ{sub star}∝(1 + z){sup –4.7±0.4} since z = 3.5, whereas the mass density of star-forming galaxies increases as ρ{sub star}∝(1 + z){sup –2.3±0.2}. At z > 2.5, star-forming galaxies dominate the total SMF at all stellar masses, although a non-zero population of quiescent galaxies persists to z = 4. Comparisons of the K{sub s} -selected star-forming galaxy SMFs with UV-selected SMFs at 2.5 < z < 4 show reasonable agreement and suggest that UV-selected samples are representative of the majority of the stellar mass density at z > 3.5. We estimate the average mass growth of individual galaxies by selecting galaxies at fixed cumulative number density. The average galaxy with log(M{sub star}/M{sub ☉}) = 11.5 at z = 0.3 has grown in mass by only 0.2 dex (0.3 dex) since z = 2.0 (3.5), whereas those with log(M{sub star}/M{sub ☉}) = 10.5 have grown by >1.0 dex since z = 2. At z < 2, the time derivatives of the mass growth are always larger for lower-mass galaxies, which demonstrates that the mass growth in galaxies since that redshift is mass-dependent and primarily bottom-up. Lastly, we examine potential sources of systematic uncertainties in the SMFs and find that those from photo-z templates, stellar population synthesis modeling, and the definition of quiescent galaxies dominate the total error budget in the SMFs.

  10. The Evolution of the Stellar Mass Functions of Star-forming and Quiescent Galaxies to z = 4 from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzin, Adam; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Franx, Marijn; McCracken, Henry J.; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Dunlop, James S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Brammer, Gabriel; Labbé, Ivo; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95,675 Ks -selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar mass density of the universe was only 50%, 10%, and 1% of its current value at z ~ 0.75, 2.0, and 3.5, respectively. The quiescent population drives most of the overall growth, with the stellar mass density of these galaxies increasing as ρstarvprop(1 + z)-4.7 ± 0.4 since z = 3.5, whereas the mass density of star-forming galaxies increases as ρstarvprop(1 + z)-2.3 ± 0.2. At z > 2.5, star-forming galaxies dominate the total SMF at all stellar masses, although a non-zero population of quiescent galaxies persists to z = 4. Comparisons of the Ks -selected star-forming galaxy SMFs with UV-selected SMFs at 2.5 < z < 4 show reasonable agreement and suggest that UV-selected samples are representative of the majority of the stellar mass density at z > 3.5. We estimate the average mass growth of individual galaxies by selecting galaxies at fixed cumulative number density. The average galaxy with log(M star/M ⊙) = 11.5 at z = 0.3 has grown in mass by only 0.2 dex (0.3 dex) since z = 2.0 (3.5), whereas those with log(M star/M ⊙) = 10.5 have grown by >1.0 dex since z = 2. At z < 2, the time derivatives of the mass growth are always larger for lower-mass galaxies, which demonstrates that the mass growth in galaxies since that redshift is mass-dependent and primarily bottom-up. Lastly, we examine potential sources of systematic uncertainties in the SMFs and find that those from photo-z templates, stellar population synthesis modeling, and the definition of quiescent galaxies dominate the total error budget in the SMFs. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under ESO programme ID 179.A-2005 and on data products

  11. Initial mass functions from ultraviolet stellar photometry: A comparison of Lucke and Hodge OB associations near 30 Doradus with the nearby field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jesse K.; Isensee, Joan E.; Cornett, Robert H.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1994-01-01

    UV stellar photometry is presented for 1563 stars within a 40 minutes circular field in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), excluding the 10 min x 10 min field centered on R136 investigated earlier by Hill et al. (1993). Magnitudes are computed from images obtained by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) in bands centered at 1615 A and 2558 A. Stellar masses and extinctions are estimated for the stars in associations using the evolutionary models of Schaerer et al. (1993), assuming the age is 4 Myr and that the local LMC extinction follows the Fitzpatrick (1985) 30 Dor extinction curve. The estimated slope of the initial mass function (IMF) for massive stars (greater than 15 solar mass) within the Lucke and Hodge (LH) associations is Gamma = -1.08 +/- 0.2. Initial masses and extinctions for stars not within LH associations are estimated assuming that the stellar age is either 4 Myr or half the stellar lifetime, whichever is larger. The estimated slope of the IMF for massive stars not within LH associations is Gamma = -1.74 +/- 0.3 (assuming continuous star formation), compared with Gamma = -1.35, and Gamma = -1.7 +/- 0.5, obtained for the Galaxy by Salpeter (1955) and Scalo (1986), respectively, and Gamma = -1.6 obtained for massive stars in the Galaxy by Garmany, Conti, & Chiosi (1982). The shallower slope of the association IMF suggests that not only is the star formation rate higher in associations, but that the local conditions favor the formation of higher mass stars there. We make no corrections for binaries or incompleteness.

  12. The ATLAS3D project - XX. Mass-size and mass-σ distributions of early-type galaxies: bulge fraction drives kinematics, mass-to-light ratio, molecular gas fraction and stellar initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele; McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M.; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    ) and dwarf irregulars (Im), respectively. We use dynamical models to analyse our kinematic maps. We show that σe traces the bulge fraction, which appears to be the main driver for the observed trends in the dynamical (M/L)JAM and in indicators of the (M/L)pop of the stellar population like Hβ and colour, as well as in the molecular gas fraction. A similar variation along contours of σe is also observed for the mass normalization of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), which was recently shown to vary systematically within the ETGs' population. Our preferred relation has the form log _{10} [(M/L)_stars/(M/L)_Salp]=a+b× log _{10}({σ _e}/130 {km s^{-1}}) with a = -0.12 ± 0.01 and b = 0.35 ± 0.06. Unless there are major flaws in all stellar population models, this trend implies a transition of the mean IMF from Kroupa to Salpeter in the interval log _{10}({σ _e}/{km s}^{-1})≈ 1.9-2.5 (or {σ _e}≈ 90-290 km s-1), with a smooth variation in between, consistently with what was shown in Cappellari et al. The observed distribution of galaxy properties on the MP provides a clean and novel view for a number of previously reported trends, which constitute special two-dimensional projections of the more general four-dimensional parameters trends on the MP. We interpret it as due to a combination of two main effects: (i) an increase of the bulge fraction, which increases σe, decreases Re, and greatly enhance the likelihood for a galaxy to have its star formation quenched, and (ii) dry merging, increasing galaxy mass and Re by moving galaxies along lines of roughly constant σe (or steeper), while leaving the population nearly unchanged.

  13. The Nature of Hβ+[OIII] and [OII] emitters to z ∼ 5 with HiZELS: stellar mass functions and the evolution of EWs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khostovan, Ali Ahmad; Sobral, David; Mobasher, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    I will present our recent-study of the properties of ~ 7000 narrow-band selected galaxies with strong Hβ+[OIII] and [OII] nebular emission lines from the High-z Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) between z ~ 0.8 ‑ 5.0. Our sample covers a wide range in stellar mass(M_stellar ∼ 10^7.5‑10^12.0 M⊙), rest-frame equivalent widths (EW_rest∼ 10‑10^5 A), and line luminosities (L_line ∼ 10^40.5‑10^43.2 erg s‑1) allowing us to study the properties of typical active/star-forming galaxies. I will present our measurements of the Hβ+[OIII]-selected and [OII]-selected stellar mass functions and densities out to z ~ 3.5 where we find that for the Hβ+[OIII]-selected stellar mass functions both M* and φ* increases with cosmic time, which may be due to the [OIII] selection including an increasing fraction of AGN at lower redshifts. The [OII]-selected stellar mass functions show a constant M* ≈ 10^11.6 M⊙ and a strong, increasing evolution with cosmic time in φ* in line with Hα studies. I will also present our measurements in the evolution of the rest-frame equivalent widths for both emission-lines up to z ~ 5. This is the first time that the EW_rest evolution has been directly measured for Hβ+[OIII] and [OII] emitters up to these redshifts (z > 1). We find evidence for a slower evolution for z > 2 in the H β+[OIII] EW_rest and a decreasing trend for z > 3 in the [OII] EW_rest evolution, which would imply low [OII] EW at the highest redshifts and higher [OIII]/[OII] line ratios. This suggests that the ionization parameter at higher redshift is significantly higher than the local Universe, although other factors such as changes in metallicities and abundances over cosmic time can influence the [OIII]/[OII] evolution. Our results set the stage for future near-IR space-based narrow-band and spectroscopic surveys to test our extrapolated predictions and also produce z > 5 measurements to constrain the high-z end of the EW_rest and [OIII]/[OII] evolution.

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the stellar mass budget by galaxy type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Ingarfield, Stephen A.; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Meštrić, Uroš; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Kennedy, Rebecca; Norberg, Peder; Taylor, Edward N.

    2016-04-01

    We report an expanded sample of visual morphological classifications from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey phase two, which now includes 7556 objects (previously 3727 in phase one). We define a local (z < 0.06) sample and classify galaxies into E, S0-Sa, SB0-SBa, Sab-Scd, SBab-SBcd, Sd-Irr, and `little blue spheroid' types. Using these updated classifications, we derive stellar mass function fits to individual galaxy populations divided both by morphological class and more general spheroid- or disc-dominated categories with a lower mass limit of log(M*/M⊙) = 8 (one dex below earlier morphological mass function determinations). We find that all individual morphological classes and the combined spheroid-/bulge-dominated classes are well described by single Schechter stellar mass function forms. We find that the total stellar mass densities for individual galaxy populations and for the entire galaxy population are bounded within our stellar mass limits and derive an estimated total stellar mass density of ρ* = 2.5 × 108 M⊙ Mpc-3 h0.7, which corresponds to an approximately 4 per cent fraction of baryons found in stars. The mass contributions to this total stellar mass density by galaxies that are dominated by spheroidal components (E and S0-Sa classes) and by disc components (Sab-Scd and Sd-Irr classes) are approximately 70 and 30 per cent, respectively.

  15. PRIMUS: Constraints on Star Formation Quenching and Galaxy Merging, and the Evolution of the Stellar Mass Function from z = 0-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun; Arnouts, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    We measure the evolution of the stellar mass function (SMF) from z = 0-1 using multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From PRIMUS we construct an i < 23 flux-limited sample of ~40, 000 galaxies at z = 0.2-1.0 over five fields totaling ≈5.5 deg2, and from the SDSS we select ~170, 000 galaxies at z = 0.01-0.2 that we analyze consistently with respect to PRIMUS to minimize systematic errors in our evolutionary measurements. We find that the SMF of all galaxies evolves relatively little since z = 1, although we do find evidence for mass assembly downsizing; we measure a ≈30% increase in the number density of ~1010 {M}_{\\odot } galaxies since z ≈ 0.6, and a <~ 10% change in the number density of all >~ 1011 {M}_{\\odot } galaxies since z ≈ 1. Dividing the sample into star-forming and quiescent using an evolving cut in specific star formation rate, we find that the number density of ~1010 {M}_{\\odot } star-forming galaxies stays relatively constant since z ≈ 0.6, whereas the space density of >~ 1011 {M}_{\\odot } star-forming galaxies decreases by ≈50% between z ≈ 1 and z ≈ 0. Meanwhile, the number density of ~1010 {M}_{\\odot } quiescent galaxies increases steeply toward low redshift, by a factor of ~2-3 since z ≈ 0.6, while the number of massive quiescent galaxies remains approximately constant since z ≈ 1. These results suggest that the rate at which star-forming galaxies are quenched increases with decreasing stellar mass, but that the bulk of the stellar mass buildup within the quiescent population occurs around ~1010.8 {M}_{\\odot }. In addition, we conclude that mergers do not appear to be a dominant channel for the stellar mass buildup of galaxies at z < 1, even among massive (gsim 1011 {M}_{\\odot }) quiescent galaxies.

  16. PRIMUS: CONSTRAINTS ON STAR FORMATION QUENCHING AND GALAXY MERGING, AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTION FROM z = 0-1

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun; Arnouts, Stephane

    2013-04-10

    We measure the evolution of the stellar mass function (SMF) from z = 0-1 using multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From PRIMUS we construct an i < 23 flux-limited sample of {approx}40, 000 galaxies at z = 0.2-1.0 over five fields totaling Almost-Equal-To 5.5 deg{sup 2}, and from the SDSS we select {approx}170, 000 galaxies at z = 0.01-0.2 that we analyze consistently with respect to PRIMUS to minimize systematic errors in our evolutionary measurements. We find that the SMF of all galaxies evolves relatively little since z = 1, although we do find evidence for mass assembly downsizing; we measure a Almost-Equal-To 30% increase in the number density of {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} galaxies since z Almost-Equal-To 0.6, and a {approx}< 10% change in the number density of all {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} galaxies since z Almost-Equal-To 1. Dividing the sample into star-forming and quiescent using an evolving cut in specific star formation rate, we find that the number density of {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} star-forming galaxies stays relatively constant since z Almost-Equal-To 0.6, whereas the space density of {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} star-forming galaxies decreases by Almost-Equal-To 50% between z Almost-Equal-To 1 and z Almost-Equal-To 0. Meanwhile, the number density of {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} quiescent galaxies increases steeply toward low redshift, by a factor of {approx}2-3 since z Almost-Equal-To 0.6, while the number of massive quiescent galaxies remains approximately constant since z Almost-Equal-To 1. These results suggest that the rate at which star-forming galaxies are quenched increases with decreasing stellar mass, but that the bulk of the stellar mass buildup within the quiescent population occurs around {approx}10{sup 10.8} M{sub sun}. In addition, we conclude that mergers do not appear to be a dominant channel for the stellar mass

  17. Variations of the stellar initial mass function in the progenitors of massive early-type galaxies and in extreme starburst environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, Gilles; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    We examine variations of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in extreme environments within the formalism derived by Hennebelle and Chabrier. We focus on conditions encountered in progenitors of massive early-type galaxies and starburst regions. We show that, when applying the concept of turbulent Jeans mass as the characteristic mass for fragmentation in a turbulent medium, the peak of the IMF in such environments is shifted toward smaller masses, leading to a bottom-heavy IMF, as suggested by various observations. In very dense and turbulent environments, we predict that the high-mass tail of the IMF can become even steeper than the standard Salpeter IMF, with a limit for the power-law exponent α ≅ –2.7, in agreement with recent observational determinations. This steepening is a direct consequence of the high densities and Mach values in such regions but also of the time dependence of the fragmentation process, as incorporated in the Hennebelle-Chabrier theory. We provide analytical parameterizations of these IMFs in such environments to be used in galaxy evolution calculations. We also calculate the star-formation rates and the mass-to-light ratios expected under such extreme conditions and show that they agree well with the values inferred in starburst environments and massive high-redshift galaxies. This reinforces the paradigm of star formation as being a universal process, i.e., the direct outcome of gravitationally unstable fluctuations in a density field initially generated by large-scale, shock-dominated turbulence. This globally enables us to infer the variations of the stellar IMF and related properties for atypical galactic conditions.

  18. THE GROWTH OF GALAXY STELLAR MASS WITHIN DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zehavi, Idit; Patiri, Santiago; Zheng Zheng

    2012-02-20

    We study the evolution of stellar mass in galaxies as a function of host halo mass, using the 'MPA' and 'Durham' semi-analytic models, implemented on the Millennium Run simulation. For both models, the stellar mass of the central galaxies increases rapidly with halo mass at the low-mass end and more slowly in halos of larger masses at the three redshifts probed (z {approx} 0, 1, 2). About 45% of the stellar mass in central galaxies in present-day halos less massive than {approx}10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun} is already in place at z {approx} 1, and this fraction increases to {approx}65% for more massive halos. The baryon conversion efficiency into stars has a peaked distribution with halo mass, and the peak location shifts toward lower mass from z {approx} 1 to z {approx} 0. The stellar mass in low-mass halos grows mostly by star formation since z {approx} 1, while in high-mass halos most of the stellar mass is assembled by mergers, reminiscent of 'downsizing'. We compare our findings to empirical results from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and DEEP2 surveys utilizing galaxy clustering measurements to study galaxy evolution. The theoretical predictions are in qualitative agreement with these phenomenological results, but there are large discrepancies. The most significant one concerns the number of stars already in place in the progenitor galaxies at z {approx} 1, which is about a factor of two larger in both semi-analytic models. We demonstrate that methods studying galaxy evolution from the galaxy-halo connection are powerful in constraining theoretical models and can guide future efforts of modeling galaxy evolution. Conversely, semi-analytic models serve an important role in improving such methods.

  19. A Critical Assessment of Stellar Mass Measurement Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Bahram; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Barro, Guillermo; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey J.; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Bell, Eric; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dickinson, Mark E.; Faber, Sandra M.; Fazio, Giovanni; Finlator, Kristian; Galametz, Audrey; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Naveen; Santini, Paola; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2015-07-01

    identify the most fundamental parameters affecting stellar mass estimate in galaxies, with the following results. (1) No significant bias in Δ log(M) was found among different codes, with all having comparable scatter (σ ({{Δ }}{log}(M))=0.136 dex). The estimated stellar mass values are seriously affected by low photometric S/N, with the rms scatter increasing for galaxies with {H}{AB}\\gt 26 mag; (2) A source of error contributing to the scatter in Δ log(M) is found to be due to photometric uncertainties (0.136 dex) and low resolution in age and extinction grids when generating the SED templates; (3) The median of stellar masses among different methods provides a stable measure of the mass associated with any given galaxy (σ ({{Δ }}{log}(M))=0.142 dex); (4) The Δ log(M) values are strongly correlated with deviations in age (defined as the difference between the estimated and expected values), with a weaker correlation with extinction; (5) The rms scatter in the estimated stellar masses due to free parameters (after fixing redshifts and initial mass function) are quantified and found to be σ ({{Δ }}{log}(M))=0.110 dex; (6) Using the observed data, we studied the sensitivity of stellar masses to both the population synthesis codes and inclusion of nebular emission lines and found them to affect the stellar mass by 0.2 and 0.3 dex respectively.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Wen Xiaoqing; Xu Jianying; Ding Yingping; Huang Tong

    2010-06-10

    At a stellar mass of 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub {Theta}} we divide the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) into two distinct families and explore the environmental dependence of galaxy properties for High Stellar Mass (HSM) and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that for HSM and LSM galaxies, the environmental dependence of some typical galaxy properties, such as color, morphologies, and star formation activities, is still very strong, which at least shows that the stellar mass is not fundamental in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment. We also note that the environmental dependence of the size for HSM and LSM galaxies is fairly weak, which is mainly due to the galaxy size being insensitive to environment.

  1. The Nature of Hβ +[OIII] and [OII] emitters to z ˜ 5 with HiZELS: stellar mass functions and the evolution of EWs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khostovan, A. A.; Sobral, D.; Mobasher, B.; Smail, I.; Darvish, B.; Nayyeri, H.; Hemmati, S.; Stott, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the properties of ˜7000 narrow-band selected galaxies with strong Hβ +[OIII] and [OII] nebular emission lines from the High-z Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) between z ˜ 0.8 - 5.0. Our sample covers a wide range in stellar mass (Mstellar ˜ 107.5 - 12.0 M⊙), rest-frame equivalent widths (EWrest˜10 - 105 Å), and line luminosities (Lline ˜ 1040.5 - 43.2 erg s-1). We measure the Hβ +[OIII]-selected stellar mass functions out to z ˜ 3.5 and find that both M⋆ and φ⋆ increases with cosmic time. The [OII]-selected stellar mass functions show a constant M⋆ ≈ 1011.6 M⊙ and a strong, increasing evolution with cosmic time in φ⋆ in line with Hα studies. We also investigate the evolution of the EWrest as a function of redshift with a fixed mass range (109.5 - 10.0 M⊙) and find an increasing trend best represented by (1 + z)3.81 ± 0.14 and (1 + z)2.72 ± 0.19 up to z ˜ 2 and z ˜ 3 for Hβ +[OIII] and [OII] emitters, respectively. This is the first time that the EWrest evolution has been directly measured for Hβ +[OIII] and [OII] emitters up to these redshifts. There is evidence for a slower evolution for z > 2 in the Hβ +[OIII] EWrest and a decreasing trend for z > 3 in the [OII] EWrest evolution, which would imply low [OII] EW at the highest redshifts and higher [OIII]/[OII] line ratios. This suggests that the ionization parameter at higher redshift may be significantly higher than the local Universe. Our results set the stage for future near-IR space-based spectroscopic surveys to test our extrapolated predictions and also produce z > 5 measurements to constrain the high-z end of the EWrest and [OIII]/[OII] evolution.

  2. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE CENTRAL 0.5 pc OF THE GALAXY. II. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J. R.; Do, T.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Matthews, K. E-mail: tuan.do@uci.edu E-mail: morris@astro.ucla.edu

    2013-02-20

    The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way plays host to a massive, young cluster that may have formed in one of the most inhospitable environments in the Galaxy. We present new measurements of the global properties of this cluster, including the initial mass function (IMF), age, and cluster mass. These results are based on Keck laser-guide-star adaptive optics observations used to identify the young stars and measure their Kp-band luminosity function as presented in Do et al. A Bayesian inference methodology is developed to simultaneously fit the global properties of the cluster utilizing the observations and extensive simulations of synthetic star clusters. We find that the slope of the mass function for this cluster is {alpha} = 1.7 {+-} 0.2, which is steeper than previously reported, but still flatter than the traditional Salpeter slope of 2.35. The age of the cluster is between 2.5 and 5.8 Myr with 95% confidence, which is a younger age than typically adopted but consistent within the uncertainties of past measurements. The exact age of the cluster is difficult to determine since our results show two distinct age solutions (3.9 Myr and 2.8 Myr) due to model degeneracies in the relative number of Wolf-Rayet and OB stars. The total cluster mass is between 14,000 and 37,000 M {sub Sun} above 1 M {sub Sun} and it is necessary to include multiple star systems in order to fit the observed luminosity function and the number of observed Wolf-Rayet stars. The new IMF slope measurement is now consistent with X-ray observations indicating a factor of 10 fewer X-ray emitting pre-main-sequence stars than expected when compared with a Salpeter IMF. The young cluster at the Galactic center is one of the few definitive examples of an IMF that deviates significantly from the near-universal IMFs found in the solar neighborhood.

  3. Stellar Populations in the Central 0.5 pc of the Galaxy. II. The Initial Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. R.; Do, T.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Matthews, K.

    2013-02-01

    The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way plays host to a massive, young cluster that may have formed in one of the most inhospitable environments in the Galaxy. We present new measurements of the global properties of this cluster, including the initial mass function (IMF), age, and cluster mass. These results are based on Keck laser-guide-star adaptive optics observations used to identify the young stars and measure their Kp-band luminosity function as presented in Do et al. A Bayesian inference methodology is developed to simultaneously fit the global properties of the cluster utilizing the observations and extensive simulations of synthetic star clusters. We find that the slope of the mass function for this cluster is α = 1.7 ± 0.2, which is steeper than previously reported, but still flatter than the traditional Salpeter slope of 2.35. The age of the cluster is between 2.5 and 5.8 Myr with 95% confidence, which is a younger age than typically adopted but consistent within the uncertainties of past measurements. The exact age of the cluster is difficult to determine since our results show two distinct age solutions (3.9 Myr and 2.8 Myr) due to model degeneracies in the relative number of Wolf-Rayet and OB stars. The total cluster mass is between 14,000 and 37,000 M ⊙ above 1 M ⊙ and it is necessary to include multiple star systems in order to fit the observed luminosity function and the number of observed Wolf-Rayet stars. The new IMF slope measurement is now consistent with X-ray observations indicating a factor of 10 fewer X-ray emitting pre-main-sequence stars than expected when compared with a Salpeter IMF. The young cluster at the Galactic center is one of the few definitive examples of an IMF that deviates significantly from the near-universal IMFs found in the solar neighborhood.

  4. The bulge-halo conspiracy in massive elliptical galaxies: implications for the stellar initial mass function and halo response to baryonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Aaron A.; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that massive elliptical galaxies have total mass density profiles within an effective radius that can be approximated as ρ_tot∝ r^{-γ^', with mean slope <γ'> = 2.08 ± 0.03 and scatter σ _{γ ^' } }=0.16± 0.02. The small scatter of the slope (known as the bulge-halo conspiracy) is not generic in Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) based models and therefore contains information about the galaxy formation process. We compute the distribution of γ' for ΛCDM-based models that reproduce the observed correlations between stellar mass, velocity dispersion, and effective radius of early-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The models have a range of stellar initial mass functions (IMFs) and dark halo responses to galaxy formation. The observed distribution of γ' is well reproduced by a model with cosmologically motivated but uncontracted dark matter haloes, and a Salpeter-type IMF. Other models are on average ruled out by the data, even though they may happen in individual cases. Models with adiabatic halo contraction (and lighter IMFs) predict too small values of γ'. Models with halo expansion, or mass-follows-light predict too high values of γ'. Our study shows that the non-homologous structure of massive early-type galaxies can be precisely reproduced by ΛCDM models if the IMF is not universal and if mechanisms, such as feedback from active galactic nuclei, or dynamical friction, effectively on average counterbalance the contraction of the halo expected as a result of baryonic cooling.

  5. A CONSTRAINT ON BROWN DWARF FORMATION VIA EJECTION: RADIAL VARIATION OF THE STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION OF THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER IC 2391

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreault, S.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2009-12-01

    We present the stellar and substellar mass function (MF) of the open cluster IC 2391, plus its radial dependence, and use this to put constraints on the formation mechanism of brown dwarfs (BDs). Our multi-band optical and infrared photometric survey with spectroscopic follow-up covers 11 deg{sup 2}, making it the largest survey of this cluster to date. We observe a radial variation in the MF over the range 0.072-0.3 M {sub sun}, but no significant variation in the MF below the substellar boundary at the three cluster radius intervals is analyzed. This lack of radial variation for low masses is what we would expect with the ejection scenario for BD formation, although considering that IC 2391 has an age about three times older than its crossing time, we expect that BDs with a velocity greater than the escape velocity have already escaped the cluster. Alternatively, the variation in the MF of the stellar objects could be an indication that they have undergone mass segregation via dynamical evolution. We also observe a significant variation across the cluster in the color of the (background) field star locus in color-magnitude diagrams and conclude that this is due to variable background extinction in the Galactic plane. From our preliminary spectroscopic follow-up, to confirm BD status and cluster membership, we find that all candidates are M dwarfs (in either the field or the cluster), demonstrating the efficiency of our photometric selection method in avoiding contaminants (e.g., red giants). About half of our photometric candidates for which we have spectra are spectroscopically confirmed as cluster members; two are new spectroscopically confirmed BD members of IC 2391.

  6. New axes for the stellar mass fundamental plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L* Schechter, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Multiple lines of argument, both observational and theoretical, point to a tight correlation between the stellar velocity dispersion observed for an early-type galaxy and the mass of the dark matter halo in which it is embedded. While effective radius and surface brightness measure properties of the stellar (baryonic) component, the stellar velocity dispersion tells us the mass, virial radius and velocity dispersion of the dark matter component. The stellar effective radius may be divided by the halo radius, and the stellar mass (inferred from the stellar surface brightness) divided by the halo mass to give new axes for the fundamental plane. The stellar velocity dispersion is then a measure of the overall size of the dark matter halo. The two dimensionless axes tell us the ratios of the stellar mass to halo mass and stellar extent to halo extent. If themass of a halo alone determined everything about the embedded galaxy, there would be a unique stellar mass fraction and a unique stellar radius fraction for a given dispersion, forming a fundamental line. If there is a range of stellar mass fractions and a range of stellar radius fractions, and if they are independent, the line will blow up into a sausage. The fact that it fans out into a plane and not a sausage tells us that the deviations in mass fraction and radius fraction from the fundamental line must be strongly correlated.

  7. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VIII. EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS IN GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yoshikawa, T.; Onodera, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the evolution of star formation activity of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3.5 as a function of stellar mass, using very deep NIR data taken with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope in the GOODS-North region. The NIR imaging data reach K{approx} 23-24 Vega magnitude and they allow us to construct a nearly stellar-mass-limited sample down to {approx}10{sup 9.5-10} M{sub sun} even at z {approx} 3. We estimated star formation rates (SFRs) of the sample with two indicators, namely, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m flux and the rest-frame 2800 A luminosity. The SFR distribution at a fixed M{sub star} shifts to higher values with increasing redshift at 0.5 < z < 3.5. More massive galaxies show stronger evolution of SFR at z {approx}> 1. We found galaxies at 2.5 < z < 3.5 show a bimodality in their SSFR distribution, which can be divided into two populations by a constant SSFR of {approx}2 Gyr{sup -1}. Galaxies in the low-SSFR group have SSFRs of {approx}0.5-1.0 Gyr{sup -1}, while the high-SSFR population shows {approx}10 Gyr{sup -1}. The cosmic SFR density (SFRD) is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11} M{sub sun} at 0.5 < z < 3.5, while the contribution of massive galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 11-11.5} M{sub sun} shows a strong evolution at z>1 and becomes significant at z {approx} 3, especially in the case with the SFR based on MIPS 24 {mu}m. In galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11.5} M{sub sun}, those with a relatively narrow range of SSFR ({approx}<1 dex) dominates the cosmic SFRD at 0.5 < z < 3.5. The SSFR of galaxies that dominate the SFRD systematically increases with redshift. At 2.5 < z < 3.5, the high-SSFR population, which is relatively small in number, dominates the SFRD. Major star formation in the universe at higher redshift seems to be associated with a more rapid growth of stellar mass of galaxies.

  8. A Stellar-mass-dependent Drop in Planet Occurrence Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R ⊕) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ~10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  9. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-01-10

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  10. THE MOST MASSIVE GALAXIES AT 3.0 {<=} z < 4.0 IN THE NEWFIRM MEDIUM-BAND SURVEY: PROPERTIES AND IMPROVED CONSTRAINTS ON THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Danilo; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Muzzin, Adam; Wake, David; Labbe, Ivo; Quadri, Ryan F.; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Rudnick, Gregory; Illingworth, Garth D.

    2010-12-10

    We use the optical to mid-infrared coverage of the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) to characterize, for the first time, the properties of a mass-complete sample of 14 galaxies at 3.0 {<=} z < 4.0 with M{sub star}>2.5 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and to derive significantly more accurate measurements of the high-mass end of the stellar mass function (SMF) of galaxies at 3.0 {<=} z < 4.0. The accurate photometric redshifts and well-sampled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) provided by the NMBS combined with the large surveyed area result in significantly reduced contributions from photometric redshift errors and cosmic variance to the total error budget of the SMF. The typical very massive galaxy at 3.0 {<=} z < 4.0 is red and faint in the observer's optical, with a median r-band magnitude of (r{sub tot}) = 26.1, and median rest-frame U - V colors of (U - V) = 1.6. About 60% of the mass-complete sample has optical colors satisfying either the U- or the B-dropout color criteria, although {approx}50% of these galaxies has r>25.5. We find that {approx}30% of the sample has star formation rates (SFRs) from SED modeling consistent with zero, although SFRs of up to {approx}1-18 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} are also allowed within 1{sigma}. However, >80% of the sample is detected at 24 {mu}m, resulting in total infrared luminosities in the range (0.5-4.0) x 10{sup 13} L{sub sun}. This implies the presence of either dust-enshrouded starburst activity (with SFRs of 600-4300 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and/or highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The contribution of galaxies with M{sub star}>2.5 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} to the total stellar mass budget at 3.0 {<=} z < 4.0 is {approx}8{sup +13}{sub -3}%. Compared to recent estimates of the stellar mass density in galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 9}-10{sup 11} M{sub sun} at z {approx} 5 and z {approx} 6, we find an evolution by a factor of 2-7 and 3-22 from z {approx} 5 and z {approx} 6, respectively, to z = 3.5. The

  11. STELLAR MASS VERSUS STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION: WHICH IS BETTER FOR LINKING GALAXIES TO THEIR DARK MATTER HALOS?

    SciTech Connect

    Li Cheng; Wang Lixin; Jing, Y. P.

    2013-01-01

    It was recently suggested that compared to its stellar mass (M{sub *}), the central stellar velocity dispersion ({sigma}{sub *}) of a galaxy might be a better indicator for its host dark matter halo mass. Here we test this hypothesis by estimating the dark matter halo mass for central galaxies in groups as a function of M{sub *} and {sigma}{sub *}. For this we have estimated the redshift-space cross-correlation function (CCF) between the central galaxies at given M{sub *} and {sigma}{sub *} and a reference galaxy sample, from which we determine both the projected CCF, w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), and the velocity dispersion profile. A halo mass is then obtained from the average velocity dispersion within the virial radius. At fixed M{sub *}, we find very weak or no correlation between halo mass and {sigma}{sub *}. In contrast, strong mass dependence is clearly seen even when {sigma}{sub *} is limited to a narrow range. Our results thus firmly demonstrate that the stellar mass of central galaxies is still a good (if not the best) indicator for dark matter halo mass, better than the stellar velocity dispersion. The dependence of galaxy clustering on {sigma}{sub *} at fixed M{sub *}, as recently discovered by Wake et al., may be attributed to satellite galaxies, for which the tidal stripping occurring within halos has stronger effect on stellar mass than on central stellar velocity dispersion.

  12. Mass loss in 2D rotating stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Lovekin, Caterine; Deupree, Bob

    2010-10-05

    Radiatively driven mass loss is an important factor in the evolution of massive stars . The mass loss rates depend on a number of stellar parameters, including the effective temperature and luminosity. Massive stars are also often rapidly rotating, which affects their structure and evolution. In sufficiently rapidly rotating stars, both the effective temperature and radius vary significantly as a function of latitude, and hence mass loss rates can vary appreciably between the poles and the equator. In this work, we discuss the addition of mass loss to a 2D stellar evolution code (ROTORC) and compare evolution sequences with and without mass loss. Preliminary results indicate that a full 2D calculation of mass loss using the local effective temperature and luminosity can significantly affect the distribution of mass loss in rotating main sequence stars. More mass is lost from the pole than predicted by 1D models, while less mass is lost at the equator. This change in the distribution of mass loss will affect the angular momentum loss, the surface temperature and luminosity, and even the interior structure of the star. After a single mass loss event, these effects are small, but can be expected to accumulate over the course of the main sequence evolution.

  13. GAMA: Stellar Mass Assembly in Galaxy Bulges and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Driver, Simon P.; Lange, Rebecca; Robotham, Aaron; Kelvin, Lee; GAMA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has to date obtained spectra, redshifts, and 21-band multi-facility photometry for over 200,000 galaxies in five survey regions that total nearly 300 square degrees on sky. We consider here a low-redshift (z<0.06), volume-limited subsample of ~8,000 GAMA galaxies that have been morphologically classified by the survey team. In order to quantify the separate bulge and disk properties of these galaxies, we apply a large-scale automated procedure for fitting images with 2D, multi-component structure models, including evaluation of fit convergence using a grid of input parameter values for each galaxy. From this analysis, we calculate the total bulge and disk contributions to the local galaxy stellar mass budget and derive mass-size relations for both pure spheroid/disk systems and the separate bulge/disk components of multi-component galaxies. We further examine the fraction of total stellar mass assembled in spheroid and disk structures as a function of galaxy environment, where environment is quantified on multiple scales from membership in large-scale filaments to groups/clusters and down to local pairings. We then discuss the effect of environmental conditions on the mechanisms of stellar mass assembly, including the implied balance between merger accumulation and in situ mass growth in different environment regimes.

  14. New Constraints on the Evolution of the Stellar-to-dark Matter Connection: A Combined Analysis of Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing, Clustering, and Stellar Mass Functions from z = 0.2 to z =1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Tinker, Jeremy; Bundy, Kevin; Behroozi, Peter S.; Massey, Richard; Rhodes, Jason; George, Matthew R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Benson, Andrew; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.; Capak, Peter; Cortês, Marina; Ilbert, Olivier; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Le Fèvre, Oliver; Lilly, Simon; McCracken, Henry J.; Salvato, Mara; Schrabback, Tim; Scoville, Nick; Smith, Tristan; Taylor, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the COSMOS survey, we perform the first joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing, galaxy spatial clustering, and galaxy number densities. Carefully accounting for sample variance and for scatter between stellar and halo mass, we model all three observables simultaneously using a novel and self-consistent theoretical framework. Our results provide strong constraints on the shape and redshift evolution of the stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) from z = 0.2 to z = 1. At low stellar mass, we find that halo mass scales as Mh vpropM 0.46 * and that this scaling does not evolve significantly with redshift from z = 0.2 to z = 1. The slope of the SHMR rises sharply at M * > 5 × 1010 M ⊙ and as a consequence, the stellar mass of a central galaxy becomes a poor tracer of its parent halo mass. We show that the dark-to-stellar ratio, Mh /M *, varies from low to high masses, reaching a minimum of Mh /M * ~ 27 at M * = 4.5 × 1010 M ⊙ and Mh = 1.2 × 1012 M ⊙. This minimum is important for models of galaxy formation because it marks the mass at which the accumulated stellar growth of the central galaxy has been the most efficient. We describe the SHMR at this minimum in terms of the "pivot stellar mass," M piv *, the "pivot halo mass," M piv h , and the "pivot ratio," (Mh /M *)piv. Thanks to a homogeneous analysis of a single data set spanning a large redshift range, we report the first detection of mass downsizing trends for both M piv h and M piv *. The pivot stellar mass decreases from M piv * = 5.75 ± 0.13 × 1010 M ⊙ at z = 0.88 to M piv * = 3.55 ± 0.17 × 1010 M ⊙ at z = 0.37. Intriguingly, however, the corresponding evolution of M piv h leaves the pivot ratio constant with redshift at (Mh /M *)piv ~ 27. We use simple arguments to show how this result raises the possibility that star formation quenching may ultimately depend on Mh /M * and not simply on Mh , as is commonly assumed. We show that simple models with such a dependence

  15. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR-TO-DARK MATTER CONNECTION: A COMBINED ANALYSIS OF GALAXY-GALAXY LENSING, CLUSTERING, AND STELLAR MASS FUNCTIONS FROM z = 0.2 to z = 1

    SciTech Connect

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Tinker, Jeremy; Bundy, Kevin; George, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.; Schrabback, Tim; Massey, Richard; Rhodes, Jason; Benson, Andrew; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Fevre, Oliver; Capak, Peter; Cortes, Marina; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lilly, Simon; McCracken, Henry J.; Salvato, Mara; and others

    2012-01-10

    Using data from the COSMOS survey, we perform the first joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing, galaxy spatial clustering, and galaxy number densities. Carefully accounting for sample variance and for scatter between stellar and halo mass, we model all three observables simultaneously using a novel and self-consistent theoretical framework. Our results provide strong constraints on the shape and redshift evolution of the stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) from z = 0.2 to z = 1. At low stellar mass, we find that halo mass scales as M{sub h} {proportional_to}M{sup 0.46}{sub *} and that this scaling does not evolve significantly with redshift from z = 0.2 to z = 1. The slope of the SHMR rises sharply at M{sub *} > 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and as a consequence, the stellar mass of a central galaxy becomes a poor tracer of its parent halo mass. We show that the dark-to-stellar ratio, M{sub h} /M{sub *}, varies from low to high masses, reaching a minimum of M{sub h} /M{sub *} {approx} 27 at M{sub *} = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and M{sub h} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. This minimum is important for models of galaxy formation because it marks the mass at which the accumulated stellar growth of the central galaxy has been the most efficient. We describe the SHMR at this minimum in terms of the 'pivot stellar mass', M{sup piv}{sub *}, the 'pivot halo mass', M{sup piv}{sub h}, and the 'pivot ratio', (M{sub h} /M{sub *}){sup piv}. Thanks to a homogeneous analysis of a single data set spanning a large redshift range, we report the first detection of mass downsizing trends for both M{sup piv}{sub h} and M{sup piv}{sub *}. The pivot stellar mass decreases from M{sup piv}{sub *} = 5.75 {+-} 0.13 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} at z = 0.88 to M{sup piv}{sub *} = 3.55 {+-} 0.17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} at z = 0.37. Intriguingly, however, the corresponding evolution of M{sup piv}{sub h

  16. The X-Ray Luminosity Functions of Field Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-Type Galaxies: Evidence for a Stellar Age Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Berkeley, M.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Kalogera, V.; Ptak, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span approximately equal to 3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background AGN/galaxies. We find that the "young" early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (approximately equals 2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L(sub x) approximately greater than (5-10) × 10(exp 37) erg s(exp -1)) per unit K-band luminosity (L(sub K); a proxy for stellar mass) than the "old" early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (approximately equals 8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of 2-3 excess of L(sub X)/L(sub K) for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  17. The X-ray luminosity functions of field low-mass X-ray binaries in early-type galaxies: Evidence for a stellar age dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.; Berkeley, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sivakoff, G. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span ≈3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background active galactic nuclei/galaxies. We find that the 'young' early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (≈2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L {sub X} ≳ (5-10) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) per unit K-band luminosity (L{sub K} ; a proxy for stellar mass) than the 'old' early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (≈8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of ≈2-3 excess of L {sub X}/L{sub K} for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  18. The Evolution of the Fractions of Quiescent and Star-forming Galaxies as a Function of Stellar Mass Since z = 3: Increasing Importance of Massive, Dusty Star-forming Galaxies in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martis, Nicholas S.; Marchesini, Danilo; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Muzzin, Adam; Labbé, Ivo; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Stefanon, Mauro; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-08-01

    Using the UltraVISTA DR1 and 3D-HST catalogs, we construct a stellar-mass-complete sample, unique for its combination of surveyed volume and depth, to study the evolution of the fractions of quiescent galaxies, moderately unobscured star-forming galaxies, and dusty star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass over the redshift interval 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 3.0. We show that the role of dusty star-forming galaxies within the overall galaxy population becomes more important with increasing stellar mass and grows rapidly with increasing redshift. Specifically, dusty star-forming galaxies dominate the galaxy population with {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )≳ 10.3 at z ≳ 2. The ratio of dusty and non-dusty star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass changes little with redshift. Dusty star-forming galaxies dominate the star-forming population at {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )≳ 10.0{--}10.5, being a factor of ˜3–5 more common, while unobscured star-forming galaxies dominate at {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )≲ 10. At {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )\\gt 10.5, red galaxies dominate the galaxy population at all redshift z < 3, either because they are quiescent (at late times) or dusty star-forming (in the early universe).

  19. The Evolution of the Fractions of Quiescent and Star-forming Galaxies as a Function of Stellar Mass Since z = 3: Increasing Importance of Massive, Dusty Star-forming Galaxies in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martis, Nicholas S.; Marchesini, Danilo; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Muzzin, Adam; Labbé, Ivo; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Stefanon, Mauro; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-08-01

    Using the UltraVISTA DR1 and 3D-HST catalogs, we construct a stellar-mass-complete sample, unique for its combination of surveyed volume and depth, to study the evolution of the fractions of quiescent galaxies, moderately unobscured star-forming galaxies, and dusty star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass over the redshift interval 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 3.0. We show that the role of dusty star-forming galaxies within the overall galaxy population becomes more important with increasing stellar mass and grows rapidly with increasing redshift. Specifically, dusty star-forming galaxies dominate the galaxy population with {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )≳ 10.3 at z ≳ 2. The ratio of dusty and non-dusty star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass changes little with redshift. Dusty star-forming galaxies dominate the star-forming population at {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )≳ 10.0{--}10.5, being a factor of ∼3–5 more common, while unobscured star-forming galaxies dominate at {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )≲ 10. At {log}({M}{{star}}/{M}ȯ )\\gt 10.5, red galaxies dominate the galaxy population at all redshift z < 3, either because they are quiescent (at late times) or dusty star-forming (in the early universe).

  20. Intermediate to low-mass stellar content of Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, W.; Clark, J. S.; Stolte, A.; Waters, R.; Negueruela, I.; Goodwin, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    We have analysed near-infrared NTT/SofI observations of the starburst cluster Westerlund 1, which is among the most massive young clusters in the Milky Way. A comparison of colour-magnitude diagrams with theoretical main-sequence and pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks yields improved extinction and distance estimates of AKs = 1.13 ± 0.03 mag and d = 3.55 ± 0.17 kpc (DM = 12.75 ± 0.10 mag). The pre-main sequence population is best fit by a Palla & Stahler isochrone for an age of 3.2 Myr, while the main sequence population is in agreement with a cluster age of 3 to 5 Myr. An analysis of the structural parameters of the cluster yields that the half-mass radius of the cluster population increases towards lower mass, indicative of the presence of mass segregation. The cluster is clearly elongated with an eccentricity of 0.20 for stars with masses between 10 and 32 M_⊙, and 0.15 for stars with masses in the range 3 to 10 M_⊙. We derive the slope of the stellar mass function for stars with masses between 3.4 and 27 M_⊙. In an annulus with radii between 0.75 and 1.5 pc from the cluster centre, we obtain a slope of Γ = -1.3. Closer in, the mass function of Westerlund 1 is shallower with Γ = -0.6. The extrapolation of the mass function for stars with masses from 0.08 to 120 M_⊙ yields an initial total stellar mass of ≈52 000 M_⊙, and a present-day mass of 20 000 to 45 000 M_⊙ (about 10 times the stellar mass of the Orion nebula cluster, and 2 to 4 times the mass of the NGC 3603 young cluster), indicating that Westerlund 1 is the most massive starburst cluster identified to date in the Milky Way. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, and retrieved from the ESO archive (Prog ID 67.C-0514).

  1. Stellar evolution at high mass including the effect of a stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a stellar wind on the evolution of stars in the mass range from 15 to 120 solar masses is investigated. All the stellar models are constructed with the use of Cox-Stewart opacities. Four possible cases of mass loss are considered: (1) no mass loss at all; (2) substantial mass loss from stars in all stages of evolution; (3) heavy mass loss from red supergiants only; and (4) sudden and very heavy mass loss from luminous yellow supergiants. The assumption of mass loss during the main-sequence phase of evolution is found to lead to a lowering of the luminosity and, unless the mass loss is extremely heavy, of the effective temperature as well. A comparison of the adopted mass-loss rates with observed rates suggests that stellar winds are probably not an important factor in the evolution of main-sequence stars and supergiants unless the initial masses are greater than about 30 solar masses.

  2. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Will M.; Sravan, Niharika; Kalogera, Vicky; Cantrell, Andrew; Kreidberg, Laura; Bailyn, Charles D.; Mandel, Ilya E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com E-mail: andrew.cantrell@yale.edu E-mail: charles.bailyn@yale.edu

    2011-11-10

    We perform a Bayesian analysis of the mass distribution of stellar-mass black holes using the observed masses of 15 low-mass X-ray binary systems undergoing Roche lobe overflow and 5 high-mass, wind-fed X-ray binary systems. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo calculations, we model the mass distribution both parametrically-as a power law, exponential, Gaussian, combination of two Gaussians, or log-normal distribution-and non-parametrically-as histograms with varying numbers of bins. We provide confidence bounds on the shape of the mass distribution in the context of each model and compare the models with each other by calculating their relative Bayesian evidence as supported by the measurements, taking into account the number of degrees of freedom of each model. The mass distribution of the low-mass systems is best fit by a power law, while the distribution of the combined sample is best fit by the exponential model. This difference indicates that the low-mass subsample is not consistent with being drawn from the distribution of the combined population. We examine the existence of a 'gap' between the most massive neutron stars and the least massive black holes by considering the value, M{sub 1%}, of the 1% quantile from each black hole mass distribution as the lower bound of black hole masses. Our analysis generates posterior distributions for M{sub 1%}; the best model (the power law) fitted to the low-mass systems has a distribution of lower bounds with M{sub 1%}>4.3 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence, while the best model (the exponential) fitted to all 20 systems has M{sub 1%}>4.5 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence. We conclude that our sample of black hole masses provides strong evidence of a gap between the maximum neutron star mass and the lower bound on black hole masses. Our results on the low-mass sample are in qualitative agreement with those of Ozel et al., although our broad model selection analysis more reliably reveals the best-fit quantitative description of the

  3. Evolution of planetary systems with time-dependent stellar mass-loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Anderson, Kassandra R.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2013-06-01

    Observations indicate that intermediate-mass stars, binary stars and stellar remnants often host planets; a complete explanation of these systems requires an understanding of how planetary orbits evolve as their central stars lose mass. Motivated by these dynamical systems, this paper generalizes in two directions previous studies of orbital evolution in planetary systems with stellar mass-loss: (1) many previous treatments focus on constant mass-loss rates and much of this work is carried out numerically. Here, we study a class of single planet systems where the stellar mass-loss rate is time dependent. The mass-loss rate can be increasing or decreasing, but the stellar mass always decreases monotonically. For this class of models, we develop analytic approximations to specify the final orbital elements for planets that remain bound after the epoch of mass-loss, and find the conditions required for the planets to become unbound. We also show that for some mass-loss functions, planets become unbound only in the asymptotic limit where the stellar mass vanishes. (2) We consider the chaotic evolution for two planet systems with stellar mass-loss. Here, we focus on a model consisting of analogues of Jupiter, Saturn and the Sun. By monitoring the divergence of initially similar trajectories through time, we calculate the Lyapunov exponents of the system. This analogue Solar system is chaotic in the absence of mass-loss with Lyapunov time τly ≈ 5-10 Myr; we find that the Lyapunov time decreases with increasing stellar mass-loss rate, with a nearly linear relationship between the two time-scales. Taken together, the results of this paper help provide an explanation for a wide range of dynamical evolution that occurs in Solar systems with stellar mass-loss.

  4. [Automatic Measurement of the Stellar Atmospheric Parameters Based Mass Estimation].

    PubMed

    Tu, Liang-ping; Wei, Hui-ming; Luo, A-li; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2015-11-01

    We have collected massive stellar spectral data in recent years, which leads to the research on the automatic measurement of stellar atmospheric physical parameters (effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g and metallic abundance [Fe/ H]) become an important issue. To study the automatic measurement of these three parameters has important significance for some scientific problems, such as the evolution of the universe and so on. But the research of this problem is not very widely, some of the current methods are not able to estimate the values of the stellar atmospheric physical parameters completely and accurately. So in this paper, an automatic method to predict stellar atmospheric parameters based on mass estimation was presented, which can achieve the prediction of stellar effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g and metallic abundance [Fe/H]. This method has small amount of computation and fast training speed. The main idea of this method is that firstly it need us to build some mass distributions, secondly the original spectral data was mapped into the mass space and then to predict the stellar parameter with the support vector regression (SVR) in the mass space. we choose the stellar spectral data from the United States SDSS-DR8 for the training and testing. We also compared the predicted results of this method with the SSPP and achieve higher accuracy. The predicted results are more stable and the experimental results show that the method is feasible and can predict the stellar atmospheric physical parameters effectively. PMID:26978937

  5. Galaxy cosmological mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ℳg were computed in terms of the redshift. ℳg was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 stellar mass-to-light ratio and its GSMF data. Results: Assuming ℳg0 ≈ 1011ℳ⊙ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in LB ∝ (1 + z)(2.40 ± 0.03) and ℳg ∝ (1 + z)(1.1 ± 0.2). However, using the GSMF results to calculate the average galactic mass produces ℳg ∝ (1 + z)(- 0.58 ± 0.22). We chose the latter result because it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to finally calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function, but whose fitted parameter values are different from the values found in the literature for the GSMF. Conclusions: This GCMF behavior follows the theoretical predictions from the cold dark matter models in which the less massive objects form first, followed later by more massive ones. In the range 0.5

  6. Energy balance of stellar coronae. III - Effect of stellar mass and radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, R.

    1984-01-01

    A homologous transformation is derived which permits the application of the numerical coronal models of Hammer from a star with solar mass and radius to other stars. This scaling requires a few approximations concerning the lower boundary conditions and the temperature dependence of the conductivity and emissivity. These approximations are discussed and found to be surprisingly mild. Therefore, the scaling of the coronal models to other stars is rather accurate; it is found to be particularly accurate for main-sequence stars. The transformation is used to derive an equation that gives the maximum temperature of open coronal regions as a function of stellar mass and radius, the coronal heating flux, and the characteristic damping length over which the corona is heated.

  7. Stellar-mass Black Holes in Young Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Johnson, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    We explore the potential cumulative energy production of stellar-mass black holes in early galaxies. Stellar-mass black holes may accrete substantially from the higher density interstellar media (ISMs) of primordial galaxies, and their energy release would be distributed more uniformly over the galaxies, perhaps providing a different mode of energy feedback into young galaxies than central supermassive black holes. We construct a model for the production and growth of stellar-mass black holes over the first few gigayears of a young galaxy. With the simplifying assumption of a constant density of the ISM, n ~ 104-105 cm-3, we estimate the number of accreting stellar-mass black holes to be ~106 and the potential energy production to be as high as 1061 erg over several billion years. For densities less than 105 cm-3, stellar-mass black holes are unlikely to reach their Eddington limit luminosities. The framework we present could be incorporated in numerical simulations to compute the feedback from stellar-mass black holes with inhomogeneous, evolving ISMs.

  8. STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES IN YOUNG GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Johnson, Vincent E-mail: flint88@mail.utexas.edu

    2011-09-10

    We explore the potential cumulative energy production of stellar-mass black holes in early galaxies. Stellar-mass black holes may accrete substantially from the higher density interstellar media (ISMs) of primordial galaxies, and their energy release would be distributed more uniformly over the galaxies, perhaps providing a different mode of energy feedback into young galaxies than central supermassive black holes. We construct a model for the production and growth of stellar-mass black holes over the first few gigayears of a young galaxy. With the simplifying assumption of a constant density of the ISM, n {approx} 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, we estimate the number of accreting stellar-mass black holes to be {approx}10{sup 6} and the potential energy production to be as high as 10{sup 61} erg over several billion years. For densities less than 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, stellar-mass black holes are unlikely to reach their Eddington limit luminosities. The framework we present could be incorporated in numerical simulations to compute the feedback from stellar-mass black holes with inhomogeneous, evolving ISMs.

  9. A new methodology to test galaxy formation models using the dependence of clustering on stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, David J. R.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Mitchell, Peter D.; Helly, John C.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Simha, Vimal; Farrow, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    We present predictions for the two-point correlation function of galaxy clustering as a function of stellar mass, computed using two new versions of the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model. These models make use of a high resolution, large volume N-body simulation, set in the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmology. One model uses a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF), while the other assumes different IMFs for quiescent star formation and bursts. Particular consideration is given to how the assumptions required to estimate the stellar masses of observed galaxies (such as the choice of IMF, stellar population synthesis model, and dust extinction) influence the perceived dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass. Broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting is carried out to estimate stellar masses for the model galaxies in the same manner as in observational studies. We show clear differences between the clustering signals computed using the true and estimated model stellar masses. As such, we highlight the importance of applying our methodology to compare theoretical models to observations. We introduce an alternative scheme for the calculation of the merger time-scales for satellite galaxies in GALFORM, which takes into account the dark matter subhalo information from the simulation. This reduces the amplitude of small-scale clustering. The new merger scheme offers improved or similar agreement with observational clustering measurements, over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.7. We find reasonable agreement with clustering measurements from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly Survey, but find larger discrepancies for some stellar mass ranges and separation scales with respect to measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey, depending on the GALFORM model used.

  10. Models of stellar population at high redshift, as constrained by PN yields and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Stellar population models are the tool to derive the properties of real galaxies, or predict them via galaxy formation models. A constructive approach is to use nearby stellar systems to calibrate uncertain quantities in stellar evolution. These checks and comparisons are particulary needed for evolved and short stellar phases such as the Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic giant branch, after whcih intermediate-mass stars evolve through the planetary nebula stage. Given the stellar mass range for which the fuel consumption along the TP-AGB is larger, high-redshift galaxies are the best probes of our modelling. I shall present the models, discuss how different prescription for the treatment of this stellar phase affects the integrated spectral energy distribution and how these compare to galaxy data, and discuss implications for the PN nebulae luminosity function and stellar remnants stemming from the various assumptions.

  11. Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey: Stellar Populations and Mass Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stephane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Dalcanton, Julianne; de Jong, Roelof S.; McDonald, Michael; Tully, R. Brent

    2015-01-01

    M31 is ideal for understanding the structure and stellar populations of spiral galaxies thanks to its proximity and our external vantage point. The Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey (ANDROIDS) has used MegaCam and WIRCam on the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope to map the M31 bulge and disk out to R=40 kpc in ugriJKs bands. Through careful sky monitoring and modelling, ANDROIDS is uniquely able to observe both the resolved stars and integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) over M31's entire disk (complimenting HST's PHAT program). By simultaneously fitting stellar populations with isochrones and SED models for M31, we can assess the systematic uncertainties of SED fits to more distant unresolved systems, and constrain the stellar populations that contribute to each bandpass. We pay close attention to the near-IR light of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in stellar population models. ANDROIDS has also surveyed M31 in narrowband TiO and CN bands, enabling a clean classification of Carbon AGB stars, and a mapping the ratio of Carbon and M-type AGB stars (C/M) across the entire disk. The correlation between C/M and stellar metallicity is useful for constraining the NIR colors of more distant galaxies. We also present a hierarchical Bayesian model of pixel-by-pixel stellar populations, yielding the most detailed map of M31's stellar mass and star formation history to date. We find that a full six-band optical-NIR fit provides the best constraints to stellar mass, a triumph for modern NIR stellar population synthesis models, though the results are consistent with an optical-only fits. Fits based on the popular g-i color combination find M/L* ratios biased by 0.1 dex, while color-mass-to-light prescriptions in the literature may differ by 0.3 dex. This result affirms that panchromatic SED modelling is crucial even for stellar mass estimation, let alone age and metallicity. Overall, we estimate the stellar mass of M31, within R=30 kpc, to be 10.3 (+2.3, -1

  12. SPIDER. V. Measuring Systematic Effects in Early-type Galaxy Stellar Masses from Photometric Spectral Energy Distribution Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, R.; Gal, R. R.; La Barbera, F.; de Carvalho, R. R.

    2011-10-01

    We present robust statistical estimates of the accuracy of early-type galaxy stellar masses derived from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting as functions of various empirical and theoretical assumptions. Using large samples consisting of ~40,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; ugriz), of which ~5000 are also in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (YJHK), with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.05 <= z <= 0.095, we test the reliability of some commonly used stellar population models and extinction laws for computing stellar masses. Spectroscopic ages (t), metallicities (Z), and extinctions (AV ) are also computed from fits to SDSS spectra using various population models. These external constraints are used in additional tests to estimate the systematic errors in the stellar masses derived from SED fitting, where t, Z, and AV are typically left as free parameters. We find reasonable agreement in mass estimates among stellar population models, with variation of the initial mass function and extinction law yielding systematic biases on the mass of nearly a factor of two, in agreement with other studies. Removing the near-infrared bands changes the statistical bias in mass by only ~0.06 dex, adding uncertainties of ~0.1 dex at the 95% CL. In contrast, we find that removing an ultraviolet band is more critical, introducing 2σ uncertainties of ~0.15 dex. Finally, we find that the stellar masses are less affected by the absence of metallicity and/or dust extinction knowledge. However, there is a definite systematic offset in the mass estimate when the stellar population age is unknown, up to a factor of 2.5 for very old (12 Gyr) stellar populations. We present the stellar masses for our sample, corrected for the measured systematic biases due to photometrically determined ages, finding that age errors produce lower stellar masses by ~0.15 dex, with errors of ~0.02 dex at the 95% CL for the median stellar age subsample.

  13. Dynamical and Stellar Masses of Lyman-alpha Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, S.; McLinden, E.; Richardson, M. L.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Tilvi, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have observed strong nebular lines of [OIII] and H alpha for Lyman-alpha galaxies at z=2-3.1 using Keck+NIRSPEC, LBT+LUCIFER, and Gemini+NIFS. [OIII] 5007 is strong enough to dominate the 2 micron K band fluxes of these galaxies, and leads to an overestimate of the stellar mass of the galaxy by an order of magnitude. After correcting for the observed [OIII] lines, we infer low masses and young ages for these galaxies. We also use the physical widths of the rest-optical lines, combined with spatial sizes from HST imaging, to obtain direct dynamical mass estimates of Lyman alpha galaxies (which cannot be done using the resonantly scattered Lyman alpha line). Finally, we combine our stellar mass estimates and line widths to place these galaxies on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. We find that the stellar masses required to reproduce the observed light are lower than one would expect based on the galaxies' line widths. The stellar mass densities of these galaxies are comparable to those of elliptical galaxies today. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant NSF-AST-0808165.

  14. A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTIES AFFECTING THE STELLAR MASS-HALO MASS RELATION FOR 0 < z < 4

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Conroy, Charlie

    2010-07-01

    We conduct a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between central galaxies and their host dark matter halos, as characterized by the stellar mass-halo mass (SM-HM) relation, with rigorous consideration of uncertainties. Our analysis focuses on results from the abundance matching technique, which assumes that every dark matter halo or subhalo above a specific mass threshold hosts one galaxy. We provide a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation for 0 < z < 1 and discuss the quantitative effects of uncertainties in observed galaxy stellar mass functions (including stellar mass estimates and counting uncertainties), halo mass functions (including cosmology and uncertainties from substructure), and the abundance matching technique used to link galaxies to halos (including scatter in this connection). Our analysis results in a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation and its evolution from z = 0 to z = 4. The shape and the evolution are well constrained for z < 1. The largest uncertainties at these redshifts are due to stellar mass estimates (0.25 dex uncertainty in normalization); however, failure to account for scatter in stellar masses at fixed halo mass can lead to errors of similar magnitude in the SM-HM relation for central galaxies in massive halos. We also investigate the SM-HM relation to z = 4, although the shape of the relation at higher redshifts remains fairly unconstrained when uncertainties are taken into account. We find that the integrated star formation at a given halo mass peaks at 10%-20% of available baryons for all redshifts from 0 to 4. This peak occurs at a halo mass of 7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} at z = 0 and this mass increases by a factor of 5 to z = 4. At lower and higher masses, star formation is substantially less efficient, with stellar mass scaling as M{sub *} {approx} M {sup 2.3}{sub h} at low masses and M{sub *} {approx} M {sup 0.29}{sub h} at high masses. The typical stellar mass for halos with mass less than 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} has

  15. A Comprehensive Analysis of Uncertainties Affecting the Stellar Mass-Halo Mass Relation for 0

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2010-06-07

    We conduct a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between central galaxies and their host dark matter halos, as characterized by the stellar mass - halo mass (SM-HM) relation, with rigorous consideration of uncertainties. Our analysis focuses on results from the abundance matching technique, which assumes that every dark matter halo or subhalo above a specific mass threshold hosts one galaxy. We provide a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation for 0 < z < 1 and discuss the quantitative effects of uncertainties in observed galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) (including stellar mass estimates and counting uncertainties), halo mass functions (including cosmology and uncertainties from substructure), and the abundance matching technique used to link galaxies to halos (including scatter in this connection). Our analysis results in a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation and its evolution from z=0 to z=4. The shape and evolution are well constrained for z < 1. The largest uncertainties at these redshifts are due to stellar mass estimates (0.25 dex uncertainty in normalization); however, failure to account for scatter in stellar masses at fixed halo mass can lead to errors of similar magnitude in the SM-HM relation for central galaxies in massive halos. We also investigate the SM-HM relation to z = 4, although the shape of the relation at higher redshifts remains fairly unconstrained when uncertainties are taken into account. We find that the integrated star formation at a given halo mass peaks at 10-20% of available baryons for all redshifts from 0 to 4. This peak occurs at a halo mass of 7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} at z = 0 and this mass increases by a factor of 5 to z = 4. At lower and higher masses, star formation is substantially less efficient, with stellar mass scaling as M{sub *} {approx} M{sub h}{sup 2.3} at low masses and M{sub *} {approx} M{sub h}{sup 0.29} at high masses. The typical stellar mass for halos with mass less than 10{sup 12} M

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS bulge, disk and total stellar mass estimates (Mendel+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, J. T.; Simard, L.; Palmer, M.; Ellison, S. L.; Patton, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalog of bulge, disk, and total stellar mass estimates for ~660000 galaxies in the Legacy area of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data (SDSS) Release 7. These masses are based on a homogeneous catalog of g- and r-band photometry described by Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11), which we extend here with bulge+disk and Sersic profile photometric decompositions in the SDSS u, i, and z bands. We discuss the methodology used to derive stellar masses from these data via fitting to broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and show that the typical statistical uncertainty on total, bulge, and disk stellar mass is ~0.15 dex. Despite relatively small formal uncertainties, we argue that SED modeling assumptions, including the choice of synthesis model, extinction law, initial mass function, and details of stellar evolution likely contribute an additional 60% systematic uncertainty in any mass estimate based on broadband SED fitting. We discuss several approaches for identifying genuine bulge+disk systems based on both their statistical likelihood and an analysis of their one-dimensional surface-brightness profiles, and include these metrics in the catalogs. Estimates of the total, bulge and disk stellar masses for both normal and dust-free models and their uncertainties are made publicly available here. (4 data files).

  17. RETIRED A STARS: THE EFFECT OF STELLAR EVOLUTION ON THE MASS ESTIMATES OF SUBGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Wright, Jason T.

    2013-01-20

    Doppler surveys have shown that the occurrence rate of Jupiter-mass planets appears to increase as a function of stellar mass. However, this result depends on the ability to accurately measure the masses of evolved stars. Recently, Lloyd called into question the masses of subgiant stars targeted by Doppler surveys. Lloyd argues that very few observable subgiants have masses greater than 1.5 M {sub Sun }, and that most of them have masses in the range 1.0-1.2 M {sub Sun }. To investigate this claim, we use Galactic stellar population models to generate an all-sky distribution of stars. We incorporate the effects that make massive subgiants less numerous, such as the initial mass function and differences in stellar evolution timescales. We find that these effects lead to negligibly small systematic errors in stellar mass estimates, in contrast to the Almost-Equal-To 50% errors predicted by Lloyd. Additionally, our simulated target sample does in fact include a significant fraction of stars with masses greater than 1.5 M {sub Sun }, primarily because the inclusion of an apparent magnitude limit results in a Malmquist-like bias toward more massive stars, in contrast to the volume-limited simulations of Lloyd. The magnitude limit shifts the mean of our simulated distribution toward higher masses and results in a relatively smaller number of evolved stars with masses in the range 1.0-1.2 M {sub Sun }. We conclude that, within the context of our present-day understanding of stellar structure and evolution, many of the subgiants observed in Doppler surveys are indeed as massive as main-sequence A stars.

  18. Stellar mass and population diagnostics of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.

    2013-12-01

    We conduct a broad investigation about stellar mass and population diagnostics in order to formulate novel constraints related to the formation and evolution of galaxies from a nearby cluster environment. Our work is powered by the use of stellar population models which transform galaxy colours and/or absorption line strengths into estimates of its stellar properties. As input to such models, we assemble an extensive compilation of age and chemical abundance information for Galactic globular clusters. This compilation allows a confident expansion of these models into new regions of parameter space that promise to refine our knowledge of galactic chemical evolution. We then draw upon a state-of-the-art spectroscopic and photometric survey of the Virgo galaxy cluster in order to constrain spatial variations of the stellar ages, metallicities, and masses within its member galaxies, and their dynamical masses. We interpret these data in the context of the histories of star formation, chemical enrichment, and stellar mass assembly to formulate a broad picture of the build-up of this cluster's content over time. In it, the giant early-type galaxies formed through highly dissipational processes at early times that built up most of their stellar mass and drew significant amounts of dark matter within their optical radii. Conversely, dwarf early-types experienced environmental processes that quenched their star formation during either the early stages of cluster assembly or upon infall at later times. Somewhat perplexing is our finding that the internal dynamics of these galaxies are largely explained by their stellar masses. Lastly, Virgo spirals also suffer from their dense environment, through ram pressure stripping and/or tidal harrassment. In addition to quenching, these effects leave an imprint on their internal dynamical evolution too. Late-type spirals exhibit evidence of having ejected significant amounts of baryons from their inner regions, likely via energetic

  19. The Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. R.; Iribarrem, A.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work is to present a semi-empirical relativistic approach which uses the general model connecting cosmological theory to observational data derived from galaxy surveys (Ribeiro & Stoeger 2003, ApJ, 592, 1) to study the galactic mass evolution. For this purpose we define a new quantity named the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF). We used the FORS Deep Field survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 5.0 and its luminosity function in the B-band, as well as this sample's stellar masses. We obtained that the GCMF behaves as a power-law given by ζ (z) ∝ [M_{g}(z)]^{-2.3± 0.4}, where M_{g} is the average galactic mass in the studied redshift interval. This result can be seen as an average of the galaxy stellar mass function pattern found in the literature, where more massive galaxies were assembled earlier than less massive ones.

  20. Stellar masses for thousands of z>1 resolved, dusty starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Caitlin; Smail, Ian; Chapman, Scott; Hung, Chao-Ling; Manning, Sinclaire; Battye, Richard; Abdalla, Filipe; Birkinshaw, Mark; Hales, Christopher; Myers, Steve; Muxlow, Tom; Jackson, Neal; Bacon, David; Brown, Michael; Browne, Ian; Beswick, Rob; Garrington, Simon; Kay, Scott; Leahy, Paddy; Nichol, Bob; Richards, Anita; Wilkinson, Peter; Sanders, David

    2015-10-01

    Dusty star-forming galaxies, with individual star formation rates >100Msun/yr, formed most of the stars in the Universe at early epochs (z 1-2), yet their physical origins and triggering, whether it be from major mergers or secular disk-bound star-formation, is still unsolved. In assessing the role of major galaxy mergers (amongst dusty galaxies) to cosmic star formation, the measurement of galaxies' stellar masses is critical. Starbursts' stellar masses tell us about their past average star formation rate and whether or not the current high-SFR phase is indeed rare (short-lived) or in line with expectation. Can we definitively measure whether the occurrence of major mergers at a given star-formation rate varies with stellar mass, as predicted? Or are high star formation rates simply always indicative of short-lived bursts? Here we propose deep infrared imaging of a new 1.77deg^2 extragalactic legacy field which has very unique, deep, high-resolution radio interferometric coverage from the e-MERLIN SuperCLASS survey; the dataset's radio continuum mapping will allow a unique morphological measurement of obscured star formation in 5000 starbursts, probing the merger fraction of dusty galaxies (which are too dusty for HST morphology). Critically, Spitzer IRAC 3.6um and 4.5um will allow calculation of galaxies' stellar masses and allow us to directly test if higher mass starbursts are less likely to exhibit clumpy, merging morphologies than their lower mass counterparts (a key corollary to the galaxies `main sequence' framework). In addition, IRAC coverage provides an independent AGN indicator (steep mid-IR powerlaw), will improve the quality of photometric redshifts in the field, and will provide crucial near-IR positional counterparts for future submillimeter coverage.

  1. A New Method for Deriving the Stellar Birth Function of Resolved Stellar Populations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, M.; Tchernyshyov, K.; Brown, T. M.; Gordon, K. D.

    2015-07-01

    We present a new method for deriving the stellar birth function (SBF) of resolved stellar populations. The SBF (stars born per unit mass, time, and metallicity) is the combination of the initial mass function (IMF), the star formation history (SFH), and the metallicity distribution function (MDF). The framework of our analysis is that of Poisson Point Processes (PPPs), a class of statistical models suitable when dealing with points (stars) in a multidimensional space (the measurement space of multiple photometric bands). The theory of PPPs easily accommodates the modeling of measurement errors as well as that of incompleteness. Our method avoids binning stars in the color–magnitude diagram and uses the whole likelihood function for each data point; combining the individual likelihoods allows the computation of the posterior probability for the population's SBF. Within the proposed framework it is possible to include nuisance parameters, such as distance and extinction, by specifying their prior distributions and marginalizing over them. The aim of this paper is to assess the validity of this new approach under a range of assumptions, using only simulated data. Forthcoming work will show applications to real data. Although it has a broad scope of possible applications, we have developed this method to study multi-band Hubble Space Telescope observations of the Milky Way Bulge. Therefore we will focus on simulations with characteristics similar to those of the Galactic Bulge. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at STScI, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. The universal stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gallazzi, Anna

    2013-12-20

    We present spectroscopic metallicities of individual stars in seven gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), and we show that dIrrs obey the same mass-metallicity relation as the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of both the Milky Way and M31: Z{sub ∗}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 0.30±0.02}. The uniformity of the relation is in contradiction to previous estimates of metallicity based on photometry. This relationship is roughly continuous with the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for galaxies as massive as M {sub *} = 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. Although the average metallicities of dwarf galaxies depend only on stellar mass, the shapes of their metallicity distributions depend on galaxy type. The metallicity distributions of dIrrs resemble simple, leaky box chemical evolution models, whereas dSphs require an additional parameter, such as gas accretion, to explain the shapes of their metallicity distributions. Furthermore, the metallicity distributions of the more luminous dSphs have sharp, metal-rich cut-offs that are consistent with the sudden truncation of star formation due to ram pressure stripping.

  3. The Universal Stellar Mass-Stellar Metallicity Relation for Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Cheng, Lucy; Bullock, James S.; Gallazzi, Anna

    2013-12-01

    We present spectroscopic metallicities of individual stars in seven gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), and we show that dIrrs obey the same mass-metallicity relation as the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of both the Milky Way and M31: Z_* \\propto M_*^{0.30+/- 0.02}. The uniformity of the relation is in contradiction to previous estimates of metallicity based on photometry. This relationship is roughly continuous with the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for galaxies as massive as M * = 1012 M ⊙. Although the average metallicities of dwarf galaxies depend only on stellar mass, the shapes of their metallicity distributions depend on galaxy type. The metallicity distributions of dIrrs resemble simple, leaky box chemical evolution models, whereas dSphs require an additional parameter, such as gas accretion, to explain the shapes of their metallicity distributions. Furthermore, the metallicity distributions of the more luminous dSphs have sharp, metal-rich cut-offs that are consistent with the sudden truncation of star formation due to ram pressure stripping. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Brightest group galaxies: stellar mass and star formation rate (paper I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozaliasl, Ghassem; Finoguenov, Alexis; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Mirkazemi, Mohammad; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    We study the distribution and evolution of the stellar mass and the star formation rate (SFR) of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) over 0.04 < z < 1.3 using a large sample of 407 X-ray galaxy groups selected from the COSMOS, AEGIS, and XMM-LSS fields. We compare our results with predictions from the semi-analytic models based on the Millennium simulation. In contrast to model predictions, we find that, as the Universe evolves, the stellar mass distribution evolves towards a normal distribution. This distribution tends to skew to low-mass BGGs at all redshifts implying the presence of a star-forming population of the BGGs with MS ˜ 1010.5 M⊙ which results in the shape of the stellar mass distribution deviating from a normal distribution. In agreement with the models and previous studies, we find that the mean stellar mass of BGGs grows with time by a factor of ˜2 between z = 1.3 and z = 0.1, however, the significant growth occurs above z = 0.4. The BGGs are not entirely a dormant population of galaxies, as low-mass BGGs in low-mass haloes are more active in forming stars than the BGGs in more massive haloes, over the same redshift range. We find that the average SFR of the BGGs evolves steeply with redshift and fraction of the passive BGGs increases as a function of increasing stellar mass and halo mass. Finally, we show that the specific SFR of the BGGs within haloes with M200 ≤ 1013.4 M⊙ decreases with increasing halo mass at z < 0.4.

  5. The Stellar Populations of Deeply Embedded Young Clusters: Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Emergent Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    1996-04-01

    The goal of this thesis is to test the following hypothesis: the initial distribution of stellar masses from a single "episode" of star formation is independent of the local physical conditions of the region. In other words, is the initial mass function (IMF) strictly universal over spatial scales d < 1 \\ pc and over time intervals Delta-tau << 3 x 10^6 yrs? We discuss the utility of embedded clusters in addressing this question. Using a combination of spectroscopic and photometric techniques, we seek to characterize emergent mass distributions of embedded clusters in order to compare them both with each other and with the field star IMF. Medium resolution (R=1000) near-infrared spectra obtainable with the current generation of NIR grating spectrographs can provide estimates of the photospheric temperatures of optically-invisible stars. Deriving these spectral types requires a three--step process; i) setting up a classification scheme based on near-infrared spectra of spectral standards; ii) understanding the effects of accretion on this classification scheme by studying optically-visible young stellar objects; and iii) applying this classification technique to the deeply embedded clusters. Combining near-infrared photometry with spectral types, accurate stellar luminosities can be derived for heavily reddened young stars thus enabling their placement in the H-R diagram. From their position in the H-R diagram, masses and ages of stars can be estimated from comparison with theoretical pre-main sequence evolutionary models. Because it is not practical to obtain complete spectroscopic samples of embedded cluster members, a technique is developed based solely on near-IR photometry for estimating stellar luminosities from flux--limited surveys. We then describe how spectroscopic surveys of deeply embedded clusters are necessary in order to adopt appropriate mass-luminosity relationships. Stellar luminosity functions constructed from complete extinction-limited samples

  6. Stellar Mass Radial Profiles of Pan-STARRS MDS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Thilker, D. A.; Heckman, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Six-band (ugrizy) surface brightness radial profiles are derived for a sample of 48 late-type face-on non-interacting nearby galaxies using the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey stack imaging (grizy) and the CFHT deep u-band imaging data. The surface brightnesses are measured down to ~ 29-30 ABmag/arcsec^2. The SB radial profiles are then fed into the advanced SED fitting software MAGPHYS (da Cunha et al. 2008) to derive radial profiles of stellar mass surface density as well as other parameters, such as metallicity and star formation history. The output stellar mass surface density profiles can be classified into three types (single exponential, down-bending, and up-bending), which is consistent with the results of Polen & Trujillo (2006). But the up-bending profiles are more common than indicated in PT06.

  7. On the uncertainties of stellar mass estimates via colour measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    Mass-to-light versus colour relations (MLCRs), derived from stellar population synthesis models, are widely used to estimate galaxy stellar masses (M*), yet a detailed investigation of their inherent biases and limitations is still lacking. We quantify several potential sources of uncertainty, using optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for a representative sample of nearby galaxies from the Virgo cluster. Our method for combining multiband photometry with MLCRs yields robust stellar masses, while errors in M* decrease as more bands are simultaneously considered. The prior assumptions in one's stellar population modelling dominate the error budget, creating a colour-dependent bias of up to 0.6 dex if NIR fluxes are used (0.3 dex otherwise). This matches the systematic errors associated with the method of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, indicating that MLCRs do not suffer from much additional bias. Moreover, MLCRs and SED fitting yield similar degrees of random error (˜0.1-0.14 dex) when applied to mock galaxies and, on average, equivalent masses for real galaxies with M* ˜ 108-11 M⊙. The use of integrated photometry introduces additional uncertainty in M* measurements, at the level of 0.05-0.07 dex. We argue that using MLCRs, instead of time-consuming SED fits, is justified in cases with complex model parameter spaces (involving, for instance, multiparameter star formation histories) and/or for large data sets. Spatially resolved methods for measuring M* should be applied for small sample sizes and/or when accuracies less than 0.1 dex are required. An appendix provides our MLCR transformations for 10 colour permutations of the grizH filter set.

  8. Probing the Mass Distribution and Stellar Populations of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Johnny; Martini, P.; Thompson, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    M82 is often considered the archetypical starburst galaxy because of its spectacular starbust-driven superwind. Its close proximity of 3.6 Mpc and nearly edge-on geometry make it a unique laboratory for studying the physics of rapid star formation and violent galactic winds. In addition, there is evidence that it has been tidally-truncated by its interaction with M81 and therefore has essentially no dark matter halo. The mass distribution of this galaxy is needed to estimate the power of its superwind, as well as determine if a dark matter halo is still present. Numerous studies have used stellar and gas dynamics to estimate the mass distribution, yet the substantial dust attenuation has been a significant challenge. We have measured the stellar kinematics in the near-infrared K-band with the LUCI-1 spectrograph at the Large Binocular Telescope. We used the '2CO stellar absorption bandhead at 2.29µm to measure the stellar rotation curve out to ˜4kpc, and our results confirm that the dark matter halo is still present. This is in stark contrast with the nearly Keplerian gas dynamics measured with HI and CO emission from the interstellar medium. We estimate M82's dynamical mass to be ˜1010 M⊙. We have also measured the equivalent width of the 12CO bandhead to provide new constraints on the spatial extent of the red supergiant population. The variation in the CO equivalent width with radius clearly shows that supergiants dominate the light within 0.5kpc radius. The superwind is likely launched from this region, where we estimate the enclosed mass is 2×109 M⊙.

  9. PRIMUS: stellar mass growth since z=1 with redshifts over 8 sq deg of SWIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Michael; Bolton, Adam; Coil, Alison; Cool, Richard; Eisenstein, Daniel; Hogg, David; Moustakas, John

    2008-03-01

    We propose here for archival research funding to measure the build-up of stellar mass over the last eight billion years, using an unprecedentedly large sample. Measuring the increase of stellar mass in galaxies, and determining its dependence on galaxy type and environment, yields crucial information about the star-formation and merger history of galaxies. This history has been the subject of intense research over the past few years, but has been limited by both systematic effects and by the sizes of the available observational samples. Our PRIMUS survey contains over 200,000 spectroscopic redshifts, measured at 1 percent precision, out to redshift z=1, covering 8 square degrees of SWIRE and S-COSMOS imaging. Our sample is flux-limited at i=23 and includes all galaxy types, spanning the red and blue galaxy populations. We have created this sample using a special mode we have developed for the IMACS instrument on the Magellan 6.5m at Las Campanas Observatories: a low dispersion prism in combination with a multi-slit mask. This configuration allows redshift determination of 1 percent accuracy, while also allowing extreme multiplexing to obtain over 2,000 galaxy spectra simultaneously. With the SWIRE optical and infrared imaging in combination with our redshift determinations, we can recover much more accurate estimates of the stellar mass of each galaxy and construct a high signal-to-noise estimate of the stellar mass function over a range of redshifts. These measurements will dramatically improve our current understanding of the build-up of stellar mass, both by decreasing the statistical uncertainty due to sample variance with our massive sample, and by decreasing the systematic uncertainties in stellar masses by using the SWIRE and S-COSMOS imaging.

  10. The Close Stellar Companions to Intermediate-mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Trenti, Michele; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    When embedded in dense cluster cores, intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) acquire close stellar or stellar-remnant companions. These companions are not only gravitationally bound, but also tend to hierarchically isolate from other cluster stars through series of multibody encounters. In this paper we study the demographics of IMBH companions in compact star clusters through direct N-body simulations. We study clusters initially composed of 105 or 2 × 105 stars with IMBHs of 75 and 150 solar masses, and we follow their evolution for 6-10 Gyr. A tight, innermost binary pair of IMBH and stellar object rapidly forms. The IMBH has a companion with an orbital semimajor axis at least three times tighter than the second-most-bound object over 90% of the time. These companionships have typical periods on the order of years and are subject to cycles of exchange and destruction. The most frequently observed, long-lived pairings persist for ˜107 years. The demographics of IMBH companions in clusters are diverse: they include both main-sequence, giant stars and stellar remnants. Companion objects may reveal the presence of an IMBH in a cluster in one of several ways. The most-bound companion stars routinely suffer grazing tidal interactions with the IMBH, offering a dynamical mechanism to produce repeated flaring episodes like those seen in the IMBH candidate HLX-1. The stellar winds of companion stars provide a minimum quiescent accretion rate for IMBHs, with implications for radio searches for IMBH accretion in globular clusters. Finally, gravitational wave inspirals of compact objects occur with promising frequency.

  11. The dependence of convective core overshooting on stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claret, A.; Torres, G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Convective core overshooting extends the main-sequence lifetime of a star. Evolutionary tracks computed with overshooting are very different from those that use the classical Schwarzschild criterion, which leads to rather different predictions for the stellar properties. Attempts over the last two decades to calibrate the degree of overshooting with stellar mass using detached double-lined eclipsing binaries have been largely inconclusive, mainly because of a lack of suitable observational data. Aims: We revisit the question of a possible mass dependence of overshooting with a more complete sample of binaries, and examine any additional relation there might be with evolutionary state or metal abundance Z. Methods: We used a carefully selected sample of 33 double-lined eclipsing binaries strategically positioned in the H-R diagram with accurate absolute dimensions and component masses ranging from 1.2 to 4.4 M⊙. We compared their measured properties with stellar evolution calculations to infer semi-empirical values of the overshooting parameter αov for each star. Our models use the common prescription for the overshoot distance dov = αovHp, where Hp is the pressure scale height at the edge of the convective core as given by the Schwarzschild criterion, and αov is a free parameter. Results: We find a relation between αov and mass, which is defined much more clearly than in previous work, and indicates a significant rise up to about 2 M⊙ followed by little or no change beyond this mass. No appreciable dependence is seen with evolutionary state at a given mass, or with metallicity at a given mass although the stars in our sample span a range of a factor of ten in [Fe/H], from -1.01 to + 0.01.

  12. Stellar density profile and mass of the Milky Way bulge from VVV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, E.; Zoccali, M.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Minniti, D.; Alonso-García, J.; Marchetti, E.; Hempel, M.; Renzini, A.; Rejkuba, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first stellar density profile of the Milky Way bulge that reaches latitude b = 0°. The profile was derived by counting red clump stars within the colour-magnitude diagram that was constructed using the new PSF-fitting photometry from VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) survey data. The new stellar density map covers the area between | l | ≤ 10° and | b | ≤ 4.5° with unprecedented accuracy, allowing the stellar kinematics from the Giraffe Inner Bulge Spectroscopic Survey (GIBS) to be linked to the stellar mass density distribution. In particular, the location of the central velocity-dispersion peak from GIBS matches a high over-density in the VVV star count map. By scaling the total luminosity function (LF) obtained from all VVV fields to the LF from Zoccali et al.(2003), we obtain the first fully empirical estimate of the mass in stars and in remnants of the Galactic bulge. Within (| b | < 9.5°, | l | < 10°), the Milky Way bulge stellar mass is 2.0 ± 0.3 × 1010M⊙. Based on observations taken within the ESO/VISTA Public Survey VVV under the programme ID 179.B-2002 (PI: Minniti).

  13. RESEARCH PAPER: Old stellar population synthesis: new age and mass estimates for Mayall II = G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; de Grijs, Richard; Fan, Zhou; Rey, Soo-Chang; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Chen, Jian-Sheng; Lee, Kyungsook; Sohn, Sangmo Tony

    2009-06-01

    Mayall II = G1 is one of the most luminous globular clusters (GCs) in M31. Here, we determine its age and mass by comparing multicolor photometry with theoretical stellar population synthesis models. Based on far- and near-ultraviolet GALEX photometry, broad-band UBVRI, and infrared JHKS 2MASS data, we construct the most extensive spectral energy distribution of G1 to date, spanning the wavelength range from 1538 to 20 000 Å. A quantitative comparison with a variety of simple stellar population (SSP) models yields a mean age which is consistent with G1 being among the oldest building blocks of M31 and having formed within ~1.7 Gyr after the Big Bang. Irrespective of the SSP model or stellar initial mass function adopted, the resulting mass estimates (of order 107 Modot) indicate that G1 is one of the most massive GCs in the Local Group. However, we speculate that the cluster's exceptionally high mass suggests that it may not be a genuine GC. Our results also suggest that G1 may contain, on average, (1.65±0.63) × 102 Lodot far-ultraviolet-bright, hot, extreme horizontal-branch stars, depending on the adopted SSP model. In addition, we demonstrate that extensive multi-passband photometry coupled with SSP analysis enables one to obtain age estimates for old SSPs that have similar accuracies as those from integrated spectroscopy or resolved stellar photometry, provided that some of the free parameters can be constrained independently.

  14. Stellar Populations of Deeply Embedded Young Clusters: Near--Infrared Spectroscopy and Emergent Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    1996-02-01

    The goal of this thesis is to test the following hypothesis: the initial distribution of stellar masses from a single ``episode'' of star formation is independent of the local physical conditions of the region. In other words, is the initial mass function (IMF) strictly universal over spatial scales d < 1 pc and over time intervals Δ τ << 3 × 106yrs? We discuss the utility of embedded clusters in addressing this question. Using a combination of spectroscopic and photometric techniques, we seek to characterize emergent mass distributions of embedded clusters in order to compare them both with each other and with the field star IMF. Medium resolution (R = 1000) near--infrared spectra obtainable with the current generation of NIR grating spectrographs can provide estimates of the photospheric temperatures of optically--invisible stars. Deriving these spectral types requires a three--step process; i) setting up a classification scheme based on near--infrared spectra of spectral standards; ii) understanding the effects of accretion on this classification scheme by studying optically--visible young stellar objects; and iii) applying this classification technique to the deeply embedded clusters. Combining near--infrared photometry with spectral types, accurate stellar luminosities can be derived for heavily reddened young stars thus enabling their placement in the H--R diagram. From their position in the H--R diagram, masses and ages of stars can be estimated from comparison with theoretical pre--main sequence evolutionary models. Because it is not practical to obtain complete spectroscopic samples of embedded cluster members, a technique is developed based solely on near--IR photometry for estimating stellar luminosities from flux--limited surveys. We then describe how spectroscopic surveys of deeply embedded clusters are necessary in order to adopt appropriate mass--luminosity relationships. Stellar luminosity functions constructed from complete extinction

  15. Observational dynamics of low-mass stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M. J.

    The last fifteen years have seen the discovery of new types of low-mass stellar systems that bridge the gap between the once well-separated regimes of galaxies and of star clusters. Whether such objects are considered galaxies depends also on the definition of the term ``galaxy'', and several possible criteria are based on their internal dynamics (e.g. the common concept that galaxies contain dark matter). Moreover, studying the internal dynamics of low-mass stellar systems may also help understand their origin and evolutionary history. The focus of this paper is on two classes of stellar systems at the interface between star clusters and dwarf galaxies: ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) and diffuse Galactic globular clusters (GCs). A review of our current knowledge on the properties of UCDs is provided and dynamical considerations applying to diffuse GCs are introduced. In the following, recent observational results on the internal dynamics of individual UCDs and diffuse Galactic globular clusters are presented. Partly based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Observing Programmes 078.B-0496(B) and 081.B-0282). Doctoral Thesis Award Lecture 2013

  16. The Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Pierluigi

    1997-10-01

    This thesis aims to review the cosmological mass function problem, both from the theoretical and the observational point of view, and to present a new mass function theory, based on realistic approximations for the dynamics of gravitational collapse. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction on gravitational dynamics in cosmological models. Chapter 2 gives a complete review of the mass function theory. Chapters 3 and 4 present the ``dynamical'' mass function theory, based on truncated Lagrangian dynamics and on the excursion set approach. Chapter 5 reviews the observational state-of-the-art and the main applications of the mass function theories described before. Finally, Chapter 6 gives conclusions and future prospects.

  17. REPRODUCING THE STELLAR MASS/HALO MASS RELATION IN SIMULATED {Lambda}CDM GALAXIES: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONAL ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Ferah; Governato, F.; Loebman, S.; Quinn, T.; Brooks, A. M.; Christensen, C.; Shen, S.; Moster, B.; Wadsley, J.

    2013-03-20

    We examine the present-day total stellar-to-halo mass (SHM) ratio as a function of halo mass for a new sample of simulated field galaxies using fully cosmological, {Lambda}CDM, high-resolution SPH + N-body simulations. These simulations include an explicit treatment of metal line cooling, dust and self-shielding, H{sub 2}-based star formation (SF), and supernova-driven gas outflows. The 18 simulated halos have masses ranging from a few times 10{sup 8} to nearly 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. At z = 0, our simulated galaxies have a baryon content and morphology typical of field galaxies. Over a stellar mass range of 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}-4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} we find extremely good agreement between the SHM ratio in simulations and the present-day predictions from the statistical abundance matching technique presented in Moster et al. This improvement over past simulations is due to a number systematic factors, each decreasing the SHM ratios: (1) gas outflows that reduce the overall SF efficiency but allow for the formation of a cold gas component; (2) estimating the stellar masses of simulated galaxies using artificial observations and photometric techniques similar to those used in observations; and (3) accounting for a systematic, up to 30% overestimate in total halo masses in DM-only simulations, due to the neglect of baryon loss over cosmic times. Our analysis suggests that stellar mass estimates based on photometric magnitudes can underestimate the contribution of old stellar populations to the total stellar mass, leading to stellar mass errors of up to 50% for individual galaxies. These results highlight that implementing a realistic high density threshold for SF considerably reduces the overall SF efficiency due to more effective feedback. However, we show that in order to reduce the perceived tension between the SF efficiency in galaxy formation models and in real galaxies, it is very important to use proper techniques to

  18. Stellar evolution at high mass with convective core overshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.; Chin, C.-W.

    1985-01-01

    The transition from stellar evolution models with no convective core overshooting (CCO) at all to models in which homogeneous mixing due to CCO reaches far beyond the formal convective core boundary is systematically explored. Overshooting is parameterized in terms of the ratio d/H(p), where d is the distance of convective overshoot beyond the formal convective core boundary and H(p) is the local pressure scale height. It is concluded that CCO in very massive main sequence stars produces a great expansion of the stellar envelope if d/H(p) is large but not excessively large. CCO does not entirely suppress convective instability above the overshoot zone in the envelopes of main sequence stars more massive than about 15 solar masses. A general comparison of theoretically constructed isochrones for young stars with observed main sequence turnups indicates that the observed turnups are longer, brighter, and cooler at the tip than those expected on thfe basis of standard evolutionary theory.

  19. THE MASS MIXING LENGTH IN CONVECTIVE STELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Trampedach, Regner; Stein, Robert F. E-mail: stein@pa.msu.edu

    2011-04-20

    The scale length over which convection mixes mass in a star can be calculated as the inverse of the vertical derivative of the unidirectional (up or down) mass flux. This is related to the mixing length in the mixing length theory of stellar convection. We give the ratio of mass mixing length to pressure scale height for a grid of three-dimensional surface convection simulations, covering from 4300 K to 6900 K on the main sequence, and up to giants at log g = 2.2, all for solar composition. These simulations also confirm what is already known from solar simulations that convection does not proceed by discrete convective elements, but rather as a continuous, slow, smooth, warm upflow and turbulent, entropy deficient, fast down drafts. This convective topology also results in mixing on a scale comparable to the classic mixing length formulation, and is simply a consequence of mass conservation on flows in a stratified atmosphere.

  20. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  1. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): stellar mass growth of spiral galaxies in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Grootes, Meiert; Marcum, Pamela M.; Popescu, Cristina; Tuffs, Richard; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Driver, Simon P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lara-López, Maritza A.; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda; Taylor, Edward N.; Owers, Matt; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2016-04-01

    We look for correlated changes in stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) along filaments in the cosmic web by examining the stellar masses and UV-derived SFRs of 1799 ungrouped and unpaired spiral galaxies that reside in filaments. We devise multiple distance metrics to characterize the complex geometry of filaments, and find that galaxies closer to the cylindrical centre of a filament have higher stellar masses than their counterparts near the periphery of filaments, on the edges of voids. In addition, these peripheral spiral galaxies have higher SFRs at a given mass. Complementing our sample of filament spiral galaxies with spiral galaxies in tendrils and voids, we find that the average SFR of these objects in different large-scale environments are similar to each other with the primary discriminant in SFR being stellar mass, in line with previous works. However, the distributions of SFRs are found to vary with large-scale environment. Our results thus suggest a model in which in addition to stellar mass as the primary discriminant, the large-scale environment is imprinted in the SFR as a second-order effect. Furthermore, our detailed results for filament galaxies suggest a model in which gas accretion from voids on to filaments is primarily in an orthogonal direction. Overall, we find our results to be in line with theoretical expectations of the thermodynamic properties of the intergalactic medium in different large-scale environments.

  2. Inferences on the Relations Between Central Black Hole Mass and Total Galaxy Stellar Mass in the High-redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Reines, Amy E.

    2016-03-01

    At the highest redshifts, z\\gt 6, several tens of luminous quasars have been detected. The search for fainter active galactic nucleus (AGN), in deep X-ray surveys, has proven less successful, with few candidates to date. An extrapolation of the relationship between black hole (BH) and bulge mass would predict that the sample of z\\gt 6 galaxies host relatively massive BHs (\\gt {10}6 {M}⊙ ), if one assumes that total stellar mass is a good proxy for bulge mass. At least a few of these BHs should be luminous enough to be detectable in the 4Ms CDFS. The relation between BH and stellar mass defined by local moderate-luminosity AGNs in low-mass galaxies, however, has a normalization that is lower by approximately an order of magnitude compared to the BH-bulge mass relation. We explore how this scaling changes the interpretation of AGNs in the high-z universe. Despite large uncertainties, driven by those in the stellar mass function, and in the extrapolation of local relations, one can explain the current non-detection of moderate-luminosity AGNs in Lyman Break Galaxies if galaxies below {10}11 {M}⊙ are characterized by the low-normalization scaling, and, even more so, if their Eddington ratio is also typical of moderate-luminosity AGNs rather than luminous quasars. AGNs being missed by X-ray searches due to obscuration or instrinsic X-ray weakness also remain a possibility.

  3. Multifrequency studies of galaxies and groups. I. Environmental effect on galaxy stellar mass and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, A.; Heinämäki, P.; Nurmi, P.; Teerikorpi, P.; Tempel, E.; Lietzen, H.; Einasto, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. To understand the role of the environment in galaxy formation, evolution, and present-day properties, it is essential to study the multifrequency behavior of different galaxy populations under various environmental conditions. Aims: We study the stellar mass functions of different galaxy populations in groups as a function of their large-scale environments using multifrequency observations. Methods: We cross-matched the SDSS DR10 group catalog with GAMA Data Release 2 and Wide-field Survey Explorer (WISE) data to construct a catalog of 1651 groups and 11 436 galaxies containing photometric information in 15 different wavebands ranging from ultraviolet (0.152 μm) to mid-infrared (22 μm). We performed the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies using the MAGPHYS code and estimate the rest-frame luminosities and stellar masses. We used the 1 /Vmax method to estimate the galaxy stellar mass and luminosity functions, and the luminosity density field of galaxies to define the large-scale environment of galaxies. Results: The stellar mass functions of both central and satellite galaxies in groups are different in low- and high-density, large-scale environments. Satellite galaxies in high-density environments have a steeper low-mass end slope compared to low-density environments, independent of the galaxy morphology. Central galaxies in low-density environments have a steeper low-mass end slope, but the difference disappears for fixed galaxy morphology. The characteristic stellar mass of satellite galaxies is higher in high-density environments and the difference exists only for galaxies with elliptical morphologies. Conclusions: Galaxy formation in groups is more efficient in high-density, large-scale environments. Groups in high-density environments have higher abundances of satellite galaxies, irrespective of the satellite galaxy morphology. The elliptical satellite galaxies are generally more massive in high-density environments. The stellar

  4. RETENTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Morscher, Meagan; Umbreit, Stefan; Farr, Will M.; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu

    2013-01-20

    Globular clusters should be born with significant numbers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). It has been thought for two decades that very few of these BHs could be retained through the cluster lifetime. With masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }, BHs are {approx}20 times more massive than an average cluster star. They segregate into the cluster core, where they may eventually decouple from the remainder of the cluster. The small-N core then evaporates on a short timescale. This is the so-called Spitzer instability. Here we present the results of a full dynamical simulation of a globular cluster containing many stellar-mass BHs with a realistic mass spectrum. Our Monte Carlo simulation code includes detailed treatments of all relevant stellar evolution and dynamical processes. Our main finding is that old globular clusters could still contain many BHs at present. In our simulation, we find no evidence for the Spitzer instability. Instead, most of the BHs remain well mixed with the rest of the cluster, with only the innermost few tens of BHs segregating significantly. Over the 12 Gyr evolution, fewer than half of the BHs are dynamically ejected through strong binary interactions in the cluster core. The presence of BHs leads to long-term heating of the cluster, ultimately producing a core radius on the high end of the distribution for Milky Way globular clusters (and those of other galaxies). A crude extrapolation from our model suggests that the BH-BH merger rate from globular clusters could be comparable to the rate in the field.

  5. X-ray polarimetric studies of stellar mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Stellar mass black holes are among the brightest X-ray sources in the sky. Thus, they are excellent candidates for X-ray polarimetry, a technique that requires very large number of photons for a sensitive measurement. For accreting black holes in the thermal state, polarization provides important information about the black hole's spin magnitude and orientation relative to the observer. For black holes in the "low-hard" or "steep power-law" states, polarization provides a unique probe of the geometry of the hot electron corona.

  6. Structure and evolution of high-mass stellar mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebbeek, Evert; Gaburov, Evghenii; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pols, Onno R.

    2013-10-01

    In young dense clusters repeated collisions between massive stars may lead to the formation of a very massive star (above 100 M⊙). In the past, the study of the long-term evolution of merger remnants has mostly focused on collisions between low-mass stars (up to about 2 M⊙) in the context of blue-straggler formation. The evolution of collision products of more massive stars has not been as thoroughly investigated. In this paper, we study the long-term evolution of a number of stellar mergers formed by the head-on collision of a primary star with a mass of 5-40 M⊙ with a lower mass star at three points in its evolution in order to better understand their evolution. We use smooth particle hydrodynamics calculations to model the collision between the stars. The outcome of this calculation is reduced to one dimension and imported into a stellar evolution code. We follow the subsequent evolution of the collision product through the main sequence at least until the onset of helium burning. We find that little hydrogen is mixed into the core of the collision products, in agreement with previous studies of collisions between low-mass stars. For collisions involving evolved stars, we find that during the merger the surface nitrogen abundance can be strongly enhanced. The evolution of most of the collision products proceeds analogously to that of normal stars with the same mass, but with a larger radius and luminosity. However, the evolution of collision products that form with a hydrogen-depleted core is markedly different from that of normal stars with the same mass. They undergo a long-lived period of hydrogen-shell burning close to the main-sequence band in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and spend the initial part of core-helium burning as compact blue supergiants.

  7. Estimating luminosities and stellar masses of galaxies photometrically without determining redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, B. C.; Yee, H. K. C. E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-09-10

    Large direct imaging surveys usually use a template-fitting technique to estimate photometric redshifts for galaxies, which are then applied to derive important galaxy properties such as luminosities and stellar masses. These estimates can be noisy and suffer from systematic biases because of the possible mis-selection of templates and the propagation of the photometric redshift uncertainty. We introduce an algorithm, the Direct Empirical Photometric method (DEmP), that can be used to directly estimate these quantities using training sets, bypassing photometric redshift determination. DEmP also applies two techniques to minimize the effects arising from the non-uniform distribution of training set galaxy redshifts from a flux-limited sample. First, for each input galaxy, fitting is performed using a subset of the training set galaxies with photometry and colors closest to those of the input galaxy. Second, the training set is artificially resampled to produce a flat distribution in redshift or other properties, e.g., luminosity. To test the performance of DEmP, we use a four filter-band mock catalog to examine its ability to recover redshift, luminosity, stellar mass, and luminosity and stellar mass functions. We also compare the results to those from two publicly available template-fitting methods, finding that the DEmP algorithm outperforms both. We find that resampling the training set to have a uniform redshift distribution produces the best results not only in photometric redshift, but also in estimating luminosity and stellar mass. The DEmP method is especially powerful in estimating quantities such as near-IR luminosities and stellar mass using only data from a small number of optical bands.

  8. SPIDER. V. MEASURING SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXY STELLAR MASSES FROM PHOTOMETRIC SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FITTING

    SciTech Connect

    Swindle, R.; Gal, R. R.; La Barbera, F.; De Carvalho, R. R.

    2011-10-15

    We present robust statistical estimates of the accuracy of early-type galaxy stellar masses derived from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting as functions of various empirical and theoretical assumptions. Using large samples consisting of {approx}40,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; ugriz), of which {approx}5000 are also in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (YJHK), with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.05 {<=} z {<=} 0.095, we test the reliability of some commonly used stellar population models and extinction laws for computing stellar masses. Spectroscopic ages (t), metallicities (Z), and extinctions (A{sub V} ) are also computed from fits to SDSS spectra using various population models. These external constraints are used in additional tests to estimate the systematic errors in the stellar masses derived from SED fitting, where t, Z, and A{sub V} are typically left as free parameters. We find reasonable agreement in mass estimates among stellar population models, with variation of the initial mass function and extinction law yielding systematic biases on the mass of nearly a factor of two, in agreement with other studies. Removing the near-infrared bands changes the statistical bias in mass by only {approx}0.06 dex, adding uncertainties of {approx}0.1 dex at the 95% CL. In contrast, we find that removing an ultraviolet band is more critical, introducing 2{sigma} uncertainties of {approx}0.15 dex. Finally, we find that the stellar masses are less affected by the absence of metallicity and/or dust extinction knowledge. However, there is a definite systematic offset in the mass estimate when the stellar population age is unknown, up to a factor of 2.5 for very old (12 Gyr) stellar populations. We present the stellar masses for our sample, corrected for the measured systematic biases due to photometrically determined ages, finding that age errors produce lower stellar masses by {approx}0.15 dex, with errors of {approx}0.02 dex at the

  9. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. III. MEASURING AGES AND MASSES OF PARTIALLY RESOLVED STELLAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Beerman, Lori C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Ben F.; Seth, Anil C.; Bell, Eric F.; Bianchi, Luciana C.; Caldwell, Nelson; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Larsen, Soren S.; Melbourne, Jason L.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skillman, Evan D.

    2012-12-01

    The apparent age and mass of a stellar cluster can be strongly affected by stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), when inferred from the integrated color of low-mass clusters ({approx}<10{sup 4} M {sub Sun }). We use simulated star clusters to show that these effects are minimized when the brightest, rapidly evolving stars in a cluster can be resolved, and the light of the fainter, more numerous unresolved stars can be analyzed separately. When comparing the light from the less luminous cluster members to models of unresolved light, more accurate age estimates can be obtained than when analyzing the integrated light from the entire cluster under the assumption that the IMF is fully populated. We show the success of this technique first using simulated clusters, and then with a stellar cluster in M31. This method represents one way of accounting for the discrete, stochastic sampling of the stellar IMF in less massive clusters and can be leveraged in studies of clusters throughout the Local Group and other nearby galaxies.

  10. A census of stellar mass in ten massive haloes at z ~ 1 from the GCLASS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burg, R. F. J.; Muzzin, A.; Hoekstra, H.; Wilson, G.; Lidman, C.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We study the stellar mass content of massive haloes in the redshift range 0.86 < z < 1.34, by measuring (1) the stellar mass in the central galaxy versus total dynamical halo mass; (2) the total stellar mass (including satellites) versus total halo mass; and (3) the radial stellar mass and number density profiles for the ensemble halo. Methods: We use a Ks-band selected catalogue for the 10 clusters in the Gemini Cluster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey (GCLASS), with photometric redshifts and stellar masses measured from 11-band SED fitting. Combining the photometric catalogues with the deep spectroscopic component of GCLASS, we correct the cluster galaxy sample for interlopers. We also perform a dynamical analysis of the cluster galaxies to estimate the halo mass M200 for each cluster based on a measurement of its velocity dispersion. Results: (1) We find that the central galaxy stellar mass fraction decreases with total halo mass and that this is in reasonable, quantitative agreement with measurements from abundance matching studies at z ~ 1. (2) The total stellar mass fractions of these systems decrease with halo mass, indicating that lower mass systems are more efficient at transforming baryons into stars. We find the total stellar mass to be a good proxy for total halo mass, with a small intrinsic scatter. When we compare these results from GCLASS with literature measurements, we find that the stellar mass fraction at fixed halo mass shows no significant evolution in the range 0 < z < 1. (3) We measure a relatively high NFW concentration parameter cg ~ 7 for the stellar mass distribution in these clusters, and debate a possible scenario for explaining the evolution of the stellar mass distribution from the GCLASS sample to their likely descendants at lower redshift. Conclusions: The stellar mass measurements in the z ~ 1 haloes provided by GCLASS puts constraints on the stellar mass assembly history of clusters observed in the local Universe. A simple

  11. MEASUREMENT OF THE MASS AND STELLAR POPULATION DISTRIBUTION IN M82 WITH THE LBT

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Johnny P.; Martini, Paul; Thompson, Todd A.

    2012-09-20

    We present a K-band spectroscopic study of the stellar and gas kinematics, mass distribution, and stellar populations of the archetypical starburst galaxy M82. Our results are based on a single spectrum at a position angle of 67.{sup 0}5 through the K-band nucleus. We used the {sup 12}CO stellar absorption band head at 2.29 {mu}m (CO{sub 2.29}) to measure the rotation curve out to nearly 4 kpc radius on both the eastern and western sides of the galaxy. Our data show that the rotation curve is flat from 1 to 4 kpc. This stands in sharp contrast to some previous studies, which have interpreted H I and CO emission-line position-velocity diagrams as evidence for a declining rotation curve. The kinematics of the Br{gamma}, H{sub 2}, and He I emission lines are consistent with, although characterized by slightly higher velocities than, the stellar kinematics. We derived M82's mass distribution from our stellar kinematic measurements and estimate that its total dynamical mass is {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. We measured the equivalent width of CO{sub 2.29} (W{sub 2.29}) as a function of distance from the center of the galaxy to investigate the spatial extent of the red supergiant (RSG) population. The variation in W{sub 2.29} with radius clearly shows that RSGs dominate the light inside 500 pc radius. M82's superwind is likely launched from this region, where we estimate that the enclosed mass is {approx}<2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }.

  12. Stellar evolution including diffusion and matter flow induced by mass-loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, O.; Vick, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is clear that in order to explain many observed stellar phenomenae, atomic diffusion must be included in stellar models. Observed surface abundances allow us to constrain other transport pro- cesses which compete with atomic diffusion. We will focus on the effect of the flow of matter induced by mass-loss in stellar models.

  13. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF VIRIAL AND STELLAR MASS IN MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lagattuta, David J.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Auger, Matthew W.; Marshall, Philip J.; Bradac, Marusa; Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphael; Schrabback, Tim; Faure, Cecile; Anguita, Timo

    2010-06-20

    We measure the average mass properties of a sample of 41 strong gravitational lenses at moderate redshift (z {approx} 0.4-0.9) and present the lens redshift for six of these galaxies for the first time. Using the techniques of strong and weak gravitational lensing on archival data obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope, we determine that the average mass overdensity profile of the lenses can be fit with a power-law profile ({Delta}{Sigma} {proportional_to} R {sup -0.86{+-}0.16}) that is within 1{sigma} of an isothermal profile ({Delta}{Sigma} {proportional_to} R {sup -1}) with velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub v} = 260 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}. Additionally, we use a two-component de Vaucouleurs + Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) model to disentangle the total mass profile into separate luminous and dark matter components and determine the relative fraction of each component. We measure the average rest frame V-band stellar mass-to-light ratio (Y{sub V} = 4.0 {+-} 0.6 h M{sub sun}/L{sub sun}) and virial mass-to-light ratio ({tau}{sub V} = 300 {+-} 90 h M{sub sun}/L{sub sun}) for our sample, resulting in a virial-to-stellar mass ratio of M{sub vir}/M{sub *} = 75 {+-} 25. Relaxing the NFW assumption, we estimate that changing the inner slope of the dark matter profile by {approx}20% yields a {approx}30% change in stellar mass-to-light ratio. Finally, we compare our results to a previous study using low-redshift lenses to understand how galaxy mass profiles evolve over time. We investigate the evolution of M{sub vir}/M{sub *}(z) = {alpha}(1 + z){sup {beta}}, and find best-fit parameters of {alpha} = 51 {+-} 36 and {beta} = 0.9 {+-} 1.8, constraining the growth of virial-to-stellar mass ratio over the last {approx}7 Gyr. We note that, by using a sample of strong lenses, we are able to constrain the growth of M{sub vir}/M{sub *}(z) without making any assumptions about the initial mass function of the stellar population.

  14. Quantitative constraints on starburst cycles in galaxies with stellar masses in the range 108-1010 M⊙

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2014-07-01

    We have used 4000 Å break and HδA indices in combination with SFR/M* derived from emission line flux measurements to constrain the recent star formation histories of galaxies with stellar masses in the range 108-1010 M⊙. The fraction of the total SFR density in galaxies with ongoing bursts is a strong function of stellar mass, declining from 0.85 at a stellar mass of 108 M⊙ to 0.25 for galaxies with M* ˜ 1010 M⊙. Low-mass galaxies are not all young. The distribution of half-mass formation times for galaxies with stellar masses less than 109 M⊙ is broad, spanning the range 1-10 Gyr. The peak-to-trough variation in star formation rate among the bursting population ranges lies in the range 10-25. In low-mass galaxies, the average duration of the bursts is comparable to the dynamical time of the galaxy. Galaxy structure is correlated with estimated burst mass fraction, but in different ways in low- and high-mass galaxies. High-mass galaxies with large burst mass fractions are more centrally concentrated, indicating that bulge formation is at work. In low-mass galaxies, stellar surface densities μ* decrease as a function of Fburst. These results are in good agreement with the observational predictions of Teyssier et al. and lend further credence to the idea that the cuspy halo problem can be solved by energy input from multiple starbursts over the lifetime of the galaxy. We note that there is no compelling evidence for initial mass function variations in the population of star-forming galaxies in the local Universe.

  15. Mass transfer between debris discs during close stellar encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jílková, Lucie; Hamers, Adrian S.; Hammer, Michael; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-04-01

    We study mass transfers between debris discs during stellar encounters. We carried out numerical simulations of close flybys of two stars, one of which has a disc of planetesimals represented by test particles. We explored the parameter space of the encounters, varying the mass ratio of the two stars, their pericentre and eccentricity of the encounter, and its geometry. We find that particles are transferred to the other star from a restricted radial range in the disc and the limiting radii of this transfer region depend on the parameters of the encounter. We derive an approximate analytic description of the inner radius of the region. The efficiency of the mass transfer generally decreases with increasing encounter pericentre and increasing mass of the star initially possessing the disc. Depending on the parameters of the encounter, the transfer particles have a specific distribution in the space of orbital elements (semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre) around their new host star. The population of the transferred particles can be used to constrain the encounter through which it was delivered. We expect that many stars experienced transfer among their debris discs and planetary systems in their birth environment. This mechanism presents a formation channel for objects on wide orbits of arbitrary inclinations, typically having high eccentricity but possibly also close to circular (eccentricities of about 0.1). Depending on the geometry, such orbital elements can be distinct from those of the objects formed around the star.

  16. THE STELLAR-TO-HALO MASS RELATION FOR LOCAL GROUP GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, C. B.; Cintio, A. Di; Knebe, A.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.; Hoffman, Y.; Garrison-Kimmel, S.

    2014-03-20

    We contend that a single power-law halo mass distribution is appropriate for direct matching to the stellar masses of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies, allowing the determination of the slope of the stellar mass-halo mass relation for low-mass galaxies. Errors in halo masses are well defined as the Poisson noise of simulated Local Group realizations, which we determine using local volume simulations. For the stellar mass range 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}stellar mass-halo mass relation follows a power law with slope of 3.1, significantly steeper than most values in the literature. This steep relation between stellar and halo masses would indicate that Local Group dwarf galaxies are hosted by dark matter halos with a small range of mass. Our methodology is robust down to the stellar mass to which the census of observed Local Group galaxies is complete, but the significant uncertainty in the currently measured slope of the stellar-to-halo mass relation will decrease dramatically if the Local Group completeness limit was 10{sup 6.5} M {sub ☉} or below, highlighting the importance of pushing such limit to lower masses and larger volumes.

  17. Report on the ESO Workshop ''Stellar End Products: The Low-mass - High-mass Connection''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J.; Humphreys, E.; Wittkowski, M.

    2015-09-01

    There are many similarities in the mass-loss processes between evolved low-mass and high-mass stars and the workshop brought together observers and theoreticians to compare and contrast the asymptotic giant branch and red supergiant evolutionary phases. Asymmetric and collimated mass loss, bipolarity, binarity, stellar rotation and magnetic fields were among the key topics explored. Many results were displayed from state-of-the-art high spatial resolution facilities, such as ALMA and the VLTI. A summary of the workshop topics is presented.

  18. How Lyman Alpha Emission Depends on Galaxy Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzún, Grecco A.; Blanc, Guillermo A.; González, Valentino; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Lira, Paulina; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we show how the stellar mass (M *) of galaxies affects the 3 < z < 4.6 Lyα equivalent width (EW) distribution. To this end, we design a sample of 629 galaxies in the M * range 7.6\\lt {log}{M}*/{M}ȯ \\lt 10.6 from the 3D-HST/CANDELS survey. We perform spectroscopic observations of this sample using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System, allowing us to measure Lyα fluxes and use 3D-HST/CANDELS ancillary data. In order to study the Lyα EW distribution dependence on M *, we split the whole sample in three stellar mass bins. We find that, in all bins, the distribution is best represented by an exponential profile of the form {dN}({M}*)/d{EW}={W}0{({M}*)}-1A({M}*){e}-{EW/{W}0({M}*)}. Through a Bayesian analysis, we confirm that lower M * galaxies have higher Lyα EWs. We also find that the fraction A of galaxies featuring emission and the e-folding scale W 0 of the distribution anti-correlate with M *, recovering expressions of the forms A({M}*)=-0.26(.13){log}{M}*/{M}ȯ +3.01(1.2) and {W}0({M}*)=-15.6(3.5){log}{M}*/{M}ȯ +166(34). These results are crucial for proper interpretation of Lyα emission trends reported in the literature that may be affected by strong M * selection biases.

  19. EFFECT OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR MODEL PARAMETERS ON ESTIMATED MASSES AND RADII OF SINGLE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Verner, Graham A.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne E-mail: gav@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk E-mail: y.p.elsworth@bham.ac.uk

    2012-02-10

    Accurate and precise values of radii and masses of stars are needed to correctly estimate properties of extrasolar planets. We examine the effect of uncertainties in stellar model parameters on estimates of the masses, radii, and average densities of solar-type stars. We find that in the absence of seismic data on solar-like oscillations, stellar masses can be determined to a greater accuracy than either stellar radii or densities; but to get reasonably accurate results the effective temperature, log g, and metallicity must be measured to high precision. When seismic data are available, stellar density is the most well-determined property, followed by radius, with mass the least well-determined property. Uncertainties in stellar convection, quantified in terms of uncertainties in the value of the mixing length parameter, cause the most significant errors in the estimates of stellar properties.

  20. A Comparison of Stellar Mass-Transfer & Merger Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohline, Joel E.; Motl, P.; Diehl, S.; Even, W.; Clayton, G.; Fryer, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed comparisons of 3D stellar mass-transfer and merger simulations that have been carried out using two very different numerical hydrodynamic algorithms -- a finite-volume "grid" code (typically using 4M cylindrical grid cells) and a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code (typically using 1M particles). In all cases the initial binary models contain synchronously rotating, n = 3/2 polytropic stars of a specified mass ratio (q = Mdonor/Maccretor) that are in circular orbit with one star (the donor) marginally filling its Roche lobe. In our "base" set of 8 comparison simulations, we have followed the evolution of binaries having four different initial mass ratios (q0 = 1.3, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4) and each is evolved using two different equations of state: polytropic (P) and ideal-gas (I). In addition, some evolutions are repeated using a different numerical resolution and/or a different initial episode of "driving" to initiate mass-transfer. In the case of the binary systems with q0 = 1.3 and q0 = 0.7, the codes show a remarkable level of quantitative agreement; in the former case, the two stars merge and, in the latter case, the donor gets tidally disrupted. Binary systems with q0 = 0.5 or 0.4 enter a long phase (> 10-20 orbits) of stable mass-transfer during which the binary separation steadily increases; tidal disruption of the donor may ultimately occur if sufficiently deep contact is made between the Roche lobe and the donor during an initial episode of "driving." This work has been supported by grants AST-0708551 and DGE-0504507 from the U.S. National Science Foundation; by grants NNX07AG84G and NNX10AC72G from NASA's ATP program; and by grants of high-performance computing time on the TeraGrid, at LSU and across LONI (Louisiana Optical Network Initiative).

  1. The incidence of stellar mergers and mass gainers among massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    De Mink, S. E.; Sana, H.; Langer, N.; Izzard, R. G.; Schneider, F. R. N.

    2014-02-10

    Because the majority of massive stars are born as members of close binary systems, populations of massive main-sequence stars contain stellar mergers and products of binary mass transfer. We simulate populations of massive stars accounting for all major binary evolution effects based on the most recent binary parameter statistics and extensively evaluate the effect of model uncertainties. Assuming constant star formation, we find that 8{sub −4}{sup +9}% of a sample of early-type stars are the products of a merger resulting from a close binary system. In total we find that 30{sub −15}{sup +10}% of massive main-sequence stars are the products of binary interaction. We show that the commonly adopted approach to minimize the effects of binaries on an observed sample by excluding systems detected as binaries through radial velocity campaigns can be counterproductive. Systems with significant radial velocity variations are mostly pre-interaction systems. Excluding them substantially enhances the relative incidence of mergers and binary products in the non-radial velocity variable sample. This poses a challenge for testing single stellar evolutionary models. It also raises the question of whether certain peculiar classes of stars, such as magnetic O stars, are the result of binary interaction and it emphasizes the need to further study the effect of binarity on the diagnostics that are used to derive the fundamental properties (star-formation history, initial mass function, mass-to-light ratio) of stellar populations nearby and at high redshift.

  2. Stellar feedback from high-mass X-ray binaries in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artale, M. C.; Tissera, P. B.; Pellizza, L. J.

    2015-04-01

    We explored the role of X-ray binaries composed by a black hole and a massive stellar companion [black hole X-ray binaries (BHXs)] as sources of kinetic feedback by using hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Following previous results, our BHX model selects metal-poor stars (Z = [0, 10-4]) as possible progenitors. The model that better reproduces observations assumes that an ˜20 per cent fraction of low-metallicity black holes are in binary systems which produces BHXs. These sources are estimated to deposit ˜1052 erg of kinetic energy per event. With these parameters and in the simulated volume, we find that the energy injected by BHXs represents ˜30 per cent of the total energy released by Type II supernova and BHX events at redshift z ˜ 7 and then decreases rapidly as baryons get chemically enriched. Haloes with virial masses smaller than ˜1010 M⊙ (or Tvir ≲ 105 K) are the most directly affected ones by BHX feedback. These haloes host galaxies with stellar masses in the range 107-108 M⊙. Our results show that BHX feedback is able to keep the interstellar medium warm, without removing a significant gas fraction, in agreement with previous analytical calculations. Consequently, the stellar-to-dark matter mass ratio is better reproduced at high redshift. Our model also predicts a stronger evolution of the number of galaxies as a function of the stellar mass with redshift when BHX feedback is considered. These findings support previous claims that the BHXs could be an effective source of feedback in early stages of galaxy evolution.

  3. Accretion onto the first stellar mass black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2009-08-05

    The first stars, forming at redshifts z > 15 in minihalos with M {approx} 10{sup 5-6} M{sub {circle_dot}} may leave behind remnant black holes, which could conceivably have been the 'seeds' for the supermassive black holes observed at z {approx}< 7. We study remnant black hole growth through accretion, including for the first time the radiation emitted due to accretion, with adaptive mesh refinement cosmological radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. The effects of photo-ionization and heating dramatically affect the large-scale inflow, resulting in negligible mass growth. We compare cases with accretion luminosity included and neglected to show that accretion radiation drastically changes the environment within 100 pc of the black hole, increasing gas temperatures by an order of magnitude. Gas densities are reduced and further star formation in the same minihalo is prevented for the two hundred million years we followed. Without radiative feedback included most seed black holes do not gain mass as efficiently as has been hoped for in previous theories, implying that black hole remnants of Pop III stars in minihalos are not likely to be miniquasars. Most importantly, however, our calculations demonstrate that if these black holes are indeed accreting close to the Bondi-Hoyle rate with ten percent radiative efficiency they have a dramatic local effect in regulating star formation in the first galaxies. This suggests a novel mechanism for massive black hole formation - stellar-mass black holes may have suppressed fragmentation and star formation after falling into halos with virial temperatures {approx} 10{sup 4} K, facilitating intermediate mass black hole formation at their centers.

  4. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pitann, Jan; Bouwman, Jeroen; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Hennemann, Martin

    2011-12-10

    In this paper, we present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopy for 14 intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs). We use Spitzer spectroscopy to investigate the physical properties of these sources and their environments. Our sample can be divided into two types of objects: young isolated, embedded objects with spectra that are dominated by ice and silicate absorption bands, and more evolved objects that are dominated by extended emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pure H{sub 2} rotational lines. We are able to constrain the illuminating FUV fields by classifying the PAH bands below 9 {mu}m. For most of the sources we are able to detect several atomic fine structure lines. In particular, the [Ne II] line appearing in two regions could originate from unresolved photodissociation regions or J-shocks. We relate the identified spectral features to observations obtained from NIR through submillimeter imaging. The spatial extent of several H{sub 2} and PAH bands is matched with morphologies identified in previous Infrared Array Camera observations. This also allows us to distinguish between the different H{sub 2} excitation mechanisms. In addition, we calculate the optical extinction from the silicate bands and use this to constrain the spectral energy distribution fit, allowing us to estimate the masses of these YSOs.

  5. Stellar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation.' As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules.' The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly-ionized oxygen atoms.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping

    2012-07-10

    Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

  7. The early gaseous and stellar mass assembly of Milky Way-type galaxy haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    In cosmological simulations of Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structure formation a vast number of subhalos is expected around massive galaxies like the Milky Way (MW). These DM subhalos are filled with baryons, gas that forms stars very early as observed from the stellar populations in the MW satellite galaxies. Satellite galaxies evolve in the tidal field of their mature galaxy and suffer accretion to the major galaxy and their partly disruption. By this, their mass loss is expected to feed the galaxy halo with stars and gas.From the Via Lactea II simulations we select a massive DM halo with its satellite system which evolves in the simulations to a present-day MW-type galaxy. We follow its evolution from redshift 4.5 to 2.5, i.e. over almost 2 billion years of the most interesting epoch of mass assembly. A high mass resolution allows for even low-mass satellites down to 10^5 Msun, but limits their distance range to the innermost 240 satellites of the system only. The applied chemo-dynamical method includes star formation, stellar energetic and chemical feedback, and gas physical processes.After the onset of the simulation our models demonstrate the action of tidal effects and satellite merging on the star-formation rate of the satellites, their gas loss by means of hot-gas expansion, of ram-pressure and tidal stripping, and the tidal extraction of stars, leading to the formation of the stellar and gaseous galactic halo. We also analyze the evolution of the satellites’ mass function, their baryonic and DM mass distributions, chemical abundances, their compactness, their present-day appearance, etc. with respect to observations and present-day correlations.

  8. The Origin of the Stellar Mass Spectrum in Turbulence and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is one of the oldest problems in theoretical astrophysics, and one of the most profound. This distribution touches virtually every area of astrophysics, from interpreting observations of integrated starlight, to synthesis of heavy elements, to formation of galaxies, to the development of life. A comprehensive theory of the IMF, and its possible variation, is directly relevant to the NASA mission of understanding our origins, and would also be invaluable for interpreting observations from NASA missions that measure integrated starlight. While the problem of the IMF has stood for a long time, recent developments in both numerical and analytic techniques make the problem ripe for solution. We propose to develop a comprehensive theory for the origin of the IMF that is based on two main ingredients: the statistical properties of the ubiquitous turbulence in interstellar clouds, and the role of stellar radiative feedback in shaping how that gas fragments under the action of self-gravity. This work will proceed on two fronts. Analytically, we will extend the excursion set formalism for turbulence recently developed by Hopkins to account for the effects of local sources of stellar radiative feedback, which have been shown by both simulations and observations to have profound effects on how gas fragments. In parallel, we will conduct adaptive mesh refinement radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to test and guide the development of this analytic framework. The goal will be to develop a predictive theory of the IMF that is capable of explaining both the shape and the normalization of the stellar mass function, and its possible variation with star-forming environment.

  9. Ultraviolet to infrared emission of z > 1 galaxies: Can we derive reliable star formation rates and stellar masses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Morrison, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our knowledge of the cosmic mass assembly relies on measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar), of galaxies as a function of redshift. These parameters must be estimated in a consistent way with a good knowledge of systematics before studying their correlation and the variation of the specific SFR. Constraining these fundamental properties of galaxies across the Universe is of utmost importance if we want to understand galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We seek to derive SFRs and stellar masses in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of infrared emission originating from dust. Results: We build a sample of galaxies with z > 1, all observed from the ultraviolet to the infrared in their rest frame. The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different star formation histories are introduced: an exponentially decreasing or increasing SFR and a more complex one coupling a decreasing SFR with a younger burst of constant star formation. We define different sets of data, with or without a good sampling of the ultraviolet range, near-infrared, and thermal infrared data. Variations of the metallicity are also investigated. The impact of these different cases on the determination of stellar mass and SFR are analysed. Conclusions: Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population zf ≃ 8 cannot fit the data correctly. All the other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter, especially for the exponentially decreasing models. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As

  10. The mass-loss evolution of oxygen-rich AGB stars and its consequences for stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, W. E. C. J.

    1989-02-01

    A semiempirical mass loss equation (MLE) for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar shells is presented. The MLE is a function of stellar luminosity, expansion velocity of the circumstellar shell, and the ratio between the IRAS 25 and 12 micron flux densities. The results are compared with previously derived MLEs. The IRAS Point Source Catalog is used to find the mass loss as a function of time. The MLE is tested by estimating the total mass lost on the AGB. A simple expression is found relating the initial main sequence mass and the maximum AGB luminosity. The time-dependent properties of the MLE are tested using a sample of Miras and OH/IR stars. A relation between period, luminosity, and stellar envelope mass is found and compared with the observed period-luminosity relations for globular cluster Miras and Miras in the LMC. Good agreement is found.

  11. The stellar-to-halo mass relation of GAMA galaxies from 100 deg2 of KiDS weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uitert, Edo; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, M. J. I.; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kuijken, Konrad; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; McFarland, John; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Peacock, John; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, A. S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; Taylor, Edward N.; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2016-07-01

    We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7 < log 10(M*/h- 2 M⊙) < 11.7 and z < 0.4, obtained from a combined analysis of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use ˜100 deg2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation due to a degeneracy between the satellite fraction and the halo mass, which is lifted when we simultaneously fit the stellar mass function. At M* > 5 × 1010 h- 2 M⊙, the stellar mass increases with halo mass as {˜ }M_h^{0.25}. The ratio of dark matter to stellar mass has a minimum at a halo mass of 8 × 1011 h-1 M⊙ with a value of M_h/M_{*}=56_{-10}^{+16} [h]. We also use the GAMA group catalogue to select centrals and satellites in groups with five or more members, which trace regions in space where the local matter density is higher than average, and determine for the first time the stellar-to-halo mass relation in these denser environments. We find no significant differences compared to the relation from the full sample, which suggests that the stellar-to-halo mass relation does not vary strongly with local density. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies can also be obtained by modelling the lensing signal and stellar mass function of satellite galaxies only, which shows that the assumptions to model the satellite contribution in the halo model do not significantly bias the stellar-to-halo mass relation. Finally, we show that the combination of weak lensing with the stellar mass function can be used to test the purity of group catalogues.

  12. The stellar-to-halo mass relation of GAMA galaxies from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uitert, Edo; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, M. J. I.; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kuijken, Konrad; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; McFarland, John; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Peacock, John; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, A. S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2016-04-01

    We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7 < log10(M★/h-2M⊙) < 11.7 and z < 0.4, obtained from a combined analysis of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use ˜100 deg2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation due to a degeneracy between the satellite fraction and the halo mass, which is lifted when we simultaneously fit the stellar mass function. At M★ > 5 × 1010h-2M⊙, the stellar mass increases with halo mass as ˜ {}M_h^{0.25}. The ratio of dark matter to stellar mass has a minimum at a halo mass of 8 × 1011h-1M⊙ with a value of M_h/M_*=56_{-10}^{+16} [h]. We also use the GAMA group catalogue to select centrals and satellites in groups with five or more members, which trace regions in space where the local matter density is higher than average, and determine for the first time the stellar-to-halo mass relation in these denser environments. We find no significant differences compared to the relation from the full sample, which suggests that the stellar-to-halo mass relation does not vary strongly with local density. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies can also be obtained by modelling the lensing signal and stellar mass function of satellite galaxies only, which shows that the assumptions to model the satellite contribution in the halo model do not significantly bias the stellar-to-halo mass relation. Finally, we show that the combination of weak lensing with the stellar mass function can be used to test the purity of group catalogues.

  13. Binary black hole mergers from globular clusters: Masses, merger rates, and the impact of stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Carl L.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of GW150914, the binary black hole merger detected by Advanced LIGO, has the potential to revolutionize observational astrophysics. But to fully utilize this new window into the Universe, we must compare these new observations to detailed models of binary black hole formation throughout cosmic time. Expanding upon our previous work [C. L. Rodriguez, M. Morscher, B. Pattabiraman, S. Chatterjee, C.-J. Haster, and F. A. Rasio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 051101 (2015).], we study merging binary black holes formed in globular clusters using our Monte Carlo approach to stellar dynamics. We have created a new set of 52 cluster models with different masses, metallicities, and radii to fully characterize the binary black hole merger rate. These models include all the relevant dynamical processes (such as two-body relaxation, strong encounters, and three-body binary formation) and agree well with detailed direct N -body simulations. In addition, we have enhanced our stellar evolution algorithms with updated metallicity-dependent stellar wind and supernova prescriptions, allowing us to compare our results directly to the most recent population synthesis predictions for merger rates from isolated binary evolution. We explore the relationship between a cluster's global properties and the population of binary black holes that it produces. In particular, we derive a numerically calibrated relationship between the merger times of ejected black hole binaries and a cluster's mass and radius. With our improved treatment of stellar evolution, we find that globular clusters can produce a significant population of massive black hole binaries that merge in the local Universe. We explore the masses and mass ratios of these binaries as a function of redshift, and find a merger rate of ˜5 Gpc-3yr-1 in the local Universe, with 80% of sources having total masses from 32 M⊙ to 64 M⊙. Under standard assumptions, approximately one out of every seven binary black hole mergers

  14. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  15. THE STELLAR-TO-HALO MASS RELATION OF LOCAL GALAXIES SEGREGATES BY COLOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Puebla, Aldo; Yang, Xiaohu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Jing, Y. P.; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv

    2015-02-01

    By means of a statistical approach that combines different semi-empirical methods of galaxy-halo connection, we derive the stellar-to-halo mass relations (SHMR) of local blue and red central galaxies. We also constrain the fraction of halos hosting blue/red central galaxies and the occupation statistics of blue and red satellites as a function of halo mass, M {sub h}. For the observational input we use the blue and red central/satellite galaxy stellar mass functions and two-point correlation functions in the stellar mass range of 9 < log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) <12. We find that: (1) the SHMR of central galaxies is segregated by color, with blue centrals having a SHMR above that of red centrals; at log(M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ∼12, the M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratio of the blue centrals is ≈0.05, which is ∼1.7 times larger than the value of red centrals. (2) The constrained scatters around the SHMRs of red and blue centrals are ≈0.14 and ≈0.11 dex, respectively. The scatter of the average SHMR of all central galaxies changes from ∼0.20 dex to ∼0.14 dex in the 11.3 < log(M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) <15 range. (3) The fraction of halos hosting blue centrals at M{sub h}=10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} is 87%, but at 2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} decays to ∼20%, approaching a few percent at higher masses. The characteristic mass at which this fraction is the same for blue and red galaxies is M{sub h}≈7×10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Our results suggest that the SHMR of central galaxies at large masses is shaped by mass quenching. At low masses processes that delay star formation without invoking too strong supernova-driven outflows could explain the high M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratios of blue centrals as compared to those of the scarce red centrals.

  16. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar-Mass Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morscher, Maggie

    Globular clusters are gravitationally bound systems containing up to millions of stars, and are found ubiquitously in massive galaxies, including the Milky Way. With densities as high as a million stars per cubic parsec, they are one of the few places in the Universe where stars interact with one another. They therefore provide us with a unique laboratory for studying how gravitational interactions can facilitate the formation of exotic systems, such as X-ray binaries containing black holes, and merging double black hole binaries, which are produced much less efficiently in isolation. While telescopes can provide us with a snapshot of what these dense clusters look like at present, we must rely on detailed numerical simulations to learn about their evolution. These simulations are quite challenging, however, since dense star clusters are described by a complicated set of physical processes occurring on many different length and time scales, including stellar and binary evolution, weak gravitational scattering encounters, strong resonant binary interactions, and tidal stripping by the host galaxy. Until very recently, it was not possible to model the evolution of systems with millions of stars, the actual number contained in the largest clusters, including all the relevant physics required describe these systems accurately. The Northwestern Group's Henon Monte Carlo code, CMC, which has been in development for over a decade, is a powerful tool that can be used to construct detailed evolutionary models of large star clusters. With its recent parallelization, CMC is now capable of addressing a particularly interesting unsolved problem in astrophysics: the dynamical evolution of stellar black holes in dense star clusters. Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes, the remnants of stars with initial masses from 20 - 100

  17. Powerful, Rotating Disk Winds from Stellar-mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaastra, J.; Kallman, T.; King, A. L.; Proga, D.; Raymond, J.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of ionized X-ray disk winds found in the Fe K band of four stellar-mass black holes observed with Chandra, including 4U 1630-47, GRO J1655-40, H 1743-322, and GRS 1915+105. High-resolution photoionization grids were generated in order to model the data. Third-order gratings spectra were used to resolve complex absorption profiles into atomic effects and multiple velocity components. The Fe xxv line is found to be shaped by contributions from the intercombination line (in absorption), and the Fe xxvi line is detected as a spin-orbit doublet. The data require 2-3 absorption zones, depending on the source. The fastest components have velocities approaching or exceeding 0.01c, increasing mass outflow rates and wind kinetic power by orders of magnitude over prior single-zone models. The first-order spectra require re-emission from the wind, broadened by a degree that is loosely consistent with Keplerian orbital velocities at the photoionization radius. This suggests that disk winds are rotating with the orbital velocity of the underlying disk, and provides a new means of estimating launching radii—crucial to understanding wind driving mechanisms. Some aspects of the wind velocities and radii correspond well to the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), suggesting a physical connection. We discuss these results in terms of prevalent models for disk wind production and disk accretion itself, and implications for massive black holes in AGNs.

  18. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is a collection of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones that spans a range of [Fe/H] from -2.5 to +0.5, [a/Fe] from -0.2 to +0.8 (for [Fe/H]<=0) or +0.2 (for [Fe/H]>0), and initial He mass fractions from Y=0.245 to 0.40. Stellar evolution tracks were computed for masses between 0.1 and 4 Msolar, allowing isochrones to be generated for ages as young as 250 Myr. For the range in masses where the core He flash occurs, separate He-burning tracks were computed starting from the zero age horizontal branch. The tracks and isochrones have been transformed to the observational plane in a variety of photometric systems including standard UBV(RI)C, Stromgren uvby, SDSS ugriz, 2MASS JHKs, and HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2. The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is accessible through a Web site at http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/ where all tracks, isochrones, and additional files can be downloaded. [Copied from online abstract of paper titled "Darmouth Stellar Evolution Database" authored by Dotter, Chaboyer, Jevremovic, Kostov, Baron, Ferguson, and Jason. Abstract is located at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJS..178...89D] Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  19. The Clustering of Radio Galaxies: Biasing and Evolution versus Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi; Tiwari, Prabhakar

    2015-10-01

    We study the angular clustering of ∼6 × 105 NVSS sources on scales ≳ 50{h}-1 {Mpc} in the context of the ΛCDM scenario. The analysis partially relies on the redshift distribution of 131 radio galaxies, inferred from the Hercules and CENSORS survey, and an empirical fit to the stellar-to-halo mass relation. For redshifts z ≲ 0.7, the fraction of radio activity versus stellar mass evolves as {f}{{{RL}}}∼ {M}*{α 0+{α }1z}, where α0 = 2.529 ± 0.184 and {α }1={1.854}-0.761+0.708. The estimate on α0 is largely driven by the results of Best et al., while the constraint on α1 is new. We derive a biasing factor b(z=0.5)={2.093}-0.109+0.164 between radio galaxies and the underlying mass. The function b(z)=0.33{z}2+0.85z+1.6 fits well the redshift dependence. We also provide convenient parametric forms for the redshift-dependent radio luminosity function, which are consistent with the redshift distribution and the NVSS source count versus flux.

  20. A grid of MHD models for stellar mass loss and spin-down rates of solar analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    Stellar winds are believed to be the dominant factor in the spin-down of stars over time. However, stellar winds of solar analogs are poorly constrained due to observational challenges. In this paper, we present a grid of magnetohydrodynamic models to study and quantify the values of stellar mass loss and angular momentum loss rates as a function of the stellar rotation period, magnetic dipole component, and coronal base density. We derive simple scaling laws for the loss rates as a function of these parameters, and constrain the possible mass loss rate of stars with thermally driven winds. Despite the success of our scaling law in matching the results of the model, we find a deviation between the 'solar dipole' case and a real case based on solar observations that overestimates the actual solar mass loss rate by a factor of three. This implies that the model for stellar fields might require a further investigation with additional complexity. Mass loss rates in general are largely controlled by the magnetic field strength, with the wind density varying in proportion to the confining magnetic pressure B {sup 2}. We also find that the mass loss rates obtained using our grid models drop much faster with the increase in rotation period than scaling laws derived using observed stellar activity. For main-sequence solar-like stars, our scaling law for angular momentum loss versus poloidal magnetic field strength retrieves the well-known Skumanich decline of angular velocity with time, Ω{sub *}∝t {sup –1/2}, if the large-scale poloidal magnetic field scales with rotation rate as B{sub p}∝Ω{sub ⋆}{sup 2}.

  1. Improved Estimates of the Milky Way's Stellar Mass and Star Formation Rate from Hierarchical Bayesian Meta-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    We present improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by combining previous measurements from the literature using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical method that allows us to account for the possibility that any value may be incorrect or have underestimated errors. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about the nature of problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields an SFR for the Galaxy of {{\\dot{M}}\\star }=1.65+/- 0.19 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1}, assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF). By combining HB methods with Monte Carlo simulations that incorporate the latest estimates of the Galactocentric radius of the Sun, R0, the exponential scale length of the disk, Ld, and the local surface density of stellar mass, {{Σ}\\star }({{R}0}), we show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is M\\star B=0.91+/- 0.07× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ }, the disk mass is M\\star D=5.17+/- 1.11× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ }, and their combination yields a total stellar mass of {{M}\\star }=6.08+/- 1.14× {{10}10} {{M}⊙ } (assuming a Kroupa IMF and an exponential disk profile). This analysis is based upon a new compilation of literature bulge mass estimates, normalized to common assumptions about the stellar IMF and Galactic disk properties, presented herein. We additionally find a bulge-to-total mass ratio for the Milky Way of B/T=0.150-0.019+0.028 and a specific SFR of {{\\dot{M}}\\star }/{{M}\\star }=2.71+/- 0.59× {{10}-11} yr-1.

  2. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ☉}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ☉}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ☉}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ∼10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ☉}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ☉}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t

  3. THE MASS DEPENDENCE BETWEEN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND THEIR STELLAR HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-07-10

    We present a substantial extension of the millimeter (mm) wave continuum photometry catalog for circumstellar dust disks in the Taurus star-forming region, based on a new ''snapshot'' {lambda} = 1.3 mm survey with the Submillimeter Array. Combining these new data with measurements in the literature, we construct a mm-wave luminosity distribution, f(L{sub mm}), for Class II disks that is statistically complete for stellar hosts with spectral types earlier than M8.5 and has a 3{sigma} depth of roughly 3 mJy. The resulting census eliminates a longstanding selection bias against disks with late-type hosts, and thereby demonstrates that there is a strong correlation between L{sub mm} and the host spectral type. By translating the locations of individual stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram into masses and ages, and adopting a simple conversion between L{sub mm} and the disk mass, M{sub d} , we confirm that this correlation corresponds to a statistically robust relationship between the masses of dust disks and the stars that host them. A Bayesian regression technique is used to characterize these relationships in the presence of measurement errors, data censoring, and significant intrinsic scatter: the best-fit results indicate a typical 1.3 mm flux density of {approx}25 mJy for 1 M{sub Sun} hosts and a power-law scaling L{sub mm}{proportional_to}M{sub *}{sup 1.5-2.0}. We suggest that a reasonable treatment of dust temperature in the conversion from L{sub mm} to M{sub d} favors an inherently linear M{sub d} {proportional_to}M{sub *} scaling, with a typical disk-to-star mass ratio of {approx}0.2%-0.6%. The measured rms dispersion around this regression curve is {+-}0.7 dex, suggesting that the combined effects of diverse evolutionary states, dust opacities, and temperatures in these disks imprint a full width at half-maximum range of a factor of {approx}40 on the inferred M{sub d} (or L{sub mm}) at any given host mass. We argue that this relationship between M{sub d

  4. Ultraviolet to Mid-Infrared Observations of Star-forming Galaxies at z~2: Stellar Masses and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Erb, Dawn K.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Adelberger, Kurt L.; Pettini, Max; Barmby, Pauline; Huang, Jiasheng

    2005-06-01

    We present the broadband UV through mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a sample of 72 spectroscopically confirmed star-forming galaxies at z=2.30+/-0.3. Located in a 72 arcmin2 field centered on the bright background QSO, HS 1700+643, these galaxies were preselected to lie at z~2 solely on the basis of their rest-frame UV colors and luminosities and should be representative of UV-selected samples at high redshift. In addition to deep ground-based photometry spanning from 0.35 to 2.15 μm, we make use of Spitzer IRAC data, which probe the rest-frame near-IR at z~2. The range of stellar populations present in the sample is investigated with simple, single-component stellar population synthesis models. The inability to constrain the form of the star formation history limits our ability to determine the parameters of extinction, age, and star formation rate without using external multiwavelength information. Emphasizing stellar mass estimates, which are much less affected by these uncertainties, we find =10.32+/-0.51 for the sample. The addition of Spitzer IRAC data as a long-wavelength baseline reduces stellar mass uncertainties by a factor of 1.5-2 relative to estimates based on optical-Ks photometry alone. However, the total stellar mass estimated for the sample is remarkably insensitive to the inclusion of IRAC data. We find correlations between stellar mass and rest-frame R band (observed Ks) and rest-frame 1.4 μm (observed 4.5 μm) luminosities, although with significant scatter. Even at rest-frame 1.4 μm, the mass-to-light ratio varies by a factor of 15 indicating that even the rest-frame near-IR, when taken alone, is a poor indicator of stellar mass in star-forming galaxies at z~2. Allowing for the possibility of episodic star formation, we find that typical galaxies in our sample could contain up to 3 times more stellar mass in an old underlying burst than what was inferred from single-component modeling. In contrast, mass

  5. Full-lifetime simulations of multiple unequal-mass planets across all phases of stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Mustill, Alexander J.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Redfield, Seth; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Bowler, Alex B.; Lloyd, Maximillian J. S.

    2016-06-01

    We know that planetary systems are just as common around white dwarfs as around main-sequence stars. However, self-consistently linking a planetary system across these two phases of stellar evolution through the violent giant branch poses computational challenges, and previous studies restricted architectures to equal-mass planets. Here, we remove this constraint and perform over 450 numerical integrations over a Hubble time (14 Gyr) of packed planetary systems with unequal-mass planets. We characterize the resulting trends as a function of planet order and mass. We find that intrusive radial incursions in the vicinity of the white dwarf become less likely as the dispersion amongst planet masses increases. The orbital meandering which may sustain a sufficiently dynamic environment around a white dwarf to explain observations is more dependent on the presence of terrestrial-mass planets than any variation in planetary mass. Triggering unpacking or instability during the white dwarf phase is comparably easy for systems of unequal-mass planets and systems of equal-mass planets; instabilities during the giant branch phase remain rare and require fine-tuning of initial conditions. We list the key dynamical features of each simulation individually as a potential guide for upcoming discoveries.

  6. The Pleiades mass function: Models versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraux, E.; Kroupa, P.; Bouvier, J.

    2004-10-01

    Two stellar-dynamical models of binary-rich embedded proto-Orion-Nebula-type clusters that evolve to Pleiades-like clusters are studied with an emphasis on comparing the stellar mass function with observational constraints. By the age of the Pleiades (about 100 Myr) both models show a similar degree of mass segregation which also agrees with observational constraints. This thus indicates that the Pleiades is well relaxed and that it is suffering from severe amnesia. It is found that the initial mass function (IMF) must have been indistinguishable from the standard or Galactic-field IMF for stars with mass m ≲ 2 M⊙, provided the Pleiades precursor had a central density of about 104.8 stars/pc3. A denser model with 105.8 stars/pc3 also leads to reasonable agreement with observational constraints, but owing to the shorter relaxation time of the embedded cluster it evolves through energy equipartition to a mass-segregated condition just prior to residual-gas expulsion. This model consequently preferentially loses low-mass stars and brown dwarfs (BDs), but the effect is not very pronounced. The empirical data indicate that the Pleiades IMF may have been steeper than the Salpeter for stars with m⪆ 2 M⊙.

  7. The range of variation of the mass of the most massive star in stellar clusters derived from 35 million Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, Bogdan; Hanson, M. M. E-mail: margaret.hanson@uc.edu

    2014-01-01

    A growing fraction of simple stellar population models, in an aim to create more realistic simulations capable of including stochastic variation in their outputs, begin their simulations with a distribution of discrete stars following a power-law function of masses. Careful attention is needed to create a correctly sampled initial mass function (IMF), and here we provide a solid mathematical method, called MASSCLEAN IMF Sampling, for doing so. We use our method to perform 10 million MASSCLEAN Monte Carlo stellar cluster simulations to determine the most massive star in a mass distribution as a function of the total mass of the cluster. We find that a maximum mass range is predicted, not a single maximum mass. This range is (1) dependent on the total mass of the cluster and (2) independent of an upper stellar mass limit, M{sub limit} , for unsaturated clusters and emerges naturally from our IMF sampling method. We then turn our analysis around, starting with our new database of 25 million simulated clusters, to constrain the highest mass star from the observed integrated colors of a sample of 40 low-mass Large Magellanic Cloud stellar clusters of known age and mass. Finally, we present an analytical description of the maximum mass range of the most massive star as a function of the cluster's total mass and present a new M{sub max} -M{sub cluster} relation.

  8. 3D mapping of stellar populations in galaxies as a function of environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a6-year SDSS-IV survey that will obtain resolved spectroscopy from 3600A to 10300 A for a representative sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. MaNGA will allow the internal kinematics and spatially-resolved properties of stellar populations and gas inside galaxies to be studied as a function of local environment and halo mass for the very first time. I will present results from our analysis of the first year MaNGA data. The main focus is on the 3-dimensional distribution of stellar population properties in galaxies - formation age, element abundance, IMF slope - studying how these vary spatially in galaxies as a function of galaxy environment and dark matter halo mass.

  9. Establishing a relation between the mass and the spin of stellar-mass black holes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Indrani; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2013-08-01

    Stellar mass black holes (SMBHs), forming by the core collapse of very massive, rapidly rotating stars, are expected to exhibit a high density accretion disk around them developed from the spinning mantle of the collapsing star. A wide class of such disks, due to their high density and temperature, are effective emitters of neutrinos and hence called neutrino cooled disks. Tracking the physics relating the observed (neutrino) luminosity to the mass, spin of black holes (BHs) and the accretion rate (M) of such disks, here we establish a correlation between the spin and mass of SMBHs at their formation stage. Our work shows that spinning BHs are more massive than nonspinning BHs for a given M. However, slowly spinning BHs can turn out to be more massive than spinning BHs if M at their formation stage was higher compared to faster spinning BHs. PMID:23971549

  10. Protostar mass functions in young clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Philip C.

    2014-01-20

    In an improved model of protostar mass functions (PMFs), protostars gain mass from isothermal cores in turbulent clumps. Their mass accretion rate is similar to Shu accretion at low mass and to reduced Bondi accretion at high mass. Accretion durations follow a simple expression in which higher-mass protostars accrete for longer times. These times are set by ejections, stellar feedback, and gravitational competition, which terminate accretion and reduce its efficiency. The mass scale is the mass of a critically stable isothermal core. In steady state, the PMF approaches a power law at high mass because of competition between clump accretion and accretion stopping. The power law exponent is the ratio of the timescales of accretion and accretion stopping. The protostar luminosity function (PLF) peaks near 1 L {sub ☉} because of inefficient accretion of core gas. Models fit observed PLFs in four large embedded clusters. These indicate that their underlying PMFs may be top-heavy compared with the initial mass function, depending on the protostar radius model.

  11. THE STELLAR MASS STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE GALAXIES FROM z = 0 TO z = 2.5: SURFACE DENSITY PROFILES AND HALF-MASS RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Szomoru, Daniel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Trenti, Michele; Illingworth, Garth D.; Oesch, Pascal

    2013-02-15

    We present stellar mass surface density profiles of a mass-selected sample of 177 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5, obtained using very deep Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-infrared data over the GOODS-South field, including recent CANDELS data. Accurate stellar mass surface density profiles have been measured for the first time for a complete sample of high-redshift galaxies more massive than 10{sup 10.7} M {sub Sun }. The key advantage of this study compared to previous work is that the surface brightness profiles are deconvolved for point-spread function smoothing, allowing accurate measurements of the structure of the galaxies. The surface brightness profiles account for contributions from complex galaxy structures such as rings and faint outer disks. Mass profiles are derived using radial rest-frame ug color profiles and a well-established empirical relation between these colors and the stellar mass-to-light ratio. We derive stellar half-mass radii from the mass profiles, and find that these are on average {approx}25% smaller than rest-frame g-band half-light radii. This average size difference of 25% is the same at all redshifts, and does not correlate with stellar mass, specific star formation rate, effective surface density, Sersic index, or galaxy size. Although on average the difference between half-mass size and half-light size is modest, for approximately 10% of massive galaxies this difference is more than a factor of two. These extreme galaxies are mostly extended, disk-like systems with large central bulges. These results are robust, but could be impacted if the central dust extinction becomes high. ALMA observations can be used to explore this possibility. These results provide added support for galaxy growth scenarios wherein massive galaxies at these epochs grow by accretion onto their outer regions.

  12. Stellar mass of elliptical galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen-Hung; Ko, Chung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Stellar mass is an important ingredient in the study of the evolution of galaxies. As an alternative to the dark matter paradigm, MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) provides us a tool to estimate more directly the baryonic mass of a galaxy via its dynamical mass. As most baryons are resided in stars in an elliptical galaxy, we estimate its stellar mass by calculating its dynamical mass in the framework of MOND. Hernquist model is adopted for the mass distribution. We select elliptical galaxies with measured velocity dispersion and effective radius between redshift 0.05 and 0.5 from the main galaxy sample and the luminous red galaxy sample in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this contribution we present the evolution of the stellar mass of elliptical galaxies with redshift.

  13. Masses of black holes in binary stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M.

    1996-08-01

    Mass determination methods and their results for ten black holes in X-ray binary systems are summarised. A unified interpretation of the radial velocity and optical light curves allows one to reliably justify the close binary system model and to prove the correctness of determination of the optical star mass function fv(m).The orbit plane inclination i can be estimated from an analysis of optical light curve of the system, which is due mainly to the ellipsoidal shape of the optical star (the so-called ellipticity effect). The component mass ratio q = mx/mv is obtained from information about the distance to the binary system as well as from data about rotational broadening of absorption lines in the spectrum of the optical star. These data allow one to obtain from the value of fv(m) a reliable value of the black hole mass mx or its low limit, as well as the optical star mass mv. An independent estimate of the optical star mass mv obtained from information about its spectral class and luminosity gives us test results. Additional test comes from information about the absence or presence of X-ray eclipses in the system. Effects of the non-zero dimension of the optical star, its pear-like shape, and X-ray heating on the absorption line profiles and the radial velocity curve are investigated. It is very significant that none of ten known massive (mx > 3M) X-ray sources considered as black hole candidates is an X-ray pulsar or an X-ray burster of the first kind.

  14. The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G): Stellar Masses, Sizes, and Radial Profiles for 2352 Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael; Kim, Taehyun; Laine, Jarkko; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gil de Paz, Armando; Comeron, Sebastien; Hinz, Joannah; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.; Schinnerer, Eva; Ho, Luis; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Madore, Barry; Holwerda, Benne; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Knapen, Johan H.; Meidt, Sharon; Querejeta, Miguel; Mizusawa, Trisha; Seibert, Mark; Laine, Seppo; Courtois, Helene

    2015-07-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies is a volume, magnitude, and size-limited survey of 2352 nearby galaxies with deep imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. In this paper, we describe our surface photometry pipeline and showcase the associated data products that we have released to the community. We also identify the physical mechanisms leading to different levels of central stellar mass concentration for galaxies with the same total stellar mass. Finally, we derive the local stellar mass-size relation at 3.6 μm for galaxies of different morphologies. Our radial profiles reach stellar mass surface densities below ˜ 1 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2. Given the negligible impact of dust and the almost constant mass-to-light ratio at these wavelengths, these profiles constitute an accurate inventory of the radial distribution of stellar mass in nearby galaxies. From these profiles we have also derived global properties such as asymptotic magnitudes (and the corresponding stellar masses), isophotal sizes and shapes, and concentration indices. These and other data products from our various pipelines (science-ready mosaics, object masks, 2D image decompositions, and stellar mass maps) can be publicly accessed at IRSA (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/S4G/).

  15. Stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Fender, Rob; Belloni, Tomaso

    2012-08-01

    We review the likely population, observational properties, and broad implications of stellar-mass black holes and ultraluminous x-ray sources. We focus on the clear empirical rules connecting accretion and outflow that have been established for stellar-mass black holes in binary systems in the past decade and a half. These patterns of behavior are probably the keys that will allow us to understand black hole feedback on the largest scales over cosmological time scales. PMID:22859481

  16. CONSTRAINING THE QUADRUPOLE MOMENT OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES WITH THE CONTINUUM FITTING METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Bambi, Cosimo; Barausse, Enrico E-mail: barausse@umd.edu

    2011-04-20

    Black holes in general relativity are known as Kerr black holes and are characterized solely by two parameters, the mass M and the spin J. All the higher multipole moments of the gravitational field are functions of these two parameters. For instance, the quadrupole moment is Q = -J {sup 2}/M, which implies that a measurement of M, J, and Q for black hole candidates would allow one to test whether these objects are really black holes as described by general relativity. While future gravitational-wave experiments will be able to test the Kerr nature of these objects with very high accuracy, in this paper we show that it is possible to put constraints on the quadrupole moment of stellar-mass black hole candidates by using presently available X-ray data of the thermal spectrum of their accretion disk.

  17. STELLAR MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FROM GALAXY SPECTRA: HOW ACCURATE CAN THEY BE?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallazzi, Anna; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2009-12-01

    Stellar masses play a crucial role in the exploration of galaxy properties and the evolution of the galaxy population. In this paper, we explore the minimum possible uncertainties in stellar mass-to-light ratios (M {sub *}/L) from the assumed star formation history (SFH) and metallicity distribution, with the goals of providing a minimum set of requirements for observational studies. We use a large Monte Carlo library of SFHs to study as a function of galaxy spectral type and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) the statistical uncertainties of M {sub *}/L values using either absorption-line data or broadband colors. The accuracy of M {sub *}/L estimates can be significantly improved by using metal-sensitive indices in combination with age-sensitive indices, in particular for galaxies with intermediate-age or young stellar populations. While M {sub *}/L accuracy clearly depends on the spectral S/N, there is no significant gain in improving the S/N much above 50 pixel{sup -1} and limiting uncertainties of {approx}0.03 dex are reached. Assuming that dust is accurately corrected or absent and that the redshift is known, color-based M {sub *}/L estimates are only slightly more uncertain than spectroscopic estimates (at comparable spectroscopic and photometric quality), but are more easily affected by systematic biases. This is the case in particular for galaxies with bursty SFHs (high H{delta} {sub A} at fixed D4000 {sub n}), the M {sub *}/L of which cannot be constrained any better than {approx}0.15 dex with any indicators explored here. Finally, we explore the effects of the assumed prior distribution in SFHs and metallicity, finding them to be higher for color-based estimates.

  18. Stellar Masses from the CANDELS Survey: The GOODS-South and UDS Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fontana, A.; Mobasher, B.; Barro, G.; Castellano, M.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Grazian, A.; Hsu, L. T.; Lee, B.; Lee, S.-K.; Pforr, J.; Salvato, M.; Wiklind, T.; Wuyts, S.; Almaini, O.; Cooper, M. C.; Galametz, A.; Weiner, B.; Amorin, R.; Boutsia, K.; Conselice, C. J.; Dahlen, T.; Dickinson, M. E.; Giavalisco, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Guo, Y.; Hathi, N. P.; Kocevski, D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kurczynski, P.; Merlin, E.; Mortlock, A.; Newman, J. A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Simons, R.; Willner, S. P.

    2015-03-01

    We present the public release of the stellar mass catalogs for the GOODS-S and UDS fields obtained using some of the deepest near-IR images available, achieved as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey project. We combine the effort from 10 different teams, who computed the stellar masses using the same photometry and the same redshifts. Each team adopted their preferred fitting code, assumptions, priors, and parameter grid. The combination of results using the same underlying stellar isochrones reduces the systematics associated with the fitting code and other choices. Thanks to the availability of different estimates, we can test the effect of some specific parameters and assumptions on the stellar mass estimate. The choice of the stellar isochrone library turns out to have the largest effect on the galaxy stellar mass estimates, resulting in the largest distributions around the median value (with a semi interquartile range larger than 0.1 dex). On the other hand, for most galaxies, the stellar mass estimates are relatively insensitive to the different parameterizations of the star formation history. The inclusion of nebular emission in the model spectra does not have a significant impact for the majority of galaxies (less than a factor of 2 for ~80% of the sample). Nevertheless, the stellar mass for the subsample of young galaxies (age <100 Myr), especially in particular redshift ranges (e.g., 2.2 < z < 2.4, 3.2 < z < 3.6, and 5.5 < z < 6.5), can be seriously overestimated (by up to a factor of 10 for <20 Myr sources) if nebular contribution is ignored.

  19. The dependence of oxygen and nitrogen abundances on stellar mass from the CALIFA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, E.; García-Benito, R.; Vílchez, J. M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Kehrig, C.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We analysed the optical spectra of individual emission-line regions extracted from a sample of 350 spiral galaxies of the CALIFA survey. We selected the star-forming HII regions and calculated total O/H abundances and N/O ratios using the semi-empirical routine HII-Chi-mistry. We performed linear fittings to the abundances as a function of the de-projected galactocentric distances and we studied the statistical properties of the slopes and the characteristic values at the effective radius as a function of other integrated properties. Although galaxies present a wide variety of spatial chemical distributions both for O/H and N/O, a characteristic value at the effective radius can be obtained that tightly correlates with stellar mass. No other dependences are found with other integrated properties such as SFR, morphology or presence of a bar.

  20. Haloes light and dark: dynamical models of the stellar halo and constraints on the mass of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. A.; Evans, N. W.

    2015-11-01

    We develop a flexible set of action-based distribution functions (DFs) for stellar haloes. The DFs have five free parameters, controlling the inner and outer density slope, break radius, flattening, and anisotropy, respectively. The DFs generate flattened stellar haloes with a rapidly varying logarithmic slope in density, as well as a spherically aligned velocity ellipsoid with a long axis that points towards the Galactic Centre - all attributes possessed by the stellar halo of the Milky Way. We use our action-based DF to model the blue horizontal branch stars extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as stellar halo tracers in a spherical Galactic potential. As the selection function is hard to model, we fix the density law from earlier studies and solve for the anisotropy and gravitational potential parameters. Our best-fitting model has a velocity anisotropy that becomes more radially anisotropic on moving outwards. It changes from β ≈ 0.4 at Galactocentric radius of 15 kpc to ≈0.7 at 60 kpc. This is a gentler increase than is typically found in simulations of stellar haloes built from the multiple accretion of smaller systems. We find the potential corresponds to an almost flat rotation curve with amplitude of ≈200 km s-1 at these distances. This implies an enclosed mass of ≈4.5 × 1011 M⊙ within a spherical shell of radius 50 kpc.

  1. Galaxy Stellar Mass Assembly Between 0.2 < z < 2 from the S-COSMOS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, O.; Salvato, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Aussel, H.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Kartaltepe, J.; Scoville, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Arnouts, S.; Bundy, K.; Cassata, P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Koekemoer, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lilly, S.; Surace, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Thompson, D.; Tresse, L.; Zamojski, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2010-02-01

    We follow the galaxy stellar mass assembly by morphological and spectral type in the COSMOS 2 deg2 field. We derive the stellar mass functions and stellar mass densities from z = 2 to z = 0.2 using 196,000 galaxies selected at F 3.6 μm > 1 μJy with accurate photometric redshifts (σ_{(z_phot-z_spec)/(1+z_spec)}=0.008 at i + < 22.5). Using a spectral classification, we find that z ~ 1 is an epoch of transition in the stellar mass assembly of quiescent galaxies. Their stellar mass density increases by 1.1 dex between z = 1.5-2 and z = 0.8-1 (Δt ~ 2.5 Gyr), but only by 0.3 dex between z = 0.8-1 and z ~ 0.1 (Δt ~ 6 Gyr). Then, we add the morphological information and find that 80%-90% of the massive quiescent galaxies (log M ˜ 11) have an elliptical morphology at z < 0.8. Therefore, a dominant mechanism links the shutdown of star formation and the acquisition of an elliptical morphology in massive galaxies. Still, a significant fraction of quiescent galaxies present a Spi/Irr morphology at low mass (40%-60% at log M˜ 9.5), but this fraction is smaller than predicted by semi-analytical models using a "halo quenching" recipe. We also analyze the evolution of star-forming galaxies and split them into "intermediate activity" and "high activity" galaxies. We find that the most massive "high activity" galaxies end their high star formation rate phase first. Finally, the space density of massive star-forming galaxies becomes lower than the space density of massive elliptical galaxies at z < 1. As a consequence, the rate of "wet mergers" involved in the formation of the most massive ellipticals must decline very rapidly at z < 1, which could explain the observed slow down in the assembly of these quiescent and massive sources. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope

  2. ON THE LAST 10 BILLION YEARS OF STELLAR MASS GROWTH IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Samuel N.

    2012-02-01

    The star formation rate-stellar mass relation (SFR-M{sub *}) and its evolution (i.e., the SFR main sequence) describe the growth rate of galaxies of a given stellar mass and at a given redshift. Assuming that present-day star-forming galaxies (SFGs) were always star forming in the past, these growth rate observations can be integrated to calculate average star formation histories (SFHs). Using this Main Sequence Integration (MSI) approach, we trace present-day massive SFGs back to when they were 10%-20% of their current stellar mass. The integration is robust throughout those epochs: the SFR data underpinning our calculations are consistent with the evolution of stellar mass density in this regime. Analytic approximations to these SFHs are provided. Integration-based results reaffirm previous suggestions that current SFGs formed virtually all of their stellar mass at z < 2. It follows that massive galaxies observed at z > 2 are not the typical progenitors of SFGs today. We also check MSI-based SFHs against those inferred from analysis of the fossil record-from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of SFGs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stars in dwarf irregular galaxies. Once stellar population age uncertainties are accounted for, the main sequence is in excellent agreement with SED-based SFHs (from VESPA). Extrapolating SFR main sequence observations to dwarf galaxies, we find differences between MSI results and SFHs from CMD analysis of Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and Local Group galaxies. Resolved dwarfs appear to grow much slower than main sequence trends imply, and also slower than slightly higher mass SED-analyzed galaxies. This difference may signal problems with SFH determinations, but it may also signal a shift in star formation trends at the lowest stellar masses.

  3. Planetary mass function and planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, M.

    2011-02-01

    With planets orbiting stars, a planetary mass function should not be seen as a low-mass extension of the stellar mass function, but a proper formalism needs to take care of the fact that the statistical properties of planet populations are linked to the properties of their respective host stars. This can be accounted for by describing planet populations by means of a differential planetary mass-radius-orbit function, which together with the fraction of stars with given properties that are orbited by planets and the stellar mass function allows the derivation of all statistics for any considered sample. These fundamental functions provide a framework for comparing statistics that result from different observing techniques and campaigns which all have their very specific selection procedures and detection efficiencies. Moreover, recent results both from gravitational microlensing campaigns and radial-velocity surveys of stars indicate that planets tend to cluster in systems rather than being the lonely child of their respective parent star. While planetary multiplicity in an observed system becomes obvious with the detection of several planets, its quantitative assessment however comes with the challenge to exclude the presence of further planets. Current exoplanet samples begin to give us first hints at the population statistics, whereas pictures of planet parameter space in its full complexity call for samples that are 2-4 orders of magnitude larger. In order to derive meaningful statistics, however, planet detection campaigns need to be designed in such a way that well-defined fully deterministic target selection, monitoring and detection criteria are applied. The probabilistic nature of gravitational microlensing makes this technique an illustrative example of all the encountered challenges and uncertainties.

  4. Recent Stellar Mass Assembly of Low-mass Star-forming Galaxies at Redshifts 0.3 < z < 0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Gallego, Jesús; Pacifici, Camilla; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stéphane; Gil de Paz, Armando; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The epoch when low-mass star-forming galaxies (LMSFGs) form the bulk of their stellar mass is uncertain. While some models predict an early formation, others favor a delayed scenario until later ages of the universe. We present constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of LMSFGs obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach that (1) consistently combines photometric (broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time. The sample includes 31 spectroscopically confirmed LMSFGs (7.3 <= log M */M ⊙ <= 8.0), at 0.3 < z spec < 0.9, in the Extended-Chandra Deep Field-South field. Among them, 24 were selected with photometric stellar mass log M */M ⊙ < 8.0, 0.3 < z phot < 1.0, and m NB816, AB < 26 mag; the remaining 7 were selected as blue compact dwarfs within the same photometric redshift and magnitude ranges. We also study a secondary sample of 43 more massive spectroscopically confirmed galaxies (8.0 < log M */M ⊙ <= 9.1), selected with the same criteria. The SFRs and stellar masses derived for both samples place our targets on the standard main sequence of star-forming galaxies. The median SFH of LMSFGs at intermediate redshifts appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ~0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for LMSFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for the more massive secondary sample. Based on observations carried out with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programs 088.A-0321 and 090.A-0858.

  5. RECENT STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF LOW-MASS STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT REDSHIFTS 0.3 < z < 0.9

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Gallego, Jesús; De Paz, Armando Gil; Villar, Víctor; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stéphane; Barro, Guillermo

    2015-01-20

    The epoch when low-mass star-forming galaxies (LMSFGs) form the bulk of their stellar mass is uncertain. While some models predict an early formation, others favor a delayed scenario until later ages of the universe. We present constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of LMSFGs obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach that (1) consistently combines photometric (broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time. The sample includes 31 spectroscopically confirmed LMSFGs (7.3 ≤ log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} ≤ 8.0), at 0.3 < z {sub spec} < 0.9, in the Extended-Chandra Deep Field-South field. Among them, 24 were selected with photometric stellar mass log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} < 8.0, 0.3 < z {sub phot} < 1.0, and m {sub NB816,} {sub AB} < 26 mag; the remaining 7 were selected as blue compact dwarfs within the same photometric redshift and magnitude ranges. We also study a secondary sample of 43 more massive spectroscopically confirmed galaxies (8.0 < log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} ≤ 9.1), selected with the same criteria. The SFRs and stellar masses derived for both samples place our targets on the standard main sequence of star-forming galaxies. The median SFH of LMSFGs at intermediate redshifts appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ∼0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for LMSFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for the more massive secondary sample.

  6. AGE AND MASS SEGREGATION OF MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THEIR OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Hagai B.; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes in galactic nuclei. They are thought to have formed through in situ star formation following gas inflow to the nucleus of the galaxy and/or through the infall of multiple stellar clusters. Here we study the latter, and explore the composite structure of the NSC and its relation to the various stellar populations originating from its progenitor infalling clusters. We use N-body simulations of cluster infalls and show that this scenario may produce observational signatures in the form of age segregation: the distribution of the stellar properties (e.g., stellar age and/or metallicity) in the NSCs reflects the infall history of the different clusters. The stellar populations of clusters, infalling at different times (dynamical ages), are differentially segregated in the NSC and are not fully mixed even after a few gigayears of evolution. Moreover, the radial properties of stellar populations in the progenitor cluster are mapped to their radial distribution in the final NSC, potentially leading to efficient mass segregation in NSCs, even those where relaxation times are longer than a Hubble time. Finally, the overall structures of the stellar populations present non-spherical configurations and show significant cluster to cluster population differences.

  7. The panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. V. Ages and masses of the year 1 stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fouesneau, Morgan; Johnson, L. Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Bianchi, Luciana; Caldwell, Nelson; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Larsen, Søren S.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Seth, Anil C.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2014-05-10

    We present ages and masses for 601 star clusters in M31 from the analysis of the six filter integrated light measurements from near-ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, made as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). We derive the ages and masses using a probabilistic technique, which accounts for the effects of stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function. Tests on synthetic data show that this method, in conjunction with the exquisite sensitivity of the PHAT observations and their broad wavelength baseline, provides robust age and mass recovery for clusters ranging from ∼10{sup 2} to 2 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. We find that the cluster age distribution is consistent with being uniform over the past 100 Myr, which suggests a weak effect of cluster disruption within M31. The age distribution of older (>100 Myr) clusters falls toward old ages, consistent with a power-law decline of index –1, likely from a combination of fading and disruption of the clusters. We find that the mass distribution of the whole sample can be well described by a single power law with a spectral index of –1.9 ± 0.1 over the range of 10{sup 3}-3 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. However, if we subdivide the sample by galactocentric radius, we find that the age distributions remain unchanged. However, the mass spectral index varies significantly, showing best-fit values between –2.2 and –1.8, with the shallower slope in the highest star formation intensity regions. We explore the robustness of our study to potential systematics and conclude that the cluster mass function may vary with respect to environment.

  8. A stellar evolution paradigm based on specific mass loss and feedback modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Stencel, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new paradigm for stellar evolution which deals with a detailed treatment of mass loss and feedback modes. The paradigm is presented as a logical diagram which describes the respective dependencies of atmospheric properties relevant to mass loss generation.

  9. Low mass stellar and substellar companionship among nearby white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiszcz, R.; Méndez, R. A.

    2009-05-01

    This work is a systematic, deep search for stellar and substellar objects orbiting nearby white dwarfs (WDs). The scientific interest spans testing specific predictions of common envelope evolutionary phase models, as well as providing constraints to planetary system evolution in advanced stages of its parent star (Livio & Soker 1984; Willes & Wu 2005). Additionally, we seek to explore the hypothesis about the origin of metal lines in hydrogen WDs, produced by the accretion of tidal disturbed asteroidal or cometary material. This could be linked to the presence of a undetected substellar object that perturbed the orbits of these asteroids or comets (Debes & Sigurdsson 2002). Here, we show preliminary results of this project.

  10. Burying a binary: Dynamical mass loss and a continuous optically thick outflow explain the candidate stellar merger V1309 Scorpii

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej

    2014-06-10

    V1309 Sco was proposed to be a stellar merger and a common envelope transient based on the pre-outburst light curve of a contact eclipsing binary with a rapidly decaying orbital period. Using published data, I show that the period decay timescale P/ P-dot of V1309 Sco decreased from ∼1000 to ∼170 yr in ≲ 6 yr, which implies a very high value of P{sup ¨}. I argue that V1309 Sco experienced an onset of dynamical mass loss through the outer Lagrange point, which eventually obscured the binary. The photosphere of the resulting continuous optically thick outflow expands as the mass-loss rate increases, explaining the ∼200 day rise to optical maximum. The model yields the mass-loss rate of the binary star as a function of time and fits the observed light curve remarkably well. It is also possible to observationally constrain the properties of the surface layers undergoing the dynamical mass loss. V1309 Sco is thus a prototype of a new class of stellar transients distinguished by a slow rise to optical maximum that are driven by dynamical mass loss from a binary. I discuss the implications of these findings for stellar transients and other suggested common envelope events.

  11. Acoustic and buoyancy modes throughout stellar evolution: Seismic properties of stars at different stellar ages and masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, S.

    2012-12-01

    Parameter regions in which stars can become pulsationally unstable are found throughout the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Stars of high, intermediate, low, and very low masses may cross various instability regions along their paths of evolutionary sequences. In describing them, I give special consideration to hybrid pulsational characteristics that are particularly valuable for asteroseismic investigations, to \\dot{P} measurements that allow us to directly follow the stellar evolutionary changes in some stars, and to new research results that stand out with respect to previous consensus.

  12. Mass-loss From Evolved Stellar Populations In The Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebel, David

    2012-01-01

    I have conducted a study of a sample of 30,000 evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 6,000 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), covering their variability, mass-loss properties, and chemistry. The initial stages of of my thesis work focused on the infrared variability of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars in the LMC. I determined the period-luminosity (P-L) relations for 6 separate sequences of 30,000 evolved star candidates at 8 wavelengths, as a function of photometrically assigned chemistry, and showed that the P-L relations are different for different chemical populations (O-rich or C-rich). I also present results from the Grid of Red supergiant and Asymptotic giant branch star ModelS (GRAMS) radiative transfer (RT) model grid applied to the evolved stellar population of the LMC. GRAMS is a pre-computed grid of RT models of RSG and AGB stars and surrounding circumstellar dust. Best-fit models are determined based on 12 bands of photometry from the optical to the mid-infrared. Using a pre-computed grid, I can present the first reasonably detailed radiative transfer modeling for tens of thousands of stars, allowing me to make statistically accurate estimations of the carbon-star luminosity function and the global dust mass return to the interstellar medium from AGB stars, both key parameters for stellar population synthesis models to reproduce. In the SAGE-Var program, I used the warm Spitzer mission to take 4 additional epochs of observations of 7500 AGB stars in the LMC and SMC. These epochs, combined with existing data, enable me to derive mean fluxes at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, that will be used for tighter constraints for GRAMS, which is currently limited by the variability induced error on the photometry. This work is support by NASA NAG5-12595 and Spitzer contract 1415784.

  13. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. V. A UNIVERSAL RELATION FOR STELLAR MASS AND SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Yamada, Toru; Akiyama, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Onodera, Masato

    2010-02-01

    We present a universal linear correlation between the stellar mass and surface brightness (SB) of galaxies at 0.3 < z < 3, using a deep K-band-selected catalog in the GOODS-North region. The correlation has a nearly constant slope, independent of redshift and color of galaxies in the rest-z frame. Considering unresolved compact galaxies, the tight correlation gives a lower boundary of SB for a given stellar mass; lower SB galaxies are prohibited over the boundary. The universal slope suggests that the stellar mass in galaxies was built up over their cosmic histories in a similar manner irrelevant to galaxy mass, as opposed to the scenario that massive galaxies mainly accumulated their stellar mass by major merging. In contrast, SB shows a strong dependence on redshift for a given stellar mass. It evolves as approx(1 + z){sup -2.0a}pprox{sup -0.8}, in addition to dimming as (1 + z){sup 4} by the cosmological expansion effect. The brightening depends on galaxy color and stellar mass. The blue population (rest-frame U - V < 0), which is dominated by young and star-forming galaxies, evolves as approx(1 + z){sup -0.8+}-{sup 0.3} in the rest-V band. On the other hand, the red population (U - V>0) and the massive galaxies (M{sub *}>10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) show stronger brightening, (1 + z){sup -1.5+}-{sup 0.1}. By comparison with galaxy evolution models, the phenomena are well understood by the pure luminosity evolution of galaxies out to z approx 3.

  14. DISSECTING THE STELLAR-MASS-SFR CORRELATION IN z = 1 STAR-FORMING DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Salmi, F.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Sargent, M. T.; Bethermin, M.; Renzini, A.; Le Borgne, D. E-mail: edaddi@cea.fr

    2012-07-20

    Using a mass-limited sample of 24 {mu}m detected, star-forming galaxies at 0.5 < z < 1.3, we study the mass-star formation rate (SFR) correlation and its tightness. The correlation is well defined ({sigma} = 0.28 dex) for disk galaxies (n{sub Sersic} < 1.5), while more bulge-dominated objects often have lower specific SFRs (sSFRs). For disk galaxies, a much tighter correlation ({sigma} = 0.19 dex) is obtained if the rest-frame H-band luminosity is used instead of stellar mass derived from multi-color photometry. The sSFR correlates strongly with rest-frame optical colors (hence luminosity-weighted stellar age) and also with clumpiness (which likely reflects the molecular gas fraction). This implies that most of the observed scatter is real, despite its low level, and not dominated by random measurement errors. After correcting for these differential effects a remarkably small dispersion remains ({sigma} = 0.14 dex), suggesting that measurement errors in mass or SFR are {approx}< 0.10 dex, excluding systematic uncertainties. Measurement errors in stellar masses, the thickening of the correlation due to real sSFR variations, and varying completeness with stellar mass, can spuriously bias the derived slope to lower values due to the finite range over which observables (mass and SFR) are available. When accounting for these effects, the intrinsic slope for the main sequence for disk galaxies gets closer to unity.

  15. Mapping the inner stellar halo of the Milky Way from 2MASS and SDSS-III/APOGEE survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Besançon Galaxy model was used to compare the infrared colour distribution of synthetic stars with those from 2MASS observations taking the selection function of the data into account, in order to study the shape of the stellar halo of the Milky Way, with complemetary spectroscopic data from SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. Furthermore, we compared the generated mock metallicity distribution of the Besançon Galaxy model, to the intrinsic metallicity distribution with reliable stellar parameters from the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP). The comparison was carried accross a large volume of the inner part of the Galaxy, revealing that a metal-poor population, [M/H]<-1.2 dex, could fill an extended component of the inner galactic halo. With this data set, we are able to model a more realistic mass density distribution of the stellar halo component of the Milky Way, assuming a six-parameters double power-law model, and reconstruct the behaviour of the rotation curve in the inner part of the Galaxy.

  16. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  17. Made-to-measure models of the Galactic box/peanut bulge: stellar and total mass in the bulge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portail, M.; Wegg, C.; Gerhard, O.; Martinez-Valpuesta, I.

    2015-03-01

    We construct dynamical models of the Milky Way's box/peanut (B/P) bulge, using the recently measured 3D density of red clump giants (RCGs) as well as kinematic data from the Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) survey. We match these data using the NMAGIC made-to-measure method, starting with N-body models for barred discs in different dark matter haloes. We determine the total mass in the bulge volume of the RCGs measurement ( ± 2.2 × ±1.4 × ±1.2 kpc) with unprecedented accuracy and robustness to be 1.84 ± 0.07 × 1010 M⊙. The stellar mass in this volume varies between 1.25 and 1.6 × 1010 M⊙, depending on the amount of dark matter in the bulge. We evaluate the mass-to-light and mass-to-clump ratios in the bulge and compare them to theoretical predictions from population synthesis models. We find a mass-to-light ratio in the K band in the range 0.8-1.1. The models are consistent with a Kroupa or Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), but a Salpeter IMF is ruled out for stellar ages of 10 Gyr. To match predictions from the Zoccali IMF derived from the bulge stellar luminosity function requires ˜40 per cent or ˜ 0.7 × 1010 M⊙ dark matter in the bulge region. The BRAVA data together with the RCGs 3D density imply a low pattern speed for the Galactic B/P bulge of Ωp = 25-30 km s- 1 kpc- 1. This would place the Galaxy among the slow rotators (R ≥ 1.5). Finally, we show that the Milky Way's B/P bulge has an off-centred X structure, and that the stellar mass involved in the peanut shape accounts for at least 20 per cent of the stellar mass of the bulge, significantly larger than previously thought.

  18. Peculiar Transients as Probes of Stellar Evolution and Mass-Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drout, Maria; Berger, Edo; Pan-STARRS1 CFA/JHU Transient Team

    2016-01-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of supernovae not only probe the explosion mechanism, but also carry information about the configuration of the star at the moment of collapse and the mass-loss history of the progenitor system in the years immediately preceding its death. The study of supernovae therefore offers us one of our only observational views of the final stages of stellar evolution. As a result, the discovery by wide-field dedicated surveys of new classes of astronomical transients at an ever-increasing rate has both expanded the types of stellar systems that we can directly probe and challenged some of our existing views of how these uncertain final stages proceed. In this talk I will discuss my thesis work on several types of new and peculiar astronomical transients and what their properties, intrinsic rates, and explosion environments are teaching us about stellar evolution and stellar death.

  19. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  20. Toward Understanding Stellar Radial Velocity Jitter as a Function of Wavelength: The Sun as a Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  1. Quantifying the line-of-sight mass distributions for time-delay lenses with stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristian; Fassnacht, Chris; Treu, Tommaso; Suyu, Sherry; Auger, Matt; Koopmans, Leon; Marshall, Phil; Wong, Kenneth; Collett, Thomas; Agnello, Adriano; Blandford, Roger; Courbin, Frederic; Hilbert, Stefan; Meylan, Georges; Sluse, Dominique

    2014-12-01

    Measuring cosmological parameters with a realistic account of systematic uncertainties is currently one of the principal challenges of physical cosmology. Building on our recent successes with two gravitationally lensed systems, we have started a program to achieve accurate cosmographic measurements from five gravitationally lensed quasars. We aim at measuring H_0 with an accuracy better than 4%, comparable to but independent from measurements by current BAO, SN or Cepheid programs. The largest current contributor to the error budget in our sample is uncertainty about the line-of-sight mass distribution and environment of the lens systems. In this proposal, we request wide-field u-band imaging of the only lens in our sample without already available Spitzer/IRCA observations, B1608+656. The proposed observations are critical for reducing these uncertainties by providing accurate redshifts and in particular stellar masses for galaxies in the light cones of the target lens system. This will establish lensing as a powerful and independent tool for determining cosmography, in preparation for the hundreds of time-delay lenses that will be discovered by future surveys.

  2. Shock interactions, turbulence and the origin of the stellar mass spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pudritz, Ralph E; Kevlahan, N K-R

    2013-11-28

    Supersonic turbulence is an essential element in understanding how structure within interstellar gas is created and shaped. In the context of star formation, many computational studies show that the mass spectrum of density and velocity fluctuations within dense clouds, as well as the distribution of their angular momenta, trace their origin to the statistical and physical properties of gas that is lashed with shock waves. In this paper, we review the observations, simulations and theories of how turbulent-like processes can account for the structures we see in molecular clouds. We then compare traditional ideas of supersonic turbulence with a simpler physical model involving the effects of multiple shock waves and their interactions in the interstellar medium. Planar intersecting shock waves produce dense filaments and generate vortex sheets that are essential to create the broad range of density and velocity structure in clouds. As an example, the lower-mass behaviour of the stellar initial mass function can be traced to the tendency of a collection of shock waves to build up a lognormal density distribution (or column density). Vorticity--which is essential to produce velocity structure over a very broad range of length scales in shocked clouds--can also be generated by the passage of curved shocks or intersecting planar shocks through such media. Two major additional physical forces affect the structure of star-forming gas--gravity and feedback processes from young stars. Both of these can produce power-law tails at the high-mass end of the initial mass function. PMID:24146011

  3. Rapid and Bright Stellar-mass Binary Black Hole Mergers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, Imre

    2016-06-01

    Galactic nuclei are expected to harbor the densest population of stellar-mass black holes, accounting for as much as ∼ 2% of the mass of the nuclear stellar cluster. A significant fraction (∼ 30%) of these black holes can reside in binaries. We discuss the fate of the black hole binaries in active galactic nuclei, which get trapped in the inner region of the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole. Binary black holes can migrate into and then rapidly merge within the disk. The binaries also accrete a significant amount of gas from the disk, potentially leading to detectable X-ray or gamma-ray emission.

  4. Stellar encounter driven red-giant star mass loss in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquato, Mario; Moraghan, Anthony; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; De Luca, Andrea; Raimondo, Gabriella; Carini, Roberta; Brocato, Enzo

    2014-07-01

    Globular cluster (GC) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are reasonably well understood in terms of standard stellar evolution. However, there are still some open issues, such as fully accounting for the horizontal branch (HB) morphology in terms of chemical and dynamical parameters. Mass loss on the red giant branch (RGB) shapes the mass distribution of the HB stars, and the color distribution in turn. The physical mechanisms driving mass loss are still unclear, as direct observations fail to reveal a clear correlation between mass-loss rate and stellar properties. The HB mass distribution is further complicated by helium-enhanced multiple stellar populations due to differences in the evolving mass along the HB. We present a simple analytical mass-loss model based on tidal stripping through Roche-Lobe overflow during stellar encounters. Our model naturally results in a non-Gaussian mass-loss distribution with high skewness and contains only two free parameters. We fit it to the HB mass distribution of four Galactic GCs, as obtained from fitting the CMD with zero age HB models. The best-fit model accurately reproduces the observed mass distribution. If confirmed on a wider sample of GCs, our results would account for the effects of dynamics in RGB mass-loss processes and provide a physically motivated procedure for synthetic CMDs of GCs. Our physical modeling of mass loss may result in the ability to disentangle the effects of dynamics and helium-enhanced multiple populations on the HB morphology and is instrumental in making HB morphology a probe of the dynamical state of GCs, leading to an improved understanding of their evolution.

  5. THE PROGENITOR MASS OF SN 2011dh FROM STELLAR POPULATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2011-11-20

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we characterize the age of the stellar association in the vicinity of supernova (SN) 2011dh and use it to infer the zero-age main-sequence mass (M{sub ZAMS}) of the progenitor star. We find two distinct and significant star formation (SF) events with ages of <6 and 17{sup +3}{sub -4} Myr, and the corresponding M{sub ZAMS} are >29 and 13{sup +2}{sub -1} M{sub Sun }, respectively. These two bursts represent 18{sup +4}{sub -9}% (young) and 64{sup +10}{sub -14}% (old) of the total SF in the last 50 Myr. Adopting these fractions as probabilities suggests that the most probable M{sub ZAMS} is 13{sup +2}{sub -1} M{sub Sun }. These results are most sensitive to the luminosity function along the well-understood main sequence (MS) and are less sensitive to uncertain late-stage stellar evolution. Therefore, they stand even if the progenitor suffered disruptive post-MS evolution (e.g., eruptive mass loss or binary Roche-lobe overflow). Progenitor identification will help to further constrain the appropriate population. Even though pre-explosion images show a yellow supergiant (YSG) at the site of the SN, panchromatic SN light curves suggest a more compact star as the progenitor. In spite of this, our results suggest an association between the YSG and the SN. Not only was the star located at the SN site, but reinforcing an association, the star's bolometric luminosity is consistent with the final evolutionary stage of the 17 Myr old starburst. If the YSG disappears, then M{sub ZAMS} = 13{sup +2}{sub -1} M{sub Sun }, but if it persists, then our results allow the possibility that the progenitor was an unseen star of >29 M{sub Sun }.

  6. The Effects of the Local Environment and Stellar Mass on Galaxy Quenching to z ∼ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Behnam; Mobasher, Bahram; Sobral, David; Rettura, Alessandro; Scoville, Nick; Faisst, Andreas; Capak, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We study the effects of the local environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties using a mass complete sample of quiescent and star-forming systems in the COSMOS field at z≲ 3. We show that at z≲ 1 the median star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) of all galaxies depend on the environment, but they become independent of the environment at z ≳ 1. However, we find that only for star-forming galaxies, the median SFR and sSFR are similar in different environments regardless of redshift and stellar mass. We find that the quiescent fraction depends on the environment at z ≲ 1 and on stellar mass out to z ∼ 3. We show that at z ≲ 1 galaxies become quiescent faster in denser environments and that the overall environmental quenching efficiency increases with cosmic time. Environmental and mass quenching processes depend on each other. At z ≲ 1 denser environments more efficiently quench galaxies with higher masses (log(M/{M}ȯ ) ≳ 10.7), possibly due to a higher merger rate of massive galaxies in denser environments. We also show that mass quenching is more efficient in denser regions. We show that the overall mass quenching efficiency ({ε }{mass}) for more massive galaxies (log(M/{M}ȯ ) ≳ 10.2) rises with cosmic time until z ∼ 1 and then flattens out. However, for less massive galaxies, the rise in {ε }{mass} continues to the present time. Our results suggest that environmental quenching is only relevant at z ≲ 1 and is likely a fast process, whereas mass quenching is the dominant mechanism at z ≳ 1 with a possible stellar feedback physics.

  7. Transiting Sub-stellar companions of Intermediate-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Daniel; Guenther, Eike W.; Heber, Ulrich; Geier, Stephan; Grziwa, Sascha

    2015-09-01

    We use the CoRoT-survey to search for transiting close-in planets of intermediate-mass stars (M* = 1.3 - 2.1 M⊙). We present recent results of our survey. RV-surveys and direct imaging campaigns showed, that intermediate-mass main-sequence stars have more massive planets then solar-like stars. Even brown dwarfs have been found. In our study we concentrated on short-period planets for which a mass-determination is possible. The detection of close-in planets of intermediate-mass stars put strong constraints on the timescales of the formation and migration. We already have identified transiting Jupiter-like planet candidates with short orbital periods and observed these candidates with high-resolution echelle-spectrographs at various Telescopes.

  8. The evolution in the stellar mass of brightest cluster galaxies over the past 10 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Lidman, Chris; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Guatelli, Susanna; Hill, Allison R.; Hoekstra, Henk; Kurinsky, Noah; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Z. Cemile; Safavi-Naeini, Mitra; Sifón, Cristóbal; Stefanon, Mauro; van de Sande, Jesse; van Dokkum, Pieter; Weigel, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Using a sample of 98 galaxy clusters recently imaged in the near-infrared with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) New Technology Telescope, WIYN telescope and William Herschel Telescope, supplemented with 33 clusters from the ESO archive, we measure how the stellar mass of the most massive galaxies in the universe, namely brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), increases with time. Most of the BCGs in this new sample lie in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.6, which has been noted in recent works to mark an epoch over which the growth in the stellar mass of BCGs stalls. From this sample of 132 clusters, we create a subsample of 102 systems that includes only those clusters that have estimates of the cluster mass. We combine the BCGs in this subsample with BCGs from the literature, and find that the growth in stellar mass of BCGs from 10 billion years ago to the present epoch is broadly consistent with recent semi-analytic and semi-empirical models. As in other recent studies, tentative evidence indicates that the stellar mass growth rate of BCGs may be slowing in the past 3.5 billion years. Further work in collecting larger samples, and in better comparing observations with theory using mock images, is required if a more detailed comparison between the models and the data is to be made.

  9. The evolution in the stellar mass of brightest cluster galaxies over the past 10 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Lidman, Chris; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Guatelli, Susanna; Hill, Allison R.; Hoekstra, Henk; Kurinsky, Noah; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Z. Cemile; Safavi-Naeini, Mitra; Sifón, Cristóbal; Stefanon, Mauro; van de Sande, Jesse; van Dokkum, Pieter; Weigel, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Using a sample of 98 galaxy clusters recently imaged in the near infra-red with the ESO NTT, WIYN and WHT telescopes, supplemented with 33 clusters from the ESO archive, we measure how the stellar mass of the most massive galaxies in the universe, namely Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG), increases with time. Most of the BCGs in this new sample lie in the redshift range $0.2stellar mass of BCGs stalls. From this sample of 132 clusters, we create a subsample of 102 systems that includes only those clusters that have estimates of the cluster mass. We combine the BCGs in this subsample with BCGs from the literature, and find that the growth in stellar mass of BCGs from 10 billion years ago to the present epoch is broadly consistent with recent semi-analytic and semi-empirical models. As in other recent studies, tentative evidence indicates that the stellar mass growth rate of BCGs may be slowing in the past 3.5 billion years. Further work in collecting larger samples, and in better comparing observations with theory using mock images is required if a more detailed comparison between the models and the data is to be made.

  10. The evolution in the stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies over the past 10 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Lidman, Chris; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Guatelli, Susanna; Hill, Allison R.; Hoekstra, Henk; Kurinsky, Noah; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Z. Cemile; Safavi-Naeini, Mitra; Sifón, Cristóbal; Stefanon, Mauro; van de Sande, Jesse; van Dokkum, Pieter; Weigel, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Using a sample of 98 galaxy clusters recently imaged in the near infra-red with the ESO NTT, WIYN and WHT telescopes, supplemented with 33 clusters from the ESO archive, we measure how the stellar mass of the most massive galaxies in the universe, namely Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG), increases with time. Most of the BCGs in this new sample lie in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.6, which has been noted in recent works to mark an epoch over which the growth in the stellar mass of BCGs stalls. From this sample of 132 clusters, we create a subsample of 102 systems that includes only those clusters that have estimates of the cluster mass. We combine the BCGs in this subsample with BCGs from the literature, and find that the growth in stellar mass of BCGs from 10 billion years ago to the present epoch is broadly consistent with recent semi-analytic and semi-empirical models. As in other recent studies, tentative evidence indicates that the stellar mass growth rate of BCGs may be slowing in the past 3.5 billion years. Further work in collecting larger samples, and in better comparing observations with theory using mock images is required if a more detailed comparison between the models and the data is to be made.

  11. EVOLUTION OF PLANETARY ORBITS WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS AND TIDAL DISSIPATION

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2013-11-10

    Intermediate mass stars and stellar remnants often host planets, and these dynamical systems evolve because of mass loss and tides. This paper considers the combined action of stellar mass loss and tidal dissipation on planetary orbits in order to determine the conditions required for planetary survival. Stellar mass loss is included using a so-called Jeans model, described by a dimensionless mass loss rate γ and an index β. We use an analogous prescription to model tidal effects, described here by a dimensionless dissipation rate Γ and two indices (q, p). The initial conditions are determined by the starting value of angular momentum parameter η{sub 0} (equivalently, the initial eccentricity) and the phase θ of the orbit. Within the context of this model, we derive an analytic formula for the critical dissipation rate Γ, which marks the boundary between orbits that spiral outward due to stellar mass loss and those that spiral inward due to tidal dissipation. This analytic result Γ = Γ(γ, β, q, p, η{sub 0}, θ) is essentially exact for initially circular orbits and holds to within an accuracy of ≈50% over the entire multi-dimensional parameter space, where the individual parameters vary by several orders of magnitude. For stars that experience mass loss, the stellar radius often displays quasi-periodic variations, which produce corresponding variations in tidal forcing; we generalize the calculation to include such pulsations using a semi-analytic treatment that holds to the same accuracy as the non-pulsating case. These results can be used in many applications, e.g., to predict/constrain properties of planetary systems orbiting white dwarfs.

  12. Inference on gravitational waves from coalescences of stellar-mass compact objects and intermediate-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haster, Carl-Johan; Wang, Zhilu; Berry, Christopher P. L.; Stevenson, Simon; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescences of neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of ≳100 solar masses represent one of the exciting possible sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors. These sources can provide definitive evidence for the existence of IMBHs, probe globular-cluster dynamics, and potentially serve as tests of general relativity. We analyse the accuracy with which we can measure the masses and spins of the IMBH and its companion in intermediate-mass-ratio coalescences. We find that we can identify an IMBH with a mass above 100 M⊙ with 95 per cent confidence provided the massive body exceeds 130 M⊙. For source masses above ˜200 M⊙, the best measured parameter is the frequency of the quasi-normal ringdown. Consequently, the total mass is measured better than the chirp mass for massive binaries, but the total mass is still partly degenerate with spin, which cannot be accurately measured. Low-frequency detector sensitivity is particularly important for massive sources, since sensitivity to the inspiral phase is critical for measuring the mass of the stellar-mass companion. We show that we can accurately infer source parameters for cosmologically redshifted signals by applying appropriate corrections. We investigate the impact of uncertainty in the model gravitational waveforms and conclude that our main results are likely robust to systematics.

  13. Stellar mass assembly and star formation history from z=0.2 out to z=6 in the COSMOS and VIPERS fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    A clear and comprehensive picture describing the physical processes which regulate the stellar mass assembly is still missing in galaxy formation scenario. I will present a measurement of the galaxy stellar mass function and stellar mass density from z=0.2 out to z=6. Our study relies on deep near-infrared imaging over wide fields: the WIRCAM/CFHT coverage of the 20 sq-deg VIPERS fields combined with the new IRAC/Spitzer coverage (the SPLASH survey) of the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field. Our analysis is based on photometric redshifts of 1,5 million of galaxies reaching a precision around 4% at 4function of their stellar mass. I will also use the stellar mass density to infer the cosmic star formation history over 90% of the age of the Universe. I will compare this estimate with the results obtained using direct tracers of the star formation rate as the UV or IR emissivity.

  14. INSIGHTS ON THE STELLAR MASS-METALLICITY RELATION FROM THE CALIFA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    González Delgado, R. M.; García-Benito, R.; Pérez, E.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; López Fernández, R.; Sánchez, S. F.; Alves, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; Husemann, B.; Bekeraite, S.; Jungwiert, B.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Marino, R. A. [CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Departamento de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s Collaboration: CALIFA collaboration920; and others

    2014-08-10

    We use spatially and temporally resolved maps of stellar population properties of 300 galaxies from the CALIFA integral field survey to investigate how the stellar metallicity (Z {sub *}) relates to the total stellar mass (M {sub *}) and the local mass surface density (μ{sub *}) in both spheroidal- and disk-dominated galaxies. The galaxies are shown to follow a clear stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) over the whole 10{sup 9}-10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} range. This relation is steeper than the one derived from nebular abundances, which is similar to the flatter stellar MZR derived when we consider only young stars. We also find a strong relation between the local values of μ{sub *} and Z {sub *} (the μZR), betraying the influence of local factors in determining Z {sub *}. This shows that both local (μ{sub *}-driven) and global (M {sub *}-driven) processes are important in determining metallicity in galaxies. We find that the overall balance between local and global effects varies with the location within a galaxy. In disks, μ{sub *} regulates Z {sub *}, producing a strong μZR whose amplitude is modulated by M {sub *}. In spheroids it is M {sub *} that dominates the physics of star formation and chemical enrichment, with μ{sub *} playing a minor, secondary role. These findings agree with our previous analysis of the star formation histories of CALIFA galaxies, which showed that mean stellar ages are mainly governed by surface density in galaxy disks and by total mass in spheroids.

  15. Do Not Forget the Forest for the Trees: The Stellar-mass Halo-mass Relation in Different Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue

    2015-10-01

    The connection between dark matter halos and galactic baryons is often not well constrained nor well resolved in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Thus, halo occupation distribution models that assign galaxies to halos based on halo mass are frequently used to interpret clustering observations, even though it is well known that the assembly history of dark matter halos is related to their clustering. In this paper we use high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulations to compare the halo and stellar mass growth of galaxies in a large-scale overdensity to those in a large-scale underdensity (on scales of about 20 Mpc). The simulation reproduces assembly bias, in which halos have earlier formation times in overdense environments than in underdense regions. We find that the ratio of stellar mass to halo mass is larger in overdense regions in central galaxies residing in halos with masses between 1011 and 1012.9 M⊙. When we force the local density (within 2 Mpc) at z = 0 to be the same for galaxies in the large-scale over- and underdensities, we find the same results. We posit that this difference can be explained by a combination of earlier formation times, more interactions at early times with neighbors, and more filaments feeding galaxies in overdense regions. This result puts the standard practice of assigning stellar mass to halos based only on their mass, rather than considering their larger environment, into question.

  16. ANALYTICAL EXPRESSIONS FOR THE ENVELOPE BINDING ENERGY OF GIANTS AS A FUNCTION OF BASIC STELLAR PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Loveridge, A. J.; Van der Sluys, M. V.; Kalogera, V.

    2011-12-10

    The common-envelope (CE) phase is an important stage in the evolution of binary stellar populations. The most common way to compute the change in orbital period during a CE is to relate the binding energy of the envelope of the Roche-lobe filling giant to the change in orbital energy. Especially in population-synthesis codes, where the evolution of millions of stars must be computed and detailed evolutionary models are too expensive computationally, simple approximations are made for the envelope binding energy. In this study, we present accurate analytic prescriptions based on detailed stellar-evolution models that provide the envelope binding energy for giants with metallicities between Z = 10{sup -4} and Z = 0.03 and masses between 0.8 M{sub Sun} and 100 M{sub Sun }, as a function of the metallicity, mass, radius, and evolutionary phase of the star. Our results are also presented in the form of electronic data tables and Fortran routines that use them. We find that the accuracy of our fits is better than 15% for 90% of our model data points in all cases, and better than 10% for 90% of our data points in all cases except the asymptotic giant branches for three of the six metallicities we consider. For very massive stars (M {approx}> 50 M{sub Sun }), when stars lose more than {approx}20% of their initial mass due to stellar winds, our fits do not describe the models as accurately. Our results are more widely applicable-covering wider ranges of metallicity and mass-and are of higher accuracy than those of previous studies.

  17. PRIMUS: The Dependence of AGN Accretion on Host Stellar Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Burles, Scott M.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2012-02-01

    We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS, and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L 2-10 keV = 1042-44 erg s-1 within a parent sample of ~25,000 galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 over ~3.4 deg2 and to i ~ 23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z ~ 1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor ~2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.

  18. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Craig D.; Miller, Christopher J.; Richards, Joseph W.; Deadman, Paul-James; Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Kathy Romer, A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Liddle, Andrew R.; Hoyle, Ben; Hilton, Matt; Stott, John P.; Capozzi, Diego; Collins, Chris A.; Sahlen, Martin; Stanford, S. Adam; Viana, Pedro T. P.

    2012-06-10

    This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5 R{sub 200}, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in the highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters.

  19. The Stellar Mass Fundamental Plane and Compact Quiescent Galaxies at z < 0.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Damjanov, Ivana; Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Fabricant, Daniel G.

    2016-04-01

    We examine the evolution of the relation between stellar mass surface density, velocity dispersion, and half-light radius—the stellar mass fundamental plane (MFP)—for quiescent galaxies at z < 0.6. We measure the local relation from galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the intermediate redshift relation from ∼500 quiescent galaxies with stellar masses 10 ≲ log(M*/M⊙) ≲ 11.5. Nearly half of the quiescent galaxies in our intermediate redshift sample are compact. After accounting for important selection and systematic effects, the velocity dispersion distribution of galaxies at intermediate redshifts is similar to that of galaxies in the local universe. Galaxies at z < 0.6 appear to be smaller (≲0.1 dex) than galaxies in the local sample. The orientation of the stellar MFP is independent of redshift for massive quiescent galaxies at z < 0.6 and the zero-point evolves by ∼0.04 dex. Compact quiescent galaxies fall on the same relation as the extended objects. We confirm that compact quiescent galaxies are the tail of the size and mass distribution of the normal quiescent galaxy population.

  20. The Stripe 82 Massive Galaxy Project - II. Stellar mass completeness of spectroscopic galaxy samples from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Bundy, Kevin; Saito, Shun; Tinker, Jeremy; Maraston, Claudia; Tojeiro, Rita; Huang, Song; Brownstein, Joel R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) has collected spectra for over one million galaxies at 0.15 < z < 0.7 over a volume of 15.3 Gpc3 (9376 deg2) - providing us an opportunity to study the most massive galaxy populations with vanishing sample variance. However, BOSS samples are selected via complex colour cuts that are optimized for cosmology studies, not galaxy science. In this paper, we supplement BOSS samples with photometric redshifts from the Stripe 82 Massive Galaxy Catalog and measure the total galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) at z ˜ 0.3 and z ˜ 0.55. With the total SMF in hand, we characterize the stellar mass completeness of BOSS samples. The high-redshift CMASS (constant mass) sample is significantly impacted by mass incompleteness and is 80 per cent complete at log 10(M*/M⊙) > 11.6 only in the narrow redshift range z = [0.51, 0.61]. The low-redshift LOWZ sample is 80 per cent complete at log 10(M*/M⊙) > 11.6 for z = [0.15, 0.43]. To construct mass complete samples at lower masses, spectroscopic samples need to be significantly supplemented by photometric redshifts. This work will enable future studies to better utilize the BOSS samples for galaxy-formation science.

  1. Older and colder: The impact of starspots on stellar masses, ages, and lithium during the pre-main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    clusters, studying the initial mass function, measuring planet formation timescales, and inferring the lifetimes of circum-stellar disks.

  2. Chromospheric dust formation, stellar masers and mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A multistep scenario which describes a plausible mass loss mechanism associated with red giant and related stars is outlined. The process involves triggering a condensation instability in an extended chromosphere, leading to the formation of cool, dense clouds which are conducive to the formation of molecules and dust grains. Once formed, the dust can be driven away from the star by radiation pressure. Consistency with various observed phenomena is discussed.

  3. Gravoturbulent star formation: Effects of the equation of state on stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klessen, Ralf S.; Spaans, Marco; Jappsen, Anne-Katharina

    Stars form by gravoturbulent fragmentation of interstellar gas clouds. The supersonic turbulence ubiquitously observed in Galactic molecular gas generates strong density fluctuations with gravity taking over in the densest and most massive regions. Collapse sets in to build up stars and star clusters.Turbulence plays a dual role. On global scales it provides support, while at the same time it can promote local collapse. Stellar birth is thus intimately linked to the dynamic behavior of parental gas clouds, which governs when and where protostellar cores form, and how they contract and grow in mass via accretion from the surrounding cloud material to build up stars. The equation of state plays a pivotal role in the fragmentation process. Under typical cloud conditions, massive stars form as part of dense clusters following the "normal" mass function observed, e.g. in the solar neighborhood. However, for gas with an effective polytropic index greater than unity star formation becomes biased towards isolated massive stars. This is relevant for understanding the properties of zero-metallicity stars (Population III) or stars that form under extreme environmental conditions like in the Galactic center or in luminous starbursts.

  4. X-ray induced stellar mass loss near active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. Mark; Shull, J. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The effects of UV and X-ray radiation on stars in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are critically evaluated. Mass loss rates in X-ray-induced winds are evaluated for realistic red giant models, and the effects of the ablation of stellar envelopes by radiation pressure are considered. The importance of X-ray-induced mass loss in the standard quasar model is evaluated and whether it can provide a source of accretion fuel or emission-line clouds is discussed. It is concluded that thermal winds driven by X-ray heating are a minor total supply of mass to AGN, but that thermal plus line-driven winds and stellar ablation may increase the mass loss and improve the chances for supplying a fraction of the necessary mass supply to the central object. It is speculated that when steady winds are inefficient, complex time-dependent processes due to X-ray energy injection deep into a stellar atmosphere could still release significant mass from stars.

  5. GRAVITATIONAL CONUNDRUM? DYNAMICAL MASS SEGREGATION VERSUS DISRUPTION OF BINARY STARS IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Li, Chengyuan; Zheng, Yong; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Deng, Licai; Hu, Yi; Wicker, James E.

    2013-03-01

    Upon their formation, dynamically cool (collapsing) star clusters will, within only a few million years, achieve stellar mass segregation for stars down to a few solar masses, simply because of gravitational two-body encounters. Since binary systems are, on average, more massive than single stars, one would expect them to also rapidly mass segregate dynamically. Contrary to these expectations and based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations, we show that the compact, 15-30 Myr old Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1818 exhibits tantalizing hints at the {approx}> 2{sigma} level of significance (>3{sigma} if we assume a power-law secondary-to-primary mass-ratio distribution) of an increasing fraction of F-star binary systems (with combined masses of 1.3-1.6 M {sub Sun }) with increasing distance from the cluster center, specifically between the inner 10''-20'' (approximately equivalent to the cluster's core and half-mass radii) and the outer 60''-80''. If confirmed, then this will offer support for the theoretically predicted but thus far unobserved dynamical disruption processes of the significant population of 'soft' binary systems-with relatively low binding energies compared to the kinetic energy of their stellar members-in star clusters, which we have access to here by virtue of the cluster's unique combination of youth and high stellar density.

  6. The global and local stellar mass assembly histories of galaxies from the MaNGA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Medel, H. J.; Sánchez,, S. F.; Avila-Reese, V.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M., J.

    2016-06-01

    By means of the fossil record method implemented through Pipe3D we reconstruct the global and radial stellar mass growth histories (MGHs) of a large sample of galaxies in the mass range 10^{8.5}M⊙-10^{11.5}M⊙ from the MaNGA survey. We find that: (1) The main driver of the global MGHs is mass, with more massive galaxies assembling their masses earlier (downsizing). (2) For most galaxies in their late evolutionary stages, the innermost regions formed earlier than the outermost ones (inside-out). This behaviour is stronger for blue/late-type galaxies.

  7. Analytical Expressions for the Envelope Binding Energy of Giants as a Function of Basic Stellar Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveridge, A. J.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Kalogera, V.

    2011-12-01

    The common-envelope (CE) phase is an important stage in the evolution of binary stellar populations. The most common way to compute the change in orbital period during a CE is to relate the binding energy of the envelope of the Roche-lobe filling giant to the change in orbital energy. Especially in population-synthesis codes, where the evolution of millions of stars must be computed and detailed evolutionary models are too expensive computationally, simple approximations are made for the envelope binding energy. In this study, we present accurate analytic prescriptions based on detailed stellar-evolution models that provide the envelope binding energy for giants with metallicities between Z = 10-4 and Z = 0.03 and masses between 0.8 M ⊙ and 100 M ⊙, as a function of the metallicity, mass, radius, and evolutionary phase of the star. Our results are also presented in the form of electronic data tables and Fortran routines that use them. We find that the accuracy of our fits is better than 15% for 90% of our model data points in all cases, and better than 10% for 90% of our data points in all cases except the asymptotic giant branches for three of the six metallicities we consider. For very massive stars (M >~ 50 M ⊙), when stars lose more than ~20% of their initial mass due to stellar winds, our fits do not describe the models as accurately. Our results are more widely applicable—covering wider ranges of metallicity and mass—and are of higher accuracy than those of previous studies.

  8. On the deceleration of Fanaroff-Riley Class I jets: mass loading by stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucho, M.; Martí, J. M.; Laing, R. A.; Hardee, P. E.

    2014-06-01

    Jets in low-luminosity radio galaxies are known to decelerate from relativistic speeds on parsec scales to mildly or subrelativistic speeds on kiloparsec scales. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this effect, including strong reconfinement shocks and the growth of instabilities (both leading to boundary-layer entrainment) and mass loading from stellar winds or molecular clouds. We have performed a series of axisymmetric simulations of the early evolution of jets in a realistic ambient medium to probe the effects of mass loading from stellar winds using the code RATPENAT. We study the evolution of Fanaroff-Riley Class I (FR I) jets, with kinetic powers Lj ˜ 1041-1044 erg s-1, within the first 2 kpc of their evolution, where deceleration by stellar mass loading should be most effective. Mass entrainment rates consistent with present models of stellar mass loss in elliptical galaxies produce deceleration and effective decollimation of weak FR I jets within the first kiloparsec. However, powerful FR I jets are not decelerated significantly. In those cases where the mass loading is important, the jets show larger opening angles and decollimate at smaller distances, but the overall structure and dynamics of the bow shock are similar to those of unloaded jets with the same power and thrust. According to our results, the flaring observed on kiloparsec scales is initiated by mass loading in the weaker FR I jets and by reconfinement shocks or the growth of instabilities in the more powerful jets. The final mechanism of decollimation and deceleration is always the development of disruptive pinching modes.

  9. Dark matter capture in the first stars: a power source and limit on stellar mass

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas; Aguirre, Anthony E-mail: dspolyar@physics.ucsc.edu

    2008-11-15

    The annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles can provide an important heat source for the first (Pop III, 'Pop' standing for 'population') stars, potentially leading to a new phase of stellar evolution known as a 'dark star'. When dark matter (DM) capture via scattering off baryons is included, the luminosity from DM annihilation may dominate over the luminosity due to fusion, depending on the DM density and scattering cross section. The influx of DM due to capture may thus prolong the dark star phase of stellar evolution as long as the ambient DM density is high enough. Comparison of DM luminosity with the Eddington luminosity for the star may constrain the stellar mass of zero-metallicity stars. Alternatively, if sufficiently massive Pop III stars are found, they might be used to bound dark matter properties.

  10. YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS WITH A SCHUSTER MASS DISTRIBUTION. I. STATIONARY WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Palous, Jan; Wuensch, Richard; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto; Martinez-Gonzalez, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic models for spherically symmetric winds driven by young stellar clusters with a generalized Schuster stellar density profile are explored. For this we use both semi-analytic models and one-dimensional numerical simulations. We determine the properties of quasi-adiabatic and radiative stationary winds and define the radius at which the flow turns from subsonic to supersonic for all stellar density distributions. Strongly radiative winds significantly diminish their terminal speed and thus their mechanical luminosity is strongly reduced. This also reduces their potential negative feedback into their host galaxy interstellar medium. The critical luminosity above which radiative cooling becomes dominant within the clusters, leading to thermal instabilities which make the winds non-stationary, is determined, and its dependence on the star cluster density profile, core radius, and half-mass radius is discussed.

  11. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  12. Evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies: the influence of morphology, stellar mass and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongyao; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Conselice, Christopher J.

    2015-11-01

    Using a sample of 425 nearby brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from von der Linden et al., we study the relationship between their internal properties (stellar masses, structural parameters and morphologies) and their environment. More massive BCGs tend to inhabit denser regions and more massive clusters than lower mass BCGs. Furthermore, cDs, which are BCGs with particularly extended envelopes, seem to prefer marginally denser regions and tend to be hosted by more massive haloes than elliptical BCGs. cD and elliptical BCGs show parallel positive correlations between their stellar masses and environmental densities. However, at a fixed environmental density, cDs are, on average, ˜40 per cent more massive. Our results, together with the findings of previous studies, suggest an evolutionary link between elliptical and cD BCGs. We suggest that most present-day cDs started their life as ellipticals, which subsequently grew in stellar mass and size due to mergers. In this process, the cD envelope developed. The large scatter in the stellar masses and sizes of the cDs reflects their different merger histories. The growth of the BCGs in mass and size seems to be linked to the hierarchical growth of the structures they inhabit: as the groups and clusters became denser and more massive, the BCGs at their centres also grew. This process is nearing completion since the majority (˜60 per cent) of the BCGs in the local Universe have cD morphology. However, the presence of galaxies with intermediate morphological classes (between ellipticals and cDs) suggests that the growth and morphological transformation of some BCGs is still ongoing.

  13. GAMA/H-ATLAS: THE DUST OPACITY-STELLAR MASS SURFACE DENSITY RELATION FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Andrae, E.; Popescu, C. C.; Pastrav, B.; Gunawardhana, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Kelvin, L. S.; Driver, S. P.; Liske, J.; Seibert, M.; Graham, Alister W.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; and others

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, {tau}{sup f}{sub B}, and the stellar mass surface density, {mu}{sub *}, of nearby (z {<=} 0.13) spiral galaxies. This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which were detected in the FIR/submillimeter (submm) in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to stellar mass surface density, we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and Sersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships of stellar mass to metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the interstellar medium. We use the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu and Tuffs to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and stellar surface density, in which attenuation of the UV light used for the measurement of SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which we demonstrate is due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a general picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar

  14. Predicting and Disentangling Stellar Variability in Quiet Stars: Implications for Low-mass Planet Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, Heather; Watson, Chris; Stassun, Keivan; Shelyag, Sergiy; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Bastien, Fabienne; Pepper, Josh

    2015-08-01

    Stellar variability is one of the main limiting factors in the detection and confirmation of low-mass planets. Even for magnetically quiet stars, astrophysical noise could be present at the 10m/s level. For these stars we demonstrate, using Kepler and GALEX data, that it may be possible to use photometric variability to predict the RV noise. Such a relationship creates a filtering mechanism to prioritize planetary candidates in transit surveys that are ideal for RV follow-up. Going beyond this, we use 3D magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to create Sun-as-a-star observations, focusing on stellar surface magneto-convection. Using these model observations we have identified correlations between the stellar line shape, brightness, and RV variability. We demonstrate that photometric observations may be key in disentangling stellar and planetary induced RV signals. Disentangling these signals allows us to reach the 10 cm/s noise level in our model star, indicating significant promise for the confirmation of low-mass planet candidates in the future.

  15. The Specific Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass Fraction of Low-mass Central Galaxies in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Reese, V.; Colín, P.; González-Samaniego, A.; Valenzuela, O.; Firmani, C.; Velázquez, H.; Ceverino, D.

    2011-08-01

    By means of cosmological N-body + hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies in the context of the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario we explore the specific star formation rates (SSFR = SFR/Ms , Ms is the stellar mass) and stellar mass fractions (Fs ≡ Ms /Mh , Mh is the halo mass) for sub-M* field galaxies at different redshifts (0 <~ z <~ 1.5). Distinct low-mass halos (2.5 <~ Mh /1010 M sun <~ 50 at z = 0) were selected for the high-resolution re-simulations. The Hydrodynamics Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code was used and some variations of the sub-grid parameters were explored. Most simulated galaxies, specially those with the highest resolutions, have significant disk components and their structural and dynamical properties are in reasonable agreement with observations of sub-M* field galaxies. However, the SSFRs are 5-10 times smaller than the averages of several (compiled and homogenized here) observational determinations for field blue/star-forming galaxies at z < 0.3 (at low masses, most observed field galaxies are actually blue/star forming). This inconsistency seems to remain even at z ~ 1-1.5, although it is less drastic. The Fs of simulated galaxies increases with Mh as semi-empirical inferences show. However, the values of Fs at z ≈ 0 are ~5-10 times larger in the simulations than in the inferences; these differences increases probably to larger factors at z ~ 1-1.5. The inconsistencies reported here imply that simulated low-mass galaxies (0.2 <~ Ms /109 M sun <~ 30 at z = 0) assembled their stellar masses much earlier than observations suggest. Our results confirm the predictions found by means of ΛCDM-based models of disk galaxy formation and evolution for isolated low-mass galaxies, and highlight that our understanding and implementation of astrophysics into simulations and models are still lacking vital ingredients.

  16. Photometric monitoring of open clusters: Low-mass eclipsing binary stars and the stellar mass-luminosity-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, Leslie

    2006-06-01

    This thesis describes a photometric monitoring survey of Galactic star clusters designed to detect low-mass eclipsing binary star systems through variations in their relative lightcurves. The aim is to use cluster eclipsing binaries to measure the masses and radii of M-dwarf stars with ages and metallicities known from studies of brighter cluster stars. This information will provide an improved calibration of the mass-luminosity-radius relation for low-mass stars, be used to test stellar structure and evolution models, and help quantify the contribution of low-mass stars to the global mass census in the Galaxy. The survey is designed to detect eclipse events in stars of ~0.3 M_sun and consists of 600 Gbytes of raw imaging data on six open clusters with a range of ages (~ 0.15 - 4 Gyr) and metallicites (~ -0.2 - 0.0 dex). The clusters NGC 1647 and M 35 contain excellent candidate systems showing eclipse like variations in brightness and photometry consistent with cluster membership. The analysis of these clusters and the eclipsing M-dwarf stars detected in them are presented. Analysis of the candidate system in NGC 1647 confirms the object as a newly discovered M-dwarf eclipsing binary in the cluster with compenent masses of M 1 = 0.47 ± 0.05[Special characters omitted.] and M 2 = 0.19 ± 0.02[Special characters omitted.] . The small mass ratio ( M 2 / M 1 ) and low secondary mass of this object provide an unprecedented opportunity to test stellar models. We find that no stellar evolution models are consistent with all the properties of both M-dwarf stars in the eclipsing binary. The candidate in M 35 has been confirmed as an M-dwarf eclipsing binary, and the masses of the individual components are estimated to be M 1 ~ 0.25 M_sun and M 2 ~ 0.15 M_sun . Additional high resolution spectroscopic and photometric observations, for which we have applied and been awarded time, are necessary to accurately derive the intrinsic properties of the individual stellar

  17. The star formation main sequence and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparre, Martin; Hayward, Christopher C.; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the physical processes that drive star formation is a key challenge for galaxy formation models. In this paper, we study the tight correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of galaxies at a given redshift, how halo growth influences star formation, and star formation histories of individual galaxies. We study these topics using Illustris, a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulation of galaxy formation. Illustris reproduces the observed relation (the star formation main sequence, SFMS) between SFR and stellar mass at redshifts z = 0 and 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ≃ 1-2, the simulated SFMS has a significantly lower normalization than reported by observations. The scatter in the relation is consistent with the observed scatter. However, the fraction of outliers above the SFR-stellar mass relation in Illustris is less than that observed. Galaxies with halo masses of ˜1012 M⊙ dominate the SFR density of the Universe, in agreement with the results of abundance matching. Furthermore, more-massive galaxies tend to form the bulk of their stars at high redshift, which indicates that `downsizing' occurs in Illustris. We also studied the star formation histories of individual galaxies, including the use of a principal component analysis decomposition. We find that for fixed stellar mass, galaxies that form earlier have more-massive black holes at z = 0, indicating that star formation and black hole growth are tightly linked processes in Illustris. While many of the properties of normal star-forming galaxies are well reproduced in the Illustris simulation, forming a realistic population of starbursts will likely require higher resolution and probably a more sophisticated treatment of star formation and feedback from stars and black holes.

  18. Effects of Stellar-Mass Black Holes on Massive Star Cluster Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Morscher, Meagan; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Pattabiraman, Bharat

    2015-08-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of stellar mass black holes in Galactic globular clusters. Given that the detection of black holes is challenging, these detections likely indicate the existence of large populations of stellar mass black holes in these clusters. This is in direct contrast to the past understanding that at most a handful of black holes may remain in old globular clusters due to rapid mutual dynamical ejection. Modern realistic star-by-star numerical simulations suggest that the retention fraction of stellar mass black holes is typically much higher than previously thought and depends on the details of initial properties such as total cluster mass, distribution of birth kicks, and initial concentration of the cluster. The presence of a population of black holes also dramatically alters the global evolution of star clusters. I will present results from our latest numerical simulations with a focus on the observable global properties of star clusters that might serve as indicators of the presence of a large population of retained black holes.

  19. Magnetic Origins of the Stellar Mass-Obliquity Correlation in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin

    2015-10-01

    Detailed observational characterization of transiting exoplanet systems has revealed that the spin-axes of massive (M≳ 1.2{M}⊙ ) stars often exhibit substantial misalignments with respect to the orbits of the planets they host. Conversely, lower-mass stars tend to only have limited obliquities. A similar trend has recently emerged within the observational data set of young stars’ magnetic field strengths: massive T-Tauri stars tend to have dipole fields that are ˜10 times weaker than their less-massive counterparts. Here we show that the associated dependence of magnetic star-disk torques upon stellar mass naturally explains the observed spin-orbit misalignment trend, provided that misalignments are obtained within the disk-hosting phase. Magnetic torques act to realign the stellar spin-axes of lower-mass stars with the disk plane on a timescale significantly shorter than the typical disk lifetime, whereas the same effect operates on a much longer timescale for massive stars. Cumulatively, our results point to a primordial excitation of extrasolar spin-orbit misalignment, signalling consistency with disk-driven migration as the dominant transport mechanism for short-period planets. Furthermore, we predict that spin-orbit misalignments in systems where close-in planets show signatures of dynamical, post-nebular emplacement will not follow the observed correlation with stellar mass.

  20. THE STELLAR MASS–HALO MASS RELATION FOR LOW-MASS X-RAY GROUPS AT 0.5< z< 1 IN THE CDFS WITH CSI

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shannon G.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Mulchaey, John S.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.

    2015-01-30

    Since z∼1, the stellar mass density locked in low-mass groups and clusters has grown by a factor of ∼8. Here, we make the first statistical measurements of the stellar mass content of low-mass X-ray groups at 0.5stellar-to-halo mass scales for wide-field optical and infrared surveys. Groups are selected from combined Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations in the Chandra Deep Field South. These ultra-deep observations allow us to identify bona fide low-mass groups at high redshift and enable measurements of their total halo masses. We compute aggregate stellar masses for these halos using galaxies from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) spectroscopic redshift survey. Stars comprise ∼3%–4% of the total mass of group halos with masses 10{sup 12.8}mass of Fornax and one-fiftieth the mass of Virgo). Complementing our sample with higher mass halos at these redshifts, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass ratio decreases toward higher halo masses, consistent with other work in the local and high redshift universe. The observed scatter about the stellar–halo mass relation is σ∼0.25 dex, which is relatively small and suggests that total group stellar mass can serve as a rough proxy for halo mass. We find no evidence for any significant evolution in the stellar–halo mass relation since z≲1. Quantifying the stellar content in groups since this epoch is critical given that hierarchical assembly leads to such halos growing in number density and hosting increasing shares of quiescent galaxies.

  1. A New Planet around an M Dwarf: Revealing a Correlation between Exoplanets and Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, John Asher; Butler, R. Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Vogt, Steven S.; Wright, Jason T.; Peek, Kathryn M. G.

    2007-11-01

    We report precise Doppler measurements of GJ 317 (M3.5 V) that reveal the presence of a planet with a minimum mass MPsini=1.2 MJup in an eccentric, 692.9 day orbit. GJ 317 is only the third M dwarf with a Doppler-detected Jovian planet. The residuals to a single-Keplerian fit show evidence of a possible second orbital companion. The inclusion of a second Jupiter-mass planet (P~2700 days, MPsini=0.83 MJup) decreases sqrt(χ2ν) from 2.02 to 1.23, and reduces the rms from 12.5 to 6.32 m s-1. A false-alarm test yields a 1.1% probability that the curvature in the residuals of the single-planet fit is due to random fluctuations, lending additional credibility to the two-planet model. However, our data only marginally constrain a two-planet fit, and further monitoring is necessary to fully characterize the properties of the second companion. To study the effect of stellar mass on giant planet occurrence, we measure the fraction of stars with planets in three mass bins comprised of our samples of M Dwarfs, solar-mass stars, and intermediate-mass subgiants. We find a positive correlation between stellar mass and the occurrence rate of Jovian planets within 2.5 AU. Low-mass K and M stars have a 1.8%+/-1.0% planet occurrence rate compared to 4.2%+/-0.7% for solar-mass stars and 8.9%+/-2.9% for the higher mass subgiants. This result indicates that the former F- and A-type stars with M*>=1.3 Msolar in our sample are nearly 5 times more likely than the M dwarfs to harbor a giant planet. Our analysis shows that the correlation between Jovian planet occurrence and stellar mass exists even after correcting for the effects of stellar metallicity. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by both NASA and the University of California.

  2. On the theoretical framework of magnetized outflows from stellar-mass black holes and related observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, D. M.; Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Steiner, J. F.; Papadopoulos, D. B.; Laycock, S. G. T.

    2016-09-01

    The spins of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) and the power outputs of their jets are measurable quantities. Unfortunately, the currently employed methods do not agree and the results are controversial. Two major issues concern the measurements of BH spin and beam (jet) power. The former issue can be resolved by future observations. But the latter issue can be resolved now, if we pay attention to what is expected from theoretical considerations. The question of whether a correlation has been found between the power outputs of few objects and the spins of their BHs is moot because BH beam power does not scale with the square of the spin of the BH. We show that the theoretical BH beam power is a strongly non-linear function of spin that cannot be approximated by a quadratic relation, as is generally stated when the influence of the magnetic field is not accounted for in the Blandford & Znajek model. The BH beam power of ballistic jets should scale a lot more steeply with BH spin irrespective of the magnetic field assumed to thread the horizon and the spin range considered. This behaviour may already be visible in the analyses of radio observations by Narayan & McClintock and Russell et al. In agreement with previous studies, we also find that the power output that originates in the inner regions of the surrounding accretion discs is higher than that from the BHs and it cannot be ignored in investigations of continuous compact jets from these systems.

  3. Stellar evolution at high mass with semiconvective mixing according to the Schwarzschild criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1976-01-01

    Evolutionary sequences for stellar models with 10, 15, 30, and 60 solar masses, as well as four different initial chemical compositions, are calculated to the end of core helium burning using the Schwarzschild criterion for convection. The results are analyzed in terms of the modifications of interior structure and surface parameters induced by semiconvective mixing as a result of adopting the Schwarzschild criterion. It is found that the main differences from results based on the Ledoux criterion are the great extent of the convectively unstable layers in the intermediate zone and the eventual development of a fully convective zone at the base of the semiconvective one. It is shown that semiconvection develops outside the convective core just after the ZAMS stage for masses greater than 12 solar masses and just before the stage of central hydrogen exhaustion for masses greater than 6 solar masses. The present models are found to be insufficiently hot in comparison with the bulk of observed stable blue supergiants and to predict far too many red supergiants fro the range above 20 solar masses. It is concluded that something is fundamentally wrong with the models, the most likely suspects being the stellar opacities adopted and the neglect of mass loss.

  4. Luminosity excesses in low-mass young stellar objects - A statistical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Karen M.; Strom, Stephen E.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Hartmann, Lee

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study in which the observed total luminosity is compared quantitatively with an estimate of the stellar luminosity for a sample of 59 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Taurus-Auriga complex. In 13 of the analyzed YSOs, luminosity excesses greater than 0.20 are observed together with greater than 0.6 IR excesses, which typically contribute the bulk of the observed excess luminosity and are characterized by spectral energy distributions which are flat or rise toward long wavelengths. The analysis suggests that YSOs showing the largest luminosity excesses typically power optical jets and/or molecular outflows or have strong winds, as evidenced by the presence of O I emission, indicating a possible correlation between accretion and mass-outflow properties.

  5. SMOOTH(ER) STELLAR MASS MAPS IN CANDELS: CONSTRAINTS ON THE LONGEVITY OF CLUMPS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lotz, Jennifer; Hathi, Nimish P.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; and others

    2012-07-10

    We perform a detailed analysis of the resolved colors and stellar populations of a complete sample of 323 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.5 < z < 1.5 and 326 SFGs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the ERS and CANDELS-Deep region of GOODS-South. Galaxies were selected to be more massive than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and have specific star formation rates (SFRs) above 1/t{sub H} . We model the seven-band optical ACS + near-IR WFC3 spectral energy distributions of individual bins of pixels, accounting simultaneously for the galaxy-integrated photometric constraints available over a longer wavelength range. We analyze variations in rest-frame color, stellar surface mass density, age, and extinction as a function of galactocentric radius and local surface brightness/density, and measure structural parameters on luminosity and stellar mass maps. We find evidence for redder colors, older stellar ages, and increased dust extinction in the nuclei of galaxies. Big star-forming clumps seen in star formation tracers are less prominent or even invisible in the inferred stellar mass distributions. Off-center clumps contribute up to {approx}20% to the integrated SFR, but only 7% or less to the integrated mass of all massive SFGs at z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 2, with the fractional contributions being a decreasing function of wavelength used to select the clumps. The stellar mass profiles tend to have smaller sizes and M20 coefficients, and higher concentration and Gini coefficients than the light distribution. Our results are consistent with an inside-out disk growth scenario with brief (100-200 Myr) episodic local enhancements in star formation superposed on the underlying disk. Alternatively, the young ages of off-center clumps may signal inward clump migration, provided this happens efficiently on the order of an orbital timescale.

  6. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass–metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ∼130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%–55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  7. Growing massive black holes through supercritical accretion of stellar-mass seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, A.; Haardt, F.; Dotti, M.; Fiacconi, D.; Mayer, L.; Madau, P.

    2016-03-01

    The rapid assembly of the massive black holes that power the luminous quasars observed at z ˜ 6-7 remains a puzzle. Various direct collapse models have been proposed to head-start black hole growth from initial seeds with masses ˜105 M⊙, which can then reach a billion solar mass while accreting at the Eddington limit. Here, we propose an alternative scenario based on radiatively inefficient supercritical accretion of stellar-mass holes embedded in the gaseous circumnuclear discs (CNDs) expected to exist in the cores of high-redshift galaxies. Our sub-pc resolution hydrodynamical simulations show that stellar-mass holes orbiting within the central 100 pc of the CND bind to very high density gas clumps that arise from the fragmentation of the surrounding gas. Owing to the large reservoir of dense cold gas available, a stellar-mass black hole allowed to grow at super-Eddington rates according to the `slim-disc' solution can increase its mass by three orders of magnitudes within a few million years. These findings are supported by simulations run with two different hydro codes, RAMSES based on the Adaptive Mesh Refinement technique and GIZMO based on a new Lagrangian Godunov-type method, and with similar, but not identical, sub-grid recipes for star formation, supernova feedback, black hole accretion and feedback. The low radiative efficiency of supercritical accretion flows are instrumental to the rapid mass growth of our black holes, as they imply modest radiative heating of the surrounding nuclear environment.

  8. PRIMUS: THE DEPENDENCE OF AGN ACCRETION ON HOST STELLAR MASS AND COLOR

    SciTech Connect

    Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Blanton, Michael R.; Zhu Guangtun; Burles, Scott M.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.

    2012-02-10

    We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS, and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L{sub 2-10keV} = 10{sup 42-44} erg s{sup -1} within a parent sample of {approx}25,000 galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 over {approx}3.4 deg{sup 2} and to i {approx} 23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5< log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}<12 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z {approx} 1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor {approx}2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.

  9. The Pisa Stellar Evolution Data Base for low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Omodarme, M.; Valle, G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The last decade showed an impressive observational effort from the photometric and spectroscopic point of view for ancient stellar clusters in our Galaxy and beyond, leading to important and sometimes surprising results. Aims: The theoretical interpretation of these new observational results requires updated evolutionary models and isochrones spanning a wide range of chemical composition so that the possibility of multipopulations inside a stellar cluster is also taken also into account. Methods: With this aim we built the new "Pisa Stellar Evolution Database" of stellar models and isochrones by adopting a well-tested evolutionary code (FRANEC) implemented with updated physical and chemical inputs. In particular, our code adopts realistic atmosphere models and an updated equation of state, nuclear reaction rates and opacities calculated with recent solar elements mixture. Results: A total of 32 646 models have been computed in the range of initial masses 0.30 ÷ 1.10 M⊙ for a grid of 216 chemical compositions with the fractional metal abundance in mass, Z, ranging from 0.0001 to 0.01, and the original helium content, Y, from 0.25 to 0.42. Models were computed for both solar-scaled and α-enhanced abundances with different external convection efficiencies. Correspondingly, 9720 isochrones were computed in the age range 8 ÷ 15 Gyr, in time steps of 0.5 Gyr. The whole database is available to the scientific community on the web. Models and isochrones were compared with recent calculations available in the literature and with the color-magnitude diagram of selected Galactic globular clusters. The dependence of relevant evolutionary quantities, namely turn-off and horizontal branch luminosities, on the chemical composition and convection efficiency were analyzed in a quantitative statistical way and analytical formulations were made available for reader's convenience. These relations can be useful in several fields of stellar evolution, e.g. evolutionary

  10. Confirmation of Small Dynamical and Stellar Masses for Extreme Emission Line Galaxies at z Approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maseda, Michael V.; van Der Wel, Arjen; da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Pacifici, Camilla; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Bell, Eric F.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lundgren, Britt F.; Marchesini, Danilo; Nelson, Eric J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Straughn, Amber N.; Trump. Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations from the Large Binocular Telescope and the Very Large Telescope reveal kinematically narrow lines (approx. 50 km/s) for a sample of 14 extreme emission line galaxies at redshifts 1.4 < z < 2.3. These measurements imply that the total dynamical masses of these systems are low (< or approx. 3 × 10(exp 9) M). Their large [O III] (lambda)5007 equivalent widths (500-1100 Angstroms) and faint blue continuum emission imply young ages of 10-100 Myr and stellar masses of 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9)M, confirming the presence of a violent starburst. The dynamical masses represent the first such determinations for low-mass galaxies at z > 1. The stellar mass formed in this vigorous starburst phase represents a large fraction of the total (dynamical) mass, without a significantly massive underlying population of older stars. The occurrence of such intense events in shallow potentials strongly suggests that supernova-driven winds must be of critical importance in the subsequent evolution of these systems.

  11. CONFIRMATION OF SMALL DYNAMICAL AND STELLAR MASSES FOR EXTREME EMISSION LINE GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Maseda, Michael V.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Pacifici, Camilla; Momcheva, Ivelina; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Nelson, Erica J.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Bell, Eric F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lundgren, Britt F.; Marchesini, Danilo; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Straughn, Amber N.; and others

    2013-11-20

    Spectroscopic observations from the Large Binocular Telescope and the Very Large Telescope reveal kinematically narrow lines (∼50 km s{sup –1}) for a sample of 14 extreme emission line galaxies at redshifts 1.4 < z < 2.3. These measurements imply that the total dynamical masses of these systems are low (≲ 3 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}). Their large [O III] λ5007 equivalent widths (500-1100 Å) and faint blue continuum emission imply young ages of 10-100 Myr and stellar masses of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, confirming the presence of a violent starburst. The dynamical masses represent the first such determinations for low-mass galaxies at z > 1. The stellar mass formed in this vigorous starburst phase represents a large fraction of the total (dynamical) mass, without a significantly massive underlying population of older stars. The occurrence of such intense events in shallow potentials strongly suggests that supernova-driven winds must be of critical importance in the subsequent evolution of these systems.

  12. THE STELLAR MASS GROWTH OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE IRAC SHALLOW CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Bode, Paul; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stanford, S. A.; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-07-01

    The details of the stellar mass assembly of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) remain an unresolved problem in galaxy formation. We have developed a novel approach that allows us to construct a sample of clusters that form an evolutionary sequence, and have applied it to the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS) to examine the evolution of BCGs in progenitors of present-day clusters with mass of (2.5-4.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. We follow the cluster mass growth history extracted from a high resolution cosmological simulation, and then use an empirical method that infers the cluster mass based on the ranking of cluster luminosity to select high-z clusters of appropriate mass from ISCS to be progenitors of the given set of z = 0 clusters. We find that, between z = 1.5 and 0.5, the BCGs have grown in stellar mass by a factor of 2.3, which is well-matched by the predictions from a state-of-the-art semi-analytic model. Below z = 0.5 we see hints of differences in behavior between the model and observation.

  13. Influence of a stellar wind on the evolution of a star of 30 solar masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.

    1980-01-01

    A coarse grid of theoretical evolutionary tracks was calculated for a 30 solar mass star to determine the role of mass loss in the evolution of the star during core He burning. The Cox-Stewart opacities were applied, and the rate of mass loss, criterion for convection, and initial chemical composition were taken into consideration. Using the Schwarzschild criterion, the star undergoes little mass loss during core He burning and remains a blue supergiant separated from main sequence stars on the H-R diagram. The stellar remnant consists of the original He core and may appear bluer than equally luminous main sequence stars; a variety of possible evolutionary tracks can be obtained for an initial solar mass of 30 with proper choices of free parameters.

  14. Linking low- to high-mass young stellar objects with Herschel-HIFI observations of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San José-García, I.; Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Braine, J.; Herpin, F.; Johnstone, D.; van Kempen, T. A.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Water probes the dynamics in young stellar objects (YSOs) effectively, especially shocks in molecular outflows. It is therefore a key molecule for exploring whether the physical properties of low-mass protostars can be extrapolated to massive YSOs, an important step in understanding the fundamental mechanisms regulating star formation. Aims: As part of the WISH key programme, we investigate excited water line properties as a function of source luminosity, in particular the dynamics and the excitation conditions of shocks along the outflow cavity wall. Methods: Velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI spectra of the H2O 202-111 (988 GHz), 211-202 (752 GHz) and 312-303 (1097 GHz) lines were analysed, together with 12CO J = 10-9 and 16-15, for 52 YSOs with bolometric luminosities ranging from <1 to >105 L⊙. The H2O and 12CO line profiles were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components which are related to the different physical structures of the protostellar system. The non-LTE radiative transfer code radex was used to constrain the excitation conditions of the shocks along the outflow cavity. Results: The profiles of the three excited water lines are similar, indicating that they probe the same gas. Two main emission components are seen in all YSOs: a broad component associated with non-dissociative shocks in the outflow cavity wall ("cavity shocks") and a narrow component associated with the quiescent envelope material. More than 60% of the total integrated intensity in the excited water lines comes from the broad cavity shock component, while the remaining emission comes mostly from the envelope for low-mass Class I, intermediate- and high-mass objects, and dissociative "spot shocks" for low-mass Class 0 protostars. The widths of the water lines are surprisingly similar from low- to high-mass YSOs, whereas 12CO J = 10-9 line widths increase slightly with Lbol. The excitation analysis of the cavity shock component shows stronger 752 GHz emission for high-mass

  15. STELLAR PARAMETERS AND METALLICITIES OF STARS HOSTING JOVIAN AND NEPTUNIAN MASS PLANETS: A POSSIBLE DEPENDENCE OF PLANETARY MASS ON METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, L.; Cunha, K.; De Araujo, F. X.; De la Reza, R.; Smith, V. V.; Schuler, S. C.

    2010-09-10

    The metal content of planet-hosting stars is an important ingredient that may affect the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Accurate stellar abundances require the determinations of reliable physical parameters, namely, the effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity. This work presents the homogeneous derivation of such parameters for a large sample of stars hosting planets (N = 117), as well as a control sample of disk stars not known to harbor giant, closely orbiting planets (N = 145). Stellar parameters and iron abundances are derived from an automated analysis technique developed for this work. As previously found in the literature, the results in this study indicate that the metallicity distribution of planet-hosting stars is more metal rich by {approx}0.15 dex when compared to the control sample stars. A segregation of the sample according to planet mass indicates that the metallicity distribution of stars hosting only Neptunian-mass planets (with no Jovian-mass planets) tends to be more metal poor in comparison with that obtained for stars hosting a closely orbiting Jovian planet. The significance of this difference in metallicity arises from a homogeneous analysis of samples of FGK dwarfs which do not include the cooler and more problematic M dwarfs. This result would indicate that there is a possible link between planet mass and metallicity such that metallicity plays a role in setting the mass of the most massive planet. Further confirmation, however, must await larger samples.

  16. AN INITIAL MASS FUNCTION STUDY OF THE DWARF STARBURST GALAXY NGC 4214

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J. E.; Calzetti, D.; Chandar, R.; Lee, J. C.; Whitmore, B.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Kissel, J. S.; Da Silva, Robert L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; O'Connell, R. W.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Kim, Hwihyun E-mail: callzetti@astro.umass.edu

    2013-04-10

    The production rate of ionizing photons in young ({<=}8 Myr), unresolved stellar clusters in the nearby irregular galaxy NGC 4214 is probed using multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 data. We normalize the ionizing photon rate by the cluster mass to investigate the upper end of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). We have found that within the uncertainties the upper end of the stellar IMF appears to be universal in this galaxy, and that deviations from a universal IMF can be attributed to stochastic sampling of stars in clusters with masses {approx}<10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. Furthermore, we have found that there does not seem to be a dependence of the maximum stellar mass on the cluster mass. We have also found that for massive clusters, feedback may cause an underrepresentation in H{alpha} luminosities, which needs to be taken into account when conducting this type of analysis.

  17. Population II stars and the Spite plateau. Stellar evolution models with mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, M.; Michaud, G.; Richer, J.; Richard, O.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: We aim to determine the constraints that observed chemical abundances put on the potential role of mass loss in metal poor dwarfs. Methods: Self-consistent stellar evolutionary models that include all the effects of atomic diffusion and radiative accelerations for 28 chemical species were computed for stellar masses between 0.6 and 0.8 M⊙. Models with an initial metallicity of Z0 = 0.00017 and mass loss rates from 10-15 M⊙ yr-1 to 10-12 M⊙ yr-1 were calculated. They were then compared to previous models with mass loss, as well as to models with turbulent mixing. Results: For models with an initial metallicity of [Fe/H]0 = -2.31, mass loss rates of about 10-12 M⊙ yr-1 lead to surface abundance profiles that are very similar to those obtained in models with turbulence. Both models have about the same level of agreement with observations of galactic-halo lithium abundances, as well as lithium and other elemental abundances from metal poor globular clusters such as NGC 6397. In this cluster, models with mass loss agree slightly better with subgiant observations of Li abundance than those with turbulence. Lower red giant branch stars instead favor the models with turbulence. Larger differences between models with mass loss and those with turbulence appear in the interior concentrations of metals. Conclusions: The relatively high mass loss rates required to reproduce plateau-like lithium abundances appear unlikely when compared to the solar mass-loss rate. However the presence of a chromosphere on these stars justifies further investigation of the mass-loss rates. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Dynamical Estimate of Post-main-sequence Stellar Masses in 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, Javiera; Richer, Harvey; Heyl, Jeremy; Kalirai, Jason; Goldsbury, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    We use the effects of mass segregation on the radial distribution of different stellar populations in the core of 47 Tucanae to find estimates for the masses of stars at different post-main-sequence evolutionary stages. We take samples of main-sequence (MS) stars from the core of 47 Tucanae, at different magnitudes (i.e., different masses), and use the effects of this dynamical process to develop a relation between the radial distance (RD) at which the cumulative distribution reaches the 20th and 50th percentile and stellar mass. From these relations we estimate the masses of different post-MS populations. We find that mass remains constant for stars going through the evolutionary stages from the upper MS up to the horizontal branch (HB). By comparing RDs of the HB stars with stars of lower masses, we can exclude a mass loss greater than 0.09 {M}ȯ during the red giant branch (RGB) stage at nearly the 3σ level. The slightly higher mass estimates for the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are consistent with the AGB having evolved from somewhat more massive stars. The AGB also exhibits evidence of contamination by more massive stars, possibly blue straggler stars (BSSs), going through the RGB phase. We do not include the BSSs in this paper due to the complexity of these objects; instead, the complete analysis of this population is left for a companion paper. The process to estimate the masses described in this paper is exclusive to the core of 47 Tuc.

  19. Stellar and Intermediate-Mass Black Holes in the Milky Way and Nearby Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, Jimmy

    2010-08-09

    With the advent of high resolution X-ray telescopes, the ability to identify extragalactic black holes has greatly enhanced our understanding of massive compact objects, as we are no longer limited to the rather meager Milky Way black hole population. The greatly increased numbers have opened up opportunities to find new modes of compact object accretion and potentially long-sought evidence for intermediate-mass black holes. In this lecture series, the current state of knowledge of stellar- and intermediate-mass black holes is reviewed, particularly in regards to black hole populations in external galaxies.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar masses of optical & IR QSO hosts (Zhang+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Shi, Y.; Rieke, G. H.; Xia, X.; Wang, Y.; Sun, B.; Wan, L.

    2016-05-01

    This study builds on that of Shi et al. (2014, J/ApJS/214/23), who presented infrared spectroscopic and photometric observations of Palomar-Green (PG; Schmidt & Green 1983ApJ...269..352S) and 2MASS quasars (Cutri et al. 2001ASPC..232...78C; Smith et al. 2002, J/ApJ/569/23) and used them to derive SFRs. We complement these results by estimating the stellar masses using the optical/near-IR photometric measurements of quasar hosts from the literature based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based adaptive optics (AO) observations. (1 data file).

  1. Stellar mass to halo mass scaling relation for X-ray-selected low-mass galaxy clusters and groups out to redshift z ≈ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, I.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J.; Desai, S.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Gangkofner, C.; Gupta, N.; Liu, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present the stellar mass-halo mass scaling relation for 46 X-ray-selected low-mass clusters or groups detected in the XMM-Newton-Blanco Cosmology Survey (XMM-BCS) survey with masses 2 × 1013 M⊙ ≲ M500 ≲ 2.5 × 1014 M⊙ (median mass 8 × 1013 M⊙) at redshift 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 1.02 (median redshift 0.47). The cluster binding masses M500 are inferred from the measured X-ray luminosities LX, while the stellar masses M⋆ of the galaxy populations are estimated using near-infrared (NIR) imaging from the South Pole Telescope Deep Field survey and optical imaging from the BCS survey. With the measured LX and stellar mass M⋆, we determine the best-fitting stellar mass-halo mass relation, accounting for selection effects, measurement uncertainties and the intrinsic scatter in the scaling relation. The resulting mass trend is M_{star }∝ M_{500}^{0.69± 0.15}, the intrinsic (lognormal) scatter is σ _{ln M_{star }|M_{500}}=0.36^{+0.07}_{-0.06}, and there is no significant redshift trend M⋆ ∝ (1 + z)-0.04 ± 0.47, although the uncertainties are still large. We also examine M⋆ within a fixed projected radius of 0.5 Mpc, showing that it provides a cluster binding mass proxy with intrinsic scatter of ≈93 per cent (1σ in M500). We compare our M⋆ = M⋆(M500, z) scaling relation from the XMM-BCS clusters with samples of massive, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect selected clusters (M500 ≈ 6 × 1014 M⊙) and low-mass NIR-selected clusters (M500 ≈ 1014 M⊙) at redshift 0.6 ≲ z ≲ 1.3. After correcting for the known mass measurement systematics in the compared samples, we find that the scaling relation is in good agreement with the high-redshift samples, suggesting that for both groups and clusters the stellar content of the galaxy populations within R500 depends strongly on mass but only weakly on redshift out to z ≈ 1.

  2. Two stellar-mass black holes in the globular cluster M22.

    PubMed

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J; Miller-Jones, James C A; Seth, Anil C

    2012-10-01

    Hundreds of stellar-mass black holes probably form in a typical globular star cluster, with all but one predicted to be ejected through dynamical interactions. Some observational support for this idea is provided by the lack of X-ray-emitting binary stars comprising one black hole and one other star ('black-hole/X-ray binaries') in Milky Way globular clusters, even though many neutron-star/X-ray binaries are known. Although a few black holes have been seen in globular clusters around other galaxies, the masses of these cannot be determined, and some may be intermediate-mass black holes that form through exotic mechanisms. Here we report the presence of two flat-spectrum radio sources in the Milky Way globular cluster M22, and we argue that these objects are black holes of stellar mass (each ∼10-20 times more massive than the Sun) that are accreting matter. We find a high ratio of radio-to-X-ray flux for these black holes, consistent with the larger predicted masses of black holes in globular clusters compared to those outside. The identification of two black holes in one cluster shows that ejection of black holes is not as efficient as predicted by most models, and we argue that M22 may contain a total population of ∼5-100 black holes. The large core radius of M22 could arise from heating produced by the black holes. PMID:23038466

  3. The early gaseous and stellar mass assembly of Milky Way-type galaxy halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Petrov, Mykola

    2016-08-01

    How the Milky Way has accumulated its mass over the Hubble time, whether significant amounts of gas and stars were accreted from satellite galaxies, or whether the Milky Way has experienced an initial gas assembly and then evolved more-or-less in isolation is one of the burning questions in modern astronomy, because it has consequences for our understanding of galaxy formation in the cosmological context. Here we present the evolutionary model of a Milky Way-type satellite system zoomed into a cosmological large-scale simulation. Embedded into Dark Matter halos and allowing for baryonic processes these chemo-dynamical simulations aim at studying the gas and stellar loss from the satellites to feed the Milky Way halo and the stellar chemical abundances in the halo and the satellite galaxies.

  4. GG Tau: the ringworld and beyond. Mass accretion and planetary formation in young multiple stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Beck, Tracy; Guilloteau, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In binary stellar systems, exoplanet searches have revealed planetary mass companions orbiting both in circumstellar and in circumbinary orbits. Modelling studies suggest increased dynamical complexity around the young stars that form such systems. Circumstellar and circumbinary disks likely exhibit different physical conditions for planet formation, which also depends on the stellar separation. Although binaries and higher order multiple stars are relatively common in nearby star-forming regions, surprisingly few systems with circumbinary distributions of proto-planetary material have been found. With its spectacular ring of dust and gas encircling the central triple star, one such system, GG Tau A, has become a unique laboratory for investigating the physics of circumsystem gas and dust evolution. We review here its physical properties.

  5. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsi, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the absolute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional `box-in-a-star' model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI 777 nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  6. Central Stellar Mass Deficits in the Bulges of Local Lenticular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, B. T.

    2014-03-01

    The centers of giant galaxies display stellar mass deficits (Mdef) which are thought to be a signature left by inspiraling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries that are formed in post-merger galaxies. We quantify these deficits for a sample of five luminous lenticular galaxies with bulge magnitude MV ≲ -21 mag and find Mdef ≍ 0.5 - 2MBH (black hole mass). Contrary to the traditionally proposed lenticular galaxy formation mechanisms such as ram-pressure stripping and galaxy harassment, the mass deficits in these galaxies suggest a two stage inside-out process for their assembly. That is, their bulges may have formed through “dry” major-merger events involving SMBHs while their disk was subsequently built up via cold gas accretion scenarios. Interestingly, these bulges have sizes and mass densities comparable to the compact massive galaxies found at z ˜ 2.

  7. A giant elliptical galaxy with a lightweight initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.

    2013-09-01

    We present new observations of the closest known strong-lensing galaxy, the σ ≈ 330 km s- 1 giant elliptical ESO325-G004, made with the ESO Very Large Telescope. The low redshift of the lens (zl = 0.035) results in arcs being formed at a small fraction of the effective radius (REin = 2.85 arcsec ≈ Reff/4). At such small radii, stars dominate the lensing mass, so that lensing provides a direct probe of the stellar mass-to-light ratio, with only small corrections needed for dark matter. However, the redshift of the galaxy lensed by ESO325-G004 was unknown until now, so the lensing mass was not securely determined. Using X-SHOOTER, we have detected multiple spectral lines, from two bright parts of the arc system, and measured a source redshift of zs = 2.141. Combined with lens modelling constraints, this yields a total mass inside the Einstein radius of 1.50 ± 0.06 × 1011 M⊙. We estimate the range of possible contribution of dark matter to the lensing mass, using halo profile statistics from cosmological N-body simulations. Subtracting this component yields a stellar mass-to-light ratio for the lens of M*/LF814W = 3.14^{+0.24}_{-0.42} (M/L)_{{odot }, F814W}. Using VIMOS, we have also obtained very high signal-to-noise spectroscopy for the lens galaxy. Fitting models to this spectrum confirms that ESO325-G004 has a very old stellar population. For a Milky-Way-like (Kroupa) initial mass function (IMF), the stellar population fit yields a predicted stellar mass-to-light ratio of ΥMW = 3.01 ± 0.25 (M/L)⊙, F814W. Hence, the mass attributable to stars with a Kroupa IMF is consistent with the lensing estimate. By contrast, a Salpeter (or heavier) IMF is disfavoured at the 99.8 per cent confidence level. A `heavyweight' IMF, with a mass twice as large as the Kroupa case, is firmly excluded for this galaxy. Such an IMF has been proposed for more distant elliptical lenses, and also to explain strong dwarf-star-sensitive spectral features, in particular the Na I

  8. Recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation and implications for the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segers, Marijke C.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-02-01

    We use cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments and OverWhelmingly Large Simulations projects to assess the significance of recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation. The fractional contributions of stellar mass-loss to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass densities increase with time, reaching 35 and 19 per cent, respectively, at z = 0. The importance of recycling increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass for M* < 1010.5 M⊙, and decreases mildly at higher mass. This trend arises from the mass dependence of feedback associated with star formation and AGN, which preferentially suppresses star formation fuelled by recycling. Recycling is more important for satellites than centrals and its contribution decreases with galactocentric radius. The relative contribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars increases with time and towards galaxy centres. This is a consequence of the more gradual release of AGB ejecta compared to that of massive stars, and the preferential removal of the latter by star formation-driven outflows and by lock up in stellar remnants. Recycling-fuelled star formation exhibits a tight, positive correlation with galaxy metallicity, with a secondary dependence on the relative abundance of alpha elements (which are predominantly synthesized in massive stars), that is insensitive to the subgrid models for feedback. Hence, our conclusions are directly relevant for the origin of the mass-metallicity relation and metallicity gradients. Applying the relation between recycling and metallicity to the observed mass-metallicity relation yields our best estimate of the mass-dependent contribution of recycling. For centrals with a mass similar to that of the Milky Way, we infer the contributions of recycled stellar ejecta to the SFR and stellar mass to be 35 and 20 per cent, respectively.

  9. Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence: the colour-density relation at fixed stellar mass persists to z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Michael C.; Coil, Alison L.; Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Bundy, Kevin; Conselice, Christopher J.; Croton, Darren J.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Lin, Lihwai; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2010-11-01

    We use data drawn from the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey to investigate the relationship between local galaxy density, stellar mass and rest-frame galaxy colour. At z ~ 0.9, we find that the shape of the stellar mass function at the high-mass [ log 10(M*/h-2 Msolar) > 10.1] end depends on the local environment, with high-density regions favouring more massive systems. Accounting for this stellar mass-environment relation (i.e. working at fixed stellar mass), we find a significant colour-density relation for galaxies with 10.6 < log 10(M*/h-2 Msolar) < 11.1 and 0.75 < z < 0.95. This result is shown to be robust to variations in the sample selection and to extend to even lower masses [down to log 10(M*/h-2 Msolar) ~ 10.4]. We conclude by discussing our results in comparison to recent works in the literature, which report no significant correlation between galaxy properties and environment at fixed stellar mass for the same redshift and stellar mass domain. The non-detection of environmental dependence found in other data sets is largely attributable to their smaller sample sizes and lower sampling density, as well as systematic effects such as inaccurate redshifts and biased analysis techniques. Ultimately, our results based on DEEP2 data illustrate that the evolutionary state of a galaxy at z ~ 1 is not exclusively determined by the stellar mass of the galaxy. Instead, we show that local environment appears to play a distinct role in the transformation of galaxy properties at z > 1. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. E-mail: cooper@as.arizona.edu (MCC); cnaw@as.arizona.edu (CNAW); bjw@as.arizona.edu (BJW); bgerke@slac.stanford.edu (BFG); janewman

  10. Reassessing the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Olivia Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies depends on a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The observed strength of this dependence varies substantially depending on the choice of metallicity calibration, but has significant implications for theories of galaxy evolution, as it constrains the interplay between infall of pristine gas, metal production due to star formation, and ejection of enriched gas from galaxies. We present a new analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity and SFR for ~140,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a new set of theoretically calibrated abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013), we find a weaker dependence of metallicity on SFR at fixed stellar mass than was found by previous studies using different calibration techniques for gas phase metallicity. We analyze possible biases in the derivation of mass, metallicity, and SFR that could cause the observed strength of the metallicity dependence on SFR to differ from reality, as the calculation of each of these quantities is subject to systematic errors. Chemical evolution models must carefully consider these sources of potential bias when accounting for metallicity dependence on SFR.

  11. HIGH- AND INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, Y.-H. E-mail: chu@astro.illinois.edu

    2009-09-01

    nebulae, and background galaxies. A comprehensive search for YSOs in the LMC has also been carried out by the SAGE team and reported by Whitney et al. There are three major differences between these two searches. (1) In the common region of color-magnitude space, {approx}850 of our 1172 probable YSOs are missed in the SAGE YSO catalog because their conservative point-source identification criteria have excluded YSOs superposed on complex stellar and interstellar environments. (2) About 20%-30% of the YSOs identified by the SAGE team are sources we classify as background galaxies. (3) The SAGE YSO catalog identifies YSO in parts of color-magnitude space that we excluded and thus contains more evolved or fainter YSOs missed by our analysis. The shortcomings and strengths of both these YSO catalogs should be considered prior to statistical studies of star formation in the LMC. Finally, the mid-infrared luminosity functions in the IRAC bands of our most likely YSO candidates in the LMC can be well described by N(L) {proportional_to} L {sup -1}, which is consistent with the Salpeter initial mass function if a mass-luminosity relation of L {proportional_to} M {sup 2.4} is adopted.

  12. Temperature-dependent nuclear partition functions and abundances in the stellar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Nasser Tawfik, Abdel; Ezzelarab, Nada; Abas Khan, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the temperature-dependent nuclear partition functions (TDNPFs) and nuclear abundances for 728 nuclei, assuming nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE). The theories of stellar evolution support NSE. Discrete nuclear energy levels have been calculated microscopically, using the pn-QRPA theory, up to an excitation energy of 10 MeV in the calculation of the TDNPFs. This feature of our paper distinguishes it from previous calculations. Experimental data is also incorporated wherever available to ensure the reliability of our results. Beyond 10 MeV, we employ a simple Fermi gas model and perform integration over the nuclear level densities to approximate the TDNPFs. We calculate nuclidic abundances, using the Saha equation, as a function of three parameters: stellar density, stellar temperature and the lepton-to-baryon content of stellar matter. All these physical parameters are considered to be extremely important in the stellar interior. The results obtained in this paper show that the equilibrium configuration of nuclei remains unaltered by increasing the stellar density (only the calculated nuclear abundances increase by roughly the same order of magnitude). Increasing the stellar temperature smoothes the equilibrium configuration showing peaks at the neutron-number magic nuclei.

  13. AGN host galaxy mass function in COSMOS. Is AGN feedback responsible for the mass-quenching of galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Schulze, A.; Merloni, A.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; La Franca, F.; Peng, Y.; Piconcelli, E.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the role of supermassive black holes in the global context of galaxy evolution by measuring the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF) and the specific accretion rate, that is, λSAR, the distribution function (SARDF), up to z ~ 2.5 with ~1000 X-ray selected AGN from XMM-COSMOS. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we jointly fit the stellar mass function and specific accretion rate distribution function, with the X-ray luminosity function as an additional constraint. Our best-fit model characterizes the SARDF as a double power-law with mass-dependent but redshift-independent break, whose low λSAR slope flattens with increasing redshift while the normalization increases. This implies that for a given stellar mass, higher λSAR objects have a peak in their space density at earlier epoch than the lower λSAR objects, following and mimicking the well-known AGN cosmic downsizing as observed in the AGN luminosity function. The mass function of active galaxies is described by a Schechter function with an almost constant M∗⋆ and a low-mass slope α that flattens with redshift. Compared to the stellar mass function, we find that the HGMF has a similar shape and that up to log (M⋆/M⊙) ~ 11.5, the ratio of AGN host galaxies to star-forming galaxies is basically constant (~10%). Finally, the comparison of the AGN HGMF for different luminosity and specific accretion rate subclasses with a previously published phenomenological model prediction for the "transient" population, which are galaxies in the process of being mass-quenched, reveals that low-luminosity AGN do not appear to be able to contribute significantly to the quenching and that at least at high masses, that is, M⋆ > 1010.7 M⊙, feedback from luminous AGN (log Lbol ≳ 46 [erg/s]) may be responsible for the quenching of star formation in the host galaxy.

  14. FUV Spectra of Evolved Late-K and M Stars: Mass Loss Revisited and Stellar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report for the FUSE Cycle 1 program A100: FUV Spectra of Evolved Late-K and M Stars: Mass Loss revisited and Stellar Activity. Targets alpha TrA (K3 II) and gamma Cru (M3 III) were originally assigned 25 ksec each, to be observed in the medium aperture. Once the in-flight performance and telescope alignment problems were known, the observations were reprogrammed to optimized the scientific return of the program. Alpha TrA was scheduled for 25 ksec observations in both the medium and large apertures. The principle aim of this program was to measure the stellar FUV line and continuum emission, in order to estimate the photoionization radiation field and to determine the level of stellar activity through the fluxes in the collisionally excited high temperature diagnostics: C III 977Angstroms and O VI 1032,1038Angstrom doublet. The medium aperture observations were obtained successfully while the large aperture observations were thought by Johns Hopkins University (JHU)to be lost to satellite problems. There was insufficient signal-to- noise in the medium aperture short wavelength Sic channels to do quantitative science.

  15. SUPER-CRITICAL GROWTH OF MASSIVE BLACK HOLES FROM STELLAR-MASS SEEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    We consider super-critical accretion with angular momentum onto stellar-mass black holes as a possible mechanism for growing billion-solar-mass black holes from light seeds at early times. We use the radiatively inefficient ''slim disk'' solution—advective, optically thick flows that generalize the standard geometrically thin disk model—to show how mildly super-Eddington intermittent accretion may significantly ease the problem of assembling the first massive black holes when the universe was less than 0.8 Gyr old. Because of the low radiative efficiencies of slim disks around non-rotating as well as rapidly rotating black holes, the mass e-folding timescale in this regime is nearly independent of the spin parameter. The conditions that may lead to super-critical growth in the early universe are briefly discussed.

  16. The stellar mass assembly of galaxies in the Illustris simulation: growth by mergers and the spatial distribution of accreted stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sales, Laura V.; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Zhu, Qirong; Wellons, Sarah; Nelson, Dylan; Torrey, Paul; Springel, Volker; Ma, Chung-Pei; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-05-01

    We use the Illustris simulation to study the relative contributions of in situ star formation and stellar accretion to the build-up of galaxies over an unprecedentedly wide range of masses (M* = 109-1012 M⊙), galaxy types, environments, and assembly histories. We find that the `two-phase' picture of galaxy formation predicted by some models is a good approximation only for the most massive galaxies in our simulation - namely, the stellar mass growth of galaxies below a few times 1011 M⊙ is dominated by in situ star formation at all redshifts. The fraction of the total stellar mass of galaxies at z = 0 contributed by accreted stars shows a strong dependence on galaxy stellar mass, ranging from about 10 per cent for Milky Way-sized galaxies to over 80 per cent for M* ≈ 1012 M⊙ objects, yet with a large galaxy-to-galaxy variation. At a fixed stellar mass, elliptical galaxies and those formed at the centres of younger haloes exhibit larger fractions of ex situ stars than disc-like galaxies and those formed in older haloes. On average, ˜50 per cent of the ex situ stellar mass comes from major mergers (stellar mass ratio μ > 1/4), ˜20 per cent from minor mergers (1/10 < μ < 1/4), ˜20 per cent from very minor mergers (μ < 1/10), and ˜10 per cent from stars that were stripped from surviving galaxies (e.g. flybys or ongoing mergers). These components are spatially segregated, with in situ stars dominating the innermost regions of galaxies, and ex situ stars being deposited at larger galactocentric distances in order of decreasing merger mass ratio.

  17. Effects of Stellar-Mass Black Holes on Star Cluster Evolution and Survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Morscher, Meagan; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of stellar mass black holes in globular clusters. These discoveries likely indicate the existence of large populations of black holes that are still bound in these clusters. This is in direct contrast to the past understanding that at most a few black holes can remain bound to an old cluster due to rapid mass segregation and dynamical ejection. Modern realistic star-by-star numerical simulations suggest that the retention fraction of stellar mass black holes is typically much higher than what was previously thought. The retention fraction over time depends intricately on the details of initial cluster properties as well as black hole formation physics. The presence of a population of black holes dramatically alters the cluster's evolution and even survival. I will present results from our latest numerical simulations with a focus on the observable global properties of star clusters that might serve as indicators of the presence of a large population of retained black holes.

  18. The Evolution of Advanced Merger (U)LIRGs on the Color-Stellar Mass Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Based on a sample of 79 local advanced merger (adv-merger) (U)LIRGs, we search for evidence of quenching processes by investigating the distributions of star formation history indicators (EW(Hα), EW(HΔA) and Dn(4000)) on the NUV-r color-mass and SFR-M * diagrams. The distributions of EW(Hα) and Dn(4000) on the NUV-r color-mass diagram show clear trends that at a given stellar mass, galaxies with redder NUV-r colors have smaller EW(Hα) and larger D n (4000). The reddest adv-merger (U)LIRGs close to the green valley mostly have D n (4000)> 1.4. In addition, in the SFR-M * diagram, as the SFR decreases, the EW(Hα) decreases and the D n (4000) increases, implying that the adv-merger (U)LIRGs on the star formation main sequence have more evolved stellar populations than those above the main sequence. These results indicate that a fraction of the adv-merger (U)LIRGs have already exhibited signs of fading from the starburst phase and that the NUV-r reddest adv-merger (U)LIRGs are likely at the initial stage of post-starbursts with an age of ∼ 1 Gyr, which is consistent with the gas exhaustion time-scales. Therefore, our results offer additional support for the fast evolutionary track from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  19. Stellar, Remnant, Planetary, and Dark-Object Masses from Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew P.; Bennett, David P.; Boden, Andrew; Depoy, Darren L.; Gaudi, Scott B.; Griest, Kim; Han, Cheongho; Paczynski, Bohdan; Reid, I. Neill

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of our project is to make a complete census of the stellar population of the Galaxy. We are broadening the term stellar here to include both ordinary stars and dark stars. Ordinary stars, burning their nuclear fuel and shining, can perhaps best be studied with traditional astronomical techniques, but dark stars, by which we include old brown dwarfs, black holes, old white dwarfs, neutron stars, and perhaps exotic objects such as mirror matter stars or primordial black holes, can only be studied by their gravitational effects. Traditionally, these objects have been probed in binaries, and thus selected in a way that may or may not be representative of their respective field populations. The only way to examine the field population of these stars is through microlensing, the deflection of light from a visible star in the background by an object (dark or not) in the foreground. When lensed, there are two images of the background star. Although these images cannot be resolved when the lens has a stellar mass, the lensing effect can be detected in two ways: photometrically, i.e. by measuring the magnification of the source by the lens, and astrometrically, i.e. by measuring the shift in the centroid of the two images. Photometric microlensing experiments have detected hundreds of microlensing events over the past decade. Despite its successes, photometric microlensing has so far been somewhat frustrating because these events are difficult to interpret. Almost nothing is known about the masses of individual lenses and very little is known about the statistical properties of the lenses treated as a whole, such as their average mass. Although probably over 100 of the lenses are in fact dark objects, we can't determine which they are, let alone investigate finer details such as what their masses are, and where they are in the Galaxy. With SIM, we will break the microlensing degeneracy, and allow detailed interpretation of individual microlensing events. We

  20. Observational Constraints on Low-Mass Stellar Evolution and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne Louise

    2011-07-01

    Low-mass stars (? < 1.0M⊙) account for more than 70% of the galactic stellar population yet models describing the evolution of their fundamental properties lack stringent observational constraints, especially at early ages. Furthermore, recent observations indicate a significant discrepancy between model predictions and the precise (2 - 3%) observed, dynamical masses and radii measured using low-mass eclipsing binary systems (EBs). Additionally, the theory of planet formation via core accretion predicts notably less hot-Jupiter formation around M-dwarfs (Mdot ? ≤ 0.6M⊙), but as yet, no large enough study exists to robustly test it. Further still, it is predicted that the dynamic environment of stellar clusters, in which most stars are believed to form, hampers planet formation, but again, current null detections of planets in stellar clusters are not statistically significant to test the theory. More observations are required to cement both the theory of low-mass stellar evolution and planet formation. This thesis aims to provide the necessary constraints by uncovering new low-mass EBs and transiting exoplanets in time-series photometry and follow-up spectroscopy from the Monitor project, a photometric monitoring campaign of low-mass stars in nine young open clusters, and in the WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS), a photometric monitoring campaign of ∼10,000 field M-dwarfs. Chapters 3 and 4 present my study of the young (130 Myr) cluster, M 50. I confirm three EB candidates as cluster members, including evidence that one of these is in a triple system with a wide-separation, low-mass tertiary component. The derived masses and radii for this system and one further double-lined, non-cluster member are presented, but these objects required dedicated, single-slit spectroscopic follow-up to yield the accuracy required to test pre-main sequence models. My non-detection of planets in this cluster is consistent with the results of all other cluster transit surveys. The

  1. WINGS-SPE II: A catalog of stellar ages and star formation histories, stellar masses and dust extinction values for local clusters galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; Bressan, A.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.

    2011-02-01

    Context. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (wings) is a project whose primary goal is to study the galaxy populations in clusters in the local universe (z < 0.07) and of the influence of environment on their stellar populations. This survey has provided the astronomical community with a high quality set of photometric and spectroscopic data for 77 and 48 nearby galaxy clusters, respectively. Aims: In this paper we present the catalog containing the properties of galaxies observed by the wings SPEctroscopic (wings-spe) survey, which were derived using stellar populations synthesis modelling approach. We also check the consistency of our results with other data in the literature. Methods: Using a spectrophotometric model that reproduces the main features of observed spectra by summing the theoretical spectra of simple stellar populations of different ages, we derive the stellar masses, star formation histories, average age and dust attenuation of galaxies in our sample. Results: ~ 5300 spectra were analyzed with spectrophotometric techniques, and this allowed us to derive the star formation history, stellar masses and ages, and extinction for the wings spectroscopic sample that we present in this paper. Conclusions: The comparison with the total mass values of the same galaxies derived by other authors based on sdss data, confirms the reliability of the adopted methods and data. Based on observations taken at the Anglo Australian Telescope (3.9 m- AAT), and at the William Herschel Telescope (4.2 m- WHT).Full Table 2 is available in electronic form both at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A45, and by querying the wings database at http://web.oapd.inaf.it/wings/new/index.html

  2. Stellar Masses in the Mysterious Young Triple Star System AS 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encalada, Frankie; Rosero, Viviana A.; Prato, Lisa A.; Bruhns, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The lack of accurate absolute mass measurements for young, low-mass pre-main sequence stars is problematic for the calibration of stellar evolutionary track models. An on-going program to increase the sample of young star masses begins with mass ratio measurements in spectroscopic binaries. By the end of its 5-year duration, the GAIA all-sky mission will provide new astrometric measurements for young spectroscopic binaries down to separations of tens of microarcseconds, yielding absolute masses for double-lined systems. We obtain mass ratios by taking high-resolution spectra of young double-lined spectroscopic binaries over a few epochs to construct a radial velocity versus phase diagram. For the young spectroscopic binary AS 205B, using eight of our own spectra supplied by the CSHELL instrument on the IRTF at Mauna Kea, plus one from the literature, we estimate a period of approximately 140 days, an eccentricity of 0.7, and a mass-ratio of 0.5. This spectroscopic system comprises the secondary in a 1.4'' visual binary in which both the A and B components are surrounded by optically thick, actively accreting disks, making AS 205B a member of that rare class of young spectroscopic binaries with a primordial circumbinary disk.

  3. A STELLAR DYNAMICAL MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE BLACK HOLE IN NGC 3998 FROM KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jonelle L.; Van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Barth, Aaron J.; Sarzi, Marc

    2012-07-01

    We present a new stellar dynamical mass measurement of the black hole in the nearby, S0 galaxy NGC 3998. By combining laser guide star adaptive optics observations obtained with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope with long-slit spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Keck I telescope, we map out the stellar kinematics on both small spatial scales, well within the black hole sphere of influence, and large scales. We find that the galaxy is rapidly rotating and exhibits a sharp central peak in the velocity dispersion. Using the kinematics and the stellar luminosity density derived from imaging observations, we construct three-integral, orbit-based, triaxial stellar dynamical models. We find the black hole has a mass of M{sub BH} = (8.1{sup +2.0}{sub -1.9}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, with an I-band stellar mass-to-light ratio of M/L = 5.0{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} M{sub Sun }/L{sub Sun} (3{sigma} uncertainties), and that the intrinsic shape of the galaxy is very round, but oblate. With the work presented here, NGC 3998 is now one of a very small number of galaxies for which both stellar and gas dynamical modeling have been used to measure the mass of the black hole. The stellar dynamical mass is nearly a factor of four larger than the previous gas dynamical black hole mass measurement. Given that this cross-check has so far only been attempted on a few galaxies with mixed results, carrying out similar studies in other objects is essential for quantifying the magnitude and distribution of the cosmic scatter in the black hole mass-host galaxy relations.

  4. Revisiting the Cosmological Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seunghwan; Lee, J.

    2013-01-01

    A non-stochastic scale-independent multi-dimensional barrier model of ellipsoidal collapse for the excursion set halo mass function is presented. The key concept of our model is that a bound halo forms at the moment when the initial shear eigenvalues hit a multi-dimensional absorbing barrier of constant height in their random walking process. The multi-dimensional barrier height that characterizes the analytic halo mass function is empirically determined by fitting the numerical results from the high-resolution N-body simulation to our model. It is found that the best-fit value of the barrier height is independent of redshift and key cosmological parameters. Our analytic model with empirically determined barrier-height is shown to work excellently in the wide mass-range at various redshifts: The ratio of the model to the N-body results departs from unity by up to 5% over 1011 1015M⊙/h at z=0, 0.5 and 1 for both of the FoF-halo and SO-halo cases. It is also shown that our analytic model naturally explains the stochastic behaviors of the density threshold value and its log-normal distribution.

  5. Investigating a Possible New Heavyweight Champion for Stellar Mass Black Holes with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Robin

    Using methods described below, we have identified a record-breaking black hole candidate (BHC) associated with a globular cluster inside the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). Our BHC, known as XBo 135, has an inferred mass of 50 solar masses, around 60% heavier than the current record holder. We have been granted a 33 hr observation with the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory that will allow us to test different scenarios for the formation of such a beast. We are asking for $55k to support one postdoc (R. Barnard) for 6 months, travel to a conference to share our results, and publication in ApJ. We have strong observational evidence for two classes of black hole (BH): stellar mass BHs that are formed in the death throes of the most massive stars, and supermassive BHs that live at the centers of most galaxies. Stellar mass BHs are 3-30 times more massive than the Sun, while supermassive black holes 1 E+6 times more massive still. It is unknown how such massive black holes are formed, although we suspect the existence of a class of intermediate mass black holes that bridge the two populations. Our target, XBo 135, is an X-ray binary (XB) system where a compact object (neutron star or black hole) accretes material from a co-orbiting donor star; mass transfer from the donor to the compact object results in a huge release of energy, extracted from the gravitational potential energy of the in-falling matter. The material forms an accretion disk that gets faster and hotter as it approaches the accretor, extracting energy >10 times more efficiently than nuclear fusion. We have invented a method for identifying BHXBs from the X-ray emission alone, summarized as follows. At low accretion rates, all XBs exhibit strikingly similar emission that is dominated by a power law component with photon index <2, contributing >90% of the X-ray flux. Crucially, this emission is limited to luminosities below 10% of the Eddington limit , which is proportional to the mass of the accretor. If we observe low

  6. The Main Sequence Luminosity Function of Low-Mass Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme

    2009-07-01

    Theoretical work indicates that the dynamical evolution of globular clusters of low mass and low central concentration is strongly determined by mass-loss processes, such as stellar evaporation and tidal stripping, that can eventually lead to cluster dissolution. In fact, mass loss and cluster disruption is now considered to be a viable explanation for the form of the faint end of the Milky Way globular cluster luminosity function. A clear observational demonstration of the prevalence of cluster mass-loss would have ramifications not only for the dynamical evolution of individual globular clusters and their internal stellar mass distributions, but also for the relationships between halo field and cluster stars and the properties of globular cluster systems in galaxies. Our previous WFPC2 imaging of the low-mass diffuse halo cluster Palomar 5 revealed a main sequence deficient in stars compared to other low-concentration globular clusters of much higher mass, consistent with there having been a considerable loss of stars from this system. But is Pal 5 typical of low-mass, low-concentration halo clusters? We propose to place the mass-loss scenario on a firm observational footing {or otherwise} by using WFC3 imaging to measure the main-sequence stellar mass functions of two of the lowest-mass lowest-concentration globular clusters in the Milky Way, AM-4 and Palomar 13, in order to search for analogous evidence of stellar depletion.

  7. Mass Accretion Processes in Young Stellar Objects: Role of Intense Flaring Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Salvatore; Reale, Fabio; Peres, Giovanni; Mignone, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    According to the magnetospheric accretion scenario, young low-mass stars are surrounded by circumstellar disks which they interact with through accretion of mass. The accretion builds up the star to its final mass and is also believed to power the mass outflows, which may in turn have a signicant role in removing the excess angular momentum from the star-disk system. Although the process of mass accretion is a critical aspect of star formation, some of its mechanisms are still to be fully understood. On the other hand, strong flaring activity is a common feature of young stellar objects (YSOs). In the Sun, such events give rise to perturbations of the interplanetary medium. Similar but more energetic phenomena occur in YSOs and may influence the circumstellar environment. In fact, a recent study has shown that an intense flaring activity close to the disk may strongly perturb the stability of circumstellar disks, thus inducing mass accretion episodes (Orlando et al. 2011). Here we review the main results obtained in the field and the future perspectives.

  8. THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASS-SPHEROID STELLAR MASS RELATION FOR SERSIC AND CORE-SERSIC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Nicholas; Graham, Alister W; Schombert, James

    2013-05-01

    We have examined the relationship between supermassive black hole mass (M{sub BH}) and the stellar mass of the host spheroid (M{sub sph,*}) for a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. To derive the spheroid stellar masses we used improved Two Micron All Sky Survey K{sub s}-band photometry from the ARCHANGEL photometry pipeline. Dividing our sample into core-Sersic and Sersic galaxies, we find that they are described by very different M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relations. For core-Sersic galaxies-which are typically massive and luminous, with M{sub BH} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to} M{sub sph,*}{sup 0.97{+-}0.14}, consistent with other literature relations. However, for the Sersic galaxies-with typically lower masses, M{sub sph,*} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to}M{sub sph,*}{sup 2.22{+-}0.58}, a dramatically steeper slope that differs by more than 2 standard deviations. This relation confirms that, for Sersic galaxies, M{sub BH} is not a constant fraction of M{sub sph,*}. Sersic galaxies can grow via the accretion of gas which fuels both star formation and the central black hole, as well as through merging. Their black hole grows significantly more rapidly than their host spheroid, prior to growth by dry merging events that produce core-Sersic galaxies, where the black hole and spheroid grow in lockstep. We have additionally compared our Sersic M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relation with the corresponding relation for nuclear star clusters, confirming that the two classes of central massive object follow significantly different scaling relations.

  9. Assisted Inspirals of Stellar Mass Black Holes Embedded in AGN Disks: Solving the "Final AU Problem"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas C.; Metzger, Brian D.; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    We explore the evolution of stellar mass black hole binaries (BHBs) which are formed in the self-gravitating disks of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Hardening due to three-body scattering and gaseous drag are effective mechanisms that reduce the semi-major axis of a BHB to radii where gravitational waves take over, on timescales shorter than the typical lifetime of the AGN disk. Taking observationally-motivated assumptions for the rate of star formation in AGN disks, we find a rate of disk-induced BHB mergers (R ˜ 3 yr^{-1} Gpc^{-3}, but with large uncertainties) that is comparable with existing estimates of the field rate of BHB mergers, and the approximate BHB merger rate implied by the recent Advanced LIGO detection of GW150914. BHBs formed thorough this channel will frequently be associated with luminous AGN, which are relatively rare within the sky error regions of future gravitational wave detector arrays. This channel could also possess a (potentially transient) electromagnetic counterpart due to super-Eddington accretion onto the stellar mass black hole following the merger.

  10. Stellar wind in state transitions of high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čechura, J.; Hadrava, P.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: We have developed a new code for the three-dimensional time-dependent raditation hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar wind in interacting binaries to improve models of accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries and to quantitatively clarify the observed variability of these objects. We used the code to test the influence of various parameters on the structure and properties of circumstellar matter. Methods: Our code takes into account acceleration of the wind due to the Roche effective potential, Coriolis force, gas pressure, and (CAK-) radiative pressure in the lines and continuum of the supergiant radiation field that is modulated by its gravity darkening and by the photo-ionization caused by X-ray radiation from the compact companion. The parameters of Cygnus X-1 were used to test the properties of our model. Results: Both two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations show that the Coriolis force substantially influences the mass loss and consequently the accretion rate onto the compact companion. The gravitational field of the compact companion focuses the stellar wind, which leads to the formation of a curved cone-like gaseous tail behind the companion. The changes of X-ray photo-ionization of the wind material during X-ray spectral-state transitions significantly influence the wind structure and offer an explanation of the variability of Cygnus X-1 in optical observations (the Hα emission).

  11. The role of stellar mass-loss in dynamics of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungwiert, B.; Combes, F.; Palous, J.

    A new N-body sticky-particles computer code for spiral galaxies is presented. The substantial improvement over existing models, either sticky-particles or SPH, is the scheme for the bi-directional mass exchange between gas and stars: the consumption of the former by star formation is taken into account by locking a fraction of gas in newly created stars while the mass-loss from stars via stellar winds and supernova explosions is implemented as time dependent over the Hubble time. A comparison with models not including gas recycling or treating it as immediate shows important differences as to star formation rate, gas consumption time, and the rate at which gas is fuelled towards galactic centers, all having potentially deep consequences for galactic evolution.

  12. New Insights on the Galactic Bulge Initial Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamida, A.; Sahu, K. C.; Casertano, S.; Anderson, J.; Cassisi, S.; Gennaro, M.; Cignoni, M.; Brown, T. M.; Kains, N.; Ferguson, H.; Livio, M.; Bond, H. E.; Buonanno, R.; Clarkson, W.; Ferraro, I.; Pietrinferni, A.; Salaris, M.; Valenti, J.

    2015-09-01

    We have derived the Galactic bulge initial mass function (IMF) of the Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search field in the mass range 0.15 \\lt M/{M}⊙ 1.0, using deep photometry collected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Observations at several epochs, spread over 9 years, allowed us to separate the disk and bulge stars down to very faint magnitudes, F814W ≈ 26 mag, with a proper-motion accuracy better than 0.5 mas yr-1 (20 km s-1). This allowed us to determine the IMF of the pure bulge component uncontaminated by disk stars for this low-reddening field in the Sagittarius window. In deriving the mass function, we took into account the presence of unresolved binaries, errors in photometry, distance modulus and reddening, as well as the metallicity dispersion and the uncertainties caused by adopting different theoretical color-temperature relations. We found that the Galactic bulge IMF can be fitted with two power laws with a break at M˜ 0.56 {M}⊙ , the slope being steeper (α =-2.41+/- 0.50) for the higher masses, and shallower (α =-1.25+/- 0.20) for the lower masses. In the high-mass range, our derived mass function agrees well with the mass function derived for other regions of the bulge. In the low-mass range however, our mass function is slightly shallower, which suggests that separating the disk and bulge components is particularly important in the low-mass range. The slope of the bulge mass function is also similar to the slope of the mass function derived for the disk in the high-mass regime, but the bulge mass function is slightly steeper in the low-mass regime. We used our new mass function to derive stellar mass-to-light values for the Galactic bulge and we obtained 2.1 \\lt M/{L}F814W \\lt 2.4 and 3.1 \\lt M/{L}F606W \\lt 3.6 according to different assumptions on the slope of the IMF for masses larger than 1{M}⊙ . Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the

  13. The evolving relation between star formation rate and stellar mass in the VIDEO survey since z = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Russell; Vaccari, Mattia; Jarvis, Matt; Smith, Mathew; Giovannoli, Elodie; Häußler, Boris; Prescott, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass, M*, relation of a star-forming (SF) galaxy (SFG) sample in the XMM-LSS field to z ˜ 3.0 using the near-infrared data from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. Combining VIDEO with broad-band photometry, we use the SED fitting algorithm CIGALE to derive SFRs and M* and have adapted it to account for the full photometric redshift probability-distribution-function uncertainty. Applying an SF selection using the D4000 index, we find evidence for strong evolution in the normalization of the SFR-M* relation out to z ˜ 3 and a roughly constant slope of (SFR ∝ M_*^{α }) α = 0.69 ± 0.02 to z ˜ 1.7. We find this increases close to unity towards z ˜ 2.65. Alternatively, if we apply a colour selection, we find a distinct turnover in the SFR-M* relation between 0.7 ≲ z ≲ 2.0 at the high-mass end, and suggest that this is due to an increased contamination from passive galaxies. We find evolution of the specific SFR ∝ (1 + z)2.60 at log10(M*/M⊙) ˜ 10.5, out to z ≲ 2.4 with an observed flattening beyond z ˜ 2 with increased stellar mass. Comparing to a range of simulations we find the analytical scaling relation approaches, that invoke an equilibrium model, a good fit to our data, suggesting that a continual smooth accretion regulated by continual outflows may be a key driver in the overall growth of SFGs.

  14. Dark Matter Halo Models of Stellar Mass-dependent Galaxy Clustering in PRIMUS+DEEP2 at 0.2>z>1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Moustakas, John; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-07-01

    We utilize ΛCDM halo occupation models of galaxy clustering to investigate the evolving stellar mass dependent clustering of galaxies in the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and DEEP2 Redshift Survey over the past eight billion years of cosmic time, between 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.2. These clustering measurements provide new constraints on the connections between dark matter halo properties and galaxy properties in the context of the evolving large-scale structure of the universe. Using both an analytic model and a set of mock galaxy catalogs, we find a strong correlation between central galaxy stellar mass and dark matter halo mass over the range {M}{halo}˜ {10}11-{10}13 {h}-1 {M}⊙ , approximately consistent with previous observations and theoretical predictions. However, the stellar-to-halo mass relation and the mass scale where star formation efficiency reaches a maximum appear to evolve more strongly than predicted by other models, including models based primarily on abundance-matching constraints. We find that the fraction of satellite galaxies in halos of a given mass decreases significantly from z˜ 0.5 to z˜ 0.9, partly due to the fact that halos at fixed mass are rarer at higher redshift and have lower abundances. We also find that the {M}1/{M}{min} ratio, a model parameter that quantifies the critical mass above which halos host at least one satellite, decreases from ≈ 20 at z˜ 0 to ≈ 13 at z˜ 0.9. Considering the evolution of the subhalo mass function vis-à-vis satellite abundances, this trend has implications for relations between satellite galaxies and halo substructures and for intracluster mass, which we argue has grown due to stripped and disrupted satellites between z˜ 0.9 and z˜ 0.5.

  15. Investigating accretion disk - radio jet coupling across the stellar mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Altamirano, Diego; Körding, Elmar G.; Krimm, Hans A.; Maitra, Dipankar; Remillard, Ron A.; Russell, David M.; Tudose, Valeriu; Dhawan, Vivek; Fender, Rob P.; Heinz, Sebastian; Markoff, Sera; Migliari, Simone; Rupen, Michael P.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    2011-02-01

    Relationships between the X-ray and radio behavior of black hole X-ray binaries during outbursts have established a fundamental coupling between the accretion disks and radio jets in these systems. I begin by reviewing the prevailing paradigm for this disk-jet coupling, also highlighting what we know about similarities and differences with neutron star and white dwarf binaries. Until recently, this paradigm had not been directly tested with dedicated high-angular resolution radio imaging over entire outbursts. Moreover, such high-resolution monitoring campaigns had not previously targetted outbursts in which the compact object was either a neutron star or a white dwarf. To address this issue, we have embarked on the Jet Acceleration and Collimation Probe Of Transient X-Ray Binaries (JACPOT XRB) project, which aims to use high angular resolution observations to compare disk-jet coupling across the stellar mass scale, with the goal of probing the importance of the depth of the gravitational potential well, the stellar surface and the stellar magnetic field, on jet formation. Our team has recently concluded its first monitoring series, including (E)VLA, VLBA, X-ray, optical, and near-infrared observations of entire outbursts of the black hole candidate H 1743-322, the neutron star system Aquila X-1, and the white dwarf system SS Cyg. Here I present preliminary results from this work, largely confirming the current paradigm, but highlighting some intriguing new behavior, and suggesting a possible difference in the jet formation process between neutron star and black hole systems.

  16. REVEALING VELOCITY DISPERSION AS THE BEST INDICATOR OF A GALAXY's COLOR, COMPARED TO STELLAR MASS, SURFACE MASS DENSITY, OR MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Franx, Marijn

    2012-06-01

    Using data of nearby galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we investigate whether stellar mass (M{sub star}), central velocity dispersion ({sigma}), surface mass density ({Sigma}), or the Sersic n parameter is best correlated with a galaxy's rest-frame color. Specifically, we determine how the mean color of galaxies varies with one parameter when another is fixed. When M{sub star} is fixed we see that strong trends remain with all other parameters, whereas residual trends are weaker when {Sigma}, n, or {sigma} is fixed. Overall {sigma} is the best indicator of a galaxy's typical color, showing the largest residual color dependence when any of the other three parameters are fixed, and M{sub star} is the poorest. Other studies have indicated that both the central black hole mass and possibly host dark matter halo properties (mass or concentration) are also better correlated with {sigma} than with M{sub star}, {Sigma}, or n. Therefore, it could be the case that the strong correlation between color and {sigma} reflects an underlying relationship between a galaxy's star formation history and/or present star formation rate and the properties of its dark matter halo and/or the feedback from its central supermassive black hole.

  17. Ultraluminous X-rays from the historical supernova 1986L: Testing stellar mass black hole scenario for the ULX origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kwan Lok

    2014-09-01

    The Type II-L SN 1986L was first discovered in X-ray through serendipitous Swift observations taken in 2005 and 2007 with a luminosity of 1.6*10^40 erg/s which is reminiscent of ULX that could either be an IMBH or a stellar mass black hole at (super-)Eddington accretion. While Type II-L SNe are suggested to explode in binary, we suspect that a stellar mass black hole remnant created by fallback forming an X-ray binary with the progenitor's companion to produce the ULX. As the positional accuracy of Swift prevents a solid identification, a deep Chandra observation is required to confirm the SN-ULX association. If confirmed, SN 1986L will be the first ULX detected in a young SNR, which favors the stellar mass black hole scenario.

  18. CHARACTERIZING THE BROWN DWARF FORMATION CHANNELS FROM THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND BINARY-STAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, Ingo; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel; Marks, Michael

    2015-02-10

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key property of stellar populations. There is growing evidence that the classical star-formation mechanism by the direct cloud fragmentation process has difficulties reproducing the observed abundance and binary properties of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. In particular, recent analytical derivations of the stellar IMF exhibit a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to observational data. Here we derive the residual mass function of brown dwarfs as an empirical measure of the brown dwarf deficiency in recent star-formation models with respect to observations and show that it is compatible with the substellar part of the Thies-Kroupa IMF and the mass function obtained by numerical simulations. We conclude that the existing models may be further improved by including a substellar correction term that accounts for additional formation channels like disk or filament fragmentation. The term ''peripheral fragmentation'' is introduced here for such additional formation channels. In addition, we present an updated analytical model of stellar and substellar binarity. The resulting binary fraction and the dynamically evolved companion mass-ratio distribution are in good agreement with observational data on stellar and very-low-mass binaries in the Galactic field, in clusters, and in dynamically unprocessed groups of stars if all stars form as binaries with stellar companions. Cautionary notes are given on the proper analysis of mass functions and the companion mass-ratio distribution and the interpretation of the results. The existence of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs does not imply that these form just like stars in direct fragmentation.

  19. Effects of finite spectral bandwidth and focusing error on the transfer function in stellar speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsubo, J.

    1985-05-01

    The normal model of light propagation through a turbulent atmosphere is used to investigate the telescope-atmosphere transfer function in stellar speckle interferometry. The effect of the finite bandwidth of a spectral filter on the transfer function is considered. The permissible focusing errors for successful processing in stellar speckle interferometry are obtained based on the normal model. Some observational results are presented and compared with theory. The normal model leads to an analytically simple solution and properly describes light scattering from turbulent atmosphere. The results for the normal model are compared with those for the log-normal model.

  20. Determination of the stellar (n,γ) cross section of Ca40 with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Wallner, A.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Mengoni, A.; Gallino, R.; Paul, M.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2009-06-01

    The stellar (n,γ) cross section of Ca40 at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing γ-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the Li7(p,n)Be7 reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic Ca40 is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, Ca40 can also play a secondary role as “neutron poison” for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of <σ>30keV=5.73±0.34 mb.

  1. No Evidence for Multiple Stellar Populations in the Low-mass Galactic Globular Cluster E 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Strader, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Multiple stellar populations are a widespread phenomenon among Galactic globular clusters. Even though the origin of the enriched material from which new generations of stars are produced remains unclear, it is likely that self-enrichment will be feasible only in clusters massive enough to retain this enriched material. We searched for multiple populations in the low mass (M˜ 1.4× {10}4 {M}⊙ ) globular cluster E3, analyzing SOAR/Goodman multi-object spectroscopy centered on the blue cyanogen (CN) absorption features of 23 red giant branch stars. We find that the CN abundance does not present the typical bimodal behavior seen in clusters hosting multistellar populations, but rather a unimodal distribution that indicates the presence of a genuine single stellar population, or a level of enrichment much lower than in clusters that show evidence for two populations from high-resolution spectroscopy. E3 would be the first bona fide Galactic old globular cluster where no sign of self-enrichment is found. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  2. The impact of chromospheric activity on observed initial mass functions

    SciTech Connect

    Stassun, Keivan G.; Scholz, Aleks; Dupuy, Trent J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2014-12-01

    Using recently established empirical calibrations for the impact of chromospheric activity on the radii, effective temperatures, and estimated masses of active low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, we reassess the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) across the stellar/substellar boundary in the Upper Sco star-forming region (age ∼ 5-10 Myr). We adjust the observed effective temperatures to warmer values using the observed strength of the chromospheric Hα emission, and redetermine the estimated masses of objects using pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram. The effect of the activity-adjusted temperatures is to shift the objects to higher masses by 3%-100%. While the slope of the resulting IMF at substellar masses is not strongly changed, the peak of the IMF does shift from ≈0.06 to ≈0.11 M {sub ☉}. Moreover, for objects with masses ≲ 0.2 M {sub ☉}, the ratio of brown dwarfs to stars changes from ∼80% to ∼33%. These results suggest that activity corrections are essential for studies of the substellar mass function, if the masses are estimated from spectral types or from effective temperatures.

  3. A stellar feedback origin for neutral hydrogen in high-redshift quasar-mass haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Kereš, Dušan; Hopkins, Philip F.; Murray, Norman

    2016-09-01

    Observations reveal that quasar host haloes at z ˜ 2 have large covering fractions of cool dense gas (≳60 per cent for Lyman limit systems within a projected virial radius). Most simulations have so far failed to explain these large observed covering fractions. We analyse a new set of 15 simulated massive haloes with explicit stellar feedback from the FIRE project, covering the halo mass range Mh ≈ 2 × 1012 - 1013 M⊙ at z = 2. This extends our previous analysis of the circum-galactic medium of high-redshift galaxies to more massive haloes. Active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback is not included in these simulations. We find Lyman limit system covering fractions consistent with those observed around quasars. The large H I covering fractions arise from star formation-driven galactic winds, including winds from low-mass satellite galaxies that interact with cosmological filaments. We show that it is necessary to resolve these satellite galaxies and their winds to reproduce the large Lyman limit system covering fractions observed in quasar-mass haloes. Our simulations predict that galaxies occupying dark matter haloes of mass similar to quasars but without a luminous AGN should have Lyman limit system covering fractions comparable to quasars.

  4. A UKIDSS-based search for low-mass stars and small stellar clumps in off-cloud parts of young star-forming regions *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perger, M.; Lodieu, N.; Martín, E. L.; Barrado Y Navascués, D.

    2011-07-01

    The form and universality of the mass function of young and nearby star-forming regions is still under debate. Its relation to the stellar density, its mass peak and the dependency on most recent models shows significant differencies for the various regions and remains unclear up to date. We aim to get a more complete census of two of such regions. We investigate yet unexplored areas of Orion and Taurus-Auriga, observed by the UKIDSS survey. In the latter, we search for low-mass stars via photometric and proper motion criteria and signs for variability. In Orion, we search for small stellar clumps via nearest-neighbor methods. Highlights in Taurus would be the finding of the missing low-mass stars and the detection of a young cluster T dwarf. In Orion, we discovered small stellar associations of its OB1b and OB1c populations. Combined with what is known in literature, we will provide by this investigations a general picture of the results of the star-forming processes in large areas of Taurus and Orion and probe the most recent models. Based on data of the UKIRT (operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the U.K.) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS).Supported by the Marie Curie Research Training Network `CONSTELLATION' under grant no. MRTN-CT-2006-035890.

  5. On mass-response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Marani, Alessandro; Bellin, Alberto

    1989-07-01

    Field transport of reactive solute species is investigated through a class of stochastic models, here termed mass response functions (MRFs), which incorporate simplified concepts of chemical/physical nonequilibrium kinetics in the formulation of transport by travel time distributions. MRFs are probability density functions (pdfs) associated with solute particles' travel time within transport volumes. The theory hinges on recent advances in modeling transport of solutes in groundwater and in basin scale transport volumes and links the approaches of surface hydrologists with recent subsurface transport models. The relationship between MRFs and the theory of solute transport by continuous motions is investigated. It is found that MRFs extend the basic formulation of transport of inert solutes to a particular case of sorption process. The relationship between MRFs and the basic differential convection-dispersion equation incorporating linear sorption is also investigated. It is found here that not only are transfer functions of solutes consistent with any mechanistic three-dimensional (3-D) model of convection dispersion, but also that they are, under limit conditions, the product of the travel time distribution of the carrier flow with a bounded continuous function. The latter is the solution to an initial value problem which results from solving the general 3-D differential equations of convection dispersion with sorption under some simplifying assumptions, and formally coincides with the resident concentration included (as an assumption) in the original MRF formulation. Travel time distributions and MRFs underlain by statistical constraints rather than by dynamical models are proposed. Non-Gaussian distributions are studied by statistical-mechanical tools and are found to represent the norm, rather than the exception, in this formulation of transport of reactive solutes. The concepts are applied to a field study and are shown to yield reliable models of solute

  6. UNCOVERING DRIVERS OF DISK ASSEMBLY: BULGELESS GALAXIES AND THE STELLAR MASS TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Sarah H.; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine what processes govern the assembly history of galaxies with rotating disks, we examine the stellar mass Tully-Fisher (TF) relation over a wide range in redshift partitioned according to whether or not galaxies contain a prominent bulge. Using our earlier Keck spectroscopic sample, for which bulge/total parameters are available from analyses of Hubble Space Telescope images, we find that bulgeless disk galaxies with z > 0.8 present a significant offset from the local (TF) relation whereas, at all redshifts probed, those with significant bulges fall along the local relation. Our results support the suggestion that bulge growth may somehow expedite the maturing of disk galaxies onto the (TF) relation. We discuss a variety of physical hypotheses that may explain this result in the context of kinematic observations of star-forming galaxies at redshifts z = 0 and z > 2.

  7. Absolute masses and radii determination in multiplanetary systems without stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Mardling, R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Damiani, C.; Bruno, G.; Bonfils, X.; Deleuil, M.

    2015-11-01

    The masses and radii of extrasolar planets are key observables for understanding their interior, formation and evolution. While transit photometry and Doppler spectroscopy are used to measure the radii and masses respectively of planets relative to those of their host star, estimates for the true values of these quantities rely on theoretical models of the host star which are known to suffer from systematic differences with observations. When a system is composed of more than two bodies, extra information is contained in the transit photometry and radial velocity data. Velocity information (finite speed-of-light, Doppler) is needed to break the Newtonian MR-3 degeneracy. We performed a photodynamical modelling of the two-planet transiting system Kepler-117 using all photometric and spectroscopic data available. We demonstrate how absolute masses and radii of single-star planetary systems can be obtained without resorting to stellar models. Limited by the precision of available radial velocities (38 m s-1), we achieve accuracies of 20 per cent in the radii and 70 per cent in the masses, while simulated 1 m s-1 precision radial velocities lower these to 1 per cent for the radii and 2 per cent for the masses. Since transiting multiplanet systems are common, this technique can be used to measure precisely the mass and radius of a large sample of stars and planets. We anticipate these measurements will become common when the TESS and PLATO mission provide high-precision light curves of a large sample of bright stars. These determinations will improve our knowledge about stars and planets, and provide strong constraints on theoretical models.

  8. The dwarfs beyond: The stellar-to-halo mass relation for a new sample of intermediate redshift low-mass galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Sarah H.; Ellis, Richard S.; Newman, Andrew B.; Benson, Andrew

    2014-02-20

    A number of recent challenges to the standard ΛCDM paradigm relate to discrepancies that arise in comparing the abundance and kinematics of local dwarf galaxies with the predictions of numerical simulations. Such arguments rely heavily on the assumption that the Local Volume's dwarf and satellite galaxies form a representative distribution in terms of their stellar-to-halo mass ratios. To address this question, we present new, deep spectroscopy using DEIMOS on Keck for 82 low-mass (10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}), star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 1). For 50% of these we are able to determine resolved rotation curves using nebular emission lines and thereby construct the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation to masses as low as 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. Using scaling relations determined from weak lensing data, we convert this to a stellar-to-halo mass relation for comparison with abundance matching predictions. We find a discrepancy between our observations and the predictions from abundance matching in the sense that we observe 3-12 times more stellar mass at a given halo mass. We suggest possible reasons for this discrepancy, as well as improved tests for the future.

  9. ON THE INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT CENTRAL STELLAR MASS-HALO MASS RELATION, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF THE MOST MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Francesco; Buchan, Stewart; Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Bouillot, Vincent; Rettura, Alessandro; Meert, Alan; Bernardi, Mariangela; Sheth, Ravi; Vikram, Vinu; Kravtsov, Andrey; Marchesini, Danilo; Behroozi, Peter; Maraston, Claudia; Capozzi, Diego; Ascaso, Begoña; Huertas-Company, Marc; Lemaux, Brian C.; Gal, Roy R.; Lubin, Lori M.; and others

    2014-12-20

    The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain under debate. Several recent works support a relation in the local universe steeper than previously thought. Based on comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z ∼ 1 for stellar masses M {sub star} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of β ≳ 0.35-0.70 instead of the usual β ≲ 0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (≲ 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for M {sub star} > 3 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z ∼ 1.

  10. On the Intermediate-redshift Central Stellar Mass-Halo Mass Relation, and Implications for the Evolution of the Most Massive Galaxies Since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Guo, Hong; Bouillot, Vincent; Rettura, Alessandro; Meert, Alan; Buchan, Stewart; Kravtsov, Andrey; Bernardi, Mariangela; Sheth, Ravi; Vikram, Vinu; Marchesini, Danilo; Behroozi, Peter; Zheng, Zheng; Maraston, Claudia; Ascaso, Begoña; Lemaux, Brian C.; Capozzi, Diego; Huertas-Company, Marc; Gal, Roy R.; Lubin, Lori M.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Carollo, Marcella; Cattaneo, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain under debate. Several recent works support a relation in the local universe steeper than previously thought. Based on comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z ~ 1 for stellar masses M star >~ 2 × 1011 M ⊙. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of β >~ 0.35-0.70 instead of the usual β <~ 0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (lsim 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for M star > 3 × 1011 M ⊙, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z ~ 1.

  11. The Luminosity Function and Radial Profile of the Stellar Population in the Core of 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paresce, F.; de Marchi, G.; Jedrzejewski, R.; Gilliland, R.; Stratta, M. G.

    1994-12-01

    The core of the galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae was observed by the Faint Object Camera on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope for the first time through narrow band F253M and F346M filters centered at 253 nm and 346 nm. A total of 511 stars down to the detection limit at m346 =~ 24 in the 7('') times 7('') field were accurately placed on a m346 vs m253-m346 color magnitude diagram to characterize the stellar populations in the core. Approximately 100 objects above and to the right of the main sequence turn-off are the same as those classified earlier with the aberrated HST but the rest below it are new objects seen now for the first time thanks to the substantial improvement in sensitivity. The new objects form a well defined main sequence whose luminosity function turns over dramatically at m346 =~ 20 well before the completeness limit and well before the end of the slowly increasing luminosity function for the outer fields measured from the ground by Hesser et al. (1987). We interpret this premature drop in the number of stars below ~ 0.7 M_sun in the core as the effect of mass segregation due to two body relaxation. The position of 9 objects in the range 20< m346<24 and -1.5function. We have also analyzed very deep frames of the core of 47 Tuc obtained with the WFPC1 before refurbishment in the U band to study with the highest possible accuracy the radial profile of stellar density around the geometrical center of the cluster. This data set fully confirms and extends further the results published by Calzetti et al. (1993) that showed that the radial density profile of 47 Tuc is not consistent with a King model of core radius 25('') extending all the way to the center but requires a central density enhancement of radius ~ 8('') = 0.02 parsec superimposed on the former. This result provides fresh evidence that this cluster may have suffered

  12. What stellar populations can tell us about the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation in SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Gomes, J. M.; Schlickmann, M.; Mateus, A.; Schoenell, W.

    2010-04-01

    During the last three decades, many papers have reported the existence of a luminosity metallicity or mass metallicity (M-Z) relation for all kinds of galaxies: The more massive galaxies are also the ones with more metal-rich interstellar medium. We have obtained the mass-metallicity relation at different lookback times for the same set of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using the stellar metallicities estimated with our spectral synthesis code starlight. Using stellar metallicities has several advantages: We are free of the biases that affect the calibration of nebular metallicities; we can include in our study objects for which the nebular metallicity cannot be measured, such as AGN hosts and passive galaxies; we can probe metallicities at different epochs of a galaxy evolution. We have found that the M-Z relation steepens and spans a wider range in both mass and metallicity at higher redshifts for SDSS galaxies. We also have modeled the time evolution of stellar metallicity with a closed-box chemical evolution model, for galaxies of different types and masses. Our results suggest that the M-Z relation for galaxies with present-day stellar masses down to 1010 M⊙ is mainly driven by the star formation history and not by inflows or outflows.

  13. MODEL-INDEPENDENT STELLAR AND PLANETARY MASSES FROM MULTI-TRANSITING EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Johnson, John Asher

    2013-01-10

    Precise exoplanet characterization requires precise classification of exoplanet host stars. The masses of host stars are commonly estimated by comparing their spectra to those predicted by stellar evolution models. However, spectroscopically determined properties are difficult to measure accurately for stars that are substantially different from the Sun, such as M-dwarfs and evolved stars. Here, we propose a new method to dynamically measure the masses of transiting planets near mean-motion resonances and their host stars by combining observations of transit timing variations with radial velocity (RV) measurements. We derive expressions to analytically determine the mass of each member of the system and demonstrate the technique on the Kepler-18 system. We compare these analytic results to numerical simulations and find that the two are consistent. We identify eight systems for which our technique could be applied if follow-up RV measurements are collected. We conclude that this analysis would be optimal for systems discovered by next-generation missions similar to TESS or PLATO, which will target bright stars that are amenable to efficient RV follow-up.

  14. Improved Constraints on the Milky Way’s Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass from Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licquia, Timothy; Newman, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method for improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by building upon the previous measurements found in the literature, combining the information contained in each of them using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical analysis that allows us to account for the possibility that any one of them may be incorrect or have underestimated its errors. In this application, the HB method yields similar estimates to a weighted average, but with more realistic error estimates. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about potential problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields a SFR for the Galaxy of 1.66 ± 0.20 M⊙ yr-1. When calculating the stellar mass contained in each component of the Milky Way, we incorporate Monte Carlo simulations to reflect the latest estimates of the galactocentric radius of the sun and stellar mass surface density of the local neighborhood. We show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is M*B = 0.91 ± 0.08 × 1010 M⊙, the disk mass is M*D = 4.89+0.98-0.82 × 1010 M⊙, and their combination yields a total stellar mass of M* = 5.76+0.98-0.82 × 1010 M⊙. This work displays the advantage of using HB meta-analysis to robustly combine a set of measurements that are prone to numerous systematic errors, while simultaneously providing information on the level of systematics that may be having an impact.

  15. THE LUMINOSITY AND MASS FUNCTIONS OF LOW-MASS STARS IN THE GALACTIC DISK. II. THE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Covey, Kevin R.; West, Andrew A.; Reid, I. Neill; Golimowski, David A.

    2010-06-15

    We report on new measurements of the luminosity function (LF) and mass function (MF) of field low-mass dwarfs derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 photometry. The analysis incorporates {approx}15 million low-mass stars (0.1 M{sub sun}< M < 0.8 M{sub sun}), spread over 8400 deg{sup 2}. Stellar distances are estimated using new photometric parallax relations, constructed from ugriz photometry of nearby low-mass stars with trigonometric parallaxes. We use a technique that simultaneously measures Galactic structure and the stellar LF from 7 < M{sub r} < 16. We compare the LF to previous studies and convert to an MF using the mass-luminosity relations of Delfosse et al. The system MF, measured over -1.0< log M/M{sub sun} <-0.1, is well described by a lognormal distribution with M{sub o} = 0.25 M{sub sun}. We stress that our results should not be extrapolated to other mass regimes. Our work generally agrees with prior low-mass stellar MFs and places strong constraints on future theoretical star formation studies.

  16. A calibration of the stellar mass fundamental plane at z ∼ 0.5 using the micro-lensing-induced flux ratio anomalies of macro-lensed quasars {sup ,} {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, Paul L.; Pooley, David; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    We measure the stellar mass surface densities of early-type galaxies by observing the micro-lensing of macro-lensed quasars caused by individual stars, including stellar remnants, brown dwarfs, and red dwarfs too faint to produce photometric or spectroscopic signatures. Instead of observing multiple micro-lensing events in a single system, we combine single-epoch X-ray snapshots of 10 quadruple systems, and compare the measured relative magnifications for the images with those computed from macro-models. We use these to normalize a stellar mass fundamental plane constructed using a Salpeter initial mass function with a low-mass cutoff of 0.1 M {sub ☉} and treat the zeropoint of the surface mass density as a free parameter. Our method measures the graininess of the gravitational potential produced by individual stars, in contrast to methods that decompose a smooth total gravitational potential into two smooth components, one stellar and one dark. We find the median likelihood value for the normalization factor F by which the Salpeter stellar masses must be multiplied is 1.23, with a one sigma confidence range, dominated by small number statistics, of 0.77

  17. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  18. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) . Luminosity and stellar mass dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.5 < z < 1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, F.; Bolzonella, M.; Branchini, E.; Davidzon, I.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; Moscardini, L.; Pollo, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We investigate the dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and stellar mass in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.1, using the first ~ 55 000 redshifts from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Methods: We measured the redshift-space two-point correlation functions (2PCF), ξ(s) and ξ(rp,π) , and the projected correlation function, wp(rp), in samples covering different ranges of B-band absolute magnitudes and stellar masses. We considered both threshold and binned galaxy samples, with median B-band absolute magnitudes - 21.6 ≲ MB - 5log (h) ≲ - 19.5 and median stellar masses 9.8 ≲ log (M⋆ [h-2 M⊙]) ≲ 10.7. We assessed the real-space clustering in the data from the projected correlation function, which we model as a power law in the range 0.2 < rp [h-1 Mpc ] < 20. Finally, we estimated the galaxy bias as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift, assuming a flat Λ cold dark matter model to derive the dark matter 2PCF. Results: We provide the best-fit parameters of the power-law model assumed for the real-space 2PCF - the correlation length, r0, and the slope, γ - as well as the linear bias parameter, as a function of the B-band absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and redshift. We confirm and provide the tightest constraints on the dependence of clustering on luminosity at 0.5 < z < 1.1. We prove the complexity of comparing the clustering dependence on stellar mass from samples that are originally flux-limited and discuss the possible origin of the observed discrepancies. Overall, our measurements provide stronger constraints on galaxy formation models, which are now required to match, in addition to local observations, the clustering evolution measured by VIPERS galaxies between z = 0.5 and z = 1.1 for a broad range of luminosities and stellar masses. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, under programmes 182.A-0886 (LP) at the Very Large Telescope, and also based on

  19. The Dependence of Stellar Mass and Angular Momentum Losses on Latitude and the Interaction of Active Region and Dipolar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2015-11-01

    Rotation evolution of late-type stars is dominated by magnetic braking and the underlying factors that control this angular momentum loss are important for the study of stellar spin-down. In this work, we study angular momentum loss as a function of two different aspects of magnetic activity using a calibrated Alfvén wave-driven magnetohydrodynamic wind model: the strengths of magnetic spots and their distribution in latitude. By driving the model using solar and modified solar surface magnetograms, we show that the topology of the field arising from the net interaction of both small-scale and large-scale field is important for spin-down rates and that angular momentum loss is not a simple function of large scale magnetic field strength. We find that changing the latitude of magnetic spots can modify mass and angular momentum loss rates by a factor of two. The general effect that causes these differences is the closing down of large-scale open field at mid- and high-latitudes by the addition of the small-scale field. These effects might give rise to modulation of mass and angular momentum loss through stellar cycles, and present a problem for ab initio attempts to predict stellar spin-down based on wind models. For all the magnetogram cases considered here, from dipoles to various spotted distributions, we find that angular momentum loss is dominated by the mass loss at mid-latitudes. The spin-down torque applied by magnetized winds therefore acts at specific latitudes and is not evenly distributed over the stellar surface, though this aspect is unlikely to be important for understanding spin-down and surface flows on stars.

  20. STELLAR MASS-GAP AS A PROBE OF HALO ASSEMBLY HISTORY AND CONCENTRATION: YOUTH HIDDEN AMONG OLD FOSSILS

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, A. J.; Conroy, C.; Wetzel, A. R.; Tinker, J. L.

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the use of the halo mass-gap statistic—defined as the logarithmic difference in mass between the host halo and its most massive satellite subhalo—as a probe of halo age and concentration. A cosmological N-body simulation is used to study N ∼ 25, 000 group/cluster-sized halos in the mass range 10{sup 12.5} < M{sub halo}/M{sub ☉} < 10{sup 14.5}. In agreement with previous work, we find that halo mass-gap is related to halo formation time and concentration. On average, older and more highly concentrated halos have larger halo mass-gaps, and this trend is stronger than the mass-concentration relation over a similar dynamic range. However, there is a large amount of scatter owing to the transitory nature of the satellite subhalo population, which limits the use of the halo mass-gap statistic on an object-by-object basis. For example, we find that 20% of very large halo mass-gap systems (akin to {sup f}ossil groups{sup )} are young and have likely experienced a recent merger between a massive satellite subhalo and the central subhalo. We relate halo mass-gap to the observable stellar mass-gap via abundance matching. Using a galaxy group catalog constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we find that the star formation and structural properties of galaxies at fixed mass show no trend with stellar mass-gap. This is despite a variation in halo age of ≈2.5 Gyr over ≈1.2 dex in stellar mass-gap. Thus, we find no evidence to suggest that the halo formation history significantly affects galaxy properties.

  1. Using modern stellar observables to constrain stellar parameters and the physics of the stellar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.

    2014-05-01

    The current state and future evolution of a star is, in principle, specified by a only a few physical quantities: the mass, age, hydrogen, helium, and metal abundance. These same fundamental quantities are crucial for reconstructing the history of stellar systems ranging in scale from planetary systems to galaxies. However, the fundamental parameters are rarely directly observable, and we are forced to use proxies that are not always sensitive or unique functions of the stellar parameters we wish to determine. Imprecise or inaccurate determinations of the fundamental parameters often limit our ability to draw inferences about a given system. As new technologies, instruments, and observing techniques become available, the list of viable stellar observables increases, and we can explore new links between the observables and fundamental quantities in an effort to better characterize stellar systems. In the era of missions such as Kepler, time-domain observables such as the stellar rotation period and stellar oscillations are now available for an unprecedented number of stars, and future missions promise to further expand the sample. Furthermore, despite the successes of stellar evolution models, the processes and detailed structure of the deep stellar interior remains uncertain. Even in the case of well-measured, well understood stellar observables, the link to the underlying parameters contains uncertainties due to our imperfect understanding of stellar interiors. Model uncertainties arise from sources such as the treatment of turbulent convection, transport of angular momentum and mixing, and assumptions about the physical conditions of stellar matter. By carefully examining the sensitivity of stellar observables to physical processes operating within the star and model assumptions, we can design observational tests for the theory of stellar interiors. I propose a series of tools based on new or revisited stellar observables that can be used both to constrain

  2. Water in high-mass pre- and proto-stellar cores from Hi-GAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Carina M.; Olmi, Luca; Codella, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    As a part of our on-going investigation of the earliest phases of massive star formation, we present Herschel-HIFI data of H2O, NH3 and N2H+ towards a sample of high-mass starless cores and proto-stellar objects in two galactic fields, each containing objects in different evolutionary stages. We observed 17 sources in the l = 30° galactic field, and 35 sources in the l = 59° field. The clumps in the l = 59°region have lower luminosity and mass than the l = 30° objects. We find that the sources with detections have much higher mean luminosities than compared to the sources with no detection of any line, but the mean masses are similar. Most sources with detections are proto-stellar, and at least two of the detected sources in the l = 59° region are in a more advanced stage of evolution. For the l = 30° sources no preferential evolutionary phase is evident. None of these sources, however, appear to belong to the late phase of envelope dispersal.The detections show complex line shapes from the protostellar envelopes, molecular outflows and infall. All detections in the l = 59° field show similar water line profiles with broad outflows, whereas towards l = 30° no outflows are detected and all sources display very different line shapes. Both water and ammonia are also often self-absorbed, sometimes saturated, and some sources show an inverse or a regular P-Cygni line profile. N2H+ do not exhibit line asymmetries or absorption. The integrated intensities of the three lines are correlated, and we also find correlations between the water line luminosity and continuum temperature. The typical water luminosity towards the l = 30° sources is lower than compared to l = 59° sources, but their continuum temperature is higher, which may suggest a later evolutionary stage.In the sight-lines towards 11 sources in the l = 30° field, among which four have no detections in the star-forming regions, we also detect H2O and NH3 in absorption from interstellar gas. Since

  3. SEARCH FOR IONIZED JETS TOWARD HIGH-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, Andres E.; Garay, Guido; Brooks, Kate J.; Voronkov, Maxim A.

    2012-07-01

    We are carrying out multi-frequency radio continuum observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, to systematically search for collimated ionized jets toward high-mass young stellar objects (HMYSOs). Here we report observations at 1.4, 2.4, 4.8, and 8.6 GHz, made with angular resolutions of about 7'', 4'', 2'', and 1'', respectively, toward six objects of a sample of 33 southern HMYSOs thought to be in very early stages of evolution. The objects in the sample were selected from radio and infrared catalogs by having positive radio spectral indices and being luminous (L{sub bol} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }), but underluminous in radio emission compared with that expected from its bolometric luminosity. This criterion makes the radio sources good candidates for being ionized jets. As part of this systematic search, two ionized jets have been discovered: one previously published and the other reported here. The rest of the observed candidates correspond to three hypercompact H II regions and two ultracompact H II regions. The two jets discovered are associated with two of the most luminous (7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} and 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} L{sub Sun }) HMYSOs known to harbor this type of object, showing that the phenomena of collimated ionized winds appear in the formation process of stars at least up to masses of {approx}20 M{sub Sun} and provide strong evidence for a disk-mediated accretion scenario for the formation of high-mass stars. From the incidence of jets in our sample, we estimate that the jet phase in high-mass protostars lasts for {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} yr.

  4. The DiskMass Survey. VI. Gas and stellar kinematics in spiral galaxies from PPak integral-field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2013-09-01

    We present ionized-gas ([Oiii]λ5007 Å) and stellar kinematics (velocities and velocity dispersions) for 30 nearly face-on spiral galaxies out to as many as three K-band disk scale lengths (hR). These data have been derived from PPak integral-field-unit spectroscopy from 4980-5370 Å observed at a mean resolution of λ/Δλ = 7700 (σinst = 17 km s-1). These data are a fundamental product of our survey and will be used in companion papers to, e.g., derive the detailed (baryonic+dark) mass budget of each galaxy in our sample. Our presentation provides a comprehensive description of the observing strategy and data reduction, including a robust measurement and removal of shift, scale, and rotation effects in the data due to instrumental flexure. Using an in-plane coordinate system determined by fitting circular-speed curves to our velocity fields, we derive azimuthally averaged rotation curves and line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σLOS) and luminosity profiles for both the stars and [Oiii]-emitting gas. Along with a clear presentation of the data, we demonstrate: (1) The [Oiii] and stellar rotation curves exhibit a clear signature of asymmetric drift with a rotation difference that is 11% of the maximum rotation speed of the galaxy disk, comparable to measurements in the solar neighborhood in the Milky Way. (2) The e-folding length of the stellar velocity dispersion (hσ) is 2hR on average, as expected for a disk with a constant scale height and mass-to-light ratio, with a scatter that is notably smaller for massive, high-surface-brightness disks in the most luminous galaxies. (3) At radii larger than 1.5hR, σLOS tends to decline slower than the best-fitting exponential function, which may be due to an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, disk flaring, or disk heating by the dark-matter halo. (4) A strong correlation exists between the central vertical stellar velocity dispersion of the disks (σz,0) and their circular rotational speed at 2.2hR (V2.2h

  5. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disc morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Masters, Karen L.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O. Ivy; Nichol, Robert C.; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-05-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate (SFR) relation in star-forming disc galaxies at z ≤ 0.085, using Galaxy Zoo morphologies to examine different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. We examine the number of spiral arms, their relative pitch angle, and the presence of a galactic bar in the disc, and show that both the slope and dispersion of the M⋆-SFR relation is constant when varying all the above parameters. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by ˜0.3 dex; this is significantly smaller than the increase seen in merging systems at z > 1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M⋆-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50 per cent are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  6. Diffuse supernova neutrinos: oscillation effects, stellar cooling and progenitor mass dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Tamborra, Irene E-mail: tamborra@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) using the recent progenitor-dependent, long-term supernova simulations from the Basel group and including neutrino oscillations at several post-bounce times. Assuming multi-angle matter suppression of collective effects during the accretion phase, we find that oscillation effects are dominated by the matter-driven MSW resonances, while neutrino-neutrino collective effects contribute at the 5–10% level. The impact of the neutrino mass hierarchy, of the time-dependent neutrino spectra and of the diverse progenitor star population is 10% or less, small compared to the uncertainty of at least 25% of the normalization of the supernova rate. Therefore, assuming that the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy will be determined within the next decade, the future detection of the DSNB will deliver approximate information on the MSW-oscillated neutrino spectra. With a reliable model for neutrino emission, its detection will be a powerful instrument to provide complementary information on the star formation rate and for learning about stellar physics.

  7. Bright radio emission from an ultraluminous stellar-mass microquasar in M 31.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Matthew J; Miller-Jones, James C A; Markoff, Sera; Fender, Rob; Henze, Martin; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Scaife, Anna M M; Roberts, Timothy P; Walton, Dominic; Carpenter, John; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Bower, Geoffrey C; Gurwell, Mark; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Haberl, Frank; Harris, Jonathan; Daniel, Michael; Miah, Junayd; Done, Chris; Morgan, John S; Dickinson, Hugh; Charles, Phil; Burwitz, Vadim; Della Valle, Massimo; Freyberg, Michael; Greiner, Jochen; Hernanz, Margarita; Hartmann, Dieter H; Hatzidimitriou, Despina; Riffeser, Arno; Sala, Gloria; Seitz, Stella; Reig, Pablo; Rau, Arne; Orio, Marina; Titterington, David; Grainge, Keith

    2013-01-10

    A subset of ultraluminous X-ray sources (those with luminosities of less than 10(40) erg s(-1); ref. 1) are thought to be powered by the accretion of gas onto black holes with masses of ∼5-20M cicled dot, probably by means of an accretion disk. The X-ray and radio emission are coupled in such Galactic sources; the radio emission originates in a relativistic jet thought to be launched from the innermost regions near the black hole, with the most powerful emission occurring when the rate of infalling matter approaches a theoretical maximum (the Eddington limit). Only four such maximal sources are known in the Milky Way, and the absorption of soft X-rays in the interstellar medium hinders the determination of the causal sequence of events that leads to the ejection of the jet. Here we report radio and X-ray observations of a bright new X-ray source in the nearby galaxy M 31, whose peak luminosity exceeded 10(39) erg s(-1). The radio luminosity is extremely high and shows variability on a timescale of tens of minutes, arguing that the source is highly compact and powered by accretion close to the Eddington limit onto a black hole of stellar mass. Continued radio and X-ray monitoring of such sources should reveal the causal relationship between the accretion flow and the powerful jet emission. PMID:23235823

  8. Observations of Relativistically Broadened Iron Kalpha Lines From Stellar Mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of Doppler broadened and gravitationally redshifted iron emission lines from accreting black holes has been used to measure the inner radius of the optically thick disk (Rin). At high mass accretion rates, when the disk is at or close to the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO), a determination of Rin provides a constraint on the spin of the black hole. Measuring Rin can also provide information about whether the disk is truncated or not, and this is especially important for understanding the relationship between the disk and the steady jet in the hard state. Over the past few years, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has provided improved measurements due to its combination of bandpass (3-79 keV), good energy resolution, and high throughput. In this presentation, we discuss NuSTAR results for a number of stellar mass black holes (e.g., Cyg X-1, GX 339-4, and GRS 1739-278). While these observations have been successful in obtaining measurements of Rin, the improved spectra have also provided extra information about the source geometry and the inner disk inclination, which we will discuss.

  9. Ultra-diffuse Galaxies in Clusters and the Field: Masses and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron; Laine, Seppo; Krick, Jessica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Villaume, Alexa; Brodie, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) were recognized only last year as a novel class of galaxies, with luminosities like dwarfs but sizes like giants. Although some UDGs appear to be just unusually extended dwarfs, others show evidence of being very different and unexpected: their dark matter halos are overmassive by factors of ~10, with one UDG even being arguably a 'failed Milky Way.' These exotic galaxies might be a byproduct of environmental processes within galaxy clusters, but UDGs have also now been found in the field. It is crucial for understanding their origins to test if UDGs have the same properties in cluster and field environments. Here we propose studying the stellar populations (ages and metallicities) of seven UDGs using Spitzer/IRAC 3.6- and 4.5-micron imaging combined with optical photometry, along with mass estimation of three of the UDGs using HST/ACS imaging to provide globular cluster number counts and colors (proxies for halo mass). This ultra low surface brightness photometry in the near infrared, on an important new class of galaxies, could become a legacy result from the Spitzer mission.

  10. The SDSS-2MASS-WISE 10-dimensional stellar colour locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezić, Željko; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruan, John J.; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas M.; Covey, Kevin R.; Lewis, Alexia R.; AlSayyad, Yusra; Anderson, Lauren M.

    2014-06-01

    We present the fiducial main-sequence stellar locus traced by 10 photometric colours observed by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Median colours are determined using 1052 793 stars with r-band extinction less than 0.125. We use this locus to measure the dust extinction curve relative to the r band, which is consistent with previous measurements in the SDSS and 2MASS bands. The WISE band extinction coefficients are larger than predicted by standard extinction models. Using 13 lines of sight, we find variations in the extinction curve in H, Ks, and WISE bandpasses. Relative extinction decreases towards Galactic anticentre, in agreement with prior studies. Relative extinction increases with Galactic latitude, in contrast to previous observations. This indicates a universal mid-IR extinction law does not exist due to variations in dust grain size and chemistry with Galactocentric position. A preliminary search for outliers due to warm circumstellar dust is also presented, using stars with high signal-to-noise ratio in the W3 band. We find 199 such outliers, identified by excess emission in Ks - W3. Inspection of SDSS images for these outliers reveals a large number of contaminants due to nearby galaxies. Six sources appear to be genuine dust candidates, yielding a fraction of systems with infrared excess of 0.12 ± 0.05 per cent.

  11. A process of stellar nucleosynthesis which mimicks mass fractionation in P-xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.

    1980-01-01

    The combination of the O-shell theory of Heymann and Dziczkaniec and the supernova theory of Woosley and Howard clearly identifies the astrophysical sites for the formation of the anomalous light Xe component in carbonaceous chondrites. These sites are the O- and Ne-shells, and possibly C-shell of a massive star. Most of the Xe-124 and Xe-126 are formed in the O-shell during hydrostatic core silicon-burning, when a seed of heavy nuclei is exposed to an effective temperature near T9 = 2.0. Xe-128 is formed via Ba-128 in the O-shell, but the amounts appear too small to satisfy the deduced Xe-128/Xe-124 and Xe-128/Xe-126 yield ratios from the chondrites. However, substantial amounts of Xe-128 can be formed in the adjacent Ne- and C-shells during the explosion. The formation of Ba-128 in the O-shell would increase if the (gamma, alpha) photodisintegration rate in Ba-128 is actually smaller than calculated by Woosley and Howard. Lewis et al. have proposed that the anomalous light Xe component is mass-fractionated normal Xe. It is in this sense that the process of stellar nucleosynthesis of the present paper mimicks mass-fractionation.

  12. On the shoulders of giants: properties of the stellar halo and the Milky Way mass distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kafle, Prajwal Raj; Sharma, Sanjib; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2014-10-10

    Halo stars orbit within the potential of the Milky Way, and hence their kinematics can be used to understand the underlying mass distribution. However, the inferred mass distribution depends sensitively on assumptions made on the density and the velocity anisotropy profiles of the tracer population. Also, there is a degeneracy between the parameters of the halo and those of the disk or bulge. Most previous attempts that use halo stars have made arbitrary assumptions about these. In this paper, we decompose the Galaxy into three major components—a bulge, a Miyamoto-Nagai disk, and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo - and then model the kinematic data of the halo blue horizontal branch and K-giant stars from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration. Additionally, we use the gas terminal velocity curve and the Sgr A* proper motion. With the distance of the Sun from the center of the Galaxy R {sub ☉} = 8.5 kpc, our kinematic analysis reveals that the density of the stellar halo has a break at 17.2{sub −1.0}{sup +1.1} kpc and an exponential cutoff in the outer parts starting at 97.7{sub −15.8}{sup +15.6} kpc. Also, we find that the tracer velocity anisotropy is radially biased with β {sub s} = 0.4 ± 0.2 in the outer halo. We measure halo virial mass M {sub vir} to be 0.80{sub −0.16}{sup +0.31}×10{sup 12} M{sub ⊙}, concentration c to be 21.1{sub −8.3}{sup +14.8}, disk mass to be 0.95{sub −0.30}{sup +0.24}×10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙}, disk scale length to be 4.9{sub −0.4}{sup +0.4} kpc, and bulge mass to be 0.91{sub −0.38}{sup +0.31}×10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}. The halo mass is found to be small, and this has important consequences. The giant stars reveal that the outermost halo stars have low velocity dispersion, but interestingly this suggests a truncation of the stellar halo density rather than a small overall mass of the Galaxy. Our estimates of local escape velocity v{sub esc}=550.9{sub −22.1}{sup +32.4} km s{sup −1} and

  13. Homogeneous spectroscopic parameters for bright planet host stars from the northern hemisphere . The impact on stellar and planetary mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Mortier, A.; Tsantaki, M.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Neves, V.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: In this work we derive new precise and homogeneous parameters for 37 stars with planets. For this purpose, we analyze high resolution spectra obtained by the NARVAL spectrograph for a sample composed of bright planet host stars in the northern hemisphere. The new parameters are included in the SWEET-Cat online catalogue. Methods: To ensure that the catalogue is homogeneous, we use our standard spectroscopic analysis procedure, ARES+MOOG, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. These spectroscopic stellar parameters are then used as input to compute the stellar mass and radius, which are fundamental for the derivation of the planetary mass and radius. Results: We show that the spectroscopic parameters, masses, and radii are generally in good agreement with the values available in online databases of exoplanets. There are some exceptions, especially for the evolved stars. These are analyzed in detail focusing on the effect of the stellar mass on the derived planetary mass. Conclusions: We conclude that the stellar mass estimations for giant stars should be managed with extreme caution when using them to compute the planetary masses. We report examples within this sample where the differences in planetary mass can be as high as 100% in the most extreme cases. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées and the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France (Run ID L131N11 - OPTICON_2013A_027).

  14. Failed supernovae explain the compact remnant mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2014-04-10

    One explanation for the absence of higher mass red supergiants (16.5 M {sub ☉} ≲ M ≲ 25 M {sub ☉}) as the progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) is that they die in failed SNe creating black holes. Simulations show that such failed SNe still eject their hydrogen envelopes in a weak transient, leaving a black hole with the mass of the star's helium core (5-8 M {sub ☉}). Here we show that this naturally explains the typical masses of observed black holes and the gap between neutron star and black hole masses without any fine-tuning of stellar mass loss, binary mass transfer, or the SN mechanism, beyond having it fail in a mass range where many progenitor models have density structures that make the explosions more likely to fail. There is no difficulty including this ∼20% population of failed SNe in any accounting of SN types over the progenitor mass function. And, other than patience, there is no observational barrier to either detecting these black hole formation events or limiting their rates to be well below this prediction.

  15. On the Inconsistency between Cosmic Stellar Mass Density and Star Formation Rate up to z ∼ 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density (SMD) and instantaneous star formation rate in the redshift range 0 < z < 8 using a large observational data sample. We first compile the measurements of SMDs up to z ∼ 8. Comparing the observed SMDs with the time-integral of instantaneous star formation history (SFH), we find that the observed SMDs are lower than that implied from the SFH at z < 4. We also use the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to derive the best-fitting SFH from the observed SMD data. At 0.5 < z < 6, the observed star formation rate densities are larger than the best-fitting one, especially at z ∼ 2 where they are larger by a factor of about two. However, at lower (z < 0.5) and higher redshifts (z > 6), the derived SFH is consistent with the observations. This is the first time that the discrepancy between the observed SMD and instantaneous star formation rate has been tested up to very high redshift z ≈ 8 using the MCMC method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of SMD, initial mass function, and evolution of cosmic metallicity.

  16. Observational Constraints on Stellar Flares and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    Multi-wavelength surveys have catalogued a wealth of stellar flare data for stars representing a broad range of masses and ages. Young solar analogs inform our understanding of the Sun's evolution and the influence of its activity on early solar system formation, while field star observations allow us to place its current activity into context within a statistical ensemble of main-sequence G-type stars. At the same time, stellar observations probe a variety of interior and coronal conditions, providing constraints on models of equilibrium (and loss thereof!) for magnetic structures. In this review, I will focus on our current understanding of stellar flares, prominences, and coronal mass ejections as a function of stellar parameters. As our interpretation of stellar data relies heavily on solar-stellar analogy, I will explore how far into extreme stellar parameter spaces this comparison can be invoked.

  17. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joe; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Godfrey, Paige A.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    The physical and atmospheric properties of ultracool dwarfs are deeply entangled due to the degenerate effects of mass, age, metallicity, clouds and dust, activity, rotation, and possibly even formation mechanism on observed spectra. Accurate determination of fundamental parameters for a wide diversity of objects at the low end of the IMF is thus crucial to testing stellar and planetary formation theories. To determine these quantities, we constructed and flux calibrated nearly-complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 221 M, L, T, and Y dwarfs using published parallaxes and 0.3-40 μm spectra and photometry. From these homogeneous SEDs, we calculated bolometric luminosity (Lbol), effective temperature (Teff), mass, surface gravity, radius, spectral indexes, synthetic photometry, and bolometric corrections (BCs) for each object. We used these results to derive Lbol, Teff, and BC polynomial relations across the entire very-low-mass star/brown dwarf/planetary mass regime. We use a subsample of objects with age constraints based on nearby young moving group membership, companionship with a young star, or spectral signatures of low surface gravity to define new age-sensitive diagnostics and characterize the reddening of young substellar atmospheres as a redistribution of flux from the near-infrared into the mid-infrared. Consequently we find the SED flux pivots at Ks band, making BCKs as a function of spectral type a tight and age independent relationship. We find that young L dwarfs are systematically 300 K cooler than field age objects of the same spectral type and up to 600 K cooler than field age objects of the same absolute H magnitude. Finally, we present preliminary comparisons of these empirical results to best fit parameters from four different model atmosphere grids via Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis in order to create prescriptions for the reliable and efficient characterization of new ultracool dwarfs.

  18. Very Low Mass Stellar and Substellar Companions to Solar-like Stars from MARVELS. I. A Low-mass Ratio Stellar Companion to TYC 4110-01037-1 in a 79 Day Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, John P.; Ge, Jian; Crepp, Justin R.; De Lee, Nathan; Eastman, Jason; Esposito, Massimiliano; Fleming, Scott W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Ghezzi, Luan; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I.; Lee, Brian L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Agol, Eric; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Barnes, Rory; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Cargile, Phillip; Chang, Liang; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Porto De Mello, G. F.; Femenía, Bruno; Ferreira, Leticia D.; Gary, Bruce; Hebb, Leslie; Holtzman, Jon; Liu, Jian; Ma, Bo; Mack, Claude E.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Paegert, Martin; Pan, Kaike; Pepper, Joshua; Rebolo, Rafael; Santiago, Basilio; Schneider, Donald P.; Shelden, Alaina C.; Simmons, Audrey; Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Bo

    2012-05-01

    TYC 4110-01037-1 has a low-mass stellar companion, whose small mass ratio and short orbital period are atypical among binary systems with solar-like (T eff <~ 6000 K) primary stars. Our analysis of TYC 4110-01037-1 reveals it to be a moderately aged (lsim5 Gyr) solar-like star having a mass of 1.07 ± 0.08 M ⊙ and radius of 0.99 ± 0.18 R ⊙. We analyze 32 radial velocity (RV) measurements from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey as well as 6 supporting RV measurements from the SARG spectrograph on the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo telescope obtained over a period of ~2 years. The best Keplerian orbital fit parameters were found to have a period of 78.994 ± 0.012 days, an eccentricity of 0.1095 ± 0.0023, and a semi-amplitude of 4199 ± 11 m s-1. We determine the minimum companion mass (if sin i = 1) to be 97.7 ± 5.8 M Jup. The system's companion to host star mass ratio, >=0.087 ± 0.003, places it at the lowest end of observed values for short period stellar companions to solar-like (T eff <~ 6000 K) stars. One possible way to create such a system would be if a triple-component stellar multiple broke up into a short period, low q binary during the cluster dispersal phase of its lifetime. A candidate tertiary body has been identified in the system via single-epoch, high contrast imagery. If this object is confirmed to be comoving, we estimate it would be a dM4 star. We present these results in the context of our larger-scale effort to constrain the statistics of low-mass stellar and brown dwarf companions to FGK-type stars via the MARVELS survey.

  19. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksić, J.; Annis, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Hartley, W. G.; Jeltema, T.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Suchyta, E.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.

    2016-08-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (5 filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope CLASH (17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25% of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f⋆ = (6.8 ± 1.7) × 10-3 within a radius of r200c ≃ 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both datasets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ˜100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.

  20. A prescription and fast code for the long-term evolution of star clusters - III. Unequal masses and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Poul E. R.; Gieles, Mark; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Baumgardt, Holger

    2014-08-01

    We present a new version of the fast star cluster evolution code EVOLVE ME A CLUSTER OF STARS (EMACSS). While previous versions of EMACSS reproduced clusters of single-mass stars, this version models clusters with an evolving stellar content. Stellar evolution dominates early evolution, and leads to: (1) reduction of the mean mass of stars due to the mass loss of high-mass stars; (2) expansion of the half-mass radius; (3) for (nearly) Roche Volume filling clusters, the induced escape of stars. Once sufficient relaxation has occurred (≃10 relaxation times-scales), clusters reach a second, `balanced' state whereby the core releases energy as required by the cluster as a whole. In this state: (1) stars escape due to tidal effects faster than before balanced evolution; (2) the half-mass radius expands or contracts depending on the Roche volume filling factor; and (3) the mean mass of stars increases due to the preferential ejection of low-mass stars. We compare the EMACSS results of several cluster properties against N-body simulations of clusters spanning a range of initial number of stars, mass, half-mass radius, and tidal environments, and show that our prescription accurately predicts cluster evolution for this data base. Finally, we consider applications for EMACSS, such as studies of galactic globular cluster populations in cosmological simulations.

  1. Age, Stellar Mass, and Rest-Frame UV Slope of a z ~ 11 Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan; Moustakas, Leonidas; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Moustakas, John; Postman, Marc; Zheng, Wei; Shu, XinWen; Bradley, Larry; Bouwens, Rychard; Smit, Renske; Labbe, Ivo; Zitrin, Adi; Carrasco, Mauricio; Ford, Holland; Donahue, Megan; Rosati, Piero; Kelson, Dan; Nonino, Mario; Broadhurst, Tom

    2013-10-01

    The first galaxies are the frontier of extragalactic astronomy. Hubble and Spitzer have measured the buildup of stellar mass and specific star formation rates from z ~ 8 to 4. Extending this to z > 9 with the handful of candidates discovered in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field has not been possible due to their faint observed fluxes (~10 nJy). We expect the upcoming Frontier Fields to deliver another ~35 - 120 candidates at z ~ 9 - 12. It is imperative that we learn more about their physical properties, but many will still be too faint for follow-up. Fortunately, CLASH, a shallower survey of gravitational lensing clusters, has yielded 4 much brighter z > 9 candidates, including the most distant: MACS0647-JD at z ~ 10.8 (observed 420 Myr after the Big Bang). Our primary target, lensed image MACS0647-JD2, is magnified by a factor of 7 to 170 nJy in the rest-frame UV. With an intrinsic (unlensed) flux of ~25 nJy, it is a near-analog of z > 9 candidates discovered in 'blank' (unlensed) Hubble deep fields. The existing Spitzer IRAC imaging (5 hours in each of ch1 3.6um and ch2 4.5um, PI Egami) yields no detection in ch1 but a possible (3-sigma) intriguing detection of a Balmer break / [OII] 3727A emission in ch2. Here we propose imaging 10 times deeper (50 hours in each band) to detect the object significantly in both channels and obtain the first constraints on the age, stellar mass, and rest-frame UV slope of a galaxy observed in the heart of the epoch of reionization. This imaging will also enable study of a large sample of ~30 lensed z ~ 6 - 8 candidates (far more than revealed by most other cluster lenses) with delensed intrinsic fluxes down to ~1 nJy. This study, now possible before JWST, will contribute to measurements of scatter about the 'main sequence of star formation,' constraining SFR duty cycles at these early times.

  2. NICMOS Imaging Survey of Dusty Debris Around Nearby Stars Across the Stellar Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Association of planetary systems with dusty debris disks is now quite secure, and advances in our understanding of planet formation and evolution can be achieved by the identification and characterization of an ensemble of debris disks orbiting a range of central stars with different masses and ages. Imaging debris disks in starlight scattered by dust grains remains technically challenging so that only about a dozen systems have thus far been imaged. A further advance in this field needs an increased number of imaged debris disks. However, the technical challege of such observations, even with the superb combination of HST and NICMOS, requires the best targets. Recent HST imaging investigations of debris disks were sample-limited not limited by the technology used. We performed a search for debris disks from a IRAS/Hipparcos cross correlation which involved an exhaustive background contamination check to weed out false excess stars. Out of ~140 identified debris disks, we selected 22 best targets in terms of dust optical depth and disk angular size. Our target sample represents the best currently available target set in terms of both disk brightness and resolvability. For example, our targets have higher dust optical depth, in general, than newly identified Spitzer disks. Also, our targets cover a wider range of central star ages and masses than previous debris disk surveys. This will help us to investigate planetary system formation and evolution across the stellar mass spectrum.The technical feasibility of this program in two-gyro mode guiding has been proven with on-orbit calibration and science observations during HST cycles 13, 14, and 15.

  3. Analysis of the three-dimensional stellar velocity field using vector spherical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vityazev, V. V.; Tsvetkov, A. S.

    2009-02-01

    We apply vector spherical functions to problems of stellar kinematics. Using these functions allows all of the systematic components in the stellar velocity field to be revealed without being attached to a specific physical model. Comparison of the theoretical decomposition coefficients of the equations for a particular kinematical model with observational data can provide precise information about whether the model is compatible with the observations and can reveal systematic components that are not described by this model. The formalism of vector spherical functions is particularly well suited for analyzing the present and future (e.g., GAIA) catalogs containing all three velocity vector components: the propermotions in both coordinates and the radial velocity. We show that there are systematic components in the proper motions of Hipparcos stars that cannot be interpreted in terms of the linear Ogorodnikov-Milne model. The same result is also confirmed by an analysis of the radial velocities for these stars.

  4. Reconstructing the stellar mass distributions of galaxies using S{sup 4}G IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm images. II. The conversion from light to mass

    SciTech Connect

    Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva; Van de Ven, Glenn; Querejeta, Miguel; Peletier, Reynier; Knapen, Johan H.; Cisternas, Mauricio; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Hinz, Joannah L.; De Paz, Armando Gil; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Buta, Ronald J.; Ho, Luis C.; Holwerda, Benne; and others

    2014-06-20

    We present a new approach for estimating the 3.6 μm stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratio Y{sub 3.6} in terms of the [3.6]-[4.5] colors of old stellar populations. Our approach avoids several of the largest sources of uncertainty in existing techniques using population synthesis models. By focusing on mid-IR wavelengths, we gain a virtually dust extinction-free tracer of the old stars, avoiding the need to adopt a dust model to correctly interpret optical or optical/near-IR colors normally leveraged to assign the mass-to-light ratio Y. By calibrating a new relation between near-IR and mid-IR colors of giant stars observed in GLIMPSE we also avoid the discrepancies in model predictions for the [3.6]-[4.5] colors of old stellar populations due to uncertainties in the molecular line opacities assumed in template spectra. We find that the [3.6]-[4.5] color, which is driven primarily by metallicity, provides a tight constraint on Y{sub 3.6}, which varies intrinsically less than at optical wavelengths. The uncertainty on Y{sub 3.6} of ∼0.07 dex due to unconstrained age variations marks a significant improvement on existing techniques for estimating the stellar M/L with shorter wavelength data. A single Y{sub 3.6} = 0.6 (assuming a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF)), independent of [3.6]-[4.5] color, is also feasible because it can be applied simultaneously to old, metal-rich and young, metal-poor populations, and still with comparable (or better) accuracy (∼0.1 dex) than alternatives. We expect our Y{sub 3.6} to be optimal for mapping the stellar mass distributions in S{sup 4}G galaxies, for which we have developed an independent component analysis technique to first isolate the old stellar light at 3.6 μm from nonstellar emission (e.g., hot dust and the 3.3 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature). Our estimate can also be used to determine the fractional contribution of nonstellar emission to global (rest-frame) 3.6 μm fluxes, e.g., in WISE imaging, and

  5. Breathing FIRE: How Stellar Feedback Drives Radial Migration, Rapid Size Fluctuations, and Population Gradients in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Wetzel, Andrew; Geha, Marla; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K.; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (Mstar = 2 × 106 - 5 × 1010 M⊙) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ˜1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ˜200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed Mstar. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at Mstar ≈ 107-9.6 M⊙, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  6. AGN and stellar feedback in star-forming galaxies at redshift 2 : outflows, mass-loading and quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, O.

    2016-06-01

    Galactic-scale outflows are ubiquitous in observations of star-forming galaxies, up to high redshift. Such galactic outflows are mainly generated by internal sources of feedback: young stars, supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Still, the physical origins of such outflows are not well understood, and their main driver is still debated. Up to now, most simulations take into account AGN feedback or stellar feedback but not both, because both phenomena happen on very different spatial and time scales. Most of them also still fail to reproduce all observed parameters from first principles. In this poster, we present the POGO project: Physical Origins of Galactic Outflows. With this suite of 23 simulations, we model AGN and stellar feedback simultaneously based on physical assumptions for the first time at very high resolution (6 to 1.5 pc), and investigate their impact on the outflow parameters of the host-galaxy. Here, we show that AGN and stellar feedback couple non-linearly, and that the mass-loading of the resulting outflow highly depends on the mass of the host, all the more because the coupling can either be positive (small masses) or negative (intermediate masses). Nevertheless, the main driver of the outflow remains the AGN at all masses.

  7. Measuring the Spins of Stellar-Mass Holes in X-ray Binaries, Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Jeffrey

    Relativity theory firmly predicts that an astronomical black hole is the result of the complete gravitational collapse of tens, millions or billions of solar masses of matter to a point, a conclusion that is beyond comprehension. In our Milky Way, there are an estimated 100 million ``stellar" black holes, the collapsed remnants of giant burned-out stars. The masses of 23 of these black holes, with typical masses of 10 suns, have been measured, most of them by our team during the past 25 years. These black holes are closely orbited by a normal star that trickles gas into an X-ray-hot disk of matter that encircles the black hole. During these past five years, we have succeeded in measuring the spins (or rate of rotation) of six of these same black holes. This is of fundamental importance for two reasons. First, a black hole is *totally* described by just the two numbers that specify its mass and its spin. Second, this complete description allows one to build full models of relativistic jets, supernovae, gamma-ray burst sources, etc. Our method for measuring spin is based on Einstein's prediction that their exists a smallest radius for a particle orbiting a black hole, inside of which the particle suddenly plunges into the hole. As a consequence, the inner edge of the disk of gas that encircles the black hole is truncated at this minimum radius, which depends only on the spin and the known mass of the black hole. We determine the inner radius of this disk and thereby the spin by fitting the continuous X-ray spectrum recorded by an X-ray detector to a model of the black-hole's disk that includes all relativistic effects. We propose to double our sample of black holes with measured spins from six to twelve while continuing to improve the quality of all of our spin estimates. The bulk of the requested funding will provide continued support for a postdoctoral student who leads our X-ray data analysis effort. Our work represents a new and vital use of NASA's vast HEASARC

  8. Accelerating a water maser face-on jet from a high mass young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Kazuhito; Sorai, Kazuo; Honma, Mareki; Hirota, Tomoya; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Niinuma, Kotaro; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Fujisawa, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    We report on long-term single-dish and VLBI monitoring for intermittent flare activities of a dominant blue-shifted H2O maser associated with a southern high mass young stellar object, G353.273+0.641. Bi-weekly single-dish monitoring using the Hokkaido University Tomakomai 11 m radio telescope has shown that a systematic acceleration continues over four years beyond the lifetime of individual maser features. This fact suggests that the H2O maser traces a region where molecular gas is steadily accelerated. There were five maser flares during the five years of monitoring, and maser distributions in four of them were densely monitored by VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The overall distribution of the maser features suggests the presence of a bipolar jet, with the 3D kinematics indicating that it is almost face-on (inclination angle of ˜ 8°-17° from the line of sight). Most maser features were recurrently excited within a region of 100×100 au2 around the radio continuum peak, while their spatial distributions significantly varied between each flare. This confirms that episodic propagations of outflow shocks recurrently invoke intermittent flare activities. We also measured annual parallax, deriving a source distance of 1.70^{+0.19}_{-0.16} kpc that is consistent with the commonly used photometric distance.

  9. Stellar halos around Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2016-08-01

    The Local Group is now home to 102 known galaxies and candidates, with many new faint galaxies continuing to be discovered. The total stellar mass range spanned by this population covers a factor of close to a billion, from the faintest systems with stellar masses of order a few thousand to the Milky Way and Andromeda, with stellar masses of order 1011 M ⊙. Here, I discuss the evidence for stellar halos surrounding Local Group galaxies spanning from dwarf scales (with the case of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal), though to intermediate mass systems (M33) and finishing with M31. Evidence of extended stellar populations and merging is seen across the luminosity function, indicating that the processes that lead to halo formation are common at all mass scales.

  10. From Outside-in to Inside-out: Galaxy Assembly Mode Depends on Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Li, Jinrong; Lin, Weipeng; Wang, Jing; Fan, Lulu; Kong, Xu

    2015-05-01

    In this Letter, we investigate how galaxy mass assembly mode depends on stellar mass M* using a large sample of ∼10,000 low-redshift galaxies. Our galaxy sample is selected to have SDSS {{R}90}\\gt 5\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 0, which allows the measures of both the integrated and the central NUV–r color indices. We find that in the {{M}*}–(NUV–r) green valley (GV), the {{M}*}\\lt {{10}10} {{M}ȯ } galaxies mostly have positive or flat color gradients, while most of the {{M}*}\\gt {{10}10.5} {{M}ȯ } galaxies have negative color gradients. When their central Dn4000 index values exceed 1.6, the {{M}*}\\lt {{10}10.0} {{M}ȯ } galaxies have moved to the UV red sequence, whereas a large fraction of the {{M}*}\\gt {{10}10.5} {{M}ȯ } galaxies still lie on the UV blue cloud or the GV region. We conclude that the main galaxy assembly mode is transiting from “the outside-in” mode to “the inside-out” mode at {{M}*}\\lt {{10}10} {{M}ȯ } and at {{M}*}\\gt {{10}10.5} {{M}ȯ }. We argue that the physical origin of this is the compromise between the internal and the external processes that drive the star formation quenching in galaxies. These results can be checked with the upcoming large data produced by the ongoing integral field spectroscopic survey projects, such as CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI in the near future.

  11. The evolution of host mass and black hole mass in quasi-stellar objects from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, S.; Croom, S. M.; Miller, L.; Babic, A.; Moore, D.; Brewer, B.; Sharp, R. G.; Boyle, B. J.; Shanks, T.; Smith, R. J.; Outram, P. J.; Loaring, N. S.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the relation between the mass of supermassive black holes (MBH) in quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) and the mass of the dark matter haloes hosting them (MDH). We measure the widths of broad emission lines (MgII λ2798, CIV λ1549) from QSO composite spectra as a function of redshift. These widths are then used to determine virial black hole mass estimates. We compare our virial black hole mass estimates to dark matter halo masses for QSO hosts derived by Croom et al. based on measurements of QSO clustering. This enables us to trace the MBH-MDH relation over the redshift range z = 0.5-2.5. We calculate the mean zero-point of the MBH-MDH relation to be MBH = 108.4+/-0.2Msolar for an MDH = 1012.5Msolar. These data are then compared with several models connecting MBH and MDH as well as recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution. We note that the flux-limited nature of QSO samples can cause a Malmquist-type bias in the measured zero-point of the MBH-MDH relation. The magnitude of this bias depends on the scatter in the MBH-MDH relation, and we re-evaluate the zero-point assuming three published values for this scatter. We create a subsample of our data defined by a constant magnitude interval around L* and find (1 + z)3.3+/-1.3 evolution in MBH between z ~ 0.5 and 2.5 for typical, L* QSOs. We also determine the Eddington ratios (L/LEdd) for the same subsample and find no significant evolution: (1 + z)-0.4+/-1.1. Taken at face value, our data suggest that a decrease in active black hole mass since z ~ 2.5 is the driving force behind luminosity evolution of typical, L*, optically selected QSOs. However, we note that our data are also consistent with a picture in which reductions in both black hole mass and accretion rate contribute equally to luminosity evolution. In addition, we find that these evolution results are strongly affected by the virial black hole mass estimators used. Changes to the calibration of these have a significant effect on the

  12. Stellar Masses and Start Formation Rates of Lensed Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies from the SPT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Gonzalez, Anthony; SPT SMG Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift (2.8 ≤ z ≤ 5.7) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using HST, Spitzer, Herschel and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution HST/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in Spitzer/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses, IR luminosities, and star formation rates (SFRs). The SED fits of six SPT sources show that the intrinsic stellar masses span a range more than one order of magnitude with a median value ˜ 5 ×1010M⊙. The intrinsic IR luminosities range from 4×1012L⊙ to 4×1013L⊙. They all have prodigious intrinsic star formation rates of 510 to 4800 M⊙yr-1. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these six DSFGs have specific SFRs that all lie above the MS, including two galaxies that are a factor of 10 higher than the MS. Our results suggest that we are witnessing the ongoing strong starburst events which may be driven by major mergers.

  13. The mass function of ω Centauri down to 0.15 Msolar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollima, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Bellazzini, M.

    2007-11-01

    By means of deep FORS1/VLT and ACS/Hubble Space Telescope observations of a wide area in the stellar system ω Cen we measured the luminosity function of main-sequence stars down to R = 22.6 and IF814W = 24.5. The luminosity functions obtained have been converted into mass functions and compared with analytical initial mass functions (IMFs) available in the literature. The mass function obtained, reaching M ~ 0.15Msolar, can be well reproduced by a broken power law with indices α = -2.3 for M > 0.5Msolar and α = -0.8 for M < 0.5Msolar. Since the stellar populations of ω Cen have been proved to be actually unaffected by dynamical evolution processes, the mass function measured in this stellar system should represent the best approximation of the IMF of a star cluster. The comparison with the MF measured in other Galactic globular clusters suggests that possible primordial differences in the slope of the low-mass end of their MF could exist. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory within the observing program 74.D-0369(B). Also based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. E-mail: antonio.sollima@bo.astro.it

  14. Dynamical evolution of stellar mass black holes in dense stellar clusters: estimate for merger rate of binary black holes originating from globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, A.

    2013-10-01

    We have performed N-body simulations of globular clusters (GCs) in order to estimate a detection rate of mergers of binary stellar mass black holes (BBHs) by means of gravitational wave (GW) observatories. For our estimate, we have only considered mergers of BBHs which escape from GCs (BBH escapers). BBH escapers merge more quickly than BBHs inside GCs because of their small semimajor axes. N-body simulation cannot deal with a GC with the number of stars N ˜ 106 due to its high calculation cost. We have simulated dynamical evolution of small N clusters (104 ≲ N ≲ 105), and have extrapolated our simulation results to large N clusters. From our simulation results, we have found the following dependence of BBH properties on N. BBHs escape from a cluster at each two-body relaxation time at a rate proportional to N. Semimajor axes of BBH escapers are inversely proportional to N, if initial mass densities of clusters are fixed. Eccentricities, primary masses and mass ratios of BBH escapers are independent of N. Using this dependence of BBH properties, we have artificially generated a population of BBH escapers from a GC with N ˜ 106, and have estimated a detection rate of mergers of BBH escapers by next-generation GW observatories. We have assumed that all the GCs are formed 10 or 12 Gyr ago with their initial numbers of stars Ni = 5 × 105-2 × 106 and their initial stellar mass densities inside their half-mass radii ρh,i = 6 × 103-106 M⊙ pc-3. Then, the detection rate of BBH escapers is 0.5-20 yr-1 for a BH retention fraction RBH = 0.5. A few BBH escapers are components of hierarchical triple systems, although we do not consider secular perturbation on such BBH escapers for our estimate. Our simulations have shown that BHs are still inside some of GCs at the present day. These BHs may marginally contribute to BBH detection.

  15. The Galaxy mass function up to z =4 in the GOODS-MUSIC sample: into the epoch of formation of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, A.; Salimbeni, S.; Grazian, A.; Giallongo, E.; Pentericci, L.; Nonino, M.; Fontanot, F.; Menci, N.; Monaco, P.; Cristiani, S.; Vanzella, E.; de Santis, C.; Gallozzi, S.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.The goal of this work is to measure the evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function and of the resulting Stellar Mass Density up to redshift ≃4, in order to study the assembly of massive galaxies in the high redshift Universe. Methods: .We have used the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, containing 3000 Ks-selected galaxies with multi-wavelength coverage extending from the U band to the Spitzer 8 μm band, of which 27% have spectroscopic redshifts and the remaining fraction have accurate photometric redshifts. On this sample we have applied a standard fitting procedure to measure stellar masses. We compute the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function and the resulting Stellar Mass Density up to redshift ≃4, taking into proper account the biases and incompleteness effects. Results: .Within the well known trend of global decline of the Stellar Mass Density with redshift, we show that the decline of the more massive galaxies may be described by an exponential timescale of ≃6 Gyr up to z≃ 1.5, and proceeds much faster thereafter, with an exponential timescale of ≃0.6 Gyr. We also show that there is some evidence for a differential evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function, with low mass galaxies evolving faster than more massive ones up to z≃ 1{-}1.5 and that the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function remains remarkably flat (i.e. with a slope close to the local one) up to z≃ 1{-}1.3. Conclusions: .The observed behaviour of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function is consistent with a scenario where about 50% of present-day massive galaxies formed at a vigorous rate in the epoch between redshift 4 and 1.5, followed by a milder evolution until the present-day epoch.

  16. The Relation between Star-Formation Rate and Stellar Mass of Galaxies at z ~ 1-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    The relation between the star-formation Rate and stellar mass (M ⋆) of galaxies represents a fundamental constraint on galaxy formation, and has been studied extensively both in observations and cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. However, the observed amplitude of the star-formation rate-stellar mass relation has not been successfully reproduced in simulations, indicating either that the halo accretion history and baryonic physics are poorly understood/modelled or that observations contain biases. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the SFR - M ⋆ relation of z ~ 1-4 galaxies and display the inconsistency between observed relations that are obtained using different techniques. We employ cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from various groups which are tuned to reproduce a range of observables and compare these with a range of observed SFR - M ⋆ relations. We find that numerical results are consistent with observations that use Spectral Energy Distribution techniques to estimate star-formation rates, dust corrections, and stellar masses. On the contrary, simulations are not able to reproduce results that were obtained by combining only UV and IR luminosities (UV+IR). These imply star-formation rates at a fixed stellar mass that are larger almost by a factor of 5 than those of Spectral Energy Distribution measurements for z ~ 1.5-4. For z < 1.5, the results from simulations, Spectral Energy Distribution fitting techniques and IR+UV conversion agree well. We find that surveys that preferably select star-forming galaxies (e.g. by adopting Lyman-break or blue selection) typically predict a larger median/average star-formation rate at a fixed stellar mass especially for high mass objects, with respect to mass selected samples and hydrodynamic simulations. Furthermore, we find remarkable agreement between the numerical results from various authors who have employed different cosmological codes and run simulations with different resolutions. This is

  17. Stellar orbits in the Galaxy and mass extinctions on the Earth: a connection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto de Mello, G. F.; Dias, W. S.; Lepine, J.; Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Kazu, R. S.

    2014-03-01

    The orbits of the stars in the disk of the Galaxy, and their passages through the Galactic spiral arms, are a rarely mentioned factor of biosphere stability which might be important for long-term planetary climate evolution, with a possible bearing on mass extinctions. The Sun lies very near the co-rotation radius, where stars revolve around the Galaxy in the same period as the density wave perturbations of the spiral arms (Dias & Lepine 2005). Conventional wisdom generally considers that this status makes for few passages through the spiral arms. Controversy still surrounds whether time spent inside or around spiral arms is dangerous to biospheres and conducive to mass extinctions (Bailer-Jones 2009). Possible threats include giant molecular clouds disturbing the Oort comet cloud and provoking heavy bombardment (Clube & Napier 1982); a higher exposure to cosmic rays near star forming regions triggering increased cloudiness in Earth's atmosphere and ice ages (Gies & Helsel 2005); and the destruction of Earth's ozone layer posed by supernova explosions (Gehrels et al 2003). We present detailed calculations of the history of spiral arm passages for all 212 solartype stars nearer than 20 parsecs, including the total time spent inside the spiral arms in the last 500 million years, when the spiral arm position can be traced with good accuracy. There is a very large diversity of stellar orbits amongst solar neighborhood solar-type stars, and the time fraction spent inside spiral arms can vary from a few percent to nearly half the time. The Sun, despite its proximity to the galactic co-rotation radius, has exceptionally low eccentricity and a low vertical velocity component, and therefore spends 40% of its lifetime crossing the spiral arms, more than nearly all nearby stars. We discuss the possible implications of this fact to the long-term habitability of the Earth, and possible correlations of the Sun's passage through the spiral arms with the five great mass

  18. The High-Mass End of the Black Hole Mass Function: Mass Estimates in Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Bontà, E.; Ferrarese, L.; Corsini, E. M.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Coccato, L.; Sarzi, M.; Pizzella, A.; Beifiori, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging and spectroscopic observations of three Brightest Cluster Galaxies, Abell 1836-BCG, Abell 2052-BCG, and Abell 3565-BCG, obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The data provide detailed information on the structure and mass profile of the stellar component, the dust optical depth, and the spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized gas within the innermost region of each galaxy. Dynamical models, which account for the observed stellar mass profile and include the contribution of a central supermassive black hole (SBH), are constructed to reproduce the kinematics derived from the Hα and [N II]λλ6548,6583 emission lines. Secure SBH detection with M • = 3.61+0.41 -0.50 × 109 M sun and M • = 1.34+0.21 -0.19 × 109 M sun, respectively, are obtained for Abell 1836-BCG and Abell 3565-BCG, which show regular rotation curves and strong central velocity gradients. In the case of Abell 2052-BCG, the lack of an orderly rotational motion prevents a secure determination, although an upper limit of M • lsim 4.60 × 109 M sun can be placed on the mass of the central SBH. These measurements represent an important step forward in the characterization of the high-mass end of the SBH mass function. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 279.B-5004(A).

  19. A Physical Approach to the Identification of High-z Mergers: Morphological Classification in the Stellar Mass Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibinel, A.; Le Floc'h, E.; Perret, V.; Bournaud, F.; Daddi, E.; Pannella, M.; Elbaz, D.; Amram, P.; Duc, P.-A.

    2015-06-01

    At z ≳ 1, the distinction between merging and “normal” star-forming galaxies based on single band morphology is often hampered by the presence of large clumps which result in a disturbed, merger-like appearance even in rotationally supported disks. In this paper we discuss how a classification based on canonical, non-parametric structural indices measured on resolved stellar mass maps, rather than on single-band images, reduces the misclassification of clumpy but not merging galaxies. We calibrate the mass-based selection of mergers using the MIRAGE hydrodynamical numerical simulations of isolated and merging galaxies which span a stellar mass range of 109.8-1010.6 M⊙ and merger ratios between 1:1-1:6.3. These simulations are processed to reproduce the typical depth and spatial resolution of observed Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) data. We test our approach on a sample of real z≃ 2 galaxies with kinematic classification into disks or mergers and on ˜100 galaxies in the HUDF field with photometric/spectroscopic redshift between 1.5 ≤ z ≤ 3 and M > 109.4 M⊙. We find that a combination of the asymmetry AMASS and M20, MASS indices measured on the stellar mass maps can efficiently identify real (major) mergers with ≲20% contamination from clumpy disks in the merger sample. This mass-based classification cannot be reproduced in star-forming galaxies by H-band measurements alone, which instead result in a contamination from clumpy galaxies which can be as high as 50%. Moreover, we find that the mass-based classification always results in a lower contamination from clumpy galaxies than an H-band classification, regardless of the depth of the imaging used (e.g., CANDELS versus HUDF).

  20. The low-mass star and sub-stellar populations of the 25 Orionis group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Juan José; Briceño, César; Mateu, Cecilia; Hernández, Jesús; Vivas, Anna Katherina; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; Allen, Lori

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a survey of the low-mass star and brown dwarf population of the 25 Orionis group. Using optical photometry from the CIDA (Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía `Francisco J. Duarte', Mérida, Venezuela) Deep Survey of Orion, near-IR photometry from the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy and low-resolution spectroscopy obtained with Hectospec at the MMT telescope, we selected 1246 photometric candidates to low-mass stars and brown dwarfs with estimated masses within 0.02 ≲ M/M⊙ ≲ 0.8 and spectroscopically confirmed a sample of 77 low-mass stars as new members of the cluster with a mean age of ˜7 Myr. We have obtained a system initial mass function of the group that can be well described by either a Kroupa power-law function with indices α3 = -1.73 ± 0.31 and α2 = 0.68 ± 0.41 in the mass ranges 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.08 and 0.08 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.5, respectively, or a Scalo lognormal function with coefficients m_c=0.21^{+0.02}_{-0.02} and σ = 0.36 ± 0.03 in the mass range 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.8. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of this numerous candidate sample, we have confirmed the east-west elongation of the 25 Orionis group observed in previous works, and rule out a possible southern extension of the group. We find that the spatial distributions of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in 25 Orionis are statistically indistinguishable. Finally, we found that the fraction of brown dwarfs showing IR excesses is higher than for low-mass stars, supporting the scenario in which the evolution of circumstellar discs around the least massive objects could be more prolonged.

  1. Fluctuations in Stellar Winds and Their Possible Connections to the Wind Mass Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    1997-06-01

    We show that the spherical, polytropic stellar winds are stable to all adiabatic fluctuations in the sense of absolute and convective stabilities. It is also shown that the neutrally stable sound waves driven by stellar turbulence or nonradial pulsations are trapped and become much enhanced near both the wind-flow base and the sonic resonance. They can exert great wave pressure at both locations, which are known to be critical in determining wind strength. This finding is strongly suggestive of a possible intimate connection between stellar turbulence and/or pulsations and stellar wind flux. In addition, a scenario for the appearance of large-amplitude waves riding on the winds at great, and hence observable, distances is given in the above context.

  2. A SWIFT SURVEY OF ACCRETION ONTO STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.

    2013-05-20

    We present a systemic analysis of all of the stellar-mass black hole binaries (confirmed and candidate) observed by the Swift observatory up to 2010 June. The broad Swift bandpass enables a trace of disk evolution over an unprecedented range in flux and temperature. The final data sample consists of 476 X-ray spectra containing greater than 100 counts, in the 0.6-10 keV band. This is the largest sample of high-quality CCD spectra of accreting black holes published to date. In addition, strictly simultaneous data at optical/UV wavelengths are available for 255 (54%) of these observations. The data are modeled with a combination of an accretion disk and a hard spectral component. For the hard component we consider both a simple power-law model and a thermal Comptonization model. An accretion disk is detected at greater than the 5{sigma} confidence level in 61% of the observations. Light curves and color-color diagrams are constructed for each system. Hardness-luminosity and disk fraction-luminosity diagrams are constructed and are observed to be consistent with those typically observed by RXTE, noting the sensitivity below 2 keV provided by Swift. The observed spectra have an average luminosity of {approx}1% Eddington, though we are sensitive to accretion disks down to a luminosity of 10{sup -3} L{sub Edd}. Thus, this is also the largest sample of such cool accretion disks studied to date. The accretion disk temperature distribution displays two peaks consistent with the classical hard and soft spectral states, with a smaller number of disks distributed between these. The distribution of inner disk radii is observed to be continuous regardless of which model is used to fit the hard continua. There is no evidence for large-scale truncation of the accretion disk in the hard state (at least for L{sub x} {approx}> 10{sup -3} L{sub Edd}), with all of the accretion disks having radii {approx}< 40 R{sub g} . Plots of the accretion disk inner radius versus hardness ratio

  3. Stellar mass - Metallicity Relation for AKARI-FMOS Infrared Luminous Galaxies at z~0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Goto, Tomo; Pearson, Chris; Buat, Véronique; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2015-08-01

    Heavy elements are synthesized in stars and returned into the interstellar medium reflecting the result of the past star formation activity in a galaxy. Thus, the gas phase metallicity is a key parameter in understanding the processes of the formation and the evolution of a galaxy. Many investigations of stellar mass (M*) and gas phase metallicity (Z) relation (MZ relation), which is more massive galaxies tend to be more metal-rich, and a fundamental relation (FMR), whereby galaxies define a tight surface in the three-dimensional space of M*, Z, and Star Formation Rate (SFR) have done up to z~3.3. However, this relation only holds to ultraviolet, optical, or near-infrared selected star forming galaxies. Since most of star formation activities in galaxies at high-z universe are hidden by dust, to fully understand the MZ relation and its evolution, it is critical to study dusty galaxies.Here, we investigate the MZ relation and FMR for infrared bright galaxies at z~0.9 discovered by AKARI NEP-Deep survey.We estimated the M* and Z from SED fitting using the AKARI NEP-Deep data with its follow-up multi-wavelength photometric data (from X-ray to FIR) and from Halpha-[NII] emission line ratio taken by Subaru/FMOS, respectively. We found that (1) the infrared bright galaxies at z~0.9 is already chemically evolved to the level of star-forming galaxies in the local universe, and (2) the metallicity of our sample is systematically larger than that of the FMR. The results suggest a possibility that metal was actively created in dusty galaxies up to z~1, then outflow blows out dust and gas, suddenly stopping the chemical evolution and star formation activity, and the galaxies end up being what they are today.

  4. Precession of orbits around the stellar-mass black hole in H 1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Accreting stellar-mass black holes often show a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in their X-ray flux with a period that slowly drifts from ~10s to ~0.05s, and an iron emission line in their X-ray spectrum. The iron line is generated by fluorescent re-emission, by the accretion disk, of X-ray photons originating in the innermost hot flow. The line shape is distorted by relativistic motion of the orbiting plasma and the gravitational pull of the black hole. The QPO arises from the immediate vicinity of the black hole, but its physical origin has long been debated. It has been suggested that the QPO originates via Lense-Thirring precession, a General Relativistic effect causing the inner flow to precess as the spinning black hole twists up the surrounding space-time. This predicts a characteristic rocking of the iron line between red and blue shift as the receding and approaching sides of the disk are respectively illuminated. I will talk about our observations of the black hole binary H 1743-322 in which the line energy varies in step with the ~4.5s QPO cycle, providing strong evidence that such QPOs originate via Lense-Thirring precession. This effect has previously been measured in our Solar System but our detection is in the strong field regime of General Relativity, at a precession rate 14 orders of magnitude faster than possible in the Earth's gravitational field. Our result enables the application of tomographic techniques to map the motion of matter in the strong gravity near black hole event horizons.

  5. Intermediate-Mass Black Hole(s) and Stellar Orbits in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yuri; Wu, Alice; Thommes, Ed

    2005-12-01

    Many young stars reside within the central half-parsec from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center. The origin of these stars remains a puzzle. Recently, Hansen & Milosavljevic (HM) have argued that an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) could have delivered the young stars to the immediate vicinity of Sgr A*. Here we focus on the final stages of the HM scenario. Namely, we integrate numerically the orbits of stars that are initially bound to the IMBH but are stripped from it by the tidal field of Sgr A*. Our numerical algorithm is a symplectic integrator designed specifically for the problem at hand; however, we have checked our results with SYMBA, a version of the widely available SWIFT code. We find that the distribution of the postinspiral orbital parameters is sensitive to the eccentricity of the inspiraling IMBH. If the IMBH is on a circular orbit, then the inclinations of numerically computed orbits relative to the inspiral plane are almost always smaller than 10°, and therefore (1) the simulations are in good agreement with the observed motions of stars in a clockwise-moving stellar disk; and (2) the simulations never reproduce the orbits of stars outside this disk, which include those in the second thick ring of stars and the randomly oriented unrelaxed orbits of some of the S stars. If the IMBH's orbital eccentricity is e=0.6, then approximately half of the stars end up with orbital inclinations below 10°, and another half have inclinations anywhere between 0° and 180° this is somewhat closer to what is observed. We also show that if the IRS 13 cluster is bound by an IMBH, as has been argued by Maillard et al., then the same IMBH could not have delivered all of the young stars to their present location.

  6. The Mass Function of Cosmic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audit, E.; Teyssier, R.; Alimi, J.-M.

    We investigate some modifications to the Press and Schechter (1974) (PS) prescription resulting from shear and tidal effects. These modifications rely on more realistic treatments of the collapse process than the standard approach based on the spherical model. First, we show that the mass function resulting from a new approximate Lagrangian dynamic (Audit and Alimi, A&A 1996), contains more objects at high mass, than the classical PS mass function and is well fitted by a PS-like function with a threshold density of deltac ≍ 1.4. However, such a Lagrangian description can underestimate the epoch of structure formation since it defines it as the collapse of the first principal axis. We therefore suggest some analytical prescriptions, for computing the collapse time along the second and third principal axes, and we deduce the corresponding mass functions. The collapse along the third axis is delayed by the shear and the number of objects of high mass then decreases. Finally, we show that the shear also strongly affects the formation of low-mass halos. This dynamical effect implies a modification of the low-mass slope of the mass function and allows the reproduction of the observed luminosity function of field galaxies.

  7. EDDINGTON-LIMITED ACCRETION AND THE BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Albert, Loic; Arzoumanian, Doris; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine

    2010-08-15

    We present discovery observations of a quasar in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) at redshift z = 6.44. We also use near-infrared spectroscopy of nine CFHQS quasars at z {approx} 6 to determine black hole masses. These are compared with similar estimates for more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars to investigate the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity. We find a strong correlation between Mg II FWHM and UV luminosity and that most quasars at this early epoch are accreting close to the Eddington limit. Thus, these quasars appear to be in an early stage of their life cycle where they are building up their black hole mass exponentially. Combining these results with the quasar luminosity function, we derive the black hole mass function at z = 6. Our black hole mass function is {approx}10{sup 4} times lower than at z = 0 and substantially below estimates from previous studies. The main uncertainties which could increase the black hole mass function are a larger population of obscured quasars at high redshift than is observed at low redshift and/or a low quasar duty cycle at z = 6. In comparison, the global stellar mass function is only {approx}10{sup 2} times lower at z = 6 than at z = 0. The difference between the black hole and stellar mass function evolution is due to either rapid early star formation which is not limited by radiation pressure as is the case for black hole growth or inefficient black hole seeding. Our work predicts that the black hole mass-stellar mass relation for a volume-limited sample of galaxies declines rapidly at very high redshift. This is in contrast to the observed increase at 4 < z < 6 from the local relation if one just studies the most massive black holes.

  8. The SWELLS survey - VI. Hierarchical inference of the initial mass functions of bulges and discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Brendon J.; Marshall, Philip J.; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso; Dutton, Aaron A.; Barnabè, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    The long-standing assumption that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is universal has recently been challenged by a number of observations. Several studies have shown that a `heavy' IMF (e.g. with a Salpeter-like abundance of low-mass stars and thus normalization) is preferred for massive early-type galaxies, while this IMF is inconsistent with the properties of less massive, later-type galaxies. These discoveries motivate the hypothesis that the IMF may vary (possibly very slightly) across galaxies and across components of individual galaxies (e.g. bulges versus discs). In this paper, we use a sample of 19 late-type strong gravitational lenses from the Sloan WFC Edge-on Late-type Lens Survey (SWELLS) to investigate the IMFs of the bulges and discs in late-type galaxies. We perform a joint analysis of the galaxies' total masses (constrained by strong gravitational lensing) and stellar masses (constrained by optical and near-infrared colours in the context of a stellar population synthesis model, up to an IMF normalization parameter). Using minimal assumptions apart from the physical constraint that the total stellar mass m* within any aperture must be less than the total mass mtot within the aperture, we find that the bulges of the galaxies cannot have IMFs heavier (i.e. implying high mass per unit luminosity) than Salpeter, while the disc IMFs are not well constrained by this data set. We also discuss the necessity for hierarchical modelling when combining incomplete information about multiple astronomical objects. This modelling approach allows us to place upper limits on the size of any departures from universality. More data, including spatially resolved kinematics (as in Paper V) and stellar population diagnostics over a range of bulge and disc masses, are needed to robustly quantify how the IMF varies within galaxies.

  9. Modeling Small Stellar Populations Using Starburst99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gerardo Arturo; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Stellar populations synthesis models have proven to be excellent tools to learn about galaxy evolution. However, modeling small stellar populations (lower than 105 M⊙) has been an intriguing and continuous to be a field of intensive research. In this work, we have developed a new approach to form stars from clusters first, where massive stars are formed from fractions of mass of small stellar clusters. This new approximation is based on the empirical power law (mc-2) for the mass function of clusters between 20-1100 M⊙ found in recent years and the maximum stellar mass that can be formed in a cluster. Incorporating this new approach to form clusters has made us upgrade the way we integrate the stellar properties and the way that the isochrone is produced with a new technique. To produce the new models we have used the most recent version of Starburst99 that incorporates the most recent stellar evolution models with rotation. On the verge of solving nearby stellar populations and observing small stellar populations across the universe, this new approach brings a new scope on trying to disentangle the nature of hyper and supermassive stars in small stellar populations. In this work we present this new approach and the results when these models are applied to very energetic stellar populations such as the cluster in NGC 3603. Our most important result is that we have modeled the ionizing power of this cluster and some others by forming enough supermassive stars in a cluster of ~104 M⊙.

  10. Mass function study of open star clusters Haffner 11 and Czernik 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, D.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Durgapal, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    We analysis VI CCD data of two open clusters Haffner 11 and Czernik 31 in order to determine their luminosity function, mass function and mass-segregation for the first time. The observed luminosity function is corrected for both data incompleteness and field star contamination. Theoretical stellar evolutionary isochrones are used to convert luminosity function into mass function. The Mass function slopes are derived as 1.22 ± 0.42 and 1.55 ± 0.38 for Haffner 11 and Czernik 31 respectively. They agree with the Salpeter value (x = 1.35) within the errors. The effect of mass segregation are observed in both the clusters. The estimated dynamical relaxation time is less than age of the clusters. This indicates that they are dynamically relaxed. The cause of relaxation may be due to the dynamical evolution or imprint of star formation or both.

  11. AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE SHOULDER OF GIANTS: JOVIAN PLANETS AROUND LATE K DWARF STARS AND THE TREND WITH STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Fischer, Debra A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2013-07-01

    Analyses of exoplanet statistics suggest a trend of giant planet occurrence with host star mass, a clue to how planets like Jupiter form. One missing piece of the puzzle is the occurrence around late K dwarf stars (masses of 0.5-0.75 M{sub Sun} and effective temperatures of 3900-4800 K). We analyzed four years of Doppler radial velocity (RVs) data for 110 late K dwarfs, one of which hosts two previously reported giant planets. We estimate that 4.0% {+-} 2.3% of these stars have Saturn-mass or larger planets with orbital periods <245 days, depending on the planet mass distribution and RV variability of stars without giant planets. We also estimate that 0.7% {+-} 0.5% of similar stars observed by Kepler have giant planets. This Kepler rate is significantly (99% confidence) lower than that derived from our Doppler survey, but the difference vanishes if only the single Doppler system (HIP 57274) with completely resolved orbits is considered. The difference could also be explained by the exclusion of close binaries (without giant planets) from the Doppler but not Kepler surveys, the effect of long-period companions and stellar noise on the Doppler data, or an intrinsic difference between the two populations. Our estimates for late K dwarfs bridge those for solar-type stars and M dwarfs, and support a positive trend with stellar mass. Small sample size precludes statements about finer structure, e.g., a ''shoulder'' in the distribution of giant planets with stellar mass. Future surveys such as the Next Generation Transit Survey and the Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey will ameliorate this deficiency.

  12. Testing Stellar Evolution Models: Absolute Dimensions of the Low-Mass Eclipsing Binary Star V651 Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Allison; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    We report accurate values of several key quantities for the low-mass, 0.9968096 day period, double-lined eclipsing binary V651 Cas. We determine accurate values for the masses, radii and temperatures of the primary and secondary as follows: M = 0.8553(81) solar masses, R = 0.957(17) solar radii, and effective temperature = 5733(100) K for the primary component, and M = 0.7564(48) solar masses, R = 0.771(15) solar radii, and effective temperature = 5113(105) for the secondary component, with formal uncertainties shown in parentheses. A comparison with the stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program suggests an age of 11(1) Gyr for a best-fit metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.2. While the isochrone mentioned correctly reproduces the measured radii and temperatures of the stars within the current uncertainties, we note that the secondary radius appears marginally larger and the temperature marginally cooler than models would predict. This is consistent with similar discrepancies found for other low-mass stars, generally accredited to surface activity. With further improvement in the measurement errors, and a spectroscopic measure of the metallicity, V651 Cas should be a valuable system for understanding the effects of magnetic activity on the global structure of low-mass stars and for providing guidance to improve stellar evolution models.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  13. The H I mass function as a probe of photoionization feedback on low-mass galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Seek; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Power, C.; Park, Jaehong; Lagos, C. d. P.; Baugh, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    We explore the galaxy formation physics governing the low-mass end of the H I mass function in the local Universe. Specifically, we predict the effects on the H I mass function of varying (i) the strength of photoionization feedback and the redshift of the end of the epoch of reionization, (ii) the cosmology, (iii) the supernovae feedback prescription and (iv) the efficiency of star formation. We find that the shape of the low-mass end of the H I mass function is most affected by the critical halo mass below which galaxy formation is suppressed by photoionization heating of the intergalactic medium. We model the redshift dependence of this critical dark matter halo mass by requiring a match to the low-mass end of the H I mass function. The best-fitting critical dark matter halo mass decreases as redshift increases in this model, corresponding to a circular velocity of ˜50 km s-1 at z = 0, ˜30 km s-1 at z ˜ 1 and ˜12 km s-1 at z = 6. We find that an evolving critical halo mass is required to explain both the shape and abundance of galaxies in the H I mass function below M_{H I} ˜ 108 h^{-2} {M_{{⊙}}}. The model makes specific predictions for the clustering strength of H I-selected galaxies with H I masses >106 and >107 h-2 M⊙ and for the relation between the H I and stellar mass contents of galaxies which will be testable with upcoming surveys with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders. We conclude that measurements of the H I mass function at z ≥ 0 will lead to an improvement in our understanding of the net effect of photoionization feedback on galaxy formation and evolution.

  14. VERY LOW MASS STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-LIKE STARS FROM MARVELS. I. A LOW-MASS RATIO STELLAR COMPANION TO TYC 4110-01037-1 IN A 79 DAY ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewski, John P.; Agol, Eric; Barnes, Rory; Ge, Jian; De Lee, Nathan; Fleming, Scott W.; Lee, Brian L.; Chang, Liang; Crepp, Justin R.; Eastman, Jason; Gaudi, B. Scott; Esposito, Massimiliano; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Porto De Mello, G. F.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Bizyaev, Dmitry; and others

    2012-05-15

    TYC 4110-01037-1 has a low-mass stellar companion, whose small mass ratio and short orbital period are atypical among binary systems with solar-like (T{sub eff} {approx}< 6000 K) primary stars. Our analysis of TYC 4110-01037-1 reveals it to be a moderately aged ({approx}<5 Gyr) solar-like star having a mass of 1.07 {+-} 0.08 M{sub Sun} and radius of 0.99 {+-} 0.18 R{sub Sun }. We analyze 32 radial velocity (RV) measurements from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey as well as 6 supporting RV measurements from the SARG spectrograph on the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo telescope obtained over a period of {approx}2 years. The best Keplerian orbital fit parameters were found to have a period of 78.994 {+-} 0.012 days, an eccentricity of 0.1095 {+-} 0.0023, and a semi-amplitude of 4199 {+-} 11 m s{sup -1}. We determine the minimum companion mass (if sin i = 1) to be 97.7 {+-} 5.8 M{sub Jup}. The system's companion to host star mass ratio, {>=}0.087 {+-} 0.003, places it at the lowest end of observed values for short period stellar companions to solar-like (T{sub eff} {approx}< 6000 K) stars. One possible way to create such a system would be if a triple-component stellar multiple broke up into a short period, low q binary during the cluster dispersal phase of its lifetime. A candidate tertiary body has been identified in the system via single-epoch, high contrast imagery. If this object is confirmed to be comoving, we estimate it would be a dM4 star. We present these results in the context of our larger-scale effort to constrain the statistics of low-mass stellar<