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Sample records for stem cell replacement

  1. Stem cell approaches for diabetes: towards beta cell replacement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells hold great promise for pancreatic beta cell replacement therapy for diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, beta cells are mostly destroyed, and in type 2 diabetes beta cell numbers are reduced by 40% to 60%. The proof-of-principle that cellular transplants of pancreatic islets, which contain insulin-secreting beta cells, can reverse the hyperglycemia of type 1 diabetes has been established, and there is now a need to find an adequate source of islet cells. Human embryonic stem cells can be directed to become fully developed beta cells and there is expectation that induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be similarly directed. iPS cells can also be generated from patients with diabetes to allow studies of the genomics and pathogenesis of the disease. Some alternative approaches for replacing beta cells include finding ways to enhance the replication of existing beta cells, stimulating neogenesis (the formation of new islets in postnatal life), and reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells to insulin-producing cells. Stem-cell-based approaches could also be used for modulation of the immune system in type 1 diabetes, or to address the problems of obesity and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Herein, we review recent advances in our understanding of diabetes and beta cell biology at the genomic level, and we discuss how stem-cell-based approaches might be used for replacing beta cells and for treating diabetes. PMID:21951399

  2. Mitochondrial gene replacement in primate offspring and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Ma, Hong; Clepper, Lisa; Woodward, Joy; Li, Ying; Ramsey, Cathy; Kolotushkina, Olena; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2009-09-17

    Mitochondria are found in all eukaryotic cells and contain their own genome (mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA). Unlike the nuclear genome, which is derived from both the egg and sperm at fertilization, the mtDNA in the embryo is derived almost exclusively from the egg; that is, it is of maternal origin. Mutations in mtDNA contribute to a diverse range of currently incurable human diseases and disorders. To establish preclinical models for new therapeutic approaches, we demonstrate here that the mitochondrial genome can be efficiently replaced in mature non-human primate oocytes (Macaca mulatta) by spindle-chromosomal complex transfer from one egg to an enucleated, mitochondrial-replete egg. The reconstructed oocytes with the mitochondrial replacement were capable of supporting normal fertilization, embryo development and produced healthy offspring. Genetic analysis confirmed that nuclear DNA in the three infants born so far originated from the spindle donors whereas mtDNA came from the cytoplast donors. No contribution of spindle donor mtDNA was detected in offspring. Spindle replacement is shown here as an efficient protocol replacing the full complement of mitochondria in newly generated embryonic stem cell lines. This approach may offer a reproductive option to prevent mtDNA disease transmission in affected families. PMID:19710649

  3. Adult subventricular zone neural stem cells as a potential source of dopaminergic replacement neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cave, John W.; Wang, Meng; Baker, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials engrafting human fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue have demonstrated, in principle, that cell replacement therapy provides substantial long-lasting improvement of motor impairments generated by Parkinson's Disease (PD). The use of fetal tissue is not practical for widespread clinical implementation of this therapy, but stem cells are a promising alternative source for obtaining replacement cells. The ideal stem cell source has yet to be established and, in this review, we discuss the potential of neural stem cells in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) as an autologous source of replacement cells. We identify three key challenges for further developing this potential source of replacement cells: (1) improving survival of transplanted cells, (2) suppressing glial progenitor proliferation and survival, and (3) developing methods to efficiently produce dopaminergic neurons. Subventricular neural stem cells naturally produce a dopaminergic interneuron phenotype that has an apparent lack of vulnerability to PD-mediated degeneration. We also discuss whether olfactory bulb dopaminergic neurons derived from adult SVZ neural stem cells are a suitable source for cell replacement strategies. PMID:24574954

  4. Stem Cell Replacement Improves Expression of SMP30 in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Taketani, Shigeru; Adachi, Yasushi; Ikehara, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that replacing bone marrow stem cells may improve hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in db/db mice, a type 2 diabetic mouse model. Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30) is an antioxidant protein that decreases with aging. However, it has not been clear whether SMP30 decreases in the livers of obese mice, and whether stem cell replacement would improve SMP30 expression in the liver. Bone marrow stem cells of db/db mice were replaced with the bone marrow stem cells of C57BL/6 mice. Plasma cytokine and insulin levels were measured, and glycogen content, expression of SMP30, and fibrosis in the liver were assessed. Our results showed that stem cell replacement increased the expression of SMP30 in the liver, resulting from decreased plasma inflammation cytokines and hyperinsulinemia in db/db mice. This is the first report that stem cell replacement increased the expression of SMP30 in the liver, and may help prevent fibrosis in the liver of db/db mice. PMID:26694363

  5. Stem cells for cell replacement therapy: a therapeutic strategy for HD?

    PubMed

    Rosser, Anne; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-09-15

    Much interest has been expressed over the last couple of decades in the potential application of stem cells to medicine, both for research and diagnostic tools and as a source of donor cells for therapeutic purposes. Potential therapeutic applications include replacement of cells in many body organs where the capacity for intrinsic repair is limited, including the pancreas, heart, and brain. A key challenge is to generate the relevant donor cell types, and this is particularly challenging in the brain where the number of different neuronal subtypes is so great. Although dopamine neuron replacement in Parkinson's disease has been the focus of most clinical studies, great interest has been shown in this approach for other disorders, including Huntington's disease. Replacing complete neural circuits in the adult brain is clearly challenging, and there are many other complexities with regard to both donor cells and host. This article presents the pros and cons of taking a cell therapy approach in Huntington's disease. It considers the implantation both of cells that are already of the same neural subtype as those lost in the disease process (ie, primary fetal cells derived from the developing striatum) and those derived from stem cells, which require "directing" toward that phenotype. PMID:25216372

  6. Stem cell-based organ replacements-airway and lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jonathan M; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin A

    2014-06-01

    Tissue engineering requires the use of cells seeded onto scaffolds, often in conjunction with bioactive molecules, to regenerate or replace tissues. Significant advances have been made in recent years within the fields of stem cell biology and biomaterials, leading to some exciting developments in airway tissue engineering, including the first use of stem cell-based tissue-engineered tracheal replacements in humans. In addition, recent advances within the fields of scaffold biology and decellularization offer the potential to transplant patients without the use of immunosuppression. PMID:24994525

  7. Arthritic Periosteal Tissue From Joint Replacement Surgery: A Novel, Autologous Source of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hana; Docheva, Denitsa; Knothe, Ulf R.

    2014-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of using periosteal tissue from the femoral neck of arthritic hip joints, usually discarded in the normal course of hip replacement surgery, as an autologous source of stem cells. In addition, the study aims to characterize intrinsic differences between periosteum-derived cell (PDC) populations, isolated via either enzymatic digestion or a migration assay, including their proliferative capacity, surface marker expression, and multipotency, relative to commercially available human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured under identical conditions. Commercial BMSCs and PDCs were characterized in vitro, using a growth assay, flow cytometry, as well as assay of Oil Red O, alizarin red, and Safranin O/Fast Green staining after respective culture in adipo-, osteo-, and chondrogenic media. Based on these outcome measures, PDCs exhibited proliferation rate, morphology, surface receptor expression, and multipotency similar to those of BMSCs. No significant correlation was observed between outcome measures and donor age or diagnosis (osteoarthritis [OA] and rheumatoid arthritis [RA], respectively), a profound finding given recent rheumatological studies indicating that OA and RA share not only common biomarkers and molecular mechanisms but also common pathophysiology, ultimately resulting in the need for joint replacement. Furthermore, PDCs isolated via enzymatic digestion and migration assay showed subtle differences in surface marker expression but otherwise no significant differences in proliferation or multipotency; the observed differences in surface marker expression may indicate potential effects of isolation method on the population of cells isolated and/or the behavior of the respective isolated cell populations. This study demonstrates, for the first time to our knowledge, the feasibility of using arthritic tissue resected during hip replacement as a source of autologous stem cells. In sum, periosteum tissue that is resected with the femoral neck in replacing the hip represents an unprecedented and, to date, unstudied source of stem cells from OA and RA patients. Follow-up studies will determine the degree to which this new, autologous source of stem cells can be banked for future use. PMID:24477075

  8. “Global” cell replacement is feasible via neural stem cell transplantation: Evidence from the dysmyelinated shiverer mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Yandava, Booma D.; Billinghurst, Lori L.; Snyder, Evan Y.

    1999-01-01

    Many diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly those of genetic, metabolic, or infectious/inflammatory etiology, are characterized by “global” neural degeneration or dysfunction. Therapy might require widespread neural cell replacement, a challenge not regarded conventionally as amenable to neural transplantation. Mouse mutants characterized by CNS-wide white matter disease provide ideal models for testing the hypothesis that neural stem cell transplantation might compensate for defective neural cell types in neuropathologies requiring cell replacement throughout the brain. The oligodendrocytes of the dysmyelinated shiverer (shi) mouse are “globally” dysfunctional because they lack myelin basic protein (MBP) essential for effective myelination. Therapy, therefore, requires widespread replacement with MBP-expressing oligodendrocytes. Clonal neural stem cells transplanted at birth—using a simple intracerebroventricular implantation technique—resulted in widespread engraftment throughout the shi brain with repletion of MBP. Accordingly, of the many donor cells that differentiated into oligodendroglia—there appeared to be a shift in the fate of these multipotent cells toward an oligodendroglial fate—a subgroup myelinated up to 52% (mean = ≈40%) of host neuronal processes with better compacted myelin of a thickness and periodicity more closely approximating normal. A number of recipient animals evinced decrement in their symptomatic tremor. Therefore, “global” neural cell replacement seems feasible for some CNS pathologies if cells with stem-like features are used. PMID:10359833

  9. Directing human induced pluripotent stem cells into a neurosensory lineage for auditory neuron replacement.

    PubMed

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Bergen, Nicole Van; Crombie, Duncan; Needham, Karina; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A

    2014-08-01

    Emerging therapies for sensorineural hearing loss include replacing damaged auditory neurons (ANs) using stem cells. Ultimately, it is important that these replacement cells can be patient-matched to avoid immunorejection. As human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can be obtained directly from the patient, they offer an opportunity to generate patient-matched neurons for transplantation. Here, we used an established neural induction protocol to differentiate two hiPSC lines (iPS1 and iPS2) and one human embryonic stem cell line (hESC; H9) toward a neurosensory lineage in vitro. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR were used to analyze the expression of key markers involved in AN development at defined time points of differentiation. The hiPSC- and hESC-derived neurosensory progenitors expressed the dorsal hindbrain marker (PAX7), otic placodal marker (PAX2), proneurosensory marker (SOX2), ganglion neuronal markers (NEUROD1, BRN3A, ISLET1, III-tubulin, Neurofilament kDa 160), and sensory AN markers (GATA3 and VGLUT1) over the time course examined. The hiPSC- and hESC-derived neurosensory progenitors had the highest expression levels of the sensory neural markers at 35 days in vitro. Furthermore, the neurons generated from this assay were found to be electrically active. While all cell lines analyzed produced functional neurosensory-like progenitors, variabilities in the levels of marker expression were observed between hiPSC lines and within samples of the same cell line, when compared with the hESC controls. Overall, these findings indicate that this neural assay was capable of differentiating hiPSCs toward a neurosensory lineage but emphasize the need for improving the consistency in the differentiation of hiPSCs into the required lineages. PMID:25126480

  10. Directing Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells into a Neurosensory Lineage for Auditory Neuron Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Bergen, Nicole Van; Crombie, Duncan; Needham, Karina; Dottori, Mirella

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging therapies for sensorineural hearing loss include replacing damaged auditory neurons (ANs) using stem cells. Ultimately, it is important that these replacement cells can be patient-matched to avoid immunorejection. As human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can be obtained directly from the patient, they offer an opportunity to generate patient-matched neurons for transplantation. Here, we used an established neural induction protocol to differentiate two hiPSC lines (iPS1 and iPS2) and one human embryonic stem cell line (hESC; H9) toward a neurosensory lineage in vitro. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR were used to analyze the expression of key markers involved in AN development at defined time points of differentiation. The hiPSC- and hESC-derived neurosensory progenitors expressed the dorsal hindbrain marker (PAX7), otic placodal marker (PAX2), proneurosensory marker (SOX2), ganglion neuronal markers (NEUROD1, BRN3A, ISLET1, III-tubulin, Neurofilament kDa 160), and sensory AN markers (GATA3 and VGLUT1) over the time course examined. The hiPSC- and hESC-derived neurosensory progenitors had the highest expression levels of the sensory neural markers at 35 days in vitro. Furthermore, the neurons generated from this assay were found to be electrically active. While all cell lines analyzed produced functional neurosensory-like progenitors, variabilities in the levels of marker expression were observed between hiPSC lines and within samples of the same cell line, when compared with the hESC controls. Overall, these findings indicate that this neural assay was capable of differentiating hiPSCs toward a neurosensory lineage but emphasize the need for improving the consistency in the differentiation of hiPSCs into the required lineages. PMID:25126480

  11. Stem Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  12. Mitochondrial gene replacement in human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Iyer, S; Xiao, E; Alsayegh, K; Eroshenko, N; Riggs, M J; Bennett, J P; Rao, R R

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor (hNP) cells are an excellent resource for understanding early neural development and neurodegenerative disorders. Given that many neurodegenerative disorders can be correlated with defects in the mitochondrial genome, optimal utilization of hNP cells requires an ability to manipulate and monitor changes in the mitochondria. Here, we describe a novel approach that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (rhTFAM) protein to transfect and express a pathogenic mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) carrying the G11778A mutation associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) disease, into dideoxycytidine (ddC)-treated hNPs. Treatment with ddC reduced endogenous mtDNA and gene expression, without loss of hNP phenotypic markers. Entry of G11778A mtDNA complexed with the rhTFAM was observed in mitochondria of ddC-hNPs. Expression of the pathogenic RNA was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of the SfaN1-digested cDNA. On the basis of the expression of neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin, neuronal differentiation occurred. Our results show for the first time that pathogenic mtDNA can be introduced and expressed into hNPs without loss of phenotype or neuronal differentiation potential. This mitochondrial gene replacement technology allows for creation of in vitro stem cell-based models useful for understanding neuronal development and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21918550

  13. Multi-kilobase homozygous targeted gene replacement in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Susan M.; Ortiz, Luis; Mali, Prashant; Aach, John; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases such as TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 system have so far been used to disrupt, correct or insert transgenes at precise locations in mammalian genomes. We demonstrate efficient knock-in targeted replacement of multi-kilobase genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Using a model system replacing endogenous human genes with their mouse counterpart, we performed a comprehensive study of targeting vector design parameters for homologous recombination. A 2.7 kilobase (kb) homozygous gene replacement was achieved in up to 11% of iPSC without selection. The optimal homology arm length was around 2 kb, with homology length being especially critical on the arm not adjacent to the cut site. Homologous sequence inside the cut sites was detrimental to targeting efficiency, consistent with a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) mechanism. Using two nuclease sites, we observed a high degree of gene excisions and inversions, which sometimes occurred more frequently than indel mutations. While homozygous deletions of 86 kb were achieved with up to 8% frequency, deletion frequencies were not solely a function of nuclease activity and deletion size. Our results analyzing the optimal parameters for targeting vector design will inform future gene targeting efforts involving multi-kilobase gene segments, particularly in human iPSC. PMID:25414332

  14. Current applications of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue replacement in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N; Hanson, Summer E; Hematti, Peiman; Thibeault, Susan L

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapy utilizing adult mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) may very well revolutionize the treatment of a variety of head and neck diseases through the restoration of normal structure and function. Transplanting allogeneic or autologous MSCs into damaged tissues can serve multiple regenerative functions through their self-renewal, differentiation capacity, immune modulation and secretion of bioactive molecules. Further, trophic factors expressed by MSCs have been shown to influence their microenvironment through the promotion of extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis and wound healing needed to regenerate or replace injured tissues. Although clinical applications of MSC based therapies in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery are still in their infancy, efforts are being made to understand and exploit MSCs for tissue repair as well as engineering strategies. In this review, we highlight pre clinical and clinical investigations employing MSC based therapies for the reconstruction of bone, cartilage, soft tissue and vocal fold defects. PMID:23671810

  15. Use of Differentiated Pluripotent Stem Cells in Replacement Therapy for Treating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ira J.; Daley, George Q.; Goldman, Steven A.; Huard, Johnny; Kamp, Timothy J.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived pluripotent stem cells (PSC) directed to various cell fates holds promise as source material for treating numerous disorders. The availability of precisely differentiated PSC-derived cells will dramatically impact blood component and hematopoietic stem cell therapies, and should facilitate treatment of diabetes, some forms of liver disease and neurologic disorders, retinal diseases, and possibly heart disease. Although an unlimited supply of specific cell types are needed, other barriers must be overcome. This review of the state of cell therapies highlights important challenges. Successful cell transplantation will require optimizing the best cell type and site for engraftment, overcoming limitations to cell migration and tissue integration, and occasionally needing to control immunologic reactivity. Collaboration among scientists, clinicians, and industry is critical for generating new stem cell-based therapies. PMID:25146295

  16. Human Neural Stem Cell Replacement Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis by Spinal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hefferan, Michael P.; Galik, Jan; Kakinohana, Osamu; Sekerkova, Gabriela; Santucci, Camila; Marsala, Silvia; Navarro, Roman; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Johe, Karl; Feldman, Eva; Cleveland, Don W.; Marsala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutation in the ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) causes an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Mutant synthesis in motor neurons drives disease onset and early disease progression. Previous experimental studies have shown that spinal grafting of human fetal spinal neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A rats leads to a moderate therapeutical effect as evidenced by local α-motoneuron sparing and extension of lifespan. The aim of the present study was to analyze the degree of therapeutical effect of hNSCs once grafted into the lumbar spinal ventral horn in presymptomatic immunosuppressed SOD1G93A rats and to assess the presence and functional integrity of the descending motor system in symptomatic SOD1G93A animals. Methods/Principal Findings Presymptomatic SOD1G93A rats (60–65 days old) received spinal lumbar injections of hNSCs. After cell grafting, disease onset, disease progression and lifespan were analyzed. In separate symptomatic SOD1G93A rats, the presence and functional conductivity of descending motor tracts (corticospinal and rubrospinal) was analyzed by spinal surface recording electrodes after electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. Silver impregnation of lumbar spinal cord sections and descending motor axon counting in plastic spinal cord sections were used to validate morphologically the integrity of descending motor tracts. Grafting of hNSCs into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A rats protected α-motoneurons in the vicinity of grafted cells, provided transient functional improvement, but offered no protection to α-motoneuron pools distant from grafted lumbar segments. Analysis of motor-evoked potentials recorded from the thoracic spinal cord of symptomatic SOD1G93A rats showed a near complete loss of descending motor tract conduction, corresponding to a significant (50–65%) loss of large caliber descending motor axons. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that in order to achieve a more clinically-adequate treatment, cell-replacement/gene therapy strategies will likely require both spinal and supraspinal targets. PMID:22916141

  17. Stem-cell-based, tissue engineered tracheal replacement in a child: a 2-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Martin J; De Coppi, Paolo; Speggiorin, Simone; Roebuck, Derek; Butler, Colin R; Samuel, Edward; Crowley, Claire; McLaren, Clare; Fierens, Anja; Vondrys, David; Cochrane, Lesley; Jephson, Christopher; Janes, Samuel; Beaumont, Nicholas J; Cogan, Tristan; Bader, Augustinus; Seifalian, Alexander M; Hsuan, J Justin; Lowdell, Mark W; Birchall, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Stem-cell-based, tissue engineered transplants might offer new therapeutic options for patients, including children, with failing organs. The reported replacement of an adult airway using stem cells on a biological scaffold with good results at 6 months supports this view. We describe the case of a child who received a stem-cell-based tracheal replacement and report findings after 2 years of follow-up. Methods A 12-year-old boy was born with long-segment congenital tracheal stenosis and pulmonary sling. His airway had been maintained by metal stents, but, after failure, a cadaveric donor tracheal scaffold was decellularised. After a short course of granulocyte colony stimulating factor, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were retrieved preoperatively and seeded onto the scaffold, with patches of autologous epithelium. Topical human recombinant erythropoietin was applied to encourage angiogenesis, and transforming growth factor ? to support chondrogenesis. Intravenous human recombinant erythropoietin was continued postoperatively. Outcomes were survival, morbidity, endoscopic appearance, cytology and proteomics of brushings, and peripheral blood counts. Findings The graft revascularised within 1 week after surgery. A strong neutrophil response was noted locally for the first 8 weeks after surgery, which generated luminal DNA neutrophil extracellular traps. Cytological evidence of restoration of the epithelium was not evident until 1 year. The graft did not have biomechanical strength focally until 18 months, but the patient has not needed any medical intervention since then. 18 months after surgery, he had a normal chest CT scan and ventilation-perfusion scan and had grown 11 cm in height since the operation. At 2 years follow-up, he had a functional airway and had returned to school. Interpretation Follow-up of the first paediatric, stem-cell-based, tissue-engineered transplant shows potential for this technology but also highlights the need for further research. Funding Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust, The Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, University College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, and Region of Tuscany. PMID:22841419

  18. A Distinct Subpopulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Muse Cells, Directly Commit to the Replacement of Liver Components.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, H; Kushida, Y; Nojima, M; Kuroda, Y; Wakao, S; Ishida, K; Endo, F; Kume, K; Takahara, T; Nitta, H; Tsuda, H; Dezawa, M; Nishizuka, S S

    2016-02-01

    Genotyping graft livers by short tandem repeats after human living-donor liver transplantation (n = 20) revealed the presence of recipient or chimeric genotype cases in hepatocytes (6 of 17, 35.3%), sinusoidal cells (18 of 18, 100%), cholangiocytes (15 of 17, 88.2%) and cells in the periportal areas (7 of 8, 87.5%), suggesting extrahepatic cell involvement in liver regeneration. Regarding extrahepatic origin, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been suggested to contribute to liver regeneration but compose a heterogeneous population. We focused on a more specific subpopulation (1-2% of BM-MSCs), called multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, for their ability to differentiate into liver-lineage cells and repair tissue. We generated a physical partial hepatectomy model in immunodeficient mice and injected green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled human BM-MSC Muse cells intravenously (n = 20). Immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization and species-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed that they integrated into regenerating areas and expressed liver progenitor markers during the early phase and then differentiated spontaneously into major liver components, including hepatocytes (≈74.3% of GFP-positive integrated Muse cells), cholangiocytes (≈17.7%), sinusoidal endothelial cells (≈2.0%), and Kupffer cells (≈6.0%). In contrast, the remaining cells in the BM-MSCs were not detected in the liver for up to 4 weeks. These results suggest that Muse cells are the predominant population of BM-MSCs that are capable of replacing major liver components during liver regeneration. PMID:26663569

  19. Impact of enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with Morquio A syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Almciga-Daz, Carlos J; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Montao, Adriana M; Giugliani, Roberto; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Rodrguez-Lpez, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Snchez, Oscar F; Mason, Robert W; Barrera, Luis A; Mackenzie, William G; Orii, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) can present with systemic skeletal dysplasia, leading to a need for multiple orthopedic surgical procedures, and often become wheelchair bound in their teenage years. Studies on patients with MPS IVA treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) showed a sharp reduction on urinary keratan sulfate, but only modest improvement based on a 6-minute walk test and no significant improvement on a 3-minute climb-up test and lung function test compared with the placebo group, at least in the short-term. Surgical remnants from ERT-treated patients did not show reduction of storage materials in chondrocytes. The impact of ERT on bone lesions in patients with MPS IVA remains limited. ERT seems to be enhanced in a mouse model of MPS IVA by a novel form of the enzyme tagged with a bone-targeting moiety. The tagged enzyme remained in the circulation much longer than untagged native enzyme and was delivered to and retained in bone. Three-month-old MPS IVA mice treated with 23 weekly infusions of tagged enzyme showed marked clearance of the storage materials in bone, bone marrow, and heart valves. When treatment was initiated at birth, reduction of storage materials in tissues was even greater. These findings indicate that specific targeting of the enzyme to bone at an early stage may improve efficacy of ERT for MPS IVA. Recombinant N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) (erGALNS) and in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (prGALNS) has been produced as an alternative to the conventional production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Recombinant GALNS produced in microorganisms may help to reduce the high cost of ERT and the introduction of modifications to enhance targeting. Although only a limited number of patients with MPS IVA have been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), beneficial effects have been reported. A wheelchair-bound patient with a severe form of MPS IVA was treated with HSCT at 15 years of age and followed up for 10 years. Radiographs showed that the figures of major and minor trochanter appeared. Loud snoring and apnea disappeared. In all, 1 year after bone marrow transplantation, bone mineral density at L2-L4 was increased from 0.372 g/cm(2) to 0.548 g/cm(2) and was maintained at a level of 0.480.054 for the following 9 years. Pulmonary vital capacity increased approximately 20% from a baseline of 1.08 L to around 1.31 L over the first 2 years and was maintained thereafter. Activity of daily living was improved similar to the normal control group. After bilateral osteotomies, a patient can walk over 400 m using hip-knee-ankle-foot orthoses. This long-term observation of a patient shows that this treatment can produce clinical improvements although bone deformity remained unchanged. In conclusion, ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA patients, and there are some indications that HSCT may be an alternative to treat this disease. However, as neither seems to be a curative therapy, at least for the skeletal dysplasia in MPS IVA patients, new approaches are investigated to enhance efficacy and reduce costs to benefit MPS IVA patients. PMID:25897204

  20. Impact of enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with Morquio A syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Montaño, Adriana M; Giugliani, Roberto; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Sánchez, Oscar F; Mason, Robert W; Barrera, Luis A; Mackenzie, William G; Orii, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) can present with systemic skeletal dysplasia, leading to a need for multiple orthopedic surgical procedures, and often become wheelchair bound in their teenage years. Studies on patients with MPS IVA treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) showed a sharp reduction on urinary keratan sulfate, but only modest improvement based on a 6-minute walk test and no significant improvement on a 3-minute climb-up test and lung function test compared with the placebo group, at least in the short-term. Surgical remnants from ERT-treated patients did not show reduction of storage materials in chondrocytes. The impact of ERT on bone lesions in patients with MPS IVA remains limited. ERT seems to be enhanced in a mouse model of MPS IVA by a novel form of the enzyme tagged with a bone-targeting moiety. The tagged enzyme remained in the circulation much longer than untagged native enzyme and was delivered to and retained in bone. Three-month-old MPS IVA mice treated with 23 weekly infusions of tagged enzyme showed marked clearance of the storage materials in bone, bone marrow, and heart valves. When treatment was initiated at birth, reduction of storage materials in tissues was even greater. These findings indicate that specific targeting of the enzyme to bone at an early stage may improve efficacy of ERT for MPS IVA. Recombinant N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) (erGALNS) and in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (prGALNS) has been produced as an alternative to the conventional production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Recombinant GALNS produced in microorganisms may help to reduce the high cost of ERT and the introduction of modifications to enhance targeting. Although only a limited number of patients with MPS IVA have been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), beneficial effects have been reported. A wheelchair-bound patient with a severe form of MPS IVA was treated with HSCT at 15 years of age and followed up for 10 years. Radiographs showed that the figures of major and minor trochanter appeared. Loud snoring and apnea disappeared. In all, 1 year after bone marrow transplantation, bone mineral density at L2–L4 was increased from 0.372 g/cm2 to 0.548 g/cm2 and was maintained at a level of 0.48±0.054 for the following 9 years. Pulmonary vital capacity increased approximately 20% from a baseline of 1.08 L to around 1.31 L over the first 2 years and was maintained thereafter. Activity of daily living was improved similar to the normal control group. After bilateral osteotomies, a patient can walk over 400 m using hip–knee–ankle–foot orthoses. This long-term observation of a patient shows that this treatment can produce clinical improvements although bone deformity remained unchanged. In conclusion, ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA patients, and there are some indications that HSCT may be an alternative to treat this disease. However, as neither seems to be a curative therapy, at least for the skeletal dysplasia in MPS IVA patients, new approaches are investigated to enhance efficacy and reduce costs to benefit MPS IVA patients. PMID:25897204

  1. Enzyme replacement therapy prior to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I: 10year combined experience of 2 centres.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arunabha; Miller, Weston; Orchard, Paul J; Jones, Simon A; Mercer, Jean; Church, Heather J; Tylee, Karen; Lund, Troy; Bigger, Brian W; Tolar, Jakub; Wynn, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for the severe form of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I, or Hurler syndrome. In many centres standard practice is to deliver enzyme replacement therapy alongside haematopoietic stem cell transplantation to improve the condition of the patient prior to transplant. We report the combined 10year experience of this approach in two paediatric metabolic and transplant centres. Of 81 patients who underwent a first transplant procedure for Hurler, 88% (71/81) survived and 81% (66/81) were alive and engrafted at a median follow-up of 46months (range 3-124months). The incidence of grade II-IV acute and any chronic graft versus host disease was 17% and 11% respectively. Urinary glycosaminoglycans were significantly reduced after a period of enzyme replacement therapy, and further reductions were seen at 13-24months and 25+months after transplantation. In several individuals with decreased cardiac contractility, an improvement of their condition during enzyme replacement therapy enabled them to undergo transplantation, with one individual receiving full intensity conditioning. PMID:26832957

  2. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  3. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs.

    PubMed

    Dikina, Anna D; Strobel, Hannah A; Lai, Bradley P; Rolle, Marsha W; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-06-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-?1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted into a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications. PMID:25818451

  4. Tracking of iron-labeled human neural stem cells by magnetic resonance imaging in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Gómez, Milagros; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) derived from the ventral mesencephalon are powerful research tools and candidates for cell therapies in Parkinson's disease. However, their clinical translation has not been fully realized due, in part, to the limited ability to track stem cell regional localization and survival over long periods of time after in vivo transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an excellent non-invasive method to study the fate of transplanted cells in vivo. For magnetic resonance imaging cell tracking, cells need to be labeled with a contrast agent, such as magnetic nanoparticles, at a concentration high enough to be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Grafting of human neural stem cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles allows cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging without impairment of cell survival, proliferation, self-renewal, and multipotency. However, the results reviewed here suggest that in long term grafting, activated microglia and macrophages could contribute to magnetic resonance imaging signal by engulfing dead labeled cells or iron nanoparticles dispersed freely in the brain parenchyma over time. PMID:26981077

  5. Large-Scale Hematopoietic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Provides Granulocytes or Macrophages for Cell Replacement Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Nico; Ackermann, Mania; Frenzel, Eileen; Liebhaber, Steffi; Brennig, Sebastian; Happle, Christine; Hoffmann, Dirk; Klimenkova, Olga; Lttge, Doreen; Buchegger, Theresa; Khnel, MarkPhilipp; Schambach, Axel; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Figueiredo, Constanca; Hansen, Gesine; Skokowa, Julia; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types, whereas granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage CSF (M-CSF) represent critical cytokines in myeloid differentiation. When this was investigated in a pluripotent-stem-cell-based hematopoietic differentiation model, IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF exposure resulted in the continuous generation of myeloid cells from an intermediate myeloid-cell-forming complex containing CD34+ clonogenic progenitor cells for more than 2months. Whereas IL-3/G-CSF directed differentiation toward CD45+CD11b+CD15+CD16+CD66b+ granulocytic cells of various differentiation stages up to a segmented morphology displaying the capacity of cytokine-directed migration, respiratory burst response, and neutrophil-extracellular-trap formation, exposure to IL-3/M-CSF resulted in CD45+CD11b+CD14+CD163+CD68+ monocyte/macrophage-type cells capable of phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Hence, we show here that myeloid specification of human pluripotent stem cells by IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF allows for prolonged and large-scale production of myeloid cells, and thus is suited for cell-fate and disease-modeling studies as well as gene- and cell-therapy applications. PMID:25680479

  6. Human foetal brain tissue as quality control when developing stem cells towards cell replacement therapy for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Nelander, Jenny; Grealish, Shane; Parmar, Malin

    2013-12-18

    Human foetal brain tissue has been used in experimental and clinical trials to develop cell replacement therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. These pioneering clinical studies have shown proof of principle that cell replacement therapy can be effective and is worthwhile to develop as a therapeutic strategy for repairing the damaged brain. However, because of the limited availability of foetal brain material, and difficulties in producing standardized and quality-tested cell preparations from this source, there have been extensive efforts in investigating the potential use of alternative cell sources for generating a large number of transplantable, authentic neural progenitors and neurons. In this review, we highlight the value of using human foetal tissue as a reference material for quality control of acquired cell fate of in vitro generated neurons before and after transplantation. PMID:24257249

  7. A stable chimeric fibroblast growth factor (FGF) can successfully replace basic FGF in human pluripotent stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Yasuko; Higuchi, Kumiko; Aiki, Yasuhiko; Shu, Yujing; Asada, Masahiro; Asashima, Makoto; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru; Ito, Yuzuru

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are essential for maintaining self-renewal in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Recombinant basic FGF (bFGF or FGF2) is conventionally used to culture pluripotent stem cells; however, because of the instability of bFGF, repeated addition of fresh bFGF into the culture medium is required in order to maintain its concentration. In this study, we demonstrate that a heat-stable chimeric variant of FGF, termed FGFC, can be successfully used for maintaining human pluripotent stem cells. FGFC is a chimeric protein composed of human FGF1 and FGF2 domains that exhibits higher thermal stability and protease resistance than do both FGF1 and FGF2. Both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells were maintained in ordinary culture medium containing FGFC instead of FGF2. Comparison of cells grown in FGFC with those grown in conventional FGF2 media showed no significant differences in terms of the expression of pluripotency markers, global gene expression, karyotype, or differentiation potential in the three germ lineages. We therefore propose that FGFC may be an effective alternative to FGF2, for maintenance of human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25850016

  8. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  9. [Stem cells and senescence].

    PubMed

    Wa?, Halina; Czarnecka, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into specialized cells, that build the whole body. These rare cells are required for homeostasis and tissue replacement throughout the human lifespan, and appear to be characterized by a few specific physiological and biochemical properties, particularly the capacity for self-renewal. Recent studies suggest that stem cells may undergo senescence, what plays a crucial role in organismal aging. Importantly, both senescence and apoptosis are anti-cancer mechanisms that counteract neoplastic transformation of stem cells. On the other hand, mechanisms that suppress the development of cancer may also induce an unwanted consequence: a decline in the number and functional alterations of stem cells with advancing age. These functional changes reflect harmful effects of age on the genome, epigenome, and proteome of stem cells. Some of which arise cell independently and others which are imposed by an age-related change in the local milieu or systemic environment. Remarkably, some of the changes, particularly epigenomic and proteomic ones, are potentially reversible, and both environmental (e.g. caloric restrictions, hypoxia) and genetic interventions can lead to inducible pluripotency. Here, we discuss recent discoveries in the field of senescence of stem cells. These findings have profound implications, not only for our understanding of stem cells' biology and organismal aging, but also for stem cell-based regenerative medicine and stem cell-based therapy of age-related diseases. PMID:25134352

  10. Optimizing stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, Franois; Wion, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindberghs plane. PMID:20803548

  11. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... General Information Stem Cell Basics Stem Cell Basics Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current Research Policy Glossary Site Map Stem Cell Basics This primer on stem cells is intended ...

  12. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Stem Cell Basics Stem Cell Basics: Introduction Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current Research Policy Glossary Site Map Stem Cell Basics Introduction: What are stem cells, and why ...

  13. Activities of Daily Living in patients with Hunter syndrome: Impact of enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tanjuakio, Julian; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Patel, Pravin; Yasuda, Eriko; Kubaski, Francyne; Tanaka, Akemi; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mason, Robert W.; Montaño, Adriana M.; Orii, Kenji E.; Orii, Koji O.; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) in patients with Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis II; MPS II) using a newly designed ADL questionnaire. We applied the questionnaire to evaluate clinical phenotypes and therapeutic efficacies of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We also explored early signs and symptoms to make early diagnosis feasible. We devised a new ADL questionnaire with three domains: “Movement,” “Movement with Cognition,” and “Cognition.” Each domain has four subcategories rated on a 5-point scale based on level of assistance. We also scored signs and symptoms unique to MPS by 12 subcategories (five points per category), providing 60 points in total. The questionnaire was first administered to 138 healthy Japanese controls (0.33 – 50 years), and successively, to 74 Japanese patients with Hunter syndrome (4 – 49 years). The patient cohort consisted of 51 severe and 23 attenuated phenotypes; 20 patients treated with HSCT, 23 patients treated early with ERT (≤ 8 years), and 25 patients treated late with ERT (> 8 years), and 4 untreated patients. Among 18 severe phenotypic patients treated by HSCT, 10 were designated as early HSCT (≤ 5 years), while 8 were designated as late HSCT (> 5 years). Scores from patients with severe phenotypes were lower than controls and attenuated phenotypes in all categories. Among patients with severe phenotypes, there was a trend that HSCT provides a higher ADL score than early ERT, and there was a significant difference in ADL scores between late ERT and HSCT groups. Early ERT and early HSCT provided a higher score than late ERT and late HSCT, respectively. In conclusion, we have evaluated the feasibility of a new questionnaire in control population and patients with Hunter syndrome, leading to a novel evaluation method for clinical phenotypes and therapeutic efficacy. Early treatment with HSCT provides a better consequence in ADL of patients. PMID:25468646

  14. Stem Cells and Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home General Information Can Stem Cells Help Me? Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current Research Policy Glossary Site Map Can Stem Cells Help Me? The International Society for Stem Cell ...

  15. Prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate gland formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative androgen receptor-negative (AR(-)) status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade therapy. The androgen-regulated gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG could be used to clarify both the cells of origin and the evolution of prostate cancer cells. In this review, we show that the hypothesis that distinct subtypes of cancer result from abnormalities within specific cell types-the stem cell theory of cancer-may instigate a major paradigm shift in cancer research and therapy. Ultimately, the stem cell theory of cancers will affect how we practice clinical oncology: our diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy of prostate and other cancers. PMID:22421313

  16. Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, ...

  17. Replacing and safeguarding pancreatic β cells for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bruin, Jennifer E; Rezania, Alireza; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a scalable source of pancreatic cells for transplantation into patients with diabetes. Here, we describe how the field is gaining momentum toward a β cell replacement therapy. PMID:26631630

  18. Stem cells and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J Dawn; Giordano, Frank J

    2003-01-01

    Several recent discoveries have shifted the paradigm that there is no potential for myocardial regeneration and have fueled enthusiasm for a new frontier in the treatment of cardiovascular disease-stem cells. Fundamental to this emerging field is the cumulative evidence that adult bone marrow stem cells can differentiate into a wide variety of cell types, including cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells. This phenomenon has been termed stem cell plasticity and is the basis for the explosive recent interest in stem cell-based therapies. Directed to cardiovascular disease, stem cell therapy holds the promise of replacing lost heart muscle and enhancing cardiovascular revascularization. Early evidence of the feasibility of stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease came from a series of animal experiments demonstrating that adult stem cells could become cardiac muscle cells (myogenesis) and participate in the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis and vasculogenesis) in the heart after myocardial infarction. These findings have been rapidly translated to ongoing human trials, but many questions remain. This review focuses on the use of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells for the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular disease and will contrast how far we have come in a short time with how far we still need to go before stem cell therapy becomes routine in cardiovascular medicine. PMID:12900745

  19. Introduction of a point mutation into the mouse genome by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells using a replacement type vector with a selectable marker.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, M; Japn, M A; Low, M J

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of small mutations instead of null alleles into the mouse genome has broad applications to the study of protein structure-function relationships and the creation of animal models of human genetic diseases. To test a simple mutational strategy we designed a targeting vector for the mouse proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene containing a single nucleotide insertion that converts the initial tyrosine codon of beta-endorphin 1-31 to a premature translational termination codon and introduces a unique Hpal endonuclease restriction site. The targeting vector also contains a neo cassette immediately 3' to the last POMC exon and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase cassette to allow positive and negative selection. Homologous recombination occurred at a frequency of 1/30 clones of electroporated embryonic stem cells selected in G418 and gancyclovir. 10/11 clones identified initially by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy had the predicted structure without evidence of concatemer formation by Southern blot analysis. We used a combination of Hpa I digestion of PCR amplified fragments and direct nucleotide sequencing to further confirm that the point mutation was retained in 9/10 clones. The POMC gene was transcriptionally silent in embryonic stem cells and the targeted allele was not activated by the downstream phosphoglycerate kinase-1 promoter that transcribed the neo gene. Under the electroporation conditions used, we have demonstrated that a point mutation can be introduced with high efficiency and precision into the POMC gene using a replacement type vector containing a retained selectable marker without affecting expression of the allele in the embryonic stem cells. A similar strategy may be useful for a wide range of genes. Images PMID:8392702

  20. Double replacement: strategy for efficient introduction of subtle mutations into the murine Col1a-1 gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Liu, X; Jaenisch, R

    1994-01-01

    A subtle mutation that rendered type I collagen resistant to mammalian collagenase has been introduced into the murine Col1a-1 (recently redesignated Cola-1) gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Initially, a "hit and run" procedure was used. Since two steps were required for introducing each mutation and more than one mutation was to be introduced in the same genomic region independently, we have developed a streamlined procedure that involves two sequential replacement-type homologous recombination events. In the first step, an internal deletion was introduced into the Col1a-1 locus along with the positive and negative selectable markers, neo and tk, to mark the region of interest. G418-resistant homologous recombinants were isolated and used in the second step in which the deleted Col1a-1 allele was replaced with a construct containing the desired mutation. Homologous recombinants containing the mutation were identified among the Tk- ES clones after selection with FIAU [1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodouracil (called fialuridine)]. Approximately 10% of such clones contained the desired mutation. The double replacement procedure greatly reduces the time and amount of work required to introduce mutations independently into the same or closely linked regions. Once the homologous recombinants derived from the first step are established, the introduction of other mutations into the deleted region becomes a one-step procedure. For X number of introduced mutations, 2X selections are required with the "hit and run" approach, but only X + 1 are required with the double-replacement method. This innovative procedure could be very useful in studies of gene structure and function as well as gene expression and regulation. Images PMID:8146196

  1. Stem cells: review and update.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Karl G; Longaker, Michael T

    2004-01-01

    Regenerative medicine and emerging biotechnologies stand to revolutionize the practice of medicine. Advancements in stem cell biology, including embryonic and postnatal somatic stem cells, have made the prospect of tissue regeneration a potential clinical reality. Short of reproductive cloning, these same technologies, properly used, could allow for the creation of replacement tissue for the deficient host. To provide a concise review for surgeons on the current science and biology of stem cells, we surveyed the scientific literature, MEDLINE, and relevant political headlines that illuminate the stem cell discussion; the issues are summarized in this review. Building on this conceptual framework, the related issues of clinical promise and the political debate enveloping this emerging technology are examined. A basic understanding of stem cell biology is paramount to stay informed of this emerging technology and the national debate. PMID:14718284

  2. Stem cells, retinal ganglion cells and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Sluch, Valentin M; Zack, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) represent an essential neuronal cell type for vision. These cells receive inputs from light-sensing photoreceptors via retinal interneurons and then relay these signals to the brain for further processing. RGC diseases that result in cell death, e.g. glaucoma, often lead to permanent damage since mammalian nerves do not regenerate. Stem cell differentiation can generate cells needed for replacement or can be used to generate cells capable of secreting protective factors to promote survival. In addition, stem cell-derived cells can be used in drug screening research. Here, we discuss the current state of stem cell research potential for interference in glaucoma and other optic nerve diseases with a focus on stem cell differentiation to RGCs. PMID:24732765

  3. [Corneal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Samoil?, O

    2012-01-01

    Corneal stem cells are adult type stem cells located in the basal layer of the epithelium at the sclero-corneal limbus. Modern concepts regarding corneal stem cells are discussed, focusing on stem niche location, corneal healing mechanisms, methods to cultivate stem cells in vitro or genetic and structural characterization. Most of the research in this area was performed in the last decade. PMID:23713335

  4. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A.H.; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. PMID:25752437

  5. Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Allergy Emergency Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants Print A A A Text Size ... Recovery Coping en espaol Trasplantes de clulas madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have ...

  6. Embryonic stem cells. Stem cell programs.

    PubMed

    Zerhouni, Elias

    2003-05-01

    The availability of human embryonic stem cell lines provides an important tool for scientists to explore the fundamental mechanisms that regulate differentiation into specific cell types. When more is known about the mechanisms that govern these processes, human embryonic stem cells may be clinically useful in generating cell types that have been damaged or depleted by a variety of human diseases. The NIH is actively pursuing a variety of initiatives to promote this developing research field, while continuing and expanding its long-standing investment in adult stem cells and research. PMID:12738840

  7. Stem cells: science, policy, and ethics.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Gerald D; Fischbach, Ruth L

    2004-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cells offer the promise of a new regenerative medicine in which damaged adult cells can be replaced with new cells. Research is needed to determine the most viable stem cell lines and reliable ways to promote the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into specific cell types (neurons, muscle cells, etc). To create new cell lines, it is necessary to destroy preimplantation blastocysts. This has led to an intense debate that threatens to limit embryonic stem cell research. The profound ethical issues raised call for informed, dispassionate debate. PMID:15545983

  8. Cancer Stem Cell Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    Mission The Cancer Stem Cell Consortium is a self-assembled organization of intramural scientists at all levels of training with an interest in fundamental questions concerning stem cells, developmental biology, and cancer. We host scientific exchanges, w

  9. Stem cells assessed.

    PubMed

    Blanpain, Cdric; Daley, George Q; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Passegu, Emmanuelle; Rossant, Janet; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2012-07-01

    The increasing momentum of stem cell research continues, with the better characterization of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, the conversion of differentiated cells into different cell types and the use of pluripotent stem cells to generate whole tissues, among other advances. Here, six experts in the field of stem cell research compare different stem cell models and highlight the importance of pursuing complementary experimental approaches for a better understanding of pluripotency and differentiation and an informed approach to medical applications. PMID:22678486

  10. Putative intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    A heterogeneous set of intestinal stem cells markers has been described in intestinal glands but the ultrastructural identity of intestinal stem cells remains unknown. By using electron microscopy, this study demonstrated the presence of cells with stem morphology in the intestinal glands of mice of different ages. These putative intestinal stem cells have large, euchromatic, irregular shaped nucleus, large, visible nucleolus, few ER cisternae and mitochondria. Their morphology is distinct from the morphology of any other intestinal gland cell. Stem cells located at the base of intestinal glands undergo mitosis. This study enhances the hypothesis of a gland (crypt) base columnar cell that gives rise to all the intestinal lineages. PMID:26366225

  11. Pancreatic Stem Cells Remain Unresolved

    PubMed Central

    Morahan, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are ideally placed as cell sources for a diabetic transplantation therapy. Unfortunately, the inability to generate functional differentiated islet cells from pluripotent stem cells and the poor availability of donor islets have severely restricted the broad clinical use of the replacement therapy. Therefore, endogenous sources that can be directed to becoming insulin-secreting cells are actively sought after. In particular, any cell types in the developing or adult pancreas that may act as pancreatic stem cells (PSC) would provide an alternative renewable source for endogenous regeneration. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress and knowledge of such PSC, and discuss ways that facilitate the future development of this often controversial, but crucial research. PMID:25132582

  12. Pancreatic stem cells remain unresolved.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet ? cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient ? cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including ? cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are ideally placed as cell sources for a diabetic transplantation therapy. Unfortunately, the inability to generate functional differentiated islet cells from pluripotent stem cells and the poor availability of donor islets have severely restricted the broad clinical use of the replacement therapy. Therefore, endogenous sources that can be directed to becoming insulin-secreting cells are actively sought after. In particular, any cell types in the developing or adult pancreas that may act as pancreatic stem cells (PSC) would provide an alternative renewable source for endogenous regeneration. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress and knowledge of such PSC, and discuss ways that facilitate the future development of this often controversial, but crucial research. PMID:25132582

  13. Introduction to stem cells and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kolios, George; Moodley, Yuben

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are a population of undifferentiated cells characterized by the ability to extensively proliferate (self-renewal), usually arise from a single cell (clonal), and differentiate into different types of cells and tissue (potent). There are several sources of stem cells with varying potencies. Pluripotent cells are embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of the embryo and induced pluripotent cells are formed following reprogramming of somatic cells. Pluripotent cells can differentiate into tissue from all 3 germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). Multipotent stem cells may differentiate into tissue derived from a single germ layer such as mesenchymal stem cells which form adipose tissue, bone, and cartilage. Tissue-resident stem cells are oligopotent since they can form terminally differentiated cells of a specific tissue. Stem cells can be used in cellular therapy to replace damaged cells or to regenerate organs. In addition, stem cells have expanded our understanding of development as well as the pathogenesis of disease. Disease-specific cell lines can also be propagated and used in drug development. Despite the significant advances in stem cell biology, issues such as ethical controversies with embryonic stem cells, tumor formation, and rejection limit their utility. However, many of these limitations are being bypassed and this could lead to major advances in the management of disease. This review is an introduction to the world of stem cells and discusses their definition, origin, and classification, as well as applications of these cells in regenerative medicine. PMID:23257690

  14. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of ...

  15. Artificial Stem Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Lutolf, Matthias P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their dual ability to reproduce themselves (self-renew) and specialize (differentiate), yielding a plethora of daughter cells that maintain and regenerate tissues. In contrast to their embryonic counterparts, adult stem cells retain their unique functions only if they are in intimate contact with an instructive microenvironment, termed stem cell niche. In these niches, stem cells integrate a complex array of molecular signals that, in concert with induced cell-intrinsic regulatory networks, control their function and balance their numbers in response to physiologic demands. This progress report provides a perspective on how advanced materials technologies could be used (i) to engineer and systematically analyze specific aspects of functional stem cells niches in a controlled fashion in vitro and (ii) to target stem cell niches in vivo. Such artificial niches constitute potent tools for elucidating stem cell regulatory mechanisms with the capacity to directly impact the development of novel therapeutic strategies for tissue regeneration. PMID:20882496

  16. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis. PMID:22404469

  17. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... based therapies Cell culture Cell division Chromosome Clone Cloning Cord blood stem cells Culture medium Differentiation Directed ... Pluripotent Polar body Preimplantation Proliferation Regenerative medicine Reproductive cloning Signals Somatic cell Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) ...

  18. Stem Cells and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Fernanda M.P.; Santos, Anderson K.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Gomes, Katia N.; Ladeira, Luiz O.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing interest in stem cell research is linked to the promise of developing treatments for many lifethreatening, debilitating diseases, and for cell replacement therapies. However, performing these therapeutic innovations with safety will only be possible when an accurate knowledge about the molecular signals that promote the desired cell fate is reached. Among these signals are transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i. Acting as an intracellular messenger, Ca2+ has a key role in cell signaling pathways in various differentiation stages of stem cells. The aim of this chapter is to present a broad overview of various moments in which Ca2+-mediated signaling is essential for the maintenance of stem cells and for promoting their development and differentiation, also focusing on their therapeutic potential. PMID:22453975

  19. Embryonic stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Joydeep; Rao, Mahendra

    2007-10-01

    Stem cell therapies, particularly those using embryonic stem cells, offer a novel approach to treating disease. There is an ongoing effort to develop tools and reagents to assist in understanding stem cells at a research level. In addition to these research tools, making stem cell therapy a reality requires the development of tools that enable the translation of research into viable therapies. Three sets of tools are discussed in this article: tools enabling stem cell scale-up and manufacture to GMP standards, tools addressing the behavior of cells in animal models, and tools to assess transplanted cells in early clinical trials. The development of such tools will address many of the safety and efficacy questions that are likely to arise as stem cell therapies move from bench to bedside. PMID:17899490

  20. Stem cells versus plasticity in liver and pancreas regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Janel L; Grompe, Markus; Sander, Maike

    2016-02-25

    Cell replacement in adult organs can be achieved through stem cell differentiation or the replication or transdifferentiation of existing cells. In the adult liver and pancreas, stem cells have been proposed to replace tissue cells, particularly following injury. Here we review how specialized cell types are produced in the adult liver and pancreas. Based on current evidence, we propose that the plasticity of differentiated cells, rather than stem cells, accounts for tissue repair in both organs. PMID:26911907

  1. Scientists Find Stem Cells That Might Repair Skull, Face Bones

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157041.html Scientists Find Stem Cells That Might Repair Skull, Face Bones Discovery made ... they may be one step closer to using stem cells to replace damaged skull and facial bones in ...

  2. Stem Cells News Update: A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, SC

    2013-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to a previous Commentary published in 2011. It updates some of the events mentioned in that Commentary and continues with more interesting and exciting news on stem cell research and the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine. Some of the news includes: 1) the 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka; 2) the cloning of human embryonic stem cells; 3) the continued search for truly pluripotent adult stem cells via in vitro and in vivo protocols; 4) the breakthrough in organ replacements; 5) the global stem cell race; 6) the global stem cell cryo-preservation business; 7) the worldwide stem cell donor registries, and 8) the issue of government regulation on stem cell therapy. PMID:24778557

  3. Toward beta cell replacement for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Bjarki; Sui, Lina; Freytes, Donald O; Creusot, Remi J; Egli, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of insulin more than 90 years ago introduced a life-saving treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes, and since then, significant progress has been made in clinical care for all forms of diabetes. However, no method of insulin delivery matches the ability of the human pancreas to reliably and automatically maintain glucose levels within a tight range. Transplantation of human islets or of an intact pancreas can in principle cure diabetes, but this approach is generally reserved for cases with simultaneous transplantation of a kidney, where immunosuppression is already a requirement. Recent advances in cell reprogramming and beta cell differentiation now allow the generation of personalized stem cells, providing an unlimited source of beta cells for research and for developing autologous cell therapies. In this review, we will discuss the utility of stem cell-derived beta cells to investigate the mechanisms of beta cell failure in diabetes, and the challenges to develop beta cell replacement therapies. These challenges include appropriate quality controls of the cells being used, the ability to generate beta cell grafts of stable cellular composition, and in the case of type 1 diabetes, protecting implanted cells from autoimmune destruction without compromising other aspects of the immune system or the functionality of the graft. Such novel treatments will need to match or exceed the relative safety and efficacy of available care for diabetes. PMID:25733347

  4. Stress and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2013-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23799624

  5. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page Print this page Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  6. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  8. Human embryonic stem cells and respect for life

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to stimulate academic discussion about the ethical justification of using human primordial stem cells for tissue transplantation, cell replacement, and gene therapy. There are intriguing alternatives to using embryos obtained from elective abortions and in vitro fertilisation to reconstitute damaged or dysfunctional human organs. These include the expansion and transplantation of latent adult progenitor cells. Key Words: Primordial stem cell research embryonic stem cells pluripotent stem cells embryo research PMID:10860206

  9. Autophagy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jun-Lin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Prescott, Mark; Menendez, Javier A.; Liu, Fei; Wang, Fen; Wang, Chenran; Wolvetang, Ernst; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Zhang, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered in autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes for degradation. As a major intracellular degradation and recycling pathway, autophagy is crucial for maintaining cellular homeostasis as well as remodeling during normal development, and dysfunctions in autophagy have been associated with a variety of pathologies including cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and neurodegenerative disease. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and differentiate into various cells in the body, which are important in development, tissue renewal and a range of disease processes. Therefore, it is predicted that autophagy would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis in various stem cells given their relatively long life in the organisms. In contrast to the extensive body of knowledge available for somatic cells, the role of autophagy in the maintenance and function of stem cells is only beginning to be revealed as a result of recent studies. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the current understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of autophagy in embryonic stem cells, several tissue stem cells (particularly hematopoietic stem cells), as well as a number of cancer stem cells. We discuss how recent studies of different knockout mice models have defined the roles of various autophagy genes and related pathways in the regulation of the maintenance, expansion and differentiation of various stem cells. We also highlight the many unanswered questions that will help to drive further research at the intersection of autophagy and stem cell biology in the near future. PMID:23486312

  10. Keystone symposia - stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan

    2004-05-01

    The Keystone Symposia stem cell conference focused on the biological nature of self-renewing cell populations that exist in special regulatory niches and form other cell types that enable maintenance of tissue function, repair and, in some cases, regeneration. Adult stem cells are present in most, if not all tissues, and their regulation as renewing populations, the nature of the niche and the factors driving decisions for differentiation in primary pathways remain the dominant interest in the field. The more vexed question concerning possible transdifferentiation of adult stem cells from one tissue type to another has become focused on the role of fusion and whether this is a recapitulation of normal processes in embryonic and adult development. The possible linkage of cancer phenotypes with stem cells and downstream progenitor cell types through loss of regulatory influences in renewal, expansion and lineage commitment is a rapidly growing interest. Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells and their maintenance and directed differentiation into a variety of tissue types remains an optimistic field of research in which some debate exists about true pluripotency of adult stem cells. The role of epigenetic influences on differentiation and development has drawn on data from nuclear transfer studies in cloning the whole organism and in ES cell production. The formation of germ cells and their renewal and differentiation was also a major interest of the symposium. PMID:15155166

  11. Harnessing stem cells and dendritic cells for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2008-01-01

    This review presents the latest achievements in basic studies on stem-cell biology and on approaches aimed to design therapies based on stem cells and dendritic cells. Studies on stem-cell homeostasis are aimed to delineate the accessibility of these cells for therapeutic purposes. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has become a routine application of stem cells in the treatment of patients with cancer and with hematologic disorders. Perspectives of application of the mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine and for tolerance induction following allogeneic transplantation are being extensively explored. Reprogramming of adult somatic cells to an undifferentiated pluripotent state in vitro by a transduction with just four genes encoding transcription factors opened the way for the generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. Such induced pluripotent stem cells hold a great promise for replacement therapies of various so far incurable disorders. However, because of the tumorigenic potential of the retroviral vector transduction-induced pluripotent stem cells, before these cells become useful for clinical application, appropriate, safe methods of stem cell generation, selection, proliferation and differentiation need to be elaborated. There is a great potential for further developments of cancer immunotherapies and for controlling of post-transplantational reactions, if current basic studies on stem cells and on immunostimulatory and tolerogenic dendritic cells would be successfully translated to the clinic. PMID:19172843

  12. Stem cell strategies for Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, K; Alvarez, A; Marutle, A; Kwak, Y D; Choumkina, E

    2006-06-01

    We have found much evidence that the brain is capable of regenerating neurons after maturation. In our previous study, human neural stem cells (HNSCs) transplanted into aged rat brains differentiated into neural cells and significantly improved the cognitive functions of the animals, indicating that HNSCs may be a promising candidate for cell-replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, ethical and practical issues associated with HNSCs compel us to explore alternative strategies. Here, we report novel technologies to differentiate adult human mesenchymal stem cells, a subset of stromal cells in the bone marrow, into neural cells by modifying DNA methylation or over expression of nanog, a homeobox gene expressed in embryonic stem cells. We also report peripheral administrations of a pyrimidine derivative that increases endogenous stem cell proliferation improves cognitive function of the aged animal. Although these results may promise a bright future for clinical applications used towards stem cell strategies in AD therapy, we must acknowledge the complexity of AD. We found that glial differentiation takes place in stem cells transplanted into amyloid-( precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We also found that over expression of APP gene or recombinant APP treatment causes glial differentiation of stem cells. Although further detailed mechanistic studies may be required, RNA interference of APP or reduction of APP levels in the brain can significantly reduced glial differentiation of stem cells and may be useful in promoting neurogenesis after stem cell transplantation. PMID:16953146

  13. Cell replacement therapy for central nervous system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Danju; McKinnon, Randall D.

    2015-01-01

    The brain and spinal cord can not replace neurons or supporting glia that are lost through traumatic injury or disease. In pre-clinical studies, however, neural stem and progenitor cell transplants can promote functional recovery. Thus the central nervous system is repair competent but lacks endogenous stem cell resources. To make transplants clinically feasible, this field needs a source of histocompatible, ethically acceptable and non-tumorgenic cells. One strategy to generate patient-specific replacement cells is to reprogram autologous cells such as fibroblasts into pluripotent stem cells which can then be differentiated into the required cell grafts. However, the utility of pluripotent cell derived grafts is limited since they can retain founder cells with intrinsic neoplastic potential. A recent extension of this technology directly reprograms fibroblasts into the final graftable cells without an induced pluripotent stem cell intermediate, avoiding the pluripotent caveat. For both types of reprogramming the conversion efficiency is very low resulting in the need to amplify the cells in culture which can lead to chromosomal instability and neoplasia. Thus to make reprogramming biology clinically feasible, we must improve the efficiency. The ultimate source of replacement cells may reside in directly reprogramming accessible cells within the brain. PMID:26604878

  14. Cell replacement therapy for central nervous system diseases.

    PubMed

    Tso, Danju; McKinnon, Randall D

    2015-09-01

    The brain and spinal cord can not replace neurons or supporting glia that are lost through traumatic injury or disease. In pre-clinical studies, however, neural stem and progenitor cell transplants can promote functional recovery. Thus the central nervous system is repair competent but lacks endogenous stem cell resources. To make transplants clinically feasible, this field needs a source of histocompatible, ethically acceptable and non-tumorgenic cells. One strategy to generate patient-specific replacement cells is to reprogram autologous cells such as fibroblasts into pluripotent stem cells which can then be differentiated into the required cell grafts. However, the utility of pluripotent cell derived grafts is limited since they can retain founder cells with intrinsic neoplastic potential. A recent extension of this technology directly reprograms fibroblasts into the final graftable cells without an induced pluripotent stem cell intermediate, avoiding the pluripotent caveat. For both types of reprogramming the conversion efficiency is very low resulting in the need to amplify the cells in culture which can lead to chromosomal instability and neoplasia. Thus to make reprogramming biology clinically feasible, we must improve the efficiency. The ultimate source of replacement cells may reside in directly reprogramming accessible cells within the brain. PMID:26604878

  15. Ocular stem cells: a status update!

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are unspecialized cells that have been a major focus of the field of regenerative medicine, opening new frontiers and regarded as the future of medicine. The ophthalmology branch of the medical sciences was the first to directly benefit from stem cells for regenerative treatment. The success stories of regenerative medicine in ophthalmology can be attributed to its accessibility, ease of follow-up and the eye being an immune-privileged organ. Cell-based therapies using stem cells from the ciliary body, iris and sclera are still in animal experimental stages but show potential for replacing degenerated photoreceptors. Limbal, corneal and conjunctival stem cells are still limited for use only for surface reconstruction, although they might have potential beyond this. Iris pigment epithelial, ciliary body epithelial and choroidal epithelial stem cells in laboratory studies have shown some promise for retinal or neural tissue replacement. Trabecular meshwork, orbital and sclera stem cells have properties identical to cells of mesenchymal origin but their potential has yet to be experimentally determined and validated. Retinal and retinal pigment epithelium stem cells remain the most sought out stem cells for curing retinal degenerative disorders, although treatments using them have resulted in variable outcomes. The functional aspects of the therapeutic application of lenticular stem cells are not known and need further attention. Recently, embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium has been used for treating patients with Stargardts disease and age-related macular degeneration. Overall, the different stem cells residing in different components of the eye have shown some success in clinical and animal studies in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:25158127

  16. [Cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Niewiarowska, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory gains increasingly greater significance in the world of medicine. Numerous findings of scientific research in vivo and in vitro indicate that it is the population of undifferentiated, self-renewing cells which is responsible for recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Similarly to normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) function in the environment of the other cells of the organism, called the niche, where they receive signals for differentiation and proliferation processes. Disorders in the signaling pathways between CSC and the niche that result from e.g. acquired oncogenic mutations may lead to uncontrolled proliferation of stem cells, gaining independence from the primary niche or settling a new microenvironment. CSC are identified on the basis of specific markers - membrane proteins or cell enzymes. Methods based on the measurement of dye fluorescence (obtaining side population, SP) or fluorescence of the fluorophore conjugated with a monoclonal antibody directed against the specific CSC marker are used for isolation. A different method obtains morphologically miscellaneous clones by single cell cloning: holo-, mero- and paraclones. Tumor forming assay in NOD/SCID mice is a standard in vivo test that confirms the stem character of isolated cells. However, this model may not fully reflect the complexity of cancer illnesses in human beings. Solving the mystery of oncogenesis, including the existence of cancer stem cells, is undoubtedly one of the priorities of contemporary medicine that should contribute to the improvement of cancer therapy. PMID:23001204

  17. Cardiac Stem Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Leri, Annarosa; Rota, Marcello; Hosoda, Toru; Goichberg, Polina; Anversa, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The critical role that stem cell niches have in cardiac homeostasis and myocardial repair following injury is the focus of this review. Cardiac niches represent specialized microdomains where the quiescent and activated state of resident stem cells is regulated. Alterations in niche function with aging and cardiac diseases result in abnormal sites of cardiomyogenesis and inadequate myocyte formation. The relevance of Notch 1 signaling, gap-junction formation, HIF-1? and metabolic state in the regulation of stem cell growth and differentiation within the cardiac niches are discussed. PMID:25267073

  18. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  19. Stem cell therapy and the retina.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E; Pearson, R A

    2007-10-01

    Retinal degeneration culminating in photoreceptor loss is the leading cause of untreatable blindness in the developed world. In this review, we consider how photoreceptors might be replaced by transplantation and how stem cells might be optimised for use as donor cells in future clinical strategies for retinal repair. We discuss the current advances in human and animal models of retinal cell transplantation, focussing on stem cell and reproductive cloning biology, in relation to the practical issues of retinal transplantation surgery. Stem and progenitor cells can be isolated from a number of sources including embryonic tissue, adult brain and even the retina, prompting many researchers to investigate the potential for using these cells to generate photoreceptors for transplantation. Nevertheless, several obstacles need to be overcome before these techniques can be applied in a clinical setting. Embryonic or stem cells have so far shown little ability to differentiate into retinal phenotypes when transplanted into the adult retina. We have recently noted, however, that donor cells harvested much later, at the photoreceptor precursor developmental stage, can be transplanted successfully and restore visual function. The current challenge is to understand the developmental processes that guide embryonic or adult stem cells towards photoreceptor differentiation, so that large numbers of these cells might be transplanted at the optimal stage. Future advances in reproductive cloning technology could lead to the successful generation of stem cells from adult somatic cells, thereby facilitating auto-transplantation of genetically identical cells in patients requiring photoreceptor replacement. PMID:17914439

  20. Stem cells in embryonic skin development.

    PubMed

    Forni, Maria F; Trombetta-Lima, Marina; Sogayar, Mari C

    2012-01-01

    The skin is a complex stratified organ which acts not only as a permeability barrier and defense against external agents, but also has essential thermoregulatory, sensory and metabolic functions. Due to its high versatility and activity, the skin undergoes continuous self-renewal to repair damaged tissue and replace old cells. Consequently, the skin is a reservoir for adult stem cells of different embryonic origins. Skin stem cell populations reside in the adult hair follicle, sebaceous gland, dermis and epidermis. However, the origin of most of the stem cell populations found in the adult epidermis is still unknown. Far more unknown is the embryonic origin of other stem cells that populate the other layers of this tissue. In this review we attempt to clarify the emergence, structure, markers and embryonic development of diverse populations of stem cells from the epidermis, dermis and related appendages such as the sebaceous gland and hair follicle. PMID:23283431

  1. Interventional stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Prologo, J D; Hawkins, M; Gilliland, C; Chinnadurai, R; Harkey, P; Chadid, T; Lee, Z; Brewster, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The ability to deliver cells in appropriate doses to their targeted site of action is a well-known obstacle to optimising stem cell therapy. Systemic administration of cells results in pulmonary "trapping," which significantly decreases the number of available circulating cells to impact underlying disorders. Directed delivery of stem cells in interventional radiology may provide an additional option for bypassing the lungs, as well as introduce novel potential avenues for decreasing doses required to effect cellular therapy, efficiently obtain local paracrine effects, and/or to simplify targeting strategies. PMID:26874660

  2. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  3. Hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trigg, Michael E

    2004-04-01

    The hematopoietic system of the young child acquires, through time, the ability to cope with exposure to a number of environmental toxins and infectious agents. Occasionally, severe aplastic anemia occurs secondary to exposure to some of these toxins or infectious agents. The occurrence of severe aplastic anemia provides an opportunity to study the maturation of the hematopoietic system because often the immune system is partially intact. Hematopoietic stem cell transplants permit the study of the complete reconstitution of the hematopoietic and immunologic system. Stem cell transplants are often used to treat severe aplastic anemia or, alternatively, may be part of the treatment for an underlying malignant disease or a genetic disease. Sources of stem cells and the age of the recipient and donor have an impact on the success of the stem cell transplant. A stem cell transplantation provides a window of opportunity to study and observe the normal maturation of the immune system and the sensitivity. Very clearly, children recover from severe aplastic anemia and stem cell transplantations more readily with fewer problems and complications than adults. The environmental risks that a child who received a stem cell transplantation faces are related primarily to the deficiencies of the hematopoietic system and immune system during the recovery phase. Therefore, diminished resistance to infectious agents, primarily viruses and other opportunistic organisms, are the primary risk that children who are recovering from these transplantations face. There are few data on the susceptibility of these children to the toxic effects of other environmental toxicants during the recovery period, which may take years before complete recovery. PMID:15060199

  4. Stem cells in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huei-Wen; Lin, Chun-Che; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic techniques have been recently developed for cell-based assays. In microfluidic systems, the objective is for these microenvironments to mimic in vivo surroundings. With advantageous characteristics such as optical transparency and the capability for automating protocols, different types of cells can be cultured, screened, and monitored in real time to systematically investigate their morphology and functions under well-controlled microenvironments in response to various stimuli. Recently, the study of stem cells using microfluidic platforms has attracted considerable interest. Even though stem cells have been studied extensively using bench-top systems, an understanding of their behavior in in vivo-like microenvironments which stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation is still lacking. In this paper, recent cell studies using microfluidic systems are first introduced. The various miniature systems for cell culture, sorting and isolation, and stimulation are then systematically reviewed. The main focus of this review is on papers published in recent years studying stem cells by using microfluidic technology. This review aims to provide experts in microfluidics an overview of various microfluidic systems for stem cell research. PMID:21522491

  5. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  6. Leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo

    2011-03-01

    Leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) or leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are defined by their ability to form tumors after xenotransplantation in immunodeficient mice and appear to be rare in most human leukemias. In various leukemias, only small subpopulations of cells can transfer disease upon transplantation into immunocompromised NOD/SCID mice, and markers that distinguish the leukemogenic cancer cells from the bulk populations of non-leukemogenic cells have been identified. However, the phenotype of LICs is heterogeneous: it is variable for the different types of acute myeloid leukemias; cells with different membrane phenotype can act as LICs in each B-acute lymphoid leukemia; LICs change during the evolution of chronic myeloid leukemia from the chronic to the acute phase. There is a general consensus that the identification and characterization of leukemic stem cells might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets and, through this way, to more effective treatments by focusing therapy on the most malignant cells. PMID:21107841

  7. Stem cells: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kathyjo A; Majka, Susan M; Wulf, Gerald G; Goodell, Margaret A

    2002-01-01

    The identification of adult-derived stem cells which maintain plasticity throughout the course of a lifetime, has transformed the field of stem cell biology. Bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are the most well-characterized population of these multipotential cells. First identified for their ability to reconstitute blood lineages and rescue lethally irradiated hosts, these cells have also been shown to differentiate and integrate into skeletal muscle, cardiac myocytes, vascular endothelium, liver, and brain tissue. Various populations of HSC are being studied, exploiting cell surface marker expression, such as Sca-1, c-kit, CD34, and lin; as well as the abilityto efflux the vital dye Hoecsht 33342. Detection of engrafted donor derived cells into various tissue types in vivo is a laborious process and may involve detection of beta-galactosidase via colorimetric reaction or antibody labeling or green fluorescent protein (GFP) via fluorescence microscopy, as well as in situ hybridization to detect the Y-chromosome. Using these techniques, the search has begun for tissue specific stem cells capable of host tissue regeneration, self renewal, and transdifferentiation. Caution is urged when interpreting these types of experiments because although they are stimulating, limitations of the technologies may provide misleading results. PMID:12046843

  8. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  9. State of the Art in Stem Cell Research: Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, and Transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marolt, Darja

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells divide by asymmetric division and display different degrees of potency, or ability to differentiate into various specialized cell types. Owing to their unique regenerative capacity, stem cells have generated great enthusiasm worldwide and represent an invaluable tool with unprecedented potential for biomedical research and therapeutic applications. Stem cells play a central role in the understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating tissue development and regeneration in normal and pathological conditions and open large possibilities for the discovery of innovative pharmaceuticals to treat the most devastating diseases of our time. Not least, their intrinsic characteristics allow the engineering of functional tissues for replacement therapies that promise to revolutionize the medical practice in the near future. In this paper, the authors present the characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and new developments of transdifferentiation technologies and explore some of the biomedical applications that this emerging technology is expected to empower. PMID:24089646

  10. Understanding melanoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nicholas; Couts, Kasey L; Luo, Yuchun; Fujita, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumors are incredibly diverse and contain many different subpopulations of cells. The cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulation is responsible for many aspects of tumorigenesis and has been shown to play an important role in melanoma development, progression, drug resistance and metastasis. However, it is becoming clear that tumor cell populations are dynamic and can be influenced by many factors, such as signals from the tumor microenvironment and somatic evolution. This review will present the current understanding of CSCs and the challenges of identifying and characterizing this dynamic cell population. The known characteristics and functions of melanoma stem cells, and the potential for therapeutic targeting of these cells in melanoma, will be discussed. PMID:26594315

  11. From Beta Cell Replacement to Beta Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is affecting more than 25.8 million people in the United States, causing huge burden on the health care system and economy. Insulin injection, which is the predominant treatment for diabetes, is incapable of replenishing the lost insulin-producing beta cell in patients. Restoring beta cell mass through replacement therapy such as islet transplantation or beta cell regeneration through in vitro and in vivo strategies has attracted particular attentions in the field due to its potential to cure diabetes. In the aspect of islet transplantation, gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and more biocompatible immunosuppressive drugs have been tested in various preclinical animal models to improve the longevity and function of human islets against the posttransplantation challenges. In the islet regeneration aspect, insulin-producing cells have been generated through in vitro transdifferentiation of stem cells and other types of cells and demonstrated to be capable of glycemic control. Moreover, several biomarkers including cell-surface receptors, soluble factors, and transcriptional factors have been identified or rediscovered in mediating the process of beta cell proliferation in rodents. This review summarizes the current progress and hurdles in the preclinical efforts in resurrecting beta cells. It may provide some useful insights into the future drug discovery for antidiabetic purposes. PMID:25355714

  12. Stem cell therapy for the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Injury and disease of the spinal cord are generally met with a poor prognosis. This poor prognosis is due not only to the characteristics of the diseases but also to our poor ability to deliver therapeutics to the spinal cord. The spinal cord is extremely sensitive to direct manipulation, and delivery of therapeutics has proven a challenge for both scientists and physicians. Recent advances in stem cell technologies have opened up a new avenue for the treatment of spinal cord disease and injury. Stem cells have proven beneficial in rodent models of spinal cord disease and injury. In these animal models, stem cells have been shown to produce their effect by the dual action of cell replacement and the trophic support of the factors secreted by these cells. In this review we look at the main clinical trials involving stem cell transplant into the spinal cord, focusing on motor neuron diseases and spinal cord injury. We will also discuss the major hurdles in optimizing stem cell delivery methods into the spinal cord. We shall examine current techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging guidance and cell labeling and will look at the current research striving to improve these techniques. With all caveats and future research taken into account, this is a very exciting time for stem cell transplant into the spinal cord. We are only beginning to realize the huge potential of stem cells in a central nervous system setting to provide cell replacement and trophic support. Many more trials will need to be undertaken before we can fully exploit the attributes of stem cells. PMID:22776143

  13. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants Print A A A Text Size What's ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  14. Stem cell therapy for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, K O; Gan, S U; Calne, R Y

    2012-12-01

    Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future. PMID:23565384

  15. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.

  16. Stem cells and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Margaret A; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    Research into stem cells and aging aims to understand how stem cells maintain tissue health, what mechanisms ultimately lead to decline in stem cell function with age, and how the regenerative capacity of somatic stem cells can be enhanced to promote healthy aging. Here, we explore the effects of aging on stem cells in different tissues. Recent research has focused on the ways that genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and the extrinsic environmental milieu influence stem cell functionality over time. We describe each of these three factors, the ways in which they interact, and how these interactions decrease stem cell health over time. We are optimistic that a better understanding of these changes will uncover potential strategies to enhance stem cell function and increase tissue resiliency into old age. PMID:26785478

  17. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    MedlinePLUS

    Bone marrow is the soft, fatty tissue inside your bones. Bone marrow contains stem cells, which are immature cells that ... lymphoma , and myeloma can be treated with a bone marrow transplant . This is now often called a stem ...

  18. Stem Cells and Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent findings in stem cell biology have resulted in new opportunities for the treatment of reproductive disease. Endometrial regeneration can be driven by bone marrow derived stem cells. This finding has potential implications for the treatment of uterine disorders. It also supports a new theory for the etiology of endometriosis. The ovaries have been shown to contain stem cells that form oocytes in adults and can be cultured in vitro to develop mature oocytes. Stem cells from the fetus have been demonstrated to lead to microchimerism in the mother and implicated in several maternal diseases. Additionally the placenta may be another source of hematopoietic stem cell. Finally endometrial derived stem cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into non-reproductive tissues. While we are just beginning to understand stem cells and many key questions remain, the potential advantages of stem cells in reproductive biology and medicine are apparent. PMID:19208782

  19. Stem cells and somatic cells: reprogramming and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Estrov, Zeev

    2009-01-01

    Recent seminal discoveries have significantly advanced the field of stem cell research and received worldwide attention. Improvements in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology, enabling the cloning of Dolly the sheep, and the derivation and differentiation of human embryonic stem cells raised hopes that normal cells could be generated to replace diseased or injured tissue. At the same time, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that somatic cells of one tissue are capable of generating cells of another tissue. It was theorized that any cell might be reprogrammed, by exposure to a new environment, to become another cell type. This concept contradicts two established hypotheses: (1) that only specific tissues are generated from the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm and (2) that tissue cells arise from a rare population of tissue-specific stem cells in a hierarchical fashion. SCNT, cell fusion experiments, and most recent gene transfer studies also contradict these hypotheses, as they demonstrate that mature somatic cells can be reprogrammed to regain pluripotent (or even totipotent) stem cell capacity. On the basis of the stem cell theory, hierarchical cancer stem cell differentiation models have been proposed. Cancer cell plasticity is an established phenomenon that supports the notion that cellular phenotype and function might be altered. Therefore, mechanisms of cellular plasticity should be exploited and the clinical significance of the cancer stem cell theory cautiously assessed. PMID:19778860

  20. Intestinal stem cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Asfaha, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal epithelium is renewed every 3-5 days from at least two principal stem cell pools. Actively cycling crypt based columnar (CBC) Lgr5(+) cells and slower cycling Bmi1-expressing or Krt19-expressing cells maintain the small intestinal and colonic epithelium in homeostasis and injury. Following acute epithelial damage, Lgr5+ stem cells are susceptible to injury and a reserve stem cell or progenitor pool is responsible for regeneration of the epithelium. Current data suggests that intestinal stem cells respond to inflammatory signals to modulate their expansion during epithelial regeneration. Here, we review how inflammation and injury affect intestinal and colonic stem cells. PMID:26654865

  1. Urothelial cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dimov, Irena; Visnjic, Milan; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2010-01-01

    There is mounting evidence supporting the idea that tumors, similar to normal adult tissues, arise from a specific stem-like cell population, the cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are considered as the real driving force behind tumor growth, the ability to metastasize, as well as resistance to conventional antitumor therapy. The concept that cancer growth recapitulates normal proliferative and/or regenerative processes, even though in very dysfunctional ways, has tremendous implications for cancer therapy. The rapid development of the CSC field, shoulder to shoulder with powerful genome-wide screening techniques, has provided cause for optimism for the development of more reliable therapies in the future. However, several important issues still lie ahead. Recent identification of a highly tumorigenic stem-like compartment and existence of urothelial differentiation programs in urothelial cell carcinomas (UCCs) raised important questions about UCC initiation and development. This review examines the present knowledge on CSCs in UCCs regarding the similarities between CSCs and the adult urothelial stem cells, potential origin of urothelial CSCs, main regulatory pathways, surface markers expression, and the current state of CSC-targeting therapeutic strategies. PMID:20661533

  2. Materials as stem cell regulators

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  3. Once Upon a Stem Cell

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Science > Once Upon a Stem Cell Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Once Upon a Stem Cell By ... Do Geometry Sticky Stem Cells This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  4. Advances in Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Hopman, Rusudan K.; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)–mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) has largely replaced bone marrow (BM) as a source of stem cells for both autologous and allogeneic cell transplantation. With G-CSF alone, up to 35% of patients are unable to mobilize sufficient numbers of CD34 cells/kg to ensure successful and consistent multi-lineage engraftment and sustained hematopoietic recovery. To this end, research is ongoing to identify new agents or combinations which will lead to the most effective and efficient stem cell mobilization strategies, especially in those patients who are at risk for mobilization failure. We describe both established agents and novel strategies at various stages of development. The latter include but are not limited to drugs that target the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, S1P agonists, VCAM/VLA-4 inhibitors, parathyroid hormone, proteosome inhibitors, Groβ, and agents that stabilize HIF. While none of the novel agents have yet gained an established role in HPC mobilization in clinical practice, many early studies exploring these new pathways show promising results and warrant further investigation. PMID:24476957

  5. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells?

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Richard L.; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A.; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Boucher, Shayne E.; Bickenbach, Jackie R.; Kerr, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. Scope of review A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. Major conclusions An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. General significance Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. PMID:22820019

  6. Cell Replacement Therapies: Is It Time to Reprogram?

    PubMed Central

    Feund, Christian; Mummery, Christine L.; Hoeben, Rob C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell transplantations have become a very successful therapeutic approach to treat otherwise life-threatening blood disorders. It is thought that stem cell transplantation may also become a feasible treatment option for many non-blood-related diseases. So far, however, the limited availability of human leukocyte antigen-matched donors has hindered development of some cell replacement therapies. The Nobel-prize rewarded finding that pluripotency can be induced in somatic cells via expression of a few transcription factors has led to a revolution in stem cell biology. The possibility to change the fate of somatic cells by expressing key transcription factors has been used not only to generate pluripotent stem cells, but also for directly converting somatic cells into fully differentiated cells of another lineage or more committed progenitor cells. These approaches offer the prospect of generating cell types with a specific genotype de novo, which would circumvent the problems associated with allogeneic cell transplantations. This technology has generated a plethora of new disease-specific research efforts, from studying disease pathogenesis to therapeutic interventions. Here we will discuss the opportunities in this booming field of cell biology and summarize how the scientists in the Netherlands have joined efforts in one area to exploit the new technology. PMID:25141889

  7. Stem cells as therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders?

    PubMed

    Mattson, M P

    2001-11-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive increase in the risk of several prominent neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In each of these disorders specific populations of neurons become dysfunctional, then die and are not replaced. The adult brain and spinal cord contain populations of so-called neural stem cells (self-renewing and multipotent) and neural precursor cells (specified to a certain fate, but still mitotic) that may provide a continuing source of new neurons and glial cells during successful aging and after injury to the nervous system. Recent studies have shown that stem cells from embryos and adults can be transplanted into the nervous system, differentiate into neurons and glia and restore lost function in experimental models of neurodegenerative diseases. Embryonic stem cells may be a particularly effective donor cell type for transplantation-based therapies. Efficacy of stem cell therapies remains to be established in clinical trials in humans. Another approach is to mobilize endogenous neural stem cells. Animals studies have shown that dietary and behavioral modifications can indeed stimulate neurogenesis. Molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural stem cells and neural precursor cells are being elucidated and are revealing novel targets for the development of pharmaceuticals that promote neurogenesis. PMID:19811037

  8. Melanocytes, melanocyte stem cells, and melanoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Deborah; Mascarenhas, Joseph B.; Shea, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Melanocyte stem cells differ greatly from melanoma stem cells; the former provide pigmented cells during normal tissue homeostasis and repair, while the latter play an active role in a lethal form of cancer. These two cell types share several features and can be studied by similar methods. Aspects held in common by both melanocyte stem cells and melanoma stem cells include their expression of shared biochemical markers, a system of similar molecular signals necessary for their maintenance, and a requirement for an ideal niche microenvironment for providing these factors. This review provides a perspective of both these cell types and discusses potential models of stem cell growth and propagation. Recent findings provide a strong foundation for the development of new therapeutics directed at isolating and manipulating melanocyte stem cells for tissue engineering or at targeting and eradicating melanoma specifically, while sparing non-tumor cells. PMID:23438380

  9. Stem cells: research tools and clinical treatments.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Michael C; Wallace, Euan M

    2011-09-01

    The term 'stem cell' most commonly refers to embryonic stem cells, particularly in the lay media; however, it also describes other cell types. A stem cell represents a cell of multi-lineage potential with the ability for self-renewal. It is now clear that the plasticity and immortality of a given stem cell will depend on what type of stem cell it is, whether an embryonic stem cell, a fetal-placental stem cell or an adult stem cell. Stem cells offer great promise as cell-based therapies for the future. With evolving technology, much of the socio-political debate regarding stem cells can now be avoided. PMID:21951457

  10. [Perinatal sources of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Piskorska-Jasiulewicz, Magdalena Maria; Witkowska-Zimny, Ma?gorzata

    2015-01-01

    Recently, stem cell biology has become an interesting topic. Several varieties of human stem cells have been isolated and identified in vivo and in vitro. Successful application of hematopoietic stem cells in hematology has led to the search for other sources of stem cells and expanding the scale of their application. Perinatal stem cells are a versatile cell population, and they are interesting for both scientific and practical objectives. Stem cells from perinatal tissue may be particularly useful in the clinic for autologous transplantation for fetuses and newborns, and after banking in later stages of life, as well as for in utero transplantation in the case of genetic disorders. In this review paper we focus on the extraction and therapeutic potential of stem cells derived from perinatal tissues such as the placenta, the amnion, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood and Wharton's jelly. PMID:25748624

  11. Progress and prospects in stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-ling; Yi, Fei; Pan, Hui-ze; Duan, Shun-lei; Ding, Zhi-chao; Yuan, Guo-hong; Qu, Jing; Zhang, Hai-chen; Liu, Guang-hui

    2013-06-01

    In the past few years, progress being made in stem cell studies has incontestably led to the hope of developing cell replacement based therapy for diseases deficient in effective treatment by conventional ways. The induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are of great interest of cell therapy research because of their unrestricted self-renewal and differentiation potentials. Proof of principle studies have successfully demonstrated that iPSCs technology would substantially benefit clinical studies in various areas, including neurological disorders, hematologic diseases, cardiac diseases, liver diseases and etc. On top of this, latest advances of gene editing technologies have vigorously endorsed the possibility of obtaining disease-free autologous cells from patient specific iPSCs. Here in this review, we summarize current progress of stem cell therapy research with special enthusiasm in iPSCs studies. In addition, we compare current gene editing technologies and discuss their potential implications in clinic application in the future. PMID:23736002

  12. Human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Rodin, Sergey; Stenfelt, Sonya; Antonsson, Liselotte; Tryggvason, Karl; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-02-01

    The establishment of permanent human embryonic stem cell lines (hESCs) was first reported in 1998. Due to their pluripotent nature and ability to differentiate to all cell types in the body, they have been considered as a cell source for regenerative medicine. Since then, intensive studies have been carried out regarding factors regulating pluripotency and differentiation. hESCs are obtained from supernumerary human IVF (invitro fertilization) embryos that cannot be used for the couple's infertility treatment. Today, we can establish and expand these cells in animal substance-free conditions, even from single cells biopsied from eight-cell stage embryos. There are satisfactory tests for the demonstration of genetic stability, absence of tumorigenic mutations, functionality, and safety of hESCs. Clinical trials are ongoing for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and spinal cord injury (SCI). This review focuses on the present state of these techniques. PMID:26602389

  13. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17?-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17?-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  14. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17?-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17?-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  15. Stem cells and the stem cell niche in the breast: an integrated hormonal and developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Brisken, Cathrin; Duss, Stephan

    2007-06-01

    The mammary gland is a unique organ in that it undergoes most of its development after birth under the control of systemic hormones. Whereas in most other organs stem cells divide in response to local stimuli, to replace lost cells, in the mammary gland large numbers of cells need to be generated at specific times during puberty, estrous cycles and pregnancy to generate new tissue structures. This puts special demands on the mammary stem cells and requires coordination of local events with systemic needs. Our aim is to understand how the female reproductive hormones control mammary gland development and influence tumorigenesis. We have shown that steroid hormones act in a paracrine fashion in the mammary gland delegating different functions to locally produced factors. These in turn, affect cell-cell interactions that result in changes of cell behavior required for morphogenesis and differentiation. Here, we discuss how these hormonally regulated paracrine interactions may impinge on stem cells and the stem cell niche and how this integration of signals adds extra levels of complexity to current mammary stem cell models. We propose a model whereby the stem cell niches change depending on the developmental stages and the hormonal milieu. According to this model, repeated hormone stimulation of stem cells and their niches in the course of menstrual cycles may be an important early event in breast carcinogenesis and may explain the conundrum why breast cancer risk increases with the number of menstrual cycles experienced prior to a first pregnancy. PMID:17873347

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    HAWLEY, ROBERT G.; RAMEZANI, ALI; HAWLEY, TERESA S.

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the capacity to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into all of the mature blood cell types. The ability to prospectively identify and isolate HSCs has been the subject of extensive investigation since the first transplantation studies implying their existence almost 50 years ago. Despite significant advances in enrichment protocols, the continuous in vitro propagation of human HSCs has not yet been achieved. This chapter describes current procedures used to phenotypically and functionally characterize candidate human HSCs and initial efforts to derive permanent human HSC lines. PMID:17141055

  17. Stem cells and progenitor cells in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Haller, Hermann; de Groot, Kirsten; Bahlmann, Ferdinand; Elger, Marlies; Fliser, Danilo

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are necessary for repair and regeneration of injured renal tissue. Infiltrating or resident stem cells can contribute to the replacement of lost or damaged tissue. However, the regulation of circulating progenitor cells is not well understood. We have analyzed the effects of erythropoietin on circulating progenitor cells and found that low levels of erythropoietin induce mobilization and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells. In an animal model of 5/6 nephrectomy we could demonstrate that erythropoietin ameliorates tissue injury. Full regeneration of renal tissue demands the existence of stem cells and an adequate local "milieu," a so-called stem cell niche. We have previously described a stem cell niche in the kidneys of the dogfish, Squalus acanthus. Further analysis revealed that in the regenerating zone of the shark kidney, stem cells exist that can be induced by loss of renal tissue to form new glomeruli. Such animal models improve our understanding of stem cell behavior in the kidney and may eventually contribute to novel therapies. PMID:16221168

  18. Recent advances in stem cell neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Ostenfeld, T; Svendsen, C N

    2003-01-01

    1. Neural stem cells can be cultured from the CNS of different mammalian species at many stages of development. They have an extensive capacity for self-renewal and will proliferate ex vivo in response to mitogenic growth factors or following genetic modification with immortalising oncogenes. Neural stem cells are multipotent since their differentiating progeny will give rise to the principal cellular phenotypes comprising the mature CNS: neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. 2. Neural stem cells can also be derived from more primitive embryonic stem (ES) cells cultured from the blastocyst. ES cells are considered to be pluripotent since they can give rise to the full cellular spectrum and will, therefore, contribute to all three of the embryonic germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. However, pluripotent cells have also been derived from germ cells and teratocarcinomas (embryonal carcinomas) and their progeny may also give rise to the multiple cellular phenotypes contributing to the CNS. In a recent development, ES cells have also been isolated and grown from human blastocysts, thus raising the possibility of growing autologous stem cells when combined with nuclear transfer technology. 3. There is now an emerging recognition that the adult mammalian brain, including that of primates and humans, harbours stem cell populations suggesting the existence of a previously unrecognised neural plasticity to the mature CNS, and thereby raising the possibility of promoting endogenous neural reconstruction. 4. Such reports have fuelled expectations for the clinical exploitation of neural stem cells in cell replacement or recruitment strategies for the treatment of a variety of human neurological conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and ischaemic brain injury. Owing to their migratory capacity within the CNS, neural stem cells may also find potential clinical application as cellular vectors for widespread gene delivery and the expression of therapeutic proteins. In this regard, they may be eminently suitable for the correction of genetically-determined CNS disorders and in the management of certain tumors responsive to cytokines. Since large numbers of stem cells can be generated efficiently in culture, they may obviate some of the technical and ethical limitations associated with the use of fresh (primary) embryonic neural tissue in current transplantation strategies. 5. While considerable recent progress has been made in terms of developing new techniques allowing for the long-term culture of human stem cells, the successful clinical application of these cells is presently limited by our understanding of both (i) the intrinsic and extrinsic regulators of stem cell proliferation and (ii) those factors controlling cell lineage determination and differentiation. Although such cells may also provide accessible model systems for studying neural development, progress in the field has been further limited by the lack of suitable markers needed for the identification and selection of cells within proliferating heterogeneous populations of precursor cells. There is a further need to distinguish between the committed fate (defined during normal development) and the potential specification (implying flexibility of fate through manipulation of its environment) of stem cells undergoing differentiation. 6. With these challenges lying ahead, it is the opinion of the authors that stem-cell therapy is likely to remain within the experimental arena for the foreseeable future. In this regard, few (if any) of the in vivo studies employing neural stem cell grafts have shown convincingly that behavioural recovery can be achieved in the various model paradigms. Moreover, issues relating to the quality control of cultured cells and their safety following transplantation have only begun to be addressed. 7. While on the one hand cell biotechnologists have been quick to realise the potential commercial value, human stem cell research and its clinical applications has been the subject of intense ethical and legislative considerations. The present chapter aims to review some recent aspects of stem cell research applicable to developmental neurobiology and the potential applications in clinical neuroscience. PMID:12627808

  19. Characteristics of glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sampetrean, Oltea; Saya, Hideyuki

    2013-10-01

    The cancer stem cell theory postulates that tumors are sustained by a select cell population with specific features, such as self-renewal ability and the capacity to give rise to a heterogeneous mass of tumor cells. The existence of such cells has been demonstrated for glioblastoma, with these cells being referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs). Glioblastomas are notoriously heterogeneous tumors, however, and the isolation and characterization of their stem cells will require further investigations. Furthermore, the lack of unequivocal markers for GSCs and a partial overlap in characteristics with other cells often lead to confusion. Here, we review the characteristics necessary for a glioma cell to be considered a stem cell, and we adopt our murine glioblastoma model based on genetically modified neural stem cells to illustrate and discuss the GSC concept. PMID:23584571

  20. Stem Cells in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Edmond J.; Ziga, Joaquin; Koka, Prasad S.; Husain, Zaheed; Romero, Viviana; Stern, Joel N.H.; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha

    2008-01-01

    Aging is a genetically programmed decline in the functional effectiveness of the organism. It is manifested by a collective group of changes in cells or organs that occur over the course of a lifespan, limiting the duration of life. Longevity usually refers to long-lived members of a population within species. Organs develop and can involute according to specific timetables. Such timetables correlate with a preordained proliferative capacity of cells mediated by cell and organ clocks. In this review, we discuss different aspects related to genetic and environmental factors that are involved in determining life span. We discuss the influence of ontogenic, genetic and environmental factors in aging. The genetic factors can be studied in embryonic stem cells (ESC) and in niches (microenvironments) of stem cells (SC) using cellular or experimental animal models. We discuss molecular mechanisms involving genes and proteins associated with death pathways, niches, or hubs, on longevity. Moreover, we also discuss genes and proteins, associated with death pathways, on longevity. Unraveling these mechanisms may further our understanding of human aging leading to development of therapeutic interventions with the potential of prolonging life. PMID:19030125

  1. Making a Hematopoietic Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Michael G; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Lemischka, Ihor R; Moore, Kateri A

    2016-03-01

    Previous attempts to either generate or expand hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro have involved either ex vivo expansion of pre-existing patient or donor HSCs or de novo generation from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs alleviated ESC ethical issues but attempts to generate functional mature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful. New efforts focus on directly reprogramming somatic cells into definitive HSCs and HSPCs. To meet clinical needs and to advance drug discovery and stem cell therapy, alternative approaches are necessary. In this review, we synthesize the strategies used and the key findings made in recent years by those trying to make an HSC. PMID:26526106

  2. Making a Hematopoietic Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Michael G.; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Moore, Kateri A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous attempts to either generate or expand hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro have involved either ex vivo expansion of pre-existing patient or donor HSCs or de novo generation from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs alleviated ESC ethical issues but attempts to generate functional mature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful. New efforts focus on directly reprogramming somatic cells into definitive HSCs and HSPCs. To meet clinical needs and to advance drug discovery and stem cell therapy, alternative approaches are necessary. In this review, we synthesize the strategies used and the key findings made in recent years by those trying to make an HSC. PMID:26526106

  3. Pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever. PMID:26045976

  4. Immunomodulation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Reza; Fiorina, Paolo; Adra, Chaker N.; Atkinson, Mark; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent stromal cells that have the potential to give rise to cells of diverse lineages. Interestingly, MSCs can be found in virtually all postnatal tissues. The main criteria currently used to characterize and identify these cells are the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into tissues of mesodermal origin, combined with a lack in expression of certain hematopoietic molecules. Because of their developmental plasticity, the notion of MSC-based therapeutic intervention has become an emerging strategy for the replacement of injured tissues. MSCs have also been noted to possess the ability to impart profound immunomodulatory effects in vivo. Indeed, some of the initial observations regarding MSC protection from tissue injury once thought mediated by tissue regeneration may, in reality, result from immunomodulation. Whereas the exact mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory functions of MSC remain largely unknown, these cells have been exploited in a variety of clinical trials aimed at reducing the burden of immune-mediated disease. This article focuses on recent advances that have broadened our understanding of the immunomodulatory properties of MSC and provides insight as to their potential for clinical use as a cell-based therapy for immune-mediated disorders and, in particular, type 1 diabetes. PMID:18586907

  5. Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zuoren; Pestell, Timothy G.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of cells within tumors with capabilities of self-renewal, differentiation, and tumorigenicity when transplanted into an animal host. A number of cell surface markers such as CD44, CD24, and CD133 are often used to identify and enrich CSCs. A regulatory network consisting of microRNAs and Wnt/?-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways controls the CSC properties. The clinical relevance of CSCs has been strengthened by emerging evidence, demonstrating that CSCs are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation treatment and that CSCs are very likely to be the origin of cancer metastasis. CSCs are believed to be an important target for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Herein we summarize the current understanding of CSCs, with a focus on the role of miRNA and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), and discuss the clinical application of targeting CSCs for cancer treatment. PMID:22981632

  6. [Brain tumor stem cells].

    PubMed

    Hide, Takuichiro; Makino, Keishi; Nakamura, Hideo; Yano, Shigetoshi; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2015-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive brain tumor, and which harbors not only rapidly dividing cells but also small populations of slowly dividing and dormant cells with tumorigenesity-, self-renewal-, and multi-lineage differentiation capabilities. GBM stem cells (GSCs), which are resistant to conventional chemo -radiotherapy and may be a cause of local recurrence and dissemination. Additionally, heterogeneity of GSCs in the same tumor had been shown by the innovation of microarray and sequencing technology. However, outcome in patients with GBM remains unsatisfactory. Accumulation of the clinical evidence and basic research findings targeting for GSCs and their specific microenvironments (GSC niches) raise the possibility of new treatments to overcome GBM. PMID:25985640

  7. Skeletal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal stem cells (SSCs) reside in the postnatal bone marrow and give rise to cartilage, bone, hematopoiesis-supportive stroma and marrow adipocytes in defined in vivo assays. These lineages emerge in a specific sequence during embryonic development and post natal growth, and together comprise a continuous anatomical system, the bone-bone marrow organ. SSCs conjoin skeletal and hematopoietic physiology, and are a tool for understanding and ameliorating skeletal and hematopoietic disorders. Here and in the accompanying poster, we concisely discuss the biology of SSCs in the context of the development and postnatal physiology of skeletal lineages, to which their use in medicine must remain anchored. PMID:25758217

  8. Stem Cells, Redox Signaling, and Stem Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Functional stem cell decline has been postulated to result in loss of maintenance of tissue homeostasis leading to organismal decline and diseases of aging. Recent Advances: Recent findings implicate redox metabolism in the control of stem cell pool and stem cell aging. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are better known for their damaging properties to DNA, proteins and lipids, recent findings suggest that ROS may also be an integral physiological mediator of cellular signaling in primary cells. Critical Issues: Here we review recent published work on major signaling pathways and transcription factors that are regulated by ROS and mediate ROS regulation of stem cell fate. We will specifically focus on how alterations in this regulation may be implicated in disease and particularly in diseases of stem cell aging. In general, based on the work described here we propose a model in which ROS function as stem cell rheostat. Future Directions: Future work in elucidating how ROS control stem cell cycling, apoptotic machinery, and lineage determination should shed light on mechanisms whereby ROS may control stem cell aging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1902–1916. PMID:24383555

  9. Wnt Signaling in Stem Cells and Tumor Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Wnt signaling cascade is critically important in stem cell biology, both in homeostatic maintenance and repair and regeneration of tissues and organs, through their respective somatic stem cells (SSCs). However, aberrant Wnt signaling is associated with a wide array of tumor types and Wnt signaling is important in the so-termed cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) population. The ability to safely therapeutically target the Wnt signaling pathway offers enormous promise. However, just like the Sword of Damocles, significant risks and concerns regarding targeting such a critical pathway in normal stem cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis remain ever present. With this in mind, we review our current understanding of the role of Wnt signaling in SSCs and CSC/TICs and the potential to pharmacologically manipulate these endogenous stem cell populations (both normal and tumor). PMID:26251120

  10. Placenta-an alternative source of stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matikainen, Tiina; Laine, Jarmo . E-mail: jarmo.laine@bts.redcoss.fi

    2005-09-01

    The two most promising practical applications of human stem cells are cellular replacement therapies in human disease and toxicological screening of candidate drug molecules. Both require a source of human stem cells that can be isolated, purified, expanded in number and differentiated into the cell type of choice in a controlled manner. Currently, uses of both embryonic and adult stem cells are investigated. While embryonic stem cells are pluripotent and can differentiate into any specialised cell type, their use requires establishment of embryonic stem cell lines using the inner cell mass of an early pre-implantation embryo. As the blastocyst is destroyed during the process, ethical issues need to be carefully considered. The use of embryonic stem cells is also limited by the difficulties in growing large numbers of the cells without inducing spontaneous differentiation, and the problems in controlling directed differentiation of the cells. The use of adult stem cells, typically derived from bone marrow, but also from other tissues, is ethically non-controversial but their differentiation potential is more limited than that of the embryonic stem cells. Since human cord blood, umbilical cord, placenta and amnion are normally discarded at birth, they provide an easily accessible alternative source of stem cells. We review the potential and current status of the use of adult stem cells derived from the placenta or umbilical cord in therapeutic and toxicological applications.

  11. Stem cell ageing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fulle, Stefania; Centurione, Lucia; Mancinelli, Rosa; Sancilio, Silvia; Manzoli, Francesco Antonio; Di Pietro, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as the process of deterioration of many body functions over the lifespan of an individual. In spite of the number of different theories about ageing, there is a general consensus in identifying ageing effects in a reduced capacity to regenerate injured tissues or organs and an increased propensity to infections and cancer. In recent years the stem cell theory of ageing has gained much attention. Adult stem cells residing in mammalian tissues are essential for tissue homeostasis and repair throughout adult life. With advancing age, the highly regulated molecular signalling necessary to ensure proper cellular, tissue, and organ homeostasis loses coordination and leads, as a consequence, to a compromised potential of regeneration and repair of damaged cells and tissues. Although a complete comprehension of the molecular mechanisms involved in stem cell ageing and apoptosis is far to be reached, recent studies are beginning to unravel the processes involved in stem cell ageing, particularly in adult skeletal muscle stem cells, namely satellite cells. Thus, the focus of this review is to analyse the relationship between stem cell ageing and apoptosis with a peculiar attention to human satellite cells as compared to haematopoietic stem cells. Undoubtedly, the knowledge of age-related changes of stem cells will help in understanding the ageing process itself and will provide novel therapeutic challenges for improved tissue regeneration. PMID:22352749

  12. Trophoblast Stem Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R. Michael; Fisher, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Trophoblast stem cells (TSC) are the precursors of the differentiated cells of the placenta. In the mouse, TSC can be derived from outgrowths of either blastocyst polar trophectoderm (TE) or extraembryonic ectoderm (ExE), which originates from polar TE after implantation. The mouse TSC niche appears to be located within the ExE adjacent to the epiblast, on which it depends for essential growth factors, but whether this cellular architecture is the same in other species remains to be determined. Mouse TSC self-renewal can be sustained by culture on mitotically inactivated feeder cells, which provide one or more factors related to the NODAL pathway, and a medium supplemented with FGF4, heparin, and fetal bovine serum. Repression of the gene network that maintains pluripotency and emergence of the transcription factor pathways that specify a trophoblast (TR) fate enables TSC derivation in vitro and placental formation in vivo. Disrupting the pluripotent network of embryonic stem cells (ESC) causes them to default to a TR ground state. Pluripotent cells that have acquired sublethal chromosomal alterations may be sequestered into TR for similar reasons. The transition from ESC to TSC, which appears to be unidirectional, reveals important aspects of initial fate decisions in mice. TSC have yet to be derived from domestic species in which remarkable TR growth precedes embryogenesis. Recent derivation of TSC from blastocysts of the rhesus monkey suggests that isolation of the human equivalents may be possible and will reveal the extent to which mechanisms uncovered by using animal models are true in our own species. PMID:21106963

  13. Embryonic stem cell bank: a work proposal.

    PubMed

    Nieto, A; Cobo, F; Barroso-Deljess, A; Barnie, A H; Catalina, P; Cabrera, C M; Cortes, J L; Montes, R M; Concha, A

    2006-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have an unlimited capacity to proliferate by a self-renewal process and can be differentiated in the three germ layers, opening doors to new clinical therapies to replace missing or damaged cells. The number of research groups and projects using human stem cells has increased largely in the last 5 yr. The creation of stem cell banks is another important step to support the advance of research in this field. Banks must be operated within the strict regulatory famework of good manufacturing practices and good laboratory practices that assure the highest quality standards and must implement a quality system that complies with international quality systems standards. It may also be appropriate to aim at an accreditation in order to assure correct laboratory practices at all times. Stem cell banks should receive the lines previously derived by other groups and hESCs should be provided for groups that justify their use in a research project previously approved by an ethical committee. The assays generally accepted as typical of hESCs together with the microbiological analysis should be performed in order to assure a consistent, reliable, and safe line for the researchers. In this article, the Andalusian Stem Cell Bank proposes a model of a stem cell banking process in order to create a flow diagram of hESC lines and, following the international initiatives in stem cells research, to achieve the full characterization of cells and a standardization of protocols that would simplify the hESCs culture. PMID:17237550

  14. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  15. The new stem cell biology.

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Frimberger, Angela E.; Dooner, Mark S.; Mcauliffe, Christina I.; Miller, Caroline; Becker, Pamela; Badiavas, Evangelis; Falanga, Vincent J.; Elfenbein, Gerald; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating muscle, cardiac, hepatic, renal, and bone cells. Purified hematopoietic stem cells have generated cardiac and hepatic cells and reversed disease manifestations in these tissues. Hematopoietic stem cells also alter phenotype with cell cycle transit or circadian phase. During a cytokine stimulated cell cycle transit, reversible alterations of differentiation and engraftment occur. Primitive hematopoietic stem cells express a wide variety of adhesion and cytokine receptors and respond quickly with migration and podia extensions on exposure to cytokines. These data suggest an "Open Chromatin" model of stem cell regulation in which there is a fluctuating continuum in the stem cell/progenitor cell compartments, rather than a hierarchical relationship. These observations, along with progress in using low dose treatments and tolerization approaches, suggest many new therapeutic strategies involving stem cells and the creation of a new medical specialty; stemology. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:12053709

  16. Bioprinting for stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in applying bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized biomolecules can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cells of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics. PMID:23260439

  17. Stem cells behind the barrier.

    PubMed

    Cangkrama, Michael; Ting, Stephen B; Darido, Charbel

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells sustain the adult skin for a lifetime through self-renewal and the production of committed progenitors. These stem cells generate progeny that will undergo terminal differentiation leading to the development of a protective epidermal barrier. Whereas the molecular mechanisms that govern epidermal barrier repair and renewal have been extensively studied, pathways controlling stem cell differentiation remain poorly understood. Asymmetric cell divisions, small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), chromatin remodeling complexes, and multiple differentiation factors tightly control the balance of stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, and disruption of this balance leads to skin diseases. In this review, we summarize and discuss current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating epidermal stem and progenitor cell differentiation, and explore new relationships for maintenance of skin barrier function. PMID:23812084

  18. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cell of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics. PMID:23260439

  19. Stem cells for spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-26

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer's disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  20. Stem cells for spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer’s disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  1. Methods of Retinal Ganglion Cell Differentiation From Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Davidson, Kathryn C.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma, the worldwide leading cause of irreversible blindness, is characterized by progressive degeneration of the optic nerve and loss of retinal ganglion cells. Research into glaucoma pathogenesis has been hampered by difficulties in isolating and culturing retinal ganglion cells in vitro. However, recent improvements in laboratory techniques have enabled the generation of a variety of mature cell types from pluripotent stem cells, including retinal ganglion cells. Indeed, stem cell-based approaches have the potential to revolutionize the field by providing an unlimited source of cells for replacement therapies and by enabling development of in vitro disease models for drug screening and research. Consequently, research aimed at directing pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into retinal ganglion cells has expanded dramatically during the past decade, resulting in significant advances in technique and efficiency. In this paper, we review the methodology for retinal ganglion cell differentiation from pluripotent stem cells of both mouse and human origin and summarize how these techniques have opened up new avenues for modelling glaucoma. Generation of stem cell–derived retinal ganglion cells will have significant translational values, providing an in vitro platform to study the mechanisms responsible for pathogenesis and for drug screening to improve treatment options, as well as for the development of cell therapies for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. PMID:25774327

  2. [Stem cell therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Laure

    2009-03-01

    Medicine will be faced with a major challenge in coming years, namely how to treat for tissue dysfunction due to disease and aging There are two basic options: drug therapy and cell therapy. Stem cells have been the subject of intense speculation and controversy for several years, as they open up radically new therapeutic possibilities. Classical drugs can only smoothen consequences of tissue dysfunction, whereas cell therapy has the potential to restore tissue function by providing fresh cells. Cell therapy is totally different from organ transplantation, which can only benefit a limited number of patients. The use of the generic term "stem cells" to designate a whole variety of cell types that are present throughout life, is a source of confusion and ambiguity. It will take years of cognitive research to unravel the molecular mechanisms that govern a stem cell's multi- or totipotent status before we can fully exploit this therapeutic tool to the full. The younger a stem cell the greater its potential and, probably, the more durable its benefits, but the use of embryonic stem cells raises ethical issues. The redundancy or equivalence of diferent categories of cells is another source of controversy, yet researchers must be able to study stem cells in all their diversity, as complementary rather than competitive alternatives, in an acceptable ethical and regulatory environment. We briefly describe the three types of stem cells: pluripotent embryonic stem cells, fetal and adult stem cells, and pluripotent reprogrammed adult somatic cells. Only the former two categories have physiological functions: the first gives rise to tissues and organs while the second maintains tissue function during adulthood PMID:19883007

  3. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells) are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation. PMID:26635851

  4. The Clinical Status of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianyun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jing; Li, Yaqi; Tan, Zirui; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising option for treatment of ICM. Several stem cell types including cardiac-derived stem cells (CSCs), bone marrow-derived stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), and CD34+ and CD 133+ stem cells have been applied in clinical researches. The clinical effect produced by stem cell administration in ICM mainly depends on the transdifferentiation and paracrine effect. One important issue is that low survival and residential rate of transferred stem cells in the infracted myocardium blocks the effective advances in cardiac improvement. Many other factors associated with the efficacy of cell replacement therapy for ICM mainly including the route of delivery, the type and number of stem cell infusion, the timing of injection, patient's physical condition, the particular microenvironment onto which the cells are delivered, and clinical condition remain to be addressed. Here we provide an overview of the pros and cons of these transferred cells and discuss the current state of their therapeutic potential. We believe that stem cell translation will be an ideal option for patients following ischemic heart disease in the future. PMID:26101528

  5. The Clinical Status of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianyun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jing; Li, Yaqi; Tan, Zirui; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Li, Quanhai; Yan, Baoyong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising option for treatment of ICM. Several stem cell types including cardiac-derived stem cells (CSCs), bone marrow-derived stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), and CD34(+) and CD 133(+) stem cells have been applied in clinical researches. The clinical effect produced by stem cell administration in ICM mainly depends on the transdifferentiation and paracrine effect. One important issue is that low survival and residential rate of transferred stem cells in the infracted myocardium blocks the effective advances in cardiac improvement. Many other factors associated with the efficacy of cell replacement therapy for ICM mainly including the route of delivery, the type and number of stem cell infusion, the timing of injection, patient's physical condition, the particular microenvironment onto which the cells are delivered, and clinical condition remain to be addressed. Here we provide an overview of the pros and cons of these transferred cells and discuss the current state of their therapeutic potential. We believe that stem cell translation will be an ideal option for patients following ischemic heart disease in the future. PMID:26101528

  6. When stem cells meet immunoregulation.

    PubMed

    Tasso, Roberta; Pennesi, Giuseppina

    2009-05-01

    The clinical use of stem cells to prevent tissue injury or reconstruct damaged organs is constrained by different ethical and biological issues. Whereas the use of adult stem cells isolated from differentiated tissues is advantageous from the ethical point of view, the immune response of a host to implants of either embryonic or adult stem cells remains a critical problem. Embryonic stem cells can be rejected by an immunocompetent recipient as well as some types of adult stem cells. There is, however, a population of adult stem cells able to differentiate into the three mesenchymal lineages, osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes that have the additional capacity of modulating the immune response by the activation of disparate mechanisms, among which the generation of antigen-specific CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T lymphocytes. This short review will focus on the immunological properties of embryonic and adult stem cells are, with particular emphasis on the immunomodulatory function of mesenchymal stem cells and their interactions with regulatory T lymphocytes. PMID:19539568

  7. Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on Twitter. What Is a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant? A blood and marrow stem cell transplant ... NEXT >> Updated: November 15, 2011 Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant in the News May 19, 2015 New ...

  8. Generating cartilage repair from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Aixin; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of degeneration and injury of articular cartilage has been very challenging for scientists and surgeons. As an avascular and hypocellular tissue, cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Chondrocytes are the only cell type in cartilage, in which they are surrounded by the extracellular matrix that they secrete and assemble. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects has achieved good results, but the limited resources and complexity of the procedure have hindered wider application. Stem cells form an alternative to chondrocytes as a source of chondrogenic cells due to their ability to proliferate extensively while retaining the potential for differentiation. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells have been differentiated into chondrocytes, but the limitations in their proliferative ability and the heterogeneous cell population hinder their adoption as a prime alternative source for generating chondrocytes. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are attractive as candidates for cell replacement therapy because of their unlimited self-renewal and ability for differentiation into mesodermal derivatives as well as other lineages. In this review, we focus on current protocols for chondrogenic differentiation of ESCs, in particular the chemically defined culture system developed in our lab that could potentially be adapted for clinical application. PMID:23957872

  9. Lasers, stem cells, and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The medical use of low level laser (LLL) irradiation has been occurring for decades, primarily in the area of tissue healing and inflammatory conditions. Despite little mechanistic knowledge, the concept of a non-invasive, non-thermal intervention that has the potential to modulate regenerative processes is worthy of attention when searching for novel methods of augmenting stem cell-based therapies. Here we discuss the use of LLL irradiation as a "photoceutical" for enhancing production of stem cell growth/chemoattractant factors, stimulation of angiogenesis, and directly augmenting proliferation of stem cells. The combination of LLL together with allogeneic and autologous stem cells, as well as post-mobilization directing of stem cells will be discussed. PMID:20158898

  10. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Veronica; Gaggianesi, Miriam; Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora; Dieli, Francesco; Stassi, Giorgio; Todaro, Matilde

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool. PMID:24212789

  11. LncRNAs in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shanshan; Shan, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are critical regulatory factors in essentially all forms of life. Stem cells occupy a special position in cell biology and Biomedicine, and emerging results show that multiple ncRNAs play essential roles in stem cells. We discuss some of the known ncRNAs in stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, adult stem cells, and cancer stem cells with a focus on long ncRNAs. Roles and functional mechanisms of these lncRNAs are summarized, and insights into current and future studies are presented. PMID:26880946

  12. Stem cell mechanics: Auxetic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The nuclei of naive mouse embryonic stem cells that are transitioning towards differentiation expand when the cells are stretched and contract when they are compressed. What drives this auxetic phenotype is, however, unclear.

  13. Pancreatic Differentiation from Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are considered as a cell source for replacement therapies for pancreatic beta cells and other organs.We identified tetrabenazine (TBZ), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor as a promoter of late-stage differentiation of Pdx1-positive pancreatic progenitor cells into Ngn3-positive endocrine progenitor cells. A cell-permeable cAMP analog, dBu-cAMP promotes beta cell maturation in late stage of differentiation. The induced beta cells can secrete insulin in a glucose-dependent manner.Our protocol consists of a three -step differentiation process. ES cell recapitulate embryonic developmental processes in vitro. Therefore, the ES cell differentiation system is a useful model for the understanding of molecular mechanism of beta-cell differentiation and are useful for application for future regenerative medicine. PMID:25762295

  14. Metabolic circuits in neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Yeon; Rhee, Inmoo

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic activity indicative of cellular demand is emerging as a key player in cell fate decision. Numerous studies have demonstrated that diverse metabolic pathways have a critical role in the control of the proliferation, differentiation and quiescence of stem cells. The identification of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) and the characterization of their development and fate decision process have provided insight into the regenerative potential of the adult brain. As a result, the potential of NSPCs in cell replacement therapies for neurological diseases is rapidly growing. The aim of this review is to discuss the recent findings on the crosstalk among key regulators of NSPC development and the metabolic regulation crucial for the function and cell fate decisions of NSPCs. Fundamental understanding of the metabolic circuits in NSPCs may help to provide novel approaches for reactivating neurogenesis to treat degenerative brain conditions and cognitive decline. PMID:25037158

  15. Stem cells: sources and applications.

    PubMed

    Vats, A; Tolley, N S; Polak, J M; Buttery, L D K

    2002-08-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary area of research aimed at regeneration of tissues and restoration of function of organs through implantation of cells/tissues grown outside the body, or stimulating cells to grow into implanted matrix. In this short review, some of the most recent developments in the use of stem cells for tissue repair and regeneration will be discussed. There is no doubt that stem cells derived from adult and embryonic sources hold great therapeutic potential but it is clear that there is still much research required before their use is commonplace. There is much debate over adult versus embryonic stem cells and whether both are required. It is probably too early to disregard one or other of these cell sources. With regard to embryonic stem cells, the major concern relates to the ethics of their creation and the proposed practice of therapeutic cloning. PMID:12169121

  16. STEM CELLS, CELL TRANSPLANTATION AND LIVER REPOPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Michael; Shafritz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation is currently the only therapeutic option for patients with end-stage chronic liver disease and for severe acute liver failure. Because of limited donor availability, attention has been focused on the possibility to restore liver mass and function through cell transplantation. Stem cells are a promising source for liver repopulation after cell transplantation, but whether or not the adult mammalian liver contains hepatic stem cells is highly controversial. Part of the problem is that proliferation of mature adult hepatocytes is sufficient to regenerate the liver after two-thirds partial hepatectomy or acute toxic liver injury and participation of stem cells is not required. However, under conditions in which hepatocyte proliferation is blocked, undifferentiated epithelial cells in the periportal areas, called oval cells, proliferate, differentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver mass. These cells are referred to as facultative liver stem cells, but they do not repopulate the normal liver after their transplantation. In contrast, epithelial cells isolated from the early fetal liver can effectively repopulate the normal liver, but they are already traversing the hepatic lineage and may not be true stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells and embryonic stem cells can be induced to differentiate along the hepatic lineage in culture, but at present these cells are inefficient in repopulating the liver. This review will characterize these various cell types and compare the properties of these cells and the conditions under which they do or do not repopulate the liver following their transplantation. PMID:18187050

  17. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  18. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  19. Livestock induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Mumaw, J L; West, F D; Stice, S L

    2012-08-01

    Chimeric animals generated from livestock-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door of opportunity to genetically manipulate species for the production of biomedical models, improving traits of agricultural importance and potentially providing a system to test novel iPSC therapies. The potential of pluripotent stem cells in livestock has long been recognized, with many attempts being chronicled to isolate, culture and characterize pluripotent cells from embryos. However, in most cases, livestock stem cells derived from embryonic sources have failed to reach a pluripotent state marked by the inability to form chimeric animals. The in-depth understanding of core pluripotency factors and the realization of how these factors can be harnessed to reprogram adult cells into an induced pluripotent state has changed the paradigm of livestock stem cells. In this review, we will examine the advancements in iPSC technology in mammalian and avian livestock species. PMID:22827352

  20. Ovarian germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Cheryl E; Telfer, Evelyn E; Anderson, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    It has long been established that germline stem cells (GSCs) are responsible for lifelong gametogenesis in males, and some female invertebrates (for example, Drosophila) and lower vertebrates (for example, teleost fish and some prosimians) also appear to rely on GSCs to replenish their oocyte reserve in adulthood. However, the presence of such cells in the majority of female mammals is controversial, and the idea of a fixed ovarian reserve determined at birth is the prevailing belief among reproductive biologists. However, accumulating evidence demonstrates the isolation and culture of putative GSCs from the ovaries of adult mice and humans. Live offspring have been reportedly produced from the culture of adult mouse GSCs, and human GSCs formed primordial follicles using a mouse xenograft model. If GSCs were present in adult female ovaries, it could be postulated that the occurrence of menopause is not due to the exhaustion of a fixed supply of oocytes but instead is a result of GSC and somatic cell aging. Alternatively, they may be benign under normal physiological conditions. If their existence were confirmed, female GSCs could have many potential applications in both basic science and clinical therapies. GSCs not only may provide a valuable model for germ cell development and maturation but may have a role in the field of fertility preservation, with women potentially being able to store GSCs or GSC-derived oocytes from their own ovaries prior to infertility-inducing treatments. Essential future work in this field will include further independent corroboration of the existence of GSCs in female mammals and the demonstration of the production of mature competent oocytes from GSCs cultured entirely in vitro. PMID:25157949

  1. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yan; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou ; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  2. Progress in myeloma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Richard Dela; Tricot, Guido; Zangari, Maurizio; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy in the United States and affects about 4 in 100,000 Americans. Even though much progress has been made in MM therapy, MM remains an incurable disease for the vast majority of patients. The existence of MM stem cell is considered one of the major causes of MM drug-resistance, leading to relapse. This highlights the importance and urgency of developing approaches to target MM stem cells. However, very little is known about the molecular characteristics of the MM stem cells, which makes it difficult to target MM stem cells therapeutically. Evidence of the existence of a myeloma stem cell has been provided by Matsui et al. showing that the CD138- and CD20+ fraction, which is a minor population of the MM cells, has a greater clonogenic potential and has the phenotype of a memory B-cell (CD19+, CD27+). In this review, we report recent progress of cell surface markers in cancer stem cells, especially in myeloma and the molecular mechanisms related to drug resistance and myeloma disease progression. PMID:22432075

  3. Harvesting dental stem cells - Overview.

    PubMed

    Sunil, P M; Manikandan, Ramanathan; Muthumurugan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Sivakumar, Muniapillai

    2015-08-01

    Dental stem cells have recently become one of the widely researched areas in dentistry. Ever since the identification of stem cells from various dental tissues like deciduous teeth, dental papilla, periodontal ligament and third molars, storing them for future use for various clinical applications was being explored. Dental stem cells were harvested and isolated using various techniques by different investigators and laboratories. This article explains the technical aspects of preparing the patient, atraumatic and aseptic removal of the tooth and its safe transportation and preservation for future expansion. PMID:26538883

  4. Harvesting dental stem cells - Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, P. M.; Manikandan, Ramanathan; Muthumurugan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Sivakumar, Muniapillai

    2015-01-01

    Dental stem cells have recently become one of the widely researched areas in dentistry. Ever since the identification of stem cells from various dental tissues like deciduous teeth, dental papilla, periodontal ligament and third molars, storing them for future use for various clinical applications was being explored. Dental stem cells were harvested and isolated using various techniques by different investigators and laboratories. This article explains the technical aspects of preparing the patient, atraumatic and aseptic removal of the tooth and its safe transportation and preservation for future expansion. PMID:26538883

  5. Application of Stem Cell Technology in Dental Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruoxue; Lengner, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    Significance In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the isolation and characterization of dental tissue-derived stem cells and address the potential of these cell types for use in regenerative cell transplantation therapy. Recent Advances Looking forward, platforms for the delivery of stem cells via scaffolds and the use of growth factors and cytokines for enhancing dental stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are discussed. Critical Issues We aim to understand the developmental origins of dental tissues in an effort to elucidate the molecular pathways governing the genesis of somatic dental stem cells. The advantages and disadvantages of several dental stem cells are discussed, including the developmental stage and specific locations from which these cells can be purified. In particular, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth may act as a very practical and easily accessibly reservoir for autologous stem cells and hold the most value in stem cell therapy. Dental pulp stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells should also be considered for their triple lineage differentiation ability and relative ease of isolation. Further, we address the potentials and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cells as a cell source in dental regenerative. Future Directions From an economical and a practical standpoint, dental stem cell therapy would be most easily applied in the prevention of periodontal ligament detachment and bone atrophy, as well as in the regeneration of dentin-pulp complex. In contrast, cell-based tooth replacement due to decay or other oral pathology seems, at the current time, an untenable approach. PMID:24527351

  6. Sources of Stem Cells for Transplant

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Donor matching for allogeneic transplant Sources of stem cells for transplant There are 3 possible sources of ... cord blood transplants are being actively studied. Which stem cell source is best? All 3 sources of stem ...

  7. Understanding the cancer stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Bomken, S; Fier, K; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J

    2010-01-01

    The last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in the cancer stem cell (CSC). Although it was initially believed that only a rare population of stem cells are able to undergo self-renewing divisions and differentiate to form all populations within a malignancy, a recent work has shown that these cells may not be as rare as thought first, at least in some malignancies. Improved experimental models are beginning to uncover a less rigid structure to CSC biology, in which the concepts of functional plasticity and clonal evolution must be incorporated into the traditional models. Slowly the genetic programmes and biological processes underlying stem cell biology are being elucidated, opening the door to the development of drugs targeting the CSC. The aim of ongoing research to understand CSCs is to develop novel stem cell-directed treatments, which will reduce therapy resistance, relapse and the toxicity associated with current, non-selective agents. PMID:20664590

  8. Stem cells-the hidden treasure: A strategic review.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Hitesh; Hans, Manoj Kumar; Shetty, Shashit

    2013-07-01

    In today's scenario, medical and dental professionals face a mammoth task while treating perplexing medical situations like organ failure or tissue loss. Though, different strategies exist to replace them, but ideal one is the same natural tissue or organ. In this aspect, stem cells have emerged in a promising way to provide an ideal replacement. There are different types of stem cells starting from the embryonic stage referred to as human embryonic stem cells to adult stem cells. Though in dentistry stem cell research is lagging as compared to the medical field but still a lot progress has been achieved in recent years. The stem cells have been isolated from dental pulp, human exfoliated deciduous teeth, and apical papilla and so on. These stem cells have provided exciting results like dentin-pulp regeneration, periodontal regeneration but ambiguity still prevails. As a result, much has to be further researched before its clinical application becomes a reality. Hence, these stem cells opened a new avenue in the field of regenerative dentistry. PMID:24130574

  9. Stem cell population asymmetry can reduce rate of replicative aging.

    PubMed

    Hormoz, Sahand

    2013-08-21

    Cycling tissues such as the intestinal epithelium, germ line, and hair follicles, require a constant flux of differentiated cells. These tissues are maintained by a population of stem cells, which generate differentiated progenies and self-renew. Asymmetric division of each stem cell into one stem cell and one differentiated cell can accomplish both tasks. However, in mammalian cycling tissues, some stem cells divide symmetrically into two differentiated cells and are replaced by a neighbor that divides symmetrically into two stem cells. Besides this heterogeneity in fate (population asymmetry), stem cells also exhibit heterogenous proliferation-rates; in the long run, however, all stem cells proliferate at the same average rate (equipotency). We construct and simulate a mathematical model based on these experimental observations. We show that the complex steady-state dynamics of population-asymmetric stem cells reduces the rate of replicative aging of the tissue-potentially lowering the incidence of somatic mutations and genetics diseases such as cancer. Essentially, slow-dividing stem cells proliferate and purge the population of the fast-dividing - older - cells which had undertaken the majority of the tissue-generation burden. As the number of slow-dividing cells grows, their cycling-rate increases, eventually turning them into fast-dividers, which are themselves replaced by newly emerging slow-dividers. Going beyond current experiments, we propose a mechanism for equipotency that can potentially halve the rate of replicative aging. Our results highlight the importance of a population-level understanding of stem cells, and may explain the prevalence of population asymmetry in a wide variety of cycling tissues. PMID:23623948

  10. Once Upon a Stem Cell

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of nutrients and proteins that spurred human embryonic stem cells to become heart progenitor cells, or adult heart cells in their beginning stages. Those cells then grew into the three different types that make up functioning heart muscle. This work advances our understanding of how the ...

  11. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  12. Diabetes and stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  13. Stem cells, megakaryocytes, and platelets

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brenden W.; Murphy, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Stem cells are an important tool for the study of ex-vivo models of megakaryopoiesis and the production of functional platelets. In this manuscript, we review the optimization of megakaryocyte and platelet differentiation and discuss the mechanistic studies and disease models that have incorporated stem cell technologies. Recent findings Mechanisms of cytoskeletal regulation and signal transduction have revealed insights into hierarchical dynamics of hematopoiesis, highlighting the close relationship between hematopoietic stem cells and cells of the megakaryocyte lineage. Platelet disorders have been successfully modeled and genetically corrected, and differentiation strategies have been optimized to the extent that utilizing stem cell-derived platelets for cellular therapy is feasible. Summary Studies that utilize stem cells for the efficient derivation of megakaryocytes and platelets have played a role in uncovering novel molecular mechanisms of megakaryopoiesis, modeling and correcting relevant diseases, and differentiating platelets that are functional and scalable for translation into the clinic. Efforts to derive megakaryocytes and platelets from pluripotent stem cells foster the opportunity of a revolutionary cellular therapy for the treatment of multiple platelet-associated diseases. PMID:25023469

  14. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nszai, Mt; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  15. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and recovery with PBSC donation Jeff, peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process. You may experience headaches, or bone or muscle aches, for several days before PBSC donation. These ...

  16. Human embryonic stem cells and cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Hauch, Kip D; Xu, Chunhui; Laflamme, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The muscle lost after a myocardial infarction is replaced with noncontractile scar tissue, often initiating heart failure. Whole-organ cardiac transplantation is the only currently available clinical means of replacing the lost muscle, but this option is limited by the inadequate supply of donor hearts. Thus, cell-based cardiac repair has attracted considerable interest as an alternative means of ameliorating cardiac injury. Because of their tremendous capacity for expansion and unquestioned cardiac potential, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an attractive candidate cell source for obtaining cardiomyocytes and other useful mesenchymal cell types for such therapies. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exhibit a committed cardiac phenotype and robust proliferative capacity, and recent testing in rodent infarct models indicates that they can partially remuscularize injured hearts and improve contractile function. Although the latter successes give good reason for optimism, considerable challenges remain in the successful application of hESCs to cardiac repair, including the need for preparations of high cardiac purity, improved methods of delivery, and approaches to overcome immune rejection and other causes of graft cell death. This review will describe the phenotype of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes and preclinical experience with these cells and will consider strategies to overcoming the aforementioned challenges. PMID:18657407

  17. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs from normal cells, together with CSC immunogenicity and relatively low toxicity of immunotherapies, makes immune targeting of CSCs a promising approach for cancer treatment. This review will present immunotherapeutic approaches using dendritic cells, T cells, pluripotent stem cells, and monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate CSCs. PMID:25691822

  18. Stem cell therapy as an option for pediatric surgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; De Coppi, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to replace, repair, or restore normal function of cells, tissues, and organs that are damaged by disease and holds a promising potential for the treatment of congenital anomalies. Herein, we present an overview of the different stem cell populations and discuss the potentials and most recent updates in stem cell therapy relevant to pediatric surgeons. In particular, we focus on stem cell applications in intestinal regeneration for necrotizing enterocolitis, liver regeneration in biliary atresia and human hepatocyte transplantation for liver failure, and pulmonary regeneration of hypoplastic lungs due to prematurity or congenital diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:24945441

  19. Genetically engineered stem cells for therapeutic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Claudius; Gupta, Rashmi; Mohan, Hema; Niess, Hanno; Bruns, Christiane J; Kopp, Reinhard; von Luettichau, Irene; Guba, Markus; Heeschen, Christopher; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J

    2007-08-01

    Stem cell and gene therapy approaches have held out much hope for the development of new tools to treat disease. Therapeutic approaches based on these methods have only rarely found their way into the clinic. The linking of stem cell therapy with selective gene therapy enhances therapeutic options for the regeneration or replacement of diseased or missing cells. This review focuses on the rationale and preliminary results of combining stem cell and gene therapy. Special emphasis is placed on various molecular techniques currently used to genetically engineer stem cells. Viral and nonviral genes delivering technologies are detailed as are techniques for the modulation of gene expression in the context of stem cell recruitment and differentiation. Finally potential clinical applications for this new therapeutic strategy are discussed. PMID:17969558

  20. Conductive space solar cell coverglass replacement technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Zach S.; Wilt, David M.; Hoffman, Ryan; Ferguson, Dale

    2014-03-01

    A flexible space solar cell coverglass replacement called Pseudomorphic Glass (PMG) has been under investigation in hopes of providing a robust, flexible, high transmissivity replacement for conventional coverglass. PMG is composed of conventional cover glass and/or fused silica in the form of small spheres incorporated in a variety of polymer matrices. The glass spheres provide the primary radiation protection and the polymer matrix provides the mechanical integrity. PMG development has recently focused on technologies for providing the electrical conductivity required to dissipate environmental charging, even in the presence of electric propulsion plumes.

  1. Recent highlights on bone stem cells: a report from Bone Stem Cells 2009, and not only.

    PubMed

    Cenni, Elisabetta; Perut, Francesca; Baglo, Serena Rubina; Fiorentini, Elisa; Baldini, Nicola

    2010-11-01

    The use of stem cells has opened new prospects for the treatment of orthopaedic conditions characterized by large bone defects. However, many issues still exist to which answers are needed before routine, large-scale application becomes possible. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC), which are clonogenic, multipotential precursors present in the bone marrow stroma, are generally employed for bone regeneration. Stem cells with multilineage differentiation similar to MSC have also been demonstrated in adipose tissue, peripheral blood, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid. Each source presents its own advantages and drawbacks. Unfortunately, no unique surface antigen is expressed by MSC, and this hampers simple MSC enrichment from heterogeneous populations. MSC are identified through a combination of physical, morphological and functional assays. Different in vitro and in vivo models have been described for the research on bone stem cells. These models should predict the in vivo bone healing capacity of MSC and if the induced osteogenesis is similar to the physiological one. Although stem cells offer an exciting possibility of a renewable source of cells and tissues for replacement, orthopaedic applications often represent case reports whereas controlled randomized trials are still lacking. Further biological aspects of bone stem cells should be elucidated and a general consensus on the best models, protocols and proper use of scaffolds and growth factors should be achieved. PMID:20874718

  2. Immune Modulation of Stem Cells and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, Arin B.; Olson, Eric N.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system, best known as the first line of defense against invading pathogens, is integral to tissue development, homeostasis and wound repair. In recent years, there has been a growing appreciation that cellular and humoral components of the immune system also contribute to regeneration of damaged tissues, including limbs, skeletal muscle, heart and the nervous system. Here, we discuss key findings that implicate inflammatory cells and their secreted factors in tissue replacement following injury via stem cells and other reparative mechanisms. We highlight clinical conditions that are amenable to immune-mediated regeneration and suggest immune targeting strategies for tissue regeneration. PMID:24996166

  3. Embryonic stem cells: protecting pluripotency from alloreactivity.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Paul J; Robertson, Nathan J; Minger, Stephen L; Waldmann, Herman

    2007-10-01

    There can be little doubt that 2006 turned out to be the annus horribilis for therapeutic cloning by somatic nuclear transfer (SNT). As the full extent of the fraud surrounding the generation of patient-specific embryonic stem (ES) cell lines became apparent, hopes began to fade for the advent of cell replacement therapies (CRT), free from the confounding issues of immune rejection. While the dust begins to settle, it is perhaps pertinent to ask whether the promise of SNT is still worth pursuing or whether alternative strategies for immune evasion might help fill the void. PMID:17709235

  4. Plasticity of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Paul S; Simon, Liz; Nanjappa, Manjunatha K; Medrano, Theresa I; Berry, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant breakthroughs over the past decade in the development and use of pluripotent stem cells as a potential source of cells for applications in regenerative medicine. It is likely that this methodology will begin to play an important role in human clinical medicine in the years to come. This review describes the plasticity of one type of pluripotent cell, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), and their potential therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine and male infertility. Normally, SSCs give rise to sperm when in the testis. However, both human and murine SSCs can give rise to cells with embryonic stem (ES) cell-like characteristics that can be directed to differentiate into tissues of all three embryonic germ layers when placed in an appropriate inductive microenvironment, which is in contrast to other postnatal stem cells. Previous studies have reported that SSCs expressed an intermediate pluripotent phenotype before differentiating into a specific cell type and that extended culture was necessary for this to occur. However, recent studies from our group using a tissue recombination model demonstrated that SSCs differentiated rapidly into another tissue, in this case, prostatic epithelium, without expression of pluripotent ES cell markers before differentiation. These results suggest that SSCs are capable of directly differentiating into other cell types without going through an intermediate ES cell-like stage. Because SSCs do not require reprogramming to achieve a pluripotent state, they are an attractive source of pluripotent cells for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:25677134

  5. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Sean P.; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that tumors are maintained by a self-renewing CSC population that is also capable of differentiating into non-self renewing cell populations that constitute the bulk of the tumor. Although, the CSC hypothesis does not directly address the cell of origin of cancer, it is postulated that tissue-resident stem or progenitors are the most common targets of transformation. Clinically, CSCs are predicted to mediate tumor recurrence after chemo- and radiation-therapy due to the relative inability of these modalities to effectively target CSCs. If this is the case, then CSC must be efficiently targeted to achieve a true cure. Similarities between normal and malignant stem cells, at the levels of cell-surface proteins, molecular pathways, cell cycle quiescence, and microRNA signaling present challenges in developing CSC-specific therapeutics. Approaches to targeting CSCs include the development of agents targeting known stem cell regulatory pathways as well as unbiased high-throughput siRNA or small-molecule screening. Based on studies of pathways present in normal stem cells, recent work has identified potential Achilles heals of CSC, whereas unbiased screening provides opportunities to identify new pathways utilized by CSC as well as develop potential therapeutic agents. Here, we review both approaches and their potential to effectively target breast CSC. PMID:20599450

  6. Types of Stem Cell Transplants for Treating Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sources of stem cells for transplant Types of stem cell transplants for treating cancer In a typical stem ... come from your identical twin or triplet Autologous stem cell transplants These stem cells come from you alone. ...

  7. Cell replacement and visual restoration by retinal sheet transplants

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affect millions of people. Replacing lost cells with new cells that connect with the still functional part of the host retina might repair a degenerating retina and restore eyesight to an unknown extent. A unique model, subretinal transplantation of freshly dissected sheets of fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells, combined with its retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), has demonstrated successful results in both animals and humans. Most other approaches are restricted to rescue endogenous retinal cells of the recipient in earlier disease stages by a ‘nursing’ role of the implanted cells and are not aimed at neural retinal cell replacement. Sheet transplants restore lost visual responses in several retinal degeneration models in the superior colliculus (SC) corresponding to the location of the transplant in the retina. They do not simply preserve visual performance – they increase visual responsiveness to light. Restoration of visual responses in the SC can be directly traced to neural cells in the transplant, demonstrating that synaptic connections between transplant and host contribute to the visual improvement. Transplant processes invade the inner plexiform layer of the host retina and form synapses with presumable host cells. In a Phase II trial of RP and ARMD patients, transplants of retina together with its RPE improved visual acuity. In summary, retinal progenitor sheet transplantation provides an excellent model to answer questions about how to repair and restore function of a degenerating retina. Supply of fetal donor tissue will always be limited but the model can set a standard and provide an informative base for optimal cell replacement therapies such as embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived therapy. PMID:22771454

  8. Pluripotent stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Rainer; Scheubert, Lena; Lustrek, Mitja; Repsilber, Dirk; Fuellen, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are able to self-renew and to differentiate into all adult cell types. Many studies report data describing these cells and characterize them in molecular terms. Gene expression data of pluripotent and non-pluripotent cells from mouse were assembled. Machine learning was applied to classify samples into pluripotent and non-pluripotent cells. To identify minimal sets of best biomarkers, three methods were used: information gain, random forests, and genetic algorithm. PMID:22874386

  9. Lost in translation: pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Mania; Liebhaber, Steffi; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Lachmann, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) such as embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells represent a promising cell type to gain novel insights into human biology. Understanding the differentiation process of PSCs in vitro may allow for the identification of cell extrinsic/intrinsic factors, driving the specification process toward all cell types of the three germ layers, which may be similar to the human in vivo scenario. This would not only lay the ground for an improved understanding of human embryonic development but would also contribute toward the generation of novel cell types used in cell replacement therapies. In this line, especially the developmental process of mesodermal cells toward the hematopoietic lineage is of great interest. Therefore, this review highlights recent progress in the field of hematopoietic specification of pluripotent stem cell sources. In addition, we would like to shed light on emerging factors controlling primitive and definitive hematopoietic development and to highlight recent approaches to improve the differentiation potential of PSC sources toward hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. While the generation of fully defined hematopoietic stem cells from PSCs remains challenging in vitro, we here underline the instructive role of cell extrinsic factors such as cytokines for the generation of PSC-derived mature hematopoietic cells. Thus, we have comprehensively examined the role of cytokines for the derivation of mature hematopoietic cell types such as macrophages, granulocytes, megakaryocytes, erythrocytes, dendritic cells, and cells of the B- and T-cell lineage. PMID:26174486

  10. Adult stem cell-based apexogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Shu, Li-Hong; Yan, Ming; Dai, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Generally, the dental pulp needs to be removed when it is infected, and root canal therapy (RCT) is usually required in which infected dental pulp is replaced with inorganic materials (paste and gutta percha). This treatment approach ultimately brings about a dead tooth. However, pulp vitality is extremely important to the tooth itself, since it provides nutrition and acts as a biosensor to detect the potential pathogenic stimuli. Despite the reported clinical success rate, RCT-treated teeth are destined to be devitalized, brittle and susceptible to postoperative fracture. Recently, the advances and achievements in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have inspired novel biological approaches to apexogenesis in young patients suffering from pulpitis or periapical periodontitis. This review mainly focuses on the benchtop and clinical regeneration of root apex mediated by adult stem cells. Moreover, current strategies for infected pulp therapy are also discussed here. PMID:25332909

  11. Engineering stem cell niches in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meimei; Liu, Ning; Zang, Ru; Li, Yan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells have the potential to be expanded and differentiated into various cell types in the body. Efficient differentiation of stem cells with the desired tissue-specific function is critical for stem cell-based cell therapy, tissue engineering, drug discovery and disease modeling. Bioreactors provide a great platform to regulate the stem cell microenvironment, known as “niches”, to impact stem cell fate decision. The niche factors include the regulatory factors such as oxygen, extracellular matrix (synthetic and decellularized), paracrine/autocrine signaling and physical forces (i.e., mechanical force, electrical force and flow shear). The use of novel bioreactors with precise control and recapitulation of niche factors through modulating reactor operation parameters can enable efficient stem cell expansion and differentiation. Recently, the development of microfluidic devices and microbioreactors also provides powerful tools to manipulate the stem cell microenvironment by adjusting flow rate and cytokine gradients. In general, bioreactor engineering can be used to better modulate stem cell niches critical for stem cell expansion, differentiation and applications as novel cell-based biomedicines. This paper reviews important factors that can be more precisely controlled in bioreactors and their effects on stem cell engineering. PMID:24179601

  12. Stem Cells and Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, ANDREW W.; DORRELL, CRAIG; GROMPE, MARKUS

    2011-01-01

    One of the defining features of the liver is the capacity to maintain a constant size despite injury. Although the precise molecular signals involved in the maintenance of liver size are not completely known, it is clear that the liver delicately balances regeneration with overgrowth. Mammals, for example, can survive surgical removal of up to 75% of the total liver mass. Within 1 week after liver resection, the total number of liver cells is restored. Moreover, liver overgrowth can be induced by a variety of signals, including hepatocyte growth factor or peroxisome proliferators; the liver quickly returns to its normal size when the proliferative signal is removed. The extent to which liver stem cells mediate liver regeneration has been hotly debated. One of the primary reasons for this controversy is the use of multiple definitions for the hepatic stem cell. Definitions for the liver stem cell include the following: (1) cells responsible for normal tissue turnover, (2) cells that give rise to regeneration after partial hepatectomy, (3) cells responsible for progenitor-dependent regeneration, (4) cells that produce hepatocyte and bile duct epithelial phenotypes in vitro, and (5) transplantable liver-repopulating cells. This review will consider liver stem cells in the context of each definition. PMID:19470389

  13. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Hyem, Marte Rrvik; Mly, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjrn Olav

    2015-09-01

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells. PMID:25997796

  14. Biomaterial Approaches for Stem Cell-Based Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cutts, Josh; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Brafman, David A

    2015-01-01

    Adult and pluripotent stem cells represent a ready supply of cellular raw materials that can be used to generate the functionally mature cells needed to replace damaged or diseased heart tissue. However, the use of stem cells for cardiac regenerative therapies is limited by the low efficiency by which stem cells are differentiated in vitro to cardiac lineages as well as the inability to effectively deliver stem cells and their derivatives to regions of damaged myocardium. In this review, we discuss the various biomaterial-based approaches that are being implemented to direct stem cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. First, we discuss the stem cell types available for cardiac repair and the engineering of naturally and synthetically derived biomaterials to direct their in vitro differentiation to the cell types that comprise heart tissue. Next, we describe biomaterial-based approaches that are being implemented to enhance the in vivo integration and differentiation of stem cells delivered to areas of cardiac damage. Finally, we present emerging trends of using stem cell-based biomaterial approaches to deliver pro-survival factors and fully vascularized tissue to the damaged and diseased cardiac tissue. PMID:26052226

  15. [The hematopoietic stem cell niche].

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Yuya

    2015-10-01

    Somatic stem cells self-renew to maintain tissue homeostasis for the lifetime of organisms through tightly controlled proliferation and differentiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essentially required for hematopoietic homeostasis. Therefore, they not only ensure lifelong replenishment of all blood lineages, but also maintain a constant pool. Cell cycle quiescence is a critical feature contributing to stem cell maintenance. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of bone marrow (BM) microenvironments that regulate HSC functions (HSC niches). In the HSC field, there has been considerable interest and debate regarding whether or not quiescence and proliferation of HSCs is regulated by distinct niches. Previous reports suggest that quiescent HSCs reside near osteoblasts in the BM whereas actively cycling HSCs are found near sinusoids. However, this popular concept has not been supported by rigorous analyses. To gain more insight into the spatial localization of HSCs, we have developed a whole-mount staining technique that allows precise measurements of 3D distances of HSCs from structures and allows computational simulation to define the significance of these interactions. This novel approach has allowed us to uncover two distinct types of vessels associated with quiescent and proliferating HSCs and to underscore the importance of arteriolar vessels for stem cell quiescence. We will discuss the crosstalk between the two hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells with a review of the recent literature. PMID:26458426

  16. [Therapeutic use of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-15

    Stem cells display important capacities of self renewing, proliferation and differentiation. Because those present in the embryo have the more remarkable properties, their potential use in the therapy of until now incurable degenerative diseases have been envisioned. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are located in the inner mass of the balstocyst at early stages of the development. Even in long-term cultures they still retain their undifferentiated features. Under specific culture conditions, ES cells can be committed into a variety of differentiation pathways, giving rise to large amounts of cells corresponding to different tissues (neurones, cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, etc.). However, producing these tissues from already established ES cell lines would lead to immune rejection when transplanted to patients. To prevent this pitfall and using the expertise accumulated by animal cloning by nucleus transfer, it has been proposed to adapt this technique to human ES cells. The therapeutic cloning consists in transferring the nucleus of somatic stem cells isolated from the patient into an enucleated oocyte, to allow blastocyst development from which ES cells will be derived. From these stem cells, compatible tissues will be then produced. The problem is that it is in theoretically possible to reimplant the cloned blastocyst into a surrogate mother for obtaining a baby genetically identical to the donor. This is called reproductive cloning. This worrying risk raises important ethic and legal questions. PMID:15497791

  17. Characterization of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martí, Mercè; Mulero, Lola; Pardo, Cristina; Morera, Cristina; Carrió, Meritxell; Laricchia-Robbio, Leopoldo; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Characterization of pluripotent stem cells is required for the registration of stem cell lines and allows for an impartial and objective comparison of the results obtained when generating multiple lines. It is therefore crucial to establish specific, fast and reliable protocols to detect the hallmarks of pluripotency. Such protocols should include immunocytochemistry (takes 2 d), identification of the three germ layers in in vitro-derived embryoid bodies by immunocytochemistry (immunodetection takes 3 d) and detection of differentiation markers in in vivo-generated teratomas by immunohistochemistry (differentiation marker detection takes 4 d). Standardization of the immunodetection protocols used ensures minimum variations owing to the source, the animal species, the endogenous fluorescence or the inability to collect large amounts of cells, thereby yielding results as fast as possible without loss of quality. This protocol provides a description of all the immunodetection procedures necessary to characterize mouse and human stem cell lines in different circumstances. PMID:23306458

  18. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    tefkov, Kate?ina; Prochzkov, Ji?ina; Pachernk, Ji?

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  19. Storage of hemopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pamphilon, Derwood; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Background: Autologous, and in some cases allogeneic, hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) are stored for varying periods of time prior to infusion. For periods of greater than 48 h, storage requires cryopreservation. It is essential to optimize cell storage and ensure the quality of the product for subsequent reinfusion. Methods: A number of important variables may affect the subsequent quality of infused HSC and therapeutic cells (TC). This review discusses these and also reviews the regulatory framework that now aims to ensure the quality of stem cells and TC for transplantation. Results: Important variables included cell concentration, temperature, interval from collection to cryopreservation, manipulations performed. They also included rate of freezing and whether controlled-rate freezing was employed. Parameters studied were type of cryoprotectant utilized [dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) is most commonly used, sometimes in combination with hydroxyethyl starch (HES)]; and storage conditions. It is also important to assess the quality of stored stem cells. Measurements employed included the total cell count (TNC), mononuclear cell count (MNC), CD34+ cells and colony-forming units - granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM). Of these, TNC and CD34+ are the most useful. However, the best measure of the quality of stored stem cells is their subsequent engraftment. The quality systems used in stem cell laboratories are described in the guidance of the Joint Accreditation Committee of ISCT (Europe) and the EBMT (JACIE) and the EU Directive on Tissues and Cells plus its supporting commission directives. Inspections of facilities are carried out by the appropriate national agencies and JACIE. Conclusion: For high-quality storage of HSC and TC, processing facilities should use validated procedures that take into account critical variables. The quality of all products must be assessed before and after storage. PMID:21938237

  20. Neural stem cells: from neurobiology to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Andressen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing numbers of publications about cell replacement therapies in various neurodegenerative diseases, reports on therapeutic benefits are still rare due to the huge array of parameters affecting the clinically relevant outcome. Limiting conditions can be attributed to origin and number of cells used for transplantation, their in vitro storage, propagation and/or predifferentiation. In addition, the ability of these cells for a site directed differentiation and functional integration in sufficient numbers is known to depend on extrinsic factors including intracerebral position of graft(s). Thus, obstacles to the use of cells in replacement therapies of neurological disorders reflect the molecular as well as cellular complexity of affected functional systems. This review will highlight central aspects of cell replacement strategies that are currently regarded as the most limiting issues in respect to survival, cell identity and site directed differentiation as well as functional integration of grafts. Special attention will be paid to neural stem cells, derived from either fetal or adult central nervous tissue. Unravelling the molecular biology of these proliferating cells in combination with instructive environmental cues for their site directed differentiation will pave the way to high reproducibility in collection, propagation, and predifferentiation of transplantable cells in vitro. In addition, this knowledge of intrinsic and extrinsic cues for a site directed neural differentiation during development will broaden the perspective for any pluripotent stem cell, namely embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells, as an alternate source for a cell based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23092257

  1. Endometrial stem cell transplantation in MPTP- exposed primates: an alternative cell source for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Erin F; Mutlu, Levent; Massasa, Efi E; Elsworth, John D; Eugene Redmond, D; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Cell-replacement therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to slow down or replace neuronal loss. Compared to other stem cell types, endometrium-derived stem cells (EDSCs) are an attractive source of stem cells for cellular therapies because of their ease of collection and vast differentiation potential. Here we demonstrate that endometrium-derived stem cells may be transplanted into an MPTP exposed monkey model of PD. After injection into the striatum, endometrium-derived stem cells engrafted, exhibited neuron-like morphology, expressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and increased the numbers of TH positive cells on the transplanted side and dopamine metabolite concentrations in vivo. Our results suggest that endometrium-derived stem cells may provide a therapeutic benefit in the primate model of PD and may be used in stem cell based therapies. PMID:25283241

  2. Endometrial stem cell transplantation in MPTP- exposed primates: an alternative cell source for treatment of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Erin F; Mutlu, Levent; Massasa, Efi E; Elsworth, John D; Eugene Redmond, D; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Cell-replacement therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to slow down or replace neuronal loss. Compared to other stem cell types, endometrium-derived stem cells (EDSCs) are an attractive source of stem cells for cellular therapies because of their ease of collection and vast differentiation potential. Here we demonstrate that endometrium-derived stem cells may be transplanted into an MPTP exposed monkey model of PD. After injection into the striatum, endometrium-derived stem cells engrafted, exhibited neuron-like morphology, expressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and increased the numbers of TH positive cells on the transplanted side and dopamine metabolite concentrations in vivo. Our results suggest that endometrium-derived stem cells may provide a therapeutic benefit in the primate model of PD and may be used in stem cell based therapies. PMID:25283241

  3. Stem cell-based therapy for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Maucksch, Christof; Vazey, Elena M; Gordon, Renee J; Connor, Bronwen

    2013-04-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of medium spiny neurons in the basal ganglia. The development of stem cell-based therapies for HD aims to replace lost neurons and/or to prevent cell death. This review will discuss pre-clinical studies which have utilized stem or progenitor cells for transplantation therapy using HD animal models. In several studies, neural stem and progenitor cells used as allotransplants and xenografts have been shown to be capable of surviving transplantation and differentiating into mature GABAergic neurons, resulting in behavioral improvements. Beneficial effects have also been reported for transplantation of stem cells derived from non-neural tissue, for example, mesenchymal- and adipose-derived stem cells, which have mainly been attributed to their secretion of growth and neurotrophic factors. Finally, we review studies using stem cells genetically engineered to over-express defined neurotrophic factors. While these studies prove the potential of stem cells for transplantation therapy in HD, it also becomes clear that technical and ethical issues regarding the availability of stem cells must be solved before human trials can be conducted. PMID:23097329

  4. Stem cells: sources and therapies.

    PubMed

    Monti, Manuela; Perotti, Cesare; Del Fante, Claudia; Cervio, Marila; Redi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The historical, lexical and conceptual issues embedded in stem cell biology are reviewed from technical, ethical, philosophical, judicial, clinical, economic and biopolitical perspectives. The mechanisms assigning the simultaneous capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to stem cells (immortal template DNA and asymmetric division) are evaluated in the light of the niche hypothesis for the stemness state. The induction of cell pluripotency and the different stem cells sources are presented (embryonic, adult and cord blood). We highlight the embryonic and adult stem cell properties and possible therapies while we emphasize the particular scientific and social values of cord blood donation to set up cord blood banks. The current scientific and legal frameworks of cord blood banks are reviewed at an international level as well as allogenic, dedicated and autologous donations. The expectations and the challenges in relation to present-day targeted diseases like diabetes mellitus type I, Parkinson's disease and myocardial infarction are evaluated in the light of the cellular therapies for regenerative medicine. PMID:23283430

  5. Glioblastoma stem cells and stem cell-targeting immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Rogelio; Azad, Tej D; Feroze, Abdullah H; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Cheshier, Samuel H

    2015-07-01

    Advancements in immunotherapeutics promise new possibilities for the creation of glioblastoma (GBM) treatment options. Ongoing work in cancer stem cell biology has progressively elucidated the role of this tumor sub-population in oncogenesis and has distinguished them as prime therapeutic targets. Current clinical trials take a multifaceted approach with the intention of harnessing the intrinsic cytotoxic capabilities of the immune system to directly target glioblastoma cancer stem cells (gCSC) or indirectly disrupt their stromal microenvironment. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies have emerged as the most common approaches, with particular iterations incorporating cancer stem cell antigenic markers in their treatment designs. Ongoing work to determine the comprehensive antigenic profile of the gCSC in conjunction with efforts to counter the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment holds much promise in future immunotherapeutic strategies against GBM. Given recent advancements in these fields, we believe there is tremendous potential to improve outcomes of GBM patients in the continuing evolution of immunotherapies targeted to cancer stem cell populations in GBM. PMID:25682090

  6. Learning about Cancer by Studying Stem Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Science Home Page Learning About Cancer by Studying Stem Cells By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 8, 2014 Normally, ... of them are exploring the process by studying stem cells. Modeling Early Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic cancer cells grown ...

  7. Stem cell differentiation: Sticky mechanical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher S.

    2014-06-01

    Physical cues from the extracellular environment influence the lineage commitment of stem cells. Now, experiments on human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on photodegradable hydrogels show that the cells' fate can also be determined by past physical environments.

  8. Stem-cell ecology and stem cells in motion

    PubMed Central

    Scadden, David T.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights major scientific developments over the past 50 years or so in concepts related to stem-cell ecology and to stem cells in motion. Many thorough and eloquent reviews have been presented in the last 5 years updating progress in these issues. Some paradigms have been challenged, others validated, or new ones brought to light. In the present review, we will confine our remarks to the historical development of progress. In doing so, we will refrain from a detailed analysis of controversial data, emphasizing instead widely accepted views and some challenging novel ones. PMID:18398055

  9. DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying; Xie, Nina; Jin, Peng; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation are specific epigenetic mechanisms that can contribute to the regulation of gene expression and cellular functions. DNA methylation is important for the function of embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells (such as haematopoietic stem cells, neural stem cells and germline stem cells), and changes in DNA methylation patterns are essential for successful nuclear reprogramming. In the past several years, the rediscovery of hydroxymethylation and the TET enzymes expanded our insights tremendously and uncovered more dynamic aspects of cytosine methylation regulation. Here, we review the current knowledge and highlight the most recent advances in DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and several well-studied adult stems cells. Our current understanding of stem cell epigenetics and new advances in the field will undoubtedly stimulate further clinical applications of regenerative medicine in the future. PMID:25776144

  10. DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; Xie, Nina; Jin, Peng; Wang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    In mammals, DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation are specific epigenetic mechanisms that can contribute to the regulation of gene expression and cellular functions. DNA methylation is important for the function of embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells (such as haematopoietic stem cells, neural stem cells and germline stem cells), and changes in DNA methylation patterns are essential for successful nuclear reprogramming. In the past several years, the rediscovery of hydroxymethylation and the TET enzymes expanded our insights tremendously and uncovered more dynamic aspects of cytosine methylation regulation. Here, we review the current knowledge and highlight the most recent advances in DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and several well-studied adult stems cells. Our current understanding of stem cell epigenetics and new advances in the field will undoubtedly stimulate further clinical applications of regenerative medicine in the future. PMID:25776144

  11. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadjimichael, Christiana; Chanoumidou, Konstantina; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Kretsovali, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal transducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors (cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research framework for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. PMID:26516408

  12. Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Stem Cell (RPESC).

    PubMed

    Saini, Janmeet S; Temple, Sally; Stern, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a pigmented cellular monolayer that supports photoreceptor cells located in the overlying neural retina. The RPE is critical for vision and its dysfunction results in numerous pathologies, several with limited available disease-altering strategies. Regeneration of the retina from RPE is robust in lower vertebrates, but is not normally exhibited in mammals. We recently found that a subpopulation of human RPE cells can be stimulated in culture to generate multipotent self-renewing cells-the RPE stem cell (RPESC). RPESC can be expanded to generate RPE progeny that are a potential source for cell replacement therapy. Alternatively, RPESC can produce mesenchymal progeny which serve as a disease model of epiretinal membrane formation. Yet another potential application of RPESCs is activation within the eye to awaken dormant endogenous repair. PMID:26427459

  13. Adult reserve stem cells and their potential for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Young, Henry E; Duplaa, Cecile; Romero-Ramos, Marina; Chesselet, Marie-Francoise; Vourc'h, Patrick; Yost, Michael J; Ericson, Kurt; Terracio, Louis; Asahara, Takayuki; Masuda, Haruchika; Tamura-Ninomiya, Sayaka; Detmer, Kristina; Bray, Robert A; Steele, Timothy A; Hixson, Douglas; el-Kalay, Mohammad; Tobin, Brian W; Russ, Roy D; Horst, Michael N; Floyd, Julie A; Henson, Nicholas L; Hawkins, Kristina C; Groom, Jaime; Parikh, Amar; Blake, Lisa; Bland, Laura J; Thompson, Angela J; Kirincich, Amy; Moreau, Catherine; Hudson, John; Bowyer, Frank P; Lin, T J; Black, Asa C

    2004-01-01

    Tissue restoration is the process whereby multiple damaged cell types are replaced to restore the histoarchitecture and function to the tissue. Several theories have been proposed to explain the phenomenon of tissue restoration in amphibians and in animals belonging to higher orders. These theories include dedifferentiation of damaged tissues, transdifferentiation of lineage-committed progenitor cells, and activation of reserve precursor cells. Studies by Young et al. and others demonstrated that connective tissue compartments throughout postnatal individuals contain reserve precursor cells. Subsequent repetitive single cell-cloning and cell-sorting studies revealed that these reserve precursor cells consisted of multiple populations of cells, including tissue-specific progenitor cells, germ-layer lineage stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. Tissue-specific progenitor cells display various capacities for differentiation, ranging from unipotency (forming a single cell type) to multipotency (forming multiple cell types). However, all progenitor cells demonstrate a finite life span of 50 to 70 population doublings before programmed cell senescence and cell death occurs. Germ-layer lineage stem cells can form a wider range of cell types than a progenitor cell. An individual germ-layer lineage stem cell can form all cells types within its respective germ-layer lineage (i.e., ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm). Pluripotent stem cells can form a wider range of cell types than a single germ-layer lineage stem cell. A single pluripotent stem cell can form cells belonging to all three germ layer lineages. Both germ-layer lineage stem cells and pluripotent stem cells exhibit extended capabilities for self-renewal, far surpassing the limited life span of progenitor cells (50-70 population doublings). The authors propose that the activation of quiescent tissue-specific progenitor cells, germ-layer lineage stem cells, and/or pluripotent stem cells may be a potential explanation, along with dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation, for the process of tissue restoration. Several model systems are currently being investigated to determine the possibilities of using these adult quiescent reserve precursor cells for tissue engineering. PMID:14983110

  14. Neural stem and progenitor cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ladran, Ian; Tran, Ngoc; Topol, Aaron; Brennand, Kristen J.

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) have the potential to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and/or oligodendrocytes. Because these cells can be expanded in culture, they represent a vast source of neural cells. With the recent discovery that patient fibroblasts can be reprogrammed directly into induced NSPCs, the regulation of NSPC fate and function, in the context of cell-based disease models and patient-specific cell-replacement therapies, warrants review. PMID:24068527

  15. Stem cell-based cell therapy in neurological diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung U; de Vellis, Jean

    2009-08-01

    Human neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, and spinal cord injury are caused by a loss of neurons and glial cells in the brain or spinal cord. Cell replacement therapy and gene transfer to the diseased or injured brain have provided the basis for the development of potentially powerful new therapeutic strategies for a broad spectrum of human neurological diseases. However, the paucity of suitable cell types for cell replacement therapy in patients suffering from neurological disorders has hampered the development of this promising therapeutic approach. In recent years, neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and neural stem cells, and extensive efforts by investigators to develop stem cell-based brain transplantation therapies have been carried out. We review here notable experimental and preclinical studies previously published involving stem cell-based cell and gene therapies for Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, ALS, Alzheimer's disease, MS, stroke, spinal cord injury, brain tumor, and lysosomal storage diseases and discuss the future prospects for stem cell therapy of neurological disorders in the clinical setting. There are still many obstacles to be overcome before clinical application of cell therapy in neurological disease patients is adopted: 1) it is still uncertain what kind of stem cells would be an ideal source for cellular grafts, and 2) the mechanism by which transplantation of stem cells leads to an enhanced functional recovery and structural reorganization must to be better understood. Steady and solid progress in stem cell research in both basic and preclinical settings should support the hope for development of stem cell-based cell therapies for neurological diseases. PMID:19301431

  16. Searching for oligodendrocyte precursors for cell replacement therapies.

    PubMed

    Sypecka, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Inherited or acquired oligodendrocyte deficiency or abnormalities usually lead to severe neurological disorders, common in humans and animals. The wide spectrum of diseases to be treated, their frequency and lack of effective treatments result in an urgent need to elaborate alternative options such as cell replacement therapies. Elaborating the protocols for the efficient oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) generation for neurorestrative purposes still meets the essential obstacles. Searching for the most convenient, accessible and rich sources of stem-like cells is the first of them. The immunological barrier is another problem, which could however be solved by usage of either the allo- or the autografts and the pure, xeno-free compounds for the cell propagation. The third criterion is the efficiency of the progenitor derivation, proliferation and purification. The effective cellular replacement experiments carried on animal models of congenital and acquired neurodegenerative disease approached their translation into clinical practice. Notwithstanding due to urgent need for treatment of a broad spectrum of traumas and neurodegenerative disorders accompanied by hypo/demyelination, different cell sources and alternative strategies should necessarily be tested to expand the treatment options. PMID:21499330

  17. Isolation, Characterization, and Differentiation of Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Beane, Olivia S.; Darling, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of tissue engineering is to create a functional replacement for tissues damaged by injury or disease. In many cases, impaired tissues cannot provide viable cells, leading to the investigation of stem cells as a possible alternative. Cartilage, in particular, may benefit from the use of stem cells since the tissue has low cellularity and cannot effectively repair itself. To address this need, researchers are investigating the chondrogenic capabilities of several multipotent stem cell sources, including adult and extra-embryonic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Comparative studies indicate that each cell type has advantages and disadvantages, and while direct comparisons are difficult to make, published data suggest some sources may be more promising for cartilage regeneration than others. In this review, we identify current approaches for isolating and chondrogenically differentiating MSCs from bone marrow, fat, synovium, muscle, and peripheral blood, as well as cells from extra-embyronic tissues, ESCs, and iPSCs. Additionally, we assess chondrogenic induction with growth factors, identifying standard cocktails used for each stem cell type. Cell-only (pellet) and scaffold-based studies are also included, as is a discussion of in vivo results. PMID:22907257

  18. Small molecule-based approaches to adult stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Lairson, Luke L; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Zhu, Shoutian; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of stem cell-based strategies for the treatment of a broad range of human diseases, including neurodegenerative, autoimmune, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal diseases. To date, such regenerative approaches have focused largely on the development of cell transplantation therapies using cells derived from pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Although there have been exciting preliminary reports describing the efficacy of ESC-derived replacement therapies, approaches involving ex vivo manipulated ESCs are hindered by issues of mutation, immune rejection, and ethical controversy. An alternative approach involves direct in vivo modulation or ex vivo expansion of endogenous adult stem cell populations using drug-like small molecules. Here we describe chemical approaches to the regulation of somatic stem cell biology that are yielding new biological insights and that may ultimately lead to innovative new medicines. PMID:23294307

  19. Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Dailey, Travis; Tajiri, Naoki; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for stroke have expanded substantially over the last decade. The diversity of embryonic and adult tissue sources provides researchers with the ability to harvest an ample supply of stem cells. However, the optimal conditions of stem cell use are still being determined. Along this line of the need for optimization studies, we discuss studies that demonstrate effective dose, timing, and route of stem cells. We recognize that stem cell derivations also provide uniquely individual difficulties and limitations in their therapeutic applications. This review will outline the current knowledge, including benefits and challenges, of the many current sources of stem cells for stroke therapy. PMID:24147217

  20. Chemical approaches to studying stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Kai; Wei, Wanguo; Shi, Yan; Ding, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including both pluripotent stem cells and multipotent somatic stem cells, hold great potential for interrogating the mechanisms of tissue development, homeostasis and pathology, and for treating numerous devastating diseases. Establishment of in vitro platforms to faithfully maintain and precisely manipulate stem cell fates is essential to understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology, and to translate stem cells into regenerative medicine. Chemical approaches have recently provided a number of small molecules that can be used to control cell self-renewal, lineage differentiation, reprogramming and regeneration. These chemical modulators have been proven to be versatile tools for probing stem cell biology and manipulating cell fates toward desired outcomes. Ultimately, this strategy is promising to be a new frontier for drug development aimed at endogenous stem cell modulation. PMID:23266890

  1. Stem cell therapy of cataract

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cataract is recognized as a disease of the lens resulting in many blindness cases, while the only therapeutic procedure is surgery. Thus, to tackle this disease, alternative methods are required. Stem cell therapy is one of the alternative treatment modalities. Paired lens’ epithelial pieces induced by vitreous body were shown to produce lens-like structures. Here, Wharton’s jelly derived stem cells are suggested as the best candidates for this purpose, as these cells have potency for the differentiation into the lens fiber cells. Hypothesis: It is hypothesized that Wharton’s jelly derived stem cells could be used as a novel and appropriate source for the treatment of cataract. Evaluation of Hypothesis: To attain this aim, lens of an animal model of cataract can be removed. Then, the human Wharton’s jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) are injected into a capsule. Finally, the expression of crystalline proteins and vision function are analyzed. Conclusion: It is hypothesized that the lens capsule could act as a natural scaffold and hWJSCs could be used to restore the lens structure in the empty capsule. PMID:26929919

  2. Recent Advances towards the Clinical Application of Stem Cells for Retinal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Silke; Jayaram, Hari; Limb, G. Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases constitute a major cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Stem cell-based therapies offer hope for these patients at risk of or suffering from blindness due to the deterioration of the neural retina. Various sources of stem cells are currently being investigated, ranging from human embryonic stem cells to adult-derived induced pluripotent stem cells as well as human Mller stem cells, with the first clinical trials to investigate the safety and tolerability of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium cells having recently commenced. This review aims to summarize the latest advances in the development of stem cell strategies for the replacement of retinal neurons and their supportive cells, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) affected by retinal degenerative conditions. Particular emphasis will be given to the advances in stem cell transplantation and the challenges associated with their translation into clinical practice. PMID:24710533

  3. Production of neural stem cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu; Jin, Sha

    2014-10-20

    Despite significant advances in commercially available media and kits and the differentiation approaches for human neural stem cell (NSC) generation, NSC production from the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) is complicated by its time-consuming procedure, complex medium composition, and purification step. In this study, we developed a convenient and simplified NSC production protocol to meet the demand of NSC production. We demonstrated that NSCs can be generated efficiently without requirement of specific small molecules or embryoid body formation stage. Our experimental results suggest that a short suspension culture period may facilitate ectoderm lineage specification rather than endoderm or mesoderm lineage specification from hPSCs. The method developed in this study shortens the turnaround time of NSC production from both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) differentiation. It provides a straightforward and useful strategy for generating NSCs that can benefit a wide range of research applications for human brain research. PMID:25150215

  4. Leydig cells: From stem cells to aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haolin; Ge, Ren-Shan; Zirkin, Barry R.

    2009-01-01

    Leydig cells are the testosterone-producing cells of the testis. The adult Leydig cell population ultimately develops from undifferentiated mesenchymal-like stem cells present in the interstitial compartment of the neonatal testis. Four distinct stages of adult Leydig cell development have been identified and characterized: stem Leydig cells, progenitor Leydig cells, immature Leydig cells and adult Leydig cells. The stem Leydig cells are undifferentiated cells that are capable of indefinite self-renewal, differentiation, and replenishment of the Leydig cell niche. Progenitor Leydig cells are derived from the stem Leydig cells. These spindle-shaped cells are luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor positive, have high mitotic activity, and produce little testosterone but rather testosterone metabolites. The progenitor Leydig cells give rise to immature Leydig cells which are round, contain large amounts of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and produce some testosterone but also very high levels of testosterone metabolites. A single division of these cells produces adult Leydig cells, which are terminally differentiated cells that produce high levels of testosterone. As men age, serum testosterone levels decline, and this is associated with alterations in body composition, energy level, muscle strength, physical, sexual and cognitive functions, and mood. In the Brown Norway rat, used extensively as a model for male reproductive aging, age-related reductions in serum testosterone result from significant decline in the ability of aged Leydig cells to produce testosterone in response to LH stimulation. This review describes Leydig cell development and aging. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms by which testosterone synthesis declines with aging are discussed. PMID:19481681

  5. Epigenetic regulation of mammalian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuekun; Zhao, Xinyu

    2008-12-01

    Two critical properties of stem cells are self-renewal and multipotency. The maintenance of their "stemness" state and commitment to differentiation are therefore tightly controlled by intricate molecular networks. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling and the noncoding RNA-mediated process, have profound regulatory roles in mammalian gene expression. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic regulators are key players in stem cell biology and their dysfunction can result in human diseases such as cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we review the recent evidences that advance our knowledge in epigenetic regulations of mammalian stem cells, with focus on embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells. PMID:18393635

  6. The Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Differentiation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mahshid; Shamsasanjan, karim; Movassaghpourakbari, Aliakbar; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Molaeipour, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow microenvironment contains cellular and acellular compartments. The cellular compartment includes hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and some other stromal cell types, while the acellular compartment is composed of scaffold proteins known as the extra cellular matrix. Direct cell-cell contact as well as cytokines secreted by mesenchymal stem cells during coculture of hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells play a critical role in hematopoiesis, and determines the fate of hematopoietic stem cells. Several studies have demonstrated the impact of mesenchymal stem cells on self-renewal, expansion, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in vitro, which have shown different and contradictory results. In this paper, we will investigate the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in vitro. PMID:26504750

  7. Stem Cell Therapy: A New Treatment for Burns?

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna; Smith, Alexandra H.; Blit, Patrick H.; Shehab, Mohammed Al; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new approach in almost every medicine specialty. This vast, heterogeneous family of cells are now both naturally (embryonic and adult stem cells) or artificially obtained (induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs) and their fates have become increasingly controllable, thanks to ongoing research in this passionate new field. We are at the beginning of a new era in medicine, with multiple applications for stem cell therapy, not only as a monotherapy, but also as an adjunct to other strategies, such as organ transplantation or standard drug treatment. Regrettably, serious preclinical concerns remain and differentiation, cell fusion, senescence and signalling crosstalk with growth factors and biomaterials are still challenges for this promising multidisciplinary therapeutic modality. Severe burns have several indications for stem cell therapy, including enhancement of wound healing, replacement of damaged skin and perfect skin regeneration – incorporating skin appendages and reduced fibrosis –, as well as systemic effects, such as inflammation, hypermetabolism and immunosuppression. The aim of this review is to describe well established characteristics of stem cells and to delineate new advances in the stem cell field, in the context of burn injury and wound healing.

  8. Stem cells in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Feng, Fei; Zhou, Yong-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which were first identified in acute myeloid leukemia and subsequently in a large array of solid tumors, play important roles in cancer initiation, dissemination and recurrence. CSCs are often transformed tissue-specific stem cells or de-differentiated transit amplifying progenitor cells. Several populations of multipotent gastric stem cells (GSCs) that reside in the stomach have been determined to regulate physiological tissue renewal and injury repair. These populations include the Villin+ and Lgr5+ GSCs in the antrum, the Troy+ chief cells in the corpus, and the Sox2+ GSCs that are found in both the antrum and the corpus. The disruption of tumor suppressors in Villin+ or Lgr5+ GSCs leads to GC in mouse models. In addition to residing GSCs, bone marrow-derived cells can initiate GC in a mouse model of chronic Helicobacter infection. Furthermore, expression of the cell surface markers CD133 or CD44 defines gastric CSCs in mouse models and in human primary GC tissues and cell lines. Targeted elimination of CSCs effectively reduces tumor size and grade in mouse models. In summary, the recent identification of normal GSCs and gastric CSCs has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular and cellular etiology of GC and will aid in the development of effective therapies to treat patients. PMID:25574084

  9. Do we still need human embryonic stem cells for stem cell-based therapies? Epistemic and ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Hug, Kristina; Hermern, Gran

    2011-11-01

    While scientific community disagrees about similarities and differences between human embryonic stem (hES) cells and human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells, some politicians embrace translational hiPS cell research as a replacement for translational hES cell research. We examine the ethical relevance of the main differences between hES and hiPS cell-based therapies and discuss whether, given the current state of knowledge, certain differences are essential. We discuss whether well-founded preferences can be made in hypothetical scenarios with varying levels of patient safety, treatment efficacy, treatment accessibility and ethical controversy. PMID:21461713

  10. Stem Cell and Research in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine using stem cells has progressed significantly over the last decade. Plastic surgeons historically have used tissues of human being to restore various defect sites and utilized a single cell lines for the tissue regeneration. The cell sources (autologous or allogeneic), cell types (embryonic stem cell or adult stem cell), and source of tissues (bone marrow, muscle, adipose, cartilage, or blood) are very important for stem cell-based tissue coverage. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent precursors obtained from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and reported to be used for preventing muscle atrophy after peripheral nerve injury. Multipotent adult stem cells are easily accessed for plastic surgeons during many routine procedures. This article briefly review the current state of overall stem cell research and clinical applications in the plastic surgical field. PMID:25473205

  11. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are stem cells? How are they regulated? Health Fraud Scams Related Consumer Updates Adult Stem Cell Research Shows Promise Don't Be Fooled By Health Fraud Scams FDA 101: Health Fraud Awareness Cord Blood: ...

  12. Federal Policy on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The National Institutes of Health Guidelines on Human Stem Cell Research were published on July 7, 2009. This was ... of Health (NIH) can support and conduct human stem cell research. The HHS Secretary, through the NIH Director, was ...

  13. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  14. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Industry Committee Session RUCDR Humanity in a Dish Stem Cell Engineering Junior Investigator Events Career Panel Meet the ... Scientific Program Confirmed Speakers Support/Exhibit Meeting Supporters Stem Cell Engineering 2014 Program Committee Featured Speakers Deepak Srivastava ...

  15. Beware Unregulated Stem Cell Treatments, Experts Warn

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154536.html Beware Unregulated Stem Cell Treatments, Experts Warn Clinics selling treatments that ... clinics across the United States are offering unapproved stem cell treatments for conditions from baldness to heart ...

  16. Bioengineered stem cells as an alternative for islet cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah J; Gala-Lopez, Boris L; Pepper, Andrew R; Pawlick, Rena L; Shapiro, AM James

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune and increasingly prevalent condition caused by immunological destruction of beta cells. Insulin remains the mainstay of therapy. Endeavours in islet transplantation have clearly demonstrated that type 1 diabetes is treatable by cellular replacement. Many challenges remain with this approach. The opportunity to use bioengineered embryonic or adult pluripotential stem cells, or islets derived from porcine xenograft sources could address future demands, but are still associated with considerable challenges. This detailed review outlines current progress in clinical islet transplantation, and places this in perspective for the remarkable scientific advances now occurring in stem cell and regenerative medicine approaches in the treatment of future curative treatment of diabetes. PMID:25815266

  17. Bioengineered stem cells as an alternative for islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah J; Gala-Lopez, Boris L; Pepper, Andrew R; Pawlick, Rena L; Shapiro, Am James

    2015-03-24

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune and increasingly prevalent condition caused by immunological destruction of beta cells. Insulin remains the mainstay of therapy. Endeavours in islet transplantation have clearly demonstrated that type 1 diabetes is treatable by cellular replacement. Many challenges remain with this approach. The opportunity to use bioengineered embryonic or adult pluripotential stem cells, or islets derived from porcine xenograft sources could address future demands, but are still associated with considerable challenges. This detailed review outlines current progress in clinical islet transplantation, and places this in perspective for the remarkable scientific advances now occurring in stem cell and regenerative medicine approaches in the treatment of future curative treatment of diabetes. PMID:25815266

  18. The stem cell secretome and its role in brain repair

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Denise; Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Musco, Giovanna; Bachi, Angela; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Compelling evidence exists that non-haematopoietic stem cells, including mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural/progenitor stem cells (NPCs), exert a substantial beneficial and therapeutic effect after transplantation in experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease models through the secretion of immune modulatory or neurotrophic paracrine factors. This paracrine hypothesis has inspired an alternative outlook on the use of stem cells in regenerative neurology. In this paradigm, significant repair of the injured brain may be achieved by injecting the biologics secreted by stem cells (secretome), rather than implanting stem cells themselves for direct cell replacement. The stem cell secretome (SCS) includes cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, and has gained increasing attention in recent years because of its multiple implications for the repair, restoration or regeneration of injured tissues. Thanks to recent improvements in SCS profiling and manipulation, investigators are now inspired to harness the SCS as a novel alternative therapeutic option that might ensure more efficient outcomes than current stem cell-based therapies for CNS repair. This review discusses the most recent identification of MSC- and NPC-secreted factors, including those that are trafficked within extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs), and reflects on their potential effects on brain repair. It also examines some of the most convincing advances in molecular profiling that have enabled mapping of the SCS. PMID:23827856

  19. Monitoring of beta cell replacement outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charles A; Haque, Waqas Z; Yoshimatsu, Gumpei; Balajii, Prathab S; Lawrence, Michael C; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement treatment for patients with "brittle" type 1 diabetes (T1D) or intractable chronic pancreatitis to restore or preserve pancreatic endocrine function. Early after transplant, a significant islet mass is lost due to an innate inflammatory response, and further loss of the islet graft occurs over time due to immune response, drug toxicity, or metabolic exhaustion. Thus, clinically feasible techniques are essential to monitor islet graft function and survival to maintain appropriate therapy. Currently, islet graft function is monitored using blood glucose levels, insulin and C-peptide levels, and islet imaging. However, these tests are influenced by physiological changes, including beta cell stimulation. Biomarkers that are independent of metabolic stimuli would be more accurate and reliable in detecting islet damage. Antibodies against islet autoantigens are useful but not reliable markers of islet injury due to their presence during the pretransplant period. Several islet-specific proteins such as Glutamate decarboxylase-65, doublecortin, protein phosphatase 1, regulatory (inhibitor) subunit 1A, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1, and the high-mobility group box-1 protein have been proposed as candidates to monitor islet damage, but these biomarkers have short half-lives and unreliable detection. Unmethylated insulin DNA has been studied in T1D patients and has been documented as a highly correlative and selective biomarker for beta cell death. More recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) that are selectively expressed in islets have been shown to provide sensitive and accurate quantification of islet damage. Analysis of plasma samples from autologous and allogeneic islet transplant patients has demonstrated the value of miRNA-375 as a specific biomarker to accurately assess islet damage. Use of selective, sensitive, and measurably reproducible biomarkers of islets will lead to effective monitoring of beta cell replacement therapy and may also lead to development of preventative and interventional treatment strategies to improve outcomes. PMID:26763742

  20. Epidermal Stem Cells and Their Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qi; Jin, Hongchuan; Wang, Xian

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells play an essential role in embryonic development, cell differentiation and tissue regeneration. Tissue homeostasis in adults is maintained by adult stem cells resident in the niches of different tissues. As one kind of adult stem cell, epidermal stem cells have the potential to generate diversified types of progeny cells in the skin. Although its biology is still largely unclarified, epidermal stem cells are widely used in stem cell research and regenerative medicine given its easy accessibility and pluripotency. Despite the same genome, cells within an organism have different fates due to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this review, we will briefly discuss the current understanding of epigenetic modulation in epidermal stem cells. PMID:23999591

  1. Current focus of stem cell application in retinal repair.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Alonso, María L; Srivastava, Girish K

    2015-04-26

    The relevance of retinal diseases, both in society's economy and in the quality of people's life who suffer with them, has made stem cell therapy an interesting topic for research. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) are the focus in current endeavors as a source of different retinal cells, such as photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells. The aim is to apply them for cell replacement as an option for treating retinal diseases which so far are untreatable in their advanced stage. ESCs, despite the great potential for differentiation, have the dangerous risk of teratoma formation as well as ethical issues, which must be resolved before starting a clinical trial. iPSCs, like ESCs, are able to differentiate in to several types of retinal cells. However, the process to get them for personalized cell therapy has a high cost in terms of time and money. Researchers are working to resolve this since iPSCs seem to be a realistic option for treating retinal diseases. ADMSCs have the advantage that the procedures to obtain them are easier. Despite advancements in stem cell application, there are still several challenges that need to be overcome before transferring the research results to clinical application. This paper reviews recent research achievements of the applications of these three types of stem cells as well as clinical trials currently based on them. PMID:25914770

  2. Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Hauch, Kip; Xu, Chunhui; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The muscle lost after a myocardial infarction is replaced with non-contractile scar tissue, often initiating heart failure. Whole-organ cardiac transplantation is the only currently available clinical means of replacing the lost muscle, but this option is limited by the inadequate supply of donor hearts. Thus, cell-based cardiac repair has attracted considerable interest as an alternative means of ameliorating cardiac injury. Because of their tremendous capacity for expansion and unquestioned cardiac potential, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an attractive candidate cell source for obtaining cardiomyocytes and other useful mesenchymal cell types for such therapies. hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) exhibit a committed cardiac phenotype and robust proliferative capacity, and recent testing in rodent infarct models indicates that they can partially remuscularize injured hearts and improve contractile function. Although the latter successes give good reason for optimism, considerable challenges remain to the successful application of hESCs to cardiac repair, including the need for preparations of high cardiac purity, improved methods of delivery, and approaches to overcome immune rejection and other causes of graft cell death. This review will describe the phenotype of hESC-CMs and preclinical experience with these cells and will consider strategies to overcoming the aforementioned challenges. PMID:18657407

  3. Stem Cells for Heart Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Donghui; Parikh, Abhirath; Canty, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Myocardial infarction–induced heart failure is a prevailing cause of death in the United States and most developed countries. The cardiac tissue has extremely limited regenerative potential, and heart transplantation for reconstituting the function of damaged heart is severely hindered mainly due to the scarcity of donor organs. To that end, stem cells with their extensive proliferative capacity and their ability to differentiate toward functional cardiomyocytes may serve as a renewable cellular source for repairing the damaged myocardium. Here, we review recent studies regarding the cardiogenic potential of adult progenitor cells and embryonic stem cells. Although large strides have been made toward the engineering of cardiac tissues using stem cells, important issues remain to be addressed to enable the translation of such technologies to the clinical setting. PMID:18821841

  4. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before…

  5. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before

  6. Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search Toggle Nav Nine Things To Know About Stem Cell Treatments Home > Stem Cells and Medicine > Nine Things ... Know About Stem Cell Treatments Many clinics offering stem cell treatments make claims that are not supported by ...

  7. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  8. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few

  9. Neural stem cells could serve as a therapeutic material for age-related neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Suksuphew, Sarawut; Noisa, Parinya

    2015-01-01

    Progressively loss of neural and glial cells is the key event that leads to nervous system dysfunctions and diseases. Several neurodegenerative diseases, for instance Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease, are associated to aging and suggested to be a consequence of deficiency of neural stem cell pool in the affected brain regions. Endogenous neural stem cells exist throughout life and are found in specific niches of human brain. These neural stem cells are responsible for the regeneration of new neurons to restore, in the normal circumstance, the functions of the brain. Endogenous neural stem cells can be isolated, propagated, and, notably, differentiated to most cell types of the brain. On the other hand, other types of stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells can also serve as a source for neural stem cell production, that hold a great promise for regeneration of the brain. The replacement of neural stem cells, either endogenous or stem cell-derived neural stem cells, into impaired brain is highly expected as a possible therapeutic mean for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, clinical features and current routinely treatments of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are documented. Noteworthy, we presented the promising evidence of neural stem cells and their derivatives in curing such diseases, together with the remaining challenges to achieve the best outcome for patients. PMID:25815135

  10. Neural stem cells could serve as a therapeutic material for age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Suksuphew, Sarawut; Noisa, Parinya

    2015-03-26

    Progressively loss of neural and glial cells is the key event that leads to nervous system dysfunctions and diseases. Several neurodegenerative diseases, for instance Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, are associated to aging and suggested to be a consequence of deficiency of neural stem cell pool in the affected brain regions. Endogenous neural stem cells exist throughout life and are found in specific niches of human brain. These neural stem cells are responsible for the regeneration of new neurons to restore, in the normal circumstance, the functions of the brain. Endogenous neural stem cells can be isolated, propagated, and, notably, differentiated to most cell types of the brain. On the other hand, other types of stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells can also serve as a source for neural stem cell production, that hold a great promise for regeneration of the brain. The replacement of neural stem cells, either endogenous or stem cell-derived neural stem cells, into impaired brain is highly expected as a possible therapeutic mean for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, clinical features and current routinely treatments of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are documented. Noteworthy, we presented the promising evidence of neural stem cells and their derivatives in curing such diseases, together with the remaining challenges to achieve the best outcome for patients. PMID:25815135

  11. Laser printing of skin cells and human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koch, Lothar; Kuhn, Stefanie; Sorg, Heiko; Gruene, Martin; Schlie, Sabrina; Gaebel, Ralf; Polchow, Bianca; Reimers, Kerstin; Stoelting, Stephanie; Ma, Nan; Vogt, Peter M; Steinhoff, Gustav; Chichkov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Laser printing based on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a new biofabrication technique for the arrangement of biological materials or living cells in well-defined patterns. In the current study, skin cell lines (fibroblasts/keratinocytes) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were chosen for laser printing experiments due to their high potential in regeneration of human skin and new application possibilities of stem cell therapy. To evaluate the influence of LIFT on the cells, their survival rate, their proliferation and apoptotic activity, and the DNA damages and modifications of their cell surface markers were assessed and statistically evaluated over several days. The cells survived the transfer procedure with a rate of 98%? +/- 1% standard error of the mean (skin cells) and 90%? +/- 10% (hMSC), respectively. All used cell types maintain their ability to proliferate after LIFT. Further, skin cells and hMSC did not show an increase of apoptosis or DNA fragmentation. In addition, the hMSC keep their phenotype as proven by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. This study demonstrates LIFT as a suitable technique for unharmed computer-controlled positioning of different cell types and a promising tool for future applications in the ex vivo generation of tissue replacements. PMID:19883209

  12. Human Foetal Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gtherstrm, Cecilia

    2016-02-01

    Finding suitable cell sources is one of the main challenges in regenerative medicine. In addition to improving the dysfunctional tissue requiring reconstruction, low immunogenicity is beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are immune-privileged multipotent stromal cells that can easily multiply and differentiate along many lineages with a minimal oncogenic risk. MSCs derived from foetal tissues present characteristics that suggest an even stronger cell therapeutic potential in comparison to adult MSCs. Due to these characteristics, they have been and are currently being tested in clinical trials for a diverse variety of disorders. PMID:26725704

  13. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chien, Ke-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone) and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells). The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed. PMID:25238708

  14. Methods for Stem Cell Production and Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo (Inventor); Valluri, Jagan V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for rapidly expanding a stem cell population with or without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention relates to methods for rapidly increasing the life span of stem cell populations without culture supplements in simulated microgravity conditions. The present invention also relates to methods for increasing the sensitivity of cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions and in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The methods of the present invention can also be used to proliferate cancer cells by culturing them in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids. The present invention also relates to methods for testing the sensitivity of cancer cells and cancer stem cells to chemotherapeutic agents by culturing the cancer cells and cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce tissue for use in transplantation by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors by culturing stem cells or cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions. The methods of the present invention can also be used to produce cellular factors and growth factors to promote differentiation of cancer stem cells under microgravity conditions.

  15. Dormancy in the stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tissues characterized by constant turnover contain post-mitotic, terminally differentiated cells originating from highly proliferative progenitors, which in turn derive from a relatively small population of stem cells. At the population level, self-renewal and differentiation are the possible outcomes of stem cell proliferation; overall, however, stem cells are quiescent if compared with their direct progeny. The recent discovery of a particularly quiescent, or dormant, subpopulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) raises a number of fundamental questions. As stem cell fate is influenced by the signals integrated by the stem cell niche, will dormant HSCs reside in specific dormant niches? Is the mechanism of dormancy common to multiple regenerating tissues or specific to the hematopoietic system? If cancer is maintained by a few cancer stem cells, do they also contain a subpopulation of dormant cells, and could this be exploited for therapeutic purposes? PMID:22429750

  16. Chromatin structure of pluripotent stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Recillas-Targa, Flix

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells are specialized cells with a dynamic chromatin structure, which is intimately connected with their pluripotency and physiology. In recent years somatic cells have been reprogrammed to a pluripotent state through over-expression of a defined set of transcription factors. These cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, recapitulate ES cell properties and can be differentiated to apparently all cell lineages, making iPS cells a suitable replacement for ES cells in future regenerative medicine. Chromatin modifiers play a key function in establishing and maintaining pluripotency, therefore, elucidating the mechanisms controlling chromatin structure in both ES and iPS cells is of utmost importance to understanding their properties and harnessing their therapeutic potential. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provide a genome-wide view of the chromatin structure signature in ES cells and iPS cells and that highlight the central role of histone modifiers and chromatin remodelers in pluripotency maintenance and induction. PMID:21325400

  17. Stem Cell Research in Pakistan; Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Zahra, Sayeda Anum; Muzavir, Sayed Raheel; Ashraf, Sadia; Ahmad, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Stem cells have proved to have great therapeutic potential as stem cell treatment is replacing traditional ways of treatment in different disorders like cancer, aplastic anemia, stroke, heart disorders. The developed and developing countries are investing differently in this area of research so research output and clinical translation of research greatly vary among developed and developing countries. Present study was done to investigate the current status of stem cells research in Pakistan and ways to improve it. Results Many advanced countries (USA, UK and Canada etc.) are investing heavily in stem cell research and treatment. Different developing countries like Iran, Turkey and India are also following the developed countries and investing a lot in stem cells research. Pakistan is also making efforts in establishing this field to get desired benefits but unfortunately the progress is at very low pace. If Government plays an active role along with private sector, stem cell research in Pakistan can be boosted up. The numbers of publications from Pakistan are very less compared to developed and neighboring countries and Pakistan also has very less number of institutes working in this area of research. Conclusions Stem cells research is at its initial stages in Pakistan and there is great need to bring Government, academia and industry together so they could make serious efforts to promote research in this very important field. This will help millions of patients suffering from incurable disorders and will also reduce economic loss. PMID:26019749

  18. Development of stem cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Fabin; Baremberg, Deborah; Gao, Junyu; Duan, Jing; Lu, Xianjie; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Qingfa

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders of aging, characterized by the degeneration of dopamine neurons (DA neurons) in the substantial nigra, leading to the advent of both motor symptoms and non-motor symptoms. Current treatments include electrical stimulation of the affected brain areas and dopamine replacement therapy. Even though both categories are effective in treating PD patients, the disease progression cannot be stopped. The research advance into cell therapies provides exciting potential for the treatment of PD. Current cell sources include neural stem cells (NSCs) from fetal brain tissues, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and directly induced dopamine neurons (iDA neurons). Here, we evaluate the research progress in different cell sources with a focus on using iPSCs as a valuable source and propose key challenges for developing cells suitable for large-scale clinical applications in the treatment of PD. PMID:26339485

  19. Isolation and manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giachino, Claudio; Basak, Onur; Taylor, Verdon

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells are potentially a source of cells not only for replacement therapy but also as drug vectors, bringing bioactive molecules into the brain. Stem cell-like cells can be isolated readily from the human brain, thus, it is important to find culture systems that enable expansion in a multipotent state to generate cells that are of potential use for therapy. Currently, two systems have been described for the maintenance and expansion of multipotent progenitors, an adhesive substrate bound and the neurosphere culture. Both systems have pros and cons, but the neurosphere may be able to simulate the three-dimensional environment of the niche in which the cells reside in vivo. Thus, the neurosphere, when used and cultured appropriately, can expand and provide important information about the mechanisms that potentially control neural stem cells in vivo. PMID:19089354

  20. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that ?6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  1. Cancer Stem Cell Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    Chair Kathleen Kelly, Cell and Cancer Biology Branch, CCR, NCI Members Snorri Thorgeirsson, Laboratory of Experimental Carcinogenesis, CCR, NCI Mike Alley, Developmental Therapeutics Program, NCI Jesper Andersen, Laboratory of Experimental Carcinogenesis,

  2. Potential of stem cell treatment in detrusor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2015-03-01

    The current treatments of bladder dysfunctions, such as bladder overactivity and impaired ability to empty, have limitations, and new treatment alternatives are needed. Stem cell transplantation and tissue engineering have shown promising results in preclinical studies. Stem cells were originally thought to act by differentiating into various cell types, thereby replacing damaged cells and restoring functional deficits. Even if such a mechanism cannot be excluded, the current belief is that a main action is exerted by the stem cells secreting bioactive factors that direct other stem cells to the target organ. In addition, stem cells may exert a number of other effects that can improve bladder dysfunction, since they may have antiapoptotic, antifibrotic, and immunomodulatory properties, and can induce neovascularization. Tissue engineering for bladder replacement, which has had varying success in different animal species, has reached the proof-of-concept state in humans, but recent research suggests that the present approaches may not be optimal. Further studies on new approaches, using animal models with translational predictability, seem necessary for further progress. PMID:25453263

  3. Endometrial stem cells in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    First described in 2004, endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) are adult stem cells isolated from the endometrial tissue. EnSCs comprise of a population of epithelial stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population stem cells. When secreted in the menstrual blood, they are termed menstrual stem cells or endometrial regenerative cells. Mounting evidence suggests that EnSCs can be utilized in regenerative medicine. EnSCs can be used as immuno-modulatory agents to attenuate inflammation, are implicated in angiogenesis and vascularization during tissue regeneration, and can also be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, EnSCs can be used in tissue engineering applications and there are several clinical trials currently in place to ascertain the therapeutic potential of EnSCs. This review highlights the progress made in EnSC research, describing their mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal potentials both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25097665

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ruenn Chai; Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2015-04-01

    MSCs are an extensively used cell type in clinical trials today. The initial rationale for their clinical testing was based on their differentiation potential. However, the lack of correlation between functional improvement and cell engraftment or differentiation at the site of injury has led to the proposal that MSCs exert their effects not through their differentiation potential but through their secreted product, more specifically, exosomes, a type of extracellular vesicle. We propose here that MSC exosomes function as an extension of MSC's biological role as tissue stromal support cells. Like their cell source, MSC exosomes help maintain tissue homeostasis for optimal tissue function. They target housekeeping biological processes that operate ubiquitously in all tissues and are critical in maintaining tissue homeostasis, enabling cells to recover critical cellular functions and begin repair and regeneration. This hypothesis provides a rationale for the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs and their secreted exosomes in a wide spectrum of diseases. Here, we give a brief introduction of the biogenesis of MSC exosomes, review their physiological functions and highlight some of their biochemical potential to illustrate how MSC exosomes could restore tissue homeostasis leading to tissue recovery and repair. PMID:25765629

  5. Counting human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Steven; Flanagan, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the exact number of viable cells in a given volume of a cell suspension is required for many routine tissue culture manipulations, such as plating cells for immunocytochemistry or for cell transfections. This protocol describes a straightforward and fast method for differentiating between live and dead cells and quantifying the cell concentration and total cell number using a hemacytometer. This procedure first requires detaching cells from a growth surface and resuspending them in media. Next, the cells are diluted in a solution of Trypan blue (ideally to a concentration that will give 20-50 cells per quadrant) and placed in the hemacytometer. Finally, averaging the counts of viable cells in several randomly selected quadrants, dividing the average by the volume of one 1 mm(2) quadrant (0.1 microl) and multiplying by the dilution factor gives the number of cells per l. Multiplying this cell concentration by the total volume in microl gives the total cell number. This protocol describes counting human neural stem/precursor cells (hNSPCs), but can also be used for many other cell types. PMID:18989433

  6. Stem cell maintenance in a different niche

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Lee, Seung Tae

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the difficulty of controlling stem cell fate and function in applications to regenerative medicine, a number of alternative approaches have been made. Recent reports demonstrate that a non-cellular niche modulating the biophysical microenvironment with chemical factors can support stem cell self-renewal. In our previous studies, early establishment was executed to optimize biophysical factors and it was subsequently found that the microgeometry of the extracellular matrix made huge differences in stem cell behavior and phenotype. We review here a three-dimensional, non-cellular niche designed to support stem cell self-renewal. The characteristics of stem cells under the designed system are further discussed. PMID:23875159

  7. Stem Cells in Teeth and Craniofacial Bones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Chai, Y

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells are remarkable, and stem cell-based tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical science aiming to restore damaged tissue or organs. In dentistry and reconstructive facial surgery, it is of great interest to restore lost teeth or craniofacial bone defects using stem cell-mediated therapy. In the craniofacial region, various stem cell populations have been identified with regeneration potential. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge concerning the various types of tooth- and craniofacial bone-related stem cells and discuss their in vivo identities and regulating mechanisms. PMID:26350960

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cells and Parkinson's disease: modelling and treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Jinsha; Li, Jie; Liu, Ling; Han, Chao; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Guoxin; Jiang, Haiyang; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), are characterized by progressive neuronal loss in different regions of the central nervous system, contributing to brain dysfunction in the relevant patients. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for PD patients, including with foetal ventral mesencephalic cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Moreover, stem cells can be used to model neurodegenerative diseases in order to screen potential medication and explore their mechanisms of disease. However, related ethical issues, immunological rejection and lack of canonical grafting protocols limit common clinical use of stem cells. iPSCs, derived from reprogrammed somatic cells, provide new hope for cell replacement therapy. In this review, recent development in stem cell treatment for PD, using hiPSCs, as well as the potential value of hiPSCs in modelling for PD, have been summarized for application of iPSCs technology to clinical translation for PD treatment. PMID:26748765

  9. Klotho, stem cells, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ao; Neyra, Javier A; Zhan, Ming; Hu, Ming Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and progressive biological process involving dysfunction and eventually destruction of every tissue and organ. This process is driven by a tightly regulated and complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors. Klotho is an antiaging gene encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein, klotho, which serves as an aging suppressor through a wide variety of mechanisms, such as antioxidation, antisenescence, antiautophagy, and modulation of many signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor and Wnt. Klotho deficiency activates Wnt expression and activity contributing to senescence and depletion of stem cells, which consequently triggers tissue atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, the klotho protein was shown to suppress Wnt-signaling transduction, and inhibit cell senescence and preserve stem cells. A better understanding of the potential effects of klotho on stem cells could offer novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of klotho deficiency-related aging and disease. The klotho protein may be a promising therapeutic agent for aging and aging-related disorders. PMID:26346243

  10. Dopamine neuron generation from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Park, Chang-Hwan

    2011-11-01

    The capacity of pluripotency and self-renewal of human embryonic stem (hES) cells may provide unlimited cell source for cell replacement therapy. In this manuscript we summarize hES differentiation protocols coculture with PA6 or MS5 stromal cells. After 7? 9 days of differentiation, neural rosettes were robustly appeared followed by coculture with sonic hedgehog over-expressing stromal cells efficiently generated dopaminergic neural precursor cells. Using this protocol, the majority of differentiated hES cells contained nestin positive cells (?95%) and after final differentiation a high percentage of TuJ1 positive neurons was tyrosine hydroxylase positive (?40%). PMID:24298339

  11. Plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2015-01-01

    Almost two decades ago, a number of cell culture and preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired by controversy and remained dormant. This chapter provides a brief review of evidence for HSC plasticity including our findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse. These studies strongly support the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and may be the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body. PMID:26590762

  12. Insights into kidney stem cell development and regeneration using zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Bridgette E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is an escalating global health problem, for which the formulation of therapeutic approaches using stem cells has received increasing research attention. The complexity of kidney anatomy and function, which includes the diversity of renal cell types, poses formidable challenges in the identification of methods to generate replacement structures. Recent work using the zebrafish has revealed their high capacity to regenerate the integral working units of the kidney, known as nephrons, following acute injury. Here, we discuss these findings and explore the ways that zebrafish can be further utilized to gain a deeper molecular appreciation of renal stem cell biology, which may uncover important clues for regenerative medicine. PMID:26981168

  13. Stem cell paracrine actions and tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R; McDevitt, Todd C

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells have emerged as a key element of regenerative medicine therapies due to their inherent ability to differentiate into a variety of cell phenotypes, thereby providing numerous potential cell therapies to treat an array of degenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. A recent paradigm shift has emerged suggesting that the beneficial effects of stem cells may not be restricted to cell restoration alone, but also due to their transient paracrine actions. Stem cells can secrete potent combinations of trophic factors that modulate the molecular composition of the environment to evoke responses from resident cells. Based on this new insight, current research directions include efforts to elucidate, augment and harness stem cell paracrine mechanisms for tissue regeneration. This article discusses the existing studies on stem/progenitor cell trophic factor production, implications for tissue regeneration and cancer therapies, and development of novel strategies to use stem cell paracrine delivery for regenerative medicine. PMID:20017699

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells for retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Guo-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Retinal diseases are featured with the common result of retinal cell apoptosis that will cause irreversible vision loss. Various attempts have been made for the solution against cell death. However, few approaches turn out to be effective. With the progress in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) research, MSCs were considered as a promising source for cell replacement or neuroprotection in retinal disorders. MSCs have the property of self-renewal and are multipotent cells derived from various mesenchymal tissues, which were demonstrated being capable of differentiating into multilineage tissue cells. Some works were also done to differentiate MSCs into retinal cells. MSCs could be induced to express retinal cell markers under certain stimuli. Recent studies also suggest that MSCs should be an ideal source for neuroprotection via the secretion of a variety of neurotrophins. Engineered MSCs were also used as vehicles for continuous delivery of neurotrophins against retinal degeneration with encouraging results. Since there are still barriers on the differentiation of MSCs into functional retinal cells, the use of MSCs for neuroprotection in retinal diseases seems to be a more practicable approach and worthy of further investigations. PMID:22553693

  15. Stem cell facelift: between reality and fiction.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Ibrahim, Amir E; Saad, Dibo A

    2013-03-01

    Stem cells are "big business" throughout medical technology, and their potential application in cosmetic procedures is no exception. One of the latest nonsurgical facial treatments (and new catchphrases) in plastic surgery is the "stem cell facelift." It is evident from the currently available scientific literature that the use of stem cell therapy for facial rejuvenation is limited to the theoretical induction of skin tightening and can in no way be equated to a facelift. In fact, what is advertised and promoted as a new and original technique of stem cell facelifting is mostly stem cell-enriched lipofilling. Despite encouraging data suggesting that adult stem cells hold promise for future applications, the data from clinical evidence available today do not substantiate the marketing and promotional claims being made to patients. To claim that the "stem cell facelift" is a complete facial rejuvenation procedure surgery is unethical. PMID:23417722

  16. Generation and Purification of Definitive Endoderm Cells Generated from Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Ulf; Naujok, Ortwin

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into cells of the definitive endoderm requires an in vitro gastrulation event. Differentiated somatic cells derived from this germ layer may then be used for cell replacement therapies of degenerative diseases of the liver, lung, and pancreas. Here we describe an endoderm differentiation protocol, which initiates the differentiation from a defined cell number of dispersed single cells and reliably yields in >70-80 % endoderm-committed cells in a short 5-day treatment regimen. PMID:25762297

  17. Stem cells, mitochondria and aging.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Kati J; Suomalainen, Anu; Hmlinen, Riikka H

    2015-11-01

    Decline in metabolism and regenerative potential of tissues are common characteristics of aging. Regeneration is maintained by somatic stem cells (SSCs), which require tightly controlled energy metabolism and genomic integrity for their homeostasis. Recent data indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction may compromise this homeostasis, and thereby contribute to tissue degeneration and aging. Progeroid Mutator mouse, accumulating random mtDNA point mutations in their SSCs, showed disturbed SSC homeostasis, emphasizing the importance of mtDNA integrity for stem cells. The mechanism involved changes in cellular redox-environment, including subtle increase in reactive oxygen species (H?O?and superoxide anion), which did not cause oxidative damage, but disrupted SSC function. Mitochondrial metabolism appears therefore to be an important regulator of SSC fate determination, and defects in it in SSCs may underlie premature aging. Here we review the current knowledge of mitochondrial contribution to SSC dysfunction and aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging. PMID:26014347

  18. Learning about Cancer by Studying Stem Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer by Studying Stem Cells Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Learning About Cancer by Studying Stem ... Once Upon a Stem Cell This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  19. Stem cells: The Next Therapeutic Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Humes, H. David

    2005-01-01

    Cell therapy is one of the most exciting fields in translational medicine. It stands at the intersection of a variety of rapidly developing scientific disciplines: stem cell biology, immunology, tissue engineering, molecular biology, biomaterials, transplantation biology, regenerative medicine, and clinical research. Cell-based therapy may develop into a new therapeutic platform to treat a vast array of clinical disorders. Blood transfusions and bone marrow transplantation are prime examples of the successful application of cell-based therapeutics; but recent advances in cellular and molecular biology have expanded the potential applications of this approach. Although recombinant genetic engineering to produce a variety of therapeutics such as human erythropoietin and insulin has proven successful, these treatments are unable to completely correct or reverse disease states, because most common disease processes are not due to the deficiency of a single protein but develop due to alterations in the complex interactions of a variety of cell components. In these complex situations, cell-based therapy may be a more successful strategy by providing a dynamic, interactive, and individualized therapeutic approach that responds to the pathophysiological condition of the patient. In this regard, cells may provide innovative methods for drug delivery of biologics, immunotherapy, and tissue regenerative or replacement engineering (1,2). The translation of this discipline to medical practice has tremendous potential, but in many applications technological issues need to be overcome. Since many cell-based indications are already being evaluated in the clinic, the field appears to be on the threshold of a number of successes. This review will focus on our group's use of human stem/progenitor cells in the treatment of acute and chronic renal failure as extensions to the current successful renal substitution processes of hemodialysis and hemofiltration. PMID:16555613

  20. Stem Cells, Science, and Public Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, J. Benjamin; Robert, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    These are interesting days in the scientific, social, and political debates about human embryonic stem cell research. Pluripotent stem cells--cells that can, in principle, give rise to the body's full range of cell types--were previously derivable only from human embryos that were destroyed in the process. Now, a variety of somatic cell types can…

  1. Stem Cells, Science, and Public Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, J. Benjamin; Robert, Jason Scott

    2012-01-01

    These are interesting days in the scientific, social, and political debates about human embryonic stem cell research. Pluripotent stem cells--cells that can, in principle, give rise to the body's full range of cell types--were previously derivable only from human embryos that were destroyed in the process. Now, a variety of somatic cell types can

  2. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs. PMID:22774232

  3. Stem cells for liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Than, N N; Newsome, P N

    2014-06-01

    The liver has a unique capacity to repair following injury, which is largely achieved by proliferation of hepatocytes. However, in situations of chronic or overwhelming liver injury, additional repair mechanisms, namely liver progenitor or oval cells, are activated. These cells, located in the canals of Hering, express markers for both hepatocytes and biliary cells and have the capacity to differentiate down both hepatocyte and biliary lineages. Previous work has suggested that the administration of autologous or allogeneic cell therapies such as haematopoietic or mesenchymal stem cells can augment liver repair by either stimulating endogenous repair mechanisms or by suppressing ongoing damage. A better understanding of how cell therapies can promote liver regeneration will lead to the refinement of these therapeutic approaches and also develop new pharmacological agents for liver repair. PMID:24453286

  4. The role of the design of tibial components and stems in knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Scott, C E H; Biant, L C

    2012-08-01

    Stems improve the mechanical stability of tibial components in total knee replacement (TKR), but come at a cost of stress shielding along their length. Their advantages include resistance to shear, reduced tibial lift-off and increased stability by reducing micromotion. Longer stems may have disadvantages including stress shielding along the length of the stem with associated reduction in bone density and a theoretical risk of subsidence and loosening, peri-prosthetic fracture and end-of-stem pain. These features make long stems unattractive in the primary TKR setting, but often desirable in revision surgery with bone loss and instability. In the revision scenario, stems are beneficial in order to convey structural stability to the construct and protect the reconstruction of bony defects. Cemented and uncemented long stemmed implants have different roles depending on the nature of the bone loss involved. This review discusses the biomechanics of the design of tibial components and stems to inform the selection of the component and the technique of implantation. PMID:22844039

  5. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlstrm, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisn, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  6. Effects of nanotopography on stem cell phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Liao, Susan; Ng, Clarisse CH; Chan, Casey K; Raghunath, Michael; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can self renew indefinitely and differentiate into several somatic cells given the correct environmental cues. In the stem cell niche, stem cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are crucial for different cellular functions, such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Recently, in addition to chemical surface modifications, the importance of nanometric scale surface topography and roughness of biomaterials has increasingly becoming recognized as a crucial factor for cell survival and host tissue acceptance in synthetic ECMs. This review describes the influence of nanotopography on stem cell phenotypes. PMID:21607108

  7. [Adult stem cells: their scientific interest and therapeutic future].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, L

    2007-09-01

    Fascinating and provocative findings have shaken the stem cell field during these past years, which may be exploited in the future in cell replacement therapies. Continuous renewal of blood, skin, and gut cells, has long be attributed to stem cells, but it was more unexpected to identify cells that fulfil the requirements for stem-progenitor cells in many tissues with a slow turnover such as heart, kidney, muscle and brain. However, despite their lack of risk and immunological barrier, adult stem cells are yet of poor therapeutic value in many diseases, because they are available in scarce number, are poorly amplified, and loose potential with ageing, among many obstacles. Thus, the identification in adult, and more recently fetal tissues, of cells with a high proliferative capacity and multi-lineage differentiation potential has been wellcome, although their existence is still a matter of controversy. An alternative would be to activate stem cells in situ, by acting on components of the niche as recently exemplified in the hematopoetic system. Finally, as fiction meets reality, it may become possible to reprogram human adult cells in pluripotent ES cells-like, as recently demonstrated in mice. PMID:17766162

  8. Stem cell tracking with optically active nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Cui, Yan; Chan, Jerry KY; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies hold promise and potential to address many unmet clinical needs. Cell tracking with modern imaging modalities offers insight into the underlying biological process of the stem-cell-based therapies, with the goal to reveal cell survival, migration, homing, engraftment, differentiation, and functions. Adaptability, sensitivity, resolution, and non-invasiveness have contributed to the longstanding use of optical imaging for stem cell tracking and analysis. To identify transplanted stem cells from the host tissue, optically active probes are usually used to label stem cells before the administration. In comparison to the traditional fluorescent probes like fluorescent proteins and dyes, nanoparticle-based probes are advantageous in terms of the photo-stabilities and minimal changes to the cell phenotype. The main focus here is to overview the recent development of optically active nanoparticles for stem cells tracking. The related optical imaging modalities include fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging. PMID:23638335

  9. TGF-? family signaling in stem cells?

    PubMed Central

    Sakaki-Yumoto, Masayo; Katsuno, Yoko; Derynck, Rik

    2014-01-01

    Background The diversity of cell types and tissue types that originate throughout development derives from the differentiation potential of embryonic stem cells and somatic stem cells. While the former are pluripotent, and thus can give rise to a full differentiation spectrum, the latter have limited differentiation potential but drive tissue remodeling. Additionally cancer tissues also have a small population of self-renewing cells with stem cell properties. These cancer stem cells may arise through dedifferentiation from non-stem cells in cancer tissues, illustrating their plasticity, and may greatly contribute to the resistance of cancers to chemotherapies. Scope of review The capacity of the different types of stem cells for self-renewal, the establishment and maintenance of their differentiation potential, and the selection of differentiation programs are greatly defined by the interplay of signaling molecules provided by both the stem cells themselves, and their microenvironment, the niche. Here we discuss common and divergent roles of TGF-? family signaling in the regulation of embryonic, reprogrammed pluripotent, somatic, and cancer stem cells. Major conclusions Increasing evidence highlights the similarities between responses of normal and cancer stem cells to signaling molecules, provided or activated by their microenvironment. While TGF-? family signaling regulates stemness of normal and cancer stem cells, its effects are diverse and depend on the cell types and physiological state of the cells. General significance Further mechanistic studies will provide a better understanding of the roles of TGF-? family signaling in the regulation of stem cells. These basic studies may lead to the development of a new therapeutic or prognostic strategies for the treatment of cancers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. PMID:22959078

  10. Stem cells with potential to generate insulin-producing cells in man.

    PubMed

    Zulewski, Henryk

    2007-03-01

    Replacement of insulin-producing cells represents an almost ideal treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans--although successful in experienced centres--is limited by the lack of donor organs. Generation of insulin-producing cells from stem cells represents an attractive alternative. Stem cells with the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells include embryonic stem cells (ESC) as well as adult stem cells from various tissues including the pancreas, liver, central nervous system, bone marrow and adipose tissue. The use of human ESC is hampered by ethical concerns and the inability to create patient specific ESC with therapeutic cloning. Among adult stem cells mesenchymal stem cells appear to have a particular developmental plasticity ex vivo that include their ability to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype. The present review summarises the current knowledge on the development of insulin-producing cells from stem cells with special emphasis on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the pancreas and adipose tissue. PMID:17874504

  11. Stem cells with potential to generate insulin producing cells in man.

    PubMed

    Zulewski, Henryk

    2006-10-14

    Replacement of insulin-producing cells represents an almost ideal treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans--although successful in experienced centres--is limited by the lack of donor organs. Generation of insulin-producing cells from stem cells represents an attractive alternative. Stem cells with the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells include embryonic stem cells (ESC) as well as adult stem cells from various tissues including the pancreas, liver, central nervous system, bone marrow and adipose tissue. The use of human ESC is hampered by ethical concerns and the inability to create patient specific ESC with therapeutic cloning. Among adult stem cells mesenchymal stem cells appear to have a particular developmental plasticity ex vivo that include their ability to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype. The present review summarises the current knowledge on the development of insulin-producing cells from stem cells with special emphasis on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the pancreas and adipose tissue. PMID:17103343

  12. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress

    PubMed Central

    GIRLOVANU, MIHAI; SUSMAN, SERGIU; SORITAU, OLGA; RUS-CIUCA, DAN; MELINCOVICI, CARMEN; CONSTANTIN, ANNE-MARIE; MIHU, CARMEN MIHAELA

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods to prevent teratoma formation or the ethical and religious issues regarding especially the embryonic stem cell research. The direct differentiation of stem cells into specialized cells: cardiac myocytes, neural cells, pancreatic islets cells, may represent an option in treating incurable diseases such as: neurodegenerative diseases, type I diabetes, hematologic or cardiac diseases. Nevertheless, stem cell-based therapies, based on stem cell transplantation, remain mainly at the experimental stages and their major limitation is the development of teratoma and cancer after transplantation. The induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a prime candidate for future cell therapy research because of their significant self-renewal and differentiation potential and the lack of ethical issues. This article presents an overview of the biological advances in the study of stem cells and the current progress made in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26609255

  13. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress.

    PubMed

    Girlovanu, Mihai; Susman, Sergiu; Soritau, Olga; Rus-Ciuca, Dan; Melincovici, Carmen; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods to prevent teratoma formation or the ethical and religious issues regarding especially the embryonic stem cell research. The direct differentiation of stem cells into specialized cells: cardiac myocytes, neural cells, pancreatic islets cells, may represent an option in treating incurable diseases such as: neurodegenerative diseases, type I diabetes, hematologic or cardiac diseases. Nevertheless, stem cell-based therapies, based on stem cell transplantation, remain mainly at the experimental stages and their major limitation is the development of teratoma and cancer after transplantation. The induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a prime candidate for future cell therapy research because of their significant self-renewal and differentiation potential and the lack of ethical issues. This article presents an overview of the biological advances in the study of stem cells and the current progress made in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26609255

  14. Therapeutic Implications of Leukemic Stem Cell Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chumsri, Saranya; Matsui, William; Burger, Angelika M.

    2008-01-01

    An emerging concept in cancer biology is that a rare population of cancer stem cells exists among the heterogeneous cell mass that constitutes a tumor. This concept is best understood in human myeloid leukemia. Normal and malignant hematopoietic stem cell functions are defined by a common set of critical stemness genes that regulate self-renewal and developmental pathways. Several stemness factors, such as Notch or telomerase, show differential activation in normal hematopoietic versus leukemia stem cells. These differences could be exploited therapeutically even with drugs that are already in clinical use for the treatment of leukemia. The translation of novel and existing leukemic stem cell directed therapies into clinical practice, however, will require changes in clinical trial design and the inclusion of stem cell biomarkers as correlative end points. PMID:18006753

  15. Transcriptome sequencing of hematopoietic stem cells and chronic myelgenous leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junil; Kim, Seong-Jin; Naka, Kazuhito

    2016-03-01

    Dipeptide species are accumulated in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) stem cells [1]. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of the accumulation of dipeptide species in CML stem cells, we performed transcriptome sequencing of long-term stem cells, short-term stem cells, progenitor cells from healthy control and CML-affected mice (GSE70031). The transcriptome data revealed that the expression of a dipeptide transporter (solute carrier family 15, member 2 (SLC15A2)) was elevated only in the CML stem cells. This result indicates that dipeptide species accumulates in CML stem cells through a dipeptide transporter SLC15A2. PMID:26981360

  16. Transcriptome sequencing of hematopoietic stem cells and chronic myelgenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junil; Kim, Seong-Jin; Naka, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptide species are accumulated in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) stem cells [1]. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of the accumulation of dipeptide species in CML stem cells, we performed transcriptome sequencing of long-term stem cells, short-term stem cells, progenitor cells from healthy control and CML-affected mice (GSE70031). The transcriptome data revealed that the expression of a dipeptide transporter (solute carrier family 15, member 2 (SLC15A2)) was elevated only in the CML stem cells. This result indicates that dipeptide species accumulates in CML stem cells through a dipeptide transporter SLC15A2. PMID:26981360

  17. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming. PMID:26861316

  18. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming. PMID:26861316

  19. Intestinal stem cells and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Piscaglia, Anna Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells (SCs) are the key to tissue genesis and regeneration. Given their central role in homeostasis, dysfunctions of the SC compartment play a pivotal role in the development of cancers, degenerative disorders, chronic inflammatory pathologies and organ failure. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to harsh mechanical and chemical conditions and most of the epithelial cells are replaced every 3 to 5 d. According to the so-called Unitarian hypothesis, this renewal is driven by a common intestinal stem cell (ISC) residing within the crypt base at the origin of the crypt-to-villus hierarchical migratory pattern. Celiac disease (CD) can be defined as a chronic immune-mediated disease that is triggered and maintained by dietary proteins (gluten) in genetically predisposed individuals. Many advances have been achieved over the last years in understanding of the pathogenic interactions among genetic, immunological and environmental factors in CD, with a particular emphasis on intestinal barrier and gut microbiota. Conversely, little is known about ISC modulation and deregulation in active celiac disease and upon a gluten-free diet. Nonetheless, bone marrow-derived SC transplantation has become an option for celiac patients with complicated or refractory disease. This manuscript summarizes the “state of the art” regarding CD and ISCs, their niche and potential role in the development and treatment of the disease. PMID:24772248

  20. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells. PMID:26573336

  1. Stem Cells in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Soto, Angel R.; Oakley, Derek H.; Wichterle, Hynek; Stein, Joel; Doetsch, Fiona K.; Henderson, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Given their capacity to regenerate cells lost through injury or disease, stem cells offer new vistas into possible treatments for degenerative diseases and their underlying causes. As such, stem cell biology is emerging as a driving force behind many studies in the field of regenerative medicine. This review focuses on our current understanding of the applications of stem cells in treating ailments of the human brain, with an emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases. Two types of neural stem cells are discussed: endogenous neural stem cells residing within the adult brain, and pluripotent stem cells capable of forming neural cells in culture. Endogenous neural stem cells give rise to neurons throughout life, but they are restricted to specialized regions in the brain. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms regulating these cells is key in determining their therapeutic potential, as well as finding mechanisms to activate dormant stem cells outside of these specialized microdomains. In parallel, patient-derived stem cells can be used to generate neural cells in culture, providing new tools for disease modeling, drug testing and cell-based therapies. Turning these technologies into viable treatments will require the integration of basic science with clinical skills in rehabilitation. PMID:24800720

  2. Stem cells in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Soto, Angel R; Oakley, Derek H; Wichterle, Hynek; Stein, Joel; Doetsch, Fiona K; Henderson, Christopher E

    2014-11-01

    Given their capacity to regenerate cells lost through injury or disease, stem cells offer new vistas into possible treatments for degenerative diseases and their underlying causes. As such, stem cell biology is emerging as a driving force behind many studies in regenerative medicine. This review focuses on the current understanding of the applications of stem cells in treating ailments of the human brain, with an emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases. Two types of neural stem cells are discussed: endogenous neural stem cells residing within the adult brain and pluripotent stem cells capable of forming neural cells in culture. Endogenous neural stem cells give rise to neurons throughout life, but they are restricted to specialized regions in the brain. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms regulating these cells is key in determining their therapeutic potential as well as finding mechanisms to activate dormant stem cells outside these specialized microdomains. In parallel, patient-derived stem cells can be used to generate neural cells in culture, providing new tools for disease modeling, drug testing, and cell-based therapies. Turning these technologies into viable treatments will require the integration of basic science with clinical skills in rehabilitation. PMID:24800720

  3. The ontogeny of epithelial skin stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tumbar, Tudorita

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial skin stem cells constitute an important model system for understanding the dynamics of stem cell emergence and behavior in an intact tissue. Recent published work defined discrete population of epithelial stem cells in the adult skin epithelium located in the lower hair follicle, isthmus, sebaceous gland and epidermis. Adult epidermal and hair follicle stem cells behave by a population deterministic model and adopt either one of two possible fates: (1) differentiate and be lost from the tissue or (2) expand symmetrically to self-renew. While the mechanisms controlling adult stem cell homeostasis begin to unravel, the embryonic development of epithelial skin stem cells is poorly understood. Few studies reported Sox9, Lgr6, and Runx1 expressed in subpopulations of cells in the embryonic hair placode that act as precursors of adult epithelial stem cells. Runx1 regulates a Wnt-mediated cross-talk between the nascent adult-type of hair follicle stem cells and their environment, which is essential for the stem cell timely emergence, proper maturation, long-term differentiation potential, and maintenance. The new data begin to define the basic dynamics and regulatory pathways governing the ontogeny of adult epithelial stem cells. PMID:22290419

  4. The therapeutic potential of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Fiona M.; Driskell, Ryan R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion of interest in stem cells, not just within the scientific and medical communities but also among politicians, religious groups and ethicists. Here, we summarize the different types of stem cells that have been described: their origins in embryonic and adult tissues and their differentiation potential in vivo and in culture. We review some current clinical applications of stem cells, highlighting the problems encountered when going from proof-of-principle in the laboratory to widespread clinical practice. While some of the key genetic and epigenetic factors that determine stem cell properties have been identified, there is still much to be learned about how these factors interact. There is a growing realization of the importance of environmental factors in regulating stem cell behaviour and this is being explored by imaging stem cells in vivo and recreating artificial niches in vitro. New therapies, based on stem cell transplantation or endogenous stem cells, are emerging areas, as is drug discovery based on patient-specific pluripotent cells and cancer stem cells. What makes stem cell research so exciting is its tremendous potential to benefit human health and the opportunities for interdisciplinary research that it presents. PMID:20008393

  5. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Han, Edward; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer. PMID:25772134

  6. Genetics of Gonadal Stem Cell Renewal.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Leah Joy; de Cuevas, Margaret; Matunis, Erika

    2015-11-13

    Stem cells are necessary for the maintenance of many adult tissues. Signals within the stem cell microenvironment, or niche, regulate the self-renewal and differentiation capability of these cells. Misregulation of these signals through mutation or damage can lead to overgrowth or depletion of different stem cell pools. In this review, we focus on the Drosophila testis and ovary, both of which contain well-defined niches, as well as the mouse testis, which has become a more approachable stem cell system with recent technical advances. We discuss the signals that regulate gonadal stem cells in their niches, how these signals mediate self-renewal and differentiation under homeostatic conditions, and how stress, whether from mutations or damage, can cause changes in cell fate and drive stem cell competition. PMID:26355592

  7. Reforming craniofacial orthodontics via stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Pritam; Prasad, N.K.K.; Sahoo, Nivedita; Kumar, Gunjan; Mohanty, Debapreeti; Sah, Sushila

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are the most interesting cells in cell biology. They have the potential to evolve as one of the most powerful technologies in the future. The future refers to an age where it will be used extensively in various fields of medical and dental sciences. Researchers have discovered a number of sources from which stem cells can be derived. Craniofacial problems are very common and occur at all ages. Stem cells can be used therapeutically in almost every field of health science. In fact, many procedures will be reformed after stem cells come into play. This article is an insight into the review of the current researches being carried out on stem cells and its use in the field of orthodontics, which is a specialized branch of dentistry. Although the future is uncertain, there is a great possibility that stem cells will be used extensively in almost all major procedures of orthodontics. PMID:25767761

  8. Adult Stem Cell Responses to Nanostimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tsimbouri, Penelope M.

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both internal and external forces at the nanoscale level and this response of stem cells to nanostimuli is the focus of this review. PMID:26193326

  9. Epigenetic regulation of stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Sun, Yi Eve

    2006-04-01

    Stem cells undergo extensive self-renewal and have the capacity to differentiate along multiple cell lineages. Progression from stem cells into differentiated progeny requires long-lasting changes in gene expression. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA-mediated regulatory events, are essential to controlling the heritable cellular memory of gene expression during development. Recent studies on cell fate specification of embryonic and adult stem cells/progenitors have highlighted a general and critical role for dynamic epigenetic regulation in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. PMID:16549544

  10. Adult Stem Cell Responses to Nanostimuli.

    PubMed

    Tsimbouri, Penelope M

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called "stem cell niches". They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both internal and external forces at the nanoscale level and this response of stem cells to nanostimuli is the focus of this review. PMID:26193326

  11. Stem Cells for Augmenting Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gulotta, Lawrence V.; Chaudhury, Salma; Wiznia, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Tendon healing is fraught with complications such as reruptures and adhesion formation due to the formation of scar tissue at the injury site as opposed to the regeneration of native tissue. Stem cells are an attractive option in developing cell-based therapies to improve tendon healing. However, several questions remain to be answered before stem cells can be used clinically. Specifically, the type of stem cell, the amount of cells, and the proper combination of growth factors or mechanical stimuli to induce differentiation all remain to be seen. This paper outlines the current literature on the use of stem cells for tendon augmentation. PMID:22190960

  12. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Li; Medine, Claire N; Zhu, Liang; Hay, David C

    2012-05-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation. This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells. Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease. In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases. In recent years, efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own. In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology. PMID:22563188

  13. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Li; Medine, Claire N; Zhu, Liang; Hay, David C

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation. This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells. Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease. In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases. In recent years, efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own. In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology. PMID:22563188

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  15. Endothelial potential of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zoldan, Janet; Basevitch, Yaara; Langer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Growing interest in using endothelial cells for therapeutic purposes has led to exploring human embryonic stem cells as a potential source for endothelial progenitor cells. Embryonic stem cells are advantageous when compared with other endothelial cell origins, due to their high proliferation capability, pluripotency, and low immunogenity. However, there are many challenges and obstacles to overcome before the vision of using embryonic endothelial progenitor cells in the clinic can be realized. Among these obstacles is the development of a productive method of isolating endothelial cells from human embryonic stem cells and elucidating their differentiation pathway. This review will focus on the endothelial potential of human embryonic stem cells that is described in current studies, with respect to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to endothelial cells, their isolation, and their characterization. PMID:17412888

  16. PEDF & stem cells: niche vs. nurture.

    PubMed

    Fitchev, Philip; Chung, Chuhan; Plunkett, Beth A; Brendler, Charles B; Crawford, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a multifunctional 50kD secreted glycoprotein emerging as a key factor in stem cell renewal. Characteristics of the stem cell niche can be highly dependent on location, access to the vasculature, oxygen tension and neighboring cells. In the neural stem cell (NSC) niche, specifically the subventricular zone, PEDF actively participates in the self renewal process and promotes stemness by upregulating Notch signaling effectors Hes1 and Hes5. The local vascular endothelial cells and ependymal cells are the likely sources of PEDF for the NSC while mesenchymal and retinal stem cells can actually produce PEDF. The opposing actions of PEDF and VEGF on various cells are recapitulated in the NSC niche. Intraventricular injection of PEDF promotes stem cell renewal, while injection of VEGF prompts differentiation and neurogenesis in the subventricular zone. Enhancing the expression of PEDF in stem cells has promising therapeutic implications. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing PEDF effectively inhibited pathologic angiogenesis in the murine eye and these same cells suppressed hepatocellular carcinoma growth. As a protein with bioactivities in nearly all normal organ systems, it is likely that PEDF will continue to gain visibility as an essential component in the development and delivery of novel stem cell-based therapies to combat disease. PMID:23517628

  17. Melanocyte stem cells: Biology and current aspects

    PubMed Central

    Gola, Monika; Czajkowski, Rafa?; Bajek, Anna; Dura, Aleksander; Drewa, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Epidermal stem cells have become an object of intensive research. The epidermis constitutes one of the main sources of stem cells and is a tissue of choice for use in exploring their biology. Stratified squamous epithelium (epidermis) possesses the capacity for self-renewal and repair due to the presence of epidermal stem cells (ESC). They have been identified within basal layer of the interfollicular epidermis (IFE), in the bulge of the hair follicles of rodents, and also in the human follicular bulge. Melanocyte stem cells (MSC) from hair follicles (precisely from the bulge region, which also contains epidermal stem cells) provide an attractive model for the study of stem cells and their regulation at the niche. This review summarizes the rapidly developing field of epidermal stem cell research and their application in regenerative medicine, paying particular attention to melanocyte stem cells, their biology and some of the processes that occur during hair graying and regeneration of the pigmentary system, as well as discussing how aged-associated changes in the melanocyte stem cells compartment impact hair graying. This review also includes differentiation of human skin stem cells into functional epidermal melanocytes. PMID:23018363

  18. Imported Stem Cells Strike against Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pron, Sophie; Berninger, Benedikt

    2015-11-01

    Cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties can be isolated from the cortex of adult brains following injury, but their origins and function are unclear. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Faiz etal. (2015) show that subventricular-zone-derived NSCs home to injured cortical area following stroke, where they generate reactive astrocytes. PMID:26544109

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantz, Tobias; Martin, Ulrich

    The induction of pluripotency in somatic cells is widely considered as a major breakthrough in regenerative medicine, because this approach provides the basis for individualized stem cell-based therapies. Moreover, with respect to cell transplantation and tissue engineering, expertise from bioengineering to transplantation medicine is now meeting basic research of stem cell biology.

  20. Lifting the Mist on Gastric Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Varga, Julia; Greten, Florian R

    2016-01-01

    In a recent issue of Cancer Cell, Hayakawa etal. (2015) demonstrate that Mist1(+) gastric stem cells are supported by a specialized niche composed of Cxcl12(+) endothelium and Wnt5a-producing Cxcr4(+) innate lymphoid cells. In diffuse-type gastric cancer this perivascular stem cell niche is expanded and can be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:26748749

  1. Pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells: From basic research to applications

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Masahiro; Nakayama, Takashi; Inoue, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    Basic research on pluripotent stem cells is designed to enhance understanding of embryogenesis, whereas applied research is designed to develop novel therapies and prevent diseases. Attainment of these goals has been enhanced by the establishment of embryonic stem cell lines, the technological development of genomic reprogramming to generate induced-pluripotent stem cells, and improvements in vitro techniques to manipulate stem cells. This review summarizes the techniques required to generate neural cells from pluripotent stem cells. In particular, this review describes current research applications of a simple neural differentiation method, the neural stem sphere method, which we developed. PMID:25426263

  2. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients. PMID:26483336

  3. Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells have a Reduced Tendon Differentiation Capacity Compared to Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Bavin, Emma P; Smith, Olivia; Baird, Arabella E G; Smith, Lawrence C; Guest, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries occur commonly in horses and their repair through scar tissue formation predisposes horses to a high rate of re-injury. Pluripotent stem cells may provide a cell replacement therapy to improve tendon tissue regeneration and lower the frequency of re-injury. We have previously demonstrated that equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiate into the tendon cell lineage upon injection into the damaged horse tendon and can differentiate into functional tendon cells in vitro to generate artificial tendons. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have now been derived from horses but, to date, there are no reports on their ability to differentiate into tendon cells. As iPSCs can be produced from adult cell types, they provide a more accessible source of cells than ESCs, which require the use of horse embryos. The aim of this study was to compare tendon differentiation by ESCs and iPSCs produced through two independent methods. In two-dimensional differentiation assays, the iPSCs expressed tendon-associated genes and proteins, which were enhanced by the presence of transforming growth factor-?3. However, in three-dimensional (3D) differentiation assays, the iPSCs failed to differentiate into functional tendon cells and generate artificial tendons. These results demonstrate the utility of the 3D in vitro tendon assay for measuring tendon differentiation and the need for more detailed studies to be performed on equine iPSCs to identify and understand their epigenetic differences from pluripotent ESCs prior to their clinical application. PMID:26664982

  4. Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells have a Reduced Tendon Differentiation Capacity Compared to Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bavin, Emma P.; Smith, Olivia; Baird, Arabella E. G.; Smith, Lawrence C.; Guest, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries occur commonly in horses and their repair through scar tissue formation predisposes horses to a high rate of re-injury. Pluripotent stem cells may provide a cell replacement therapy to improve tendon tissue regeneration and lower the frequency of re-injury. We have previously demonstrated that equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiate into the tendon cell lineage upon injection into the damaged horse tendon and can differentiate into functional tendon cells in vitro to generate artificial tendons. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have now been derived from horses but, to date, there are no reports on their ability to differentiate into tendon cells. As iPSCs can be produced from adult cell types, they provide a more accessible source of cells than ESCs, which require the use of horse embryos. The aim of this study was to compare tendon differentiation by ESCs and iPSCs produced through two independent methods. In two-dimensional differentiation assays, the iPSCs expressed tendon-associated genes and proteins, which were enhanced by the presence of transforming growth factor-β3. However, in three-dimensional (3D) differentiation assays, the iPSCs failed to differentiate into functional tendon cells and generate artificial tendons. These results demonstrate the utility of the 3D in vitro tendon assay for measuring tendon differentiation and the need for more detailed studies to be performed on equine iPSCs to identify and understand their epigenetic differences from pluripotent ESCs prior to their clinical application. PMID:26664982

  5. Stem cell applications for pathologies of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Noha A; Abou-Taleb, Hisham A; Orabi, Hazem

    2015-01-01

    New stem cell based therapies are undergoing intense research and are widely investigated in clinical fields including the urinary system. The urinary bladder performs critical complex functions that rely on its highly coordinated anatomical composition and multiplex of regulatory mechanisms. Bladder pathologies resulting in severe dysfunction are common clinical encounter and often cause significant impairment of patient’s quality of life. Current surgical and medical interventions to correct urinary dysfunction or to replace an absent or defective bladder are sub-optimal and are associated with notable complications. As a result, stem cell based therapies for the urinary bladder are hoped to offer new venues that could make up for limitations of existing therapies. In this article, we review research efforts that describe the use of different types of stem cells in bladder reconstruction, urinary incontinence and retention disorders. In particular, stress urinary incontinence has been a popular target for stem cell based therapies in reported clinical trials. Furthermore, we discuss the relevance of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to the development of bladder cancer. A key subject that should not be overlooked is the safety and quality of stem cell based therapies introduced to human subjects either in a research or a clinical context. PMID:26131312

  6. Derivation, characterization and retinal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mekala, Subba Rao; Vauhini, Vasundhara; Nagarajan, Usha; Maddileti, Savitri; Gaddipati, Subhash; Mariappan, Indumathi

    2013-03-01

    Millions of people world over suffer visual disability due to retinal dystrophies which can be age-related or a genetic disorder resulting in gradual degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors. Therefore, cell replacement therapy offers a great promise in treating such diseases. Since the adult retina does not harbour any stem cells, alternative stem cell sources like the embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer a great promise for generating different cell types of the retina. Here, we report the derivation of four iPSC lines from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) using a cocktail of recombinant retroviruses carrying the genes for Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and cMyc. The iPS clone MEF-4F3 was further characterized for stemness marker expression and stable reprogramming by immunocytochemistry, FACS and RT-PCR analysis. Methylation analysis of the nanog promoter confirmed the reprogrammed epigenetic state. Pluripotency was confirmed by embryoid body (EB) formation and lineage-specific marker expression. Also, upon retinal differentiation, patches of pigmented cells with typical cobble-stone phenotype similar to RPE cells are generated within 6 weeks and they expressed ZO-1 (tight junction protein), RPE65 and bestrophin (mature RPE markers) and showed phagocytic activity by the uptake of fluorescent latex beads. PMID:23385820

  7. Stem Cell Therapy for Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ichim, Thomas E; Solano, Fabio; Glenn, Eduardo; Morales, Frank; Smith, Leonard; Zabrecky, George; Riordan, Neil H

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental conditions whose incidence is reaching epidemic proportions, afflicting approximately 1 in 166 children. Autistic disorder, or autism is the most common form of ASD. Although several neurophysiological alterations have been associated with autism, immune abnormalities and neural hypoperfusion appear to be broadly consistent. These appear to be causative since correlation of altered inflammatory responses, and hypoperfusion with symptology is reported. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are in late phases of clinical development for treatment of graft versus host disease and Crohn's Disease, two conditions of immune dysregulation. Cord blood CD34+ cells are known to be potent angiogenic stimulators, having demonstrated positive effects in not only peripheral ischemia, but also in models of cerebral ischemia. Additionally, anecdotal clinical cases have reported responses in autistic children receiving cord blood CD34+ cells. We propose the combined use of MSC and cord blood CD34+cells may be useful in the treatment of autism. PMID:17597540

  8. The short stem GHEs in total hip replacement experience after 380 implantations

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Farag, M.; Schneider, P.; Hitzler, P.; Gulow, J.; Freiherr von Salis-Soglio, G

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Standard straight stems have been recognized as a gold standard implant in the field of hip replacement surgery. However, lately uncemented bone-preserving short stems started to gain more and more popularity. This was reflected in the increasing variety of available models. Up till now, short and mid-term results are available. Patients and methods: In 2002, the cementless short stemmed GHEs was introduced. 380 patients were included in our study between 2002 and 2008. Only GHEs short stems were implanted. The clinical and radiological evaluations were performed in the Orthopaedic Department, Leipzig University Hospitals, on the average of 24 months (3 to 60 months) postoperatively. Results: 365 primary implantations and 15 revision implantations were carried out. Average age 60 years. Favourable clinical and radiological outcome was seen in 361/380 patients (95%). Postoperative complications were seen in 19/380 patients (5%): 8 fissures/fractures (2.1%), 5 infections (1.3%), 4 aseptic loosenings (1.1%), 2 dislocations (0.5%). Conclusions: Short stem implants, including our own experience with GHEs model, are satisfying and promising. They represent a valuable supplementation of the treatment modalities in hip replacement surgery. However, long term results are still awaited. PMID:26504707

  9. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties.

    PubMed

    Prater, Michael D; Petit, Valrie; Alasdair Russell, I; Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A; Stingl, John

    2014-10-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt actin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using two independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage-tracing approach we follow the progeny of myoepithelial cells that express ?-smooth muscle actin and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  10. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valrie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of ?-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  11. Epithelial stem cells in adult skin.

    PubMed

    Tadeu, Ana Mafalda Baptista; Horsley, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    The skin is the first line of defense against dehydration and external environmental aggressions. It constantly renews itself throughout adult life mainly due to the activity of tissue-specific stem cells. In this review, we discuss fundamental characteristics of different stem cell populations within the skin and how they are able to contribute to normal skin homeostasis. We also examine the most recent results regarding the cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic components of the stem cell niche within the adult skin epithelium. Finally, we address the recent efforts to understand how abnormal regulation of stem cell activity contributes to the initiation and progression of skin-associated cancers. PMID:24439804

  12. [Human stem cells in the treatment of pancreatic and hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Hakonen, Elina; Toivonen, Sanna; Jalanko, Hannu; Otonkoski, Timo

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas and the liver are developmentally closely connected with each other.The development of stem cell technology has enabled the production of functional pancreatic endocrine cells and hepatocytes from pluripotent human stem cells. The differentiation of cells takes place by mimicking the events of developmental biology on a cell culture dish. The research is aiming at the development of cell replacement therapy for diabetes and hepatic insufficiency. Transplantations of islet cells have proven the possibilities of this strategy as a replacement of insulin therapy. Although there are promising initial clinical observations on hepatocyte transplantation, the limited growth capacity of these cells restricts the efficiency of the treatment. PMID:25558618

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering for Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seogjin; Na, Kun

    2011-01-01

    In tissue engineering fields, recent interest has been focused on stem cell therapy to replace or repair damaged or worn-out tissues due to congenital abnormalities, disease, or injury. In particular, the repair of articular cartilage degeneration by stem cell-based tissue engineering could be of enormous therapeutic and economic benefit for an aging population. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can induce chondrogenic differentiation would provide an appropriate cell source to repair damaged cartilage tissues; however, we must first understand the optimal environmental conditions for chondrogenic differentiation. In this review, we will focus on identifying the best combination of MSCs and functional extracellular matrices that provides the most successful chondrogenesis. PMID:22007146

  14. Dopaminergic differentiation using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mom?ilovi?, Olga; Montoya-Sack, Justine; Zeng, Xianmin

    2012-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The motor symptoms of PD are caused by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of mesencephalon. The causes for death of DA neurons are not well understood, but the strongest risk factor is increasing age. There is no cure currently available for PD, and treatment is limited to management of PD symptoms in patients. Primary DA neurons are virtually unobtainable from living patients and animal studies have proven inadequate for studying the mechanism of PD development. Pluripotent stem cells (PSC) are primary self-renewing cells capable of differentiating into all cell types of an organism, including DA neurons. PSCs represent an abundant source of cells that can be genetically modified or isolated from patients with complex diseases, enabling the production of large quantities of DA neurons for disease modeling, drug screening, and gene function studies. Furthermore, since PD arises as a result of deterioration of DA neurons in a specific brain region, it has been suggested that a relatively small number of cells could restore normal function. PSCs could provide a source of DA neurons for cell replacement therapy. In this Prospects article, we focus on the development and in vitro derivation of DA neurons from PSCs, as well as current applications of the technological advances, with the emphasis on future directions and efforts in the field. PMID:22807388

  15. Two-photon imaging of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, A.; Gorjup, E.; Riemann, I.; Sauer, D.; Knig, K.

    2008-02-01

    A variety of human and animal stem cells (rat and human adult pancreatic stem cells, salivary gland stem cells, dental pulpa stem cells) have been investigated by femtosecond laser 5D two-photon microscopy. Autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been imaged with submicron spatial resolution, 270 ps temporal resolution, and 10 nm spectral resolution. In particular, NADH and flavoprotein fluorescence was detected in stem cells. Major emission peaks at 460nm and 530nm with typical mean fluorescence lifetimes of 1.8 ns and 2.0 ns, respectively, were measured using time-correlated single photon counting and spectral imaging. Differentiated stem cells produced the extracellular matrix protein collagen which was detected by SHG signals at 435 nm.

  16. Telomere biology in stem cells and reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Batista, Luis F Z

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase expression in humans is restricted to different populations of stem and progenitor cells, being silenced in most somatic tissues. Efficient telomere homeostasis is essential for embryonic and adult stem cell function and therefore essential for tissue homeostasis throughout organismal life. Accordingly, the mutations in telomerase culminate in reduced stem cell function both in vivo and in vitro and have been associated with tissue dysfunction in human patients. Despite the importance of telomerase for stem cell biology, the mechanisms behind telomerase regulation during development are still poorly understood, mostly due to difficulties in acquiring and maintaining pluripotent stem cell populations in culture. In this chapter, we will analyze recent developments in this field, including the importance of efficient telomere homeostasis in different stem cell types and the role of telomerase in different techniques used for cellular reprogramming. PMID:24993698

  17. Stem cells in the light of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2012-01-01

    All organisms depend on stem cells for their survival. As a result, stem cells may be a prerequisite for the evolution of specific characteristics in organisms that include regeneration, multicellularity and coloniality. Stem cells have attracted the attention of biologists and medical scientists for a long time. These provide materials for regenerative medicine. We review in this paper, the link between modern stem cell research and early studies in ancient organisms. It also outlines details on stem cells in the light of evolution with an emphasis on their regeneration potential, coloniality and multicellularity. The information provided might be of use to molecular biologists, medical scientists and developmental biologists who are engaged in integrated research involving the stem cells. PMID:22825600

  18. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  19. Stem cells and regenerative medicine - future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Keith R; Weisel, Richard D; Li, Ren-Ke

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell research has expanded at an exponential rate, but its therapeutic applications have progressed much more slowly. Currently, the research focuses on understanding embryonic, adult, and inducible pluripotent stem cells. Translation of adult stem cell research has established a definitive benefit that is greater than that of the current standard of care in the field of cardiovascular medicine. The future of stem cell research and therapy will continue to provide novel avenues of diagnostics, therapeutics, and tissue regeneration. Here we discuss a brief history of stem cell research as it transitioned from the 20th to the 21st century. We address lessons learned in the first decade of the new millennium that could help guide others to translate research into therapy across disciplines. Finally, we highlight future goals and challenges that must be overcome and offer some perspective on the bright future of stem cell research and therapy. PMID:22401558

  20. From Beta cell replacement to beta cell regeneration: implications for antidiabetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Wu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes is affecting more than 25.8 million people in the United States, causing huge burden on the health care system and economy. Insulin injection, which is the predominant treatment for diabetes, is incapable of replenishing the lost insulin-producing beta cell in patients. Restoring beta cell mass through replacement therapy such as islet transplantation or beta cell regeneration through in vitro and in vivo strategies has attracted particular attentions in the field due to its potential to cure diabetes. In the aspect of islet transplantation, gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and more biocompatible immunosuppressive drugs have been tested in various preclinical animal models to improve the longevity and function of human islets against the posttransplantation challenges. In the islet regeneration aspect, insulin-producing cells have been generated through in vitro transdifferentiation of stem cells and other types of cells and demonstrated to be capable of glycemic control. Moreover, several biomarkers including cell-surface receptors, soluble factors, and transcriptional factors have been identified or rediscovered in mediating the process of beta cell proliferation in rodents. This review summarizes the current progress and hurdles in the preclinical efforts in resurrecting beta cells. It may provide some useful insights into the future drug discovery for antidiabetic purposes. PMID:25355714

  1. Stem and progenitor cells: advancing bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tevlin, R; Walmsley, G G; Marecic, O; Hu, Michael S; Wan, D C; Longaker, M T

    2016-04-01

    Unlike many other postnatal tissues, bone can regenerate and repair itself; nevertheless, this capacity can be overcome. Traditionally, surgical reconstructive strategies have implemented autologous, allogeneic, and prosthetic materials. Autologous bone-the best option-is limited in supply and also mandates an additional surgical procedure. In regenerative tissue engineering, there are myriad issues to consider in the creation of a functional, implantable replacement tissue. Importantly, there must exist an easily accessible, abundant cell source with the capacity to express the phenotype of the desired tissue, and a biocompatible scaffold to deliver the cells to the damaged region. A literature review was performed using PubMed; peer-reviewed publications were screened for relevance in order to identify key advances in stem and progenitor cell contribution to the field of bone tissue engineering. In this review, we briefly introduce various adult stem cells implemented in bone tissue engineering such as mesenchymal stem cells (including bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells), endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We then discuss numerous advances associated with their application and subsequently focus on technological advances in the field, before addressing key regenerative strategies currently used in clinical practice. Stem and progenitor cell implementation in bone tissue engineering strategies have the ability to make a major impact on regenerative medicine and reduce patient morbidity. As the field of regenerative medicine endeavors to harness the body's own cells for treatment, scientific innovation has led to great advances in stem cell-based therapies in the past decade. PMID:25990836

  2. [Bioethical challenges of stem cell tourism].

    PubMed

    Ventura-Junc, Patricio; Erices, Alejandro; Santos, Manuel J

    2013-08-01

    Stem cells have drawn extraordinary attention from scientists and the general public due to their potential to generate effective therapies for incurable diseases. At the same time, the production of embryonic stem cells involves a serious ethical issue concerning the destruction of human embryos. Although adult stem cells and induced pluripotential cells do not pose this ethical objection, there are other bioethical challenges common to all types of stem cells related particularly to the clinical use of stem cells. Their clinical use should be based on clinical trials, and in special situations, medical innovation, both of which have particular ethical dimensions. The media has raised unfounded expectations in patients and the public about the real clinical benefits of stem cells. At the same time, the number of unregulated clinics is increasing around the world, making direct offers through Internet of unproven stem cell therapies that attract desperate patients that have not found solutions in standard medicine. This is what is called stem cells tourism. This article reviews this situation, its consequences and the need for international cooperation to establish effective regulations to prevent the exploitation of patients and to endanger the prestige of legitimate stem cell research. PMID:24448860

  3. Application of Graphene Based Nanotechnology in Stem Cells Research.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shanshan; Zeng, Yongxiang; Yang, Shuying; Qin, Han; Cai, He; Wang, Jian

    2015-09-01

    The past several years have witnessed significant advances in stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Graphene, with its unique properties such as high electrical conductivity, elasticity and good molecule absorption, have potential for creating the next generation of biomaterials. This review summarizes the interrelationship between graphene and stem cells. The analysis of graphene when applied on mesenchymal stem cells, neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, embryonic stem cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, human adipose-derived stem cells and cancer stem cells, and how graphene influences cell behavior and differentiation are discussed in details. PMID:26716188

  4. Preclinical Assessment of Stem Cell Therapies for Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Joers, Valerie L.; Emborg, Marina E.

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells, as subjects of study for use in treating neurological diseases, are envisioned as a replacement for lost neurons and glia, a means of trophic support, a therapeutic vehicle, and, more recently, a tool for in vitro modeling to understand disease and to screen and personalize treatments. In this review we analyze the requirements of stem cell–based therapy for clinical translation, advances in stem cell research toward clinical application for neurological disorders, and different animal models used for analysis of these potential therapies. We focus on Parkinson’s disease (typically defined by the progressive loss of dopaminergic nigral neurons), stroke (neurodegeneration associated with decreased blood perfusion in the brain), and multiple sclerosis (an autoimmune disorder that generates demyelination, axonal damage, astrocytic scarring, and neurodegeneration in the brain and spinal cord). We chose these disorders for their diversity and the number of people affected by them. An additional important consideration was the availability of multiple animal models in which to test stem cell applications for these diseases. We also discuss the relationship between the limited number of systematic stem cell studies performed in animals, in particular nonhuman primates and the delayed progress in advancing stem cell therapies to clinical success. PMID:20075496

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells from goat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui; Li, Hui; Huang, Mingrui; Xu, Dan; Gu, Chenghao; Wang, Ziyu; Dong, Fulu; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a powerful model for genetic engineering, studying developmental biology, and modeling disease. To date, ESCs have been established from the mouse (Evans and Kaufman, 1981, Nature 292:154-156), non-human primates (Thomson et al., , Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 92:7844-7848), humans (Thomson et al., 1998, Science 282:1145-1147), and rats (Buehr et al., , Cell 135:1287-1298); however, the derivation of ESCs from domesticated ungulates such as goats, sheep, cattle, and pigs have not been successful. Alternatively, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells with several combinations of genes encoding transcription factors (OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, cMYC, LIN28, and NANOG). To date, iPSCs have been isolated from various species, but only limited information is available regarding goat iPSCs (Ren et al., 2011, Cell Res 21:849-853). The objectives of this study were to generate goat iPSCs from fetal goat primary ear fibroblasts using lentiviral transduction of four human transcription factors: OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC. The goat iPSCs were successfully generated by co-culture with mitomycin C-treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts using medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement and human basic fibroblast growth factor. The goat iPSCs colonies are flat, compact, and closely resemble human iPSCs. They have a normal karyotype; stain positive for alkaline phosphatase, OCT4, and NANOG; express endogenous pluripotency genes (OCT4, SOX2, cMYC, and NANOG); and can spontaneously differentiate into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24123501

  6. Stem cell reprogramming: A 3D boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical factors in an optimized three-dimensional microenvironment enhance the reprogramming efficiency of human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells when compared to traditional cell-culture substrates.

  7. Stem Cells, Phenotypic Inversion, and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Siggins, Robert W.; Zhang, Ping; Welsh, David; LeCapitaine, Nicole J.; Nelson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells possess the potential to cure a myriad of ailments ranging from congenital diseases to illnesses acquired through the physiological process of aging. In the adult, these cells are extremely rare and often difficult to isolate in numbers sufficient to apply to medical treatment. Ex vivo expansion of these cells will be required for most meaningful interventions. The discovery of stem/progenitor cell inversion offers a new avenue for obtaining sufficient numbers of stem cells. Adult progenitor cells are much more common than quiescent stem cells and can be isolated with minimal interventions; therefore, inversion of progenitors to stem cells may become a feasible approach for therapeutic purposes. Stem cells are known to possess few mitochondria, and mitochondrial biogenesis is required for stem cell differentiation. The microtubule cytoskeleton is a major regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. Investigations in the area of controlling cell differentiation and inducing phenotypic inversion, possibly through manipulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, may contribute to stem cell-based therapies. PMID:19079683

  8. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the “drivers” of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  9. Preconditioning Stem Cells for In Vivo Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sart, Sbastien; Ma, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Stem cells have emerged as promising tools for the treatment of incurable neural and heart diseases and tissue damage. However, the survival of transplanted stem cells is reported to be low, reducing their therapeutic effects. The major causes of poor survival of stem cells in vivo are linked to anoikis, potential immune rejection, and oxidative damage mediating apoptosis. This review investigates novel methods and potential molecular mechanisms for stem cell preconditioning in vitro to increase their retention after transplantation in damaged tissues. Microenvironmental preconditioning (e.g., hypoxia, heat shock, and exposure to oxidative stress), aggregate formation, and hydrogel encapsulation have been revealed as promising strategies to reduce cell apoptosis in vivo while maintaining biological functions of the cells. Moreover, this review seeks to identify methods of optimizing cell dose preparation to enhance stem cell survival and therapeutic function after transplantation. PMID:25126478

  10. The Patentability of Stem Cells in Australia.

    PubMed

    Petering, Jenny; Cowin, Prue

    2015-10-01

    The potential therapeutic applications of stem cells are unlimited. However, the ongoing political and social debate surrounding the intellectual property and patenting considerations of stem cell research has led to the implementation of strict legislative regulations. In Australia the patent landscape surrounding stem cells has evolved considerably over the past 20 years. The Australian Patents Act 1990 includes a specific exclusion to the patentability of human beings and of biological processes for their generation. However, this exclusion has received no judicial consideration to date, and so its scope and potential impact on stem cell patents is unclear. PMID:26134481

  11. Stem cell-based approaches in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, T A; Orsini, G; Jimenez-Rojo, L

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dental pulp and periodontal lesions remains a major clinical challenge. Classical dental treatments require the use of specialised tissue-adapted materials with still questionable efficacy and durability. Stem cell-based therapeutic approaches could offer an attractive alternative in dentistry since they can promise physiologically improved structural and functional outcomes. These therapies necessitate a sufficient number of specific stem cell populations for implantation. Dental mesenchymal stem cells can be easily isolated and are amenable to in vitro expansion while retaining their stemness. In vivo studies realised in small and large animals have evidenced the potential of dental mesenchymal stem cells to promote pulp and periodontal regeneration, but have also underlined new important challenges. The homogeneity of stem cell populations and their quality control, the delivery method, the quality of the regenerated dental tissues and their integration to the host tissue are some of the key challenges. The use of bioactive scaffolds that can elicit effective tissue repair response, through activation and mobilisation of endogenous stem cell populations, constitutes another emerging therapeutic strategy. Finally, the use of stem cells and induced pluripotent cells for the regeneration of entire teeth represents a novel promising alternative to dental implant treatment after tooth loss. In this mini-review, we present the currently applied techniques in restorative dentistry and the various attempts that are made to bridge gaps in knowledge regarding treatment strategies by translating basic stem cell research into the dental practice. PMID:26562631

  12. Hardwiring Stem Cell Communication through Tissue Structure.

    PubMed

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-03-10

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function, but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. PMID:26967287

  13. Genetic and epigenetic instability of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Karthyayani; Li, Yuan-Sheng; Hsieh, Dean-Kuo; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, research on stem cells has been receiving an increasing amount of attention, both for its advantages and disadvantages. Genetic and epigenetic instabilities among stem cells have been a recurring obstacle to progress in regenerative medicine using stem cells. Various reports have stated that these instabilities can transform stem cells when transferred in vivo and thus have the potential to develop tumors. Previous research has shown that various extrinsic and intrinsic factors can contribute to the stability of stem cells. The extrinsic factors include growth supplements, growth factors, oxygen tension, passage technique, and cryopreservation. Controlling these factors based on previous reports may assist researchers in developing strategies for the production and clinical application of "safe" stem cells. On the other hand, the intrinsic factors can be unpredictable and uncontrollable; therefore, to ensure the successful use of stem cells in regenerative medicine, it is imperative to develop and implement appropriate strategies and technique for culturing stem cells and to confirm the genetic and epigenetic safety of these stem cells before employing them in clinical trials. PMID:24622296

  14. Generation of Thyroid Follicular Cells from Pluripotent Stem Cells: Potential for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Will; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 12% of the population in the United States will be afflicted with a thyroid related disorder during their lifetime. Common treatment approaches are tailored to the specific disorder and include surgery, radioactive iodine ablation, antithyroid drugs, thyroid hormone replacement, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Regenerative medicine endeavors to combat disease by replacing or regenerating damaged, diseased, or dysfunctional body parts. A series of achievements in pluripotent stem cell research have transformed regenerative medicine in many ways by demonstrating repair of a number of body parts in mice, of which, the thyroid has now been inducted into this special group. Seminal work in pluripotent cells, namely embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have made possible their path to becoming key tools and biological building blocks for cell-based regenerative medicine to combat the gamut of human diseases, including those affecting the thyroid. PMID:24995001

  15. Minireview: beta-cell replacement therapy for diabetes in the 21st century: manipulation of cell fate by directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, Vijay; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell failure underlies type 1 diabetes; it also contributes in an essential way to type 2 diabetes. beta-Cell replacement is an important component of any cure for diabetes. The current options of islet and pancreas transplantation are not satisfactory as definitive forms of therapy. Here, we review strategies for induced de novo pancreatic beta-cell formation, which depend on the targeted differentiation of cells into pancreatic beta-cells. With this objective in mind, one can manipulate the fate of three different types of cells: 1) from terminally differentiated cells, e.g. exocrine pancreatic cells, into beta-cells; 2) from multipotent adult stem cells, e.g. hepatic oval cells, into pancreatic islets; and 3) from pluripotent stem cells, e.g. embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, into beta-cells. We will examine the pros and cons of each strategy as well as the hurdles that must be overcome before these approaches to generate new beta-cells will be ready for clinical application. PMID:20219891

  16. Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes for Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, Scott D.; Gantz, Jay A.; Pagan, Chelsea M.; Filice, Dominic; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement The adult mammalian heart has limited capacity for generation, so a major injury such as a myocardial infarction results in the permanent loss of up to one billion cardiomyocytes. The field of cardiac cell therapy aims to replace these lost contractile units with de novo cardiomyocytes to restore lost systolic function and prevent progression to heart failure. Arguably the ideal cell for this application is the human cardiomyocyte itself, which can electromechanically couple with host myocardium and contribute active systolic force. Pluripotent stem cells from both human embryonic or induced pluripotent lineages are attractive sources for cardiomyocytes, and preclinical investigation of these cells is in progress. Recent work has focused on efficient generation and purification of cardiomyocytes, tissue engineering efforts, and examining the consequences of cell transplantation from mechanical, vascular, and electrical standpoints. Here we discuss historical and contemporary aspects of pluripotent stem cell-based cardiac cell therapy, with an emphasis on recent preclinical studies with translational goals. PMID:24838687

  17. The stem cell system in demosponges: insights into the origin of somatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Funayama, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    The stem cell system is one of the unique systems that have evolved only in multicellular organisms. Major questions about this system include what type(s) of stem cells are involved (pluri-, multi- or uni-potent stem cells), and how the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells are regulated. To understand the origin of the stem cell system in metazoans and to get insights into the ancestral stem cell itself, it is important to discover the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the stem cell system in sponges (Porifera), the evolutionarily oldest extant metazoans. Histological studies here provided a body of evidence that archeocytes are the stem cells in sponges, and recent molecular studies of sponges, especially the finding of the expression of Piwi homologues in archeocytes and choanocytes in a freshwater sponge, Ephydatia fluviatilis, have provided critical insights into the stem cell system in demosponges. Here I introduce archeocytes and discuss (i) modes of archeocyte differentiation, (ii) our current model of the stem cell system in sponges composed of both archeocytes and choanocytes based on our molecular analysis and previous microscopic studies suggesting the maintenance of pluripotency in choanocytes, (iii) the inference that the Piwi and piRNA function in maintaining stem cells (which also give rise to gametes) may have already been achieved in the ancestral metazoan, and (iv) possible hypotheses about how the migrating stem cells arose in the urmetazoan (protometazoan) and about the evolutionary origin of germline cells in the urbilaterian (protobilaterian). PMID:20078651

  18. Adult stem cell and mesenchymal progenitor theories of aging.

    PubMed

    Fukada, So-Ichiro; Ma, Yuran; Uezumi, Akiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Advances in medical science and technology allow people live longer lives, which results in age-related problems. Humans cannot avoid the various aged-related alterations of aging; in other words, humans cannot remain young at molecular and cellular levels. In 1956, Harman proposed the "free radical theory of aging" to explain the molecular mechanisms of aging. Telomere length, and accumulation of DNA or mitochondrial damage are also considered to be mechanisms of aging. On the other hand, stem cells are essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis by replacing parenchymal cells; therefore, the stem cell theory of aging is also used to explain the progress of aging. Importantly, the stem cell theory of aging is likely related to other theories. In addition, recent studies have started to reveal the essential roles of tissue-resident mesenchymal progenitors/stem cells/stromal cells in maintaining tissue homeostasis, and some evidence of their fundamental roles in the progression of aging has been presented. In this review, we discuss how stem cell and other theories connect to explain the progress of aging. In addition, we consider the mesenchymal progenitor theory of aging to describing the process of aging. PMID:25364718

  19. Chemical genetics and its potential in cardiac stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Joaquim M; Riley, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade or so, intensive research in cardiac stem cell biology has led to significant discoveries towards a potential therapy for cardiovascular disease; the main cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. The major goal within the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine is to replace lost or damaged cardiac muscle and coronaries following ischaemic disease. At present, de novo cardiomyocytes can be generated either in vitro, for cell transplantation or disease modelling using directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells, or in vivo via direct reprogramming of resident adult cardiac fibroblast or ectopic stimulation of resident cardiac stem or progenitor cells. A major bottleneck with all of these approaches is the low efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation alongside their relative functional immaturity. Chemical genetics, and the application of phenotypic screening with small molecule libraries, represent a means to enhance understanding of the molecular pathways controlling cardiovascular cell differentiation and, moreover, offer the potential for discovery of new drugs to invoke heart repair and regeneration. Here, we review the potential of chemical genetics in cardiac stem cell therapy, highlighting not only the major contributions to the field so far, but also the future challenges. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Regenerative Medicine and Pharmacology: A Look to the Future. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-2 PMID:22385148

  20. ABC transporters, neural stem cells and neurogenesis--a different perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Islam, Omedul; Heese, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    Stem cells intrigue. They have the ability to divide exponentially, recreate the stem cell compartment, as well as create differentiated cells to generate tissues. Therefore, they should be natural candidates to provide a renewable source of cells for transplantation applied in regenerative medicine. Stem cells have the capacity to generate specific tissues or even whole organs like the blood, heart, or bones. A subgroup of stem cells, the neural stem cells (NSCs), is characterized as a self-renewing population that generates neurons and glia of the developing brain. They can be isolated, genetically manipulated and differentiated in vitro and reintroduced into a developing, adult or a pathologically altered central nervous system. NSCs have been considered for use in cell replacement therapies in various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Characterization of genes with tightly controlled expression patterns during differentiation represents an approach to understanding the regulation of stem cell commitment. The regulation of stem cell biology by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters has emerged as an important new field of investigation. As a major focus of stem cell research is in the manipulation of cells to enable differentiation into a targeted cell population; in this review, we discuss recent literatures on ABC transporters and stem cells, and propose an integrated view on the role of the ABC transporters, especially ABCA2, ABCA3, ABCB1 and ABCG2, in NSCs' proliferation, differentiation and regulation, along with comparisons to that in hematopoietic and other stem cells. PMID:17088897

  1. Genomic instability in induced stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pasi, C E; Dereli-Öz, A; Negrini, S; Friedli, M; Fragola, G; Lombardo, A; Van Houwe, G; Naldini, L; Casola, S; Testa, G; Trono, D; Pelicci, P G; Halazonetis, T D

    2011-05-01

    The ability to reprogram adult cells into stem cells has raised hopes for novel therapies for many human diseases. Typical stem cell reprogramming protocols involve expression of a small number of genes in differentiated somatic cells with the c-Myc and Klf4 proto-oncogenes typically included in this mix. We have previously shown that expression of oncogenes leads to DNA replication stress and genomic instability, explaining the high frequency of p53 mutations in human cancers. Consequently, we wondered whether stem cell reprogramming also leads to genomic instability. To test this hypothesis, we examined stem cells induced by a variety of protocols. The first protocol, developed specifically for this study, reprogrammed primary mouse mammary cells into mammary stem cells by expressing c-Myc. Two other previously established protocols reprogrammed mouse embryo fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells by expressing either three genes, Oct4, Sox2 and Klf4, or four genes, OSK plus c-Myc. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of stem cells derived by these protocols revealed the presence of genomic deletions and amplifications, whose signature was suggestive of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress. The genomic aberrations were to a significant degree dependent on c-Myc expression and their presence could explain why p53 inactivation facilitates stem cell reprogramming. PMID:21311564

  2. Liver Stem Cells and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Lopa; Banker, Tanuj; Murray, Joseph; Byers, Stephen; Thenappan, Arun; He, Aiwu Ruth; Shetty, Kirti; Johnson, Lynt; Reddy, E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Although the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was first proposed over 40 years ago, only in the past decade have these cells been identified in hematological malignancies, and more recently in solid tumors that include liver, breast, prostate, brain, and colon. Constant proliferation of stem cells is a vital component in liver tissues. In these renewing tissues, mutations will most likely result in expansion of the altered stem cells, perpetuating and increasing the chances of additional mutations and tumor progression. However, many details about hepatocellular cancer stem cells that are important for early detection remain poorly understood, including the precise cell(s) of origin, molecular genetics, and the mechanisms responsible for the highly aggressive clinical picture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exploration of the difference between CSCs from normal stem cells is crucial not only for the understanding of tumor biology but also for the development of specific therapies that effectively target these cells in patients. These ideas have drawn attention to control of stem cell proliferation by the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog pathways. Recent evidence also suggests a key role for the TGF-β signaling pathway in both hepatocellular cancer suppression and endoderm formation, suggesting a dual role for this pathway in tumor suppression as well as progression of differentiation from a stem or progenitor stage. This review provides a rationale for detecting and analyzing tumor stem cells as one of the most effective ways to treat cancers such as HCC. PMID:19111019

  3. Strategies to improve homing of mesenchymal stem cells for greater efficacy in stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Mirahmadi, Mahdi; Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cell-based therapeutic approach in clinical practice has been an elusive dream in medical sciences, and improvement of stem cell homing is one of major challenges in cell therapy programs. Stem/progenitor cells have a homing response to injured tissues/organs, mediated by interactions of chemokine receptors expressed on the cells and chemokines secreted by the injured tissue. For improvement of directed homing of the cells, many techniques have been developed either to engineer stem/progenitor cells with higher amount of chemokine receptors (stem cell-based strategies) or to modulate the target tissues to release higher level of the corresponding chemokines (target tissue-based strategies). This review discusses both of these strategies involved in the improvement of stem cell homing focusing on mesenchymal stem cells as most frequent studied model in cellular therapies. PMID:25231104

  4. Purification of immature neuronal cells from neural stem cell progeny.

    PubMed

    Azari, Hassan; Osborne, Geoffrey W; Yasuda, Takahiro; Golmohammadi, Mohammad G; Rahman, Maryam; Deleyrolle, Loic P; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Adams, David J; Scheffler, Bjorn; Steindler, Dennis A; Reynolds, Brent A

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation capabilities make neural stem cells (NSCs) a promising renewable source of cells for therapeutic applications. However, the practical application for neuronal cell replacement is limited by heterogeneity of NSC progeny, relatively low yield of neurons, predominance of astrocytes, poor survival of donor cells following transplantation and the potential for uncontrolled proliferation of precursor cells. To address these impediments, we have developed a method for the generation of highly enriched immature neurons from murine NSC progeny. Adaptation of the standard differentiation procedure in concert with flow cytometry selection, using scattered light and positive fluorescent light selection based on cell surface antibody binding, provided a near pure (97%) immature neuron population. Using the purified neurons, we screened a panel of growth factors and found that bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) demonstrated a strong survival effect on the cells in vitro, and enhanced their functional maturity. This effect was maintained following transplantation into the adult mouse striatum where we observed a 2-fold increase in the survival of the implanted cells and a 3-fold increase in NeuN expression. Additionally, based on the neural-colony forming cell assay (N-CFCA), we noted a 64 fold reduction of the bona fide NSC frequency in neuronal cell population and that implanted donor cells showed no signs of excessive or uncontrolled proliferation. The ability to provide defined neural cell populations from renewable sources such as NSC may find application for cell replacement therapies in the central nervous system. PMID:21687800

  5. Purification of Immature Neuronal Cells from Neural Stem Cell Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Hassan; Osborne, Geoffrey W.; Yasuda, Takahiro; Golmohammadi, Mohammad G.; Rahman, Maryam; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Adams, David J.; Scheffler, Bjorn; Steindler, Dennis A.; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation capabilities make neural stem cells (NSCs) a promising renewable source of cells for therapeutic applications. However, the practical application for neuronal cell replacement is limited by heterogeneity of NSC progeny, relatively low yield of neurons, predominance of astrocytes, poor survival of donor cells following transplantation and the potential for uncontrolled proliferation of precursor cells. To address these impediments, we have developed a method for the generation of highly enriched immature neurons from murine NSC progeny. Adaptation of the standard differentiation procedure in concert with flow cytometry selection, using scattered light and positive fluorescent light selection based on cell surface antibody binding, provided a near pure (97%) immature neuron population. Using the purified neurons, we screened a panel of growth factors and found that bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) demonstrated a strong survival effect on the cells in vitro, and enhanced their functional maturity. This effect was maintained following transplantation into the adult mouse striatum where we observed a 2-fold increase in the survival of the implanted cells and a 3-fold increase in NeuN expression. Additionally, based on the neural-colony forming cell assay (N-CFCA), we noted a 64 fold reduction of the bona fide NSC frequency in neuronal cell population and that implanted donor cells showed no signs of excessive or uncontrolled proliferation. The ability to provide defined neural cell populations from renewable sources such as NSC may find application for cell replacement therapies in the central nervous system. PMID:21687800

  6. Cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lathia, Justin D.; Mack, Stephen C.; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E.; Valentim, Claudia L.L.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Tissues with defined cellular hierarchies in development and homeostasis give rise to tumors with cellular hierarchies, suggesting that tumors recapitulate specific tissues and mimic their origins. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and malignant primary brain tumor and contains self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor initiation and therapeutic resistance. As normal stem and progenitor cells participate in tissue development and repair, these developmental programs re-emerge in CSCs to support the development and progressive growth of tumors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern CSCs has informed the development of novel targeted therapeutics for GBM and other brain cancers. CSCs are not self-autonomous units; rather, they function within an ecological system, both actively remodeling the microenvironment and receiving critical maintenance cues from their niches. To fulfill the future goal of developing novel therapies to collapse CSC dynamics, drawing parallels to other normal and pathological states that are highly interactive with their microenvironments and that use developmental signaling pathways will be beneficial. PMID:26109046

  7. Adult stem-like cells in kidney.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-26

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  8. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Michaela E.; Morton, Daniel; Rossi, Annamaria

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  9. Cancer stem cells targeting agents - a review.

    PubMed

    Shi, A-M; -Q Tao, Z; Li, H; Wang, Y-Q; Zhao, J

    2015-11-01

    Major current cancer strategies like surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are compromised due to major problem of recurrence, which usually lead to mortality. The widely accepted reason for this is resistance offered by cancer cells towards cancer drugs or inability of a therapeutic procedure to target real culprits viz. cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells). So, there is a current need of development of new agents targeting these cancer stem cells in order to overcome resistance to therapeutic procedures. The present review article is focused on new cancer cell targeting agents like salinomycin, apopotin etc and their mechanisms to target cancer stems cells will be discussed. PMID:26592827

  10. From fibroblasts and stem cells: implications for cell therapies and somatic cloning.

    PubMed

    Kues, Wilfried A; Carnwath, Joseph W; Niemann, Heiner

    2005-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the inner cell mass of early murine and human embryos exhibit extensive self-renewal in culture and maintain their ability to differentiate into all cell lineages. These features make ESCs a suitable candidate for cell-replacement therapy. However, the use of early embryos has provoked considerable public debate based on ethical considerations. From this standpoint, stem cells derived from adult tissues are a more easily accepted alternative. Recent results suggest that adult stem cells have a broader range of potency than imagined initially. Although some claims have been called into question by the discovery that fusion between the stem cells and differentiated cells can occur spontaneously, in other cases somatic stem cells have been induced to commit to various lineages by the extra- or intracellular environment. Recent data from our laboratory suggest that changes in culture conditions can expand a subpopulation of cells with a pluripotent phenotype from primary fibroblast cultures. The present paper critically reviews recent data on the potency of somatic stem cells, methods to modify the potency of somatic cells and implications for cell-based therapies. PMID:15745637

  11. Enhancing spontaneous stem cell healing (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAGUIRE, GREG; FRIEDMAN, PETER

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cells are distributed throughout the human body and are responsible to a great extent for the bodys ability to maintain and heal itself. Accumulating data since the 1990s regarding stem cells have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of stem cells are not restricted to their ability to differentiate and are more likely due to their ability to release a multitude of molecules. Recent studies indicated that ?80% of the therapeutic benefit of adult stem cells is manifested by the stem cell released molecules (SRM) rather than the differentiation of the stem cells into mature tissue. Stem cells may release potent combinations of factors that modulate the molecular composition of the cellular milieu to evoke a multitude of responses from neighboring cells. A multitude of pathways are involved in cellular and tissue function and, when the body is in a state of disease or trauma, a multitude of pathways are involved in the underlying mechanisms of that disease or trauma. Therefore, stem cells represent a natural systems-based biological factory for the production and release of a multitude of molecules that interact with the system of biomolecular circuits underlying disease or tissue damage. Currently, efforts are aimed at defining, stimulating, enhancing and harnessing SRM mechanisms, in order to develop systems-based methods for tissue regeneration, develop drugs/biologics or other therapeutics and enhance the release of SRM into the body for natural healing through proper dietary, exercise and other lifestyle strategies. PMID:24649089

  12. Stem cells from oral niches: a review

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Guido; La Monaca, Gerardo; Annibali, Susanna; Cicconetti, Andrea; Ottolenghi, Livia

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aim Stem cell research in recent years have been considered the most advanced sort of medical-scientific research and early results have aroused great expectations. Also in dentistry many studies were performed with the final aim of obtaining new bone and new teeth. In this work we describe the state of the art in dental science stem cell research. Methods We have performed a web-based research on MEDLINE within (www.pubmed.gov). We have used stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (24 paper found), periodontal ligament stem cells (32 paper found), stem cell apical papilla (16 paper found), dental pulp stem cells (136 paper found) as keywords for research. For each keyword we have performed a complete review focusing on knowledge upgrade. Results For each topic was created a selection of papers in chronological order of publication date so to give a timetable of the development of the research for each niche. Conclusion Research about stem cell from oral niches began in 2000 and every year papers publicated were more than the precedent. This review analysed about 180 articles most of which in the last 5 years. Dentla pulp from adult as from deciduous teeth seems to be the most valuable font of stem cells due to the pluripotential type of cells. PMID:22238715

  13. Dedifferentiation of committed epithelial cells into stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tata, Purushothama Rao; Mou, Hongmei; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Zhao, Rui; Prabhu, Mythili; Law, Brandon M; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Cho, Josalyn L; Breton, Sylvie; Sahay, Amar; Medoff, Benjamin D; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2013-11-14

    Cellular plasticity contributes to the regenerative capacity of plants, invertebrates, teleost fishes and amphibians. In vertebrates, differentiated cells are known to revert into replicating progenitors, but these cells do not persist as stable stem cells. Here we present evidence that differentiated airway epithelial cells can revert into stable and functional stem cells in vivo. After the ablation of airway stem cells, we observed a surprising increase in the proliferation of committed secretory cells. Subsequent lineage tracing demonstrated that the luminal secretory cells had dedifferentiated into basal stem cells. Dedifferentiated cells were morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells and they functioned as well as their endogenous counterparts in repairing epithelial injury. Single secretory cells clonally dedifferentiated into multipotent stem cells when they were cultured ex vivo without basal stem cells. By contrast, direct contact with a single basal stem cell was sufficient to prevent secretory cell dedifferentiation. In analogy to classical descriptions of amphibian nuclear reprogramming, the propensity of committed cells to dedifferentiate is inversely correlated to their state of maturity. This capacity of committed cells to dedifferentiate into stem cells may have a more general role in the regeneration of many tissues and in multiple disease states, notably cancer. PMID:24196716

  14. Dedifferentiation of committed epithelial cells into stem cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tata, Purushothama Rao; Mou, Hongmei; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Zhao, Rui; Prabhu, Mythili; Prabhu, Mythili; Law, Brandon M.; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Cho, Josalyn L.; Breton, Sylvie; Sahay, Amar; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cellular plasticity contributes to the regenerative capacity of plants, invertebrates, teleost fishes, and amphibians. In vertebrates, differentiated cells are known to revert into replicating progenitors, but these cells do not persist as stable stem cells. We now present evidence that differentiated airway epithelial cells can revert into stable and functional stem cells in vivo. Following the ablation of airway stem cells, we observed a surprising increase in the proliferation of committed secretory cells. Subsequent lineage tracing demonstrated that the luminal secretory cells had dedifferentiated into basal stem cells. Dedifferentiated cells were morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells and they functioned as well as their endogenous counterparts to repair epithelial injury. Indeed, single secretory cells clonally dedifferentiated into multipotent stem cells when they were cultured ex vivo without basal stem cells. In contrast, direct contact with a single basal stem cell was sufficient to prevent secretory cell dedifferentiation. In analogy to classical descriptions of amphibian nuclear reprogramming, the propensity of committed cells to dedifferentiate was inversely correlated to their state of maturity. This capacity of committed cells to dedifferentiate into stem cells may play a more general role in the regeneration of many tissues and in multiple disease states, notably cancer. PMID:24196716

  15. Transdifferentiation of Stem Cells: A Critical View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruh, Ina; Martin, Ulrich

    Recently a large amount of new data on the plasticity of stem cells of various lineages have emerged, providing new perspectives especially for the therapeutic application of adult stem cells. Previously unknown possibilities of cell differentiation beyond the known commitment of a given stem cell have been described using keywords such as "blood to liver," or "bone to brain." Controversies on the likelihood, as well as the biological significance, of these conversions almost immediately arose within this young field of stem cell biology. This chapter will concentrate on these controversies and focus on selected examples demonstrating the technical aspects of stem cell transdifferentiation and the evaluation of the tools used to analyze these events.

  16. Metabolic regulation of stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Rebecca J.; Agathocleous, Michalis; Morrison, Sean J.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic mechanisms, such as transcriptional and epigenetic regulators, as well as extrinsic mechanisms, such as short-range signals from the niche and long-range humoral signals. Interactions between these regulatory mechanisms and cellular metabolism are just beginning to be identified. In multiple systems, differentiation is accompanied by changes in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the levels of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, metabolic pathways regulate proliferation and differentiation by regulating energy production and the generation of substrates for biosynthetic pathways. Some metabolic pathways appear to function differently in stem cells as compared with restricted progenitors and differentiated cells. They also appear to influence stem cell function by regulating signal transduction, epigenetic marks, and oxidative stress. Studies to date illustrate the importance of metabolism in the regulation of stem cell function and suggest complex cross regulation likely exists between metabolism and other stem cell regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24697828

  17. Derivation of Endodermal Progenitors From Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ikonomou, Laertis; Kotton, Darrell N

    2015-02-01

    Stem and progenitor cells play important roles in organogenesis during development and in tissue homeostasis and response to injury postnatally. As the regenerative capacity of many human tissues is limited, cell replacement therapies hold great promise for human disease management. Pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are prime candidates for the derivation of unlimited quantities of clinically relevant cell types through development of directed differentiation protocols, that is, the recapitulation of developmental milestones in in vitro cell culture. Tissue-specific progenitors, including progenitors of endodermal origin, are important intermediates in such protocols since they give rise to all mature parenchymal cells. In this review, we focus on the in vivo biology of embryonic endodermal progenitors in terms of key transcription factors and signaling pathways. We critically review the emerging literature aiming to apply this basic knowledge to achieve the efficient and reproducible in vitro derivation of endodermal progenitors such as pancreas, liver and lung precursor cells. PMID:25160562

  18. Determination of Somatic and Cancer Stem Cell Self-Renewing Symmetric Division Rate Using Sphere Assays

    PubMed Central

    Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Ericksson, Geoffery; Morrison, Brian J.; Lopez, J. Alejandro; Burrage, Kevin; Burrage, Pamela; Vescovi, Angelo; Rietze, Rodney L.; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    Representing a renewable source for cell replacement, neural stem cells have received substantial attention in recent years. The neurosphere assay represents a method to detect the presence of neural stem cells, however owing to a deficiency of specific and definitive markers to identify them, their quantification and the rate they expand is still indefinite. Here we propose a mathematical interpretation of the neurosphere assay allowing actual measurement of neural stem cell symmetric division frequency. The algorithm of the modeling demonstrates a direct correlation between the overall cell fold expansion over time measured in the sphere assay and the rate stem cells expand via symmetric division. The model offers a methodology to evaluate specifically the effect of diseases and treatments on neural stem cell activity and function. Not only providing new insights in the evaluation of the kinetic features of neural stem cells, our modeling further contemplates cancer biology as cancer stem-like cells have been suggested to maintain tumor growth as somatic stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis. Indeed, tumor stem cell's resistance to therapy makes these cells a necessary target for effective treatment. The neurosphere assay mathematical model presented here allows the assessment of the rate malignant stem-like cells expand via symmetric division and the evaluation of the effects of therapeutics on the self-renewal and proliferative activity of this clinically relevant population that drive tumor growth and recurrence. PMID:21246056

  19. Increased Understanding of Stem Cell Behavior in Neurodegenerative and Neuromuscular Disorders by Use of Noninvasive Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Holvoet, Bryan; De Waele, Liesbeth; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Gheysens, Olivier; Sampaolesi, Maurillio; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Deroose, Christophe M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders are associated with cell-specific depletion in the human body. This imbalance in tissue homeostasis is in healthy individuals repaired by the presence of endogenous stem cells that can replace the lost cell type. However, in most disorders, a genetic origin or limited presence or exhaustion of stem cells impairs correct cell replacement. During the last 30 years, methods to readily isolate and expand stem cells have been developed and this resulted in a major change in the regenerative medicine field as it generates sufficient amount of cells for human transplantation applications. Furthermore, stem cells have been shown to release cytokines with beneficial effects for several diseases. At present however, clinical stem cell transplantations studies are struggling to demonstrate clinical efficacy despite promising preclinical results. Therefore, to allow stem cell therapy to achieve its full potential, more insight in their in vivo behavior has to be achieved. Different methods to noninvasively monitor these cells have been developed and are discussed. In some cases, stem cell monitoring even reached the clinical setting. We anticipate that by further exploring these imaging possibilities and unraveling their in vivo behavior further improvement in stem cell transplantations will be achieved. PMID:26997958

  20. Islet transplantation versus stem cells for the cell therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Basta, G; Montanucci, P; Calafiore, R

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic islet cell transplantation has represented the mainstay of cell therapy for the potential, final cure of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), along the past two decades. Unfortunately, the restricted availability of cadaveric human donor pancreases coupled with heavy side effects of the recipient's general immunosuppression, have severely crippled progress of this approach into clinical trials. Only a few excellence centers, worldwide, have thus far accrued still quite marginal clinical success. In an attempt to overcome the limits of islet transplantation new technologies for use of several stem cell lineages are being under investigation, with initial experimental evidence of success. Essentially, the actual lines of research involve attempts to either activate native endogenous stem cells that replace diseased/dead cells, by a cell regeneration process, or condition other stem cells to acquire the functional properties of the targeted cells to be substituted (i.e., beta-cell-like elements associated with insulin secretory competence). A wide array of stem cells may fulfill this task, from embryonic (whose use still faces strong ethical barriers), to adult, to induced pluripotent stem cells. Mesenchymal adult stem cells, retrievable from many different sites, including adipose tissue, bone marrow and post-partum umbilical cord Wharton Jelly, seem to couple plastic to immunoregulatory properties that might greatly help progress for the disease cure. PMID:26398188

  1. Convergence of normal stem cell and cancer stem cell developmental stage: Implication for differential therapies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Lee, Katherine L; Luo, Jane; Zhong, Jiang F; Loudon, William G

    2011-01-01

    Increased evidence shows that normal stem cells may contribute to cancer development and progression by acting as cancer-initiating cells through their interactions with abnormal environmental elements. We postulate that normal stem cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) possess similar mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation. CSC can be the key to the elaboration of anti-cancer-based therapy. In this article, we focus on a controversial new theme relating to CSC. Tumorigenesis may have a critical stage characterized as a therapeutic window, which can be identified by association of molecular, biochemical and biological events. Identifying such a stage can allow the production of more effective therapies (e.g. manipulated stem cells) to treat several cancers. More importantly, confirming the existence of a similar therapeutic window during the conversion of normal stem cells to malignant CSC may lead to targeted therapy specifically against CSC. This conversion information may be derived from investigating the biological behaviour of both normal stem cells and cancerous stem cells. Currently, there is little knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern the initiation and maintenance of CSC. Studies on co-evolution and interdependence of cancer with normal tissues may lead to a useful treatment paradigm of cancer. The crosstalk between normal stem cells and cancer formation may converge developmental stages of different types of stem cells (e.g. normal stem cells, CSC and embryonic stem cells). The differential studies of the convergence may result in novel therapies for treating cancers. PMID:22007273

  2. Mechanisms of stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    He, Shenghui; Nakada, Daisuke; Morrison, Sean J

    2009-01-01

    Self-renewal is the process by which stem cells divide to make more stem cells, perpetuating the stem cell pool throughout life. Self-renewal is division with maintenance of the undifferentiated state. This requires cell cycle control and often maintenance of multipotency or pluripotency, depending on the stem cell. Self-renewal programs involve networks that balance proto-oncogenes (promoting self-renewal), gate-keeping tumor suppressors (limiting self-renewal), and care-taking tumor suppressors (maintaining genomic integrity). These cell-intrinsic mechanisms are regulated by cell-extrinsic signals from the niche, the microenvironment that maintains stem cells and regulates their function in tissues. In response to changing tissue demands, stem cells undergo changes in cell cycle status and developmental potential over time, requiring different self-renewal programs at different stages of life. Reduced stem cell function and tissue regenerative capacity during aging are caused by changes in self-renewal programs that augment tumor suppression. Cancer arises from mutations that inappropriately activate self-renewal programs. PMID:19575646

  3. Adult Stem Cells and Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Berardi, Emanuele; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Satellite cells are unipotent stem cells involved in muscle regeneration. However, the skeletal muscle microenvironment exerts a dominant influence over stem cell function. The cell intrinsic complexity of the skeletal muscle niche located within the connective tissue between fibers includes motor neurons, tendons, blood vessels, immune response mediators and interstitial cells. All these cell types modulate the trafficking of stimuli responsible of muscle fiber regeneration. In addition, several stem cell types have been discovered in skeletal muscle tissue, mainly located in the interstitium. The majority of these stem cells appears to directly contribute to myogenic differentiation, although some of them are mainly implicated in paracrine effects. This review focuses on adult stem cells, which have been used for therapeutic purposes, mainly in animal models of chronic muscle degeneration. Emerging literature identifies other myogenic progenitors generated from pluripotent stem cells as potential candidates for the treatment of skeletal muscle degeneration. However, adult stem cells still represent the gold standard for future comparative studies. PMID:26122100

  4. Stem cells and lineages of the intestine: a developmental and evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Gold, David; Hartenstein, Volker

    2012-01-01

    The intestine consists of epithelial cells that secrete digestive enzymes and mucus (gland cells), absorb food particles (enterocytes), and produce hormones (endocrine cells). Intestinal cells are rapidly turned over and need to be replaced. In cnidarians, mitosis of differentiated intestinal cells accounts for much of the replacement; in addition, migratory, multipotent stem cells (interstitial cells) contribute to the production of intestinal cells. In other phyla, intestinal cell replacement is solely the function of stem cells entering the gut from the outside (such as in case of the neoblasts of platyhelmints) or intestinal stem cells located within the midgut epithelium (as in both vertebrates or arthropods). We will attempt in the following to review important aspects of midgut stem cells in different animal groups: where are they located, what types of lineages do they produce, and how do they develop. We will start out with a comparative survey of midgut cell types found across the animal kingdom; then briefly look at the specification of these cells during embryonic development; and finally focus on the stem cells that regenerate midgut cells during adult life. In a number of model systems, including mouse, zebrafish and Drosophila, the molecular pathways controlling ISC proliferation and the specification of intestinal cell types are under intensive investigation. We will highlight findings of the recent literature, focusing on aspects that are shared between the different models and that point at evolutionary ancient mechanisms of intestinal cell formation. PMID:23179635

  5. Stem cell technology for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion of the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention toward advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21905078

  6. Epigenetic Targeting of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer (OC). As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cell (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC towards a differentiated phenotype, by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH+ OC cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH+ cells, including their tumor initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced re-expression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by re-programming residual cancer stem-like cells. Further, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  7. Stem Cell Technology for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lunn, J. Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion on the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention towards advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21905078

  8. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the…

  9. Representations of stem cell clinics on Twitter.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    The practice of travelling abroad to receive unproven and unregulated stem cell treatments has become an increasingly problematic global phenomenon known as 'stem cell tourism'. In this paper, we examine representations of nine major clinics and providers of such treatments on the microblogging network Twitter. We collected and conducted a content analysis of Twitter posts (n?=?363) by these establishments and by other users mentioning them, focusing specifically on marketing claims about treatment procedures and outcomes, discussions of safety and efficacy of stem cell transplants, and specific representations of patients' experiences. Our analysis has shown that there were explicit claims or suggestions of benefits associated with unproven stem cell treatments in approximately one third of the tweets and that patients' experiences, whenever referenced, were presented as invariably positive and as testimonials about the efficacy of stem cell transplants. Furthermore, the results indicated that the tone of most tweets (60.2 %) was overwhelmingly positive and there were rarely critical discussions about significant health risks associated with unproven stem cell therapies. When placed in the context of past research on the problems associated with the marketing of unproven stem cell therapies, this analysis of representations on Twitter suggests that discussions in social media have also remained largely uncritical of the stem cell tourism phenomenon, with inaccurate representations of risks and benefits for patients. PMID:24970380

  10. Chemically Induced Specification of Retinal Ganglion Cells From Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riazifar, Hamidreza; Jia, Yousheng; Chen, Jing; Lynch, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is the primary pathological change for many retinal degenerative diseases. Although there is currently no effective treatment for this group of diseases, cell transplantation to replace lost RGCs holds great potential. However, for the development of cell replacement therapy, better understanding of the molecular details involved in differentiating stem cells into RGCs is essential. In this study, a novel, stepwise chemical protocol is described for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into functional RGCs. Briefly, stem cells were differentiated into neural rosettes, which were then cultured with the Notch inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT). The expression of neural and RGC markers (BRN3A, BRN3B, ATOH7/Math5, γ-synuclein, Islet-1, and THY-1) was examined. Approximately 30% of the cell population obtained expressed the neuronal marker TUJ1 as well the RGC markers. Moreover, the differentiated RGCs generated action potentials and exhibited both spontaneous and evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents, indicating that functional and mature RGCs were generated. In combination, these data demonstrate that a single chemical (DAPT) can induce PAX6/RX-positive stem cells to undergo differentiation into functional RGCs. PMID:24493857

  11. CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells Exert Accessory Function in Lipopolysaccharide-induced ?T Cell Stimulation and CD80 Expression on Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Taila; Girroleit, Gundolf; Flad, Hans-Dieter; Rietschel, Ernst T.; Ulmer, Artur J.

    1999-01-01

    CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, which circulate in peripheral blood with very low frequency, exert essential accessory function during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human T lymphocyte activation, resulting in interferon ? production and proliferation. In contrast, stimulation of T cells by conventional recall antigens is not controlled by blood stem cells. These conclusions are based on the observation that depletion of CD34+ blood stem cells results in a loss of LPS-induced T cell stimulation as well as reduced expression of CD80 antigen on monocytes. The addition of CD34-enriched blood stem cells resulted in a recovery of reactivity of T cells and monocytes to LPS. Blood stem cells could be replaced by the hematopoietic stem cell line KG-1a. These findings may be of relevance for high risk patients treated with stem cells or stem cell recruiting compounds and for patients suffering from endotoxin-mediated diseases. PMID:9989984

  12. [Prostate cancer stem cell and drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takeo; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-01-01

    Cancer tissues are comprised of cell population including a variety of cells, such as stem cell-like cancer cells, upon which a hierarchical society is constructed. This hypothesis has been applied not only to leukemia, in which the hypothesis was first experimentally confirmed, but also to solid cancers. Recent topics shed light on the modified heterogeneity by various treatments which evolve disease progression. In prostate cancer, the identification of cancer stem cells using surface markers and the relationship with prostate origin are of current interest. This article reviews studies related to the development of prostate cancer and introduce recent progress of our project, focusing on cancer stemness and drug resistance. PMID:26793878

  13. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  14. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research ...

  15. Artificial gametes from stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Inmaculada; Míguez-Forjan, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The generation of artificial gametes is a real challenge for the scientific community today. In vitro development of human eggs and sperm will pave the way for the understanding of the complex process of human gametogenesis and will provide with human gametes for the study of infertility and the onset of some inherited disorders. However, the great promise of artificial gametes resides in their future application on reproductive treatments for all these people wishing to have genetically related children and for which gamete donation is now their unique option of parenthood. This is the case of infertile patients devoid of suitable gametes, same sex couples, singles and those fertile couples in a high risk of transmitting serious diseases to their progeny. In the search of the best method to obtain artificial gametes, many researchers have successfully obtained human germ cell-like cells from stem cells at different stages of differentiation. In the near future, this field will evolve to new methods providing not only viable but also functional and safe artificial germ cells. These artificial sperm and eggs should be able to recapitulate all the genetic and epigenetic processes needed for the correct gametogenesis, fertilization and embryogenesis leading to the birth of a healthy and fertile newborn. PMID:26161331

  16. Artificial gametes from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Inmaculada; Míguez-Forjan, Jose Manuel; Simón, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The generation of artificial gametes is a real challenge for the scientific community today. In vitro development of human eggs and sperm will pave the way for the understanding of the complex process of human gametogenesis and will provide with human gametes for the study of infertility and the onset of some inherited disorders. However, the great promise of artificial gametes resides in their future application on reproductive treatments for all these people wishing to have genetically related children and for which gamete donation is now their unique option of parenthood. This is the case of infertile patients devoid of suitable gametes, same sex couples, singles and those fertile couples in a high risk of transmitting serious diseases to their progeny. In the search of the best method to obtain artificial gametes, many researchers have successfully obtained human germ cell-like cells from stem cells at different stages of differentiation. In the near future, this field will evolve to new methods providing not only viable but also functional and safe artificial germ cells. These artificial sperm and eggs should be able to recapitulate all the genetic and epigenetic processes needed for the correct gametogenesis, fertilization and embryogenesis leading to the birth of a healthy and fertile newborn. PMID:26161331

  17. CD44 integrates signaling in normal stem cell, cancer stem cell and (pre)metastatic niches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karin; Motiani, Karan; Giridhar, Premkumar Vummidi; Kasper, Susan

    2013-03-01

    The stem cell niche provides a regulatory microenvironment for cells as diverse as totipotent embryonic stem cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs) which exhibit stem cell-like characteristics and have the capability of regenerating the bulk of tumor cells while maintaining self-renewal potential. The transmembrane glycoprotein CD44 is a common component of the stem cell niche and exists as a standard isoform (CD44s) and a range of variant isoforms (CD44v) generated though alternative splicing. CD44 modulates signal transduction through post-translational modifications as well as interactions with hyaluronan, extracellular matrix molecules and growth factors and their cognate receptor tyrosine kinases. While the function of CD44 in hematopoietic stem cells has been studied in considerable detail, our knowledge of CD44 function in tissue-derived stem cell niches remains limited. Here we review CD44s and CD44v in both hematopoietic and tissue-derived stem cell niches, focusing on their roles in regulating stem cell behavior including self-renewal and differentiation in addition to cell-matrix interactions and signal transduction during cell migration and tumor progression. Determining the role of CD44 and CD44v in normal stem cell, CSC and (pre)metastatic niches and elucidating their unique functions could provide tools and therapeutic strategies for treating diseases as diverse as fibrosis during injury repair to cancer progression. PMID:23598979

  18. Bringing Leukemia Stem Cells into the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jean C Y

    2015-11-01

    Outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain poor due to high rates of relapse. Thus, there is an urgent unmet medical need for new therapies that can more effectively kill the leukemia stem cells (LSC) and recently recognized preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells (preL-HSC) that can drive relapsed disease. In order to develop such therapies, a better understanding of the biology of these stem cell populations is required. The best functional assays for stem cells are xenotransplantation models using immunodeficient mouse recipients. Here, we present evidence of the clinical validity of such models for studying the biology of AML stem cells and propose a new paradigm for the development of LSC-targeted agents and biomarker tools for patient selection. PMID:26551024

  19. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Karobi

    2015-01-01

    The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed. PMID:26649310

  20. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future. PMID:24828515

  1. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26635920

  2. Lineage Analysis of Epidermal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alcolea, Maria P.; Jones, Philip H.

    2014-01-01

    Lineage tracing involves labeling cells to track their subsequent behavior within the normal tissue environment. The advent of genetic lineage tracing and cell proliferation assays, together with high resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging and quantitative methods to infer cell behavior from lineage-tracing data, has transformed our understanding of murine epidermal stem and progenitor cells. Here, we review recent insights that reveal how a progenitor cell population maintains interfollicular epidermis, whereas stem cells, quiescent under homeostatic conditions, are mobilized in response to wounding. We discuss progress in understanding how the various stem cell populations of the hair follicle sustain this complex and highly dynamic structure, and recent analysis of stem cells in sweat and sebaceous glands. The extent to which insights from mouse studies can be applied to human epidermis is also considered. PMID:24384814

  3. Spermatogonial stem cells: Progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Komeya, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) from a mouse to other recipient mice was shown to be feasible, which clearly demonstrated the functional identity of SSCs. Since then, several important new findings and other technical developments have followed, which included a new hypothesis on their cell kinetics and spermatogonial hierarchy in the testis, a culture method allowing their self-renewal and proliferation, a testis tissue organ culture method, which induced their complete differentiation up to sperm, and the in vitro induction of germ cells from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. These advancements reinforced or advanced our understanding of this unique cell. Nonetheless, there are many unresolved questions in the study of spermatogonial stem cells and a long road remains until these cells can be used clinically in reproductive medicine. PMID:25994650

  4. Stem Cells Matter in Response to Fasting.

    PubMed

    Sailaja, Badi Sri; He, Xi C; Li, Linheng

    2015-12-22

    The molecular processes underlying intestinal adaptation to fasting and re-feeding remain largely uncharacterized. In this issue of Cell Reports, Richmond etal. report that dormant intestinal stem cells are regulated by PTEN and nutritional status. PMID:26705824

  5. Engineered Microenvironments for Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Godier, Amandine F. G.; Marolt, Darja; Gerecht, Sharon; Tajnsek, Urska; Martens, Timothy P.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of cell differentiation and assembly remains a fundamental question in developmental biology. During development, tissues emerge from coordinated sequences of the renewal, differentiation, and assembly of stem cells. Likewise, regeneration of an adult tissue is driven by the migration and differentiation of repair cells. The fields of stem cells and regenerative medicine are starting to realize how important is the entire context of the cell environment, with the presence of other cells, three-dimensional matrices, and sequences of molecular and physical morphogens. The premise is that to unlock the full potential of stem cells, at least some aspects of the dynamic environments normally present in vivo need to be reconstructed in experimental systems used in vitro. We review here some recent work that utilized engineered environments for guiding the embryonic and adult human stem cells, and focus on vasculogenesis as a critical and universally important aspect of tissue development and regeneration. PMID:19067427

  6. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1 ligand, Jagged-1, and this was complemented by radiation induced Notch-1 activation. Studies also linked hypoxia and BCSC renewal through Epo signaling. Treatment with rhEpo induced an increase in BCSC's, which again was due to rhEpo induced Jagged-1 expression and subsequent Notch-1 activation. This thesis suggests that radiation and rhEpo induce Jagged-1 expression in non-stem cells, which then induce Notch-1 activation in adjacent stem cells, and results in symmetric cancer stem cell self-renewal.

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: a new era for stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Chang, Yu-Hsun; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2015-01-01

    The human umbilical cord is a promising source of mesenchymal stem cells (HUCMSCs). Unlike bone marrow stem cells, HUCMSCs have a painless collection procedure and faster self-renewal properties. Different derivation protocols may provide different amounts and populations of stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been reported in other compartments of the umbilical cord, such as the cord lining, perivascular tissue, and Wharton's jelly. HUCMSCs are noncontroversial sources compared to embryonic stem cells. They can differentiate into the three germ layers that promote tissue repair and modulate immune responses and anticancer properties. Thus, they are attractive autologous or allogenic agents for the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant solid and soft cancers. HUCMCs also can be the feeder layer for embryonic stem cells or other pluripotent stem cells. Regarding their therapeutic value, storage banking system and protocols should be established immediately. This review critically evaluates their therapeutic value, challenges, and future directions for their clinical applications. PMID:25622293

  8. Enabling stem cell therapies through synthetic stem cellniche engineering

    PubMed Central

    Peerani, Raheem; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Enabling stem celltargeted therapies requires an understanding of how to create local microenvironments (niches) that stimulate endogenous stem cells or serve as a platform to receive and guide the integration of transplanted stem cells and their derivatives. In vivo, the stem cell niche is a complex and dynamic unit. Although components of the in vivo niche continue to be described for many stem cell systems, how these components interact to modulate stem cell fate is only beginning to be understood. Using the HSC niche as a model, we discuss here microscale engineering strategies capable of systematically examining and reconstructing individual niche components. Synthetic stem cellniche engineering may form a new foundation for regenerative therapies. PMID:20051637

  9. How Stem Cells Speak with Host Immune Cells in Inflammatory Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases. PMID:23633288

  10. Mechanisms regulating epidermal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Benjamin; Blanpain, Cdric

    2012-01-01

    The skin epidermis contains different appendages such as the hair follicle and the sebaceous glands. Recent studies demonstrated that several types of stem cells (SCs) exist in different niches within the epidermis and maintain discrete epidermal compartments, but the exact contribution of each SC populations under physiological conditions is still unclear. In addition, the precise mechanisms controlling the balance between proliferation and differentiation of epidermal SC still remain elusive. Recent studies provide new insights into these important questions by showing the contribution of hair follicle SC to the sebaceous lineage and the importance of chromatin modifications and micro-RNAs (miRs) in regulating epidermal SCs renewal and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss the importance of these papers to our understanding of the mechanisms that control epidermal SC functions. PMID:22433839

  11. Intestinal myofibroblasts: targets for stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mifflin, R. C.; Pinchuk, I. V.; Saada, J. I.

    2011-01-01

    The subepithelial intestinal myofibroblast is an important cell orchestrating many diverse functions in the intestine and is involved in growth and repair, tumorigenesis, inflammation, and fibrosis. The myofibroblast is but one of several α-smooth muscle actin-positive (α-SMA+) mesenchymal cells present within the intestinal lamina propria, including vascular pericytes, bone marrow-derived stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells or hematopoietic stem cells), muscularis mucosae, and the lymphatic pericytes (colon) and organized smooth muscle (small intestine) associated with the lymphatic lacteals. These other mesenchymal cells perform many of the functions previously attributed to subepithelial myofibroblasts. This review discusses the definition of a myofibroblast and reconsiders whether the α-SMA+ subepithelial cells in the intestine are myofibroblasts or other types of mesenchymal cells, i.e., pericytes. Current information about specific, or not so specific, molecular markers of lamina propria mesenchymal cells is reviewed, as well as the origins of intestinal myofibroblasts and pericytes in the intestinal lamina propria and their replenishment after injury. Current concepts and research on stem cell therapy for intestinal inflammation are summarized. Information about the stem cell origin of intestinal stromal cells may inform future stem cell therapies to treat human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PMID:21252048

  12. Renal capsule as a stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Kaoru; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Ni, Jie; Ratliff, Brian; Chander, Praveen; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Renal resident stem cells were previously reported within the renal tubules and papillary area. The aim of the present study was to determine whether renal capsules harbor stem cells and whether this pool can be recruited to the renal parenchyma after ischemic injury. We demonstrated the presence of label-retaining cells throughout the renal capsule, at a density of ?10 cells/mm2, and their close apposition to the blood vessels. By flow cytometry, in vitro cultured cells derived from the renal capsule were positive for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers (CD29+, vimentin+, Sca-1+, nestin+) but did not express hematopoietic and endothelial stem cell markers. Moreover, renal capsule-derived cells also exhibited self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency in differentiation conditions, all favoring stem cell characteristics and identifying them with MSC. In situ labeling of renal capsules with CM-DiI CellTracker demonstrated in vivo a directed migration of CM-DiI-labeled cells to the ischemic renal parenchyma, with the rate of migration averaging 30 ?m/h. Decapsulation of the kidneys during ischemia resulted in a modest, but statistically significant, deceleration of recovery of plasma creatinine compared with ischemic kidneys with intact renal capsule. Comparison of these conditions allows the conclusion that renal capsular cells may contribute ?2530% of the recovery from ischemia. In conclusion, the data suggest that the renal capsule may function as a novel stem cell niche harboring MSC capable of participating in the repair of renal injury. PMID:20200095

  13. [Side population cells and progress in cancer stem cell research].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Danwei; Liao, Shan; Zhu, Guangchao; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Guiyuan

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, cancer stem cells have become a hotspot for global researchers. Cancer stem cell theory deems that cells with self-renewal and differentiation potential play a key role in tumor resistance and relapse. These cells are named cancer stem cells. At present, the sorting methods include the side population cell sorting technique, screening techniques based on cell surface special markers, tumor sphere cultures, label retaining cell, ALDEFLUOR assays and so on. Side population cells are a small part of cells with the capacity of efflux DNA fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 and present a low staining intensity in flow cytometry plot. Side population cells are rich in cancer stem cells, and its sorting method has been considered simple and effective in cancer stem cell research. PMID:24921397

  14. Derivation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines from Vitrified Human Blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Cara K; Schaft, Julia; Roy, Tammie K; Dumevska, Biljana; Peura, Teija T

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells typically derived from blastulating embryos that have become excess to clinical needs in assisted reproduction programs. They provide cellular models for embryonic development and disease, and are thought to be useful for future cell replacement therapies and regenerative medicine. Here we describe methods to derive human embryonic stem cell lines. This includes blastocyst cryopreservation using a highly efficient vitrification protocol, the production and use of fibroblast feeder cells, embryo plating and passaging of resulting cellular outgrowths, and cryopreservation of putative stem cells lines. PMID:24961221

  15. Planarians as a model of aging to study the interaction between stem cells and senescent cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Perrigue, Patrick M; Najbauer, Joseph; Jozwiak, Agnieszka A; Barciszewski, Jan; Aboody, Karen S; Barish, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The depletion of stem cell pools and the accumulation of senescent cells in animal tissues are linked to aging. Planarians are invertebrate flatworms and are unusual in that their stem cells, called neoblasts, are constantly replacing old and dying cells. By eliminating neoblasts in worms via irradiation, the biological principles of aging are exposed in the absence of wound healing and regeneration, making planaria a powerful tool for aging research. PMID:26654402

  16. Planarians as a model of aging to study the interaction between stem cells and senescent cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Perrigue, Patrick M.; Najbauer, Joseph; Jozwiak, Agnieszka A.; Barciszewski, Jan; Aboody, Karen S.; Barish, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The depletion of stem cell pools and the accumulation of senescent cells in animal tissues are linked to aging. Planarians are invertebrate flatworms and are unusual in that their stem cells, called neoblasts, are constantly replacing old and dying cells. By eliminating neoblasts in worms via irradiation, the biological principles of aging are exposed in the absence of wound healing and regeneration, making planaria a powerful tool for aging research. PMID:26654402

  17. Cancer Stem Cells in Brain Tumor Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jeremy N.; Eyler, Christine E.

    2009-01-01

    Tumors are aberrant organ systems containing a complex interplay between the neoplastic compartment and recruited vascular, inflammatory, and stromal elements. Further, most cancers display a hierarchy of differentiation states within the tumor cell population. Molecular signals that drive tumor formation and maintenance commonly overlap with those involved in normal development and wound responses two processes in which normal stem cells function. It is therefore not surprising that cancers invoke stem cell programs that promote tumor malignancy. Stem cell-like cancer cells (or cancer stem cells) need not be derived from normal stem cells but may be subjected to evolutionary pressures that select for the capacity to self renew extensively or differentiate depending on conditions. Current cancer model systems may not fully recapitulate the cellular complexity of cancers, perhaps partially explaining the lack of power of these models in predicting clinical outcomes. New methods are enabling researchers to identify and characterize cancer stem cells. Our laboratory focuses on the roles of brain tumor stem cells in clinically relevant tumor biology, including therapeutic resistance, angiogenesis, and invasion/metastasis. We hope that these studies will translate into improved diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches for these lethal cancers. PMID:19329578

  18. Concise Review: Chemical Approaches for Modulating Lineage-Specific Stem Cells and Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Mingliang; Laurent, Timothy; Xie, Min

    2013-01-01

    Generation and manipulation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vitro and/or in vivo are critical for the development of stem cell-based clinical therapeutics. Lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells have many advantageous qualities, including being able to efficiently engraft and differentiate into desirable cell types in vivo after transplantation, and they are much less tumorigenic than pluripotent cells. Generation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells can be achieved by directed differentiation from pluripotent stem cells or lineage conversion from easily obtained somatic cells. Small molecules can be very helpful in these processes since they offer several important benefits. For example, the risk of tumorigenesis is greatly reduced when small molecules are used to replace integrated transcription factors, which are widely used in cell fate conversion. Furthermore, small molecules are relatively easy to apply, optimize, and manufacture, and they can more readily be developed into conventional pharmaceuticals. Alternatively, small molecules can be used to expand or selectively control the differentiation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells for desirable therapeutics purposes in vitro or in vivo. Here we summarize recent progress in the use of small molecules for the expansion and generation of desirable lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vitro and for selectively controlling cell fate of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vivo, thereby facilitating stem cell-based clinical applications. PMID:23580542

  19. Connecting Mitochondria, Metabolism, and Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Wanet, Anaïs; Arnould, Thierry; Najimi, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    As sites of cellular respiration and energy production, mitochondria play a central role in cell metabolism. Cell differentiation is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and activity and with a metabolic shift toward increased oxidative phosphorylation activity. The opposite occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. Studies have provided evidence of mitochondrial and metabolic changes during the differentiation of both embryonic and somatic (or adult) stem cells (SSCs), such as hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and tissue-specific progenitor cells. We thus propose to consider those mitochondrial and metabolic changes as hallmarks of differentiation processes. We review how mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and function are directly involved in embryonic and SSC differentiation and how metabolic and sensing pathways connect mitochondria and metabolism with cell fate and pluripotency. Understanding the basis of the crosstalk between mitochondria and cell fate is of critical importance, given the promising application of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In addition to the development of novel strategies to improve the in vitro lineage-directed differentiation of stem cells, understanding the molecular basis of this interplay could lead to the identification of novel targets to improve the treatment of degenerative diseases. PMID:26134242

  20. Culture Conditions for Mouse Pancreatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hirofumi; Saitoh, Issei; Kataoka, Hitomi Usui; Watanabe, Masami; Noguchi, Yasufumi; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mouse pancreatic stem cells have been isolated from adult mouse pancreata. However, these pancreatic stem cells could be maintained only under specific culture conditions with lot-limited fetal bovine serum (FBS). For the efficient isolation and maintenance of mouse pancreatic stem cells, it is important to identify culture conditions that can be used independent of the FBS lot. In this study, we evaluated the culture conditions required to maintain mouse pancreatic stem cells. The mouse pancreatic stem cells derived from the pancreas of a newborn mouse, HN#101, were cultured under the following conditions: 1) Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium (DMEM) with 20% lot-limited FBS, in which mouse pancreatic stem cells could be cultured without changes in morphology and growth activity; 2) complete embryonic stem (ES) cell media; and 3) complete ES cell media on feeder layers of mitomycin C-treated STO cells, which were the same culture conditions used for mouse ES cells. Under culture conditions #1 and #3, the HN#101 cells continued to form a flat cobblestone monolayer and continued to divide actively beyond the population doubling level (PDL) 100 without growth inhibition, but this did not occur under culture condition #2. The gene expression profile and differentiated capacity of the HN#101 cells cultured for 2 months under culture condition #3 were similar to those of HN#101 cells at PDL 50. These data suggest that complete ES cell media on feeder layers could be useful for maintaining the undifferentiated state of pancreatic stem cells.

  1. Signal propagation in stem-cell niches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2009-09-01

    Stem cells, maintaining tissue homeostasis, are nurtured in microscopic niches formed of so-called environmental cells. The kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of stem cells in such niches depend on their interaction with the messenger proteins secreted by environmental cells. We propose a generic mean-field kinetic model of the propagation of such signals. To motivate our study, we briefly describe a stem-cell niche in the Drosophila ovary. Our model is however applicable to other niches as well. In particular, it helps one to understand the necessary conditions for the niche function. For example, the model predicts that in the case of the Drosophila ovary each germline stem cell should have in the external membrane at least 700 receptors interacting with the signaling Dpp and Gpp proteins emanating from the cap cells.

  2. Stem Cell Therapies in Orthopaedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Marcucio, Ralph S; Nauth, Aaron; Giannoudis, Peter V; Bahney, Chelsea; Piuzzi, Nicolas S; Muschler, George; Miclau, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells offer great promise to help understand the normal mechanisms of tissue renewal, regeneration, and repair, and also for development of cell-based therapies to treat patients after tissue injury. Most adult tissues contain stem cells and progenitor cells that contribute to homeostasis, remodeling, and repair. Multiple stem and progenitor cell populations in bone are found in the marrow, the endosteum, and the periosteum. They contribute to the fracture healing process after injury and are an important component in tissue engineering approaches for bone repair. This review focuses on current concepts in stem cell biology related to fracture healing and bone tissue regeneration, as well as current strategies and limitations for clinical cell-based therapies. PMID:26584262

  3. Differentiation of hepatocytes from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mallanna, Sunil K.

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of human embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into hepatocyte-like cells provides a platform to study the molecular basis of human hepatocyte differentiation, to develop cell culture models of liver disease, and to potentially provide hepatocytes for treatment of end-stage liver disease. Additionally, hepatocyte-like cells generated from human pluripotent stem cells could serve as platforms for drug discovery, determination of pharmaceutical induced hepatotoxicity, and evaluation of idiosyncratic drug-drug interactions. Here, we describe a step-wise protocol previously developed in our laboratory that facilitates the highly efficient and reproducible differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. Our protocol uses defined culture conditions and closely recapitulates key developmental events that are found to occur during hepatogenesis. PMID:24510789

  4. Tissue-Derived Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tesche, Leora J.; Gerber, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization and isolation of various stem cell populations, from embryonic through tissue-derived stem cells, have led a rapid growth in the field of stem cell research. These research efforts have often been interrelated as to the markers that identify a select cell population are frequently analyzed to determine their expression in cells of distinct organs/tissues. In this review, we will expand the current state of research involving select tissue-derived stem cell populations including the liver, central nervous system, and cardiac tissues as examples of the success and challenges in this field of research. Lastly, the challenges of clinical therapies will be discussed as it applies to these unique cell populations. PMID:21048854

  5. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed. PMID:26367485

  6. Brain repair how stem cells are changing neurology.

    PubMed

    Modo, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The concept that everything can die, but nothing can regenerate in the brain has been replaced with new hope that stem cells will provide avenues to repair the damaged central nervous system (CNS). The treatment of brain damage has been demonstrated preclinically using a variety of stem cell sources. The prototypical cell that gives rise to the CNS is the neural stem cell (NSC). NSCs differentiate into site-appropriate phenotypes when transplanted into the damage brain and can recover lost functions. In some cases, cells can be pre-differentiated into a particular neuronal phenotype, such as dopaminergic cells, that can then be transplanted ectopically to promote behavioural improvements in conditions like Parkinson's disease. Early clinical studies in PD have demonstrated the proof of principle that this approach can improve neurodegenerative disease. The current review will discuss the different sources of stem cells in their preclinical and clinical application, as well as providing an overview as to the issues that need to be addressed to ensure a successful translation from bench to bedside. PMID:18561598

  7. Stem cells for spinal cord regeneration: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Sobani, Zain A.; Quadri, Syed A.; Enam, S. Ather

    2010-01-01

    Background: Nearly 11,000 cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) are reported in the United States annually. Current management options give a median survival time of 38 years; however, no rehabilitative measures are available. Stem cells have been under constant research given their ability to differentiate into neural cell lines replacing non functional tissue. Efforts have been made to establish new synapses and provide a conducive environment, by grafting cells from autologous and fetal sources; including embryonic or adult stem cells, Schwann cells, genetically modified fibroblasts, bone stromal cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells and combinations/ variants thereof. Methods: In order to discuss the underlying mechanism of SCI along with the previously mentioned sources of stem cells in context to SCI, a simple review of literature was conducted. An extensive literature search was conducted using the PubMed data base and online search engines and articles published in the last 15 years were considered along with some historical articles where a background was required. Results: Stem cell transplantation for SCI is at the forefront with animal and in vitro studies providing a solid platform to enable well-designed human studies. Olfactory ensheathing cells seem to be the most promising; whilst bone marrow stromal cells appear as strong candidates for an adjunctive role. Conclusion: The key strategy in developing the therapeutic basis of stem cell transplantation for spinal cord regeneration is to weed out the pseudo-science and opportunism. All the trials should be based on stringent scientific criteria and effort to bypass that should be strongly discouraged at the international level. PMID:21246060

  8. Bioreactor Engineering of Stem Cell Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Marolt, Darja; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise to revolutionize modern medicine by development of new therapies, disease models and drug screening systems. Standard cell culture systems have limited biological relevance because they do not recapitulate the complex 3-dimensional interactions and biophysical cues that characterize the in vivo environment. In this review, we discuss the current advances in engineering stem cell environments using novel biomaterials and bioreactor technologies. We also reflect on the challenges the field is currently facing with regard to translation of stem cell based therapies into the clinic. PMID:23531529

  9. Update on small intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration. PMID:23922464

  10. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  11. Stem cell applications in military medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There are many similarities between health issues affecting military and civilian patient populations, with the exception of the relatively small but vital segment of active soldiers who experience high-energy blast injuries during combat. A rising incidence of major injuries from explosive devices in recent campaigns has further complicated treatment and recovery, highlighting the need for tissue regenerative options and intensifying interest in the possible role of stem cells for military medicine. In this review we outline the array of tissue-specific injuries typically seen in modern combat - as well as address a few complications unique to soldiers - and discuss the state of current stem cell research in addressing each area. Embryonic, induced-pluripotent and adult stem cell sources are defined, along with advantages and disadvantages unique to each cell type. More detailed stem cell sources are described in the context of each tissue of interest, including neural, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal and sensory tissues, with brief discussion of their potential role in regenerative medicine moving forward. Additional commentary is given to military stem cell applications aside from regenerative medicine, such as blood pharming, immunomodulation and drug screening, with an overview of stem cell banking and the unique opportunity provided by the military and civilian overlap of stem cell research. PMID:22011454

  12. Time to Reconsider Stem Cell Induction Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Hans-Werner

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in stem cell research suggest that it may be time to reconsider the current focus of stem cell induction strategies. During the previous five years, approximately, the induction of pluripotency in somatic cells, i.e., the generation of so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), has become the focus of ongoing research in many stem cell laboratories, because this technology promises to overcome limitations (both technical and ethical) seen in the production and use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). A rapidly increasing number of publications suggest, however, that it is now possible to choose instead other, alternative ways of generating stem and progenitor cells bypassing pluripotency. These new strategies may offer important advantages with respect to ethics, as well as to safety considerations. The present communication discusses why these strategies may provide possibilities for an escape from the dilemma presented by pluripotent stem cells (self-organization potential, cloning by tetraploid complementation, patenting problems and tumor formation risk). PMID:24710555

  13. Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Gupte, Melanie J.; Ma, Peter X.

    2013-01-01

    Importance of the field Organ failure and tissue loss are challenging health issues due to widespread injury, the lack of organs for transplantation, and limitations of conventional artificial implants. The field of tissue engineering aims to provide alternative living substitutes that restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Areas covered in this review In this paper, a wide range of porous scaffolds are reviewed, with an emphasis on phase separation techniques that generate advantageous nanofibrous 3D scaffolds for stem cell-based tissue engineering applications. In addition, methods for presentation and delivery of bioactive molecules to mimic the properties of stem cell niche are summarized. Recent progress in using these bio-instructive scaffolds to support stem cell differentiation and tissue regeneration is also presented. What the reader will gain Stem cells have great clinical potential because of their capability to differentiate into multiple cell types. Biomaterials have served as artificial extracellular environments to regulate stem cell behavior. Biomaterials with various physical, mechanical, and chemical properties can be designed to control stem cell development for regeneration. Take home message The research at the interface of stem cell biology and biomaterials has made and will continue to make exciting advances in tissue engineering. PMID:23327471

  14. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Elizabeth; Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Sheth, Roosey; Seifalian, Amelia; Green, Mark; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored. PMID:24729700

  15. Stem Cell Biomarkers in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yun; Forrest, Donna; Smith, Clayton; Eaves, Allen; Eaves, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal multi-step myeloproliferative disease that is initially produced and ultimately sustained by a rare subpopulation of BCR-ABL+ cells with multi-lineage stem cell properties. These BCR-ABL+ CML stem cells are phenotypically similar to normal hematopoietic stem cells which are also maintained throughout the course of the disease at varying levels in different patients. Defining the unique properties of the leukemic stem cells that produce the chronic phase of CML has therefore had to rely heavily on access to samples from rare patients in which the stem cell compartment is dominated by leukemic elements. Here we review past and ongoing approaches using such samples to identify biologically and clinically relevant biomarkers of BCR-ABL+ stem cells that explain their unusual biology and that may help to design, or at least predict, improved treatment responses in CML patients. These studies are of particular interest in light of recent evidence that chronic phase CML stem cells are not only innately resistant to imatinib mesylate and other drugs that target the BCR-ABL oncoprotein, but are also genetically unstable. PMID:18525114

  16. Time to reconsider stem cell induction strategies.

    PubMed

    Denker, Hans-Werner

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in stem cell research suggest that it may be time to reconsider the current focus of stem cell induction strategies. During the previous five years, approximately, the induction of pluripotency in somatic cells, i.e., the generation of so-called 'induced pluripotent stem cells' (iPSCs), has become the focus of ongoing research in many stem cell laboratories, because this technology promises to overcome limitations (both technical and ethical) seen in the production and use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). A rapidly increasing number of publications suggest, however, that it is now possible to choose instead other, alternative ways of generating stem and progenitor cells bypassing pluripotency. These new strategies may offer important advantages with respect to ethics, as well as to safety considerations. The present communication discusses why these strategies may provide possibilities for an escape from the dilemma presented by pluripotent stem cells (self-organization potential, cloning by tetraploid complementation, patenting problems and tumor formation risk). PMID:24710555

  17. Understanding cancer stem cell heterogeneity and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dean G

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity is an omnipresent feature of mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. It has been recently realized that even mouse and human embryonic stem cells under the best culture conditions are heterogeneous containing pluripotent as well as partially committed cells. Somatic stem cells in adult organs are also heterogeneous, containing many subpopulations of self-renewing cells with distinct regenerative capacity. The differentiated progeny of adult stem cells also retain significant developmental plasticity that can be induced by a wide variety of experimental approaches. Like normal stem cells, recent data suggest that cancer stem cells (CSCs) similarly display significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, and that the CSC progeny can manifest diverse plasticity. Here, I discuss CSC heterogeneity and plasticity in the context of tumor development and progression, and by comparing with normal stem cell development. Appreciation of cancer cell plasticity entails a revision to the earlier concept that only the tumorigenic subset in the tumor needs to be targeted. By understanding the interrelationship between CSCs and their differentiated progeny, we can hope to develop better therapeutic regimens that can prevent the emergence of tumor cell variants that are able to found a new tumor and distant metastases. PMID:22357481

  18. Epigenetic regulation in adult stem cells and cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate to distinct cell types. Multiple signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles as extrinsic cues in maintaining adult stem cell identity and activity. Recent studies also show dynamic regulation by epigenetic mechanisms as intrinsic factors in multiple adult stem cell lineages. Emerging evidence demonstrates intimate crosstalk between these two mechanisms. Misregulation of adult stem cell activity could lead to tumorigenesis, and it has been proposed that cancer stem cells may be responsible for tumor growth and metastasis. However, it is unclear whether cancer stem cells share commonalities with normal adult stem cells. In this review, we will focus on recent discoveries of epigenetic regulation in multiple adult stem cell lineages. We will also discuss how epigenetic mechanisms regulate cancer stem cell activity and probe the common and different features between cancer stem cells and normal adult stem cells. PMID:24172544

  19. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed. PMID:23097262

  20. Stem cells of the suture mesenchyme in craniofacial bone development, repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jeong, Jaeim; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hsu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The suture mesenchyme serves as a growth centre for calvarial morphogenesis and has been postulated to act as the niche for skeletal stem cells. Aberrant gene regulation causes suture dysmorphogenesis resulting in craniosynostosis, one of the most common craniofacial deformities. Owing to various limitations, especially the lack of suture stem cell isolation, reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects remains highly challenging. Here we provide the first evidence for an Axin2-expressing stem cell population with long-term self-renewing, clonal expanding and differentiating abilities during calvarial development and homeostastic maintenance. These cells, which reside in the suture midline, contribute directly to injury repair and skeletal regeneration in a cell autonomous fashion. Our findings demonstrate their true identity as skeletal stem cells with innate capacities to replace the damaged skeleton in cell-based therapy, and permit further elucidation of the stem cell-mediated craniofacial skeletogenesis, leading to revealing the complex nature of congenital disease and regenerative medicine. PMID:26830436

  1. Stem cells of the suture mesenchyme in craniofacial bone development, repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jeong, Jaeim; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hsu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The suture mesenchyme serves as a growth centre for calvarial morphogenesis and has been postulated to act as the niche for skeletal stem cells. Aberrant gene regulation causes suture dysmorphogenesis resulting in craniosynostosis, one of the most common craniofacial deformities. Owing to various limitations, especially the lack of suture stem cell isolation, reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects remains highly challenging. Here we provide the first evidence for an Axin2-expressing stem cell population with long-term self-renewing, clonal expanding and differentiating abilities during calvarial development and homeostastic maintenance. These cells, which reside in the suture midline, contribute directly to injury repair and skeletal regeneration in a cell autonomous fashion. Our findings demonstrate their true identity as skeletal stem cells with innate capacities to replace the damaged skeleton in cell-based therapy, and permit further elucidation of the stem cell-mediated craniofacial skeletogenesis, leading to revealing the complex nature of congenital disease and regenerative medicine. PMID:26830436

  2. The Effect of Laser Irradiation on Adipose Derived Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, H.; de Villiers, J.; Mvula, B.

    2009-06-01

    There are two fundamental types of stem cells: Embryonic Stem cells and Adult Stem cells. Adult Stem cells have a more restricted potential and can usually differentiate into a few different cell types. In the body these cells facilitate the replacement or repair of damaged or diseased cells in organs. Low intensity laser irradiation was shown to increase stem cell migration and stimulate proliferation and it is thought that treatment of these cells with laser irradiation may increase the stem cell harvest and have a positive effect on the viability and proliferation. Our research is aimed at determining the effect of laser irradiation on differentiation of Adipose Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) into different cell types using a diode laser with a wavelength of 636 nm and at 5 J/cm2. Confirmation of stem cell characteristics and well as subsequent differentiation were assessed using Western blot analysis and cellular morphology supported by fluorescent live cell imaging. Functionality of subsequent differentiated cells was confirmed by measuring adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and cell viability.

  3. Seeing Stem Cells at Work In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell based-therapies are novel therapeutic strategies that hold key for developing new treatments for diseases conditions with very few or no cures. Although there has been an increase in the number of clinical trials involving stem cell-based therapies in the last few years, the long-term risks and benefits of these therapies are still unknown. Detailed in vivo studies are needed to monitor the fate of transplanted cells, including their distribution, differentiation, and longevity over time. Advancements in non-invasive cellular imaging techniques to track engrafted cells in real-time present a powerful tool for determining the efficacy of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, we describe the latest approaches to stem cell labeling and tracking using different imaging modalities. PMID:23975604

  4. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Cntia de Vasconcellos; Telles, Paloma Dias da Silva; Nascimento, Ivana Lucia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine. PMID:23580887

  5. Stem cell therapy for glaucoma: possibilities and practicalities

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V; Bull, Natalie D; Martin, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive, neurodegenerative, optic neuropathy in which currently available therapies cannot always prevent, and do not reverse, vision loss. Stem cell transplantation may provide a promising new avenue for treating many presently incurable degenerative conditions, including glaucoma. This article will explore the various ways in which transplantation of stem or progenitor cells may be applied for the treatment of glaucoma. We will critically discuss the translational prospects of two cell transplantation-based treatment modalities: neuroprotection and retinal ganglion cell replacement. In addition, we will identify specific questions that need to be addressed and obstacles to overcome on the path to clinical translation, and offer insight into potential strategies for approaching this goal. PMID:21686079

  6. Neural stem cells and cell death.

    PubMed

    Ceccatelli, S; Tamm, C; Sleeper, E; Orrenius, S

    2004-04-01

    Neural stem cells (NSC) undergo apoptotic cell death as an essential component of neural development. Here, we present the results of our studies on the mechanisms by which NSC undergo cell death in response to neurotoxic insults. As experimental models we used primary culture of adult NSC from the subventricular zone of the rat brain, and the neural stem cell line C17.2 initially derived from developing mouse cerebellum. NSC undergo apoptosis in response to staurosporine (0.25 microM) as well as agents inducing oxidative stress such as 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ). Exposed cells demonstrate an apoptotic morphology, positive TUNEL staining and phosphatidyl serine exposure as labeled with Annexin V. Using an antibody specific for cytochrome c, we found that cells exposed to staurosporine or DMNQ exhibited diffuse fluorescence throughout the cytosol, implying a release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. In addition to positive immunoreactivity against the active fragment (p17) of caspase-3, the administration of the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk (40 microM), prevents apoptosis. Both NSC and C17.2 express the Fas receptor, and procaspase-8, but exposure to agonistic Fas mAb (250 ng/ml) fails to induce apoptosis. Pretreatment with cycloheximide or actinomycin D does not influence the cell response to Fas mAb, suggesting that the endogenous inhibitor of caspase-8 FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP) is not responsible for the inhibition of the Fas pathway. Thus, it appears that the Fas dependent cell death pathway is not operative in these cells, while the mitochondrial pathway is active and caspase-3 serves as an executioner caspase in the apoptotic machinery. It is known that Fas not only induces apoptosis, but can also deliver growth stimulatory signals through activation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. The Fas-induced ERK phosphorylation that we detect in C17.2 cells suggests that in NSC Fas may function as a mediator of growth rather than death. PMID:15093249

  7. Analytical strategies for studying stem cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, James M.; Choi, William T.; Sreekumar, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Owing to their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency, stem cells possess untold potential for revolutionizing the field of regenerative medicine through the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Central to developing these strategies is improving our understanding of biological mechanisms responsible for governing stem cell fate and self-renewal. Increasing attention is being given to the significance of metabolism, through the production of energy and generation of small molecules, as a critical regulator of stem cell functioning. Rapid advances in the field of metabolomics now allow for in-depth profiling of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo, providing a systems perspective on key metabolic and molecular pathways which influence stem cell biology. Understanding the analytical platforms and techniques that are currently used to study stem cell metabolomics, as well as how new insights can be derived from this knowledge, will accelerate new research in the field and improve future efforts to expand our understanding of the interplay between metabolism and stem cell biology. PMID:26213533

  8. Technology advancement for integrative stem cell analyses.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yoon; Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-12-01

    Scientists have endeavored to use stem cells for a variety of applications ranging from basic science research to translational medicine. Population-based characterization of such stem cells, while providing an important foundation to further development, often disregard the heterogeneity inherent among individual constituents within a given population. The population-based analysis and characterization of stem cells and the problems associated with such a blanket approach only underscore the need for the development of new analytical technology. In this article, we review current stem cell analytical technologies, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each, followed by applications of these technologies in the field of stem cells. Furthermore, while recent advances in micro/nano technology have led to a growth in the stem cell analytical field, underlying architectural concepts allow only for a vertical analytical approach, in which different desirable parameters are obtained from multiple individual experiments and there are many technical challenges that limit vertically integrated analytical tools. Therefore, we propose--by introducing a concept of vertical and horizontal approach--that there is the need of adequate methods to the integration of information, such that multiple descriptive parameters from a stem cell can be obtained from a single experiment. PMID:24874188

  9. Stem cell bioprocessing: fundamentals and principles

    PubMed Central

    Placzek, Mark R.; Chung, I-Ming; Macedo, Hugo M.; Ismail, Siti; Mortera Blanco, Teresa; Lim, Mayasari; Min Cha, Jae; Fauzi, Iliana; Kang, Yunyi; Yeo, David C.L.; Yip Joan Ma, Chi; Polak, Julia M.; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the potential of stem cell research for tissue engineering-based therapies and regenerative medicine clinical applications has become well established. In 2006, Chung pioneered the first entire organ transplant using adult stem cells and a scaffold for clinical evaluation. With this a new milestone was achieved, with seven patients with myelomeningocele receiving stem cell-derived bladder transplants resulting in substantial improvements in their quality of life. While a bladder is a relatively simple organ, the breakthrough highlights the incredible benefits that can be gained from the cross-disciplinary nature of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) that encompasses stem cell research and stem cell bioprocessing. Unquestionably, the development of bioprocess technologies for the transfer of the current laboratory-based practice of stem cell tissue culture to the clinic as therapeutics necessitates the application of engineering principles and practices to achieve control, reproducibility, automation, validation and safety of the process and the product. The successful translation will require contributions from fundamental research (from developmental biology to the ‘omics’ technologies and advances in immunology) and from existing industrial practice (biologics), especially on automation, quality assurance and regulation. The timely development, integration and execution of various components will be critical—failures of the past (such as in the commercialization of skin equivalents) on marketing, pricing, production and advertising should not be repeated. This review aims to address the principles required for successful stem cell bioprocessing so that they can be applied deftly to clinical applications. PMID:19033137

  10. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lisa B.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  11. Technology Advancement for Integrative Stem Cell Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have endeavored to use stem cells for a variety of applications ranging from basic science research to translational medicine. Population-based characterization of such stem cells, while providing an important foundation to further development, often disregard the heterogeneity inherent among individual constituents within a given population. The population-based analysis and characterization of stem cells and the problems associated with such a blanket approach only underscore the need for the development of new analytical technology. In this article, we review current stem cell analytical technologies, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each, followed by applications of these technologies in the field of stem cells. Furthermore, while recent advances in micro/nano technology have led to a growth in the stem cell analytical field, underlying architectural concepts allow only for a vertical analytical approach, in which different desirable parameters are obtained from multiple individual experiments and there are many technical challenges that limit vertically integrated analytical tools. Therefore, we proposeby introducing a concept of vertical and horizontal approachthat there is the need of adequate methods to the integration of information, such that multiple descriptive parameters from a stem cell can be obtained from a single experiment. PMID:24874188

  12. Germline Stem Cells: Origin and Destiny

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Germline stem cells are key to genome transmission to future generations. Over recent years, there have been numerous insights into the regulatory mechanisms that govern both germ cell specification and the maintenance of the germline in adults. Complex regulatory interactions with both the niche and the environment modulate germline stem cell function. This perspective highlights some examples of this regulation to illustrate the diversity and complexity of the mechanisms involved. PMID:22704513

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  14. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy. PMID:17873412

  15. Crosstalk between stem cell and cell cycle machineries.

    PubMed

    Kareta, Michael S; Sage, Julien; Wernig, Marius

    2015-12-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, defined by an unlimited self-renewal capacity and an undifferentiated state, are best typified by embryonic stem cells. These cells have a unique cell cycle compared to somatic cells as defined by a rapid progression through the cell cycle and a minimal time spent in G1. Recent reports indicate that pluripotency and cell cycle regulation are mechanistically linked. In this review, we discuss the reciprocal co-regulation of these processes, how this co-regulation may prevent differentiation, and how cellular reprogramming can re-establish the unique cell cycle regulation in induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26520682

  16. Immortalization of Mouse Germ Line Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Marie-Claude; Braydich-Stolle, Laura; Dettin, Luis; Johnson, Eric; Dym, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian testis, the germ line stem cells are a small subpopulation of type A spermatogonia that proliferate and ultimately differentiate into sperm under the control of both endocrine and paracrine factors. To study the early phases of spermatogenesis at the molecular level, an in vitro system must be devised whereby germ line stem cells can be either cultured for a prolonged period of time or expanded as cell lines. In the study reported here, we chose to immortalize type A spermatogonia using the Simian virus large T-antigen gene (LTAg) under the control of an ecdysone-inducible promoter. While the cells escaped the hormonal control after a finite number of generations and expressed the LTAg constitutively, their growth remained slow and the cells exhibited morphological features typical of spermatogonia at the light microscopic level. Moreover, the cells expressed detectable levels of protein markers specific for germ cells such as Dazl, and specific for germ line stem cells such as Oct-4, a transcription factor, and GFR?-1, the receptor for glial cell linederived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Further analysis confirmed the spermatogonial phenotype and also revealed the expression of markers expressed in stem cells such as Piwi12 and Prame11. Since the cells respond to GDNF by a marked increase in their rate of proliferation, this cell line represents a good in vitro model for studying aspects of mouse germ line stem cell biology. PMID:15671143

  17. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Kong, Yan; Zhang, Mingliang; Xie, Fei; Liu, Peng; Xu, Shaohua

    2016-02-26

    A long-standing goal in regenerative medicine is to obtain scalable functional cells on demand to replenish cells lost in various conditions, including relevant diseases, injuries, and aging. As an unlimited cell source, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are invaluable for regenerative medicine, because they have the potential to give rise to any cell type in an organism. For therapeutic purposes, it is important to develop specific approach to directing PSC differentiation towards desired cell types efficiently. Through directed differentiation, PSCs could give rise to scalable, clinically relevant cells for invivo transplantation, as well as for studying diseases invitro and discovering drugs to treat them. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in directing differentiation of PSCs into a variety of cell types. In this review, we discuss recent progress in directed differentiation of PSCs, clinical translation of PSC-based cell replacement therapies, and remaining challenges. PMID:26851367

  18. rsPSCs: A new type of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weissbein, Uri; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2015-08-01

    Pluripotent stem cells capture the imagination since they can differentiate into all cell types in our body. Recent evidence suggests that in addition to embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), a new type of region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs) exists, possessing unique spatial and molecular characteristics. PMID:26077383

  19. Bioinspired materials for controlling stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Omar Z; Khademhosseini, Ali; Langer, Robert; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2010-03-16

    Although researchers currently have limited ability to mimic the natural stem cell microenvironment, recent work at the interface of stem biology and biomaterials science has demonstrated that control over stem cell behavior with artificial microenvironments is quite advanced. Embryonic and adult stem cells are potentially useful platforms for tissue regeneration, cell-based therapeutics, and disease-in-a-dish models for drug screening. The major challenge in this field is to reliably control stem cell behavior outside the body. Common biological control schemes often ignore physicochemical parameters that materials scientists and engineers commonly manipulate, such as substrate topography and mechanical and rheological properties. However, with appropriate attention to these parameters, researchers have designed novel synthetic microenvironments to control stem cell behavior in rather unnatural ways. In this Account, we review synthetic microenvironments that aim to overcome the limitations of natural niches rather than to mimic them. A biomimetic stem cell control strategy is often limited by an incomplete understanding of the complex signaling pathways that drive stem cell behavior from early embryogenesis to late adulthood. The stem cell extracellular environment presents a miscellany of competing biological signals that keep the cell in a state of unstable equilibrium. Using synthetic polymers, researchers have designed synthetic microenvironments with an uncluttered array of cell signals, both specific and nonspecific, that are motivated by rather than modeled after biology. These have proven useful in maintaining cell potency, studying asymmetric cell division, and controlling cellular differentiation. We discuss recent research that highlights important biomaterials properties for controlling stem cell behavior, as well as advanced processes for selecting those materials, such as combinatorial and high-throughput screening. Much of this work has utilized micro- and nanoscale fabrication tools for controlling material properties and generating diversity in both two and three dimensions. Because of their ease of synthesis and similarity to biological soft matter, hydrogels have become a biomaterial of choice for generating 3D microenvironments. In presenting these efforts within the framework of synthetic biology, we anticipate that future researchers may exploit synthetic polymers to create microenvironments that control stem cell behavior in clinically relevant ways. PMID:20043634

  20. Evidence for Human Lung Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Hall, Sean R.; Hosoda, Toru; DAmario, Domenico; Sanada, Fumihiro; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ogrek, Barbara; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Ferreira-Martins, Joo; Matsuda, Alex; Arranto, Christian; Goichberg, Polina; Giordano, Giovanna; Haley, Kathleen J.; Bardelli, Silvana; Rayatzadeh, Hussein; Liu, Xiaoli; Quaini, Federico; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa; Perrella, Mark A.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Anversa, Piero

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although progenitor cells have been described in distinct anatomical regions of the lung, description of resident stem cells has remained elusive. METHODS Surgical lung-tissue specimens were studied in situ to identify and characterize human lung stem cells. We defined their phenotype and functional properties in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS Human lungs contain undifferentiated human lung stem cells nested in niches in the distal airways. These cells are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent in vitro. After injection into damaged mouse lung in vivo, human lung stem cells form human bronchioles, alveoli, and pulmonary vessels integrated structurally and functionally with the damaged organ. The formation of a chimeric lung was confirmed by detection of human transcripts for epithelial and vascular genes. In addition, the self-renewal and long-term proliferation of human lung stem cells was shown in serial-transplantation assays. CONCLUSIONS Human lungs contain identifiable stem cells. In animal models, these cells participate in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. They have the undemonstrated potential to promote tissue restoration in patients with lung disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:21561345

  1. [Translational approaches in cancer stem cell research].

    PubMed

    Mozet, C; Wichmann, G; Dietz, A

    2011-09-01

    There has been a growing body of evidence in recent years to indicate that the presence of cancer stem cells may be responsible for tumour development and early recurrence after conventional therapy strategies such as surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Although this concept of a small subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is not new as such and was already discussed by Virchow decades ago, the identification of cells of this kind in human malignancies was first successful in 1997 in acute myeloid leukemia. The recent identification of cancer stem cells and the detection of their fundamental signalling pathways (e.g. Hedgehog, Notch) may offer new therapeutic options in the future and become part of a therapeutic concept. In this article, we introduce the cancer stem cell model, provide an overview of current cancer stem cell markers in different human malignancies as well as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and discuss studies on the first targeted therapies against cancer stem cells and their signalling pathways. PMID:21847639

  2. [Current concepts in stem cell research].

    PubMed

    Garrido Colino, C

    2003-12-01

    In the last few years, advances in stem cell research have opened up new horizons in the treatment of human diseases and in regenerative medicine. It is not unusual to find news on stem cell research in newspapers and other media. This review describes some basic concepts in research needed to understand the medical literature on stem cells and to provide the information and bibliography necessary to be up to date in one of the subjects that has generated the greatest number of publications in the last few years. PMID:14636520

  3. [Study of recombinant stem cell factor].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Gong, Xin; Chang, Shao-Hong; Zhao, Zhi-Hu; Zuo, Cong-Lin; Ma, Qing-Jun

    2003-11-01

    Stem cell factor is an important hematopoietic growth factor. In this study, the human stem cell factor was produced by recombinant E. coli, and the structure and biological activity of the recombinant stem cell factor(rhSCF) was studied. It was indicated that the rhSCF was a uncovalent dimer in phosphate buffer,and had the correct mass spectra, mass peptides spectra, composition of amino acid, N-terminal sequernce, C-terminal sequence and intrachain disulfide linkages, rhSCF alone or synergy with rhG-CSF could mobilze hematopoietic progenitors to blood in monkey. PMID:15971582

  4. Stem cell therapy in oral and maxillofacial region: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, PM; Manikandhan, R; Muthu, MS; Abraham, S

    2012-01-01

    Cells with unique capacity for self-renewal and potency are called stem cells. With appropriate biochemical signals stem cells can be transformed into desirable cells. The idea behind this article is to shortly review the obtained literature on stem cell with respect to their properties, types and advantages of dental stem cells. Emphasis has been given to the possibilities of stem cell therapy in the oral and maxillofacial region including regeneration of tooth and craniofacial defects. PMID:22434942

  5. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    PubMed Central

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the embryonic form. Consequently, there is public confusion over the benefits currently being derived from the use of stem cells and what can potentially be expected from their use in the future. The health educator’s role is to give an unbiased account of the current state of stem cell research. This paper provides the groundwork by discussing the types of cells currently identified, their potential use, and some of the political and ethical pitfalls resulting from such use. PMID:19672471

  6. Cancer Stem Cells: Plasticity Works against Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, T V; Chernov, I P; Monastyrskaya, G S; Kondratyeva, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2015-01-01

    Great successes in identification and deciphering of mechanisms of the adult stem cells regulation have given rise to the idea that stem cells can also function in tumors as central elements of their development, starting from the initial stage and continuing until metastasis. Such cells were called cancer stem cells (CSCs). Over the course of intense discussion, the CSCs hypothesis gradually began to be perceived as an obvious fact. Recently, the existence of CSCs has been indeed confirmed in a number of works. However, when are CSCs universal prerequisites of tumors and to what extent their role is essential for tumor evolution remains an issue far from resolved. Likewise, the problem of potential use of CSCs as therapeutic targets remains unsolved. The present review attempts to analyze the issue of cancer stem cells and the potential of targeting them in tumor therapy. PMID:26798491

  7. Cancer Stem Cells: Plasticity Works against Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, T. V.; Chernov, I. P.; Monastyrskaya, G. S.; Kondratyeva, L. G.; Sverdlov, E. D.

    2015-01-01

    Great successes in identification and deciphering of mechanisms of the adult stem cells regulation have given rise to the idea that stem cells can also function in tumors as central elements of their development, starting from the initial stage and continuing until metastasis. Such cells were called cancer stem cells (CSCs). Over the course of intense discussion, the CSCs hypothesis gradually began to be perceived as an obvious fact. Recently, the existence of CSCs has been indeed confirmed in a number of works. However, when are CSCs universal prerequisites of tumors and to what extent their role is essential for tumor evolution remains an issue far from resolved. Likewise, the problem of potential use of CSCs as therapeutic targets remains unsolved. The present review attempts to analyze the issue of cancer stem cells and the potential of targeting them in tumor therapy. PMID:26798491

  8. TGF-? Signaling in Stem Cell Regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlin; Wei, Wanguo; Ding, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) family of cytokines, including TGF-?, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), and activin/nodal, is a group of crucial morphogens in embryonic development, and plays key roles in modulating stem/progenitor cell fate. TGF-? signaling is essential in maintaining the pluripotency of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), and its modulation can direct lineage-specific differentiation. Recent studies also demonstrate TGF-? signaling negatively regulates reprogramming and inhibition of TGF-? signaling can enhance reprogramming through facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). This chapter introduces methods of modulating somatic cell reprogramming to iPSCs and neural induction from hPSCs through modulating TGF-? signaling by chemical approaches. PMID:26520122

  9. Directed induction of functional motor neuron-like cells from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwan-Woo; Cho, Jung-Sun; Park, Chul-Kyu; Jung, Sung Jun; Park, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Shin-Jae; Oh, Seog Bae; Park, Young-Seok; Chang, Mi-Sook

    2012-01-01

    Cell replacement using stem cells is a promising therapeutic approach to treat degenerative motor neuron (MN) disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a desirable cell source for autologous cell replacement therapy to treat nervous system injury due to their plasticity, low immunogenicity, and a lower risk of tumor formation than embryonic stem cells. However, hMSCs are inefficient with regards to differentiating into MN-like cells. To solve this limitation, we genetically engineered hMSCs to express MN-associated transcription factors, Olig2 and Hb9, and then treat the hMSCs expressing Olig2 and Hb9 with optimal MN induction medium (MNIM). This method of induction led to higher expression (>30% of total cells) of MN markers. Electrophysiological data revealed that the induced hMSCs had the excitable properties of neurons and were able to form functional connections with muscle fibers in vitro. Furthermore, when the induced hMSCs were transplanted into an injured organotypic rat spinal cord slice culture, an ex vivo model of spinal cord injury, they exhibited characteristics of MNs. The data strongly suggest that induced Olig2/Hb9-expressing hMSCs were clearly reprogrammed and directed toward a MN-like lineage. We propose that methods to induce Olig2 and Hb9, followed by further induction with MNIM have therapeutic potential for autologous cell replacement therapy to treat degenerative MN disorders. PMID:22496912

  10. [Effects of different culture system of isolating and passage of sheep embryonic stem-like cells].

    PubMed

    Bai, Changming; Liu, Chousheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xinzhuang

    2008-07-01

    In this research, we use mouse embryonic fibroblasts as feeder layers. To eliminate the influence of serum and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) conditioned medium (ESCCM) on self-renewal of sheep embryonic stem-like cells, knockout serum replacement (KSR) was used to replace serum, then supplanted with ESCCM for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells. We found when inner cell masses (ICMs) cultured in the control group with medium supplanted with fetal bovine serum (FBS), sheep ES-like cells could not survive for more than 3 passages. However, sheep embryonic stem-like cells could remain undifferentiated for 5 passages when cultured in the medium that FBS was substituted by KSR. The result indicates that KSR culture system was more suitable for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells compared to FBS culture system. Finally we applied medium with 15% KSR as basic medium supplanted with 40% ESCCM as a new culture system to isolate sheep embryonic stem-like cells, we found one embryonic stem-like cell line still maintained undifferentiating for 8 passages, which characterized with a normal and stable karyotype and high expression of alkaline phosphatase. These results suggest that it is suitable to culture sheep ICM in the new culture system with 15% KSR as basic medium and supplanted with 40% ESCCM, which indicated that mouse ES cells might secrete factors playing important roles in promoting sheep ES-like cells' self-renewal. PMID:18837407

  11. Stem cells in human neurodegenerative disorders--time for clinical translation?

    PubMed

    Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell-based approaches have received much hype as potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases can improve function by replacing the lost neurons and glial cells and by mediating remyelination, trophic actions, and modulation of inflammation. Endogenous neural stem cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they produce neurons and glial cells in response to injury and could be affected by the degenerative process. As we discuss here, however, significant hurdles remain before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel therapies. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation and learn how to control stem cell proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation in the pathological environment. PMID:20051634

  12. Derivation of Neural Stem Cells from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Karanfil, I??l; Bagci-Onder, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells offer therapeutic tools for neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on embryoid body (EB)-mediated stem cell culture techniques used to derive NSCs from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Generation of healthy and stable NSCs from iPSCs heavily depends on standardized in vitro cell culture systems that mimic the embryonic environments utilized during neural development. Specifically, the neural induction and expansion methods after EB formation are described in this review. PMID:25863785

  13. The Androgen Receptor Bridges Stem Cell-Associated Signaling Nodes in Prostate Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Alastair H.; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of stem cells relies on dissecting the complex signaling networks that are thought to regulate their pluripotency and self-renewal. Until recently, attention has focused almost exclusively on a small set of “core” transcription factors for maintaining the stem cell state. It is now clear that stem cell regulatory networks are far more complex. In this review, we examine the role of the androgen receptor (AR) in coordinating interactions between signaling nodes that govern the balance of cell fate decisions in prostate stem cells. PMID:26880966

  14. Fully functional hair follicle regeneration through the rearrangement of stem cells and their niches

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshima, Koh-ei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Ishibashi, Naoko; Toki, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Miho; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Iri, Tarou; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Sato, Akio; Takeda, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Organ replacement regenerative therapy is purported to enable the replacement of organs damaged by disease, injury or aging in the foreseeable future. Here we demonstrate fully functional hair organ regeneration via the intracutaneous transplantation of a bioengineered pelage and vibrissa follicle germ. The pelage and vibrissae are reconstituted with embryonic skin-derived cells and adult vibrissa stem cell region-derived cells, respectively. The bioengineered hair follicle develops the correct structures and forms proper connections with surrounding host tissues such as the epidermis, arrector pili muscle and nerve fibres. The bioengineered follicles also show restored hair cycles and piloerection through the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches. This study thus reveals the potential applications of adult tissue-derived follicular stem cells as a bioengineered organ replacement therapy. PMID:22510689

  15. The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Sato, G; Hayashi, I

    1976-12-01

    The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media. (Reemplazo del suero por hormonas en el medio de cultivo de clulas). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 120-121, 1976. The serum used in cell culture media can be replaced by a mixture of hormones and some accesory blood factors. The pituitary cell line GH3 can be grown in a medium in which serum is replaced by triiodothyronine, transferrin, parathormone, tyrotrophin releasing hormone and somatomedins. Hela and BHK cell strains can also be grown in serum free medium supplemented with hormones. Each cell type appears to have different hormonal requirements yet it may found that some hormones are required for most cell types. PMID:1026199

  16. Cancer stem cells: implications for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Shaheenah; Austin, Laura; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    The survival of patients with cancer has improved significantly, primarily because of multidisciplinary care, improved chemotherapeutic agents in both the adjuvant and metastatic settings, the introduction of targeted biologic agents, and the incorporation of palliative care services into the management scheme. However, despite these advances, a significant proportion of patients continue to experience recurrence after adjuvant treatment, and survival associated with stage IV solid tumors still remains low. A primary or acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic and biologic agents is responsible for the failure of many of the agents used to treat patients with a malignancy. This can be explained by the presence of intratumoral heterogeneity and the molecular complexity of many cancers. Factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity include genetic mutations, interactions with the microenvironment-and the presence of cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells have been identified in a number of solid tumors, including breast cancer, brain tumors, lung cancer, colon cancer, and melanoma. Cancer stem cells have the capacity to self-renew, to give rise to progeny that are different from them, and to utilize common signaling pathways. Cancer stem cells may be the source of all the tumor cells present in a malignant tumor, the reason for the resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent used to treat the malignant tumor, and the source of cells that give rise to distant metastases. This review will focus on properties of cancer stem cells; will compare and contrast the cancer stem cell model with the clonal evolution model of tumorigenesis; will discuss the role of cancer stem cells in the development of resistance to chemotherapy; and will review the therapeutic implications and challenges of targeting cancer stem cells, with an assessment of the potential such an approach holds for improving outcomes for patients with cancer. PMID:25510809

  17. Stem cell systems and regeneration in planaria.

    PubMed

    Rink, Jochen C

    2013-03-01

    Planarians are members of the Platyhelminthes (flatworms). These animals have evolved a remarkable stem cell system. A single pluripotent adult stem cell type ("neoblast") gives rise to the entire range of cell types and organs in the planarian body plan, including a brain, digestive-, excretory-, sensory- and reproductive systems. Neoblasts are abundantly present throughout the mesenchyme and divide continuously. The resulting stream of progenitors and turnover of differentiated cells drive the rapid self-renewal of the entire animal within a matter of weeks. Planarians grow and literally de-grow ("shrink") by the food supply-dependent adjustment of organismal turnover rates, scaling body plan proportions over as much as a 50-fold size range. Their dynamic body architecture further allows astonishing regenerative abilities, including the regeneration of complete and perfectly proportioned animals even from tiny tissue remnants. Planarians as an experimental system, therefore, provide unique opportunities for addressing a spectrum of current problems in stem cell research, including the evolutionary conservation of pluripotency, the dynamic organization of differentiation lineages and the mechanisms underlying organismal stem cell homeostasis. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of neoblasts as pluripotent stem cells. The second part examines the fascinating mechanistic and conceptual challenges posed by a stem cell system that epitomizes a universal design principle of biological systems: the dynamic steady state. PMID:23138344

  18. Stem Cells for Ischemic Brain Injury: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Terry C.; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Low, Walter C.

    2014-01-01

    No effective therapy is currently available to promote recovery following ischemic stroke. Stem cells have been proposed as a potential source of new cells to replace those lost due to central nervous system injury, as well as a source of trophic molecules to minimize damage and promote recovery. We undertook a detailed review of data from recent basic science and preclinical studies to investigate the potential application of endogenous and exogenous stem cell therapies for treatment of cerebral ischemia. To date, spontaneous endogenous neurogenesis has been observed in response to ischemic injury, and can be enhanced via infusion of appropriate cytokines. Exogenous stem cells from multiple sources can generate neural cells that survive and form synaptic connections after transplantation in the stroke-injured brain. Stem cells from multiple sources cells also exhibit neuroprotective properties that may ameliorate stroke deficits. In many cases, functional benefits observed are likely independent of neural differentiation, though exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Future studies of neuroregeneration will require the demonstration of function in endogenously born neurons following focal ischemia. Further, methods are currently lacking to definitively demonstrate the therapeutic effect of newly introduced neural cells. Increased plasticity following stroke may facilitate the functional integration of new neurons, but the loss of appropriate guidance cues and supporting architecture in the infarct cavity will likely impede the restoration of lost circuitry. As such careful investigation of the mechanisms underlying trophic benefits will be essential. Evidence to date suggest that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for ischemic brain injury. PMID:19399885

  19. Human embryonic stem cells and therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woo Suk; Lee, Byeong Chun; Lee, Chang Kyu; Kang, Sung Keun

    2005-06-01

    The remarkable potential of embryonic stem (ES) cells is their ability to develop into many different cell types. ES cells make it possible to treat patients by transplanting specialized healthy cells derived from them to repair damaged and diseased cells or tissues, known as "stem cell therapy". However, the issue of immunocompatibility is one of considerable significance in ES cell transplantation. One approach to overcome transplant rejection of human ES (hES) cells is to derive hES cells from nuclear transfer of the patient's own cells. This concept is known as "therapeutic cloning". In this review, we describe the derivations of ES cells and cloned ES cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer, and their potential applications in transplantation medicine. PMID:15933427

  20. The significance of the micropores at the stem-cement interface in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Blunt, L; Jiang, X; Brown, L; Barrans, S

    2011-01-01

    Cemented total hip replacement has been performed worldwide to treat patients with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis, with aseptic loosening as its primary reason for revision. It has been indicated that the stem-cement interfacial porosity may contribute to the early loosening of cemented hip prosthesis. In addition, it is generally accepted that the micropores in bone cement surface and in the bulk material are detrimental to the mechanical integrity of bone cement and act as stress concentrators, resulting in generation of fatigue cracks in the cement mantle. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the micropores also play an important part in initiation and propagation of fretting wear on polished femoral stems. Taking this into consideration, a detailed review of the potential significance of the micropores in bone cement and the methods that could be employed to reduce porosity is given in this article. It was considered that modern cementing techniques are clinically beneficial and should be applied in surgery to further improve the survivorship of cemented total hip replacement. PMID:21144164

  1. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  2. Regulation of breast cancer stem cell features

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are rare, tumour-initiating cells that exhibit stem cell properties: capacity of self-renewal, pluripotency, highly tumorigenic potential, and resistance to therapy. Cancer stem cells have been characterised and isolated from many cancers, including breast cancer. Developmental pathways, such as the Wnt/?-catenin, Notch/?-secretase/Jagged, Shh (sonic hedgehog), and BMP signalling pathways, which direct proliferation and differentiation of normal stem cells, have emerged as major signalling pathways that contribute to the self-renewal of stem and/or progenitor cells in a variety of organs and cancers. Deregulation of these signalling pathways is frequently linked to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and breast CSCs often possess properties of cells that have undergone the EMT process. Signalling networks mediated by microRNAs and EMT-inducing transcription factors tie the EMT process to regulatory networks that maintain stemness. Recent studies have elucidated epigenetic mechanisms that control pluripotency and stemness, which allows an assessment on how embryonic and normal tissue stem cells are deregulated during cancerogenesis to give rise to CSCs. Epigenetic-based mechanisms are reversible, and the possibility of resetting the abnormal cancer epigenome by applying pharmacological compounds targeting epigenetic enzymes is a promising new therapeutic strategy. Chemoresistance of CSCs is frequently driven by various mechanisms, including aberrant expression/activity of ABC transporters, aldehyde dehydrogenase and anti-oncogenic proteins (i.e. BCL2, B-cell lymphoma-2), enhanced DNA damage response, activation of pro-survival signalling pathways, and epigenetic deregulations. Despite controversy surrounding the CSC hypothesis, there is substantial evidence for their role in cancer, and a number of drugs intended to specifically target CSCs have entered clinical trials. PMID:25691826

  3. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei-Bo; Liu, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the “cancer stem cell hypothesis”, which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells (liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future. PMID:25426254

  4. Stem cells and bone: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Bone physiology and stem cells were tightly intertwined with one another, both conceptually and experimentally, long before the current explosion of interest in stem cells and so-called regenerative medicine. Bone is home to the two best known and best characterized systems of postnatal stem cells, and it is the only organ in which two stem cells and their dependent lineages coordinate the overall adaptive responses of two major physiological systems. All along, the nature and the evolutionary significance of the interplay of bone and hematopoiesis have remained a major scientific challenge, but also allowed for some of the most spectacular developments in cell biology-based medicine, such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This question recurs in novel forms at multiple turning points over time: today, it finds in the biology of the "niche" its popular phrasing. Entirely new avenues of investigation emerge as a new view of bone in physiology and medicine is progressively established. Looking at bone and stem cells in a historical perspective provides a unique case study to highlight the general evolution of science in biomedicine since the end of World War II to the present day. A paradigm shift in science and in its relation to society and policies occurred in the second half of the XXth century, with major implications thereof for health, industry, drug development, market and society. Current interest in stem cells in bone as in other fields is intertwined with that shift. New opportunities and also new challenges arise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Stem cells and bone". PMID:25171959

  5. Regulation of breast cancer stem cell features.

    PubMed

    Czerwinska, Patrycja; Kaminska, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are rare, tumour-initiating cells that exhibit stem cell properties: capacity of self-renewal, pluripotency, highly tumorigenic potential, and resistance to therapy. Cancer stem cells have been characterised and isolated from many cancers, including breast cancer. Developmental pathways, such as the Wnt/?-catenin, Notch/?-secretase/Jagged, Shh (sonic hedgehog), and BMP signalling pathways, which direct proliferation and differentiation of normal stem cells, have emerged as major signalling pathways that contribute to the self-renewal of stem and/or progenitor cells in a variety of organs and cancers. Deregulation of these signalling pathways is frequently linked to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and breast CSCs often possess properties of cells that have undergone the EMT process. Signalling networks mediated by microRNAs and EMT-inducing transcription factors tie the EMT process to regulatory networks that maintain "stemness". Recent studies have elucidated epigenetic mechanisms that control pluripotency and stemness, which allows an assessment on how embryonic and normal tissue stem cells are deregulated during cancerogenesis to give rise to CSCs. Epigenetic-based mechanisms are reversible, and the possibility of "resetting" the abnormal cancer epigenome by applying pharmacological compounds targeting epigenetic enzymes is a promising new therapeutic strategy. Chemoresistance of CSCs is frequently driven by various mechanisms, including aberrant expression/activity of ABC transporters, aldehyde dehydrogenase and anti-oncogenic proteins (i.e. BCL2, B-cell lymphoma-2), enhanced DNA damage response, activation of pro-survival signalling pathways, and epigenetic deregulations. Despite controversy surrounding the CSC hypothesis, there is substantial evidence for their role in cancer, and a number of drugs intended to specifically target CSCs have entered clinical trials. PMID:25691826

  6. Directed Dopaminergic Neuron Differentiation from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengbo; Xia, Ninuo; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (also known as A9 DA neurons) are the specific cell type that is lost in Parkinsons disease (PD). There is great interest in deriving A9 DA neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) for regenerative cell replacement therapy for PD. During neural development, A9 DA neurons originate from the floor plate (FP) precursors located at the ventral midline of the central nervous system. Here, we optimized the culture conditions for the stepwise differentiation of hPSCs to A9 DA neurons, which mimics embryonic DA neuron development. In our protocol, we first describe the efficient generation of FP precursor cells from hPSCs using a small molecule method, and then convert the FP cells to A9 DA neurons, which could be maintained in vitro for several months. This efficient, repeatable and controllable protocol works well in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from normal persons and PD patients, in which one could derive A9 DA neurons to perform in vitro disease modeling and drug screening and in vivo cell transplantation therapy for PD. PMID:25285746

  7. Will embryonic stem cells change health policy?

    PubMed

    Sage, William M

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be. PMID:20579256

  8. Stem cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Raymond, Azman Ali

    2012-01-01

    The lack of curative therapies for neurodegenerative diseases has high economic impact and places huge burden on the society. The contribution of stem cells to cure neurodegenerative diseases has been unraveled and explored extensively over the past few years. Beyond substitution of the lost neurons, stem cells act as immunomodulators and neuroprotectors. A large number of preclinical and a small number of clinical studies have shown beneficial outcomes in this context. In this review, we have summarized the current concepts of stem cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases and the recent advances in this field, particularly between 2010 and 2012. Further studies should be encouraged to resolve the clinical issues and vague translational findings for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25624807

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Rivire, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-02-01

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:22096239

  10. Advances in stem cell therapy against gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bovenberg, M Sarah S; Degeling, M Hannah; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2013-05-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most lethal cancers, and despite extensive research very little progress has been made in improving prognosis. Multimodality treatment combining surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy is the current gold standard, but effective treatment remains difficult due to the invasive nature and high recurrence of gliomas. Stem cell-based therapy using neural, mesenchymal, or hematopoietic stem cells may be an alternative approach because it is tumor selective and allows targeted therapy that spares healthy brain tissue. Stem cells can be used to establish a long-term antitumor response by stimulating the immune system and delivering prodrug, metabolizing genes, or oncolytic viruses. In this review, we discuss current trends and the latest developments in stem cell therapy against malignant gliomas from both the experimental laboratory and the clinic. PMID:23537753

  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  12. Keratinocyte stem cells: friends and foes.

    PubMed

    Pincelli, Carlo; Marconi, Alessandra

    2010-11-01

    Skin and its appendages provide a protective barrier against the assaults of the environment. To perform its role, epidermis undergoes an ongoing renewal through a balance of proliferation and differentiation/apoptosis called homeostasis. Keratinocyte stem cells reside in a special microenvironment called niche in basal epidermis, adult hair follicle, and sebaceous glands. While a definite marker ha