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Sample records for stem cells undergo

  1. Transfusion strategies in patients undergoing stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Radia, Rohini; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-04-01

    Hemopoietic stem-cell transplant patients may require intensive blood component support. Complications of transfusions include transmission of viral and bacterial infections, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and transfusion-related acute lung injury. Alloimmunization to red cell antigens may cause difficulties in selecting compatible blood, while alloimmunization to HLA expressed on platelets may cause subsequent platelet transfusion refractoriness. It is essential to define robust transfusion policies and procedures and these should be regularly audited. This article reviews blood component transfusion in the setting of hemopoietic stem-cell transplant and specifically discusses the management of ABO-mismatched transplants, the prevention of cytomegalovirus transmission, the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and the use of granulocyte transfusions. PMID:21495930

  2. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM. PMID:26758672

  3. Retinoic Acid-Treated Pluripotent Stem Cells Undergoing Neurogenesis Present Increased Aneuploidy and Micronuclei Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sartore, Rafaela C.; Campos, Priscila B.; Trujillo, Cleber A.; Ramalho, Bia L.; Negraes, Priscilla D.; Paulsen, Bruna S.; Meletti, Tamara; Costa, Elaine S.; Chicaybam, Leonardo; Bonamino, Martin H.; Ulrich, Henning; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of loss and gain of chromosomes, known as aneuploidy, has been previously described within the central nervous system. During development, at least one-third of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are aneuploid. Notably, aneuploid NPCs may survive and functionally integrate into the mature neural circuitry. Given the unanswered significance of this phenomenon, we tested the hypothesis that neural differentiation induced by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) in pluripotent stem cells is accompanied by increased levels of aneuploidy, as previously described for cortical NPCs in vivo. In this work we used embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells undergoing differentiation into NPCs. Ploidy analysis revealed a 2-fold increase in the rate of aneuploidy, with the prevalence of chromosome loss in RA primed stem cells when compared to naïve cells. In an attempt to understand the basis of neurogenic aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin expression was assessed in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA. RA increased micronuclei occurrence by almost 2-fold while decreased survivin expression by 50%, indicating possible mechanisms by which stem cells lose their chromosomes during neural differentiation. DNA fragmentation analysis demonstrated no increase in apoptosis on embryoid bodies treated with RA, indicating that cell death is not the mandatory fate of aneuploid NPCs derived from pluripotent cells. In order to exclude that the increase in aneuploidy was a spurious consequence of RA treatment, not related to neurogenesis, mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with RA under the same conditions and no alterations in chromosome gain or loss were observed. These findings indicate a correlation amongst neural differentiation, aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin downregulation in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA, providing evidence that somatically generated chromosomal variation accompanies

  4. Risk analysis of falls in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Satoko; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Kozawa, Mariko; Miyamoto, Junko; Mori, Reiko; Ogawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-08-01

    To identify fall risks in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the authors reviewed retrospective data on inpatients from April 2010 to March 2011. Among 77 HSCT patient records reviewed, the authors found that 35 patients had experienced at least one fall, including near-miss episodes (fallers). The main location of the falls was a corridor, and the main activity at the time of the fall was going to the toilet. To investigate fall risks along the HSCT time trajectory, the authors divided the time into pre- and post-engraftment periods and investigated the unique characteristics of each. PMID:25095291

  5. Coping strategies of adults with leukemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Iran: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Zahra; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Negarandeh, Reza

    2010-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) causes significant physical, social, psychological, and emotional stress in patients with leukemia. This qualitative study using semi-structured interviews explored the coping strategies of 10 adults with acute leukemia who were undergoing this form of treatment in transplantation units in a major hospital in Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2010. A content analysis identified eight themes and 13 subthemes that described the participants' coping strategies. The major themes were: attribution, denial and avoidance, connection with divine purpose, organizing treatment, seeking social support, modifying, reflection, and patience and resignation. A deeper understanding of the coping strategies that are used by patients with leukemia undergoing HSCT can help healthcare providers to encourage patients to use strategies that are likely to be more effective. Such coping strategies also can help patients to achieve a greater sense of empowerment. PMID:21210928

  6. The Perceived Threat in Adults with Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Zahra; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Negarandeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) create physical, psychological, social, and spiritual distresses in patients. Understanding this threatening situation in adults with leukemia undergoing HSCT will assist health care professionals in providing holistic care to the patients. Objectives: The aim of the present study was exploring the perceived threat in adults with leukemia undergoing HSCT. Patients and Methods: This article is part of a longitudinal qualitative study which used the grounded theory approach and was conducted in 2009-2011. Ten adults with acute leukemia scheduled for HSCT were recruited from the Hematology–Oncology Research Center and Stem Cell Transplantation, Shariati Hospital in Tehran, Iran. A series of pre-transplant and post-transplant in-depth interviews were held in the hospital’s HSCT wards. Totally, 18 interviews were conducted. Three written narratives were also obtained from the participants. The Corbin and Strauss approach was used to analyze the data. Results: Perceived threat was one of the main categories that emerged from the data. This category included four subcategories, "inattention to the signs and symptoms", "doubt and anxiety", "perception of danger and time limitation" and "change of life conditions", which occurred in linear progression over time. Conclusion: Suffering from leukemia and experiencing HSCT are events that are uniquely perceived by patients. This threatening situation can significantly effect perception of patients and cause temporary or permanent alterations in patients' lives. Health care professionals can help these patients by deeper understanding of their experiences and effective interventions. PMID:25414863

  7. Feasibility of an exercise programme in elderly patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schuler, M K; Hornemann, B; Pawandenat, C; Kramer, M; Hentschel, L; Beck, H; Kasten, P; Singer, S; Schaich, M; Ehninger, G; Platzbecker, U; Schetelig, J; Bornhäuser, M

    2016-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that physical exercise benefits younger patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We designed a prospective pilot study investigating whether elderly patients (>60 years) would also be able to participate in such a programme. It consisted of physiotherapist-supervised alternating endurance and resistance workouts on 6 of 7 days a week. Sixteen consecutive patients undergoing allo-HSCT were enrolled into the study. The median age was 64.5 years. Twelve patients participated in the programme until the time of discharge (75%) from the transplant unit. Therefore, the predefined criteria regarding feasibility were met. The reason for drop out was transplantation associated mortality in all patients (n = 4). Adherence was very good with a median of 85% attended training sessions. No adverse events were recorded. The endurance capacity dropped by 7% and lower extremity strength improved by 2% over time. Quality of life decreased during the study period, with global health being significantly worse at the time of discharge. In conclusion, a combined and intensified strength and endurance exercise programme is feasible and safe in a population of elderly patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Further research should focus on exploring effect sizes of such an intervention by conducting randomised controlled trials. PMID:26526286

  8. Prognostic Understanding, Quality of Life, and Mood in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Traeger, Lara; Kuzmuk, Kailyn; Eusebio, Justin; Vandusen, Harry; Keenan, Tanya; Shin, Jennifer; Gallagher, Emily R.; Greer, Joseph A.; Pirl, William F.; Jackson, Vicki A.; Ballen, Karen K; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Graubert, Timothy A.; McAfee, Steven; Dey, Bimalangshu; Chen, Yi-Bin A.; Temel, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how patients undergoing stem cell transplantation (HCT) and their family caregivers (FC) perceive their prognosis. We examined prognostic understanding in patients undergoing HCT and their FC and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) and mood. We conducted a longitudinal study of patients (and FC) hospitalized for HCT. We used a questionnaire to measure participants’ prognostic understanding and asked the oncologists to estimate patients’ prognosis prior to HCT. We assessed QOL and mood weekly and evaluated the relationship between prognostic understanding and QOL and mood using multivariable linear mixed models. We enrolled 90 patients undergoing (autologous n=30); myeloablative (n=30) or reduced intensity allogeneic (n=30)) HCT. 88.9% of patients and 87.1% of FC reported it is ‘extremely’ or ‘very’ important to know about prognosis. However, 77.6% of patients and 71.7% of FC reported a discordance and more optimistic prognostic perception compared to the oncologist (P’s < 0.0001). Patients with a concordant prognostic understanding with their oncologists reported worse QOL (β = −9.4, P = 0.01) and greater depression at baseline (β = 1.7, P = 0.02) and over time ((β = 1.2, P < 0.0001). Therefore, Interventions are needed to improve prognostic understanding, while providing patients with adequate psychological support. PMID:25961772

  9. Prognostic understanding, quality of life and mood in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    El-Jawahri, A; Traeger, L; Kuzmuk, K; Eusebio, J; Vandusen, H; Keenan, T; Shin, J; Gallagher, E R; Greer, J A; Pirl, W F; Jackson, V A; Ballen, K K; Spitzer, T R; Graubert, T A; McAfee, S; Dey, B; Chen, Y-B A; Temel, J S

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about how patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) and their family caregivers (FC) perceive their prognosis. We examined prognostic understanding in patients undergoing HCT and their FC and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) and mood. We conducted a longitudinal study of patients (and FC) hospitalized for HCT. We used a questionnaire to measure participants' prognostic understanding and asked the oncologists to estimate patients' prognosis prior to HCT. We assessed QOL and mood weekly and evaluated the relationship between prognostic understanding, and QOL and mood using multivariable linear mixed models. We enrolled 90 patients undergoing (autologous (n=30), myeloablative (n=30) or reduced intensity allogeneic (n=30)) HCT. About 88.9% of patients and 87.1% of FC reported it is 'extremely' or 'very' important to know about prognosis. However, 77.6% of patients and 71.7% of FC reported a discordance and more optimistic prognostic perception compared to the oncologist (P<0.0001). Patients with a concordant prognostic understanding with their oncologists reported worse QOL (β=-9.4, P=0.01) and greater depression at baseline (β=1.7, P=0.02) and over time ((β=1.2, P<0.0001). Therefore, Interventions are needed to improve prognostic understanding, while providing patients with adequate psychological support. PMID:25961772

  10. Complementary Therapies for Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant: Report of A Multisite Trial

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Sean; Barrera, Maru; Vannatta, Kathryn; Xiong, Xiaoping; Doyle, John J; Alderfer, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Children undergoing stem cell transplant (SCT) experience high levels of somatic distress and mood disturbance. This trial evaluated the efficacy of complementary therapies (massage, humor therapy, relaxation/imagery) for reducing distress associated with pediatric SCT. Methods Across 4 sites, 178 pediatric patients scheduled to undergo SCT were randomized to a child-targeted intervention involving massage and humor therapy (HPI-C), the identical child intervention plus a parent intervention involving massage and relaxation/imagery (HPI-CP) or standard care (SC). Randomization was stratified by site, age, and type of transplant. The interventions began at admission and continued through SCT week +3. Primary outcomes included patient and parent reports of somatic distress and mood disturbance obtained weekly from admission through week +6 using the BASES scales. Secondary outcomes included length of hospitalization, time to engraftment, and usage of narcotic analgesic and antiemetic medications. Results A mixed model approach was used to assess longitudinal trends of patient and parent-report outcomes and test differences between groups on these measures. Significant changes across time were observed on all patient and parent-report outcomes. However, no significant differences between treatment arms were found on the primary outcomes. Similarly, no signficant between group differences were noted on any of the medical variables as secondary outcomes. Conclusions Results of this multi-site trial failed to document significant benefits of complementary interventions in the pediatric SCT setting. PMID:20626016

  11. Pros and cons of splenectomy in patients with myelofibrosis undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Deeg, H J

    2001-03-01

    During fetal development, the spleen is a major hemopoietic organ. In the adult human, this task is relinquished to the bone marrow. However, under the stress of certain pathologic conditions, extramedullary hemopoiesis may again occur in the spleen. This is especially true for diseases of the marrow, in particular, myeloproliferative disorders such as agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, which is associated with severe fibrosis of the marrow space. At the same time, the spleen sequesters blood cells and contributes to peripheral blood cytopenias, which may improve following splenectomy. However, success is unpredictable, and the operative mortality of splenectomy is on the order of 10%. As a growing number of patients undergo hemopoietic stem cell transplantation as definitive therapy for myelofibrosis, the decision on splenectomy has additional ramifications since the spleen plays an important role in the kinetics of engraftment of donor cells and in immune reconstitution. We conclude from our analysis of available information that the benefit of splenectomy is difficult to predict, although after transplantation splenectomized patients have faster hemopoietic recovery. It appears that the most important indication for splenectomy in these patients is the relief of symptoms from massive spleen enlargement. PMID:11237072

  12. A Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Regimen for Patients with Dyskeratosis Congenita Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Adam S; Marsh, Rebecca A; Myers, Kasiani C; Davies, Stella M; Jodele, Sonata; O'Brien, Tracey A; Mehta, Parinda A

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for progressive marrow failure, myelodysplastic syndrome, or leukemia associated with dyskeratosis congenita (DC). HSCT for DC is limited by a high incidence of treatment-related mortality, thought to be related to underlying chromosomal instability and sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation. We report our experience in 7 patients with DC who underwent allogeneic transplantation using a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) preparative regimen that contained chemotherapy only (no radiation). This RIC regimen, designed specifically for patients with DC, contained alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan (with melphalan at 50% reduced dosing), with the goal of decreasing toxicity and improving outcome. All 7 patients engrafted, with none developing mixed chimerism or rejection. Two patients experienced acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and 1 went on to develop limited chronic GVHD of the skin. Five patients remain alive and well at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 14 to 57 months). We conclude that a radiation-free RIC regimen results in durable engraftment, acceptable toxicity, and improved overall survival in patients with DC undergoing allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26845033

  13. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  14. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair ... body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  15. The relapse risk of AML patients undergoing autologous transplantation correlates with the stem cell mobilizing potential.

    PubMed

    von Grünigen, Isabelle; Raschle, Joëlle; Rüsges-Wolter, Ilka; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri; Mueller, Beatrice U; Pabst, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is widely used to consolidate first remission in AML. We determined the significance of circulating CD34+ cells at the day of blood stem cell collection in 78 AML patients. Patients mobilizing more than 60,000 CD34+ cells/ml had shorter overall survival (OS; P=0.0274), shorter time to progression (TTP; P=0.0014), and a higher relapse rate (P=0.0177). High levels of CD34+ cells were an independent marker for shorter OS and TTP in a multivariate analysis. These data suggest that ASCT is associated with unfavorable outcome in AML patients with high levels of mobilized peripheral CD34+ cells. PMID:22727508

  16. Differentiation of stem cells from human infrapatellar fat pad: characterization of cells undergoing chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Felimban, Raed; Ye, Ken; Traianedes, Kathy; Di Bella, Claudia; Crook, Jeremy; Wallace, Gordon G; Quigley, Anita; Choong, Peter F M; Myers, Damian E

    2014-08-01

    Hyaline cartilage repair is a significant challenge in orthopedics and current techniques result in formation of fibrocartilage. Human infrapatellar fat pad (hIPFP)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiation into multiple tissue lineages, including cartilage and bone. Chondrogenesis is a crucial part of normal skeletal development but the molecular mechanisms are yet to be completely defined. In this study we sourced hIPFP-derived MSCs utilizing chondrogenic growth factors, transforming growth factor beta-3, and bone morphogenetic protein-6, to form hyaline-like cartilage in micromass cultures and we studied chondrogenic development of 7, 14, and 28 days. The purpose of this study was (1) to characterize chondrogenesis from MSCs derived from hIPFP tissue by conventional techniques and (2) to characterize temporal changes of key molecular components during chondrogenesis using microarray gene expression. Endpoints included histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), gene expression profiles using a microarray technique, and changes in expression of specific genes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Over 14-28 days, clusters of encapsulated chondrocytes formed surrounded by collagen type II and aggrecan in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Collagen type II and aggrecan production was confirmed using IHC and chondrogenic lineage markers were studied; SRY-related transcription factor (SOX9), collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1), and aggrecan gene expression increased significantly over the time course. Normalized microarray highlighted 608 differentially expressed genes; 10 chondrogenic genes were upregulated (2- to 87-fold), including COL2A1, COL10A1, COL9A1, COL11A1, COL9A2, COL11A2, COL1A1, COMP, SOX9, and COL3A1. We found that the upregulated genes (twofold or greater) represent significant level of expression (enrichment score) for the ECM structural constituent of the molecular functional at days 7, 14, and 28 during

  17. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing G-CSF Administration Sites for Mobilization of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells for Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Renfroe, Heather; Arnold, Mike; Vaughn, Louette; Harvey, R. Donald; Hamilton, Ellie; Lonial, Sagar; Khoury, H. Jean; Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Flowers, Christopher R.; Waller, Edmund K.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate whether granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injection in lower adipose-tissue-containing sites (arms and legs) would result in a lower exposure and reduced stem cell collection efficiency compared with injection into abdominal skin. Study Design and Methods We completed a prospective randomized study to determine the efficacy and tolerability of different injection sites for patients with multiple myeloma or lymphoma undergoing stem cell mobilization and apheresis. Primary end-points were the number of CD34+ cells collected and the number of days of apheresis. Forty patients were randomized to receive cytokine injections in their abdomen (group A) or extremities (group B). Randomization was stratified based upon diagnosis (myeloma; N=29 vs. lymphoma; N=11), age, and mobilization strategy, and balanced across demographic factors and body mass index. Results 35 subjects were evaluable for the primary end-point: 18 in group A and 17 in group B. One evaluable subject in each group failed to collect a minimum dose of at least 2.0 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg. The mean numbers of CD34+ cells (±SD) collected were not different between groups A and B (9.15 ± 4.7 × 106/kg versus 9.85 ± 5 × 106/kg, respectively; p=NS) following a median of 2 days apheresis. Adverse events were not different between the two groups. Conclusion The site of G-CSF administration does not affect the number of CD34+ cells collected by apheresis or the duration of apheresis needed to reach the target cell dose. PMID:21332729

  18. Neural stem cells exposed to BrdU lose their global DNA methylation and undergo astrocytic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Leonid; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, BrdU) is a halogenated nucleotide of low toxicity commonly used to monitor DNA replication. It is considered a valuable tool for in vitro and in vivo studies, including the detection of the small population of neural stem cells (NSC) in the mammalian brain. Here, we show that NSC grown in self-renewing conditions in vitro, when exposed to BrdU, lose the expression of stem cell markers like Nestin, Sox2 and Pax6 and undergo glial differentiation, strongly up-regulating the astrocytic marker GFAP. The onset of GFAP expression in BrdU exposed NSC was paralleled by a reduced expression of key DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and a rapid loss of global DNA CpG methylation, as we determined by our specially developed analytic assay. Remarkably, a known DNA demethylating compound, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), had similar effect on demethylation and differentiation of NSC. Since our key findings apply also to NSC derived from murine forebrain, our observations strongly suggest more caution in BrdU uses in stem cells research. We also propose that BrdU and its related substances may also open new opportunities for differentiation therapy in oncology. PMID:22379135

  19. Neural stem cells exposed to BrdU lose their global DNA methylation and undergo astrocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Leonid; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-07-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU) is a halogenated nucleotide of low toxicity commonly used to monitor DNA replication. It is considered a valuable tool for in vitro and in vivo studies, including the detection of the small population of neural stem cells (NSC) in the mammalian brain. Here, we show that NSC grown in self-renewing conditions in vitro, when exposed to BrdU, lose the expression of stem cell markers like Nestin, Sox2 and Pax6 and undergo glial differentiation, strongly up-regulating the astrocytic marker GFAP. The onset of GFAP expression in BrdU exposed NSC was paralleled by a reduced expression of key DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and a rapid loss of global DNA CpG methylation, as we determined by our specially developed analytic assay. Remarkably, a known DNA demethylating compound, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), had similar effect on demethylation and differentiation of NSC. Since our key findings apply also to NSC derived from murine forebrain, our observations strongly suggest more caution in BrdU uses in stem cells research. We also propose that BrdU and its related substances may also open new opportunities for differentiation therapy in oncology. PMID:22379135

  20. Microbiota Manipulation With Prebiotics and Probiotics in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andermann, Tessa M; Rezvani, Andrew; Bhatt, Ami S

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially life-saving therapy that often comes at the cost of complications such as graft-versus-host disease and post-transplant infections. With improved technology to understand the ecosystem of microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, and microeukaryotes) that make up the gut microbiota, there is increasing evidence of the microbiota's contribution to the development of post-transplant complications. Antibiotics have traditionally been the mainstay of microbiota-altering therapies available to physicians. Recently, interest is increasing in the use of prebiotics and probiotics to support the development and sustainability of a healthier microbiota. In this review, we will describe the evidence for the use of prebiotics and probiotics in combating microbiota dysbiosis and explore the ways in which they may be used in future research to potentially improve clinical outcomes and decrease rates of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and post-transplant infection. PMID:26780719

  1. Microbiota Manipulation With Prebiotics and Probiotics in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Tessa M.; Rezvani, Andrew; Bhatt, Ami S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially life-saving therapy that often comes at the cost of complications such as graft-versus-host disease and post-transplant infections. With improved technology to under-stand the ecosystem of microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, and microeukaryotes) that make up the gut microbiota, there is increasing evidence of the microbiota’s contribution to the development of post-transplant complications. Antibiotics have traditionally been the mainstay of microbiota-altering therapies available to physicians. Recently, interest is increasing in the use of prebiotics and probiotics to support the development and sustainability of a healthier microbiota. In this review, we will describe the evidence for the use of prebiotics and probiotics in combating microbiota dysbiosis and explore the ways in which they may be used in future research to potentially improve clinical outcomes and decrease rates of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and post-transplant infection. PMID:26780719

  2. Clofarabine-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Petri, Camille R; O'Donnell, Peter H; Cao, Hongyuan; Artz, Andrew S; Stock, Wendy; Wickrema, Amittha; Hard, Marjie; van Besien, Koen

    2014-12-01

    Abstract We examined clofarabine pharmacokinetics and association with renal toxicity in 62 patients participating in a phase I-II study of clofarabine-melphalan-alemtuzumab conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Pharmacokinetic parameters, including clofarabine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum concentration and clearance, were measured, and patients were monitored for renal injury. All patients had normal pretreatment creatinine values, but over half (55%) experienced acute kidney injury (AKI) after clofarabine administration. Age was the strongest predictor of AKI, with older patients at greater risk (p = 0.002). Clofarabine AUC was higher in patients who developed AKI, and patients with the highest dose-normalized AUCs experienced the most severe grades of AKI (p = 0.01). Lower baseline renal function, even when normal, was associated with lower clofarabine clearance (p = 0.008). These data suggest that renal-adjustment of clofarabine dosing should be considered for older and at-risk patients even when renal function is ostensibly normal. PMID:24564572

  3. Views of Patients Undergo Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation on Their Basic Needs

    PubMed Central

    Sayadi, Leila; Jafaraghaee, Fateme; Jeddian, Alireza; Atrian, Mahboobe Kafaei; Akbari, Azam; Tootoonchian, Farhood

    2013-01-01

    Background Today, hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (HSCT) has been accepted as a therapeutic approach and is widely applied in many patients with disorders of hematopoietic systems or patients with malignancies. Concomitant use of this therapeutic approach with long term chemotherapeutic procedures and hospitalization requires special care. This study was conducted to examine basic needs of patients after HSCT. Methods In this study, 171 hospitalized patients were selected after transplantation, using convenience sampling method. They completed a questionnaire formulated on the basis of Yura and Walsh Theory of Basic Needs. Results Most of the needs reported in the areas of vital functions, functional health status, and reaction to functional health status were chills (76.8%), insomnia (68.5%), and dissatisfaction with changes of lifestyle/habits (53.6%), respectively. Furthermore, 94.1% of the patients were aware of their disease. Conclusion This study identified a broad spectrum of the needs in HSCT patients. Given the importance of determining needs to reach thorough nursing care, paying attention to the provided list can facilitate the achievement of the goals of the care program for these patients. PMID:24505524

  4. Rifaximin preserves intestinal microbiota balance in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weber, D; Oefner, P J; Dettmer, K; Hiergeist, A; Koestler, J; Gessner, A; Weber, M; Stämmler, F; Hahn, J; Wolff, D; Herr, W; Holler, E

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis has been associated with acute gastrointestinal GvHD and poor outcome following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). To assess the effect of a switch in 2012 from ciprofloxacin/metronidazole to rifaximin for gut decontamination on intestinal microbiota composition and ASCT outcome, we retrospectively analyzed 394 patients receiving ASCT from September 2008 through June 2015. In 131 and 90 patients, respectively, urinary 3-indoxyl sulfate levels and intestinal enterococcal load were measured before conditioning and weekly within the first 28 days after ASCT. The use of rifaximin correlated with lower enterococcal positivity (6.9 vs 21.9%, P=0.05) and higher urinary 3-indoxyl sulfate concentrations (10.5 vs 4.6 μmoL/mmoL crea, P<0.001) after ASCT. Patients on rifaximin showed lower 1-year transplant-related mortality (P=0.04) and higher overall survival (P=0.008). Treatment of infectious complications with systemic antibiotics did not abrogate the beneficial effects of rifaximin on intestinal microbiota composition in the early course of ASCT and outcome. The data underscore the importance of maintaining a diverse population of symbiotic and mutualistic bacteria in the gut on ASCT outcome. PMID:26999466

  5. Risk Factors for Delirium in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Weckmann, Michelle T.; Gingrich, Roger; Mills, James A.; Hook, Larry; Beglinger, Leigh J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is common following hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment have been shown to improve long term outcomes. We sought to investigate the relationship between potential risk-factors and the development of delirium following HSCT. Methods Fifty-four inpatients admitted for HSCT were assessed prospectively for delirium every 2-3 days through their inpatient stay using standardized delirium and neuropsychological measures. Patient’s self-reports of medical history, medical records, and neurocognitive and psychiatric assessments were used to identify risk factors. Both pre- and post-HSCT risk factors were examined. Results Delirium incidence was 35% and occurred with highest frequency in the 2 weeks following transplant. The only pre-transplantation risk factors was lower oxygen saturation (p=0.003). Post-transplantation risk factors for delirium included higher creatinine (p<0.0001), higher blood urea nitrogen levels (p=0.005), lower creatinine clearance (p=0.0006), lower oxygen saturation (p=0.001), lower hemoglobin (p=0.04) and lower albumin (p=0.03). There was no observed association with level of cognitive performance, transplant type, disease severity, medical co-morbidity index, age or conditioning regimen. Conclusion Routine laboratory values can assist in the identification of high risk patients before delirium onset to improve early detection and treatment of delirium following HSCT. PMID:22860240

  6. High burden of BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gilis, L; Morisset, S; Billaud, G; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Labussière-Wallet, H; Nicolini, F-E; Barraco, F; Detrait, M; Thomas, X; Tedone, N; Sobh, M; Chidiac, C; Ferry, T; Salles, G; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2014-05-01

    BK virus (BKV) reactivation has been increasingly associated with the occurrence of late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT) resulting in morbidity and sometimes mortality. We investigated the incidence, risk factors and outcome of BKV-HC in 323 consecutive adult patients undergoing allo-HSCT over a 5-year period. BK viremia values for HC staging were evaluated, as well as the medico-economic impact of the complication. Forty-three patients developed BKV-HC. In univariate analysis, young age (P=0.028), unrelated donor (P=0.0178), stem cell source (P=0.0001), HLA mismatching (P=0.0022) and BU in conditioning regimen (P=0.01) were associated with a higher risk of developing BKV-HC. In multivariate analysis, patients receiving cord blood units (CBUs) (P=0.0005) and peripheral blood stem cells (P=0.011) represented high-risk subgroups for developing BKV-HC. BK viremia was directly correlated to HC severity (P=0.011) with a 3 to 6-log peak being likely associated with grades 3 or 4 HC. No correlation was found between BKV-HC and acute graft versus host disease or mortality rate. Patients with BKV-HC required a significantly longer duration of hospitalization (P<0.0001), more RBC (P=0.0003) and platelet transfusions (P<0.0001). Over the 5-year study period, the financial cost of the complication was evaluated at \\[euro]2 376 076 ($3 088 899). Strategies to prevent the occurrence of late-onset BKV-HC after allo-HSCT are urgently needed, especially in CBU and peripheral blood stem cell recipients. BK viremia correlates with the severity of the disease. Prospective studies are required to test prophylactic approaches. PMID:24488049

  7. Acute Kidney Injury and the Risk of Mortality in Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah J; Kashtan, Clifford E; Chavers, Blanche M; Cao, Qing; Smith, Angela R

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-documented complication of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Dialysis after HSCT is associated with a lower overall survival (OS); however, the association between less severe AKI and OS is unclear. We retrospectively studied 205 consecutive pediatric HSCT patients to determine the incidence and impact of all stages of AKI on OS in pediatric HSCT recipients. We used the peak pRIFLE grade during the first 100 days to classify AKI (ie, R = risk, I = injury, F = failure, L = loss of function, E = end-stage renal disease) and used the modified Schwartz formula to estimate glomerular filtration rate. AKI was observed in 173 of 205 patients (84%). The 1-year OS rate decreased significantly with an increasing severity of pRIFLE grades (P < .01). There was no difference in the OS between patients without AKI and the R/I group. Regardless of the dialysis status, stages F/L/E had significantly lower rates of OS compared with patients without AKI or R/I (P < .01). There was no difference in OS among patients with dialysis and F/L/E without dialysis (P = .65). Stages F/L/E predicted mortality independent of acute graft-versus-host disease, gender, and malignancy. The OS of children after HSCT decreases significantly with an increasing severity of AKI within the first 100 days post-transplant. Although our data did not show an increased risk of mortality with stages R/I, stages F/L/E predicted mortality regardless of dialysis. Prevention and minimization of AKI may improve survival after pediatric HSCT. PMID:27034153

  8. Study of Pulmonary Complications in Pediatric Patients With Storage Disorders Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    I Cell Disease; Fucosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Mannosidosis; Niemann-Pick Disease; Pulmonary Complications; Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Wolman Disease

  9. Glioblastoma Stem Cells Respond to Differentiation Cues but Fail to Undergo Commitment and Terminal Cell-Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Carén, Helena; Stricker, Stefan H.; Bulstrode, Harry; Gagrica, Sladjana; Johnstone, Ewan; Bartlett, Thomas E.; Feber, Andrew; Wilson, Gareth; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Bertone, Paul; Beck, Stephan; Pollard, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor whose growth is driven by stem cell-like cells. BMP signaling triggers cell-cycle exit and differentiation of GBM stem cells (GSCs) and, therefore, might have therapeutic value. However, the epigenetic mechanisms that accompany differentiation remain poorly defined. It is also unclear whether cell-cycle arrest is terminal. Here we find only a subset of GSC cultures exhibit astrocyte differentiation in response to BMP. Although overtly differentiated non-cycling astrocytes are generated, they remain vulnerable to cell-cycle re-entry and fail to appropriately reconfigure DNA methylation patterns. Chromatin accessibility mapping identified loci that failed to alter in response to BMP and these were enriched in SOX transcription factor-binding motifs. SOX transcription factors, therefore, may limit differentiation commitment. A similar propensity for cell-cycle re-entry and de-differentiation was observed in GSC-derived oligodendrocyte-like cells. These findings highlight significant obstacles to BMP-induced differentiation as therapy for GBM. PMID:26607953

  10. Collecting and Storing Tissue and DNA Samples From Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-04

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  11. Ravuconazole in Preventing Fungal Infections in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-07

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  12. Prevalence of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Bloodstream Infection in Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Fan, Xing; Tang, Wei; Hu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the causative bacteria and identify risk factors for BSI associated mortality in febrile neutropenia patients undergoing HSCT, we collected the clinical and microbiological data from patients underwent HSCT between 2008 and 2014 and performed a retrospective analysis. Throughout the study period, among 348 episodes of neutropenic fever in patients underwent HSCT, 89 episodes in 85 patients had microbiological defined BSI with a total of 108 isolates. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were the most common isolates (76, 70.3%) followed by gram-positive bacteria (GPB, 29, 26.9%) and fungus (3, 2.8%). As to the drug resistance, 26 multiple drug resistance (MDR) isolates were identified. Resistant isolates (n = 23) were more common documented in GNB, mostly Escherichia coli (9/36, 25%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6/24, 25%). A total of 12 isolated were resistant to carbapenem including 4 K pneumoniae (4/24, 16.7%), 3 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other 4 GNB isolates (Citrobacter freumdii, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Chryseobacterium indologenes). As to the GPB, only 3 resistant isolates were documented including 2 methicillin-resistant isolates (Staphylococcus hominis and Arcanobacterium hemolysis) and 1 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Among these 85 patients with documented BSI, 11 patients died of BSI as primary or associated cause with a BSI-related mortality of 13.1 ± 3.7% and 90-day overall survival after transplantation at 80.0 ± 4.3%. Patients with high-risk disease undergoing allo-HSCT, prolonged neutropenia (≥15 days) and infection with carbapenem-resistant GNB were associated with BSI associated mortality in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our report revealed a prevalence of GNB in BSI of neutropenic patients

  13. Ondansetron in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-26

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  14. Mechanical Stimulation in Preventing Bone Density Loss in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved

  15. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously

  16. Feasibility of an inpatient exercise intervention for children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Bogg, Tina Fung Ting; Broderick, Carolyn; Shaw, Peter; Cohn, Richard; Naumann, Fiona Leigh

    2015-12-01

    With improving survival rates following HSCT in children, QOL and management of short- and long-term effects need to be considered. Exercise may help mitigate fatigue and declines in fitness and strength. The aims of this study were to assess the feasibility of an inpatient exercise intervention for children undergoing HSCT and observe the changes in physical and psychological health. Fourteen patients were recruited, mean age 10 yr. A 6MWT, isometric upper and lower body strength, balance, fatigue, and QOL were assessed prior to Tx and six wk post-Tx. A supervised exercise program was offered five days per week during the inpatient period and feasibility assessed through uptake rate. The study had 100% program completion and 60% uptake rate of exercise sessions. The mean (± s.d.) weekly activity was 117.5 (± 79.3) minutes. Younger children performed significantly more minutes of exercise than adolescents. At reassessment, strength and fatigue were stabilized while aerobic fitness and balance decreased. QOL revealed a non-statistical trend towards improvement. No exercise-related adverse events were reported. A supervised inpatient exercise program is safe and feasible, with potential physiological and psychosocial benefits. PMID:26518227

  17. Favorable outcomes in elderly patients undergoing high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dahi, Parastoo B; Tamari, Roni; Devlin, Sean M; Maloy, Molly; Bhatt, Valkal; Scordo, Michael; Goldberg, Jenna; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Hamlin, Paul A; Matasar, Matthew J; Maragulia, Jocelyn; Giralt, Sergio A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Moskowitz, Craig H; Sauter, Craig S

    2014-12-01

    High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT-ASCT) can offer potential long-term remission or cure in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Limited experience is available on the safety and efficacy of HDT-ASCT in elderly patients. This is a single-center, retrospective study examining outcomes of HDT-ASCT for 202 NHL patients, ages 60 years and older, between January 2001 and December 2012. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed according to age at HDT-ASCT, hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI), NHL histology, and remission status at the time of HDT-ASCT. The median age was 65 years (range, 60 to 74) and the majority had either diffuse large B cell lymphoma (n = 73, 37%) or mantle cell lymphoma (n = 69, 34%). One hundred and fifteen patients (57%) had high HCT-CI scores at the time of HDT-ASCT. With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 4 to 11.9 years) for survivors, PFS and OS at 3 years were 60% (95% confidence interval [CI], 53% to 68%) and 73% (95% CI, 67% to 80%), respectively. Transplantation-related mortality (TRM) was 4% both at 100 days and at 1 year after HDT-ASCT. Age and HCT-CI score were not associated with OS or PFS, and high HCT-CI did not correlate with TRM. Seven patients (4%) developed secondary myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia at a median of 35 months (range, 6 to 48) after HDT-ASCT. In this single-center cohort of elderly patients with NHL undergoing HDT-ASCT, this intervention was proven tolerable and effective, with results similar to those of historic controls in younger patients. Our data suggest that age alone should not preclude HDT-ASCT in elderly patients. PMID:25175794

  18. Vancomycin Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT)

    PubMed Central

    Ghehi, Maryam Taghizadeh; Rezaee, Saeed; Hayatshahi, Alireza; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Gholami, Kheirollah; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Khoee, Seyed Hamid; Radfar, Mania; Esfandbod, Mohsen; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    Background Vancomycin is used abundantly in patients undergoing HSCT, especially during neutropenic fever. Despite its widespread use little is known about vancomycin pharmacokinetics in HSCT patients. We conducted this study to investigate vancomycin pharmacokinetic parameters in our HSCT patients and to evaluate current dosing regimen based on trough vancomycin concentrations measurement. Methods Vancomycin serum concentration at steady-state was determined prospectively in 46 adult HSCT patients who received vancomycin as empirical treatment of neutropenic fever. Individual steady-steady pharmacokinetic parameters were also determined in 20 patients who had two vancomycin levels from an administered dose, assuming one-compartment model. Acute kidney injury was also evaluated in our patients during vancomycin therapy. Results Mean (±SD) apparent volume of distribution (L/kg) and clearance (mL/min) were 0.6 (± 0.33) and 109.7 (± 57.5) respectively. With mean (±SD) total daily dose of vancomycin 31.9 (±10.5) mg/kg/day that was administered, more than 90% of measured vancomycin trough concentrations were outside the range of 15-20 mg/L and 54.3% of patients had trough concentrations below 10 mg/L. Of 46 patients, 21 patients (45.7%) developed acute kidney injury (AKI) during vancomycin therapy; among them 19 patients were receiving nephrotoxic drug(s) concomitantly. Conclusion Current vancomycin dosage regimen could not lead to recommended therapeutic serum concentrations in our patients. Large variation in vancomycin pharmacokinetic parameters observed among patients of this study along with difference of vancomycin pharmacokinetics in our study and other similar studies further explain the need for therapeutic drug monitoring and individualization of vancomycin dosing. PMID:24505536

  19. Etanercept in Treating Young Patients With Idiopathic Pneumonia Syndrome After Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pulmonary Complications; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Prospective randomised trial of amifostine cytoprotection in myeloma patients undergoing high-dose melphalan conditioned autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A; Horvath, N; Gibson, J; Prince, H M; Herrmann, R; Bashford, J; Joske, D; Grigg, A; McKendrick, J; Prosser, I; Lowenthal, R; Deveridge, S; Taylor, K

    2005-05-01

    In this prospective multicentre trial, 90 patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) were randomised to receive (n=43) or not receive (n=47) amifostine 910 mg/m(2) prior to melphalan 200 mg/m(2). Patients were monitored for regimen-related toxicity, engraftment, supportive care, response and survival. Both groups underwent ASCT at a median of 8 months from diagnosis and were matched for disease characteristics, prior therapy and pre-ASCT disease responsiveness. Amifostine infusional side-effects were frequent, occurring in 65% of patients, but of mild severity. Amifostine use was associated with a reduction in the median grade of oral mucositis (1 vs 2, P=0.01) and the frequency of severe (WHO grades 3 or 4) mucositis (12 vs 33%, P=0.02), but no reduction in the requirement for parenteral nutrition or analgesic use. Conversion to complete remission post-ASCT occurred in 30 and 14% of the amifostine and control groups, respectively (P=0.09). With a median follow-up of 35 months, there was no statistically significant difference between the median progression-free or overall survival times for the two groups. We conclude that amifostine can be safely administered prior to high-dose melphalan and significantly reduces the frequency and severity of therapy-induced oral mucositis. PMID:15778725

  1. β-d-Glucan Screening for Detection of Invasive Fungal Disease in Children Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koltze, Antonia; Rath, Peter; Schöning, Stefan; Steinmann, Jörg; Wichelhaus, Thomas A.; Bader, Peter; Bochennek, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    While the assessment of β-d-glucan (BDG) levels in adults improves the early diagnosis of invasive fungal disease (IFD), data on BDG levels in children are limited. We therefore assessed in a prospective cohort study the value of serial BDG screening for early detection of IFD in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). IFD was defined according to the revised European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria, with the necessary modification that BDG was not included as a microbiological criterion. For the analysis, a total of 702 serum samples were obtained in 34 pediatric HSCT recipients. Proven IFD occurred in two patients (fusariosis and Candida sepsis, respectively), and probable invasive aspergillosis was diagnosed in four patients. Analyses including different cutoff values for BDG levels and different definitions of the onset of IFD demonstrated that the BDG assay has a relatively high sensitivity and good negative predictive value, whereas the positive predictive value has major limitations (<30%). Receiver operating characteristic analyses suggested an optimal cutoff between 60 and 70 pg/ml for different definitions of the onset of IFD. Our data show that BDG screening in pediatric HSCT recipients has a low positive predictive value and is therefore of limited usefulness. PMID:26041896

  2. Adiponectin and resistin in acute and chronic graft-vs-host disease patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Robak, Oliver; Kuzmina, Zoya; Winkler, Andreas; Kalhs, Peter; Rabitsch, Werner; Greinix, Hildegard

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association of adiponectin and resistin levels in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with the clinical outcome, including the occurrence of acute and chronic graft-vs-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, and overall survival. Methods We prospectively collected serum samples from 40 patients undergoing either autologous (n = 12; 10 male) or allogeneic (n = 28; 11 male) HSCT for up to 12 months post HSCT and determined adiponectin and resistin serum concentrations using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results There were no significant differences in adiponectin levels (18.5 vs 9.3 µg/mL, P = 0.071) and adiponectin/BMI ratio (0.82 vs 0.39, P = 0.068) between patients with acute GVHD grades 2-4 and autologous controls. However, resistin values were significantly lower in patients with acute GVHD grades 2-4 than in autologous controls (4.6 vs 7.3 ng/mL, P = 0.030). Adiponectin levels were higher in patients with chronic GVHD (n = 17) than in autologous controls (13.5 vs 7.6 µg/mL, P = 0.051), but the difference was not significant. Adiponectin/BMI ratio was significantly higher in patients with chronic GVHD than in autologous controls (0.59 vs 0.25, P = 0.006). Patients dying from relapse also had significantly lower adiponectin levels (8.2 µg/mL) and adiponectin/BMI ratio (0.3) on admission than surviving allogeneic (15.8 µg/mL, P = 0.030 and 0.7, P = 0.004) and surviving autologous patients (19.2 µg/mL, P = 0.031 and 0.7, P = 0.021). Conclusion Adiponectin and resistin levels were altered in patients with acute and chronic GVHD compared to autologous controls and were associated with overall survival and relapse mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. PMID:27374827

  3. High-Dose Weekly AmBisome Antifungal Prophylaxis in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda; Vinks, Alexander; Filipovich, Alexandra; Vaughn, Gretchen; Fearing, Deborah; Sper, Christine; Davies, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated fungal infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The widespread use of prophylactic oral triazoles has limitations of poor absorption, interindividual variability in metabolism, and hepatic toxicity. AmBisome (amphotericin B liposomal complex) has a better safety profile than the parent drug amphotericin B and produces higher plasma and tissue concentrations. We hypothesized that once-weekly high-dose AmBisome therapy could provide adequate fungal prophylaxis for immunocompromised children undergoing HSCT. We performed a pharmacokinetic pilot study to determine whether once-weekly high-dose AmBisome administration would result in effective concentrations throughout the dosing interval. A total of 14 children (median age, 3 years, 1 month; range, 4.5 months–9 years, 9 months) undergoing HSCT received once-weekly intravenous AmBisome prophylaxis (10 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion). Blood samples for pharmacokinetic measurements were drawn around the first and the fourth weekly doses. The concentration of non–lipid-complexed amphotericin in plasma was determined by a validated bioassay. Pharmacokinetic parameters after single doses and during steady state were calculated using standard noncompartmental methods. AmBisome was well tolerated at this dose. Complete pharmacokinetic profiles for weeks 1 and 4 were obtained in 12 patients. The half-life calculated in this pediatric population was shorter on average than reported in adults (45 hours vs 152 hours). The volume of distribution correlated best with body weight (R2 = .55), and clearance was best predicted by initial serum creatinine level (R2 = .19). Mean (± standard deviation) individual plasma trough concentrations were 0.23 (0.13) mg/L after single doses and 0.47 (0.41) mg/L after multiple doses. Mean steady-state area under the curve was higher at week 4 than after a single dose (P < .05). Single-dose and steady

  4. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... stem cells blog from the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Learn About Stem Cells From Lab to You ...

  5. Higher plasma bilirubin predicts veno-occlusive disease in early childhood undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Suk; Moon, Aree; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Choi, Young Hee; Kim, Hyang Sook; Kim, Sang Geon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between plasma bilirubin levels and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) in non-adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) during cyclosporine therapy. METHODS: A total of 123 patients taking cyclosporine were evaluated using an electronic medical system at the Seoul National University Children’s Hospital from the years 2004 through 2011. Patients were grouped by age and analyzed for incidence and type of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including VOD. RESULTS: The HSCT patients were divided into three age groups: G#1 ≥ 18; 9 ≤ G#2 ≤ 17; and G#3 ≤ 8 years of age). The majority of transplant donor types were cord blood transplantations. Most prevalent ADRs represented acute graft-vs-host disease (aGVHD) and VOD. Although the incidences of aGVHD did not vary among the groups, the higher frequency ratios of VOD in G#3 suggested that an age of 8 or younger is a risk factor for developing VOD in HSCT patients. After cyclosporine therapy, the trough plasma concentrations of cyclosporine were lower in G#3 than in G#1, indicative of its increased clearance. Moreover, in G#3 only, a maximal total bilirubin level (BILmax) of ≥ 1.4 mg/dL correlated with VOD incidence after cyclosporine therapy. CONCLUSION: HSCT patients 8 years of age or younger are more at risk for developing VOD, diagnosed as hyperbilirubinemia, tender hepatomegaly, and ascites/weight gain after cyclosporine therapy, which may be represented by a criterion of plasma BILmax being ≥ 1.4 mg/dL, suggestive of more sensitive VOD indication in this age group. PMID:27358786

  6. The Prevalence of Antifungal Agents Administration in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kargar, Mona; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Milad; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Gholami, Kheirollah; Khoee, Seyed Hamid; Javadi, Mohammad Reza; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are chief infectious complications in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, the diagnosis of fungal infections is difficult, and often empiric treatment initiates. Since there is no data available on the prevalence of antifungal drugs administration in allogeneic HSCT recipients in Iran, we decided to conduct this study. Methods This study was a retrospective review of records of patients who received allogeneic HSCT in the Hematology-Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplantation center at Shariati Hospital in Tehran, between August 2009 and August 2010. Results Sixty (73.1%) patients consist of 41 men (68.3%) with mean age of 26.3 (± 1.2) years received allogeneic HSCT. Patients received prophylaxis with fulconazole however; in 28 patients (46.7%) it was switched to low dose amphotericin B. Fifteen patients (25%) received treatment with antifungal agents. Amphotericin B was the empiric agent administered. In 3 patients treatment was switched to voriconazole. Neither positive culture nor direct microscopic evidence was available from the obtained specimen. Only in one patient the result of serum galactomannan assay was positive. There were no significant differences in neutropenia duration (P value: 0.54), length of hospital stay (P value: 0.27) and number of patients developed graft versus host disease (P value: 0.07) between patients received antifungal agents with those who did not receive treatment. Conclusion In this study HSCT recipients received antifungal agents for prophylaxis. Twenty five percent of patients received treatment with antifungal agents empirically. Improvement in diagnosis of these infections can be helpful and lead to targeted therapy. We suggest larger prospective trials for better assessment of antifungal agent administration. PMID:24505528

  7. Participation in clinical research: perspectives of adult patients and parents of pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Keusch, Florian; Rao, Rohini; Chang, Lawrence; Lepkowski, James; Reddy, Pavan; Choi, Sung Won

    2014-10-01

    Despite major improvements over the past several decades, many patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT) continue to suffer from significant treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Clinical research studies (trials) have been integral to advancing the standard of care in HSCT. However, 1 of the biggest challenges with clinical trials is the low participation rate. Although barriers to participation in cancer clinical trials have been previously explored, studies specific to HSCT are lacking. The current study was undertaken to examine the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of HSCT patients regarding clinical trials. As members of focus groups, participants responded to open-ended questions that assessed factors influencing decision-making about HSCT clinical trials. Suggestions for improvements in the recruitment process were also solicited among participants. Seventeen adult HSCT patients and 6 parents of pediatric HSCT patients participated in the study. The median age was 56 years (range, 18 to 70) and 44 years (range, 28 to 54) for adult patients and parents, respectively. Participants universally indicated that too much information was provided within the informed consents and they were intimidated by the medical and legal language. Despite the large amount of information provided to them at the time of study enrollment, the participants had limited knowledge retention and recall of study details. Nevertheless, participants reported overall positive experiences with clinical trial participation and many would readily choose to participate again. A common concern among participants was the uncertainty of study outcome and general lack of feedback about results at the end of the study. Participants suggested that investigators provide more condensed and easier to understand informed consents and follow-up of study findings. These findings could be used to help guide the development of improved consent documents and enhanced

  8. Pretransplantation Minimal Residual Disease Predicts Survival in Patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Complete Remission.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Stevenson, Philip A; Cassaday, Ryan D; Graf, Solomon A; Fromm, Jonathan R; Wu, David; Holmberg, Leona A; Till, Brian G; Chauncey, Thomas R; Smith, Stephen D; Philip, Mary; Orozco, Johnnie J; Shustov, Andrei R; Green, Damian J; Libby, Edward N; Bensinger, William I; Shadman, Mazyar; Maloney, David G; Press, Oliver W; Gopal, Ajay K

    2016-02-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is standard therapy for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in remission after induction chemotherapy, with the best results for patients in complete remission (CR). We hypothesized that evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) before ASCT could further stratify outcomes for these patients. Patients with MCL who underwent ASCT in clinical CR between 1996 and 2011 with pretransplantation MRD testing were eligible. Presence of a clonal IgH rearrangement, t(11; 14) by PCR or positive flow cytometry from blood or bone marrow, was considered positive. An adjusted proportional hazards model for associations with progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was performed. Of 75 MCL patients in CR, 8 (11%) were MRD positive. MRD positivity was associated with shorter OS and PFS. The median OS for MRD-negative patients was not reached, with 82% survival at 5 years, whereas for the MRD-positive patients, median OS was 3.01 years (hazard ratio [HR], 4.04; P = .009), with a median follow-up of 5.1 years. The median PFS for MRD-negative patients was not reached with 75% PFS at 5 years, whereas for MRD-positive patients, it was 2.38 years (HR, 3.69; P = .002). MRD positivity is independently associated with poor outcomes after ASCT for MCL patients in CR. PMID:26348890

  9. Single-cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4 undergo the stochastic cardiomyogenic fate and behave like transient amplifying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoji; Sakurada, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Yukiji; Gojo, Satoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro . E-mail: umezawa@1985.jukuin.keio.ac.jp

    2007-02-15

    Bone marrow-derived stromal cells can give rise to cardiomyocytes as well as adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. The existence of mesenchymal stem cells has been proposed, but it remains unclear if a single-cell-derived stem cell stochastically commits toward a cardiac lineage. By single-cell marking, we performed a follow-up study of individual cells during the differentiation of 9-15c mesenchymal stromal cells derived from bone marrow cells. Three types of cells, i.e., cardiac myoblasts, cardiac progenitors and multipotent stem cells were differentiated from a single cell, implying that cardiomyocytes are generated stochastically from a single-cell-derived stem cell. We also demonstrated that overexpression of Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4, precardiac mesodermal transcription factors, enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of 9-15c cells, and the frequency of cardiomyogenic differentiation was increased by co-culturing with fetal cardiomyocytes. Single-cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Csx/Nkx2.5 and GATA4 behaved like cardiac transient amplifying cells, and still retained their plasticity in vivo.

  10. Infusing CD19-Directed T Cells to Augment Disease Control in Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Advanced B-Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Jena, Bipulendu; Munsell, Mark; Jackson, Rineka; Lee, Dean A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Limited curative treatment options exist for patients with advanced B-lymphoid malignancies, and new therapeutic approaches are needed to augment the efficacy of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Cellular therapies, such as adoptive transfer of T cells that are being evaluated to target malignant disease, use mechanisms independent of chemo- and radiotherapy with nonoverlapping toxicities. Gene therapy is employed to generate tumor-specific T cells, as specificity can be redirected through enforced expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to achieve antigen recognition based on the specificity of a monoclonal antibody. By combining cell and gene therapies, we have opened a new Phase I protocol at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) to examine the safety and feasibility of administering autologous genetically modified T cells expressing a CD19-specific CAR (capable of signaling through chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ) into patients with high-risk B-lymphoid malignancies undergoing autologous HSCT. The T cells are genetically modified by nonviral gene transfer of the Sleeping Beauty system and CAR+ T cells selectively propagated in a CAR-dependent manner on designer artificial antigen-presenting cells. The results of this study will lay the foundation for future protocols including CAR+ T-cell infusions derived from allogeneic sources. PMID:22107246

  11. Mouse embryonic stem cells undergo Charontosis, a novel programmed cell death pathway dependent upon cathepsins, p53, and EndoG, in response to etoposide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Elisia D.; Stephan, Zachary A.; Osterburg, Andrew; Noel, Greg; Stambrook, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are hypersensitive to many DNA damaging agents and can rapidly undergo cell death or cell differentiation following exposure. Treatment of mouse ESCs (mESCs) with etoposide (ETO), a topoisomerase II poison, followed by a recovery period resulted in massive cell death with characteristics of a programmed cell death pathway (PCD). While cell death was both caspase- and necroptosis-independent, it was partially dependent on the activity of lysosomal proteases. A role for autophagy in the cell death process was eliminated, suggesting that ETO induces a novel PCD pathway in mESCs. Inhibition of p53 either as a transcription factor by pifithrin α or in its mitochondrial role by pifithrin μ significantly reduced ESC death levels. Finally, EndoG was newly identified as a protease participating in the DNA fragmentation observed during ETO-induced PCD. We coined the term Charontosis after Charon, the ferryman of the dead in Greek mythology, to refer to the PCD signaling events induced by ETO in mESCs. PMID:23500643

  12. Mouse embryonic stem cells undergo charontosis, a novel programmed cell death pathway dependent upon cathepsins, p53, and EndoG, in response to etoposide treatment.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Elisia D; Stephan, Zachary A; Osterburg, Andrew; Noel, Greg; Stambrook, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are hypersensitive to many DNA damaging agents and can rapidly undergo cell death or cell differentiation following exposure. Treatment of mouse ESCs (mESCs) with etoposide (ETO), a topoisomerase II poison, followed by a recovery period resulted in massive cell death with characteristics of a programmed cell death pathway (PCD). While cell death was both caspase- and necroptosis-independent, it was partially dependent on the activity of lysosomal proteases. A role for autophagy in the cell death process was eliminated, suggesting that ETO induces a novel PCD pathway in mESCs. Inhibition of p53 either as a transcription factor by pifithrin α or in its mitochondrial role by pifithrin μ significantly reduced ESC death levels. Finally, EndoG was newly identified as a protease participating in the DNA fragmentation observed during ETO-induced PCD. We coined the term charontosis after Charon, the ferryman of the dead in Greek mythology, to refer to the PCD signaling events induced by ETO in mESCs. PMID:23500643

  13. Lenograstim reduces the incidence of febrile episodes, when compared with filgrastim, in multiple myeloma patients undergoing stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Orciuolo, Enrico; Buda, Gabriele; Marturano, Emerenziana; Mauro, Elisa; Milone, Giuseppe; Cangialosi, Clotilde; Di Renzo, Nicola; Pastore, Domenico; Specchia, Giorgina; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Mazza, Patrizio; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Petrini, Mario

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to show a lower incidence of febrile episodes in multiple myeloma patients receiving lenograstim vs. filgrastim after high-dose cyclophosphamide for stem cell mobilization. Patients treated with cyclophosphamide were randomly assigned to receive filgrastim or lenograstim. Primary endpoint was the incidence of febrile episodes. 5.1% patients developed a febrile episode, 9.1% with filgrastim and 1.1% with lenograstim. Lenograstim group presented a significantly higher absolute CD34+ cell number compared with the filgrastim group but no differences were detected for collection efficacy. The study demonstrated a lower incidence of febrile episodes with lenograstim compared to filgrastim. PMID:21134693

  14. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. T Cells in Predicting Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-22

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  16. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... stem cells? What are the potential uses of human stem cells and the obstacles that must be overcome before ... two kinds of stem cells from animals and humans: embryonic stem cells and non-embryonic "somatic" or "adult" stem cells . ...

  17. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... ISSCR Get Involved Media © 2015 International Society for Stem Cell Research Terms of Use Disclaimer Privacy Policy

  18. Which Patients Should Undergo Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and When Should We Do It?

    PubMed

    Oran, Betul

    2015-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) can cure a proportion of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, treatment related toxicities, graft versus host disease, infectious complications and relapse remain major problems post transplant. Further, recent new developments with innovative drugs including hypomethylating agents (HMA) have extended the therapeutic alternatives for our patients. Nevertheless, with the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning and thereby reducing early mortality, transplant numbers in MDS patients have significantly increased recently. In the absence of prospective randomized trials emphasis should be put on patient selection and optimization of the pre- and post-transplant treatment in order to achieve long-term disease control and at the same time maintain an adequate quality of life. With better understanding of disease biology and prognosis and with different types of conditioning regimens as well as different graft sources, a transplant strategy should be tailored to the individual host to maximize the benefits of this procedure. PMID:26297277

  19. Extracorporeal Photopheresis for the Prevention of Acute GVHD in Patients Undergoing Standard Myeloablative Conditioning and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shaughnessy, Paul J; Bolwell, Brian J; van Besien, Koen; Mistrik, Martin; Grigg, Andrew; Dodds, Anthony; Prince, H Miles; Durrant, Simon; Ilhan, Osman; Parenti, Dennis; Rogers, Jon; Gallo, Jose; Foss, Francine; Apperley, Jane; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Horowitz, Mary M; Abhyankar, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Summary Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is partly mediated by host antigen presenting cells (APCs) that activate donor T-cells. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) can modulate APC function and benefit some patients with GVHD. We report the results of a study using ECP administered prior to a standard myeloablative preparative regimen intended to prevent GVHD. Grade II-IV aGVHD developed in 9 (30%) of 30 recipients of HLA-matched related transplants and 13 (42%) of 31 recipients of HLA-matched unrelated or HLA-mismatched related donor transplants. Actuarial estimates of overall survival (OS) at day 100 and 1 year post transplant were 89% (95% CI, 78%-94%) and 77% (95% CI, 64%-86%), respectively. There were no unexpected adverse effects of ECP. Historical controls receiving similar conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens but no ECP were identified from the database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and multivariate analysis indicated a lower risk of grade II-IV aGVHD in patients receiving ECP (p=0.04). Adjusted OS at one year was 83% in the ECP study group and 67% in the historical control group (relative risk 0.44, 95% CI, 0.24-0.80) (p= 0.007). These preliminary data may indicate a potential survival advantage with ECP for transplant recipients undergoing standard myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:19915634

  20. Adipose-derived stem cells undergo spontaneous osteogenic differentiation in vitro when passaged serially or seeded at low density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, C; Deng, W; Lv, Q; Chen, X; Huang, T; Pan, L

    2016-07-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are a convenient source of cells for regenerating tissue. Widespread application of ADSCs requires that they propagate efficiently and differentiate in vitro. We investigated the differentiation potential of ADSCs during long-term expansion in vitro and when the cells were seeded at low density. ADSCs were isolated from the inguinal fat pads of 3-week-old male rats, then cultured serially for 12 passages; some ADSCs at passage 3 were seeded at low density. The differentiation potential of ADSCs from passage 3 to passage 12 was assessed by their capacity for adipogenesis and osteogenesis while cultured in specific induction media. Spontaneous osteogenesis of ADSCs at passage 12 and of ADSCs that were seeded at low density was detected by western blotting, alizarin red S staining and measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. We found that with increasing passage number, the adipogenic potential of ADSCs decreased and osteogenic differentiation increased. Alizarin red S staining, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expressions, and ALP activity demonstrated that both ADSCs at passage 12 and those that were seeded at low density differentiated into osteoblasts without additional induction factors. PMID:27149413

  1. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  2. The Role of Social and Cognitive Processes in the Relationship between Fear Network and Psychological Distress among Parents of Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Sands, Stephen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Gajda, Tina Marie

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined whether cognitive and social processing variables mediated the relationship between fear network and depression among parents of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Parents whose children were initiating HSCT (N = 179) completed survey measures including fear network, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), cognitive processing variables (positive reappraisal and self-blame) and social processing variables (emotional support and holding back from sharing concerns). Fear network was positively correlated with depression (p < .001). Self-blame and holding back emerged as individual partial mediators in the relationship between fear network and depression. Together they accounted for 34.3% of the variance in the relationship between fear network and depression. Positive reappraisal and emotional support did not have significant mediating effects. Social and cognitive processes, specifically self-blame and holding back from sharing concerns, play a negative role in parents’ psychological adaptation to fears surrounding a child’s HSCT. PMID:25081956

  3. Efficacy of Oral Cryotherapy on Oral Mucositis Prevention in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ruiren; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wei, Huaping; Pang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM) in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use, and length of hospital stay. Results Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99) and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25). In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively). However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively). Conclusions Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT. PMID:26024220

  4. Prognostic impact of pre-transplantation transfusion history and secondary iron overload in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a GITMO study

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Angelucci, Emanuele; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Falda, Michele; Onida, Francesco; Bernardi, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Pascutto, Cristiana; Oneto, Rosi; Pirolini, Laura; Fanin, Renato; Bosi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion-dependency affects the natural history of myelodysplastic syndromes. Secondary iron overload may concur to this effect. The relative impact of these factors on the outcome of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome receiving allogeneic stem-cell transplantation remains to be clarified. Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic effect of transfusion history and iron overload on the post-transplantation outcome of 357 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome reported to the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO) registry between 1997 and 2007. Results Transfusion-dependency was independently associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio=1.48, P=0.017) and increased non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio=1.68, P=0.024). The impact of transfusion-dependency was noted only in patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (overall survival: hazard ratio=1.76, P=0.003; non-relapse mortality: hazard ratio=1.70, P=0.02). There was an inverse relationship between transfusion burden and overall survival after transplantation (P=0.022); the outcome was significantly worse in subjects receiving more than 20 red cell units. In multivariate analysis, transfusion-dependency was found to be a risk factor for acute graft-versus-host disease (P=0.04). Among transfusion-dependent patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, pre-transplantation serum ferritin level had a significant effect on overall survival (P=0.01) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.03). This effect was maintained after adjusting for transfusion burden and duration, suggesting that the negative effect of transfusion history on outcome might be determined at least in part by iron overload. Conclusions Pre-transplantation transfusion history and serum ferritin have significant prognostic value in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, inducing a significant increase of non

  5. Beneficial effect of the CXCL12-3'A variant for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mizia, Sylwia; Polak, Małgorzata; Gronkowska, Anna; Nowak, Jacek; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Markiewicz, Mirosław; Dzierżak-Mietła, Monika; Koclęga, Anna; Sędzimirska, Mariola; Suchnicki, Krzysztof; Duda, Dorota; Lange, Janusz; Mordak-Domagała, Monika; Kościńska, Katarzyna; Jędrzejczak, Wiesław Wiktor; Kaczmarek, Beata; Hellmann, Andrzej; Kucharska, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Drabko, Katarzyna; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Hałaburda, Kazimierz; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Mika-Witkowska, Renata; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Goździk, Jolanta; Mordel, Anna; Wysoczańska, Barbara; Jaskula, Emilia; Lange, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to assess the impact of the CXCL12 gene polymorphism (rs1801157) on clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donors. Toxic complications were less frequent among patients transplanted from donors carrying the CXCL12-3'-A allele (42/79 vs. 105/151, p=0.014 and 24/79 vs. 73/151, p=0.009, for grade II-IV and III-IV, respectively). Logistic regression analyses confirmed a role of donor A allele (OR=0.509, p=0.022 and OR=0.473, p=0.013 for grade II-IV and III-IV toxicity). In addition, age of recipients (OR=0.980, p=0.036 and OR=0.981, p=0.040, respectively) was independently protective while female to male transplantation and HLA compatibility were not significant. The incidence of aGvHD (grades I-IV) was lower in patients having A allele (52/119 vs. 113/204, p=0.043) and AA homozygous genotype (6/25 vs. 159/298, p=0.005). Independent associations of both genetic markers with a decreased risk of aGvHD were also seen in multivariate analyses (A allele: OR=0.591, p=0.030; AA homozygosity: OR=0.257, p=0.006) in which HLA compatibility seemed to play less protective role (p<0.1) while recipient age and donor-recipient gender relation were not significant. Moreover, CXCL12-3'-A-positive patients were less prone to early HHV-6 reactivation (2/34 vs. 19/69, p=0.026). The presence of the CXCL12-3'-A variant was found to facilitate outcome of unrelated HSCT. PMID:25982843

  6. Prospective validation of a novel dosing scheme for intravenous busulfan in adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Heon; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Young; Choe, Sangmin; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to externally validate a new dosing scheme for busulfan. Thirty-seven adult patients who received busulfan as conditioning therapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) participated in this prospective study. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous busulfan, either as the conventional dosage (3.2 mg/kg daily) or according to the new dosing scheme based on their actual body weight (ABW) (23×ABW0.5 mg daily) targeting an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of 5924 µM·min. Pharmacokinetic profiles were collected using a limited sampling strategy by randomly selecting 2 time points at 3.5, 5, 6, 7 or 22 hours after starting busulfan administration. Using an established population pharmacokinetic model with NONMEM software, busulfan concentrations at the available blood sampling times were predicted from dosage history and demographic data. The predicted and measured concentrations were compared by a visual predictive check (VPC). Maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimators were estimated to calculate the predicted AUC (AUCPRED). The accuracy and precision of the AUCPRED values were assessed by calculating the mean prediction error (MPE) and root mean squared prediction error (RMSE), and compared with the target AUC of 5924 µM·min. VPC showed that most data fell within the 95% prediction interval. MPE and RMSE of AUCPRED were -5.8% and 20.6%, respectively, in the conventional dosing group and −2.1% and 14.0%, respectively, in the new dosing scheme group. These fi ndings demonstrated the validity of a new dosing scheme for daily intravenous busulfan used as conditioning therapy for HCT. PMID:27162478

  7. Pre- and Post-Transplantation Risk Factors for Delirium Onset and Severity in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fann, Jesse R.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Roth-Roemer, Sari; Katon, Wayne J.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine pre- and post-transplantation risk factors for delirium onset and severity during the acute phase of myeloablative hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients and Methods Ninety adult patients with malignancies admitted to the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center for their first HSCT were assessed prospectively from 1 week before transplantation to 30 days after transplantation. Delirium was assessed three times per week using the Delirium Rating Scale and the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale. Potential risk factors were assessed by patient self-report, charts, and computerized records. Multivariable analysis of time to onset of a delirium episode was undertaken using Cox proportional hazards regression with time-varying covariates. Analysis for delirium severity was carried out using a linear mixed effects model. Validation and sensitivity analyses were performed on the final models. Results Forty-five patients (50%) experienced a delirium episode. Pretransplantation risk factors for onset and higher severity of delirium were higher mean alkaline phosphatase and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. Poorer pretransplantation executive functioning was also associated with higher delirium severity. Higher doses of opioid medications were the only post-transplantation risk factor for delirium onset (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.08). Higher opioid doses, current and prior pain, and higher BUN levels were post-transplantation risk factors for greater delirium severity (all P < .01). Conclusion Pre- and post-transplantation factors can assist in identifying patients who are at risk for delirium during myeloablative HSCT and may enable clinical interventions to prevent delirium onset or decrease delirium symptoms. PMID:21263081

  8. Immunological characteristics and T-cell receptor clonal diversity in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiong; Pesenacker, Anne M; Stansfield, Alka; King, Douglas; Barge, Dawn; Foster, Helen E; Abinun, Mario; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2014-01-01

    Children with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA), the most severe subtype of JIA, are at risk from destructive polyarthritis and growth failure, and corticosteroids as part of conventional treatment can result in osteoporosis and growth delay. In children where there is failure or toxicity from drug therapies, disease has been successfully controlled by T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). At present, the immunological basis underlying remission after ASCT is unknown. Immune reconstitution of T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, natural killer T cells and monocytes, in parallel with T-cell receptor (TCR) diversity by analysis of the β variable region (TCRVb) complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3) using spectratyping and sequencing, were studied in five children with sJIA before and after ASCT. At time of follow up (mean 11·5 years), four patients remain in complete remission, while one child relapsed within 1 month of transplant. The CD8+ TCRVb repertoire was highly oligoclonal early in immune reconstitution and re-emergence of pre-transplant TCRVb CDR3 dominant peaks was observed after transplant in certain TCRVb families. Further, re-emergence of pre-ASCT clonal sequences in addition to new sequences was identified after transplant. These results suggest that a chimeric TCR repertoire, comprising T-cell clones developed before and after transplant, can be associated with clinical remission from severe arthritis. PMID:24405357

  9. Immunological characteristics and T-cell receptor clonal diversity in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Pesenacker, Anne M; Stansfield, Alka; King, Douglas; Barge, Dawn; Foster, Helen E; Abinun, Mario; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2014-06-01

    Children with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA), the most severe subtype of JIA, are at risk from destructive polyarthritis and growth failure, and corticosteroids as part of conventional treatment can result in osteoporosis and growth delay. In children where there is failure or toxicity from drug therapies, disease has been successfully controlled by T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). At present, the immunological basis underlying remission after ASCT is unknown. Immune reconstitution of T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, natural killer T cells and monocytes, in parallel with T-cell receptor (TCR) diversity by analysis of the β variable region (TCRVb) complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3) using spectratyping and sequencing, were studied in five children with sJIA before and after ASCT. At time of follow up (mean 11.5 years), four patients remain in complete remission, while one child relapsed within 1 month of transplant. The CD8(+) TCRVb repertoire was highly oligoclonal early in immune reconstitution and re-emergence of pre-transplant TCRVb CDR3 dominant peaks was observed after transplant in certain TCRVb families. Further, re-emergence of pre-ASCT clonal sequences in addition to new sequences was identified after transplant. These results suggest that a chimeric TCR repertoire, comprising T-cell clones developed before and after transplant, can be associated with clinical remission from severe arthritis. PMID:24405357

  10. End-of-life experience of children undergoing stem cell transplantation for malignancy: parent and provider perspectives and patterns of care.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Christina K; Dussel, Veronica; Hilden, Joanne M; Sheaffer, Jan W; Lehmann, Leslie; Wolfe, Joanne

    2010-05-13

    The end-of-life (EOL) experience of children who undergo stem cell transplantation (SCT) may differ from that of other children with cancer. To evaluate perspectives and patterns of EOL care after SCT, we surveyed 141 parents of children who died of cancer (response rate, 64%) and their physicians. Chart review provided additional information. Children for whom SCT was the last cancer therapy (n = 31) were compared with those for whom it was not (n = 110). SCT parents and physicians recognized no realistic chance for cure later than non-SCT peers (both P < .001) and were more likely to have a primary goal of cure at death (parents, P < .001; physicians, P = .02). SCT children were more likely to suffer highly from their last cancer therapy and die in the intensive care unit (both P < .001), with less opportunity for EOL preparation. SCT parents who recognized no realistic chance for cure more than 7 days before death along with the physician were more likely to prepare for EOL, and if their primary goal was to reduce suffering, to achieve this (P < .001). SCT is associated with significant suffering and less opportunity to prepare for EOL. Children and families undergoing SCT may benefit from ongoing discussions regarding prognosis, goals, and opportunities to maximize quality of life. PMID:20228275

  11. Challenging complications of treatment – human herpes virus 6 encephalitis and pneumonitis in a patient undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation for relapsed Hodgkin's disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bommer, Martin; Pauls, Sandra; Greiner, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    Background Reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) occurs frequently in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and is associated with bone-marrow suppression, enteritis, pneumonitis, pericarditis and also encephalitis. After autologous stem cell transplantation or intensive polychemotherapy HHV-6 reactivation is rarely reported. Case report This case demonstrates a severe symptomatic HHV-6 infection with encephalitis and pneumonitis after autologous stem cell transplantation of a patient with relapsed Hodgkin's disease. Conclusion Careful diagnostic work up in patients with severe complications after autologous stem cell transplantation is mandatory to identify uncommon infections. PMID:19619326

  12. Stem cell glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    Glycolipids are compounds containing one or more monosaccharide residues bound by a glycosidic linkage to a hydrophobic moiety. Because of their expression patterns and the intracellular localization patterns, glycolipids, including stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEA-3, SSEA-4, and possibly SSEA-1) and gangliosides (e.g., GD3, GD2, and A2B5 antigens), have been used as marker molecules of stem cells. In this review, I will introduce glycolipids expressed in pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic-like stem cells, amniotic stem cells, and multilineage-differentiating stress enduring cells), multipotent stem cells (neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fetal liver multipotent progenitor cells, and hematopoietic stem cells), and cancer stem cells (brain cancer stem cells and breast cancer stem cells), and discuss their availability as biomarkers for identifying and isolating stem cells. PMID:21161592

  13. Palifermin in Preventing Oral Mucositis Caused by Chemotherapy and/or Radiation Therapy in Young Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-30

    Breast Cancer; Graft Versus Host Disease; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Mucositis; Multiple Myeloma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  14. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-18

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  15. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  16. Graft-Versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-18

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Rituximab in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III

  18. Comparison of Three Distinct Prophylactic Agents Against Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients Undergoing Haplo-identical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Post-transplant Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Vai, Andrea; Furst, Sabine; Bramanti, Stefania; Sarina, Barbara; Granata, Angela; Faucher, Catherine; Mohty, Bilal; Harbi, Samia; Bouabdallah, Reda; Vey, Norbert; Santoro, Armando; Chabannon, Christian; Castagna, Luca; Blaise, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have remained an important problem in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT). The optimal approach for prophylactic antifungal therapy has yet to bedetermined. We conducted a retrospective analysis, comparing the safety and efficacy of micafungin 50mg/day vs. fluconazole 400mg/day vs. itraconazole 200mg/day as prophylaxis for adult patients with various haematological diseases receiving haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) followed by high-dose cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy). Overall, 99 patients were identified: 30 patients received micafungin, 50 and 19 patients received itraconazole and fluconazole, respectively. After a median follow-up of 12 months (range: 1–51), proven or probable IFIs were reported in 3 patients (10%) in the micafungin, 5 patients in the itraconazole (10%) and 2 patients (11%) in the fluconazole group (p=0.998). Fewer patients in the micafungin group had invasive aspergillosis (1 [3%] vs. 3 [6%] in the itraconazole vs. 2 [11%] in the fluconazole group, p=0.589). Four patients (13%) in the micafungin group vs 13 (26%) patients in the itraconazole group and 10 (53%) patients in the fluconazole received empirical antifungal therapy (P = 0.19). No serious adverse events related to treatment were reported by patients, and there was no treatment discontinuation because of drug-related adverse events in both groups. The present analysis shows that micafungin did better than fluconazole in preventing invasive aspergillosis after transplant in these high-risk hematological diseases, as expected. In addition, micafungin was more effective than itraconazole in preventing all IFI episodes when also considering possible fungal infections. Future prospective studies would shed light on this issue, concerning this increasingly used transplant platform. PMID:26401237

  19. Prevalence of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Bloodstream Infection in Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single Center Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Fan, Xing; Tang, Wei; Hu, Jiong

    2015-11-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the causative bacteria and identify risk factors for BSI associated mortality in febrile neutropenia patients undergoing HSCT, we collected the clinical and microbiological data from patients underwent HSCT between 2008 and 2014 and performed a retrospective analysis. Throughout the study period, among 348 episodes of neutropenic fever in patients underwent HSCT, 89 episodes in 85 patients had microbiological defined BSI with a total of 108 isolates. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were the most common isolates (76, 70.3%) followed by gram-positive bacteria (GPB, 29, 26.9%) and fungus (3, 2.8%). As to the drug resistance, 26 multiple drug resistance (MDR) isolates were identified. Resistant isolates (n = 23) were more common documented in GNB, mostly Escherichia coli (9/36, 25%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6/24, 25%). A total of 12 isolated were resistant to carbapenem including 4 K pneumoniae (4/24, 16.7%), 3 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other 4 GNB isolates (Citrobacter freumdii, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Chryseobacterium indologenes). As to the GPB, only 3 resistant isolates were documented including 2 methicillin-resistant isolates (Staphylococcus hominis and Arcanobacterium hemolysis) and 1 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Among these 85 patients with documented BSI, 11 patients died of BSI as primary or associated cause with a BSI-related mortality of 13.1 ± 3.7% and 90-day overall survival after transplantation at 80.0 ± 4.3%. Patients with high-risk disease undergoing allo-HSCT, prolonged neutropenia (≥15 days) and infection with carbapenem-resistant GNB were associated with BSI associated mortality in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our report revealed a prevalence of GNB in BSI of neutropenic patients undergoing

  20. Elevation of plasma prolactin in patients undergoing autologous blood stem-cell transplantation for breast cancer: is its modulation a step toward posttransplant immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Hinterberger-Fischer, M; Ogris, E; Kier, P; Bauer, K; Kittl, E; Habertheuer, K H; Ruckser, R; Schmid, A; Selleny, S; Fangl, M; Sebesta, C; Hinterberger, W

    2000-08-01

    Prolactin is a suspected promotor of breast cancer cell growth, and it shares pleiotropic immunoregulatory properties. We studied plasma prolactin and its drug-induced modulation in 20 women with breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous blood stem-cell transplantation. Plasma prolactin levels were serially assayed before and during conditioning and within and beyond 30 days after transplant. Before transplant, prolactin plasma levels were in the age-adjusted range of normal women. During conditioning and within 30 days after transplant, prolactin levels increased in all patients (p < 0.0001), but remained in the normal range. Antiemetic drugs such as metoclopramide and phenothiazines, known to enhance pituitary prolactin secretion, further elevated prolactin plasma levels (p < 0.00001). Patients remaining in continuous complete remission after transplant (median follow-up, 3 years) disclosed higher prolactin levels compared with those obtaining only partial remission or ensuing early relapse. Prolactin levels are regularly elevated during conditioning and within 30 days after autologous transplantation for breast cancer. Further elevations of prolactin plasma levels are induced by metoclopramide and other antiemetic drugs. Elevated plasma prolactin had no adverse effect on disease-free survival after transplant. We propose to investigate further the upregulation of prolactin after transplant aiming to induce a posttransplant consolidative immune reaction. PMID:10955855

  1. [Prophylaxis against respiratory viral disease in pediatric and adult patients undergoing solid organ and hematopoietic stem cells transplantation].

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Ana M; Catalán, Paula; Alba, Andrea; Zubleta, Marcela

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory viruses have been identified as a cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing SOT and HSCT, specially in children. The most frequent are respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza (FLU), parainfluenza (PI) and adenovirus (ADV). These infections are associated with progression to severe lower respiratory tract infections in up to 60% of the cases. It is advised to apply universal protection recommendations for respiratory viruses (A2) and some specific measures for FLU and AD. FLU: Annual anti-influenza vaccination (from 4-6 months post-transplantation in SOT, 6 months in HSCT (A2)); post- exposure prophylaxis in FLU (oseltamivir for 10 days (B2)). In lung transplantion, the prophylaxis should last as long as the risk period (B2). ADV: There is no vaccine nor valid chemoprophylaxis strategy to prevent ADV disease. In some specific HSCT recipients, weekly PCR monitoring is recommended until day+100 (A3). PMID:23282554

  2. Antimycotic therapy with liposomal amphotericin-B for patients undergoing bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Stockschläder, M; Sobottka, I; Betker, R; De Wit, M; Kröger, N; Grimm, J; Arland, M; Fiedler, W; Erttmann, R; Zander, A R

    1997-02-01

    Suspected deep or systemic mycosis in patients undergoing high-dose therapy and autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) requires an immediate systemic antimycotic therapy. Intravenous therapy with the standard drug conventional amphotericin-B is associated with severe adverse effects like nephrotoxicity and chills. Furthermore, BMT patients often receive other potential nephrotoxic drugs such as CsA or virustatics. In this study, we report 74 BMT-patients treated with liposomal amphotericin-B for culture-documented aspergillosis (n = 5) or candidiasis (n = 6), or for serologically (n = 35) or clinically suspected mycosis or as prophylaxis (n = 2). Therapy was initiated with a median dose of 2.8 (0.64-5.09) mg/kg body-weight and continued for 13 (1-55) days. The drug was excellently tolerated and only in one was therapy stopped due to severe chills and fever. Severe organ impairment was not observed under therapy with liposomal amphotericin-B. Creatinine decreased in five patients after an increase under preceding therapy with the conventional formulation. Influence of liposomal amphotericin-B on bilirubin and transaminases was difficult to evaluate due to therapy-related toxicity, veno-occlusive disease (VOD), and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). 10/11 culture-positive patients died from aspergillosis (5/5) or candidiasis (5/6), but in 9/11 of these subjects the immunity was additionally compromised by GvHD, steroid therapy, and VOD. Liposomal amphotericin-B was effective in preventing relapse of systemic mycosis in 10/12 patients with a history of aspergillosis (n = 11) or candidiasis (n = 1). We conclude, that favourable toxicity of liposomal amphotericin-B should encourage dose escalation studies of liposomal amphotericin-B randomised against the conventional formulation and that the comparison of patients undergoing BMT with patients under standard chemotherapy might be difficult because of additional risk factors of the BMT-patients. PMID

  3. The Prospective Collection, Storage and Reporting of Data on Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Utilizing a Standard Preparative Regimen

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Germ Cell Neoplasms; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Immunodeficiency Diseases

  4. The Effects of Oral Cryotherapy on Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation of Blood Stem Cells: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Askarifar, Marzieh; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ramzi, Mani; Rahmani, Azad; Jabbarzadeh, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral mucositis is one of the irritating side effects of chemotherapy in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. However, up until now, the common methods of oral mucositis therapy have failed to show significant effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of local cryotherapy on the intensity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in autologous bone marrow transplantation patients. Patients and Methods In this single, blinded, randomized clinical trial, 29 patients undergoing stem cell transplantation in Iran were selected by convenience sampling, and randomly allocated to control (n = 13) and intervention groups (n = 16). In the intervention group, cryotherapy was applied, while the control group received a normal saline mouthwash. The severity of the mucositis and neutrophil rate were investigated in five periods, based on the world health organization (WHO) scales. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression. Results In both groups, the mucositis reached its peak intensity on the 7th day, and the least intensity was obtained on the 21st day. The neutrophil rate reached the minimum value on the 7th day, then increased up to the 21st day. The two groups showed no significant differences between the mucositis severity on the 14th and 21st days (P = 0.164), while the severity of the mucositis in the cryotherapy group was significantly less than that in the saline mouthwash group (1.81 < 2.54 and 0.13 < 0.92, respectively) on the 7th and 14th days (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the neutrophil rate between the groups. Conclusions The results showed that cryotherapy is more effective than the saline mouthwash in reducing the severity of mucositis. This method is recommended for the prevention of mucositis in bone marrow transplantation. PMID:27257512

  5. Vaccine Therapy in Reducing the Frequency of Cytomegalovirus Events in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Cytomegaloviral Infection; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

  6. Hepatitis B virus reactivation and efficacy of prophylaxis with lamivudine in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Giaccone, Luisa; Festuccia, Moreno; Marengo, Andrea; Resta, Isabel; Sorasio, Roberto; Pittaluga, Fabrizia; Fiore, Francesca; Boccadoro, Mario; Rizzetto, Mario; Bruno, Benedetto; Marzano, Alfredo

    2010-06-01

    Patients previously infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) undergoing an allograft and recipients from HBV carrier donors are at risk of posttransplant viral reactivation. The role of prophylaxis with lamivudine remains unclear. One hundred seventeen patients, with a median age of 52 years (20-67 years), with various hematologic malignancies transplanted between 1999 and 2007 entered the study. Eighty-seven recipients negative for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), antihepatitis B core antigen antibodies (anti-HBc), and HBV-DNA with HBsAg and HBV-DNA negative donors were defined as at low risk of HBV reactivation, whereas all the remaining 30 patients were defined as at high risk. Patients at high risk transplanted in 2005 or after received lamivudine to prevent HBV reactivation as per the Italian guidelines by the Associazione Italiana per lo Studio del Fegato (AISF). Patients at low risk did not experience HBV reactivation/hepatitis. Among the recipients at high risk, 11 of 25 anti-HBc positive, those HBsAg positive (2 of 2) or negative but transplanted from HBsAg positive donors (3 of 3) were treated with lamivudine. None of these developed HBV reactivation/hepatitis after a median follow-up of 40 months (17-55 months). Hepatitis developed in 3 anti-HBc positive untreated patients conditioned with a reduced-intensity regimen. Hepatitis B was not observed in recipients at low risk, transplanted from HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive or negative donors. Lamivudine was effective in controlling reactivation in: HBsAg positive recipients, in patients transplanted from HBsAg positive donors and in HBsAg negative/antiHBc positive recipients, who showed a significant risk of reactivation if not given prophylaxis (NCT 00876148). PMID:20060484

  7. Supersaturated Calcium Phosphate Rinse in Preventing Oral Mucositis in Young Patients Undergoing Autologous or Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mucositis; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. A Simplified Method for the Aspiration of Bone Marrow from Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Joint Replacement for Isolating Mesenchymal Stem Cells and In Vitro Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Subhash C.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Ganguly, Milan; Veillette, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The procedure for aspiration of bone marrow from the femur of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) may vary from an OR (operating room) to OR based on the surgeon's skill and may lead to varied extent of clotting of the marrow and this, in turn, presents difficulty in the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from such clotted bone marrow. We present a simple detailed protocol for aspirating bone marrow from such patients, isolation, and characterization of MSCs from the aspirated bone marrow specimens and show that the bone marrow presented no clotting or exhibited minimal clotting. This represents an economical source and convenient source of MSCs from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine. Also, we presented the detailed protocol and showed that the MSCs derived from such bone marrow specimens exhibited MSCs characteristics and generated micromass cartilages, the recipe for regenerative medicine for osteoarthritis. The protocols we presented can be used as standard operating procedures (SOPs) by researchers and clinicians. PMID:27057356

  9. A Simplified Method for the Aspiration of Bone Marrow from Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Joint Replacement for Isolating Mesenchymal Stem Cells and In Vitro Chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Subhash C; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Ganguly, Milan; Veillette, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The procedure for aspiration of bone marrow from the femur of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) may vary from an OR (operating room) to OR based on the surgeon's skill and may lead to varied extent of clotting of the marrow and this, in turn, presents difficulty in the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from such clotted bone marrow. We present a simple detailed protocol for aspirating bone marrow from such patients, isolation, and characterization of MSCs from the aspirated bone marrow specimens and show that the bone marrow presented no clotting or exhibited minimal clotting. This represents an economical source and convenient source of MSCs from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine. Also, we presented the detailed protocol and showed that the MSCs derived from such bone marrow specimens exhibited MSCs characteristics and generated micromass cartilages, the recipe for regenerative medicine for osteoarthritis. The protocols we presented can be used as standard operating procedures (SOPs) by researchers and clinicians. PMID:27057356

  10. Psychological Distress and Psychiatric Diagnoses among Primary Caregivers of Children undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: An Examination of Prevalence, Correlates, and Racial/Ethnic Differences

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon L.; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Sands, Stephen; Gajda, Tina Marie; Darabos, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to examine the prevalence of self-reported psychological distress, examine the prevalence of interview-rated psychiatric diagnoses, identify correlates of psychological distress and psychiatric diagnosis, and examine racial/ethnic group differences on measures of psychological distress among primary caregivers of children preparing to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Methods Caregivers (N = 215) completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Impact of Events Scale (IES), and a psychiatric interview assessing major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and panic disorder (PD). Regression analyses examined correlates of distress and psychiatric diagnosis. Comparisons were made between racial/ethnic groups. Results Posttraumatic stress symptoms were reported by 54% of caregivers during the time preparing for the child’s HSCT. Twenty-seven percent of caregivers met diagnostic criteria for at least one of the psychiatric diagnoses during this time. Few factors were associated with distress or psychiatric diagnosis, except the child scheduled for allogeneic transplant, being married, and prior psychological/psychiatric care. Socio-demographic factors accounted for racial/ethnic group differences, except Hispanic/Latino caregivers reported higher BDI scores than non-Hispanic White caregivers. Conclusion Caregivers may be at greater risk of posttraumatic stress symptoms than anxiety or depression. Prior psychological/psychiatric treatment is a risk factor for greater psychological distress and psychiatric diagnosis during this time. Racial differences are mostly due to socio-demographic factors. PMID:25246347

  11. Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells do not undergo transformation after long-term in vitro culture and do not exhibit telomere maintenance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Novara, Francesca; Cometa, Angela Maria; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Moretta, Antonia; Montagna, Daniela; Maccario, Rita; Villa, Raffaella; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Locatelli, Franco

    2007-10-01

    Significant improvement in the understanding of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) biology has opened the way to their clinical use. However, concerns regarding the possibility that MSCs undergo malignant transformation have been raised. We investigated the susceptibility to transformation of human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs at different in vitro culture time points. MSCs were isolated from BM of 10 healthy donors and propagated in vitro until reaching either senescence or passage (P) 25. MSCs in the senescence phase were closely monitored for 8 to 12 weeks before interrupting the cultures. The genetic characterization of MSCs was investigated through array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), conventional karyotyping, and subtelomeric fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis both before and after prolonged culture. MSCs were tested for the expression of telomerase activity, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) transcripts, and alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) mechanism at different passages. A huge variability in terms of proliferative capacity and MSCs life span was noted between donors. In eight of 10 donors, MSCs displayed a progressive decrease in proliferative capacity until reaching senescence. In the remaining two MSC samples, the cultures were interrupted at P25 to pursue data analysis. Array-CGH and cytogenetic analyses showed that MSCs expanded in vitro did not show chromosomal abnormalities. Telomerase activity and hTERT transcripts were not expressed in any of the examined cultures and telomeres shortened during the culture period. ALT was not evidenced in the MSCs tested. BM-derived MSCs can be safely expanded in vitro and are not susceptible to malignant transformation, thus rendering these cells suitable for cell therapy approaches. PMID:17909019

  12. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells Produce Concordant Improvements in Regional Function, Tissue Perfusion and Fibrotic Burden when Administered to Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting – The PROMETHEUS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Karantalis, Vasileios; DiFede, Darcy L.; Gerstenblith, Gary; Pham, Si; Symes, James; Zambrano, Juan Pablo; Fishman, Joel; Pattany, Pradip; McNiece, Ian; Conte, John; Schulman, Steven; Wu, Katherine; Shah, Ashish; Breton, Elayne; Davis-Sproul, Janice; Schwarz, Richard; Feigenbaum, Gary; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Suncion, Viky Y.; Lardo, Albert C.; Borrello, Ivan; Mendizabal, Adam; Karas, Tomer Z.; Byrnes, John; Lowery, Maureen; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale While accumulating data support the efficacy of intramyocardial cell-based therapy to improve LV function in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy undergoing CABG, the underlying mechanism and impact of cell injection site remain controversial.Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) improve LV structure and function through several effects including: reducing fibrosis, neoangiogenesis and neomyogenesis. Objective To test the hypothesis that the impact on cardiac structure and function following intramyocardial injections of autologous MSCs results from a concordance of pro-recovery phenotypic effects. Methods and Results Six patients were injected with autologous MSCs into akinetic/hypokinetic myocardial territories not receiving bypass graft for clinical reasons. MRI was used to measure scar, perfusion, wall thickness and contractility at baseline, 3, 6 and 18 months and to compare structural and functional recovery in regions that received MSC injections alone, revascularization alone, or neither. A composite score of MRI variables was used to assess concordance of antifibrotic effects, perfusion, and contraction at different regions. After 18 months, subjects receiving MSCs exhibited increased LVEF (+9.4±1.7%, p=0.0002) and decreased scar mass (-47.5±8.1%; p<0.0001) compared to baseline. MSC-injected segments had concordant reduction in scar size, perfusion and contractile improvement (concordant score: 2.93±0.07), whereas revascularized (0.5±0.21) and non-treated segments (-0.07±0.34) demonstrated non-concordant changes (p<0.0001 vs. injected segments). Conclusions Intramyocardial injection of autologous MSCs into akinetic yet non-revascularized segments produces comprehensive regional functional restitution, which in turn drives improvement in global LV function. These findings, although inconclusive due to lack of placebo group, have important therapeutic and mechanistic hypothesis-generating implications. PMID:24565698

  13. Wilms Tumor 1 Expression and Pre-emptive Immunotherapy in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing an Allogeneic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Di Grazia, Carmen; Pozzi, Sarah; Geroldi, Simona; Grasso, Raffaella; Miglino, Maurizio; Colombo, Nicoletta; Tedone, Elisabetta; Luchetti, Silvia; Lamparelli, Teresa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ibatici, Adalberto; Bregante, Stefania; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Raiola, Anna Maria; Dominietto, Alida; Varaldo, Riccardo; Galaverna, Federica; Ghiso, Anna; Sica, Simona; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) was monitored by Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) expression in 207 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as a trigger to initiate pre-emptive immunotherapy (IT) with cyclosporin discontinuation and/or donor lymphocyte infusion. The trigger for IT was WT1 ≥ 180 copies/10(4) Abelson cells in marrow cells in the first group of 122 patients (WT1-180) and ≥ 100 copies in a subsequent group of 85 patients (WT1-100). Forty patients received IT. The cumulative incidence (CI) of relapse was 76% in WT1-180 (n = 17) versus 29% in WT1-100 patients (n = 23) receiving IT (P = .006); the leukemia-free survival from MRD positivity was 23% versus 74%, respectively (P = .003). We then looked at the entire AML patient population (n = 207). WT1-180 and WT1-100 patients were comparable for disease phase and age. The overall 4-year CI of transplantation-related mortality was 13% in both groups; the CI of leukemia relapse was 38% in the WT1-180 and 28% in the WT1-100 patients (P = .05) and leukemia-free survival was 56% versus 48%, respectively (P = .07). In conclusion, we suggests that WT1-based pre-emptive immunotherapy is feasible in patients with undergoing an allogeneic HSCT. The protective effect on relapse is greater when IT is triggered at lower levels of WT1. PMID:26970379

  14. Unrelated donors are associated with improved relapse-free survival compared to related donors in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yam, Clinton; Crisalli, Lisa; Luger, Selina M; Loren, Alison W; Hexner, Elizabeth O; Frey, Noelle V; Mangan, James K; Gao, Amy; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Porter, David L; Reshef, Ran

    2016-09-01

    Reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RI alloSCT) is a potentially curative treatment approach for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It is currently unclear if older related donors are better than younger unrelated donors for patients with MDS undergoing RI alloSCT. We retrospectively studied 53 consecutive MDS patients who underwent RI alloSCT between April 2007 and June 2014 and evaluated associations between donor type and outcomes with adjustment for significant covariates. 34 patients (median age: 64 years) and 19 patients (median age: 60 years) received allografts from unrelated and related donors, respectively. Unrelated donors were younger than related donors (median age: 32 vs. 60 years, P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences in baseline disease characteristics of patients receiving allografts from related or unrelated donors. Patients who received allografts from unrelated donors had a lower relapse risk (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 0.35, P = 0.012) and improved relapse-free survival (aHR = 0.47, P = 0.018). HLA mismatched unrelated donors were associated with a higher risk of grade 2-4 acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) (HR = 4.64, P = 0.002) without an accompanying increase in the risk of non-relapse mortality (P = 0.56). Unrelated donors provided a higher mean CD8 cell dose (P = 0.014) and were associated with higher median donor T cell chimerism at day 60 (P = 0.003) and day 100 (P = 0.03). In conclusion, patients with MDS who received allografts from unrelated donors had a lower risk of relapse and improved relapse-free survival when compared to patients who received allografts from related donors. These findings should be confirmed in a prospective study. Am. J. Hematol. 91:883-887, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27197602

  15. Stem cells supporting other stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Leatherman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cell therapies are increasingly prevalent for the treatment of damaged or diseased tissues, but most of the improvements observed to date are attributed to the ability of stem cells to produce paracrine factors that have a trophic effect on existing tissue cells, improving their functional capacity. It is now clear that this ability to produce trophic factors is a normal and necessary function for some stem cell populations. In vivo adult stem cells are thought to self-renew due to local signals from the microenvironment where they live, the niche. Several niches have now been identified which harbor multiple stem cell populations. In three of these niches – the Drosophila testis, the bulge of the mammalian hair follicle, and the mammalian bone marrow – one type of stem cell has been found to produce factors that contribute to the maintenance of a second stem cell population in the shared niche. In this review, I will examine the architecture of these three niches and discuss the molecular signals involved. Together, these examples establish a new paradigm for stem cell behavior, that stem cells can promote the maintenance of other stem cells. PMID:24348512

  16. Stem cell biobanks.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Silvana

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells contribute to innate healing and harbor a promising role for regenerative medicine. Stem cell banking through long-term storage of different stem cell platforms represents a fundamental source to preserve original features of stem cells for patient-specific clinical applications. Stem cell research and clinical translation constitute fundamental and indivisible modules catalyzed through biobanking activity, generating a return of investment. PMID:20560026

  17. Daily Weight-Based Busulfan with Cyclophosphamide and Etoposide Produces Comparable Outcomes to Four-Times-Daily Busulfan Dosing for Lymphoma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brian T; Rybicki, Lisa; Carlstrom, Kelley D; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Gerds, Aaron; Hamilton, Betty; Liu, Hien; Dean, Robert; Sobecks, Ronald; Pohlman, Brad; Andresen, Steven; Kalaycio, Matt; Bolwell, Brian J; Majhail, Navneet S

    2016-09-01

    High-dose busulfan (Bu) is an integral component of commonly used preparative regimens for both allogeneic and autologous transplantation. There is significant interest in comparing the efficacy and toxicity of administering Bu every 6 (Bu6) or every 24 hours (daily Bu). To facilitate a therapeutic dose-monitoring protocol, we transitioned from Bu6 to daily Bu dosing for patients with Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Here, we retrospectively review outcomes of 400 consecutive eligible lymphoma patients who underwent ASCT from 2007 to 2013 with high-dose busulfan (Bu), cyclophosphamide (Cy), and etoposide (E). Bu was given at a fixed dose of either .8 mg/kg every 6 hours for 14 doses for 307 patients or a fixed dose of 2.8 mg/kg every 24 hours for 4 doses (days -9 through -6) for 93 patients who underwent transplantation after the transition from Bu6 to daily Bu was made. Toxicity was assessed using pulmonary and liver function tests (LFT) at specified time points before and after ASCT. Baseline patient and disease characteristics of patients dosed with Bu6 and daily Bu were similar. There was no significant difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second or diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide before and after transplantation in the Bu6 versus daily Bu cohorts. Changes in LFTs with daily Bu were not significantly different than those with Bu6. There were no differences in relapse, nonrelapse mortality, progression-free survival, or overall survival between Bu6 and Bu 24 administration schedules in univariable or multivariable analysis (P ≥ .34). For a subset of 23 patients who had first-dose Bu levels measured, we observed significant variation in an median estimated cumulative area under the curve (AUC) of 17,568 µM-minute (range, 12,104 µM-23,084 µM-minute). In conclusion, daily Bu with Cy/E is more convenient than Bu6, has equivalent outcomes, and results in no increase

  18. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells undergo enhanced chondrogenic differentiation when grown on nanofibrous scaffolds and in a sequential two-stage culture medium environment.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Subramanian, Arjunan; Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Venugopal, Jayarama; Biswas, Arijit; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Bongso, Ariff

    2012-03-01

    The current treatments used for osteoarthritis from cartilage damage have their disadvantages of donor site morbidity, complicated surgical interventions and risks of infection and graft rejection. Recent advances in tissue engineering have offered much promise in cartilage repair but the best cell source and in vitro system have not as yet been optimised. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) have thus far been the cell of choice. However, we derived a unique stem cell from the human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (hWJSC) that has properties superior to hBMSCs in terms of ready availability, prolonged stemness characteristics in vitro, high proliferation rates, wide multipotency, non-tumorigenicity and tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. We observed enhanced cell attachment, cell proliferation and chondrogenesis of hWJSCs over hBMSCs when grown on PCL/Collagen nanoscaffolds in the presence of a two-stage sequential complex/chondrogenic medium for 21 days. Improvement of these three parameters were confirmed via inverted optics, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), MTT assay, pellet diameters, Alcian blue histology and staining, glycosaminglycans (GAG) and hyaluronic acid production and expression of key chondrogenic genes (SOX9, Collagen type II, COMP, FMOD) using immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In separate experiments we demonstrated that the 16 ng/ml of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) present in the complex medium may have contributed to driving chondrogenesis. We conclude that hWJSCs are an attractive stem cell source for inducing chondrogenesis in vitro when grown on nanoscaffolds and exposed sequentially first to complex medium and then followed by chondrogenic medium. PMID:21671058

  19. The Effect of Bone Marrow Plasma Cell Burden on Survival in Patients with Light Chain Amyloidosis Undergoing High-Dose Melphalan and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dittus, Christopher; Uwumugambi, Nsabimana; Sun, Fangui; Sloan, J Mark; Sanchorawala, Vaishali

    2016-09-01

    The prognosis in light chain (AL) amyloidosis has been linked to several variables, which are primarily related to end-organ damage. Recently, bone marrow plasma cell (BMPC) burden >10% has also been described as an adverse prognostic factor. We reviewed data pertaining to 546 patients with AL amyloidosis who underwent high-dose melphalan (HDM) and stem cell transplantation (SCT) to determine if BMPC > 10% was a negative prognostic factor. Of these patients, 445 had a BMPC burden ≤ 10% and 101 had a BMPC burden > 10%. Patients with BMPC > 30% were excluded from the study. The median overall survival (OS) was 7.86 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.69 to 9.83) in patients with BMPC ≤ 10% and 6.8 years (95% CI, 5.75 to 10.17) for those with BMPC >10% (hazard ratio, 1.106; 95% CI, .78 to 1.45; P = .70) after HDM/SCT. Of the 101 patients with a BMPC burden > 10%, 25 received induction therapy. The median OS was 7.78 years (95% CI, 5.4 to 13.4) for those without induction therapy and 5.75 years (95% CI, 3.94 to not available; P = .28) for those with induction therapy. Furthermore, hematologic response and relapse rates did not differ in these 2 groups after HDM/SCT. We conclude that BMPC > 10% and < 30% is not a poor prognostic factor with respect to survival in patients with AL amyloidosis treated with HDM/SCT and that induction therapy in this group does not impact OS. PMID:27296954

  20. The evaluation of NT-proCNP, C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein concentration in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tomasiuk, Ryszard; Gawroński, Krzysztof; Rzepecki, Piotr; Rabijewski, Michał; Cacko, Marek

    2016-08-01

    The importance of proinflamatory cytokines and acute phase proteins in pathogenesis and progression of MM is well known. However, there are any studies evaluating the role of NT-proCN in management and treatment of MM. The aim of our study was to evaluate the concentration of NT-proCNP and acute phase proteins in patients with MM before and after stem cell transplantation. We involved 40 newly diagnosed MM patients in stage III according to the Durie-Salmon classification and treated with high dose of melphalan (200mg/m2) prior to ASCT. Concentration of NT-proCNP, hs-CRP and SAA were measured before conditioning treatment and every 4days until the 24th day after stem cell infusion. We observed low NT-proCNP levels before conditioning treatment (0.121±0.04pmol/l), the higher in day on ASCT (0.28±0.14pmol/l). Further we showed significant gradual increase concentration of NT-proCNP up to 12days after stem cells infusion (1.07±0.72pmol/l). The kinetics of hs-CRP and SAA levels were similar to NT-proCNP. We showed positive correlation between NT-proCNP levels and absolute neutrophil and platelets count in patients after ASCT. NT-proCNP can be useful parameter to assess effectiveness of treatment and monitoring of hematopoetic recovery time in patients with MM after stem cell transplantations. PMID:27322507

  1. Immunomodulatory Effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-Based Mushroom Extract AndoSan in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing High Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized, Double Blinded Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021. PMID:25664323

  2. Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan; Kolaja, Kyle; Petersen, Thomas; Weber, Klaus; McVean, Maralee; Funk, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have great potential in basic research and are being slowly integrated into toxicological research. This symposium provided an overview of the state of the field, stem cell models, described allogenic stem cell treatments and issues of immunogenicity associated with protein therapeutics, and tehn concentrated on stem cell uses in regenerative medicine focusing on lung and testing strategies on engineered tissues from a pathologist's perspective. PMID:25899720

  3. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a hESC ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of NINDS ...

  4. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis. PMID:22404469

  5. Toward 'SMART' stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T

    2008-01-01

    Stem cell research is at the heart of regenerative medicine, which holds great promise for the treatment of many devastating disorders. However, in addition to hurdles posed by well-publicized ethical issues, this emerging field presents many biological challenges. What is a stem cell? How are embryonic stem cells different from adult stem cells? What are the physiological bases for therapeutically acceptable stem cells? In this editorial review, I will briefly discuss these superficially simple but actually rather complex issues that surround this fascinating cell type. The goal of this special issue on stem cells in Gene Therapy is to review some fundamental and critical aspects of current stem cell research that have translational potential. PMID:18046429

  6. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... based therapies Cell culture Cell division Chromosome Clone Cloning Cord blood stem cells Culture medium Differentiation Directed ... Pluripotent Polar body Preimplantation Proliferation Regenerative medicine Reproductive cloning Signals Somatic cell Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) ...

  7. Risk assessment of relapse by lineage-specific monitoring of chimerism in children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Preuner, Sandra; Peters, Christina; Pötschger, Ulrike; Daxberger, Helga; Fritsch, Gerhard; Geyeregger, Rene; Schrauder, André; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Bader, Peter; Ebell, Wolfram; Eckert, Cornelia; Lang, Peter; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Schrum, Johanna; Kremens, Bernhard; Ehlert, Karoline; Albert, Michael H.; Meisel, Roland; Lawitschka, Anita; Mann, Georg; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Güngör, Tayfun; Holter, Wolfgang; Strahm, Brigitte; Gruhn, Bernd; Schulz, Ansgar; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Lion, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is required as rescue therapy in about 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the relapse rates are considerable, and relapse confers a poor outcome. Early assessment of the risk of relapse is therefore of paramount importance for the development of appropriate measures. We used the EuroChimerism approach to investigate the potential impact of lineage-specific chimerism testing for relapse-risk analysis in 162 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a multicenter study based on standardized transplantation protocols. Within a median observation time of 4.5 years, relapses have occurred in 41/162 patients at a median of 0.6 years after transplantation (range, 0.13–5.7 years). Prospective screening at defined consecutive time points revealed that reappearance of recipient-derived cells within the CD34+ and CD8+ cell subsets display the most significant association with the occurrence of relapses with hazard ratios of 5.2 (P=0.003) and 2.8 (P=0.008), respectively. The appearance of recipient cells after a period of pure donor chimerism in the CD34+ and CD8+ leukocyte subsets revealed dynamics indicative of a significantly elevated risk of relapse or imminent disease recurrence. Assessment of chimerism within these lineages can therefore provide complementary information for further diagnostic and, potentially, therapeutic purposes aiming at the prevention of overt relapse. This study was registered at clinical.trials.gov with the number NC01423747. PMID:26869631

  8. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness, and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh's plane. PMID:20803548

  9. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  10. Pituitary stem cells: candidates and implications.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Farshad; Cusimano, Michael; Zuccato, Jeff A; Mohammed, Safraz; Rotondo, Fabio; Horvath, Eva; Syro, Luis V; Kovacs, Kalman; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2013-09-01

    The pituitary is the master endocrine gland of the body. It undergoes many changes after birth, and these changes may be mediated by the differentiation of pituitary stem cells. Stem cells in any tissue source must display (1) pluripotent capacity, (2) capacity for indefinite self-renewal, and (3) a lack of specialization. Unlike neural stem cells identified in the hippocampus and subventricular zone, pituitary stem cells are not associated with one specific cell type. There are many major candidates that are thought to be potential pituitary stem cell sources. This article reviews the evidence for each of the major cell types and discuss the implications of identifying a definitive pituitary stem cell type. PMID:23423660

  11. Stress and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23799624

  12. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  13. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  14. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin attenuates capacity of hematopoietic stem cells to undergo lymphocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S; Tate, Everett R; Lakatos, Peter A; Wang, Xuexia; Laiosa, Michael D

    2014-06-01

    The process of hematopoiesis, characterized by long-term self-renewal and multi-potent lineage differentiation, has been shown to be regulated in part by the ligand-activated transcription factor known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ubiquitous contaminant and the most potent AHR agonist, also modulates regulation of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) homeostasis. However, the effect of developmental TCDD exposure on early life hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. Given the inhibitory effects of TCDD on hematopoiesis and lymphocyte development, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to TCDD would alter the functional capacity of fetal HSC/HPCs to complete lymphocyte differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we employed a co-culture system designed to facilitate the maturation of progenitor cells to either B or T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we utilized an innovative limiting dilution assay to precisely quantify differences in lymphocyte differentiation between HSC/HPCs obtained from fetuses of dams exposed to 3μg/kg TCDD or control. We found that the AHR is transcribed in yolk sac hematopoietic cells and is transcriptionally active as early as gestational day (GD) 7.5. Furthermore, the number of HSC/HPCs present in the fetal liver on GD 14.5 was significantly increased in fetuses whose mothers were exposed to TCDD throughout pregnancy. Despite this increase in HSC/HPC cell number, B and T lymphocyte differentiation is decreased by approximately 2.5 fold. These findings demonstrate that inappropriate developmental AHR activation in HSC/HPCs adversely impacts lymphocyte differentiation and may have consequences for lymphocyte development in the bone marrow and thymus later in life. PMID:24709672

  15. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin attenuates capacity of hematopoietic stem cells to undergo lymphocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Wang, Xuexia; Laiosa, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    The process of hematopoiesis, characterized by long-term self-renewal and multi-potent lineage differentiation, has been shown to be regulated in part by the ligand-activated transcription factor known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ubiquitous contaminant and the most potent AHR agonist, also modulates regulation of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) homeostasis. However, the effect of developmental TCDD exposure on early life hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. Given the inhibitory effects of TCDD on hematopoiesis and lymphocyte development, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to TCDD would alter the functional capacity of fetal HSC/HPCs to complete lymphocyte differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we employed a co-culture system designed to facilitate the maturation of progenitor cells to either B or T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we utilized an innovative limiting dilution assay to precisely quantify differences in lymphocyte differentiation between HSC/HPCs obtained from fetuses of dams exposed to 3 μg/kg TCDD or control. We found that the AHR is transcribed in yolk sac hematopoietic cells and is transcriptionally active as early as gestational day (GD) 7.5. Furthermore, the number of HSC/HPCs present in the fetal liver on GD 14.5 was significantly increased in fetuses whose mothers were exposed to TCDD throughout pregnancy. Despite this increase in HSC/HPC cell number, B and T lymphocyte differentiation is decreased by approximately 2.5 fold. These findings demonstrate that inappropriate developmental AHR activation in HSC/HPCs adversely impacts lymphocyte differentiation and may have consequences for lymphocyte development in the bone marrow and thymus later in life.

  16. Developmental Exposure to 2,3,7,8 Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Attenuates Capacity of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Undergo Lymphocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Wang, Xuexia; Laiosa, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The process of hematopoiesis, characterized by long-term self-renewal and multi-potent lineage differentiation, has been shown to be regulated in part by the ligand-activated transcription factor known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ubiquitous contaminant and the most potent AHR agonist, also modulates regulation of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) homeostasis. However, the effect of developmental TCDD exposure on early life hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. Given the inhibitory effects of TCDD on hematopoiesis and lymphocyte development, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to TCDD would alter the functional capacity of fetal HSC/HPCs to complete lymphocyte differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we employed a co-culture system designed to facilitate the maturation of progenitor cells to either B or T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we utilized an innovative limiting dilution assay to precisely quantify differences in lymphocyte differentiation between HSC/HPCs obtained from fetuses of dams exposed to 3μg/kg TCDD or control. We found that the AHR is transcribed in yolk sac hematopoietic cells and is transcriptionally active as early as gestational day (GD) 7.5. Furthermore, the number of HSC/HPCs present in the fetal liver on GD 14.5 was significantly increased in fetuses whose mothers were exposed to TCDD throughout pregnancy. Despite this increase in HSC/HPC cell number, B and T lymphocyte differentiation is decreased by approximately 2.5 fold. These findings demonstrate that inappropriate developmental AHR activation in HSC/HPCs adversely impacts lymphocyte differentiation and may have consequences for lymphocyte development in the bone marrow and thymus later in life. PMID:24709672

  17. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  18. The leukemic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Craig T.

    2007-01-01

    Malignant stem cells have recently been described as the source of several types of human cancer. These unique cell types are typically rare and possess properties that are distinct from most other tumor cells. The properties of leukemic stem cells indicate that current chemotherapy drugs will not be effective. The use of current cytotoxic agents is not effective in leukemia because the agents target both the leukemic and normal stem cell populations. Consequently, new strategies are required that specifically and preferentially target the malignant stem cell population, while sparing normal stem cells. Several well known agents are lethal for the leukemic stem cell in preclinical testing. They include parthenolide, commonly known as feverfew, and TDZD-8. They have undergone various levels of preclinical development, but have not been used in patients as yet in the cancer setting. These drugs and combinations of existing therapies that target the leukemic stem cell population may provide a cure in this disease. This article summarizes recent findings in the leukemic stem cell field and discusses new directions for therapy. PMID:17336250

  19. Stem Cell Separation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Beili; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and translational stem cell research require large-scale supply of stem cells at high purity and viability, thus leading to the development of stem cell separation technologies. This review covers key technologies being applied to stem cell separation, and also highlights exciting new approaches in this field. First, we will cover conventional separation methods that are commercially available and have been widely adapted. These methods include Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), Magnet-activated cell sorting (MACS), pre-plating, conditioned expansion media, density gradient centrifugation, field flow fractionation (FFF), and dielectrophoresis (DEP). Next, we will introduce emerging novel methods that are currently under development. These methods include improved aqueous two-phase system, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), and various types of microfluidic platforms. Finally, we will discuss the challenges and directions towards future breakthroughs for stem cell isolation. Advancing stem cell separation techniques will be essential for clinical and research applications of stem cells. PMID:23505616

  20. The role of positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose integrated with computed tomography in the evaluation of patients with multiple myeloma undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patriarca, Francesca; Carobolante, Francesca; Zamagni, Elena; Montefusco, Vittorio; Bruno, Benedetto; Englaro, Emanuaela; Nanni, Cristina; Geatti, Onelio; Isola, Miriam; Sperotto, Alessandra; Buttignol, Silvia; Stocchi, Raffaella; Corradini, Paolo; Cavo, Michele; Fanin, Renato

    2015-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) integrated with computed tomography (PET/CT) has been reported to be useful for screening myelomatous lesions at diagnosis in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and for monitoring response to autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT). The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of PET/CT in MM patients who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Patients who underwent upfront auto-SCT followed by allo-SCT, either as consolidation or salvage treatment, were studied with PET/CT before and/or within 6 months after allo-SCT. The number, the maximum standard uptake value (SUV), and the location (medullary or extramedullary) of focal lesions (FLs) were recorded and investigated as predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) by univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-four patients had a PET/CT scan before allo-SCT. Of these, 22 patients (41%) had a negative PET/CT scan, 11 patients (20%) showed 1 to 3 FLs, and 21 patients (39%) had either a diffuse bone marrow involvement or more than 3 FLs. SUV was >4.2 in 21 patients (39%) and extramedullary disease (EMD) was present in 6 patients (11%). Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors before allo-SCT showed that persistence of EMD at transplantation was an independent predictor of poor PFS, whereas OS was negatively influenced by unrelated donor and SUV > 4.2. Fifty-nine patients had a PET/CT scan within 6 months after allo-SCT. Multivariate analysis of post-treatment variables showed that persistence of EMD and failure to obtain complete response or very good partial response after allo-SCT were strongly associated with shorter PFS and OS. Of the 46 patients with evaluable PET/CT scans both before and 6 months after allo-SCT, the 23 patients who maintained or reached a PET complete remission showed a significantly prolonged PFS and OS compared with the 23 patients with persistence of any PET positivity (2-year

  1. Gametogenesis from Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Mitinori; Miyauchi, Hidetaka

    2016-06-01

    The germ cell lineage originates early in development and undergoes a series of complex developmental processes that culminate in the generation of fully matured gametes, the spermatozoa and the oocytes. Remarkably, researchers have been recapitulating these developmental pathways using mouse and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). With further studies, including those involving non-human primate models, human gametogenesis may be fully reconstituted from PSCs, which would profoundly facilitate our understanding of human germ cell development and infertility. Here we discuss groundbreaking studies that lay the foundation for this achievement, the current state of the field, and challenges for deriving gametes from hPSCs. PMID:27257761

  2. Stem cells in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today. PMID:24770506

  3. [Successful treatment of an overwhelming infection with granulocyte transfusion in severe aplastic anemia patient undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kazuma, Yasuhiro; Ono, Yuichiro; Yonetani, Noboru; Imai, Yukihiro; Kawakami, Manabu; Hashimoto, Hisako; Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    A 19-year-old woman complaining of fever and a sore throat was diagnosed with very severe aplastic anemia (AA) by bone marrow examination at a local hospital. Despite administration of antibiotics and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to treat the soft tissue infection in her neck, her neutrophil count showed no increase. Because emergent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) was necessary, she was referred to our hospital. On admission, computed tomography revealed right-sided severe pharyngitis and lymphadenitis causing tracheal stenosis, and emergent intubation was required the next day. Granulocyte transfusion therapy (GTX) from related donors coupled with broad-spectrum antibiotic administration controlled the otherwise overwhelming infection. The patient received allogeneic peripheral blood SCT using a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. After allogeneic SCT, successful engraftment was obtained. She was discharged from the hospital 59 days after allogeneic SCT. She remains alive and well, as of the latest follow up. This case clearly demonstrates that GTX is useful for controlling severe infection and enables patients with severe AA to receive allogeneic SCT safely. PMID:27169447

  4. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have two features: the ability to differentiate along different lineages and the ability of self-renewal. Two major types of stem cells have been described, namely, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are obtained from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and are associated with tumorigenesis, and the use of human ESCs involves ethical and legal considerations. The use of adult mesenchymal stem cells is less problematic with regard to these issues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation. MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues, such as umbilical cord, endometrial polyps, menses blood, bone marrow, adipose tissue, etc. This is because the ease of harvest and quantity obtained make these sources most practical for experimental and possible clinical applications. Recently, MSCs have been found in new sources, such as menstrual blood and endometrium. There are likely more sources of MSCs waiting to be discovered, and MSCs may be a good candidate for future experimental or clinical applications. One of the major challenges is to elucidate the mechanisms of differentiation, mobilization, and homing of MSCs, which are highly complex. The multipotent properties of MSCs make them an attractive choice for possible development of clinical applications. Future studies should explore the role of MSCs in differentiation, transplantation, and immune response in various diseases. PMID:21396235

  7. Autophagy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jun-Lin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Prescott, Mark; Menendez, Javier A.; Liu, Fei; Wang, Fen; Wang, Chenran; Wolvetang, Ernst; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Zhang, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered in autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes for degradation. As a major intracellular degradation and recycling pathway, autophagy is crucial for maintaining cellular homeostasis as well as remodeling during normal development, and dysfunctions in autophagy have been associated with a variety of pathologies including cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and neurodegenerative disease. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and differentiate into various cells in the body, which are important in development, tissue renewal and a range of disease processes. Therefore, it is predicted that autophagy would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis in various stem cells given their relatively long life in the organisms. In contrast to the extensive body of knowledge available for somatic cells, the role of autophagy in the maintenance and function of stem cells is only beginning to be revealed as a result of recent studies. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the current understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of autophagy in embryonic stem cells, several tissue stem cells (particularly hematopoietic stem cells), as well as a number of cancer stem cells. We discuss how recent studies of different knockout mice models have defined the roles of various autophagy genes and related pathways in the regulation of the maintenance, expansion and differentiation of various stem cells. We also highlight the many unanswered questions that will help to drive further research at the intersection of autophagy and stem cell biology in the near future. PMID:23486312

  8. Hematopoietic stem cells: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mosaad, Youssef Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    Considerable efforts have been made in recent years in understanding the mechanisms that govern hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) origin, development, differentiation, self-renewal, aging, trafficking, plasticity and transdifferentiation. Hematopoiesis occurs in sequential waves in distinct anatomical locations during development and these shifts in location are accompanied by changes in the functional status of the stem cells and reflect the changing needs of the developing organism. HSCs make a choice of either self-renewal or committing to differentiation. The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is considered to be critical to the maintenance of stem cell numbers. It is still under debate if HSC can rejuvenate infinitely or if they do not possess ''true" self-renewal and undergo replicative senescence such as any other somatic cell. Gene therapy applications that target HSCs offer a great potential for the treatment of hematologic and immunologic diseases. However, the clinical success has been limited by many factors. This review is intended to summarize the recent advances made in the human HSC field, and will review the hematopoietic stem cell from definition through development to clinical applications. PMID:25457002

  9. Outcome of Patients With IgD and IgM Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Retrospective CIBMTR Study

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Donna E.; Vesole, David H.; Shrestha, Smriti; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Pérez, Waleska S.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Milone, Gustavo A.; Abidi, Muneer; Atkins, Harold; Bashey, Asad; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Boza, Willem Bujan; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gajewski, James L.; Gibson, John; Hale, Gregory A.; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert A.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Roy, Vivek; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Immunoglobulin D (IgD) and IgM multiple myeloma represent uncommon immunoglobulin isotypes, accounting for 2% and 0.5% of cases, respectively. Limited information is available regarding the prognosis of these isotypes, but they have been considered to have a more aggressive course than the more common immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA isotypes. In particular, the outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) has not been well defined. Patients and Methods Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) database, we identified 36 patients with IgD and 11 patients with IgM myeloma among 3578 myeloma patients who received intensive therapy and auto-HCT over a 10-year period. Results The progression-free and overall survival probabilities at 3 years were 38% (95% CI, 21%-56%) and 69% (95% CI, 51%-84%) for IgD myeloma, and 47% (95% CI, 17%-78%) and 68% (95% CI, 36%-93%), respectively, for IgM disease. Although formal statistical analysis was limited by the small sample size, these results were comparable to those for IgG and IgA patients autografted during the same time period. Transplantation-related mortality and disease relapse/progression of myeloma were also similar for all isotypes. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates comparable outcomes in all immunoglobulin isotypes. Therefore, auto-HCT should be offered to eligible patients with IgD and IgM myeloma. PMID:21156462

  10. Increased risk of infections and infection-related mortality in children undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation compared to conventional anticancer therapy: a multicentre nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, J; Czyzewski, K; Wysocki, M; Gryniewicz-Kwiatkowska, O; Kolodziejczyk-Gietka, A; Salamonowicz, M; Hutnik, L; Zajac-Spychala, O; Zaucha-Prazmo, A; Chelmecka-Wiktorczyk, L; Siewiera, K; Fraczkiewicz, J; Malas, Z; Tomaszewska, R; Irga-Jaworska, N; Plonowski, M; Ociepa, T; Pierlejewski, F; Gamrot, Z; Urbanek-Dadela, A; Gozdzik, J; Stolpa, W; Dembowska-Baginska, B; Perek, D; Matysiak, M; Wachowiak, J; Kowalczyk, J; Balwierz, W; Kalwak, K; Chybicka, A; Badowska, W; Szczepanski, T; Drozynska, E; Krawczuk-Rybak, M; Urasinski, T; Mlynarski, W; Woszczyk, M; Karolczyk, G; Sobol-Milejska, G; Gil, L

    2016-02-01

    This nationwide multicentre study analysed the epidemiology of bacterial, viral and fungal infections in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and paediatric haematology and oncology (PHO) patients over a period of 24 consecutive months, including incidence, hazard risk and outcome of infections as well as occurrence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. During this period, 308 HSCTs were performed and 1768 children were newly diagnosed for malignancy. Compared to PHO, the risk in HSCT patients was significantly higher for all infections (hazard ratio (HR) 2.7), bacterial (HR 1.4), fungal (HR 3.5) and viral (HR 15.7) infections. The risk was higher in allo- than auto-HSCT for bacterial (HR 1.4), fungal (HR 3.2) and viral (HR 17.7) infections. The incidence of resistant bacteria was higher in HSCT than in PHO patients for both G-negative (72.5% vs. 59.2%) and G-positive (41.4% vs. 20.5%) strains. Cumulative incidence of bacterial, fungal and viral infections in HSCT patients was 33.9, 22.8 and 38.3%, respectively. Cumulative incidence of viral infections in allo-HSCT was 28.0% for cytomegalovirus, 18.5% for BK virus, 15.5% for Epstein-Barr virus, 9.5% for adenovirus, 2.6% for varicella zoster virus, 0.9% for influenza, 0.9% for human herpesvirus 6 and 0.3% for hepatitis B virus. Survival rates from infections were lower in HSCT than in PHO patients in bacterial (96.0 vs. 98.2%), fungal (75.5 vs. 94.6%) and most viral infections. In conclusion, the risk of any infections and the occurrence of resistant bacterial strains in allo-HSCT patients were higher than in auto-HSCT and PHO patients, while the outcome of infections was better in the PHO setting. PMID:26493843

  11. Circulating miRNA panel for prediction of acute graft-versus-host disease in lymphoma patients undergoing matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gimondi, Silvia; Dugo, Matteo; Vendramin, Antonio; Bermema, Anisa; Biancon, Giulia; Cavané, Alessandra; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana

    2016-07-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) results in significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic tests for aGVHD are currently lacking, but would be beneficial in predicting aGVHD and improving the safety of allo-HSCT. Circulating microRNAs exhibit marked stability and may serve as biomarkers in several clinical settings. Here, we evaluated the use of circulating microRNAs as predictive biomarkers of aGVHD in lymphoma patients after allo-HSCT from matched unrelated donors (MUDs). After receiving informed consent, we prospectively collected plasma samples from 24 lymphoma patients before and after unmanipulated MUD allo-HSCT; microRNAs were then isolated. Fourteen patients developed aGVHD symptoms at a median of 48 days (range: 32-90) post-transplantation. Two patients developed intestinal GVHD, eight cutaneous GVHD, and four multiorgan GVHD. The microRNA expression profile was examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). MicroRNAs 194 and 518f were significantly upregulated in aGVHD samples compared with samples taken from non-aGVHD patients. Remarkably, these upregulated microRNAs could be detected before the onset of aGVHD. Pathway prediction analysis indicated that these microRNAs may regulate critical pathways involved in aGVHD pathogenesis. Considering the noninvasive characteristics of plasma sampling and the feasibility of detecting miRNAs after allo-HSCT using real-time polymerase chain reaction, our results indicate that circulating microRNAs have the potential to enable an earlier aGVHD diagnosis and might assist in individualizing therapeutic strategies after MUD allo-HSCT. Nevertheless, standardization of blood sampling and analysis protocols is mandatory for the introduction of miRNA profiling into routine clinical use. PMID:27013207

  12. When stem cells grow old: phenotypes and mechanisms of stem cell aging.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Michael B; Sinclair, David A

    2016-01-01

    All multicellular organisms undergo a decline in tissue and organ function as they age. An attractive theory is that a loss in stem cell number and/or activity over time causes this decline. In accordance with this theory, aging phenotypes have been described for stem cells of multiple tissues, including those of the hematopoietic system, intestine, muscle, brain, skin and germline. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of why adult stem cells age and how this aging impacts diseases and lifespan. With this increased understanding, it is feasible to design and test interventions that delay stem cell aging and improve both health and lifespan. PMID:26732838

  13. Epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Lyle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    It is likely that adult epithelial stem cells will be useful in the treatment of diseases, such as ectodermal dysplasias, monilethrix, Netherton syndrome, Menkes disease, hereditary epidermolysis bullosa, and alopecias. Additionally, other skin problems such as burn wounds, chronic wounds, and ulcers will benefit from stem cell-related therapies. However, there are many questions that need to be answered before this goal can be realized. The most important of these questions is what regulates the adhesion of stem cells to the niche versus migration to the site of injury. We have started to identify the mechanisms involved in this decision-making process. PMID:21618097

  14. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Della Chiesa, Mariella

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C(+)CD57(+) natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. PMID:26659918

  15. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Chiesa, Mariella Della

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C+CD57+ natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. PMID:26659918

  16. Quality of life related to oral mucositis of patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and receiving specialised oral care with low-level laser therapy: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Bezinelli, L M; Eduardo, F P; Neves, V D; Correa, L; Lopes, R M G; Michel-Crosato, E; Hamerschlak, N; Biazevic, M G H

    2016-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a painful condition that occurs in 80% of patients who undergo haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our objective was to determine the impact of mucositis on quality of life (QoL) of patients subjected to HSCT treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Patients were evaluated: (1) on the first day of treatment; (2) 5 days after autologous or 8 days after allogeneic transplantation; (3) once bone marrow had integrated; and (4) 30 days after discharge. Clinical evaluation was performed using the World Health Organization criteria; oral health QoL was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14); and mucositis symptoms with the Patient-Reported Oral Mucositis Symptom (PROMS) scale. The higher the score, the lower the patient's QoL. The OHIP-14 responses showed that at D + 5/D + 8, all domains had the highest scores, while at times 1 and 4, the scores were lower. In the PROMS scale, all domains scored worst at time 2, and the differences between the scores at the four times were statistically significant. The study has shown that QoL improves over time in patients undergoing LLLT therapy for mucositis prevention. PMID:26087364

  17. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Palifermin in Children and Adolescents with Acute Leukemias Undergoing Myeloablative Therapy and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium Trial.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joan; Rudebeck, Mattias; Neudorf, Steven; Moore, Theodore; Duerst, Reggie; Shah, Ami J; Graham, Michael; Aquino, Victor; Morris, Christopher; Olsson, Birgitta

    2016-07-01

    Currently, effective pharmacologic treatment to reduce severe oral mucositis (OM) resulting from high-dose myeloablative cytotoxic therapy in the pediatric population is not available. Palifermin has been proven to decrease the incidence and duration of severe OM in adults with hematologic malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the pediatric population, however, data on palifermin treatment are limited. A phase I dose-escalation study of palifermin in pediatric patients with acute leukemias undergoing myeloablative HSCT with total body irradiation, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide was performed to determine a safe and tolerable dose and to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile and efficacy of palifermin. Twenty-seven patients in 3 age groups (1 to 2, 3 to 11, and 12 to 16 years) and 3 dose levels (40, 60, and 80 μg/kg/day) were studied. There were no deaths, dose-limiting toxicities, or treatment-related serious adverse events. Long-term safety outcomes did not differ from what would be expected in this population. PK data showed no differences between the 3 age groups. Exposure did not increase with increase in dose. The maximum severity of OM (WHO grade 4) occurred in 6 patients (22%), none of whom was in the 80-μg/kg/day dosing group. This study showed that all doses were well tolerated and a good safety profile in all 3 pediatric age groups was seen. PMID:26968792

  18. Serum Krebs Von Den Lungen-6 as a Biomarker for Early Detection of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Children Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gassas, Adam; Schechter, Tal; Krueger, Joerg; Craig-Barnes, Hayley; Sung, Lillian; Ali, Muhammad; Dell, Sharon; Egeler, R Maarten; Zaidman, Irina; Palaniyar, Nades

    2015-08-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a devastating complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Early identification of high-risk patients is pivotal for success. Lung proteins, KL-6, CCSP, SP-A, and SP-D, measured in the serum may identify high-risk patients for BOS earlier than pulmonary function tests (PFTs) can identify changes or clinical symptoms. Lung proteins were measured in patients' serum at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months after transplantation along with history, clinical examination, and PFTs. Serum levels of lung proteins were also measured in healthy control subjects. The primary endpoint was the development of BOS confirmed by pathological biopsy or National Institutes of Health criteria. Between September 2009 and September 2011, 39 patients were enrolled. Six children developed BOS at a median time of 200 days (range, 94 to 282). KL-6 levels were low in control subjects, at a median of .1 U/mL (range, .1 to 1.5). Pre-SCT and 1-month KL-6 levels were significantly higher in surviving patients who developed BOS (n = 6) versus those who did not (n = 18) (pre-SCT: mean, 32.6 U/mL [IQR, 9.7 to 89.3] versus 5.8 U/mL [IQR, 2.1 to 12.6], P = .03; at 1 month: mean, 52.5 U/mL [IQR, 20.2 to 121.3] versus 11.4 U/mL [IQR, 5.7 to 36.0], P = .04). Three- and 6-month KL-6 levels continued to be higher in BOS group but were not statistically significant. CCSP, SP-A, and SP-D were not predictive. KL-6 measured in the serum of children receiving allo-SCT may identify patients at high risk for the development of BOS. These patients will benefit from intensive surveillance protocol and early therapy before irreversible lung damage. PMID:25963919

  19. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  20. Plant Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Greb, Thomas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-09-12

    Among the trending topics in the life sciences, stem cells have received a fair share of attention in the public debate - mostly in connection with their potential for biomedical application and therapies. While the promise of organ regeneration and the end of cancer have captured our imagination, it has gone almost unnoticed that plant stem cells represent the ultimate origin of much of the food we eat, the oxygen we breathe, as well the fuels we burn. Thus, plant stem cells may be ranked among the most important cells for human well-being. Research by many labs in the last decades has uncovered a set of independent stem cell systems that fulfill the specialized needs of plant development and growth in four dimensions. Surprisingly, the cellular and molecular design of these systems is remarkably similar, even across diverse species. In some long-lived plants, such as trees, plant stem cells remain active over hundreds or even thousands of years, revealing the exquisite precision in the underlying control of proliferation, self-renewal and differentiation. In this minireview, we introduce the basic features of the three major plant stem cell systems building on these facts, highlight their modular design at the level of cellular layout and regulatory underpinnings and briefly compare them with their animal counterparts. PMID:27623267

  1. Treatment of Oral Mucositis in Hematologic Patients Undergoing Autologous or Allogeneic Transplantation of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells: a Prospective, Randomized Study with a Mouthwash Containing Camelia Sinensis Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Giovanni; Rocco, Melania; Panichi, Alessia; Chios, Chiara Feira; Ciurli, Ester; Mannucci, Chiara; Sordi, Elisabetta; Caracciolo, Francesco; Papineschi, Federico; Benedetti, Edoardo; Petrini, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an important side effect of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCST), mainly due to toxicity of conditioning regimens. It produces significant pain and morbidity. The present study reports a prospective, randomized, non-blinded study testing the efficacy of a new mouthwash, called Baxidil Onco® (Sanitas Farmaceutici Srl, Tortona, Italy) in 60 hematologic patients undergoing HCST (28 autologous, 32 allogeneic). Baxidil Onco®, used three times a day from Day -1 to Day +30, in addition to standard prophylactic schedules, was administered to 14 patients undergoing autologous and 14 patients undergoing allogeneic HCST. The remaining 32 patients (14 autologous and 18 HCST) were treated only with standard prophylactic schedules and served as control. In our study, the overall incidence of oral mucositis, measured according to the World Health Organization 0-4 scale, was 50% in the Baxidl Onco® group versus 82% in the control group (P=0.022). In addition, a significant reduction in scale 2-4 oral mucositis was observed in the Baxidil Onco® group (25% vs 56.2%; P=0.0029). The results obtained indicate that incidence, severity and duration of oral mucositis induced by conditioning regimens for HCST can be significantly reduced by oral rinsing with Baxidil Onco®, in addition to the standard prophylaxis scheme. Since Camelia Sinensin extract, which is used to produce green tea, is the main agent in this mouthwash, we hypothesize that the anti-oxidative properties of polyphenolic compounds of tea might exert protective effects on oral mucosa. PMID:23888242

  2. Treatment of oral mucositis in hematologic patients undergoing autologous or allogeneic transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells: a prospective, randomized study with a mouthwash containing camelia sinensis leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Giovanni; Rocco, Melania; Panichi, Alessia; Chios, Chiara Feira; Ciurli, Ester; Mannucci, Chiara; Sordi, Elisabetta; Caracciolo, Francesco; Papineschi, Federico; Benedetti, Edoardo; Petrini, Mario

    2013-01-25

    Oral mucositis is an important side effect of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCST), mainly due to toxicity of conditioning regimens. It produces significant pain and morbidity. The present study reports a prospective, randomized, non-blinded study testing the efficacy of a new mouthwash, called Baxidil Onco(®) (Sanitas Farmaceutici Srl, Tortona, Italy) in 60 hematologic patients undergoing HCST (28 autologous, 32 allogeneic). Baxidil Onco(®), used three times a day from Day -1 to Day +30, in addition to standard prophylactic schedules, was administered to 14 patients undergoing autologous and 14 patients undergoing allogeneic HCST. The remaining 32 patients (14 autologous and 18 HCST) were treated only with standard prophylactic schedules and served as control. In our study, the overall incidence of oral mucositis, measured according to the World Health Organization 0-4 scale, was 50% in the Baxidl Onco(®) group versus 82% in the control group (P=0.022). In addition, a significant reduction in scale 2-4 oral mucositis was observed in the Baxidil Onco(®) group (25% vs 56.2%; P=0.0029). The results obtained indicate that incidence, severity and duration of oral mucositis induced by conditioning regimens for HCST can be significantly reduced by oral rinsing with Baxidil Onco(®), in addition to the standard prophylaxis scheme. Since Camelia Sinensin extract, which is used to produce green tea, is the main agent in this mouthwash, we hypothesize that the anti-oxidative properties of polyphenolic compounds of tea might exert protective effects on oral mucosa. PMID:23888242

  3. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to reality. However, as somatic cells might have accumulated various chromosomal abnormalities, including aneuploidies throughout their lives, the resulting IPSCs might no longer carry the perfect blueprint for the tissue to be generated, or worse, become at risk of adopting a malignant fate. In this review, we discuss the contribution of aneuploidy to healthy tissues and how aneuploidy can lead to disease. Furthermore, we review the differences between how somatic cells and stem cells respond to aneuploidy. PMID:27354891

  4. Sirolimus, Cyclosporine, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large B -Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell

  6. Embryonic Stem Cells/Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xuezhu; Zhang, Jiuchun; Smuga-Otto, Kimberly; Tian, Shulan; Yu, Junying; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which are closely related to the inner cell mass, human ESCs appear to be more closely related to the later primitive ectoderm. For example, human ESCs and primitive ectoderm share a common epithelial morphology, growth factor requirements, and the potential to differentiate to all three embryonic germ layers. However, it has previously been shown that human ESCs can also differentiate to cells expressing markers of trophoblast, an extraembryonic lineage formed before the formation of primitive ectoderm. Here, we show that phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate causes human ESCs to undergo an epithelial mesenchymal transition and to differentiate into cells expressing markers of parietal endoderm, another extraembryonic lineage. We further confirmed that this differentiation is through the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway and demonstrated that a particular PKC subtype, PKC-δ, is most responsible for this transition. PMID:22213079

  7. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Cyclosporine in Reducing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Metastatic Kidney Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  8. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  9. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research. PMID:21044008

  10. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  11. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2002-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  12. Catalyzing stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Lisa; Lyall, Drew; Rudnicki, Michael

    2008-09-01

    In 2001, the Stem Cell Network was the first of its kind, a bold initiative to forge and nurture pan-Canadian collaborations involving researchers, engineers, clinicians and private and public sector partners. Canada's broad and deep pool of stem cell talent proved to be a fertile ground for such an initiative, giving rise to a strong, thriving network that, 7 years later, can list innovative cell expansion and screening technologies, early-phase clinical trials for stroke, pulmonary hypertension, muscular dystrophy and cornea replacement, and leading discourse on ethical, legal and social issues among its accomplishments. As it moves into its second and final phase of funding, the Stem Cell Network continues to push boundaries and has set its sights on overcoming the obstacles that impede the transfer of research findings to clinical applications, commercial products and public policy. PMID:18729799

  13. Beclomethasone Dipropionate in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-05

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small

  14. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Stage II Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage

  15. Immunologic Diagnostic Blood Test in Predicting Side-Effects in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Other Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-03-03

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neuroblastoma; Therapy-related Toxicity

  16. Wnt and the Cancer Niche: Paracrine Interactions with Gastrointestinal Cancer Cells Undergoing Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E.; Jaiswal, Kshama R.; Garfield, Susan H.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. Design: We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy. PMID:23901343

  17. Idarubicin-intensified BUCY2 conditioning regimen improved survival in high-risk acute myeloid, but not lymphocytic leukemia patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Huafang; Hong, Mei; Wu, Qiuling; Nie, Dimin; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhaodong; Li, Weiming; Hu, Yu; Xia, Linghui

    2016-07-01

    The intensity of conditioning regimen is highly correlated with outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have previously reported that idarubicin (IDA) intensified BUCY2 regimen could reduce relapse and improve survival for high-risk hematological malignancies undergoing allo-HSCT. However, there is no published study comparing the efficacy of IDA-BUCY2 regimen for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) versus acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). We further retrospectively compared therapeutic outcomes of intensified conditioning regimen on 140 high-risk AML and ALL patients in the data analyses. IDA 15mg/m(2)/d was administered by continuous infusion from day -11 to -9, followed by intravenous injection of busulfan (BU) (3.2mg/kg/d) from day -6 to -4, and intravenous injection of cyclophosphamide (CY) (1.8g/m(2)/d) from day -3 to -2 in IDA-BUCY2 regimen. For high-risk AML, cumulative probabilities of 3-year relapse rates in IDA-BUCY2 and traditional BUCY2 regimens were 16.9%, 43.3% (P=0.016). Cumulative probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 69.2% vs 44.0% (P=0.024), and 66.9% vs 38.2% (P=0.01). However, two regimens showed no significant differences for high-risk ALL. Multivariate analysis also indicated that IDA intensified BUCY2 conditioning was the favorable variable to reduce relapse and elevate survival for high-risk AML patients. In conclusion, IDA-BUCY2 regimen reduces relapse and improves survival for high-risk AML undergoing allo-HSCT, but not presenting uniform therapeutic effects for high-risk ALL. PMID:27131062

  18. The Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Early Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Çiledağ, Nazan; Arda, Kemal; Arıbaş, Bilgin Kadri; Tekgündüz, Ali Irfan Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vessel involvement and the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the earlydiagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with febrile neutropenia and antibiotic-resistant feverundergoing autologous bone morrow transplantation. Material and Methods: In all, 74 pulmonary MDCT examinations in 37 consecutive hematopoietic stem celltransplantation patients with febrile neutropenia and clinically suspected IPA were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Diagnosis of IPA was based on Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and National Institute of Allergy andInfectious Diseases Mycoses Study Consensus Group criteria. In all, 0, 14, and 11 patients were diagnosed as proven,probable, and possible IPA, respectively. Among the 25 patients accepted as probable and possible IPA, all had pulmonaryMDCT findings consistent with IPA. The remaining 12 patients were accepted as having fever of unknown origin (FUO)and had patent vessels based on MDCT findings.In the patients with probable and possible IPA, 72 focal pulmonary lesions were observed; in 41 of the 72 (57%) lesionsvascular occlusion was noted and the CT halo sign was observed in 25 of these 41 (61%) lesions. Resolution of feveroccurred following antifungal therapy in 19 (76%) of the 25 patients with probable and possible IPA. In all, 6 (25%)of the patients diagnosed as IPA died during follow-up. Transplant-related mortality 100 d post transplant in patientswith IPA and FUO was 24% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, MDCT has a potential role in the early diagnosis of IPA via detection of vessel occlusion. PMID:24744620

  19. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  20. Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, and Antithymocyte Globulin in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant For Hematological Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-03

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Precancerous Condition; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Small Intestine Cancer

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Uterine stem cells: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Gargett, C E

    2007-01-01

    The mucosal lining (endometrium) of the human uterus undergoes cyclical processes of regeneration, differentiation and shedding as part of the menstrual cycle. Endometrial regeneration also follows parturition, almost complete resection and in post-menopausal women taking estrogen replacement therapy. In non-menstruating species, there are cycles of endometrial growth and apoptosis rather than physical shedding. The concept that endometrial stem/progenitor cells are responsible for the remarkable regenerative capacity of endometrium was proposed many years ago. However, attempts to isolate, characterize and locate endometrial stem cells have only been undertaken in the last few years as experimental approaches to identify adult stem/progenitor cells in other tissues have been developed. Adult stem cells are defined by their functional properties rather than by marker expression. Evidence for the existence of adult stem/progenitor cells in human and mouse endometrium is now emerging because functional stem cell assays are being applied to uterine cells and tissues. These fundamental studies on endometrial stem/progenitor cells will provide new insights into the pathophysiology of various gynaecological disorders associated with abnormal endometrial proliferation, including endometrial cancer, endometrial hyperplasia, endometriosis and adenomyosis. PMID:16960017

  3. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.

  4. Characterization of Amniotic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Chika; Zhou, Kaixuan; Takeda, Yuji; Fathy, Moustafa; Okabe, Motonori; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nakamura, Yukio; Kato, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The amnion membrane is developed from embryo-derived cells, and amniotic cells have been shown to exhibit multidifferentiation potential. These cells represent a desirable source for stem cells for a variety of reasons. However, to date very few molecular analyses of amnion-derived cells have been reported, and efficient markers for isolating the stem cells remain unclear. This paper assesses the characterization of amnion-derived cells as stem cells by examining stemness marker expressions for amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative PCR. Flow cytometry revealed that amnion epithelial cells expressed CD133, CD 271, and TRA-1-60, whereas mecenchymal cells expressed CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105. Immunohistochemistry showed that both cells expressed the stemness markers Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and SSEA4. Stemness genes' expression in amnion epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, fibroblast, bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Amnion-derived epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than bone marrow–derived MSCs. The sorted TRA1-60–positive cells expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Klf4 more than unsorted cells or TRA1-60–negative cells. TRA1-60 can be a marker for isolating amnion epithelial stem cells. PMID:25068631

  5. Materials as stem cell regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  6. Materials as stem cell regulators

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  7. On the Stem Cell Origin of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer—field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change—the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth. PMID:20431026

  8. [Mesenchymal stem cells. A review.].

    PubMed

    Sigurjónsson, O E; Guðmundsson, K O; Guðmundsson, S

    2001-01-01

    The bone marrow contains various types of stem cells. Among them are hematopoietic stem cells, which are the precursors of all blood cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells have recently received a lot of attention in biological research because of their capability to self renewal, to expand and transdifferentiate into many different cell types; bone cells, adipocytes, chondrocytes, tendocytes, neural cells and stromal cells of the bone marrow. Mesenchymal stem cells can be cultured in vitro although their differentiation potential is not yet fully understood. Several experiments have been conducted in animal models where mesenchymal stem cells have been transplanted in order to enhance hematopoiesis or to facilitate the repair of mesenchymal tissue. Similar experiments are being conducted in humans. Mesenchymal stem cells are believed to be able to enhance hematopoietic stem cells transplantation by rebuilding the bone marrow microenvironment which is damaged after radiation- and/or chemotherapy. Mesenchymal stem cells are promising as vehicles for gene transfer and therapy. It may prove possible to tranduce them with a gene coding for a defective protein i.e. collagen I in osteogenesis imperfecta. The cells could then be expanded ex vivo and transplanted to the patients where they home to the bone marrow, differentiate and produce the intact protein. Future medicine will probably involve mesenchymal stem cells in various treatment settings. PMID:17018999

  9. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  10. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  11. Stem cell aging

    PubMed Central

    Muller-Sieburg, Christa; Sieburg, Hans B.

    2009-01-01

    The question whether stem cells age remains an enigma. Traditionally, aging was thought to change the properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). We discuss here a new model of stem cell aging that challenges this view. It is now well-established that the HSC compartment is heterogeneous, consisting of epigenetically fixed subpopulations of HSC that differ in self-renewal and differentiation capacity. New data show that the representation of these HSC subsets changes during aging. HSC that generate lymphocyte-rich progeny are depleted, while myeloid-biased HSC are enriched in the aged HSC compartment. Myeloid-biased HSC, even when isolated from young donors, have most of the characteristics that had been attributed to aged HSC. Thus, the distinct behavior of the HSC isolated from aged hosts is due to the accumulation of myeloid-biased HSC. By extension this means that the properties of individual HSC are not substantially changed during the lifespan of the organism and that aged hosts do not contain many aged HSC. Myeloid-biased HSC give rise to mature cells slowly but contribute for a long time to peripheral hematopoiesis. We propose that such slow, “lazy” HSC are less likely to be transformed and therefore may safely sustain hematopoiesis for a long time. PMID:19066464

  12. Randomized Clinical Trial of Therapeutic Music Video Intervention for Resilience Outcomes in Adolescents/Young Adults Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Sheri L.; Burns, Debra S.; Stegenga, Kristin A.; Haut, Paul R.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Meza, Jane; Stump, Timothy E.; Cherven, Brooke O.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L.; Kintner, Eileen K.; Haight, Ann E.; Wall, Donna A.; Haase, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Background To reduce the risk of adjustment problems associated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) for adolescents/young adults (AYA), we examined efficacy of a therapeutic music video (TMV) intervention delivered during the acute phase of HSCT to: (a) increase protective factors of spiritual perspective, social integration, family environment, courageous coping, and hope-derived meaning; (b) decrease risk factors of illness-related distress and defensive coping; and (c) increase outcomes of self-transcendence and resilience. Methods A multi-site, randomized controlled trial (COG-ANUR0631) conducted at 8 Children’s Oncology Group sites involving 113 AYA aged 11–24 years undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Participants, randomized to the TMV or low-dose control (audiobooks) group, completed 6 sessions over 3 weeks with a board-certified music therapist. Variables were based on Haase’s Resilience in Illness Model. Participants completed measures related to latent variables of illness-related distress, social integration, spiritual perspective, family environment, coping, hope-derived meaning and resilience at baseline (T1), post-intervention (T2), and 100-days post-transplant (T3). Results At T2, the TMV group reported significantly better courageous coping (ES=0.505; P=0.030). At T3, the TMV group reported significantly better social integration (ES=0.543; P=.028) and family environment (ES=0.663; P=0.008), as well as moderate non-significant effect sizes for spiritual perspective (E=0.450; P=0.071) and self-transcendence (ES=0.424; P=0.088). Conclusion The TMV intervention improves positive health outcomes of courageous coping, social integration, and family environment during a high risk cancer treatment. We recommend the TMV be examined in a broader population of AYA with high risk cancers. PMID:24469862

  13. Male Germline Stem Cells: From Mice to Men

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, Ralph L.

    2016-01-01

    The production of functional male gametes is dependent on the continuous activity of germline stem cells. The availability of a transplantation assay system to unequivocally identify male germline stem cells has allowed their in vitro culture, cryopreservation, and genetic modification. Moreover, the system has enabled the identification of conditions and factors involved in stem cell self-renewal, the foundation of spermatogenesis, and the production of spermatozoa. The increased knowledge about these cells is also of great potential practical value, for example, for the possible cryopreservation of stem cells from boys undergoing treatment for cancer to safeguard their germ line. PMID:17446391

  14. De Novo Prediction of Stem Cell Identity using Single-Cell Transcriptome Data.

    PubMed

    Grün, Dominic; Muraro, Mauro J; Boisset, Jean-Charles; Wiebrands, Kay; Lyubimova, Anna; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan; Jansen, Erik; Clevers, Hans; de Koning, Eelco J P; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Adult mitotic tissues like the intestine, skin, and blood undergo constant turnover throughout the life of an organism. Knowing the identity of the stem cell is crucial to understanding tissue homeostasis and its aberrations upon disease. Here we present a computational method for the derivation of a lineage tree from single-cell transcriptome data. By exploiting the tree topology and the transcriptome composition, we establish StemID, an algorithm for identifying stem cells among all detectable cell types within a population. We demonstrate that StemID recovers two known adult stem cell populations, Lgr5+ cells in the small intestine and hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. We apply StemID to predict candidate multipotent cell populations in the human pancreas, a tissue with largely uncharacterized turnover dynamics. We hope that StemID will accelerate the search for novel stem cells by providing concrete markers for biological follow-up and validation. PMID:27345837

  15. Stem Cells in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Edmond J.; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Koka, Prasad S.; Husain, Zaheed; Romero, Viviana; Stern, Joel N.H.; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha

    2008-01-01

    Aging is a genetically programmed decline in the functional effectiveness of the organism. It is manifested by a collective group of changes in cells or organs that occur over the course of a lifespan, limiting the duration of life. Longevity usually refers to long-lived members of a population within species. Organs develop and can involute according to specific timetables. Such timetables correlate with a preordained proliferative capacity of cells mediated by cell and organ clocks. In this review, we discuss different aspects related to genetic and environmental factors that are involved in determining life span. We discuss the influence of ontogenic, genetic and environmental factors in aging. The genetic factors can be studied in embryonic stem cells (ESC) and in niches (microenvironments) of stem cells (SC) using cellular or experimental animal models. We discuss molecular mechanisms involving genes and proteins associated with death pathways, niches, or hubs, on longevity. Moreover, we also discuss genes and proteins, associated with death pathways, on longevity. Unraveling these mechanisms may further our understanding of human aging leading to development of therapeutic interventions with the potential of prolonging life. PMID:19030125

  16. Making a Hematopoietic Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Michael G.; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Moore, Kateri A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous attempts to either generate or expand hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro have involved either ex vivo expansion of pre-existing patient or donor HSCs or de novo generation from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs alleviated ESC ethical issues but attempts to generate functional mature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful. New efforts focus on directly reprogramming somatic cells into definitive HSCs and HSPCs. To meet clinical needs and to advance drug discovery and stem cell therapy, alternative approaches are necessary. In this review, we synthesize the strategies used and the key findings made in recent years by those trying to make an HSC. PMID:26526106

  17. Stem cells and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J Dawn; Giordano, Frank J

    2003-01-01

    Several recent discoveries have shifted the paradigm that there is no potential for myocardial regeneration and have fueled enthusiasm for a new frontier in the treatment of cardiovascular disease-stem cells. Fundamental to this emerging field is the cumulative evidence that adult bone marrow stem cells can differentiate into a wide variety of cell types, including cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells. This phenomenon has been termed stem cell plasticity and is the basis for the explosive recent interest in stem cell-based therapies. Directed to cardiovascular disease, stem cell therapy holds the promise of replacing lost heart muscle and enhancing cardiovascular revascularization. Early evidence of the feasibility of stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease came from a series of animal experiments demonstrating that adult stem cells could become cardiac muscle cells (myogenesis) and participate in the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis and vasculogenesis) in the heart after myocardial infarction. These findings have been rapidly translated to ongoing human trials, but many questions remain. This review focuses on the use of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells for the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular disease and will contrast how far we have come in a short time with how far we still need to go before stem cell therapy becomes routine in cardiovascular medicine. PMID:12900745

  18. Heterogeneity and plasticity of epidermal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schepeler, Troels; Page, Mahalia E.; Jensen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is an integral part of our largest organ, the skin, and protects us against the hostile environment. It is a highly dynamic tissue that, during normal steady-state conditions, undergoes constant turnover. Multiple stem cell populations residing in autonomously maintained compartments facilitate this task. In this Review, we discuss stem cell behaviour during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration and disease within the pilosebaceous unit, an integral structure of the epidermis that is responsible for hair growth and lubrication of the epithelium. We provide an up-to-date view of the pilosebaceous unit, encompassing the heterogeneity and plasticity of multiple discrete stem cell populations that are strongly influenced by external cues to maintain their identity and function. PMID:24961797

  19. Why do stem cells exist?

    PubMed

    Heddle, J A; Cosentino, L; Dawod, G; Swiger, R R; Paashuis-Lew, Y

    1996-01-01

    Self-renewing tissues have a differentiation hierarchy such that the stem cells are the only permanent residents of the tissue, and it is in these cells that most cancerous mutations arise. The progeny of the stem cells either remain stem cells or enter a transient proliferating cell population that differentiates to produce the functional cells of the tissue. The reason that this differentiation hierarchy exists has not been established. We show here that alternative hierarchies, in which there would be no stem cells, are feasible and biologically plausible. We show that current evidence from somatic mutation frequencies at both transgenic and endogenous loci implicates cell division in the origin of most somatic mutations. We suggest, therefore, that the existence of stem cells is an evolutionary consequence of a selective pressure to avoid cancer by reducing the number of somatic mutations. The stem cell hierarchy reduces the number of cell divisions of those cells that reside permanently in the tissue, which reduces the number of somatic mutations and thus minimizes the cancer rate. In the small intestine, the existence of stem cells reduces the mutant frequency in the stem cells by about one order of magnitude. Since two or more mutations are required to transform a cell, the protective effect may be 100-fold or more. Similar factors may be expected in other tissues. PMID:8991061

  20. Epidermal stem cells: markers, patterning and the control of stem cell fate.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, F M

    1998-01-01

    Within the epidermis, proliferation takes place in the basal layer of keratinocytes that are attached to an underlying basement membrane. Cells that leave the basal layer undergo terminal differentiation as they move towards the tissue surface. The basal layer contains two types of proliferative keratinocyte: stem cells, which have unlimited self-renewal capacity, and transit amplifying cells, those daughters of stem cells that are destined to withdraw from the cell cycle and terminally differentiate after a few rounds of division. Stem cells express higher levels of the beta 1-integrin family of extracellular matrix receptors than transit amplifying cells and this can be used to isolate each subpopulation of keratinocyte and to determine its location within the epidermis. Variation in the levels of E-cadherin, beta-catenin and plakoglobin within the basal layer suggests that stem cells may also differ from transit amplifying cells in intercellular adhesiveness. Stem cells have a patterned distribution within the epidermal basal layer and patterning is subject to autoregulation. Constitutive expression of the transcription factor c-Myc promotes terminal differentiation by driving keratinocytes from the stem cell compartment into the transit amplifying compartment. PMID:9684280

  1. Mimicking Stem Cell Niches to Increase Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Dellatore, Shara M.; Garcia, A. Sofia; Miller, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Niches regulate lineage-specific stem cell self-renewal vs. differentiation in vivo and are comprised of supportive cells and extracellular matrix components arranged in a 3-dimensional topography of controlled stiffness in the presence of oxygen and growth factor gradients. Mimicking stem cell niches in a defined manner will facilitate production of the large numbers of stem cells needed to realize the promise of regenerative medicine and gene therapy. Progress has been made in mimicking components of the niche. Immobilizing cell-associated Notch ligands increased the self-renewal of hematopoietic (blood) stem cells. Culture on a fibrous scaffold that mimics basement membrane texture increased the expansion of hematopoietic and embryonic stem cells. Finally, researchers have created intricate patterns of cell-binding domains and complex oxygen gradients. PMID:18725291

  2. Limbal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis is to systematically review limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) for the treatment of patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). This evidence-based analysis reviews LSCT as a primary treatment for nonpterygium LSCD conditions, and LSCT as an adjuvant therapy to excision for the treatment of pterygium. Background Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population The outer surface of the eye is covered by 2 distinct cell layers: the corneal epithelial layer that overlies the cornea, and the conjunctival epithelial layer that overlies the sclera. These cell types are separated by a transitional zone known as the limbus. The corneal epithelial cells are renewed every 3 to 10 days by a population of stem cells located in the limbus. Nonpterygium Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency When the limbal stem cells are depleted or destroyed, LSCD develops. In LSCD, the conjunctival epithelium migrates onto the cornea (a process called conjunctivalization), resulting in a thickened, irregular, unstable corneal surface that is prone to defects, ulceration, corneal scarring, vascularization, and opacity. Patients experience symptoms including severe irritation, discomfort, photophobia, tearing, blepharospasm, chronic inflammation and redness, and severely decreased vision. Depending on the degree of limbal stem cell loss, LSCD may be total (diffuse) or partial (local). In total LSCD, the limbal stem cell population is completed destroyed and conjunctival epithelium covers the entire cornea. In partial LSCD, some areas of the limbus are unharmed, and the corresponding areas on the cornea maintain phenotypically normal corneal epithelium. Confirmation of the presence of conjunctivalization is necessary for LSCD diagnosis as the other characteristics and symptoms are nonspecific and indicate a variety of diseases. The definitive test for LSCD is impression cytology, which detects the presence of conjunctival epithelium and

  3. Skeletal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G

    2015-03-15

    Skeletal stem cells (SSCs) reside in the postnatal bone marrow and give rise to cartilage, bone, hematopoiesis-supportive stroma and marrow adipocytes in defined in vivo assays. These lineages emerge in a specific sequence during embryonic development and post natal growth, and together comprise a continuous anatomical system, the bone-bone marrow organ. SSCs conjoin skeletal and hematopoietic physiology, and are a tool for understanding and ameliorating skeletal and hematopoietic disorders. Here and in the accompanying poster, we concisely discuss the biology of SSCs in the context of the development and postnatal physiology of skeletal lineages, to which their use in medicine must remain anchored. PMID:25758217

  4. The chiaroscuro stem cell: a unified stem cell theory.

    PubMed

    Quesenberry, Peter J; Colvin, Gerald A; Lambert, Jean-Francois

    2002-12-15

    Hematopoiesis has been considered hierarchical in nature, but recent data suggest that the system is not hierarchical and is, in fact, quite functionally plastic. Existing data indicate that engraftment and progenitor phenotypes vary inversely with cell cycle transit and that gene expression also varies widely. These observations suggest that there is no progenitor/stem cell hierarchy, but rather a reversible continuum. This may, in turn, be dependent on shifting chromatin and gene expression with cell cycle transit. If the phenotype of these primitive marrow cells changes from engraftable stem cell to progenitor and back to engraftable stem cell with cycle transit, then this suggests that the identity of the engraftable stem cell may be partially masked in nonsynchronized marrow cell populations. A general model indicates a marrow cell that can continually change its surface receptor expression and thus responds to external stimuli differently at different points in the cell cycle. PMID:12393432

  5. Mechanotransduction: Tuning Stem Cells Fate

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Francesco; Tiribuzi, Roberto; Armentano, Ilaria; Kenny, Josè Maria; Martino, Sabata; Orlacchio, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    It is a general concern that the success of regenerative medicine-based applications is based on the ability to recapitulate the molecular events that allow stem cells to repair the damaged tissue/organ. To this end biomaterials are designed to display properties that, in a precise and physiological-like fashion, could drive stem cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. The rationale is that stem cells are highly sensitive to forces and that they may convert mechanical stimuli into a chemical response. In this review, we describe novelties on stem cells and biomaterials interactions with more focus on the implication of the mechanical stimulation named mechanotransduction. PMID:24956164

  6. Pluripotent Stem Cells: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Romito, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the ability to undergo self-renewal and to give rise to all cells of the tissues of the body. However, this definition has been recently complicated by the existence of distinct cellular states that display these features. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the family of pluripotent cell lines derived from early mouse and human embryos and compare them with induced pluripotent stem cells. Shared and distinct features of these cells are reported as additional hallmark of pluripotency, offering a comprehensive scenario of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26798367

  7. Stem Cells, Redox Signaling, and Stem Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Functional stem cell decline has been postulated to result in loss of maintenance of tissue homeostasis leading to organismal decline and diseases of aging. Recent Advances: Recent findings implicate redox metabolism in the control of stem cell pool and stem cell aging. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are better known for their damaging properties to DNA, proteins and lipids, recent findings suggest that ROS may also be an integral physiological mediator of cellular signaling in primary cells. Critical Issues: Here we review recent published work on major signaling pathways and transcription factors that are regulated by ROS and mediate ROS regulation of stem cell fate. We will specifically focus on how alterations in this regulation may be implicated in disease and particularly in diseases of stem cell aging. In general, based on the work described here we propose a model in which ROS function as stem cell rheostat. Future Directions: Future work in elucidating how ROS control stem cell cycling, apoptotic machinery, and lineage determination should shed light on mechanisms whereby ROS may control stem cell aging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1902–1916. PMID:24383555

  8. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    PubMed

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research. PMID:17240634

  9. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells) are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation. PMID:26635851

  10. The new stem cell biology.

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Frimberger, Angela E.; Dooner, Mark S.; Mcauliffe, Christina I.; Miller, Caroline; Becker, Pamela; Badiavas, Evangelis; Falanga, Vincent J.; Elfenbein, Gerald; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating muscle, cardiac, hepatic, renal, and bone cells. Purified hematopoietic stem cells have generated cardiac and hepatic cells and reversed disease manifestations in these tissues. Hematopoietic stem cells also alter phenotype with cell cycle transit or circadian phase. During a cytokine stimulated cell cycle transit, reversible alterations of differentiation and engraftment occur. Primitive hematopoietic stem cells express a wide variety of adhesion and cytokine receptors and respond quickly with migration and podia extensions on exposure to cytokines. These data suggest an "Open Chromatin" model of stem cell regulation in which there is a fluctuating continuum in the stem cell/progenitor cell compartments, rather than a hierarchical relationship. These observations, along with progress in using low dose treatments and tolerization approaches, suggest many new therapeutic strategies involving stem cells and the creation of a new medical specialty; stemology. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:12053709

  11. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  12. Stem cells for spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-26

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer's disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  13. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cell of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics. PMID:23260439

  14. Stem cell mitochondria during aging.

    PubMed

    Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the central hubs of cellular metabolism, equipped with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) blueprints to direct part of the programming of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In stem cells, many stem cell factors governing the intricate balance between self-renewal and differentiation have been found to directly regulate mitochondrial processes to control stem cell behaviors during tissue regeneration and aging. Moreover, numerous nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways controlling organismal longevity in an evolutionarily conserved fashion also influence stem cell-mediated tissue homeostasis during aging via regulation of stem cell mitochondria. At the genomic level, it has been demonstrated that heritable mtDNA mutations and variants affect mammalian stem cell homeostasis and influence the risk for human degenerative diseases during aging. Because such a multitude of stem cell factors and signaling pathways ultimately converge on the mitochondria as the primary mechanism to modulate cellular and organismal longevity, it would be most efficacious to develop technologies to therapeutically target and direct mitochondrial repair in stem cells, as a unified strategy to combat aging-related degenerative diseases in the future. PMID:26851627

  15. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  16. Skeletal myogenic potential of human and mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Galli, R; Borello, U; Gritti, A; Minasi, M G; Bjornson, C; Coletta, M; Mora, M; De Angelis, M G; Fiocco, R; Cossu, G; Vescovi, A L

    2000-10-01

    Distinct cell lineages established early in development are usually maintained throughout adulthood. Thus, adult stem cells have been thought to generate differentiated cells specific to the tissue in which they reside. This view has been challenged; for example, neural stem cells can generate cells that normally originate from a different germ layer. Here we show that acutely isolated and clonally derived neural stem cells from mice and humans could produce skeletal myotubes in vitro and in vivo, the latter following transplantation into adult animals. Myogenic conversion in vitro required direct exposure to myoblasts, and was blocked if neural cells were clustered. Thus, a community effect between neural cells may override such myogenic induction. We conclude that neural stem cells, which generate neurons, glia and blood cells, can also produce skeletal muscle cells, and can undergo various patterns of differentiation depending on exposure to appropriate epigenetic signals in mature tissues. PMID:11017170

  17. LncRNAs in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shanshan; Shan, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are critical regulatory factors in essentially all forms of life. Stem cells occupy a special position in cell biology and Biomedicine, and emerging results show that multiple ncRNAs play essential roles in stem cells. We discuss some of the known ncRNAs in stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, adult stem cells, and cancer stem cells with a focus on long ncRNAs. Roles and functional mechanisms of these lncRNAs are summarized, and insights into current and future studies are presented. PMID:26880946

  18. Stem cell mechanics: Auxetic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The nuclei of naive mouse embryonic stem cells that are transitioning towards differentiation expand when the cells are stretched and contract when they are compressed. What drives this auxetic phenotype is, however, unclear.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  20. Super pharmacological levels of calcitriol (1,25-(OH)2D3) inhibits mineral deposition and decreases cell proliferation in a strain dependent manner in chicken mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenic differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vivek V; Chousalkar, Kapil C; Bhanugopan, Marie S; Quinn, Jane C

    2015-11-01

    The biologically active form of vitamin D₃, calcitriol (1,25-(OH)₂D₃), plays a key role in mineral homeostasis and bone formation and dietary vitamin D₃deficiency is a major cause of bone disorders in poultry. Supplementary dietary cholecalciferol (25-hydroxyvitamin D, 25-OH), the precursor of calcitriol, is commonly employed to combat this problem; however, dosage must be carefully determined as excess dietary vitamin D can cause toxicity resulting in a decrease in bone calcification, hypercalcinemia and renal failure. Despite much research on the therapeutic administration of dietary vitamin D in humans, the relative sensitivity of avian species to exogenous vitamin D has not been well defined. In order to determine the effects of exogenous 1,25-(OH)₂D₃during avian osteogenesis, chicken bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were exposed to varying doses of 1,25-(OH)₂D₃during in vitro osteogenic differentiation and examined for markers of early proliferation and osteogenic induction. Similar to humans and other mammals, poultry BM-MSCs were found to be highly sensitive to exogenous 1,25-(OH)₂D₃with super pharmacological levels exerting significant inhibition of mineralization and loss of cell proliferation in vitro. Strain related differences were apparent, with BM-MCSs derived from layers strains showing a higher level of sensitivity to 1,25-(OH)₂D₃than those from broilers. These data suggest that understanding species and strain specific sensitivities to 1,25-(OH)₂D₃is important for optimizing bone health in the poultry industry and that use of avian BM-MSCs are a useful tool for examining underlying effects of genetic variation in poultry. PMID:26500277

  1. Super pharmacological levels of calcitriol (1,25-(OH)2D3) inhibits mineral deposition and decreases cell proliferation in a strain dependent manner in chicken mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenic differentiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vivek V.; Chousalkar, Kapil C.; Bhanugopan, Marie S.; Quinn, Jane C.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active form of vitamin D3, calcitriol (1,25-(OH)2D3), plays a key role in mineral homeostasis and bone formation and dietary vitamin D3 deficiency is a major cause of bone disorders in poultry. Supplementary dietary cholecalciferol (25-hydroxyvitamin D, 25-OH), the precursor of calcitriol, is commonly employed to combat this problem; however, dosage must be carefully determined as excess dietary vitamin D can cause toxicity resulting in a decrease in bone calcification, hypercalcinemia and renal failure. Despite much research on the therapeutic administration of dietary vitamin D in humans, the relative sensitivity of avian species to exogenous vitamin D has not been well defined. In order to determine the effects of exogenous 1,25-(OH)2D3 during avian osteogenesis, chicken bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were exposed to varying doses of 1,25-(OH)2D3 during in vitro osteogenic differentiation and examined for markers of early proliferation and osteogenic induction. Similar to humans and other mammals, poultry BM-MSCs were found to be highly sensitive to exogenous 1,25-(OH)2D3 with super pharmacological levels exerting significant inhibition of mineralization and loss of cell proliferation in vitro. Strain related differences were apparent, with BM-MCSs derived from layers strains showing a higher level of sensitivity to 1,25-(OH)2D3 than those from broilers. These data suggest that understanding species and strain specific sensitivities to 1,25-(OH)2D3 is important for optimizing bone health in the poultry industry and that use of avian BM-MSCs are a useful tool for examining underlying effects of genetic variation in poultry. PMID:26500277

  2. Management of viral hepatitis in patients with haematological malignancy and in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation: recommendations of the 5th European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5).

    PubMed

    Mallet, Vincent; van Bömmel, Florian; Doerig, Christopher; Pischke, Sven; Hermine, Olivier; Locasciulli, Anna; Cordonnier, Catherine; Berg, Thomas; Moradpour, Darius; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Ljungman, Per

    2016-05-01

    Viral hepatitis affects millions of people worldwide, and host immunity is the key determinant of patient outcome. Viral hepatitis can be life threatening in patients with haematological malignancy, including haemopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, because of the virus itself, or through a need to decrease the dose of chemotherapy. A past or currently infected haemopoietic stem cell donor could also transmit viral hepatitis. The burden of viral hepatitis in patients with haematological malignancies and the weak evidence on which previous guidelines are based has prompted the European Conference on Infection in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) to convene a group of experts in the fields of viral hepatitis and of haematological malignancy to specifically address previously unconsidered issues and grade the available quality of evidence according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America grading system. The group recommends that all patients should be screened for hepatotropic viruses before haematological treatment and that patients or haemopoietic stem cell donors with markers of past or current viral hepatitis should be assessed by an expert. Screening, vaccination, and treatment rules are reported in this Review. PMID:27599653

  3. Thrombosis in stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Emin

    2012-04-01

    Hemostatic changes and thrombotic events are frequent in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. Arterial and venous thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Thrombotic complications can be classified into four groups including: catheter-related thrombosis, venous thromboembolic (VTE) events, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS)/veno-occlusive disease, and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TAM). The incidence of catheter-related thrombosis is 8-20% in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and the incidence is low in syngeneic and allogeneic transplant patients. Venous duplex Doppler ultrasound, venogram, and computed tomography scan are required to visualize the venous thrombus. The treatment should be aimed at the prevention of pulmonary embolism, the avoidance of thrombus extension, and the preservation of catheter patency. Patients undergoing HSCT may have risk factors for VTE including underlying malignancy, traumatic brain injury, prolonged hospitalization, administration of conditioning regimens, and central venous catheters. Important risk factors are presence of history of VTE and graft-versus-host disease. One-year incidence of symptomatic VTE is 3.7%. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease, is a serious liver disease, seen in approximately 50-60% of HSCT patients. The mortality rate from the severe form of SOS is 84.3% and majority of the patients have multi-organ failure. The frequency is quite low after autologous transplantation. Risk factors for SOS include pre-existing hepatic damage, previous high-dose chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation, female gender and donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen disparity. Cyclophosphamide and busulphan are the most common agents with the highest incidence and fatal SOS. Histopathologic features of SOS include dilatation of sinusoids, necrosis of perivenular hepatocytes, and obstruction of small intrahepatic central venules by

  4. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  5. Chromatin, epigenetics and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roloff, Tim C; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2005-03-01

    Epigenetics is a term that has changed its meaning with the increasing biological knowledge on developmental processes. However, its current application to stem cell biology is often imprecise and is conceptually problematic. This article addresses two different subjects, the definition of epigenetics and chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. We describe mechanisms that regulate chromatin changes and provide an overview of chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. Moreover, a modification of the current epigenetics definition is proposed that is not restricted by the heritability of gene expression throughout cell divisions and excludes translational gene expression control. PMID:15819395

  6. Stem cells for tooth engineering.

    PubMed

    Bluteau, G; Luder, H U; De Bari, C; Mitsiadis, T A

    2008-01-01

    Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come. PMID:18671204

  7. GPCRs in Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    DOZE, VAN A.; PEREZ, DIANNE M.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissues of the body cannot only repair themselves, but also self-renew, a property mainly due to stem cells and the various mechanisms that regulate their behavior. Stem cell biology is a relatively new field. While advances are slowly being realized, stem cells possess huge potential to ameliorate disease and counteract the aging process, causing its speculation as the next panacea. Amidst public pressure to advance rapidly to clinical trials, there is a need to understand the biology of stem cells and to support basic research programs. Without a proper comprehension of how cells and tissues are maintained during the adult life span, clinical trials are bound to fail. This review will cover the basic biology of stem cells, the various types of stem cells, their potential function, and the advantages and disadvantages to their use in medicine. We will next cover the role of G-protein coupled receptors in the regulation of stem cells and their potential in future clinical applications. PMID:23415095

  8. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  9. Isolation and characterization of cancer stem cells from medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Chi, N; Zhang, J Y; Zhu, W; Bian, Y S; Chen, H G

    2015-01-01

    Brain cancer stem cells are a subset of tumor cells present in several types of brain tumor that evade treatment regimens and are responsible for tumor recurrence. Recent reports on several tumors have suggested that Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion is a powerful technique for isolating cancer stem cell-like side population (SP) cells. In the present study, we attempted to isolate the SP cells from medulloblastoma, a malignant brain tumor in children. The tumor samples obtained were subjected to fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis for SP cell isolation. Further, the SP cells were characterized by a sphere-formation assay and analyzed for expression of stem cell genes by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Using flow cytometry, we isolated 2.9% of cancer stem-like SP cells from malignant medulloblastoma, which was reduced to 0.4% in the presence of verapamil, an inhibitor of ABC transporter. These SP cells undergo rapid proliferation and have a high tendency to form tumor spheres when compared with non-SP cells. Further, RT-PCR analysis revealed that the isolated SP cells have increased expression of neural stem cell markers such as nestin, Notch1, and the ABC transporter protein ABCG2. Therefore, our findings suggest that SP cells of medulloblastoma share the characteristics of cancer stem cells. The increased expression of stem cell markers and ABCG2 protein may function collectively and be responsible for drug and apoptosis resistance, as well as tumor recurrence and invasion. PMID:25966102

  10. Closing the circle of germline and stem cells: the Primordial Stem Cell hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Germline determination is believed to occur by either preformation or epigenesis. Animals that undergo germ cell specification by preformation have a continuous germline. However, animals with germline determination by epigenesis have a discontinuous germline, with somatic cells intercalated. This vision is contrary to August Weismann’s Germ Plasm Theory and has led to several controversies. Recent data from metazoans as diverse as planarians, annelids and sea urchins reveal the presence of pluripotent stem cell populations that express germ plasm components, despite being considered to be somatic. These data also show that germ plasm is continuous in some of these animals, despite their discontinuous germline. Presentation of the hypothesis Here, based on recent molecular data on germ plasm components, I revise the germline concept. I introduce the concept of primordial stem cells, which are evolutionarily conserved stem cells that carry germ plasm components from the zygote to the germ cells. These cells, delineated by the classic concept of the Weismann barrier, can contribute to different extents to somatic tissues or be present in a rudimentary state. The primordial stem cells are a part of the germline that can drive asexual reproduction. Testing the hypothesis Molecular information on the expression of germ plasm components is needed during early development of non-classic model organisms, with special attention to those capable of undergoing asexual reproduction and regeneration. The cell lineage of germ plasm component-containing cells will also shed light on their position with respect to the Weismann barrier. This information will help in understanding the germline and its associated stem cells across metazoan phylogeny. Implications of the hypothesis This revision of the germline concept explains the extensive similarities observed among stem cells and germline cells in a wide variety of animals, and predicts the expression of germ plasm

  11. Microbioreactors for Stem Cell Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytes, Donald O.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    During tissue development and regeneration, stem cells respond to the entire milieu of their environment, through dynamic interactions with the surrounding cells, extracellular matrix, and cascades of molecular and physical regulatory factors. A new generation of culture systems is emerging to offer some of the biological fidelity of a whole organism within highly controllable in vitro settings and provide the cultured cells with the combinations of factors they normally encounter in vivo. There is a growing notion that such "biomimetic" systems are essential for unlocking the full potential of stem cells - for tissue regeneration as well as biological research. In this chapter, we discuss the biological principles for designing biologically inspired culture systems for stem cell research and focus on the control of stem cell microenvironment through surface patterning, microfluidics, and electrical stimulation.

  12. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  13. Stem Cells in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoming; Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The lung is composed of two major anatomically distinct regions—the conducting airways and gas-exchanging airspaces. From a cell biology standpoint, the conducting airways can be further divided into two major compartments, the tracheobronchial and bronchiolar airways, while the alveolar regions of the lung make up the gas-exchanging airspaces. Each of these regions consists of distinct epithelial cell types with unique cellular physiologies and stem cell compartments. This chapter focuses on model systems with which to study stem cells in the adult tracheobronchial airways, also referred to as the proximal airway of the lung. Important in such models is an appreciation for the diversity of stem cell niches in the conducting airways that provide localized environmental signals to both maintain and mobilize stem cells in the setting of airway injury and normal cellular turnover. Because cellular turnover in airways is relatively slow, methods for analysis of stem cells in vivo have required prior injury to the lung. In contrast, ex vivo and in vitro models for analysis of airway stem cells have used genetic markers to track lineage relationships together with reconstitution systems that mimic airway biology. Over the past decades, several widely acceptable methods have been developed and used in the characterization of adult airway stem/ progenitor cells. These include localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), retroviral tagging of epithelial cells seeded into xenografts, air–liquid interface cultures to track clonal proliferative potential, and multiple transgenic mouse models. This chapter reviews the biologic context and use of these models while providing detailed methods for several of the more broadly useful models for studying adult airway stem/progenitor cell types. PMID:17141060

  14. Looking for the elusive lung stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ena Ray

    2014-01-01

    This discourse contains three perspectives on various aspects of Stem Cell Biology and tools available to study and translate into Regenerative Medicine. The lung incessantly faces onslaught of the environment, constantly undergoes oxidative stress, and is an important organ of detoxification. In degenerative diseases and inflammation, the lung undergoes irreversible remodeling that is difficult to therapeutically address and/or transplant a dying tissue. The other difficulty is to study its development and regenerative aspects to best address the aforementioned problems. This perspective therefore addresses- firstly, review of types of stem cells, their pathway of action and models in invertebrate organisms vis-a-vis microenvironment and its dynamics; secondly, stem cells in higher organisms and niche; and lastly data and inference on a novel approach to study stem cell destruction patterns in an injury model and information on putative lung stem cell niche. Stem cells are cryptic cells known to retain certain primitive characteristics making them akin to ancient cells of invertebrates, developmental stages in invertebrates and vertebrates and pliant cells of complex creatures like mammals that demonstrate stimulus-specific behavious, whether to clonally propagate or to remain well protected and hidden within specialized niches, or mobilize and differentiate into mature functionally operative cells to house-keep, repair injury or make new tissues. In lung fibrosis, alveolar epithelium degenerates progressively. In keeping with the goal of regenerative medicine, various models and assays to evaluate long and short term identity of stem cells and their niches is the subject of this perspective. We also report identification and characterization of functional lung stem cells to clarify how stem cell niches counteract this degenerative process. Inferences drawn from this injury model of lung degeneration using a short term assay by tracking side population cells and a

  15. Harvesting dental stem cells - Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, P. M.; Manikandan, Ramanathan; Muthumurugan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Sivakumar, Muniapillai

    2015-01-01

    Dental stem cells have recently become one of the widely researched areas in dentistry. Ever since the identification of stem cells from various dental tissues like deciduous teeth, dental papilla, periodontal ligament and third molars, storing them for future use for various clinical applications was being explored. Dental stem cells were harvested and isolated using various techniques by different investigators and laboratories. This article explains the technical aspects of preparing the patient, atraumatic and aseptic removal of the tooth and its safe transportation and preservation for future expansion. PMID:26538883

  16. Harvesting dental stem cells - Overview.

    PubMed

    Sunil, P M; Manikandan, Ramanathan; Muthumurugan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Sivakumar, Muniapillai

    2015-08-01

    Dental stem cells have recently become one of the widely researched areas in dentistry. Ever since the identification of stem cells from various dental tissues like deciduous teeth, dental papilla, periodontal ligament and third molars, storing them for future use for various clinical applications was being explored. Dental stem cells were harvested and isolated using various techniques by different investigators and laboratories. This article explains the technical aspects of preparing the patient, atraumatic and aseptic removal of the tooth and its safe transportation and preservation for future expansion. PMID:26538883

  17. Microarrayed Materials for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in disease modeling, cancer therapy and regenerative medicine. Despite the significant progress made during the last decade, designing materials to control stem cell fate remains challenging. As an alternative, materials microarray technology has received great attention because it allows for high throughput materials synthesis and screening at a reasonable cost. Here, we discuss recent developments in materials microarray technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Future opportunities in the field will also be reviewed. PMID:24311967

  18. Dispelling Stem-Cell Ideology.

    PubMed

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    2016-05-01

    Week-old embryos are considered the richest source of stem cells usable in medical treatments. Because the embryos are destroyed when the stem cells are removed, the debate over the embryo's legal, moral, political, and scientific status has exploded. In this debate, Sheldon Krimsky's Stem Cell Dialogues: A Philosophical and Scientific Inquiry into Medical Frontiers (Columbia UP, 2015) is the single best book. Evenhanded, eminently readable, up to date, educational, scientifically precise, powerfully researched, and very entertaining, Krimsky's slim volume is one that no scientist, policy-maker, ethicist, or intelligent reader should miss. PMID:27150419

  19. Stem cells, dot-com.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim K

    2012-09-12

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of suspect goods and services has burgeoned because of the Internet. Despite very limited approval for use, DTC stem cell-marketed "treatments" have emerged for an array of conditions, creating global public health and safety risks. However, it remains unclear whether such use of stem cells is subject to drugs or biologics regulations. To address this gap, regulatory agencies should be given clear authority, and the international community should create a framework for appropriate stem cell use. In addition, consumer protection laws should be used to scrutinize providers. PMID:22972840

  20. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  1. Derivation of the human embryonic stem cell line RCM1.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, P A; Tye, B J; Sneddon, S; Bruce, K; Dand, P; Russell, G; Collins, D M; Greenshields, A; McDonald, K; Bradburn, H; Gardner, J; Downie, J M; Courtney, A; Brison, D R

    2016-03-01

    The human embryonic stem cell line RCM-1 was derived from a failed to fertilise egg undergoing parthenogenetic stimulation. The cell line shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiation to three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. It has a normal 46XX female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity, HLA and blood group typing data is available. PMID:27346018

  2. Stem cell therapy independent of stemness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Techung

    2012-12-26

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is entering a new era shifting the focus from initial feasibility study to optimization of therapeutic efficacy. However, how MSC therapy facilitates tissue regeneration remains incompletely characterized. Consistent with the emerging notion that secretion of multiple growth factors/cytokines (trophic factors) by MSC provides the underlying tissue regenerative mechanism, the recent study by Bai et al demonstrated a critical therapeutic role of MSC-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in two animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a progressive autoimmune disorder caused by damage to the myelin sheath and loss of oligodendrocytes. Although current MS therapies are directed toward attenuation of the immune response, robust repair of myelin sheath likely requires a regenerative approach focusing on long-term replacement of the lost oligodendrocytes. This approach appears feasible because adult organs contain various populations of multipotent resident stem/progenitor cells that may be activated by MSC trophic factors as demonstrated by Bai et al This commentary highlights and discusses the major findings of their studies, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory function and trophic cross-talk mechanisms mediated by HGF and other MSC-derived trophic factors in sustaining the treatment benefits. Identification of multiple functionally synergistic trophic factors, such as HGF and vascular endothelial growth factor, can eventually lead to the development of efficacious cell-free therapeutic regimens targeting a broad spectrum of degenerative conditions. PMID:23516128

  3. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  4. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cell transplant; Allogeneic-donation ... There are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. "Auto" means self. Allogenic bone marrow transplant is when another person ...

  5. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  6. Pancreatic Stem Cells Remain Unresolved

    PubMed Central

    Morahan, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are ideally placed as cell sources for a diabetic transplantation therapy. Unfortunately, the inability to generate functional differentiated islet cells from pluripotent stem cells and the poor availability of donor islets have severely restricted the broad clinical use of the replacement therapy. Therefore, endogenous sources that can be directed to becoming insulin-secreting cells are actively sought after. In particular, any cell types in the developing or adult pancreas that may act as pancreatic stem cells (PSC) would provide an alternative renewable source for endogenous regeneration. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress and knowledge of such PSC, and discuss ways that facilitate the future development of this often controversial, but crucial research. PMID:25132582

  7. Visualizing the Functional Heterogeneity of Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Ogawa, Shizuka; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells are satellite cells that play crucial roles in tissue repair and regeneration after muscle injury. Accumulating evidence indicates that satellite cells are genetically and functionally heterogeneous, even within the same muscle. A small population of satellite cells possesses "stemness" and exhibits the remarkable ability to regenerate through robust self-renewal when transplanted into a regenerating muscle niche. In contrast, not all satellite cells self-renew. For example, some cells are committed myogenic progenitors that immediately undergo myogenic differentiation with minimal cell division after activation. Recent studies illuminate the cellular and molecular characteristics of the functional heterogeneity among satellite cells. To evaluate heterogeneity and stem cell dynamics, here we describe methods to conduct a clonal analysis of satellite cells and to visualize a slowly dividing cell population. PMID:27052612

  8. Stem Cells and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Fernanda M.P.; Santos, Anderson K.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Gomes, Katia N.; Ladeira, Luiz O.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing interest in stem cell research is linked to the promise of developing treatments for many lifethreatening, debilitating diseases, and for cell replacement therapies. However, performing these therapeutic innovations with safety will only be possible when an accurate knowledge about the molecular signals that promote the desired cell fate is reached. Among these signals are transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i. Acting as an intracellular messenger, Ca2+ has a key role in cell signaling pathways in various differentiation stages of stem cells. The aim of this chapter is to present a broad overview of various moments in which Ca2+-mediated signaling is essential for the maintenance of stem cells and for promoting their development and differentiation, also focusing on their therapeutic potential. PMID:22453975

  9. Plasticity of spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Paul S; Simon, Liz; Nanjappa, Manjunatha K; Medrano, Theresa I; Berry, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant breakthroughs over the past decade in the development and use of pluripotent stem cells as a potential source of cells for applications in regenerative medicine. It is likely that this methodology will begin to play an important role in human clinical medicine in the years to come. This review describes the plasticity of one type of pluripotent cell, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), and their potential therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine and male infertility. Normally, SSCs give rise to sperm when in the testis. However, both human and murine SSCs can give rise to cells with embryonic stem (ES) cell-like characteristics that can be directed to differentiate into tissues of all three embryonic germ layers when placed in an appropriate inductive microenvironment, which is in contrast to other postnatal stem cells. Previous studies have reported that SSCs expressed an intermediate pluripotent phenotype before differentiating into a specific cell type and that extended culture was necessary for this to occur. However, recent studies from our group using a tissue recombination model demonstrated that SSCs differentiated rapidly into another tissue, in this case, prostatic epithelium, without expression of pluripotent ES cell markers before differentiation. These results suggest that SSCs are capable of directly differentiating into other cell types without going through an intermediate ES cell-like stage. Because SSCs do not require reprogramming to achieve a pluripotent state, they are an attractive source of pluripotent cells for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:25677134

  10. Stem cell isolation: Differential stickiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-06-01

    Technologies to isolate colonies of human pluripotent stem cells from other cell types in a high-throughput manner are lacking. A microfluidic-based approach that exploits differences in the adhesion strength between these cells and a substrate may soon fill the gap.

  11. Plasticity of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Paul S; Simon, Liz; Nanjappa, Manjunatha K; Medrano, Theresa I; Berry, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant breakthroughs over the past decade in the development and use of pluripotent stem cells as a potential source of cells for applications in regenerative medicine. It is likely that this methodology will begin to play an important role in human clinical medicine in the years to come. This review describes the plasticity of one type of pluripotent cell, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), and their potential therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine and male infertility. Normally, SSCs give rise to sperm when in the testis. However, both human and murine SSCs can give rise to cells with embryonic stem (ES) cell-like characteristics that can be directed to differentiate into tissues of all three embryonic germ layers when placed in an appropriate inductive microenvironment, which is in contrast to other postnatal stem cells. Previous studies have reported that SSCs expressed an intermediate pluripotent phenotype before differentiating into a specific cell type and that extended culture was necessary for this to occur. However, recent studies from our group using a tissue recombination model demonstrated that SSCs differentiated rapidly into another tissue, in this case, prostatic epithelium, without expression of pluripotent ES cell markers before differentiation. These results suggest that SSCs are capable of directly differentiating into other cell types without going through an intermediate ES cell-like stage. Because SSCs do not require reprogramming to achieve a pluripotent state, they are an attractive source of pluripotent cells for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:25677134

  12. Electrical Property Characterization of Neural Stem Cells in Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Chen, Deyong; Li, Zhaohui; Fan, Beiyuan; George, Julian; Xue, Chengcheng; Cui, Zhanfeng; Wang, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical property characterization of stem cells could be utilized as a potential label-free biophysical approach to evaluate the differentiation process. However, there has been a lack of technology or tools that can quantify the intrinsic cellular electrical markers (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) for a large amount of stem cells or differentiated cells. In this paper, a microfluidic platform enabling the high-throughput quantification of Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm from hundreds of single neural stem cells undergoing differentiation was developed to explore the feasibility to characterize the neural stem cell differentiation process without biochemical staining. Experimental quantification using biochemical markers (e.g., Nestin, Tubulin and GFAP) of neural stem cells confirmed the initiation of the differentiation process featured with gradual loss in cellular stemness and increased cell markers for neurons and glial cells. The recorded electrical properties of neural stem cells undergoing differentiation showed distinctive and unique patterns: 1) in the suspension culture before inducing differentiation, a large distribution and difference in σcytoplasm among individual neural stem cells was noticed, which indicated heterogeneity that may result from the nature of suspension culture of neurospheres; and 2) during the differentiation in adhering monolayer culture, significant changes and a large difference in Cspecific membrane were located indicating different expressions of membrane proteins during the differentiation process, and a small distribution difference in σcytoplasm was less significant that indicated the relatively consistent properties of cytoplasm during the culture. In summary, significant differences in Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm were observed during the neural stem cell differentiation process, which may potentially be used as label-free biophysical markers

  13. Reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2011-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, can differentiate into all cell types. So, these cells can be a biological resource for regenerative medicine. However, ES cells known as standard pluripotent cells have problem to be used for cell therapy because of ethical issue of the origin and immune response on the graft. Hence, recently reprogrammed pluripotent cells have been suggested as an alternative source for regenerative medicine. Somatic cells can acquire the ES cell-like pluripotency by transferring somatic cell nuclei into oocytes, by cell fusion with pluripotent cells. Retroviral-mediated introduction of four factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can successfully reprogram somatic cells into ES cell-like pluripotent stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These cells closely resemble ES cells in gene expression pattern, cell biologic and phenotypic characteristics. However, to reach the eventual goal of clinical application, it is necessary to overcome the major drawbacks such as low reprogramming efficiency and genomic alterations due to viral integration. In this review, we discuss the current reprogramming techniques and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming induced by transcription factor transduction. PMID:24298328

  14. 25 YEARS OF EPIDERMAL STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, Ruby

    2012-01-01

    This is a chronicle of concepts in the field of epidermal stem cell biology and a historic look at their development over time. The last 25 years have seen the evolution of epidermal stem cell science, from first fundamental studies to a sophisticated science. The study of epithelial stem cell biology was aided by the ability to visualize the distribution of stem cells and their progeny through lineage analysis studies. The excellent progress we have made in understanding epidermal stem cell biology is discussed in this article. The challenges we still face in understanding epidermal stem cell include defining molecular markers for stem and progenitor subpopulations, determining the locations and contributions of the different stem cell niches, and mapping regulatory pathways of epidermal stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, our rapidly evolving understanding of epidermal stem cells has many potential uses that promise to translate into improved patient therapy. PMID:22205306

  15. Engineering stem cell niches in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meimei; Liu, Ning; Zang, Ru; Li, Yan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells have the potential to be expanded and differentiated into various cell types in the body. Efficient differentiation of stem cells with the desired tissue-specific function is critical for stem cell-based cell therapy, tissue engineering, drug discovery and disease modeling. Bioreactors provide a great platform to regulate the stem cell microenvironment, known as “niches”, to impact stem cell fate decision. The niche factors include the regulatory factors such as oxygen, extracellular matrix (synthetic and decellularized), paracrine/autocrine signaling and physical forces (i.e., mechanical force, electrical force and flow shear). The use of novel bioreactors with precise control and recapitulation of niche factors through modulating reactor operation parameters can enable efficient stem cell expansion and differentiation. Recently, the development of microfluidic devices and microbioreactors also provides powerful tools to manipulate the stem cell microenvironment by adjusting flow rate and cytokine gradients. In general, bioreactor engineering can be used to better modulate stem cell niches critical for stem cell expansion, differentiation and applications as novel cell-based biomedicines. This paper reviews important factors that can be more precisely controlled in bioreactors and their effects on stem cell engineering. PMID:24179601

  16. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-01

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells. PMID:25997796

  17. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:25520283

  18. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  19. Tenascins in stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Orend, Gertraud; Chiquet, Matthias; Tucker, Richard P; Midwood, Kim S

    2014-07-01

    Tenascins are extracellular matrix proteins with distinct spatial and temporal expression during development, tissue homeostasis and disease. Based on their expression patterns and knockout phenotypes an important role of tenascins in tissue formation, cell adhesion modulation, regulation of proliferation and differentiation has been demonstrated. All of these features are of importance in stem cell niches where a precise regulation of growth versus differentiation has to be guaranteed. In this review we summarize the expression and possible functions of tenascins in neural, epithelial and osteogenic stem cell niches during normal development and organ turnover, in the hematopoietic and pro-inflammatory niche as well as in the metastatic niche during cancer progression. PMID:24472737

  20. Hematopoietic stem cells: multiparameter regulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Wang, Yiwei; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are capable to self-renew with multi-potency which generated much excitement in clinical therapy. However, the main obstacle of HSCs in clinical application was insufficient number of HSCs which were derived from either bone marrow, peripheral blood or umbilical cord blood. This review briefly discusses the indispensable utility of growth factors and cytokines, stromal cells, extracellular matrix, bionic scaffold and microenvironment aiming to control the hematopoiesis in all directions and provide a better and comprehensive understanding for in vitro expansion of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26883144

  1. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: The Role of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, C.; van Diest, P.J.; Vooijs, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies. PMID:21506923

  2. Stem cells: sources and therapies.

    PubMed

    Monti, Manuela; Perotti, Cesare; Del Fante, Claudia; Cervio, Marila; Redi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The historical, lexical and conceptual issues embedded in stem cell biology are reviewed from technical, ethical, philosophical, judicial, clinical, economic and biopolitical perspectives. The mechanisms assigning the simultaneous capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to stem cells (immortal template DNA and asymmetric division) are evaluated in the light of the niche hypothesis for the stemness state. The induction of cell pluripotency and the different stem cells sources are presented (embryonic, adult and cord blood). We highlight the embryonic and adult stem cell properties and possible therapies while we emphasize the particular scientific and social values of cord blood donation to set up cord blood banks. The current scientific and legal frameworks of cord blood banks are reviewed at an international level as well as allogenic, dedicated and autologous donations. The expectations and the challenges in relation to present-day targeted diseases like diabetes mellitus type I, Parkinson's disease and myocardial infarction are evaluated in the light of the cellular therapies for regenerative medicine. PMID:23283430

  3. Glioblastoma stem cells and stem cell-targeting immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Rogelio; Azad, Tej D; Feroze, Abdullah H; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Cheshier, Samuel H

    2015-07-01

    Advancements in immunotherapeutics promise new possibilities for the creation of glioblastoma (GBM) treatment options. Ongoing work in cancer stem cell biology has progressively elucidated the role of this tumor sub-population in oncogenesis and has distinguished them as prime therapeutic targets. Current clinical trials take a multifaceted approach with the intention of harnessing the intrinsic cytotoxic capabilities of the immune system to directly target glioblastoma cancer stem cells (gCSC) or indirectly disrupt their stromal microenvironment. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies have emerged as the most common approaches, with particular iterations incorporating cancer stem cell antigenic markers in their treatment designs. Ongoing work to determine the comprehensive antigenic profile of the gCSC in conjunction with efforts to counter the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment holds much promise in future immunotherapeutic strategies against GBM. Given recent advancements in these fields, we believe there is tremendous potential to improve outcomes of GBM patients in the continuing evolution of immunotherapies targeted to cancer stem cell populations in GBM. PMID:25682090

  4. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest. PMID:18522846

  5. Stem-cell ecology and stem cells in motion

    PubMed Central

    Scadden, David T.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights major scientific developments over the past 50 years or so in concepts related to stem-cell ecology and to stem cells in motion. Many thorough and eloquent reviews have been presented in the last 5 years updating progress in these issues. Some paradigms have been challenged, others validated, or new ones brought to light. In the present review, we will confine our remarks to the historical development of progress. In doing so, we will refrain from a detailed analysis of controversial data, emphasizing instead widely accepted views and some challenging novel ones. PMID:18398055

  6. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadjimichael, Christiana; Chanoumidou, Konstantina; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Kretsovali, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal transducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors (cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research framework for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. PMID:26516408

  7. Deteriorating Infrastructure in the Aged Muscle Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Joseph T

    2016-08-01

    Following an injury, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic remodeling to facilitate tissue repair. In a new study, Lukjanenko and colleagues show how an age-associated change in this process affects the regenerative ability of muscle stem cells (MuSCs). PMID:27494671

  8. What if stem cells turn into embryos in a dish?

    PubMed

    Pera, Martin F; de Wert, Guido; Dondorp, Wybo; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Mummery, Christine L; Munsie, Megan; Tam, Patrick P

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies show that pluripotent stem cells can undergo self-organized development in vitro into structures that mimic the body plan of the post-implantation embryo. Modeling human embryogenesis in a dish opens up new possibilities for the study of early development and developmental disorders, but it may also raise substantial ethical concerns. PMID:26418764

  9. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients. PMID:26828436

  10. Cancer stem cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Matsui, William H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are governed by the actions of stem cells. Multipotent cells are capable of self-renewal during the course of one's lifetime. The accurate and appropriate regulation of stem cell functions is absolutely critical for normal biological activity. Several key developmental or signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles in this regulatory capacity. Specifically, the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog, and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways have all been shown experimentally to mediate various stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, cell fate decisions, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, many of these crucial signaling pathways are dysregulated in cancer. Growing evidence suggests that overactive or abnormal signaling within and among these pathways may contribute to the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a relatively rare population of cancer cells capable of self-renewal, differentiation, and generation of serially transplantable heterogeneous tumors of several types of cancer. PMID:27611937