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Sample records for stephen jay gould

  1. Stephen Jay Gould on intelligence.

    PubMed

    Korb, K B

    1994-08-01

    In The Mismeasure of Man (1981) Stephen Jay Gould provides a typically readable history of one of our most vexatious intellectual enterprises: the scientific study of intelligence. Gould is successful, as always, in rendering the relevant scientific debates accessible to general readers. What Gould does less well is to carry through his attack on prior attempts to understand natural intelligence scientifically: attempting to muster all possible arguments against such science, he conjures up a variety of impossible arguments as well. One such argument urges that Gould's predecessors are not to be taken seriously because they are racists and have let their racism influence their scientific practice. Gould has no difficulty in demonstrating the influence of racism; where he goes astray is in his dismissal of such prior work as simply unscientific because the racist conclusions preceded the collection of data. Advancing hypotheses prior to experimentation is how all of science proceeds, and is no mark of inferior work. And no science is immune to influences--racist or otherwise--from the culture in which it is embedded, as Gould elsewhere readily acknowledges. Another failed argument claims that all of the factor analysts studying intelligence have committed the intellectual sin of reifying the factors uncovered in IQ tests--concluding that the factors are real solely on the basis of how a factor analysis summarizes IQ data. Gould concludes that factor analysis is worthless for the study of intelligence. However: (1) contrary to what Gould suggests, the factor analysts themselves warned against concluding that the factors "discovered" are physiologically real merely on the basis of a factor analysis; and (2) factor analysis nevertheless remains a strong candidate technique for developing causal models worth investigating subsequently by other means. PMID:7924200

  2. Stephen Jay Gould on Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korb, Kevin B.

    1994-01-01

    Critiques ideas expressed by Gould in "The Mismeasure of Man." Agrees with Gould that many scientists who studied human intelligence were racist, but disagrees that their work must therefore necessarily be dismissed. Disputes Gould's claim that factor analysts who study human intelligence have reified their factors and that factor analysis is…

  3. Stephen Jay Gould as a political theorist.

    PubMed

    Prindle, David

    2006-01-01

    Before his death in 2002, paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould elaborated a large and inclusive theory of life's change. In this essay I concentrate on the aspects of Gould's vast theory that have the most direct political relevance. I briefly discuss his views on the philosophy of science. I examine the way he combined political values and methodology in a seamless, critical analysis of intelligence-testing and sociobiology. I concentrate most extensively on the impact his "punctuated equilibria" concept has made on contemporary political analysis, and I demonstrate that in their appropriation of this concept political scientists have violated the rules that Gould himself articulated for its use. In closing, I consider the possibility that a comprehensive theory of life, a theory that must include political values, might approach traditional questions of political thought more satisfyingly than has conventional philosophy. PMID:17722990

  4. Science and the Humanities: Stephen Jay Gould's Quest to Join the High Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Stephen Jay Gould was a scientist, a paleobiologist, who was also a professional-level historian of science. This essay explores Gould's work, showing how he used the history of science to further his agenda as a working scientist.

  5. Joltin' Joe and the Pursuit of Excellence: An Interview with Stephen Jay Gould.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mark F.

    1997-01-01

    Award-winning science author and Harvard professor Stephen Jay Gould shares some views on education and contemporary American culture. Gould's most enthusiastic school memory is singing in an all-city chorus. Harvard students are bright and motivated but have no shared culture, historical perspective, or foreign language proficiency. Gould favors…

  6. Science and the Humanities: Stephen Jay Gould's Quest to Join the High Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Jay Gould was a scientist, a paleobiologist, who was also a professional-level historian of science. This essay explores Gould's work, showing how he used the history of science to further his agenda as a working scientist.

  7. Reflections on Stephen Jay Gould's "The Mismeasure of Man" (1981): A Retrospective Review. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, John B.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that the statements and accusations made by Stephen Jay Gould about the use of factor analysis are incorrect and unjustified and that tests properly designed for the purpose can adequately measure a "general" or "g" factor of intelligence, particularly in view of the developments in testing since "The Mismeasure of Man" was written.…

  8. The History of Nature and the Nature of History: Stephen Jay Gould on Science, Philosophy, and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaser, Kent

    1999-01-01

    Considers Stephen Jay Gould's writings on the nature of history, specifically on the relationship between science and history. Addresses the scientific method, the foundations and procedures of historical explanation in science, history as contingency, and evolution as history. (CMK)

  9. Claiming Darwin: Stephen Jay Gould in contests over evolutionary orthodoxy and public perception, 1977-2002.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Myrna Perez

    2014-03-01

    This article analyzes the impact of the resurgence of American creationism in the early 1980s on debates within post-synthesis evolutionary biology. During this period, many evolutionists criticized Harvard biologist Stephen Jay Gould for publicizing his revisions to traditional Darwinian theory and opening evolution to criticism by creationists. Gould's theory of punctuated equilibrium was a significant source of contention in these disputes. Both he and his critics, including Richard Dawkins, claimed to be carrying the mantle of Darwinian evolution. By the end of the 1990s, the debate over which evolutionary thinkers were the rightful heirs to Darwin's evolutionary theory was also a conversation over whether Darwinism could be defended against creationists in the broader cultural context. Gould and others' claims to Darwin shaped the contours of a political, religious and scientific controversy. PMID:24457049

  10. Science, Intelligence, and Educational Policy: The Mismeasure of Frankenstein (with Apologies to Mary Shelley and Stephen Jay Gould).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zappardino, Pamela

    Stephen Jay Gould points out in "The Mismeasure of Man" (1981), "Science, since people must do it, is a socially embedded activity. It progresses by hunch, vision, and intuition." The legacy of the traditional construct of intelligence and its measurement through intelligence quotient (IQ) tests has not been educational improvement. Its legacy in…

  11. This view of science: Stephen Jay Gould as historian of science and scientific historian, popular scientist and scientific popularizer.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Michael B

    2002-08-01

    Science historian Ronald Numbers once remarked that the two most influential historians of science of the 20th century were Thomas Kuhn and Stephen Jay Gould. All historians are deeply familiar with Kuhn's work and influence, and most know of the remarkable impact Gould has had on evolutionary theory through both his professional and popular works. But little attention has been paid to the depth, scope, and importance of Gould's rôle as historian and philosopher of science, and his use of popular science exposition to reinforce old knowledge and generate new. This paper presents the results of an extensive quantitative content analysis of Gould's 22 books, 101 book reviews, 479 scientific papers, and 300 Natural History essays, in terms of their subject matter (Evolutionary Theory, History and Philosophy of Science, Natural History, Paleontology/Geology, Social Science/Commentary), and thematic dichotomies (Theory-Data, Time's Arrow-Time's Cycle, Adaptationism- Nonadaptationalism, Punctuationism-Gradualism, Contingency-Necessity). Special emphasis is placed on the interaction between the subjects and themata, how Gould has used the history of science to reinforce his evolutionary theory (and vice versa), and how his philosophy of science has influenced both his evolutionary theory and his historiography. That philosophy can best be summed up in a quotation from Charles Darwin, frequently cited by Gould: 'All observation must be for or against some view if it is to be of any service'. Gould followed Darwin's advice throughout his career, including his extensive writings on the history and philosophy of science. PMID:12503565

  12. This View of Science: Stephen Jay Gould as Historian of Science and Scientific Historian, Popular Scientist and Scientific Popularizer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermer, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the results of an extensive quantitative content analysis of Gould's 22 books, 101 book reviews, 479 scientific papers, and 300 Natural History essays, in terms of subject matter, and thematic dichotomies. Emphasizes the interaction between the subjects and themata, how Gould has used the history of science to reinforce his evolutionary…

  13. Many ways of being human, the Stephen J. Gould's legacy to Palaeo-Anthropology (2002-2012).

    PubMed

    Pievani, Telmo

    2012-01-01

    As an invertebrate palaeontologist and evolutionary theorist, Stephen J. Gould did not publish any direct experimental results in palaeo-anthropology (with the exception of Pilbeam and Gould, 1974), but he did prepare the stage for many debates within the discipline. We argue here that his scientific legacy in the anthropological fields has a clear and coherent conceptual structure. It is based on four main pillars: (1) the famed deconstruction of the "ladder of progress" as an influential metaphor in human evolution; (2) Punctuated Equilibria and their significance in human macro-evolution viewed as a directionless "bushy tree" of species; (3) the trade-offs between functional and structural factors in evolution and the notion of exaptation; (4) delayed growth, or neoteny, as an evidence in human evolution. These keystones should be considered as consequences of the enduring theoretical legacy of the eminent Harvard evolutionist: the proposal of an extended and revised Darwinism, coherently outlined in the last twenty years of his life (1982-2002) and set out in 2002 in his final work, The Structure of Evolutionary Theory. It is in the light of his "Darwinian pluralism", able to integrate in a new frame the multiplicity of explanatory patterns emerging from different evolutionary fields, that we understand Stephen J. Gould's legacy in palaeo-anthropology today, both in terms of provocative shocks to comfortable visions of human evolution and, above all, in terms of specific scientific predictions about future research. PMID:23274749

  14. Stephen Jay Kline on systems, or physics, complex systems, and the gap between.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2011-06-01

    At the end of his life, Stephen Jay Kline, longtime professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, completed a book on how to address complex systems. The title of the book is 'Conceptual Foundations of Multi-Disciplinary Thinking' (1995), but the topic of the book is systems. Kline first establishes certain limits that are characteristic of our conscious minds. Kline then establishes a complexity measure for systems and uses that complexity measure to develop a hierarchy of systems. Kline then argues that our minds, due to their characteristic limitations, are unable to model the complex systems in that hierarchy. Computers are of no help to us here. Our attempts at modeling these complex systems are based on the way we successfully model some simple systems, in particular, 'inert, naturally-occurring' objects and processes, such as what is the focus of physics. But complex systems overwhelm such attempts. As a result, the best we can do in working with these complex systems is to use a heuristic, what Kline calls the 'Guideline for Complex Systems.' Kline documents the problems that have developed due to 'oversimple' system models and from the inappropriate application of a system model from one domain to another. One prominent such problem is the Procrustean attempt to make the disciplines that deal with complex systems be 'physics-like.' Physics deals with simple systems, not complex ones, using Kline's complexity measure. The models that physics has developed are inappropriate for complex systems. Kline documents a number of the wasteful and dangerous fallacies of this type.

  15. Gould talking past Dawkins on the unit of selection issue.

    PubMed

    Istvan, M A

    2013-09-01

    My general aim is to clarify the foundational difference between Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Dawkins concerning what biological entities are the units of selection in the process of evolution by natural selection. First, I recapitulate Gould's central objection to Dawkins's view that genes are the exclusive units of selection. According to Gould, it is absurd for Dawkins to think that genes are the exclusive units of selection when, after all, genes are not the exclusive interactors: those agents directly engaged with, directly impacted by, environmental pressures. Second, I argue that Gould's objection still goes through even when we take into consideration Sterelny and Kitcher's defense of gene selectionism in their admirable paper "The Return of the Gene." Third, I propose a strategy for defending Dawkins that I believe obviates Gould's objection. Drawing upon Elisabeth Lloyd's careful taxonomy of the various understandings of the unit of selection at play in the philosophy of biology literature, my proposal involves realizing that Dawkins endorses a different understanding of the unit of selection than Gould holds him to, an understanding that does not require genes to be the exclusive interactors. PMID:23806523

  16. Pinyon Jay

    Pinyon jays coevolved as non-migratory mutualists with pinyon pines. Jays disperse the large wingless seed of pinyon pines over long distances, which can result in relatively rapid colonization. At the same time, the jays obtain energy and nutrients from the seeds. Although closely associated with...

  17. The rhetorical construction of Eldredge and Gould's article on the theory of punctuated equilibria in 1972.

    PubMed

    Cachón, Vladimir; Barahona, Ana; Ayala, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to show how several rhetorical tools were used and, in fact, played a central role in the argumentation advanced by Niles Eldredge and Stephen Jay Gould in their 1972 seminal article on the theory of Punctuated Equilibria. It is analyzed how Eldredge and Gould proceeded through three steps that, sequentially integrated, made their argument compelling. It is shown how they made use of analogies, metaphors and other rhetorical tools. It is sustained that they began by priming the reader to distrust the current interpretation of the fossil record offered by most paleontologists and then, in a second step, they used specific visual representations in order to suggest that the competitor theory was committed to the idea of an even and slow evolution at a constant rate, an image utilized by them as straw man. Finally, it is analyzed how, in their third step, Eldredge and Gould made use of several rhetorical arguments to present their theory as new for paleontology while, at the same time, placing it well inside the frame of the modern synthesis, and how they also managed to present their theory as more promising and capable of making predictions for future researches than the competitor theory. PMID:19579708

  18. Jay B. Nash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jable, J. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Jay B. Nash's accomplishments and professional service have long been recognized by physical educators. This article examines the major forces and events that made him one of the most important leaders in American physical education. (MT)

  19. Gould's NCLIS Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2000-01-01

    Describes Martha B. Gould's agenda for the United States National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS). Highlights include: political savvy and the National Technical Information Service; Internet policy for libraries; her status as the first public librarian to chair NCLIS; library education; federal responsibility in library

  20. Florida Scrub Jay mortality on roadsides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Breininger, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Brevard County, Florida supports two of the three largest remaining Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens) populations, with about 1870 birds on Kennedy Space Center and 920 birds on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Breininger 1989). Between 24 may and 5 June 1989, four Scrub Jay carcasses were collected on two roadsides in Brevard County apparently killed by vehicles.

  1. Evolving to the Beat of a Different Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents arguments against the recent "punctuated equilibrium" point of view expressed by evolutionists Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge. Reviews evidence for continuous and gradual change, as recently cited by four anthropologists in the July 9 issue of "Nature." (CS)

  2. An Interview with Stephen Vitiello

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Vitiello is a world-renowned contemporary sound artist whom the author has known as a colleague for several years. This article presents an interview about the overall body of Vitiello's work to date, and his thoughts on teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University. The interview explores the creative and noncreative tensions between…

  3. Stephen Hawking's Universe. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Malcolm H.; Rameau, Jonathan D.

    This program guide is meant to help teachers assist their students in viewing the six-part public television series, "Stephen Hawking's Universe." The guide features program summaries that give background information and brief synopses of the programs; previewing activities that familiarize students with the subject; vocabulary that gives…

  4. The Hopeful Traveler Jay Bryan Nash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup, Harvey M., Comp.

    This book is one of a series of publications preserving the best writing and speeches of outstanding leaders of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. Jay Bryan Nash was one of the founders of the Alliance. The speeches and essays by Nash in this collection are, for the most part, appearing in published form…

  5. Neo-Lysenkoism, IQ, and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bernard D.

    1983-01-01

    In "The Mismeasure of Man," a history of efforts to measure intelligence, Stephen Jay Gould is highly selective in his account, and tests for scientific truth by the standards of his own social and political convictions. Specifically, to combat racist approaches to theories of intelligence, Gould presses for equal and opposite bias. (Author/GC)

  6. 45. 'Replace Starboard Elevator and Repairs, Gould Island, Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. 'Replace Starboard Elevator and Repairs, Gould Island, Building No. 35,' approved 26 July 1981, NUSC Drawing No. 80-67, NAV. FAC. Drawing No. 2,047,203. Scales as noted. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  7. Author! Author! Picture Artist: Stephen Gammell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This column presents a brief biography of illustrator Stephen Gammell, well-known for both his black-and-white and his brightly colored children's picture book art. Stephen Gammell has made a long career illustrating children's stories and poems. The first book he illustrated, "A Nutty Business" (written by Ida Chittum), was published in 1973 and…

  8. Losing Jay: A Meditation on Teaching while Grieving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Blaise Astra

    2009-01-01

    The author's partner Jay died on May 23, 2006. It was sudden and unexpected--he was 31, the author was 30. Her grief was prolonged and agonizing, and she has since learned that doctors refer to her condition as "complicated grief." Truly, she is not sure how she survived the first year after Jay's death. She certainly was not convinced she wanted

  9. Losing Jay: A Meditation on Teaching while Grieving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Blaise Astra

    2009-01-01

    The author's partner Jay died on May 23, 2006. It was sudden and unexpected--he was 31, the author was 30. Her grief was prolonged and agonizing, and she has since learned that doctors refer to her condition as "complicated grief." Truly, she is not sure how she survived the first year after Jay's death. She certainly was not convinced she wanted…

  10. Visual Detection of Cryptic Prey by Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Pietrewicz, A T; Kamil, A C

    1977-02-11

    Blue jays learned to respond differentially to the presence or absence of Catocala moths in slides. This detection of the moths by the jays was affected by the background upon which the moth was placed and its body orientation, thus providing an objective measure of crypticity. These procedures are useful for the study of visual detection of prey. PMID:17732294

  11. Blue Jays Win! Crows Go Down in Defeat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuthrick, Marjorie A.

    1990-01-01

    Teachers tend to teach children in different reading groups in qualitatively different ways. Crows (slower readers) work on phonics in isolation twice as often as more accomplished Blue Jays and spend much less time on reading silently or in context. Since this situation inhibits reading achievement, teachers should seek Blue Jay potential in

  12. 50 CFR 21.46 - Depredation order for depredating scrub jays and Steller's jays in Washington and Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.46 Depredation order for... to bury or otherwise destroy the carcasses of such birds is permitted: Provided, That the Director of... jays and Steller's jays killed as may be needed for scientific investigations. (c) That such birds...

  13. 50 CFR 21.46 - Depredation order for depredating scrub jays and Steller's jays in Washington and Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.46 Depredation order for... to bury or otherwise destroy the carcasses of such birds is permitted: Provided, That the Director of... jays and Steller's jays killed as may be needed for scientific investigations. (c) That such birds...

  14. 50 CFR 21.46 - Depredation order for depredating scrub jays and Steller's jays in Washington and Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.46 Depredation order for... to bury or otherwise destroy the carcasses of such birds is permitted: Provided, That the Director of... jays and Steller's jays killed as may be needed for scientific investigations. (c) That such birds...

  15. 50 CFR 21.46 - Depredation order for depredating scrub jays and Steller's jays in Washington and Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.46 Depredation order for... to bury or otherwise destroy the carcasses of such birds is permitted: Provided, That the Director of... jays and Steller's jays killed as may be needed for scientific investigations. (c) That such birds...

  16. 50 CFR 21.46 - Depredation order for depredating scrub jays and Steller's jays in Washington and Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.46 Depredation order for... to bury or otherwise destroy the carcasses of such birds is permitted: Provided, That the Director of... jays and Steller's jays killed as may be needed for scientific investigations. (c) That such birds...

  17. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Understanding the influence of outflows on Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabek-Maunder, E.; Hatchell, J.; Buckle, J. V.; Di Francesco, J.; Richer, J.

    2016-03-01

    Using James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey data from CO J = 3 → 2 isotopologues, we present a meta-analysis of the outflows and energetics of star-forming regions in several Gould Belt clouds. The majority of the regions are strongly gravitationally bound. There is evidence that molecular outflows transport large quantities of momentum and energy. Outflow energies are at least 20 per cent of the total turbulent kinetic energies in all of the regions studied and greater than the turbulent energy in half of the regions. However, we find no evidence that outflows increase levels of turbulence, and there is no correlation between the outflow and turbulent energies. Even though outflows in some regions contribute significantly to maintaining turbulence levels against dissipation, this relies on outflows efficiently coupling to bulk motions. Other mechanisms (e.g. supernovae) must be the main drivers of turbulence in most if not all of these regions.

  19. Stephen Hales: neglected respiratory physiologist.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    1984-09-01

    Stephen Hales was an eminent early 18th century scientist and minister of the parish of Teddington near London. He is well known for his early work on blood pressure. However, he made many contributions to respiratory physiology. He clarified the nature of the respiratory gases, distinguishing between their free (gaseous) and fixed (chemically combined) forms, demonstrated that rebreathing from a closed circuit could be extended if suitable gas absorbers were included (to remove carbon dioxide), suggested a similar device as a respirator for noxious atmospheres, invented the pneumatic trough for collecting gases, measured the size of the alveoli, calculated the surface area of the interior of the lung, calculated the time spent by the blood in a pulmonary capillary, invented the U-tube manometer, and measured intrathoracic pressures during normal and forced breathing. Hale's work is remarkable for its emphasis on the "statical" method, i.e., meticulous attention to detail in measurement and careful calculations. In his later life he made important contributions in the area of public health. He was a trustee of the new colony of Georgia and willed his own library of books to the colony though their whereabouts is unknown. He deserves more recognition in the history of respiratory physiology. PMID:6386767

  20. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. Gould White, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. Gould White, Photographer March 30, 1936 VIEW OF NORTH SIDE - Smith's Covered Bridge, Beaver Valley, spanning Brandywine River, Granogue, New Castle County, DE

  1. 29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing pier (still possessing third and fourth levels) in foreground. Pitched roof extending from south end of firing pier marks location of frame approach between pier and shop building (center rear) and power plant (to right of shop). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  2. Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) conceal caches from onlookers.

    PubMed

    Legg, Edward W; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-09-01

    Animals that cache food risk having their stored food pilfered by conspecifics. Previous research has shown that a number of food-caching species of corvid use strategies that decrease the probability of conspecifics pilfering their caches. In this experiment, we investigated whether Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) would choose between caching behind an opaque and caching behind a transparent barrier whilst being observed by a conspecific. If caching in out-of-sight locations is a strategy to prevent conspecifics from pilfering these caches, then the jays should place a greater proportion of caches behind the opaque barrier when being observed than when caching in private. In accordance with this prediction, jays cached a greater proportion of food behind the opaque barrier when they were observed than when they cached in private. These results suggest that Eurasian jays may opt to cache in out-of-view locations to reduce the likelihood of conspecifics pilfering their caches. PMID:24638877

  3. Solutions for Jay and Other Underrepresented Gifted Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Jay, an African American male, was placed in the gifted class in fifth grade. He lined up with his new class on the first day of school, but refused to enter the classroom. He was angry that he had been placed in the class with "those kids" and wanted to be in the other class where his friends were. Each day thereafter, Jay struggled with being…

  4. Aversion/attraction of blue jays to microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, F E; Dowd, C; Byman, D; Schlinger, B A; Battista, S P; Kunz, T H

    1984-11-01

    Aversion/attraction experiments were conducted to determine whether birds can perceive the presence of 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwave irradiation by observing whether Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) exhibit an attraction or an aversion to the field when exposed to 25 and 50 mW/cm2. At power densities of 25 and 50 mW/cm2 Blue Jays exhibit an aversion to microwave irradiation. PMID:6522499

  5. Geographic variation in Mexican jays (Aphelocoma ultramarina): local differentiation, polyphyly or hybridization?

    PubMed

    Bhagabati, Nirmal K; Brown, Jerram L; Bowen, Bonnie S

    2004-09-01

    Studies of genetic variation within highly variable taxa can provide valuable insight into the factors influencing biological diversification. We examined six microsatellite loci, a nuclear intron and the mitochondrial control region to determine if the Mexican jay subspecies Aphelocoma ultramarina couchii and A. u. potosina have hybridized with western scrub-jays (A. californica). We suspected hybridization because these Mexican Jay populations resemble scrub-jays in several traits. We sampled six Mexican jay (N = 105) and four scrub-jay (N = 78) populations. Suspected hybrid Mexican Jay populations did not share any mitochondrial types or intron alleles with scrub-jays. All microsatellite alleles found in the suspected hybrid Mexican jay populations are also found in the control Mexican jay populations. Genetic distance-based trees from microsatellites supported reciprocal monophyly of Mexican jays and scrub-jays with bootstrap support > 80%. We randomized genotypes among populations to test scenarios consistent with hybridization. In some areas where Mexican jays and scrub-jays occur in sympatry or geographical proximity, randomization tests yield results expected under hybridization (100% support for seven of nine scenarios). However, these populations were not the primary candidates for hybridization based on phenotype. Even if low-level hybridization did occur, hybridization does not appear to be the main reason some Mexican jay populations resemble scrub-jays more than others. The scrub-jay-like traits in these populations may be due to drift, adaptation or plasticity. Alternatively, ancient hybridization, followed by selection for scrub-jay like traits in some Mexican jay populations, might have given rise to the observed variation. PMID:15315684

  6. “Anting” in Blue Jays

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Thomas; Aneshansley, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Summary Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines), is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants. Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is a strategy by which birds render ants fit for ingestion. Formicine ants are ordinarily protected by their formic acid-containing spray. Being wiped into the bird’s plumage causes them to discharge that spray, without harm to the bird, to the point of almost total emptying of the glandular sac in which the secretion is stored. The ants are therefore essentially secretion-free by the time they are swallowed. Further evidence indicates that it is the ant’s possession of the acid sac that triggers the anting behavior in the bird. If F. exsectoides are surgically deprived of their acid sac, they are eaten by the birds without first being subjected to anting. Data are also presented indicating that the ant’s crop, which is especially capacious in formicines (its contents may amount to over 30% of the formicine’s mass), and which appears to survive the anting procedure intact, constitutes, at least when laden, a valuable component of the trophic package that the bird accesses by anting. PMID:19169379

  7. Excerpts from the Writings of Stephen Toulmin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toulmin, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Presents excerpts from Stephen Toulmin's (1996 Jefferson Lecturer for the Humanities) works. The excerpt from, "Wittgenstein's Vienna," concerns the corruption of social standards, norms, and political authority. "The Return to Cosmology" discusses the role of philosophy in postmodern society and reveals surprising antecedents in stoic and

  8. Excerpts from the Writings of Stephen Toulmin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toulmin, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Presents excerpts from Stephen Toulmin's (1996 Jefferson Lecturer for the Humanities) works. The excerpt from, "Wittgenstein's Vienna," concerns the corruption of social standards, norms, and political authority. "The Return to Cosmology" discusses the role of philosophy in postmodern society and reveals surprising antecedents in stoic and…

  9. Factorial Validity of Stephen's Social Behavior Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Barbara M.; Schneider, Barry H.

    1985-01-01

    Conducted exploratory factor analysis and item analysis of Stephen's Social Behavior Assessment using ratings of elementary school pupils from regular classes. Based on these results, a tentative shorter, revised instrument was proposed which discriminated between students in regular classes and those enrolled in special education programs.…

  10. VIP interview: John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV, United States Senator.

    PubMed

    Rockefeller, J D

    1994-01-01

    John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV has proudly served the people of West Virginia for nearly 30 years. After coming to the town of Emmons in 1964 as a VISTA worker, Jay Rockefeller made the Mountain State his home. In 1966, he was elected to a two-year term in the West Virginia House of Delegates. He then served four years as Secretary of State, three years as President of West Virginia Wesleyan College, and eight years as Governor of West Virginia. In 1984, he was elected to the United States Senate and was reelected in 1990. PMID:10134008

  11. 8. VIEW OF COMBINATION GEAR HOBBING MACHINE (Gould & Eberhardt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF COMBINATION GEAR HOBBING MACHINE (Gould & Eberhardt, Newark, New Jersey. Patented No. 2103) AND LATHE (W.E. Shipley Machiner Co. Metal Working Machinery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1913). - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  12. Retrospective Cognition by Food-Caching Western Scrub-Jays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Kort, S.R.; Dickinson, A.; Clayton, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    Episodic-like memory, the retrospective component of cognitive time travel in animals, needs to fulfil three criteria to meet the behavioral properties of episodic memory as defined for humans. Here, we review results obtained with the cache-recovery paradigm with western scrub-jays and conclude that they fulfil these three criteria. The jays…

  13. AVERSION/ATTRACTION OF BLUE JAYS TO MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aversion/attraction experiments were conducted to determine whether birds can perceive of 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwave irradiation by observing whether Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) exhibit an attraction or an aversion to the field when exposed to 25 and 50 microwaves/sq ...

  14. Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, Floyd Michael

    2010-10-01

    The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly during his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

  15. Arboviral infection in two species of wild jays (Aves: Corvidae): evidence for population impacts.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Stark, Lillian M; Woolfenden, Glen E; Fitzpatrick, John W; Day, Jonathan F

    2004-03-01

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to three mosquito-borne arboviruses in blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata, and Florida scrub-jays, Aphelocoma coerulescens, to identify the effects on host survival, the influence of sex and age on infection, and the temporal patterns of antibody prevalence. Blood samples from 306 blue jays and 219 Florida scrub-jays were collected at Archbold Biological Station (Lake Placid, FL) from April 1994 through December 1995. Sera were analyzed for hemagglutination-inhibition antibody to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses, and neutralizing antibodies to EEE, Highlands J (HJ), and SLE viruses. Overall, 31.4% of blue jay samples and 22.1% of scrub-jay samples had antibodies to EEE. Antibodies to HJ were detected in slightly >15% of samples in each jay species, and SLE was detected in <3% of the samples in each jay species. A single EEE virus isolation was made from the blood of an 11-d-old scrub-jay nestling. Survival of adult blue jays seropositive to EEE was significantly lower than that of seronegative birds based on resight rates, but infection did not seem to affect survival of adult or juvenile Florida scrub-jays. PMID:15061281

  16. The Scientific Legacy of Stephen Rothman

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Walter H. C.; Bickers, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The year 2014 marks the centennial of events that led to World War 1 (“the war to end all wars”) following the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand of the crumbling Austro-Hungarian Empire. It also marks the 120th anniversary of the birth of Stephen Rothman and the 60th anniversary of the publication of his epic textbook The Physiology and Biochemistry of the Skin. In this review we document our belief that Rothman had a seismic impact on moving investigative dermatology from a medical backwater to a scientific discipline that can hold its own with that of any other specialty. PMID:25373439

  17. Stephen H. Schneider (1945-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, Ben; Solomon, Susan

    2010-10-01

    Stephen H. Schneider, a pioneering climate scientist, prolific author, and inspirational teacher, passed away on 19 July 2010 while on travel in Europe. He was 65. As is clear from the outpouring of testimonials since his passing, atmospheric science has lost a towering figure, one whose impact as a scientist and communicator was exceeded only by his extraordinary human qualities. Steve Schneider touched lives; built bridges of communication to the public, to policy makers, and across disciplines; and established a distinguished record of seminal scientific breakthroughs.

  18. Quantum Trivelpiece-Gould waves in a magnetized dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tercas, H.; Mendonca, J. T.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-07-15

    The dispersion relation for the electrostatic waves below the electron plasma frequency in a dense quantum plasma is derived by using the magnetohydrodynamic model. It is shown that in the classical case the dispersion relation reduces to the expression obtained for the well-known Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes. Attention is also devoted to the case of solitary waves associated with the nonlinear TG modes.

  19. Review of Gould Dincer reservoir storage yield reliability estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Thomas A.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.; Vogel, Richard M.; Peel, Murray C.

    2007-09-01

    The Gould-Dincer suite of techniques (normal, log-normal and Gamma), which is used to estimate the reservoir capacity-yield-reliability ( S-Y-R) relationship, is the only known available procedure in the form of a simple formula, based on annual streamflow statistics, that allows one to compute the S-Y-R relationship for a single storage capacity across the range of annual streamflow characteristics observed globally. Several other techniques are available but they are inadequate because of the restricted range of flows on which they were developed or because they are based on the Sequent Peak Algorithm or are not suitable to compute steady-state reliability values. This paper examines the theoretical basis of the Gould-Dincer approach and applies the three models to annual streamflow data for 729 rivers distributed world-wide. The reservoir capacities estimated by the models are compared with equivalent estimates based on the Extended Deficit Analysis, Behaviour analysis and the Sequent Peak Algorithm. The results suggest that, in the context of preliminary water resources planning, the Gould-Dincer Gamma model provides reliable estimates of the mean first passage time from a full to empty condition for single reservoirs. Furthermore, the storage estimates are equivalent to deficits computed using the Extended Deficit Analysis for values of drift between 0.4 and 1.0 and the values are consistent with those computed using a Behaviour simulation or a Sequent Peak Algorithm. Finally, a sensitivity analysis of the effect on storage of the four main streamflow statistics confirms that the influential ones are mean and standard deviation, while effects of skew and serial correlation are orders of magnitude lower. This finding suggests that the simple reduced form of the Gould-Dincer equation may profitably be used for regional studies of reservoir reliability subject to climate change scenarios based on regional statistics, without having to perform calculations based on time series, which may not be easily obtained.

  20. Jay Haley's Supervision of a Case of Dissociative.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This is a transcript of a supervision session with a young therapist caught in the complex world of a woman with multiple personality. Occurring very early in the written literature about treating multiple personalities, the highlight of this paper is the supervision style and technique of Jay Haley. His approach to supervision will make the reader wish that he or she could be in the room during this session. PMID:26305132

  1. Search Image Formation in the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Pietrewicz, A T; Kamil, A C

    1979-06-22

    Blue jays trained to detect Catocala moths in slides were exposed to two types of slide series containing these moths: series of one species and series of two species intermixed. In one-species series, detection ability increased with successive encounters with one prey type. No similar effect occurred in two-species series. These results are a direct demonstration of a specific search image. PMID:17813172

  2. Mind the Gap (or Mending It): Qualitative Research and Interdisciplinarity in Kinesiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vertinsky, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the perceived gap between the humanities and social sciences, and the sciences in kinesiology faculties and departments as interdisciplinary pressures mount in an increasingly complex world. I use an historical lens to highlight past difficulties in working across the two solitudes and describe Stephen Jay Gould's efforts to

  3. Darwin's Revolution in Thought: An Illustrated Lecture. Teaching Guide and Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    "Darwin's Revolution in Thought" is Stephen Jay Gould's definitive treatise on Charles Darwin. This 50-minute classroom edition videotaped lecture is structured in the form of a paradox and three riddles about Darwin's life. Each is designed to shed light on one of the key features of the theory of natural selection, its philosophical radicalism,…

  4. Better than Ever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1998-01-01

    Paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould contends that .400 hitter in baseball is thing of past because game has gotten better. The higher average, the harder to stand out from that average. Applies concept to education by comparing students' SAT scores over almost 20 years with grade-point averages. Students with highest grades received highest SAT…

  5. Grade Inflation and the Extinction of the .400 Hitter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1998-01-01

    In "Full House: The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin," Stephen Jay Gould swats at nostalgia over extinction of the .400 batter--due more to game improvements than slumping batters. The better the averages, the harder it is to be a standout. As for grade inflation, today's students are studying harder subjects, and general achievement…

  6. Mind the Gap (or Mending It): Qualitative Research and Interdisciplinarity in Kinesiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vertinsky, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the perceived gap between the humanities and social sciences, and the sciences in kinesiology faculties and departments as interdisciplinary pressures mount in an increasingly complex world. I use an historical lens to highlight past difficulties in working across the two solitudes and describe Stephen Jay Gould's efforts to…

  7. The Trying Out of the Essay: How Scientific Essayists Compose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Diane

    Six scientific essayists were interviewed to gain some understanding of their writing processes. The writers were Roger Sawin, who writes for "Horticulture"; Harold Morowitz who writes for "Hospital Practices,""Science 82" and "Science 83"; Stephen Jay Gould who writes for "Natural History"; Jeremy Bernstein who writes for the "New Yorker" and…

  8. The Trying Out of the Essay: How Scientific Essayists Compose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Diane

    Six scientific essayists were interviewed to gain some understanding of their writing processes. The writers were Roger Sawin, who writes for "Horticulture"; Harold Morowitz who writes for "Hospital Practices,""Science 82" and "Science 83"; Stephen Jay Gould who writes for "Natural History"; Jeremy Bernstein who writes for the "New Yorker" and

  9. Piagetian object permanence and its development in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius).

    PubMed

    Zucca, Paolo; Milos, Nadia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2007-04-01

    Object permanence in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) was investigated using a complete version of the Uzgiris and Hunt scale 1. Nine hand-raised jays were studied, divided into two groups according to their different developmental stages (experiment 1, older jays: 2-3 months old, n = 4; experiment 2, younger jays: 15 days old, n = 5). In the first experiment, we investigated whether older jays could achieve piagetian stage 6 of object permanence. Tasks were administered in a fixed sequence (1-15) according to the protocols used in other avian species. The aim of the second experiment was to check whether testing very young jays before their development of "neophobia" could influence the achievement times of piagetian stages. Furthermore, in this experiment tasks were administered randomly to investigate whether the jays' achievement of stage 6 follows a fixed sequence related to the development of specific cognitive abilities. All jays tested in experiments 1 and 2 fully achieved piagetian stage 6 and no "A not B" errors were observed. Performance on visible displacement tasks was better than performance on invisible ones. The results of experiment 2 show that "neophobia" affected the response of jays in terms of achievement times; the older jays in experiment 1 took longer to pass all the tasks when compared with the younger, less neophobic, jays in experiment 2. With regard to the achieving order, jays followed a fixed sequence of acquisition in experiment 2, even if tasks were administered randomly, with the exception of one subject. The results of these experiments support the idea that piagetian stages of cognitive development exist in avian species and that they progress through relatively fixed sequences. PMID:17242935

  10. John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood: Mayan Explorers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Michael

    This mini-unit focuses on the lives and accomplishments of John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood and their contacts with the Maya. This project deals specifically with how Stephens' published accounts and Catherwood's drawings became the basis from which all further Mayan research developed. These two explorers were the first to describe…

  11. 77 FR 61003 - Stephen C. Delaney, Jr.: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Stephen C. Delaney, Jr.: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and... order under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring Stephen C. Delaney, Jr...-796-4640. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Section 306(b)(1)(C) of the FD&C Act (21...

  12. Kindness in the Art Classroom: Kind Thoughts on Stephen Rowland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article is a response to Stephen Rowland's article, "Kindness," which appeared in "London Review of Education," November 2009. Much to my amazement, Stephen Rowland's article was the only one I found when I did a global database search on "kindness in education". I had thought that I would find reams of information in the databases on the…

  13. 76 FR 30947 - Stephen Lee Seldon: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Stephen Lee Seldon: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an order under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) permanently debarring Stephen Lee Seldon,...

  14. 77 FR 10533 - Stephen L. Marks: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Stephen L. Marks: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) permanently debarring Stephen L. Marks from providing services in any capacity to a person that has an approved or pending drug product application....

  15. New Burgess shale type fauna in the Middle Cambrian Stephen Formation on Mt. Stephen, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Excavation of a fossil locality discovered in 1981 on Mount Stephen, 5 km south of the Burgess shale site on Mount Wapta, has yielded about 1000 specimens of a new soft-bodied and lightly-sclerotized fauna. The fauna includes the trilobite, Glossopleura, which is characteristic of the lower part of the Stephen Formation, 100 m or more stratigraphically below the level of the Burgess shale fauna. The arthropod, Alalcomenaeus, a genus extremely rare in the Burgess shale, is by far the most numerous, followed by a new, fishlike arthropod with prominent eyes, and Branchiocaris, another extremely rare Burgess shale arthropod. Many Burgess shale animals are present, although the most common, Marrella, is absent. They include the arthropods Canadaspis, Naraoia, Plenocaris and Tuzoia, the worms Ottoia and Burgessochaeta, the onychophoran Aysheaia, the sponge Leptomitus, Wiwaxia of unknown affinities, and Fasciculus, a possible ctenophore. The Glossopleura fauna thus adds extant and extinct invertebrate groups to those already known in the Middle Cambrian epoch, mostly from the Burgess shale. It also demonstrates that the animals preserved in the Stephen Formation are evolutionarily stable.

  16. Jay Lloyd Ankeney, June 7, 1921-December 24, 2014.

    PubMed

    Snow, Norman J; Rainer, W Gerald

    2015-11-01

    Jay Ankeney, the 16th President of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, was an early pioneer in adult and pediatric cardiac operations, a prescient advocate of off-bypass coronary revascularization, and a strong champion of cardiothoracic recertification. He was among the first to endorse the need to provide practicing cardiothoracic surgeons the means for self-assessment and improvement. He led the development of Coordinating Committee for Continuing Education in Thoracic Surgery and inaugurated the self-education/self assessment syllabus for this purpose. Under his leadership he persuaded the vast majority of cardiothoracic surgeons to embrace recertification and by this means provide reassurance and accountability to their patients. PMID:26522551

  17. Pilfering Eurasian jays use visual and acoustic information to locate caches.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Rachael C; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-11-01

    Pilfering corvids use observational spatial memory to accurately locate caches that they have seen another individual make. Accordingly, many corvid cache-protection strategies limit the transfer of visual information to potential thieves. Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) employ strategies that reduce the amount of visual and auditory information that is available to competitors. Here, we test whether or not the jays recall and use both visual and auditory information when pilfering other birds' caches. When jays had no visual or acoustic information about cache locations, the proportion of available caches that they found did not differ from the proportion expected if jays were searching at random. By contrast, after observing and listening to a conspecific caching in gravel or sand, jays located a greater proportion of caches, searched more frequently in the correct substrate type and searched in fewer empty locations to find the first cache than expected. After only listening to caching in gravel and sand, jays also found a larger proportion of caches and searched in the substrate type where they had heard caching take place more frequently than expected. These experiments demonstrate that Eurasian jays possess observational spatial memory and indicate that pilfering jays may gain information about cache location merely by listening to caching. This is the first evidence that a corvid may use recalled acoustic information to locate and pilfer caches. PMID:24889656

  18. Tool-making and tool-using in the northern blue jay.

    PubMed

    Jones, T B; Kamil, A C

    1973-06-01

    Laboratory-raised Northeirn blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) have been observed tearing pieces from pages of newspaper and utilizing them as tools to rake in food pellets which were otherwise out of reach. The frequency of this behavior was dependenit upon the motivational state of the jay and the presence of food pellets. PMID:17806587

  19. Pathogenicity of Haemoproteus danilewskyi, Kruse, 1890, in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Homer, Bruce L; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    Although the impact of blood parasite infections on passerine birds is potentially great, little is known of their pathologic effects. We studied Haemoproteus danilewskyi in experimentally infected captive and naturally infected free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) to determine patterns of infection and examine the pathologic effects of the parasite on the host. Physiologic changes, such as elevated numbers of lymphocytes, heterophils, basophils, eosinophils, and monocytes and decreased packed cell volume in the peripheral blood were associated with the erythrocytic phase of experimental infections of captive juvenile jays. Sublethal pathologic changes associated with the pre-erythrocytic phase of infections were observed in the liver, lung, and spleen. Schizonts were observed in the pulmonary capillaries of a 1 yr old jay necropsied 31 days post-inoculation, but not in 20 juvenile jays necropsied 57 days post-inoculation. In free-ranging naturally infected jays plasma protein concentration increased with density of natural infections. PMID:12685080

  20. Remeasuring man.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) was the most highly regarded American scientist of the early and middle 19th century. Thanks largely to Stephen Jay Gould's book The Mismeasure of Man, Morton's cranial capacity measurements of different races is now held up as a prime example of and cautionary tale against scientific racism. A team of anthropologists recently reevaluated Morton's work and argued that it was Gould, not Morton, who was biased in his analysis. This article is a reexamination of the Morton and Gould controversy. It argues that most of Gould's arguments against Morton are sound. Although Gould made some errors and overstated his case in a number of places, he provided prima facia evidence, as yet unrefuted, that Morton did indeed mismeasure his skulls in ways that conformed to 19th century racial biases. Gould's critique of Morton ought to remain as an illustration of implicit bias in science. PMID:24761929

  1. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Credit: Stephen E. Drew ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Credit: Stephen E. Drew Collection INTERIOR VIEWS, CIRCA 1880, FROM YERINGTON FAMILY ALBUM - St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 312 North Division Street, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  2. Careful cachers and prying pilferers: Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) limit auditory information available to competitors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rachael C.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2013-01-01

    Food-storing corvids use many cache-protection and pilfering strategies. We tested whether Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) reduce the transfer of auditory information to a competitor when caching and pilfering. We gave jays a noisy and a quiet substrate to cache in. Compared with when alone, birds cached less in the noisy substrate when with a conspecific that could hear but could not see them caching. By contrast, jays did not change the amount cached in the noisy substrate when they were with a competitor that could see and hear them caching compared with when they were alone. Together, these results suggest that jays reduce auditory information during caching as a cache-protection strategy. By contrast, as pilferers, jays did not attempt to conceal their presence from a cacher and did not prefer a silent viewing perch over a noisy one when observing caching. However, birds vocalized less when watching caching compared with when they were alone, when they were watching a non-caching conspecific or when they were watching their own caches being pilfered. Pilfering jays may therefore attempt to suppress some types of auditory information. Our results raise the possibility that jays both understand and can attribute auditory perception to another individual. PMID:23222444

  3. Time Restored - The Harrison Timekeepers and R.T. Gould, the Man Who Knew (Almost) Everything

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Jonathan

    2006-09-01

    This is the story of Rupert T. Gould (1890-1948), the polymath and horologist. A remarkable man, Lt Cmdr Gould made important contributions in an extraordinary range of subject areas throughout his relatively short and dramatically troubled life. From antique clocks to scientific mysteries, from typewriters to the first systematic study of the Loch Ness Monster, Gould studied and published on them all. With the title The Stargazer, Gould was an early broadcaster on the BBC's Children's Hour when, with his encyclopaedic knowledge, he became known as The Man Who Knew Everything. Not surprisingly, he was also part of that elite group on BBC radio who formed The Brains Trust, giving on-the-spot answers to all manner of wide ranging and difficult questions. With his wide learning and photographic memory, Gould awed a national audience, becoming one of the era's radio celebrities. During the 1920s Gould restored the complex and highly significant marine timekeepers constructed by John Harrison (1693-1776), and wrote the unsurpassed classic, The Marine Chronometer, its History and Development . Today he is virtually unknown, his horological contributions scarcely mentioned in Dava Sobel's bestseller Longitude. The TV version of Longitude, in which Jeremy Irons played Rupert Gould, did at least introduce Gould's name to a wider public. Gould suffered terrible bouts of depression, resulting in a number of nervous breakdowns. These, coupled with his obsessive and pedantic nature, led to a scandalously-reported separation from his wife and cost him his family, his home, his job, and his closest friends. In this first-ever biography of Rupert Gould, Jonathan Betts, the Royal Observatory Greenwich's Senior Horologist, has given us a compelling account of a talented but flawed individual. Using hitherto unknown personal journals, the family's extensive collection of photographs, and the polymath's surviving records and notes, Betts tells the story of how Gould's early life, his naval career, and his celebrity status came together as this talented Englishman restored part of Britain's--and the world's--most important technical heritage: John Harrison's marine timekeepers.

  4. Habitat model for the Florida Scrub Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida. The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provides habitat for one of the three largest populations of the Florida Scrub Jay. This threatened bird occupies scrub, slash pine flatwoods, disturbed scrub, and coastal strand on KSC. Densities of Florida Scrub Jays were shown to vary with habitat characteristics but not necessarily with vegetation type. Relationships between Florida Scrub Jay densities and habitat characteristics were used to develop a habitat model to provide a tool to compare alternative sites for new facilities and to quantify environmental impacts. This model is being tested using long term demographic studies of colorbanded Florida Scrub Jays. Optimal habitat predicted by the model has greater than or equal to 50 percent of the shrub canopy comprised of scrub oaks, 20-50 percent open space or scrub oak vegetation within 100 m of a ruderal edge, less than or equal to 15 percent pine canopy cover, a shrub height of 120-170 cm, and is greater than or equal to 100 m from a forest. This document reviews life history, social behavior, food, foraging habitat, cover requirements, characteristics of habitat on KSC, and habitat preferences of the Florida Scrub Jay. Construction of the model and its limitations are discussed.

  5. SR-71 Pilot Stephen (Steve) D. Ishmael

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA research pilot Stephen D. Ishmael is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Ishmael was one of two NASA research pilots assigned to the SR-71 high speed research program in the early 1990s at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994), Edwards, California. Ishmael became a NASA research pilot in 1977. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA 831 (B model), military serial 61-7956. From 1990 through 1994, Dryden also had another 'A' model, NASA 832, military serial 61-7971. This aircraft was returned to the USAF inventory and was the first aircraft reactivated for USAF reconnaissance purposes in 1995. It has since returned to Dryden along with SR-71A 61-7967.

  6. Obituary: Andrew Stephen Wilson, 1947-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    On 24 May 2008, Andrew Stephen Wilson passed away at the age of 61, in his home in Silver Spring, Maryland, from complications resulting from a painful spinal illness. Andrew was arguably one of the first truly multi-wavelength astronomers of his generation. His scientific work on active galactic nuclei [AGN] spanned the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the radio to the X-rays. Andrew was born in Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, on 26 March 1947. He was the younger of two brothers whose births were separated by the Second World War. His father, Norman, came from a relatively affluent family who were coal merchants. His mother, Mary, came from a less comfortable background, one of seven children, daughter of a skilled cabinet maker/French polisher, who went through a very hard time during the depression. As a teacher, she placed enormous value on hard work and education as a way of gaining advancement in life. When Andrew was four, the family moved to Skipton, a nice market town in the Yorkshire dales. Andrew went to a small village school until age eleven when he entered Ermysted's Grammar School. He was an enthusiastic soccer and cricket player. He never lost his enthusiasm for soccer and supported the local soccer team, Leeds United, for all his life. Andrew also followed the Yorkshire county cricket team. Andrew's interest in astronomy stemmed from the fact that at Ermysted's Grammar School someone donated a four-inch refracting telescope, so he and his friends used to go back in the evenings to investigate the rings of Saturn, the moons of Jupiter, and various nebulae. While an undergraduate at Cambridge, Andrew joined the astronomy club and ground an 8-inch mirror by hand as a part of a telescope that he set up in the backyard of his parents' house. Andrew spent hours observing with this telescope, and it was the wonder of the family. At Cambridge, Andrew obtained his bachelor's degree with first-class honors in 1969. During a short visit in London with his fellow students to celebrate the end of their exams, Andrew met Finnish summer student, Kaija Kettunen, whom he married in 1975 in her home town of Lieksa, Finland. They had a son, Daniel, now living in South Riding, Virginia, and a daughter, Caroline, living in Oakland, California. In 1973, Andrew obtained his doctorate degree in physics at the Cavendish Laboratory, working under the direction of Martin Ryle, winner of the 1974 Nobel Prize in physics. Andrew's PhD was dedicated to a study of the Crab Nebula at the highest radio frequencies at which the Cambridge One-mile Telescope could operate. This work, which included both intensity and polarization data, was a triumph of perseverance and skill in the reduction of an extremely complex data set. This experience stood him in excellent stead for his future career. After his PhD, Andrew went on to be a postdoctoral research fellow at Sterrewacht, Leiden, Netherlands, and then at the Astronomy Centre of the University of Sussex, England. By that time, Andrew wanted to leave England, because he thought that he would be able to secure a permanent position in astronomy faster in another country. He also loved traveling and getting to know other cultures, and he learned foreign languages easily. In 1978, Andrew and his wife had two choices: One was to accept a position at the European Southern Observatory in Garching and the other was to come to the University of Maryland. Together they decided to come to the United States rather than go to Germany because of the language and culture. Andrew remained at the University of Maryland for his entire career. He was a scientist of extraordinary productivity and impact over his lifetime: He wrote more than three-hundred scientific publications and accumulated more than 11,000 citations to this large body of work. In the 1970s and 1980s, he pioneered the use of radio telescopes for the study of active galactic nuclei, writing in collaboration with his students a number of seminal papers that are still standard references in the field today. In the last 15 years, Andrew became an avid proponent of two of NASA's Great Observatories, the Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory. Since 1985, he was NASA Interdisciplinary Scientist and member of the Science Working Group for the Chandra X-ray Observatory. He was also an adjunct astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore since 1994. Taking advantage of this leap in technology, Andrew used these facilities to examine the environment of black holes in unprecedented detail and led a research group that was second to none in this area of research. Over the years, Andrew trained and supervised twelve Ph.D. students and more than fifteen postdoctoral research scientists, all of whom are active members of the astronomical community today. This group's work on nearby radio galaxies (e.g., Cygnus A, M87, and Pictor A) and Seyfert galaxies (e.g., the Circinus galaxy, NGC 1068, NGC 4151, and NGC 4258) is simply outstanding, a monument to Andrew's passion and perseverance to seek a complete physical understanding of the AGN phenomenon. Andrew was at his best in one-on-one discussions. He did not beat around the bush. He was always direct, frank, and honest, all for the sake of better science. He also never did anything halfway. Andrew was fully devoted to his science and held himself and others to the highest intellectual standards. He inspired many by his example, his discipline, and a sense of humor that was equally charming and disarming. The twinkle in his eyes and mischievous smile were sure signs that he was about to say something provocative and witty. Andrew will be dearly missed by the entire astronomical community. I thank Andrew's wife and brother, Kaija and Martin Wilson, for their assistance in writing this obituary.

  7. Nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould Waves: Frequency, Functional Form, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2015-11-01

    This poster considers the frequency, spatial form, and stability, of nonlinear Trivelpiece- Gould (TG) waves on a cylindrical plasma column of length L and radius rp, treating both traveling and standing waves, and focussing on the regime of experimental interest in which L/rp >> 1. In this regime TG waves are weakly dispersive, allowing strong mode-coupling between Fourier harmonics. The mode coupling implies that linear theory for such waves is a poor approximation even at fairly small amplitudes, and nonlinear theories that include only a small number of harmonics (such as 3-wave parametric resonance theory) fail to fully capture the stability properties of the system. We find that nonlinear standing waves suffer jumps in their functional form as their amplitude is varied continuously. The jumps are caused by nonlinear resonances between the standing wave and nearly linear waves whose frequencies and wave numbers are harmonics of the standing wave. Also, the standing waves are found to be unstable to a multi-wave version of 3-wave parametric resonance, with an amplitude required for instability onset that is much larger than expected from three wave theory. For traveling wave, linearly stability is found for all amplitudes that could be studied, in contradiction to 3-wave theory. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570, Department of Energy Grants DE-SC0002451and DE-SC0008693.

  8. Nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould waves: Frequency, functional form, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.; Ashourvan, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers the frequency, spatial form, and stability of nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) waves on a cylindrical plasma column of length L and radius rp, treating both traveling waves and standing waves, and focussing on the regime of experimental interest in which L /rp≫1 . In this regime, TG waves are weakly dispersive, allowing strong mode-coupling between Fourier harmonics. The mode coupling implies that linear theory for such waves is a poor approximation even at fairly small amplitude, and nonlinear theories that include a small number of harmonics, such as three-wave parametric resonance theory, also fail to fully capture the stability properties of the system. It is found that nonlinear standing waves suffer jumps in their functional form as their amplitude is varied continuously. The jumps are caused by nonlinear resonances between the standing wave and nearly linear waves whose frequencies and wave numbers are harmonics of the standing wave. Also, the standing waves are found to be unstable to a multi-wave version of three-wave parametric resonance, with an amplitude required for instability onset that is much larger than expected from three wave theory. It is found that traveling waves are linearly stable for all amplitudes that could be studied, in contradiction to three-wave theory.

  9. Apparent predation by Gray Jays, Perisoreus canadensis, on Long-toed Salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum, in the Oregon Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, M.P.; Pearl, C.A.; Bury, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    We report observations of Gray Jays (Perisoreus canadensis) appearing to consume larval Long-toed Salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum) in a drying subalpine pond in Oregon, USA. Corvids are known to prey upon a variety of anuran amphibians, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of predation by any corvid on aquatic salamanders. Long-toed Salamanders appear palatable to Gray Jays, and may provide a food resource to Gray Jays when salamander larvae are concentrated in drying temporary ponds.

  10. Toward Valid Measurement of Stephen Pepper's World Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    Two measures of the "world hypotheses" of Stephen Pepper were mailed to 100 sociobiologists, 87 behaviorists, 79 personality psychologists, and 45 human developmentalists. The World Hypothesis Scale (WHS) was designed to measure Pepper's four world views: (1) formism; (2) mechanism; (3) organicism; and (4) contextualism. The Organicism-Mechanism…

  11. SA Innovation Lecture Stephen Shapiro - Duration: 1 hour, 21 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Stephen Shapiro, one of America’s foremost innovation advisers, joined us on January 19th to show us how innovation isn’t just about generating occasional new ideas; it’s about making it a re...

  12. Stephen Baylin, M.D., Explains Genetics and Epigenetics - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen Baylin, M.D., at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discusses the how alterations in the DNA code are deciphered in a combined effort with The Cancer Genome Atlas at the National Cancer Institute to decode the brain cancer genome.

  13. Using Stephen Crane's "Maggie" To Teach the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerwin, David; Manolios, Vassilios; Popodopoulos, Lia

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a lesson plan designed for an eleventh-grade U.S. history class in which the students learn about the Progressive Era by reading Stephen Crane's "Maggie: A Girl of the Streets." Explains that students analyze point of view, role play a talk show, write an essay, and complete a long-term research project. (CMK)

  14. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  15. Could the Unidentified EGRET Sources in the Gould Belt be of Pulsar Origin?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We explore the possibility, within the polar cap model, that at least some of the recently identified new population of Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) sources in the Gould Belt sources are gamma-ray pulsars, viewed at large angles to the magnetic axis, such that the line-of-sight misses both the bright gamma-ray double cone and the radio beam. We estimate that the detectability of such off-beam gamma-ray sources is about a factor of 4-5 times higher than that of the on-beam sources. The off-beam gamma-ray pulsars also have a faint, soft nature, which is consistent with the observed properties of the Gould Belt sources. We conclude that at least some of the middle latitude sources might be such off-beam gamma-ray pulsars if they are indeed in the Gould Belt.

  16. 75 FR 8742 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX... inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of Stephen F. Austin State... with Stephen F. Austin State University. In the early 1900s, human remains representing a minimum...

  17. Crossing the Gould Belt in the Orion vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazzo, K.; Alcalá, J. M.; Covino, E.; Sterzik, M. F.; Guillout, P.; Chavarría-K., C.; Frasca, A.; Raddi, R.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The recent star formation history in the solar vicinity is not yet well constrained, and the real nature of the so-called Gould Belt is still unclear. Aims: We present a study of the large-scale spatial distribution of 6482 ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) X-ray sources in approximately 5000 deg2 in the general direction of Orion. We examine the astrophysical properties of a sub-sample of ~100 optical counterparts, using optical spectroscopy. This sub-sample is then used to investigate the space density of the RASS young star candidates by comparing X-ray number counts with Galactic model predictions. Methods: The young star candidates were selected from the RASS using X-ray criteria. We characterize the observed sub-sample in terms of spectral type, lithium content, radial and rotational velocities, and iron abundance. A population synthesis model is then applied to analyze the stellar content of the RASS in the studied area. Results: We find that stars associated with the Orion star-forming region, as expected, do show a high lithium content. As in previous RASS studies, a population of late-type stars with lithium equivalent widths larger than that of the Pleiades stars of the same spectral type (hence younger than ~70-100 Myr) is found widely spread over the studied area. Two new young stellar aggregates, namely "X-ray Clump 0534+22" (age ~ 2-10 Myr) and "X-ray Clump 0430-08" (age ~ 2-20 Myr), are also identified. Conclusions: The spectroscopic follow-up and comparison with Galactic model predictions reveal that the X-ray selected stellar population in the general direction of Orion is characterized by three distinct components, namely the clustered, the young dispersed, and the widespread field populations. The clustered population is mainly associated with regions of recent or ongoing star formation and correlates spatially with molecular clouds. The dispersed young population follows a broad lane that apparently coincides spatially with the Gould Belt, while the widespread population consists primarily of active field stars older than 100 Myr. We expect the still "bi-dimensional" picture emerging from this study to grow in depth as soon as the distance and the kinematics of the studied sources will become available from the future Gaia mission. Based on ROSAT All-Sky Survey data, low-resolution spectroscopic observations performed at the European Southern Observatory (Chile; Program 05.E-0566) and at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional de San Pedro Mártir (Mexico), and high-resolution spectroscopic observations carried out at the Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory (Spain).Table 4 and Appendix A are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. The Gould Belt 'MISFITS' Survey: The Real Solar Neighborhood Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda; Evans, Neal J., II

    2015-06-01

    We present an HCO+ J=3\\to 2 survey of Class 0+I and Flat SED young stellar objects (YSOs) found in the Gould Belt clouds by surveys with Spitzer. Our goal is to provide a uniform Stage 0+I source indicator for these embedded protostar candidates. We made single point HCO+ J=3\\to 2 measurements toward the source positions at the CSO and APEX of 546 YSOs (89% of the Class 0+I + Flat SED sample). Using the criteria from van Kempen et al., we classify sources as Stage 0+I or bona fide protostars and find that 84% of detected sources meet the criteria. We recommend a timescale for the evolution of Stage 0+I (embedded protostars) of 0.54 Myr. We find significant correlations of HCO+ integrated intensity with α and Tbol but not with Lbol. The detection fraction increases smoothly as a function of α and Lbol, while decreasing smoothly with Tbol. Using the Stage 0+I sources tightens the relation between protostars and high extinction regions of the cloud; 89% of Stage I sources lie in regions with AV > 8 mag. Class 0+I and Flat SED YSOs that are not detected in HCO+ have, on average, a factor of ∼2 higher Tbol and a factor of ∼5 lower Lbol than YSOs with HCO+ detections. We find less YSO contamination, defined as the number of undetected YSOs divided by the total number surveyed, for sources with Tbol ≲ 600 K and Lbol ≳ 1 L⊙. The contamination percentage is >90% at AV < 4 mag and decreases as AV increases.

  19. First results from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Palmeirim, P.; André, Ph.; Griffin, M. J.; Hargrave, P. J.; Könyves, V.; Bernard, J.-P.; Nutter, D. J.; Sibthorpe, B.; Di Francesco, J.; Abergel, A.; Arzoumanian, D.; Benedettini, M.; Bontemps, S.; Elia, D.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Men'shchikov, A.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Peretto, N.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Schisano, E.; Schneider, N.; Testi, L.; White, G.

    2013-06-01

    The whole of the Taurus region (a total area of 52 deg2) has been observed by the Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instruments at wavelengths of 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm as part of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. In this paper we present the first results from the part of the Taurus region that includes the Barnard 18 and L1536 clouds. A new source-finding routine, the Cardiff Source-finding AlgoRithm (CSAR), is introduced, which is loosely based on CLUMPFIND, but that also generates a structure tree, or dendrogram, which can be used to interpret hierarchical clump structure in a complex region. Sources were extracted from the data using the hierarchical version of CSAR and plotted on a mass-size diagram. We found a hierarchy of objects with sizes in the range 0.024-2.7 pc. Previous studies showed that gravitationally bound prestellar cores and unbound starless clumps appeared in different places on the mass-size diagram. However, it was unclear whether this was due to a lack of instrumental dynamic range or whether they were actually two distinct populations. The excellent sensitivity of Herschel shows that our sources fill the gap in the mass-size plane between starless and pre-stellar cores, and gives the first clear supporting observational evidence for the theory that unbound clumps and (gravitationally bound) prestellar cores are all part of the same population, and hence presumably part of the same evolutionary sequence.

  20. Western scrub-jays do not appear to attend to functionality in Aesop's Fable experiments.

    PubMed

    Logan, Corina J; Harvey, Brigit D; Schlinger, Barney A; Rensel, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Western scrub-jays are known for their highly discriminatory and flexible behaviors in a caching (food storing) context. However, it is unknown whether their cognitive abilities are restricted to a caching context. To explore this question, we tested scrub-jays in a non-caching context using the Aesop's Fable paradigm, where a partially filled tube of water contains a floating food reward and objects must be inserted to displace the water and bring the food within reach. We tested four birds, but only two learned to drop stones proficiently. Of these, one bird participated in 4/5 experiments and one in 2/5 experiments. Both birds passed one experiment, but without attending to the functional differences of the objects, and failed the other experiments. Scrub-jays were not motivated to participate in these experiments, suggesting that either this paradigm was ecologically irrelevant or perhaps their flexibility is restricted to a caching context. PMID:26925331

  1. No evidence of temporal preferences in caching by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica)☆

    PubMed Central

    Thom, James M.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and other animals often favour immediate gratification over long-term gain. Primates, including humans, appear more willing to wait for rewards than other animals, such as rats or pigeons. Another group displaying impressive patience are the corvids, which possess large brains and show sophisticated cognitive abilities. Here, we assess intertemporal choice in one corvid species, the Western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica). These birds cache food for future consumption and respond flexibly to future needs. Cache-theft and cache-degradation are time-dependent processes in scrub-jay ecology that might necessitate sensitivity to delays between caching and retrieval. We adopt a caching paradigm with delays of up to 49 h. Across two experiments we find no evidence of a preference for earlier recovery. We highlight the possibility that, although scrub-jays can discriminate between the present and the future, they may not understand how far into the future an event will occur. PMID:24378212

  2. No evidence of temporal preferences in caching by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica).

    PubMed

    Thom, James M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-03-01

    Humans and other animals often favour immediate gratification over long-term gain. Primates, including humans, appear more willing to wait for rewards than other animals, such as rats or pigeons. Another group displaying impressive patience are the corvids, which possess large brains and show sophisticated cognitive abilities. Here, we assess intertemporal choice in one corvid species, the Western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica). These birds cache food for future consumption and respond flexibly to future needs. Cache-theft and cache-degradation are time-dependent processes in scrub-jay ecology that might necessitate sensitivity to delays between caching and retrieval. We adopt a caching paradigm with delays of up to 49 h. Across two experiments we find no evidence of a preference for earlier recovery. We highlight the possibility that, although scrub-jays can discriminate between the present and the future, they may not understand how far into the future an event will occur. PMID:24378212

  3. Uranium occurrences on the Blue Jay Claim, White Signal District, Grant County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry C.; Bauer, Herman L., Jr.

    1951-01-01

    A discovery of secondary uranium minerals on the Blue Jay claim was reported in 1949 and the occurrence was examined by the authors in March 1950, The Blue Jay claim is about three-fourths of a mile south of White Signal, Grant County, N. Mex. in sees, 23 and 26, T. 20 3., R. 15 W. , New Mexico principal meridian. The Blue Jay claim is underlain by a pre-Cambrian granite mass that was intruded by numerous dikes ranging from rhyolite to basalt in composition. Abnormal radioactivity and secondary uranium minerals occur in altered rocks near oxidized quart z-pyrite veins. Forty-four samples ranged in grade from 0.001 to 0.11 percent uranium. The intermediate and basic rocks seem to have been the more favorable host rocks for the deposition of secondary uranium minerals, possibly because of their higher phosphate content.

  4. West Nile virus detection in the organs of naturally infected blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Samantha E J; Ellis, Angela E; Mead, Daniel G; Allison, Andrew B; Moulton, J Kevin; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Stallknecht, David E

    2005-04-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are an effective indicator species for West Nile virus (WNV) and may be regionally important in surveillance efforts. The sites of WNV replication and sensitivity of virus detection techniques are undefined for blue jays. The objectives of this study were to describe the gross and microscopic pathology associated with natural WNV infection in blue jays, as well as determine the most appropriate tissues to be used for virus isolation, reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques. Blue jays were collected in Georgia, USA, between May and September 2001. Initial screening by virus isolation indicated that 36 of 59 blue jays chosen for evaluation were WNV positive. From this group, 20 positive and five negative birds were chosen to compare virus detection techniques. Six positive and five negative birds were selected for histopathology examination. Splenomegaly and poor body condition were the most consistent gross findings among positive birds. The most consistent histopathologic findings in the tissues of WNV-positive blue jays were mononuclear leukocytosis and epicarditis/myocarditis. Brain, heart, and lung had the highest viral titers, and WNV antigen was most often detected by IHC in heart, kidney, liver, and lung. Reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction proved to be the most sensitive diagnostic test applied in this study irrespective of the tissue type. Brain tissue could be used effectively for both virus isolation and RT-nPCR, and this tissue is simple to remove and process. The success of IHC is highly dependent on tissue selection, and the use of multiple tissues including heart, kidney, liver, or lung is recommended. PMID:16107670

  5. Does multiple seed loading in Blue Jays result in selective dispersal of smaller acorns?

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Andrew W; Kachmar, Michael; Lichti, Nathanael; Swihart, Robert K; Stratford, Jeffrey A; Steele, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Studies from both tropical and temperate systems show that scatter-hoarding rodents selectively disperse larger seeds farther from their source than smaller seeds, potentially increasing seedling establishment in larger-seeded plants. Size-biased dispersal is evident in many oaks (Quercus) and is true both across and within species. Here, we predict that intraspecifc variation in seed size also influences acorn dispersal by the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata Linnaeus), but in an opposite manner. Blue Jays are gape-limited and selectively disperse smaller acorn species (e.g. pin oaks [Quercus palustris Mnchh]), but often carry several acorns in their crop during a single dispersal event. We predict that jays foraging on smaller acorns will load more seeds per trip and disperse seeds to greater distances than when single acorns are carried in the bill. To test this, we presented free-ranging Blue Jays with pin oak acorns of different sizes over a 2-year period. In each of 16 experimental trials, we monitored the birds at a feeding station with remote cameras and determined the number of acorns removed and the distance acorns were dispersed when cached. Jays were significantly more likely to engage in multiple seed loading with smaller seeds in both years of the study. During the second year, these smaller acorns were dispersed farther than larger acorns, and during the first year, larger acorns were dispersed farther, revealing an inconsistent response to seed size during our study. We suggest that in some circumstances, multiple seed loading by Blue Jays may favor dispersal in some plant species. PMID:21910843

  6. Stephen Ralph (15 July 1952-25 July 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    It was with great shock that we learned of the sudden death of our colleague and friend, Steve Ralph, shortly after the ARENA conference in 2006. Steve joined the ACORNE collaboration in August 2005 bringing with him a wealth of experience in areas including designing and building instrumentation systems, electronics and data acquisition. Steve attacked all new challenges with good humour; he was actively contributing to the development of an acoustic calibrator, a key goal of the ACORNE project, at the time of his death. These proceedings are dedicated to him in his memory. A website dedicated to the memory of Stephen Ralph can be accessed here: http://freespace.virgin.net/steve.ralph2006/ <span class=Stephen Ralph"/>

  7. A New Population Estimate for the Florida Scrub Jay on Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1989-01-01

    The variable circular plot method was used to sample avifauna within different vegetation types determined from aerial imagery. The Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens) population was estimated to range between 1,415 and 3,603 birds. Approximately half of the scrub and slash pine habitat appeared to be unused by Florida Scrub Jay, probably because the slash pine cover was too dense or the oak cover was too sparse. Results from the study suggest that the entire state population may be much lower than believed because the size of two of the three largest populations may have been overestimated.

  8. Top scientists join Stephen Hawking at Perimeter Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nine leading researchers are to join Stephen Hawking as visiting fellows at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Ontario, Canada. The researchers, who include string theorists Leonard Susskind from Stanford University and Asoka Sen from the Harisch-Chandra Research Institute in India, will each spend a few months of the year at the institute as "distinguished research chairs". They will be joined by another 30 scientists to be announced at a later date.

  9. 'Filling Bellies and Brains': The Educational and Political Thought of Frederick James Gould.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manton, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the pioneering efforts concerning moral education and educational reform by British educator Frederick James Gould. Discusses the application of his socialistic ideas to further three causes: (1) socialism and secularism; (2) positivism; and (3) a form of middle class radicalism. (KDR)

  10. The Gould-Wysinger Awards: A Tradition of Excellence. Fact Sheet #44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnow, Michael

    A primary goal of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is to identify and promote programs that enhance the field of juvenile justice. Since 1992, the Gould-Wysinger Awards, commemorating two OJJDP professionals, have recognized programs that advance the objectives of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act…

  11. Re-caching by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) cannot be attributed to stress.

    PubMed

    Thom, James M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2013-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) live double lives, storing food for the future while raiding the stores of other birds. One tactic scrub-jays employ to protect stores is "re-caching"-relocating caches out of sight of would-be thieves. Recent computational modelling work suggests that re-caching might be mediated not by complex cognition, but by a combination of memory failure and stress. The "Stress Model" asserts that re-caching is a manifestation of a general drive to cache, rather than a desire to protect existing stores. Here, we present evidence strongly contradicting the central assumption of these models: that stress drives caching, irrespective of social context. In Experiment (i), we replicate the finding that scrub-jays preferentially relocate food they were watched hiding. In Experiment (ii) we find no evidence that stress increases caching. In light of our results, we argue that the Stress Model cannot account for scrub-jay re-caching. PMID:23326366

  12. The Contradictions of Contemporary Culture: A Tribute to Norman Jay Levitt (1943-2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Norman Jay Levitt was the author's good friend, collaborator, and co-author. He was--above, before, and after politics--an honest inquirer. His socio-cultural views evolved continuously. Levitt, truth-seeker and liberal, was impatient with, and a devastating critic of, the political correctness and--even worse--the philosophic triviality that…

  13. Hint-seeking behaviour of western scrub-jays in a metacognition task.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arii; Clayton, Nicola S

    2016-01-01

    Metacognitive processes during memory retrieval can be tested by examining whether or not animals can assess their knowledge state when they are faced with a memory test. In a typical foraging task, food is hidden in one of the multiple tubes and the subjects are given an opportunity to check the contents of the tubes before choosing the one that they thought contained food. Following the findings from our previous study that western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) can make prospective metacognition judgements, this study tested the scrub-jays' concurrent metacognition judgements. In a series of experiments, uncertainty about the food location was induced in three ways: by making the baiting process visibly unavailable, by inserting a delay between the baiting and food retrieval, and by moving the location of the bait. The jays looked into the tubes more often during the conditions that were consistent with high uncertainty. In addition, their looking behaviour was associated not with the sight of food but with information about the location of the food. These findings suggest that the jays can differentiate the states of knowing and not knowing about certain information and take appropriate action to complement their missing knowledge. PMID:26267805

  14. High fidelity--no evidence for extra-pair paternity in Siberian jays (Perisoreus infaustus).

    PubMed

    Gienapp, Phillip; Merilä, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Extra-pair paternity (EPP) in birds is related to a number of ecological and social factors. For example, it has been found to be positively related with breeding density, negatively with the amount of paternal care and especially high rates have been observed in group-living species. Siberian jays (Perisoreous infaustus) breed at low densities and have extended parental care, which leads to the expectation of low rates of EPP. On the other hand, Siberian jays live in groups which can include also unrelated individuals, and provide opportunities for extra-pair matings. To assess the potential occurrence of EPP in Siberian jays, we analysed a large data pool (n=1029 offspring) covering ca. 30 years of samples from a Finnish Siberian jay population. Paternities were assigned based on up to 21 polymorphic microsatellite markers with the additional information from field observations. We were unable to find any evidence for occurrence of EPP in this species. Our findings are in line with earlier studies and confirm the generally low rates of EPP in related Corvid species. These results suggest that ecological factors may be more important than social factors (group living) in determining costs and benefits of extra-pair paternity. PMID:20711255

  15. Visual coverage and scanning behavior in two corvid species: American crow and Western scrub jay.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban; O'Rourke, Colleen; Pitlik, Todd

    2010-12-01

    Inter-specific differences in the configuration of avian visual fields and degree of eye/head movements have been associated with foraging and anti-predator behaviors. Our goal was to study visual fields, eye movements, and head movements in two species of corvids: American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Western scrub jay (Aphelocoma californica). American crows had wider binocular overlap, longer vertical binocular fields, narrower blind areas, and higher amplitude of eye movement than Western scrub jays. American crows can converge their eyes and see their own bill tip, which may facilitate using different foraging techniques (e.g., pecking, probing) and manufacturing and handing rudimentary tools. Western scrub jays had a higher head movement rate than American crows while on the ground, and the opposite between-species difference was found when individuals were perching. Faster head movements may enhance the ability to scan the environment, which may be related to a higher perceived risk of predation of Western scrub jays when on the ground, and American crows when perching. The visual field configuration of these species appears influenced mostly by foraging techniques while their scaning behavior, by predation risk. PMID:20803204

  16. Fisher Ames and Political Judgment: Reason, Passion, and Vehement Style in the Jay Treaty Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes Fisher Ames' fiery speech of 1796 on the Jay Treaty. Demonstrates the influence of Scottish enlightenment thinkers (particularly in moral sense philosophy and faculty psychology) on Ames and his rhetoric. Demonstrates how Ames made a compelling case to shift the standard of political judgment from reason to passion. (SR)

  17. Interruptions improve choice performance in gray jays: prolonged information processing versus minimization of costly errors.

    PubMed

    Waite, Thomas A

    2002-12-01

    Under the assumption that selection favors minimization of costly errors, erroneous choice may be common when its fitness cost is low. According to an adaptive-choice model, this cost depends on the rate at which an animal encounters the choice: the higher this rate, the smaller the cost of choosing a less valuable option. Errors should thus be more common when interruptions to foraging are shorter. A previous experiment supported this prediction: gray jays, Perisoreus canadensis, were more error prone when subjected to shorter delays to access to food rewards. This pattern, though, is also predicted by an attentional-constraints model. Because the subjects were able to inspect the rewards during delays, their improved performance when subjected to longer delays could have been a byproduct of the experimentally prolonged opportunity for information processing. To evaluate this possibility, a follow-up experiment manipulated both delay to access and whether rewards could be inspected during delays. Depriving jays of the opportunity to inspect rewards (using opaque lids) induced only a small, nonsignificant increase in error rate. This effect was independent of length of delay and so the jays' improved performance when subjected to longer delays was not simply a byproduct of prolonged information processing. More definitively, even when the jays were prevented from inspecting rewards during delays, their performance improved when subjected to longer delays. The findings are thus consistent with the adaptive-choice model. PMID:12461598

  18. Teaching the Classics: The Origin of Species as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Many (including the author) argue that reading the classics in the field should be part of a scientist's education. However, how you read the classics can be very different depending on whether you read them as a historian or as a practicing scientist. This point will be made by comparing two readings of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, and by looking at the use that Stephen Jay Gould made of the history of science in his quest to promote his scientific ideas.

  19. The NOMA of Yishayahu Leibowitz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    Stephen Jay Gould presented his position on science and religion - Non-Overlapping Magisteria (NOMA) - without justification. A detailed justification of the NOMA position can be found in the earlier work of scientist and philosopher Yishayahu Leibowitz; his work is especially interesting because it comes from a religious person. This paper summarizes Leibowitz's philosophical and theological position, and claims that his version of NOMA, and by implication similar versions of NOMA, are not applicable in science education.

  20. An introduced generalist parasite, the sticktight flea (Echidnophaga gallinacea), and its pathology in the threatened Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens).

    PubMed

    Boughton, R K; Atwell, J W; Schoech, S J

    2006-10-01

    The sticktight flea, (Echidnophaga gallinacea), a major pest of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus) that can cause severe pathology or death if untreated, is rarely recorded in free-living avian species. Sticktight fleas, however, were observed on the federally threatened Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in February 2004, in south central Florida. Of the 81 Florida scrub-jays (FSJs) sampled before the 2004 breeding season, 12 were infested, with from 1 to as many as 57 fleas. Subsequent survivorship and variation in health indices led us to conclude that the sticktight flea caused the death of several jays. Within 4 mo, 46% of sticktight flea-infested (INF) jays died, whereas in the nonflea-infested (NINF) jays, only 5.9% died. Adult INF birds lost body mass in the time since a previous capture compared with NINF jays, and mass gain was slowed in 1-yr-old INF jays. Hematocrit of INF jays was dramatically impacted, as low as 17%, and was negatively correlated with the extent of infestation. Leukocyte counts were highest in INF jays; however, plasma immunoglobulin levels were lowest. Physiological stress levels, measured using plasma corticosterone, increased more rapidly in INF jays than NINF jays and were positively correlated with heterophil/lymphocyte ratios. The impact of the sticktight flea on the federally threatened FSJ negates previous findings that sticktight fleas are benign in wild avian hosts. PMID:17152932

  1. Stephen Hales and the measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, O

    1994-12-01

    Natural philosopher and inventor, Stephen Hales (1677-1761), undertook a lengthy series of experiments on animals described in Haemastaticks (1733) which led to the first direct measurement of blood pressure. Hales retained his interest in health and disease throughout his life, and this prompted what he regarded as his most important work: the invention of ventilation systems for use in ships or prisons. Hales was the 'perpetual curate' of Teddington, Middlesex, and he combined a mechanistic, quantitative approach to his experimental work with a need and, as he saw it, a duty to discover and wonder at the wisdom and goodness of God by studying His creation. PMID:7884783

  2. The Gould's Belt very large array survey. III. The Orion region

    SciTech Connect

    Kounkel, Marina; Hartmann, Lee; Loinard, Laurent; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Dzib, Sergio A.; Torres, Rosa M.; Boden, Andrew F.; Evans, Neal J. II; Briceño, Cesar; Tobin, John

    2014-07-20

    We present results from a high-sensitivity (60 μJy), large-scale (2.26 deg{sup 2}) survey obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array as part of the Gould's Belt Survey program. We detected 374 and 354 sources at 4.5 and 7.5 GHz, respectively. Of these, 148 are associated with previously known young stellar objects (YSOs). Another 86 sources previously unclassified at either optical or infrared wavelengths exhibit radio properties that are consistent with those of young stars. The overall properties of our sources at radio wavelengths such as their variability and radio to X-ray luminosity relation are consistent with previous results from the Gould's Belt Survey. Our detections provide target lists for follow-up Very Long Baseline Array radio observations to determine their distances as YSOs are located in regions of high nebulosity and extinction, making it difficult to measure optical parallaxes.

  3. Goulds Belt, Interstellar Clouds, and the Eocene-Oligocene Helium-3 Spike

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2015-01-01

    Drag from hydrogen in the interstellar cloud which formed Gould's Belt may have sent small meteoroids with embedded helium to the Earth, perhaps explaining part or all of the (sup 3) He spike seen in the sedimentary record at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Assuming the Solar System passed through part of the cloud, meteoroids in the asteroid belt up to centimeter size may have been dragged to the resonances, where their orbital eccentricities were pumped up into Earth-crossing orbits.

  4. Predation risk induces changes in nest-site selection and clutch size in the Siberian jay.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Sönke; Griesser, Michael; Nystrand, Magdalena; Ekman, Jan

    2006-03-22

    Life-history theory predicts that an individual should reduce its reproductive efforts by laying a smaller clutch size when high risk of nest predation reduces the value of current reproduction. Evidence in favour of this 'nest predation hypothesis', however, is scarce and based largely on correlative analyses. Here, we manipulated perceived risk of nest predation in the Siberian jay Perisoreus infaustus using playback involving a mixture of calls by corvid nest predators in the vicinity of nest sites. In response to being exposed to this acoustic cue simulating increased risk of nest predation, the jays chose a nest site offering more protective covering and reduced clutch size. This is the first experimental demonstration of clutch size adjustment and nest site selection as a result of phenotypic plasticity in an open nesting passerine reflecting a facultative response to the perceived risk of nest predation. PMID:16608689

  5. Predation risk induces changes in nest-site selection and clutch size in the Siberian jay

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Sönke; Griesser, Michael; Nystrand, Magdalena; Ekman, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that an individual should reduce its reproductive efforts by laying a smaller clutch size when high risk of nest predation reduces the value of current reproduction. Evidence in favour of this ‘nest predation hypothesis’, however, is scarce and based largely on correlative analyses. Here, we manipulated perceived risk of nest predation in the Siberian jay Perisoreus infaustus using playback involving a mixture of calls by corvid nest predators in the vicinity of nest sites. In response to being exposed to this acoustic cue simulating increased risk of nest predation, the jays chose a nest site offering more protective covering and reduced clutch size. This is the first experimental demonstration of clutch size adjustment and nest site selection as a result of phenotypic plasticity in an open nesting passerine reflecting a facultative response to the perceived risk of nest predation. PMID:16608689

  6. Epizootiology of Haemoproteus danilewskyi (Haemosporina: Haemoproteidae) in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    Prevalence and density of Haemoproteus danilewskyi was studied in a population of free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida (USA) from May 1992 to December 1995. Prevalence of infection was 27% for data combined over years, seasons, ages, and sexes. Prevalence did not vary between sexes or among years, but increased with age and varied with season, being highest in June-July and lowest in November-January. Parasite density did not vary between sexes or among seasons, but was higher in younger birds when controlling for season. To determine periods of natural transmission, seasonal patterns of infection were compared with previous month abundance of the biting fly vectors. Mean monthly prevalence of H. danilewskyi in older jays was positively correlated with previous month abundance of Culicoides edeni and C. arboricola, both capable of sporogonic development of H. danilewskyi. PMID:12685063

  7. Mapping Florida Scrub Jay habitat for purposes of land-use management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.; Provancha, Mark J.; Smith, Rebecca B.

    1991-01-01

    Geographical information system (GIS) applications were used to map areas of primary and secondary Florida Scrub Jay habitat on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) using vegetation and soils maps. Data from field studies were used for accuracy assessment and evaluating the importance of mapping classes. Primary habitat accounts for 15 percent of the potential habitat and contained 57 percent of the Florida Scrub Jay population on KSC. Proximity analysis identified potential population centers, which were 44 percent of the potential habitat and contained 86 percent of the population. This study is an example of how remote sensing and GIS applications can provide information for land-use planning, habitat management, and the evaluation of cumulative impacts.

  8. Rapid divergence and postglacial colonization in western North American Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri).

    PubMed

    Burg, Theresa M; Gaston, Anthony J; Winker, Kevin; Friesen, Vicki L

    2005-10-01

    Post-Pleistocene avian colonization of deglaciated North America occurred from multiple refugia, including a coastal refugium in the northwest. The location of a Pacific Coastal refugium is controversial; however, multiple lines of evidence suggest that it was located near the Queen Charlotte Islands (also known as Haida Gwaii). The Queen Charlotte Islands contain a disproportionately large number of endemic plants and animals including the Steller's jay Cyanocitta stelleri carlottae. Using five highly variable microsatellite markers, we studied population structure among eight populations of Steller's jay (N = 150) from geographical areas representing three subspecies in western North America: C. s. carlottae, C. s. stelleri and C. s. annectens. Microsatellite analyses revealed genetic differentiation between each of the three subspecies, although more extensive sampling of additional C. s. annectens populations is needed to clarify the level of subspecies differentiation. High levels of population structure were found among C. s. stelleri populations with significant differences in all but two pairwise comparisons. A significant isolation by distance pattern was observed amongst populations in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. In the C. s. carlottae population, there was evidence of reduced genetic variation, higher number of private alleles than northern C. s. stelleri populations and higher levels of divergence between Queen Charlotte Island and other populations. We were unable to reject the hypothesis that the Queen Charlotte Islands served as a refugium during the Pleistocene. Steller's jay may have colonized the Queen Charlotte Islands near the end of the last glaciation or persisted throughout the Pleistocene, and this subspecies may thus represent a glacial relic. The larger number of private alleles, despite reduced genetic variation, morphological distinctiveness and high divergence from other populations suggests that the Queen Charlotte Island colonization pre-dates that of the mainland. Furthermore, our results show rapid divergence in Steller's jay populations on the mainland following the retreat of the ice sheets. PMID:16202093

  9. Western scrub-jays allocate longer observation time to more valuable information.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arii; Grodzinski, Uri; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-07-01

    When humans mentally reconstruct past events and imagine future scenarios, their subjective experience of mentally time travelling is accompanied by the awareness of doing so. Despite recent popularity of studying episodic memory in animals, such phenomenological consciousness has been extremely difficult to demonstrate without agreed behavioural markers of consciousness in non-linguistic subjects. We presented western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) with a task requiring them to allocate observing time between two peepholes to see food being hidden in either of two compartments, one where observing the hiding location was necessary to later relocate the food, and another where food could easily be found without watching. Jays first separately experienced these consequences of possessing information in each compartment and subsequently, once given a choice, made more looks and spent more time looking into the compartment where information was necessary than into the compartment where it was unnecessary. Thus, the jays can collect information to solve a future problem. Moreover, they can differentiate sources of information according to their potential value and modify behaviour to efficiently collect important, usable information. This is the first evidence of metacognition in a species that passes the behavioural criteria for both retrospective and prospective mental time travel. PMID:24322875

  10. Reading Stephen King: Issues of Censorship, Student Choice, and Popular Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Brenda Miller, Ed.; Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.; Chandler, Kelly, Ed.

    This collection of essays grew out of the "Reading Stephen King Conference" held at the University of Maine in 1996. Stephen King's books have become a lightning rod for the tensions around issues of including "mass market" popular literature in middle and high school English classes and of who chooses what students read. King's fiction is among…

  11. STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson smiles as he is assisted with his ascent/reentry flight suit by a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. He has been a NASA employee since 1975 and has worked at Ames and Langley Research Centers. Robinson holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering and is a licensed pilot. He will assist Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. with the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA- SPAS-2) free-flyer and conduct Comet Hale-Bopp observations with the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System. Robinson will also coordinate photo and television data operations during the mission. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery is the CRISTA-SPAS- 2. Other payloads on the 11-day mission include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments.

  12. A Markov decision process for managing habitat for Florida scrub-jays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Fred A.; Breininger, David R.; Duncan, Brean W.; Nichols, James D.; Runge, Michael C.; Williams, B. Ken

    2011-01-01

    Florida scrub-jays Aphelocoma coerulescens are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act due to loss and degradation of scrub habitat. This study concerned the development of an optimal strategy for the restoration and management of scrub habitat at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which contains one of the few remaining large populations of scrub-jays in Florida. There are documented differences in the reproductive and survival rates of scrubjays among discrete classes of scrub height (<120 cm or "short"; 120-170 cm or "optimal"; .170 cm or "tall"; and a combination of tall and optimal or "mixed"), and our objective was to calculate a state-dependent management strategy that would maximize the long-term growth rate of the resident scrub-jay population. We used aerial imagery with multistate Markov models to estimate annual transition probabilities among the four scrub-height classes under three possible management actions: scrub restoration (mechanical cutting followed by burning), a prescribed burn, or no intervention. A strategy prescribing the optimal management action for management units exhibiting different proportions of scrub-height classes was derived using dynamic programming. Scrub restoration was the optimal management action only in units dominated by mixed and tall scrub, and burning tended to be the optimal action for intermediate levels of short scrub. The optimal action was to do nothing when the amount of short scrub was greater than 30%, because short scrub mostly transitions to optimal height scrub (i.e., that state with the highest demographic success of scrub-jays) in the absence of intervention. Monte Carlo simulation of the optimal policy suggested that some form of management would be required every year. We note, however, that estimates of scrub-height transition probabilities were subject to several sources of uncertainty, and so we explored the management implications of alternative sets of transition probabilities. Generally, our analysis demonstrated the difficulty of managing for a species that requires midsuccessional habitat, and suggests that innovative management tools may be needed to help ensure the persistence of scrub-jays at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The development of a tailored monitoring program as a component of adaptive management could help reduce uncertainty about controlled and uncontrolled variation in transition probabilities of scrub-height and thus lead to improved decision making.

  13. 75 FR 8741 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Stephen F. Austin State University... to repatriate cultural items in the control of Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX... under contract with Stephen F. Austin State University. In 1957, 15 cultural items were removed from...

  14. Tool-use and instrumental learning in the Eurasian jay (Garrulus glandarius).

    PubMed

    Cheke, Lucy G; Bird, Christopher D; Clayton, Nicola S

    2011-05-01

    Recent research with Rooks has demonstrated impressive tool-using abilities in captivity despite this species' classification as a non-tool-user in the wild. Here, we explored whether another non-tool-using corvid, the Eurasian Jay, would be capable of similar feats and investigated the relative contributions of causal knowledge and instrumental conditioning to the birds' performance on the tasks. Five jays were tested on a variety of tasks involving water displacement. Two birds reliably interacted with the apparatuses. In these tasks, both birds showed a preference for inserting stones into a tube containing liquid over a tube containing a solid or a baited 'empty' tube and also for inserting sinkable items over non-sinkable items into a tube of water. To investigate the contribution of instrumental conditioning, subjects were then tested on a series of tasks in which different cues were made available. It was found that, in the absence of any apparent causal cues, these birds showed a clear preference for the rewarded tube when the food incrementally approached with every stone insertion, but not when it simply "appeared" after the correct number of stone insertions. However, it was found that subjects did not prefer to insert stones into a tube rewarded by the incremental approach of food if the available causal cues violated the expectations created by existing causal knowledge (i.e. were counter-intuitive). An analysis of the proportion of correct and incorrect stone insertions made in each trial across tasks offering different types of information revealed that subjects were substantially more successful in experiments in which causal cues were available, but that rate of learning was comparable in all experiments. We suggest that these results indicate that Eurasian jays use the incremental approach of the food reward as a conditioned reinforcer allowing them to solve tasks involving raising the water level and that this learning is facilitated by the presence of causal cues. PMID:21249510

  15. Experimental West Nile virus infection in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Weingartl, H M; Neufeld, J L; Copps, J; Marszal, P

    2004-07-01

    Ten crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and three blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata), species indigenous to North America, were intravenously inoculated with 10(3) PFU of West Nile virus (WNV) strain NY99 for production of positive tissues for Canadian surveillance. Both species developed clinical signs 4 days postinoculation (dpi). Virus was detected in blood, cloacal and tracheal swabs, and in a number of organs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and virus isolation (titers reaching over 10(7) PFU/0.1 g). Virus appeared as early as 1 dpi in blood (10(2)-10(3) PFU/ml) and spleen (10(3)-10(4) PFU/0.1 g of tissue), whereas kidney, liver, intestine, gonads, heart, skeletal muscle, and lung tested positive for WNV in a later stage of the infection. Immunostaining (IHC) using heterologous rabbit anti-WNV polyclonal antiserum detected viral antigen in a wide range of organs, starting at 2 dpi. Detection of WNV antigen in the brain of blue jays and crows by IHC was laborious as only few cells, not present in all sections, would stain positive. Mononuclear cells appeared to be an important target for virus replication, contributing to virus spread throughout tissues during the infection. This conclusion was based on the positive IHC staining of these cells in organs before virus antigen detection in parenchymal cells and supported by virus isolation and RT-PCR-positive results in white blood cells. The inability of blue jays and crows to perch and fly may reflect weakness due to generalized infection and marked skeletal muscle involvement, although involvement of the central nervous system cannot be excluded. PMID:15232136

  16. Taxonomic revision of the Elephant Pupinid snail genus Pollicaria Gould, 1856 (Prosobranchia, Pupinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kongim, Bangon; Sutcharit, Chirasak; Naggs, Fred; Panha, Somsak

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The status of species currently assigned to the Southeast Asian Elephant Pupinid snail genus Pollicaria Gould, 1856 is reassessed. Shell, radular and reproductive morphology are investigated and analysed with reference to karyotype patterns previously reported and to distribution patterns among the species. Six previously described species are recognised: Pollicaria gravida (Benson, 1856), Pollicaria myersii (Haines, 1855), Pollicaria mouhoti (Pfeiffer, 1862), Pollicaria elephas (Morgan, 1885), Pollicaria crossei (Dautzenberg & d’Hamonville, 1887) and Pollicaria rochebruni (Mabille, 1887). A new subspecies, Pollicaria mouhoti monochroma ssp. n.,is proposed and a dichotomous key to species is provided. PMID:23794846

  17. The Gould-Hopper polynomials in the Novikov-Veselov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jen-Hsu

    2011-09-01

    We use the Gould-Hopper (GH) polynomials to investigate the Novikov-Veselov (NV) equation. The root dynamics of the ?-flow in the NV equation is studied using the GH polynomials and then the Lax pair is found. In particular, when N = 3, 4, 5, one can get the Gold-fish model. The smooth rational solutions of the NV equation are also constructed via the extended Moutard transformation and the GH polynomials. The asymptotic behavior is discussed and then the smooth rational solution of the Liouville equation is obtained.

  18. Gould's Belt, interstellar clouds, and the Eocene-Oligocene helium-3 enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2016-01-01

    Drag from hydrogen in the interstellar cloud which formed Gould's Belt may have sent interplanetary dust particle (IDPs) and small meteoroids with embedded helium to the Earth, perhaps explaining part the helium-3 flux increase seen in the sedimentary record near the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Assuming the Solar System passed through part of the cloud, IDPs in the inner Solar System may have been dragged to Earth, while dust and small meteoroids in the asteroid belt up to centimeter size may have been dragged to the resonances, where their orbital eccentricities were pumped up into Earth-crossing orbits; however, this hypotheses does not explain the Popigai and Chesapeake Bay impacts.

  19. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, most of which sound quite ludicrous. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston- not Herschel- who coined the term "asteroid" to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  20. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.; Orchiston, Wayne

    2011-11-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, which Herschel rejected. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston, FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston - not Herschel - who coined the term 'asteroid' to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  1. STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey is suited up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D., prepares for launch during suit-up activities in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Buckey and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Buckey is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body -- the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

  2. Mycoplasma sturni from blue jays and northern mockingbirds with conjunctivitis in Florida.

    PubMed

    Ley, D H; Geary, S J; Berkhoff, J E; McLaren, J M; Levisohn, S

    1998-04-01

    Northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) and blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in a Florida (USA) wildlife care facility developed clinical signs and gross lesions suggestive of the ongoing outbreak of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) conjunctivitis in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) and American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis). Mycoplasmal organisms were cultured from conjunctival/corneal swabs of birds with sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and/or epiphora. All of the isolates tested were identified as Mycoplasma sturni by indirect immunofluorescence. Mycoplasma sturni as well as MG should be considered in the differential diagnosis of songbirds with conjunctivitis. PMID:9577796

  3. STS-79 Commander Readdy, Pilot Wilcutt and MS Jay Apt at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-79 Commander William F. Readdy (left), Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt and Mission Specialist Jay Apt chat after the six-member flight crew arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The astronauts' return to KSC coincides with the beginning of a three-day launch countdown that will culminate in the Sept. 16 liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on Mission STS-79. The 79th Shuttle flight will be highlighted by the fourth docking between the U.S. Shuttle and Russian Space Station Mir and the first U.S. crew exchange on the station. Launch from Pad 39A is set for about 4:54 a.m. EDT.

  4. Western scrub-jays do not appear to attend to functionality in Aesop’s Fable experiments

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Brigit D.; Schlinger, Barney A.; Rensel, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Western scrub-jays are known for their highly discriminatory and flexible behaviors in a caching (food storing) context. However, it is unknown whether their cognitive abilities are restricted to a caching context. To explore this question, we tested scrub-jays in a non-caching context using the Aesop’s Fable paradigm, where a partially filled tube of water contains a floating food reward and objects must be inserted to displace the water and bring the food within reach. We tested four birds, but only two learned to drop stones proficiently. Of these, one bird participated in 4/5 experiments and one in 2/5 experiments. Both birds passed one experiment, but without attending to the functional differences of the objects, and failed the other experiments. Scrub-jays were not motivated to participate in these experiments, suggesting that either this paradigm was ecologically irrelevant or perhaps their flexibility is restricted to a caching context. PMID:26925331

  5. Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) overcome their current desires to anticipate two distinct future needs and plan for them appropriately.

    PubMed

    Cheke, Lucy G; Clayton, Nicola S

    2012-04-23

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) have been shown to overcome present satiety to cache food they will desire in the future. Here, we show that another corvid, the Eurasian jay (Garrulus glandarius), can distinguish between two distinct future desires and plan for each appropriately, despite experiencing a conflicting current motivation. We argue that these data address the criticisms of previous work, and suggest a way in which associative learning processes and future-oriented cognition may combine to allow prospective behaviour. PMID:22048890

  6. Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) infestation on medium-sized mammals and blue jays in northwestern Illinois.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, A; Kitron, U; Jones, C J; Slajchert, T L

    1993-09-01

    High prevalence of infestation of five species of medium-sized mammals and blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata (L.), by immature Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman and Corwin was found in Castle Rock State Park in northwestern Illinois during May-August 1991. Raccoons, Procyon lotor L., and opossums, Didelphis virginiana Kerr, were infested with the highest larval densities and were trapped primarily in bottomland forest and ecotone habitats. All species had similar nymphal densities, except the eastern cottontails, Sylvilagus floridanus Allen, which were infested with fewer nymphs. Infestation by I. dammini is reported for the first time for fox squirrels, Sciurus niger E. G. St. Hilaire, and for the first time in the midwestern United States for blue jays, C. cristata. These two species were hosts for nymphs in upland forest habitat. Molting rates varied among ticks that fed on different host species and among larvae that fed on individuals of the same species. Molting rate is proposed as an important factor in determining the relative importance of a host species to I. dammini population dynamics. PMID:8254647

  7. Jay's Collectibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappel, James J.; Gillman, Jason R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in collectibles of many types, as indicated by the popularity of television programs such as the History Channel's "Pawn Stars" and "American Pickers" and the Public Broadcasting Service's "Antiques Road Show." The availability of online auction sites such as eBay has enabled many people to collect items of interest as a…

  8. Efficacy of three vaccines in protecting Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) from experimental infection with West Nile virus: implications for vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma insularis).

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarah S; Langevin, Stanley; Woods, Leslie; Carroll, Brian D; Vickers, Winston; Morrison, Scott A; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Reisen, William K; Boyce, Walter M

    2011-08-01

    The devastating effect of West Nile virus (WNV) on the avifauna of North America has led zoo managers and conservationists to attempt to protect vulnerable species through vaccination. The Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis) is one such species, being a corvid with a highly restricted insular range. Herein, we used congeneric Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test the efficacy of three WNV vaccines in protecting jays from an experimental challenge with WNV: (1) the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator(®) DNA equine vaccine, (2) an experimental DNA plasmid vaccine, pCBWN, and (3) the Merial Recombitek(®) equine vaccine. Vaccine efficacy after challenge was compared with naïve and nonvaccinated positive controls and a group of naturally immune jays. Overall, vaccination lowered peak viremia compared with nonvaccinated positive controls, but some WNV-related pathology persisted and the viremia was sufficient to possibly infect susceptible vector mosquitoes. The Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA equine vaccine and the pCBWN vaccine provided humoral immune priming and limited side effects. Five of the six birds vaccinated with the Merial Recombitek vaccine, including a vaccinated, non-WNV challenged control, developed extensive necrotic lesions in the pectoral muscle at the vaccine inoculation sites, which were attributed to the Merial vaccine. In light of the well-documented devastating effects of high morbidity and mortality associated with WNV infection in corvids, vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays with either the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA vaccine or the pCBWN vaccine may increase the numbers of birds that would survive an epizootic should WNV become established on Santa Cruz Island. PMID:21438693

  9. Effective Integration of Technology and Instruction. Q&A with Michael Jay. REL Mid-Atlantic Educator Effectiveness Webinar Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In this webinar, long-time educator and developer of education technology Michael Jay discussed the importance of using technology to support learning and gave examples of how teachers can integrate technology into their instruction based on the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards. The PowerPoint presentation and…

  10. John Jay High School Project "Rescate." E.S.E.A. Title VII. Final Evaluation Report, 1980-1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Evaluation.

    This report describes and presents 1980-81 evaluation results for Project Rescate at John Jay High School in New York City. The project, which was funded under Title VII of the Elementary Secondary Education Act, provided instruction in English as a Second Language and in native language skills for limited proficient students. Bilingual…

  11. Patterns of West Nile virus infection in Ohio blue jays: implications for initiation of the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Smith, Jennifer; Ohajuruka, Ojimadu A; Grimes, Sheila

    2004-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first detected in North America in New York City in 1999 and rapidly moved westward. Understanding the mechanisms by which the amplification cycle is reinitiated each year increases our ability to predict epizootics and geographic expansion of the disease. Such understanding is enhanced by knowledge of the patterns of infection in the vertebrate reservoir hosts. Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) may serve as reservoir hosts for WNV. We examined the influence of age and date on the prevalence of WNV in jay carcasses in Ohio during May-August 2002. Percent of carcasses that were infected increased significantly with time from 3% in May to more than 90% by August. We found no difference in prevalence between juvenile (nestlings and fledglings) and adult jays early in the season, which contradicts the expected pattern if the majority of the adults sampled in 2002 had been exposed to the virus in 2001. Therefore, jays infected in 2001 were unlikely to have been important in initiating the 2002 virus cycle in Ohio. PMID:15155993

  12. The Lloyd Sealy Library of John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Academic Library, Special Library, or Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The Lloyd Sealy Library of John Jay College of Criminal Justice started as a small collection of books in the corner of the New York City Police Academy. A little over four decades later, it now contains one of the best collections of criminal justice materials in the world. Despite fiscal setbacks and tough times for the University and the…

  13. The Jay Baum Rich telescope: a Centurion 28 at the Wise Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, Noah; Kaspi, Shai; Niv, Saar; Manulis, Ilan

    2015-10-01

    We describe the third telescope of the Wise Observatory, a 0.70-m Centurion 28 (C28IL) installed in 2013 and named the Jay Baum Rich telescope to enhance significantly the wide-field imaging possibilities of the observatory. The telescope operates from a 5.5-m diameter dome and is equipped with a large-format red-sensitive CCD camera, offering a ˜one square degree imaged field sampled at . The telescope was acquired to provide an alternative to the existing 1-m telescope for studies such as microlensing, photometry of transiting exo-planets, the follow-up of supernovae and other optical transients, and the detection of very low surface brightness extended features around galaxies.

  14. Scanning the headlines with Jay A. Levy, MD. Interview by Mark Mascolini.

    PubMed

    Levy, J A

    1996-05-01

    Dr. Jay Levy, the first scientist to isolate HIV in an American, responds to questions about the virus. Topics he discusses include targeting free virus or infected cells, the role for antiretroviral therapies, chemokines and the Levy factor, the pros and cons of the HIV nef gene, whether the Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) virus is infectious, and the use of baboons as living vaccine models. Dr. Levy does not think that the way to control HIV infection is to just attack the virus. The doctor thinks that antiretroviral therapies should be used immediately after needlesticks or after a high risk sexual encounter, and that the virus isolated in KS tests looks like a ubiquitous herpesvirus. PMID:11363530

  15. Hormone levels and infection of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Schoech, Stephan J

    2006-06-01

    Annual spring relapse of blood parasite infections in birds is believed to be the result of hormonal changes associated with breeding. As part of a larger study on the epizootiology of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in blue jays in south-central Florida, we studied the relationship between H. danilewskyi infections and levels of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosterone. We found a positive association between intensity of H. danilewskyi infection and corticosterone levels in females but not in males. We also found no association between infection and levels of prolactin, luteinizing hormone, progesterone, testosterone, or estradiol in males or females. In addition, we found a positive relationship between levels of corticosterone and handling time and between corticosterone and testosterone levels. We suggest a possible influence of corticosterone on spring relapse of Haemoproteus spp. infections in birds but provide no support for the influence of breeding hormones on relapse of these parasites. PMID:16884020

  16. The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: a first look at Serpens with HARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, S. F.; Richer, J. S.; Buckle, J. V.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Owen, J. E.; Brunt, C.; Butner, H. M.; Cavanagh, B.; Chrysostomou, A.; Curtis, E. I.; Davis, C. J.; Etxaluze, M.; Francesco, J. Di; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R. K.; Greaves, J. S.; Hatchell, J.; Johnstone, D.; Matthews, B.; Matthews, H.; Matzner, C. D.; Nutter, D.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Roberts, J. F.; Sadavoy, S.; Simpson, R. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Viti, S.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Yates, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Gould Belt Legacy Survey on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's has observed a region of 260 arcmin2 in 12CO J= 3 → 2 emission, and a 190 arcmin2 subset of this in 13CO and C18O towards the Serpens molecular cloud. We examine the global velocity structure of the non-outflowing gas, and calculate excitation temperatures and opacities. The large-scale mass and energetics of the region are evaluated, with special consideration for high-velocity gas. We find the cloud to have a mass of 203 M⊙, and to be gravitationally bound, and that the kinetic energy of the outflowing gas is approximately 70 per cent of the turbulent kinetic energy of the cloud. We identify compact outflows towards some of the submillimetre Class 0/I sources in the region.

  17. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Lane, J.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; The JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-04-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of Orion B: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright’s Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in each cluster, the most massive cores tend to be centrally located. We also apply the independent M-Σ technique and find a strong correlation between core mass and the local surface density of cores. These two lines of evidence jointly suggest that some amount of mass segregation in clusters has happened already at the dense core stage.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Serpens MWC 297 (Rumble+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Di, Francesco J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-thompson, D.; Allen, L. E.; Cieza, L. A.; Dunham, M. M.; Harvey, P. M.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-09-01

    Serpens MWC 297 was observed with SCUBA-2 on the 2012 July 5 and 8 as part of the JCMT GBS MJLSG33 SCUBA-2 Serpens Campaign. Continuum observations at 850 and 450um were made using fully sampled 30 arcmin diameter circular regions centered on RA=18:28:13.8, DE=-03:44:01.7 (J2000). The MWC 297 region was observed twice by Spitzer in the mid-infrared, first as part of the Spitzer Young Clusters Survey (SYC; Gutermuth et al., 2009, Cat. J/ApJS/184/18) and secondly as part of the Spitzer legacy programme 'Gould's Belt: star formation in the solar neighbourhood' (SGBS, PID: 30574). In both surveys, mapping observations were taken at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0um with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and at 24um with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). (3 data files).

  19. Fractal properties of trivelpiece-gould waves in periodic plasma-filled waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zaginaylov, G I; Grudiev, A; Schünemann, K; Turbin, P V

    2002-05-13

    It is shown that dispersion curves describing a spectrum of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) waves in periodic plasma-filled waveguides have a fractal nature. They are not solid lines as for other types of waves in periodic waveguides but suffer from discontinuities of the first kind at any k(z) = (P/Q) (2m+1)pi/d, where P and Q are integers, d is the period of the corrugation, and m is the transverse index of a mode. The gaps correspond to forbidden bands. The evaluation of the Hausdorf dimension of the dispersion curves is presented. Finally, qualitative consequences of the fractal nature of TG waves for plasma microwave electronics are discussed. PMID:12005642

  20. Planck intermediate results. XII: Diffuse Galactic components in the Gould Belt system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Bedini, L.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dobler, G.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Peel, M.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Tibbs, C. T.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2013-09-01

    We perform an analysis of the diffuse low-frequency Galactic components in the southern part of the Gould Belt system (130° ≤ l ≤ 230° and -50° ≤ b ≤ -10°). Strong ultra-violet flux coming from the Gould Belt super-association is responsible for bright diffuse foregrounds that we observe from our position inside the system and that can help us improve our knowledge of the Galactic emission. Free-free emission and anomalous microwave emission (AME) are the dominant components at low frequencies (ν < 40 GHz), while synchrotron emission is very smooth and faint. We separated diffuse free-free emission and AME from synchrotron emission and thermal dust emission by using Planck data, complemented by ancillary data, using the correlated component analysis (CCA) component-separation method and we compared our results with the results of cross-correlation of foreground templates with the frequency maps. We estimated the electron temperature Te from Hα and free-free emission using two methods (temperature-temperature plot and cross-correlation) and obtained Te ranging from 3100 to 5200K for an effective fraction of absorbing dust along the line of sight of 30% (fd = 0.3). We estimated the frequency spectrum of the diffuse AME and recovered a peak frequency (in flux density units) of 25.5 ± 1.5 GHz. We verified the reliability of this result with realistic simulations that include biases in the spectral model for the AME and in the free-free template. By combining physical models for vibrational and rotational dust emission and adding the constraints from the thermal dust spectrum from Planck and IRAS, we are able to present a good description of the AME frequency spectrum for plausible values of the local density and radiation field. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Dynamics and phylogenetic implications of MtDNA control region sequences in New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae).

    PubMed

    Saunders, M A; Edwards, S V

    2000-08-01

    To study the evolution of mtDNA and the intergeneric relationships of New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae), we sequenced the entire mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) from 21 species representing all genera of New World jays, an Old World jay, crows, and a magpie. Using maximum likelihood methods, we found that both the transition/transversion ratio (kappa) and among site rate variation (alpha) were higher in flanking domains I and II than in the conserved central domain and that the frequency of indels was highest in domain II. Estimates of kappa and alpha were much more influenced by the density of taxon sampling than by alternative optimal tree topologies. We implemented a successive approximation method incorporating these parameters into phylogenetic analysis. In addition we compared our study in detail to a previous study using cytochrome b and morphology to examine the effect of taxon sampling, evolutionary rates of genes, and combined data on tree resolution. We found that the particular weighting scheme used had no effect on tree topology and little effect on tree robustness. Taxon sampling had a significant effect on tree robustness but little effect on the topology of the best tree. The CR data set differed nonsignificantly from the tree derived from the cytochrome b/morphological data set primarily in the placement of the genus Gymnorhinus, which is near the base of the CR tree. However, contrary to conventional taxonomy, the CR data set suggested that blue and black jays (Cyanocorax sensu lato) might be paraphyletic and that the brown jay Psilorhinus (=Cyanocorax) morio is the sister group to magpie jays (Calocitta), a phylogenetic hypothesis that is likely as parsimonious with regard to nonmolecular characters as monophyly of Cyanocorax. The CR tree also suggests that the common ancestor of NWJs was likely a cooperative breeder. Consistent with recent systematic theory, our data suggest that DNA sequences with high substitution rates such as the CR may nonetheless be useful in reconstructing relatively deep phylogenetic nodes in avian groups. PMID:10948266

  2. Can male Eurasian jays disengage from their own current desire to feed the female what she wants?

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Ljerka; Legg, Edward W.; Shaw, Rachael C.; Cheke, Lucy G.; Mendl, Michael; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans' predictions of another person's behaviour are regularly influenced by what they themselves might know or want. In a previous study, we found that male Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) could cater for their female partner's current desire when sharing food with her. Here, we tested the extent to which the males' decisions are influenced by their own current desire. When the males' and female's desires matched, males correctly shared the food that was desired by both. When the female's desire differed from their own, the males' decisions were not entirely driven by their own desires, suggesting that males also took the female's desire into account. Thus, the male jays' decisions about their mates' desires are partially biased by their own desire and might be based upon similar processes as those found in humans. PMID:24671829

  3. Can male Eurasian jays disengage from their own current desire to feed the female what she wants?

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Ljerka; Legg, Edward W; Shaw, Rachael C; Cheke, Lucy G; Mendl, Michael; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-03-01

    Humans' predictions of another person's behaviour are regularly influenced by what they themselves might know or want. In a previous study, we found that male Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) could cater for their female partner's current desire when sharing food with her. Here, we tested the extent to which the males' decisions are influenced by their own current desire. When the males' and female's desires matched, males correctly shared the food that was desired by both. When the female's desire differed from their own, the males' decisions were not entirely driven by their own desires, suggesting that males also took the female's desire into account. Thus, the male jays' decisions about their mates' desires are partially biased by their own desire and might be based upon similar processes as those found in humans. PMID:24671829

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Uranometria Argentina catalog of bright southern stars (Gould, 1879)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, B. G.

    2010-07-01

    In 1879 Benjamin Apthorp Gould published in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the Uranometria Argentina catalog of 7756 stars south of declination +10 degrees. This included all those stars he considered magnitude 7 or brighter and some fainter stars which are close companions to brighter stars or to each other and have combined magnitude 7 or brighter. Star positions are in 1875 coordinates, and constellation boundaries also in 1875 coordinates were defined within the aforementioned declination range. With only a few small changes these were incorporated into the boundaries adopted by the IAU in 1930 and subsequently universally accepted. In terms of accurate photoelectric magnitude measurements the Uranometria Argentina is nearly complete to magnitude 6.5 in its declination range. In each constellation the individual stars considered to be magnitude 7 and brighter were numbered in sequence of increasing right ascension in 1875 coordinates, except that in a few cases this sequence was somewhat adjusted so that stars close together could be listed on adjacent lines of text. The numbering system is analogous to that in the Flamsteed Catalogus Brittanicus and now widely used. Star numbers from the Uranometria Argentina rarely appear in the 21st century despite the potential utility of their use. They were included in the American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac until 1978, and in the FK5 catalog until 1999, always with the letter G following the number in the Uranometria Argentina catalog. This serves to distinguish Flamsteed numbers with no following letters from Gould numbers, and is utilized in this presentation and recommended for general use. The file catalog.dat includes every star in the original Uranometria Argentina. In the original the constellations were presented in sequence of increasing distance from the south pole and numbered accordingly. For the convenience of 21st century astronomers the constellations are presented here by alphabetical sequence in constellation name and the stars in each constellation in the same sequence as in the original. A separate file notes.txt includes a large number of notes for individual stars and for groups of stars recognized in the original catalog as belonging together. Each note is referenced by an asterisk * in the file catalog.dat. Columns 43-63 provide J2000 coordinates and cross identifications from the Flamsteed, HD, and SAO catalogs for the stars and have been added by the author of this data set. Columns 82-154 have been copied verbatim from the Uranometria Argentina catalogue, except that where asterisks are shown errors in the original printed catalogue have been corrected and the originally published values are stated in the notes. Two publications state corrections to the printed Uranometria Argentina. These are by B.A. Gould, Astronomische Nachrichten 116, 379-382 (1887AN....116..379G), and by T. W. Backhouse, Astronomical Journal 12, 112 (1892AJ.....12Q.112B). All of these, and a few others, mostly typographical misprints found by the present author, are presented in this digital version. (5 data files).

  5. Wrestling with Stephen and Matilda: Planning Challenging Enquiries to Engage Year 7 in Medieval Anarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougall, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    McDougall found learning about Stephen and Matilda fascinating, was sure that her pupils would also and designed an enquiry to engage them in "the anarchy" of 1139-1153 AD. Pupils enjoyed exploring "the anarchy" and learning about it enhanced their knowledge and understanding of the medieval period considerably. However, McDougall argues, story…

  6. A Study Guide for Stephen B. Oates' "The Fires of Jubilee: Nat Turner's Fierce Rebellion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Ron

    2006-01-01

    This document is a study guide for Stephen B. Oates biography of Nat Turner, "The Fires of Jubilee." The book is a practical reading vehicle for introducing Nat Turner to secondary students in grades 11 and 12. Oates divides his work into four parts, which could provide the basis for four reading assignments, although the sections are not of equal

  7. Contributions of Stephen J. Ball to the Research on Educational and Curriculum Policies in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainardes, Jefferson; Gandin, Luis Armando

    2013-01-01

    This article aims at showcasing the main contributions of Stephen J. Ball to educational research in Brazil, particularly to the study of educational and curriculum policies. We also highlight some of the limitations in the incorporation of Ball's ideas in Brazil as well as some of the challenges that these author's ideas pose to…

  8. The Compleat Teacher-Scholar: An Interview with Stephen F. Davis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskist, William

    2009-01-01

    Stephen F. Davis is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Emporia State University. He served as the 2002-2003 Knapp Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at the University of San Diego. Currently, he is Distinguished Guest Professor at Morningside College and Visiting Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Texas Wesleyan University. Since

  9. 75 FR 49994 - James Stephen Ferguson, D.M.D.; Revocation of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration James Stephen Ferguson, D.M.D.; Revocation of Registration On July 24, 2009, the Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Diversion Control, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), issued an Order to Show Cause to...

  10. A Study Guide for Stephen B. Oates' "The Fires of Jubilee: Nat Turner's Fierce Rebellion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Ron

    2006-01-01

    This document is a study guide for Stephen B. Oates biography of Nat Turner, "The Fires of Jubilee." The book is a practical reading vehicle for introducing Nat Turner to secondary students in grades 11 and 12. Oates divides his work into four parts, which could provide the basis for four reading assignments, although the sections are not of equal…

  11. Power/Knowledge for Educational Theory: Stephen Ball and the Reception of Foucault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chia-Ling

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the significance of the concept of power/knowledge in educational theory. The argument proceeds in two main parts. In the first, I consider aspects of Stephen J. Ball's highly influential work in educational theory. I examine his reception of Foucault's concept of power/knowledge and suggest that there are problems in his…

  12. Tripping with Stephen Gaskin: An Exploration of a Hippy Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Gabriel Patrick

    2012-01-01

    For the last 40 years, Stephen Gaskin has been an adult educator on the fringe, working with tens of thousands of adults in the counterculture movement in pursuit of social change regarding marijuana legalization, women's rights, environmental justice issues and beyond. Gaskin has written 11 books about his experiences teaching and learning

  13. Gaze Step Distributions Reflect Fixations and Saccades: A Comment on Stephen and Mirman (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogartz, Richard S.; Staub, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In three experimental tasks Stephen and Mirman (2010) measured gaze steps, the distance in pixels between gaze positions on successive samples from an eyetracker. They argued that the distribution of gaze steps is best fit by the lognormal distribution, and based on this analysis they concluded that interactive cognitive processes underlie eye…

  14. Tripping with Stephen Gaskin: An Exploration of a Hippy Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Gabriel Patrick

    2012-01-01

    For the last 40 years, Stephen Gaskin has been an adult educator on the fringe, working with tens of thousands of adults in the counterculture movement in pursuit of social change regarding marijuana legalization, women's rights, environmental justice issues and beyond. Gaskin has written 11 books about his experiences teaching and learning…

  15. The Penetration of Educational Leadership Texts by Revelation and Prophecy: The Case of Stephen R. Covey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fenwick W.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the uncritical citation of Stephen R. Covey's book, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People," in educational administration texts undermines the social-scientific foundation of university-based administrator preparation. Asserts that the Covey's book is based on Mormon metaphysics, not social science. (Contains 41 references.) (PKP)

  16. Stephen Schneider and the "Double Ethical Bind" of Climate Change Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russill, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Stephen Schneider's perspective on climate change communication is distinguished by its longevity, a keen anticipation of research findings, historical understanding, and grounding in first-person experience. In this article, the author elaborates Schneider's work in terms of its key claims, suggestive research directions, and lessons for…

  17. 78 FR 6321 - Stephen Phillips, Brentwood Dam Ventures, LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Stephen Phillips, Brentwood Dam Ventures, LLC; Notice of Transfer of... Brentwood Dam Ventures, LLC informed the Commission that the exemption from ] licensing for the Exeter River... Dam Ventures, LLC. The project is located on the Exeter River in Rockingham County, New Hampshire....

  18. The Humanities and Interrater Reliability: A Response to R. Stephen RiCharde

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick, Arend

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's critique of R. Stephen RiCharde's argument in his essay on the humanities and interrater reliability in the July-August 2008 issue of "Assessment Update." RiCharde suggests that the humanities' historical commitment to a dialectical pedagogy, a "nonlinear" process that values disagreement and debate, is at odds…

  19. Unequivocal Acceptance--Lessons from the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Explores the question of "institutional racism" in England in the context of the Stephen Lawrence murder investigation and considers the implications of the racist charges leveled at the police after this investigation for the educational system. Calls for attention to institutional racism in the British schools. (SLD)

  20. The Compleat Teacher-Scholar: An Interview with Stephen F. Davis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskist, William

    2009-01-01

    Stephen F. Davis is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Emporia State University. He served as the 2002-2003 Knapp Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at the University of San Diego. Currently, he is Distinguished Guest Professor at Morningside College and Visiting Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Texas Wesleyan University. Since…

  1. Gaze Step Distributions Reflect Fixations and Saccades: A Comment on Stephen and Mirman (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogartz, Richard S.; Staub, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In three experimental tasks Stephen and Mirman (2010) measured gaze steps, the distance in pixels between gaze positions on successive samples from an eyetracker. They argued that the distribution of gaze steps is best fit by the lognormal distribution, and based on this analysis they concluded that interactive cognitive processes underlie eye

  2. Evidence suggesting that desire-state attribution may govern food sharing in Eurasian jays.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Ljerka; Shaw, Rachael C; Cheke, Lucy G; Clayton, Nicola S

    2013-03-01

    State-attribution is the ability to ascribe to others an internal life like one's own and to understand that internal, psychological states such as desire, hope, belief, and knowledge underlie others' actions. Despite extensive research, comparative studies struggle to adequately integrate key factors of state-attribution that have been identified by evolutionary and developmental psychology as well as research on empathy. Here, we develop a behavioral paradigm to address these issues and investigate whether male Eurasian jays respond to the changing desire-state of their female partners when sharing food. We demonstrate that males feed their mates flexibly according to the female's current food preference. Critically, we show that the males need to see what the female has previously eaten to know what food she will currently want. Consequently, the males' sharing pattern was not simply a response to their mate's behavior indicating her preference as to what he should share, nor was it a response to the males' own desire-state. Our results raise the possibility that these birds may be capable of ascribing desire to their mates. PMID:23382187

  3. Signaling for food and sex? Begging by reproductive female white-throated magpie-jays.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jesse M S; Langen, Tom A; Berg, Elena C

    2009-09-01

    Food begging is common in nutritionally dependent young of many animals, but structurally homologous calls recur in adult signal repertoires of many species. We propose eight functional hypotheses for begging in adults; these stem from observations in birds but apply broadly to other taxa in which begging occurs. Adult cooperatively-breeding white-throated magpie-jays (Calocitta formosa) use loud begging vocalizations, particularly near the nest site during reproduction. We analysed the social context and behavioural phenology of loud calling and allofeeding in this species and compared these with predictions from each functional hypothesis. We found that reproductive females are the primary producers of beg calls, and their begging peaks during the fertile period when reproductive conflict among males and females was highest. Loud begging rates correlated positively with provisioning rates, but females called more in the pre-incubation fertile period than after they initiated incubation. Based on the context, phenology and active space of the signal, we conclude that female loud begging vocalizations function to signal nutritional need to group members, but also have been evolutionarily co-opted to advertise fertility to potential extra-pair partners. The location of calling is likely a consequence of nest guarding by breeding females to prevent intraspecific brood parasitism. PMID:23293376

  4. "Anting" in Blue Jays: evidence in support of a food-preparatory function.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Thomas; Aneshansley, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines), is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants. Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is a strategy by which birds render ants fit for ingestion. Formicine ants are ordinarily protected by their formic acid-containing spray. Being wiped into the bird's plumage causes them to discharge that spray, without harm to the bird, to the point of almost total emptying of the glandular sac in which the secretion is stored. The ants are therefore essentially secretion-free by the time they are swallowed. Further evidence indicates that it is the ant's possession of the acid sac that triggers the anting behavior in the bird. If F. exsectoides are surgically deprived of their acid sac, they are eaten by the birds without first being subjected to anting. Data are also presented indicating that the ant's crop, which is especially capacious in formicines (its contents may amount to over 30% of the formicine's mass), and which appears to survive the anting procedure intact, constitutes, at least when laden, a valuable component of the trophic package that the bird accesses by anting. PMID:19169379

  5. Evidence suggesting that desire-state attribution may govern food sharing in Eurasian jays

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Ljerka; Shaw, Rachael C.; Cheke, Lucy G.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2013-01-01

    State-attribution is the ability to ascribe to others an internal life like one’s own and to understand that internal, psychological states such as desire, hope, belief, and knowledge underlie others’ actions. Despite extensive research, comparative studies struggle to adequately integrate key factors of state-attribution that have been identified by evolutionary and developmental psychology as well as research on empathy. Here, we develop a behavioral paradigm to address these issues and investigate whether male Eurasian jays respond to the changing desire-state of their female partners when sharing food. We demonstrate that males feed their mates flexibly according to the female’s current food preference. Critically, we show that the males need to see what the female has previously eaten to know what food she will currently want. Consequently, the males’ sharing pattern was not simply a response to their mate’s behavior indicating her preference as to what he should share, nor was it a response to the males’ own desire-state. Our results raise the possibility that these birds may be capable of ascribing desire to their mates. PMID:23382187

  6. Visual Search and Attention in Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata): Associative Cuing and Sequential Priming

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Bond, Alan B.; Burks, Marianna; Kamil, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Visual search for complex natural targets requires focal attention, either cued by predictive stimulus associations or primed by a representation of the most recently detected target. Since both processes can focus visual attention, cuing and priming were compared in an operant search task to evaluate their relative impacts on performance and to determine the nature of their interaction in combined treatments. Blue jays were trained to search for pairs of alternative targets among distractors. Informative or ambiguous color cues were provided prior to each trial, and targets were presented either in homogeneous blocked sequences or in constrained random order. Initial task acquisition was facilitated by priming in general, but was significantly retarded when targets were both cued and primed, indicating that the two processes interfered with each other during training. At asymptote, attentional effects were manifested mainly in inhibition, increasing latency in miscued trials and decreasing accuracy on primed trials following an unexpected target switch. A combination of cuing and priming was found to interfere with performance in such unexpected trials, apparently a result of the limited capacity of working memory. Because the ecological factors that promote priming and cuing are rather disparate, it is not clear whether they ever jointly and simultaneously contribute to natural predatory search. PMID:24893217

  7. Visual search and attention in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata): Associative cuing and sequential priming.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Bond, Alan B; Burks, Marianna; Kamil, Alan C

    2014-04-01

    Visual search for complex natural targets requires focal attention, either cued by predictive stimulus associations or primed by a representation of the most recently detected target. Because both processes can focus visual attention, cuing and priming were compared in an operant search task to evaluate their relative impacts on performance and to determine the nature of their interaction in combined treatments. Blue jays were trained to search for pairs of alternative targets among distractors. Informative or ambiguous color cues were provided before each trial, and targets were presented either in homogeneous blocked sequences or in constrained random order. Initial task acquisition was facilitated by priming in general, but was significantly retarded when targets were both cued and primed, indicating that the two processes interfered with each other during training. At asymptote, attentional effects were manifested mainly in inhibition, increasing latency in miscued trials and decreasing accuracy on primed trials following an unexpected target switch. A combination of cuing and priming was found to interfere with performance in such unexpected trials, apparently a result of the limited capacity of working memory. Because the ecological factors that promote priming or cuing are rather disparate, it is not clear whether they ever simultaneously contribute to natural predatory search. PMID:24893217

  8. Growing evidence for a core formation threshold traced in Herschel Gould Belt survey clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves , V.; André, Ph.; Schneider, N.; Palmeirim, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; Men'shchikov, A.

    2013-11-01

    It has already been suggested that a threshold in column density - or in visual extinction - may need to be exceeded to form dense cores and then protostars. Based on Herschel Gould Belt survey results in the Aquila and Orion B molecular cloud complexes we observe clear connection between the locations of the detected prestellar cores and their background column density values. This finding appears to support a core formation scenario where such threshold corresponds to the extinction above which interstellar filaments become gravitationally unstable and fragment into cores. In these two actively star-forming regions we find the vast majority of the gravitationally bound prestellar cores above a high column density of about (6-7) × 1021 cm-2 (AV ˜ 6-7). This limit similarly appears in the column density probability distribution function (PDF) of the regions as well. The spatial distribution of the protostars and young stellar objects (YSOs) also shows a tight connection with the densest sites of both clouds, as more than 70 % of them appear above the mentioned AV thresholds. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of circumstellar discs in L 1495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Greaves, J.; Richer, J. S.; Matthews, B. C.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-05-01

    We present 850 and 450 μm data from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey obtained with Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) and characterize the dust attributes of Class I, Class II and Class III disc sources in L 1495. We detect 23 per cent of the sample at both wavelengths, with the detection rate decreasing through the Classes from I to III. The median disc mask is 1.6 × 10-3 M⊙, and only 7 per cent of Class II sources have disc masses larger than 20 Jupiter masses. We detect a higher proportion of discs towards sources with stellar hosts of spectral type K than spectral type M. Class II discs with single stellar hosts of spectral type K have higher masses than those of spectral type M, supporting the hypothesis that higher mass stars have more massive discs. Variations in disc masses calculated at the two wavelengths suggest that there may be differences in dust opacity and/or dust temperature between discs with hosts of spectral types K to those with spectral type M.

  10. Neurogenesis in the mossy chiton, Mopalia muscosa (Gould) (Polyplacophora): evidence against molluscan metamerism.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas; Brückner, Martin; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2002-08-01

    Neurogenesis in the chiton Mopalia muscosa (Gould, 1846) was investigated by applying differential interference contrast microscopy, semithin serial sectioning combined with reconstruction techniques, as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy for the detection of fluorescence-conjugated antibodies against serotonin and FMRFamide. The ontogeny of serotonergic nervous structures starts with cells of the apical organ followed by those of the cerebral commissure, whereas the serotonergic prototroch innervation, pedal system, and the lateral cords develop later. In addition, there are eight symmetrically arranged serotonergic sensory cells in the dorsal pretrochal area of the larva. FMRFamide-positive neural elements include the cerebral commissure, specific "ampullary" sensory cells in the pretrochal region, as well as the larval lateral and pedal system. In the early juvenile the cerebral system no longer stains with either of the two antibodies and the pedal system lacks anti-FMRFamide immunoreactivity. Outgroup comparison with all other molluscan classes and related phyla suggests that the cord-like, nonganglionized cerebral system in the Polyplacophora is a reduced condition rather than a primitive molluscan condition. The immunosensitivity of the pedal commissures develops from posterior to anterior, suggesting independent serial repetition rather than annelid-like conditions and there is no trace of true segmentation during nervous system development. Polyplacophoran neurogenesis and all other available data on the subject contradict the idea of a segmented molluscan stem species. PMID:12112126

  11. The link between magnetic fields and filamentary clouds: bimodal cloud orientations in the Gould Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-bai; Fang, Min; Henning, Thomas; Kainulainen, Jouni

    2013-12-01

    The orientations of filamentary molecular clouds in the Gould Belt and their local intercloud media (ICM) magnetic fields are studied using near-infrared dust extinction maps and optical stellar polarimetry data. These filamentary clouds are a few-to-10 pc in length, and we find that their orientations tend to be either parallel or perpendicular to the mean field directions of the local ICM. This bimodal distribution is not found in cloud simulations with super-Alfvénic turbulence, in which the cloud orientations should be random. ICM magnetic fields that are dynamically important compared to inertial range turbulence and self-gravity can readily explain both field-filament configurations. Previous studies commonly recognize that strong magnetic fields can guide gravitational contraction and result in filaments perpendicular to them, but few discuss the fact that magnetic fields can also channel sub-Alfvénic turbulence to form filaments aligned with them. This strong-field scenario of cloud formation is also consistent with the constant field strength observed from ICM to clouds and is possible to explain the `hub-filament' cloud structure and the density threshold of cloud gravitational contraction.

  12. Modulational Instability of Gould-Trivelpiece Mode in a Strongly Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.; Salimullah, M.

    2000-07-01

    A large amplitude Gould-Trivelpiece (GT) mode in a strongly magnetized plasma, e.g., a beam-plasma system, is unstable to modulational instability. For a parabolic radial density profile, the eigen function of the GT mode is an associated Laguerre polynomial. The GT mode imparts an oscillatory velocity vozz to electrons parallel to the guide magnetic field Bsz and couples a low frequency perturbation to two GT mode sidebands, when the phase velocity of the former equals the group velocity of the pump. The density perturbation associated with the low-frequency mode couples with vozz to produce a nonlinear density perturbation driving the sideband GT modes. The pump and the side bands exert a low frequency parallel ponderomotive force on the electrons, driving the original perturbation. The threshold GT mode amplitude for the onset of modulation instability turns out to be such that voz is a fraction of the electron thermal speed. The nonlocal effects reduce the growth rate of the modulational instability significantly. The presence of the dust has two opposing effects on the modulational instability. First, it causes an enhancement in the parallel wave number of the pump and thus enhances the nonlinear coupling. Second, it introduces damping on the decay waves on account of collisions and dust charge fluctuations, thus weakening the instability.

  13. The Frenkel Kontorova Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floría, L. M.; Baesens, C.; Gómez-Gardeñes, J.

    In the preface to his monograph on the structure of Evolutionary Theory [1], the late professor Stephen Jay Gould attributes to the philosopher Immanuel Kant the following aphorism in Science Philosophy: "Percepts without concepts are blind; concepts without percepts are empty". Using with a bit of freedom these Kantian terms, one would say that a scientific model is a framework (or network) of interrelated concepts and percepts where experts build up scientific consistent explanations of a given set of observations. Good models are those which are both, conceptually simple and universal in their perceptions. Let us illustrate with examples the meaning of this statement.

  14. Autecology of the tailed jay butterfly Graphium agamemnon (Lepidoptera : Rhopalocera : Papilionidae).

    PubMed

    Ramana, S P Venkata; Atluri, J B; Reddi, C Subba

    2003-07-01

    The Tailed Jay Graphium agamemnon is one of the attractive papilionid butterflies that enliven the environment of Visakhapatnam. It occurs throughout the year. It lays eggs singly on young leaves of the mast tree Polyalthia longifolia var. pendula (Annonaceae). The eggs take 3-4 days to hatch. The larvae go through 5 instars over a period of 15-16 days. The pupal period is 13-14 days. The total period from egg to adult emergence spans over 33-36 days. Based on this short life cycle, and larval and pupal development success studied every month, this butterfly can be multivoltine with a minimum of 7-8 broods in a year. Both CI and GR decreased with the age of larva, their average figures being 3.78 and 0.43 respectively. AD values are high (average 92%) and decreased through successive instars. Both ECD and ECI followed a similar pattern with an increase from instar I up to II, then a decrease up to IV and again an increase in instar V and the highest value is with fifth instar. Adults frequently visited flowers (12-35 flowers in a min) spending 1.0 to 3.2 seconds on a flower. The nectar concentration ranged between 16 and 58%. Peak foraging activity mostly fell between 0900-1000 h. The proboscis received pollen in most of the floral species visited, thus satisfying one of the characteristics of butterfly pollination. Being a fast and strong flier it is treated as "high energy" pollinator promoting cross-pollination. PMID:15259606

  15. An example of phenotypic adherence to the island rule? – Anticosti gray jays are heavier but not structurally larger than mainland conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Dan; Norris, D Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The island rule refers to the tendency of small vertebrates to become larger when isolated on islands and the frequent dwarfing of large forms. It implies genetic control, and a necessary linkage, of size and body-mass differences between insular and mainland populations. To examine the island rule, we compared body size and mass of gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis) on Anticosti Island, Québec, located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with three mainland populations (2 in Québec and 1 in Ontario). Although gray jays on Anticosti Island were ca 10% heavier, they were not structurally larger, than the three mainland populations. This suggests that Anticosti jays are not necessarily genetically distinct from mainland gray jays and that they may have achieved their greater body masses solely through packing more mass onto mainland-sized body frames. As such, they may be the first-known example of a proposed, purely phenotypic initial step in the adherence to the island rule by an insular population. Greater jay body mass is probably advantageous in Anticosti's high-density, intensely competitive social environment that may have resulted from the island's lack of mammalian nest predators. PMID:26380697

  16. An example of phenotypic adherence to the island rule? - Anticosti gray jays are heavier but not structurally larger than mainland conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Dan; Norris, D Ryan

    2015-09-01

    The island rule refers to the tendency of small vertebrates to become larger when isolated on islands and the frequent dwarfing of large forms. It implies genetic control, and a necessary linkage, of size and body-mass differences between insular and mainland populations. To examine the island rule, we compared body size and mass of gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis) on Anticosti Island, Québec, located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with three mainland populations (2 in Québec and 1 in Ontario). Although gray jays on Anticosti Island were ca 10% heavier, they were not structurally larger, than the three mainland populations. This suggests that Anticosti jays are not necessarily genetically distinct from mainland gray jays and that they may have achieved their greater body masses solely through packing more mass onto mainland-sized body frames. As such, they may be the first-known example of a proposed, purely phenotypic initial step in the adherence to the island rule by an insular population. Greater jay body mass is probably advantageous in Anticosti's high-density, intensely competitive social environment that may have resulted from the island's lack of mammalian nest predators. PMID:26380697

  17. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at Dense Cores in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Mottram, J. C.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 μm map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 μm peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1-2 × 1023 cm-2, most of the mass is found within dense cores, while at lower cloud column densities, below 1 × 1023 cm-2, this fraction drops to 10% or lower. Overall, the fraction of dense cores associated with a protostar is quite small (<8%), but becomes larger for the densest and most centrally concentrated cores. NGC 2023/2024 and NGC 2068/2071 appear to be on the path to forming a significant number of stars in the future, while L1622 has little additional mass in dense cores to form many new stars.

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: a quantitative comparison between SCUBA-2 data reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairs, S.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Graves, S.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Salji, C.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; JCMT Gould Belt survey Team

    2015-12-01

    Performing ground-based submillimetre observations is a difficult task as the measurements are subject to absorption and emission from water vapour in the Earth's atmosphere and time variation in weather and instrument stability. Removing these features and other artefacts from the data is a vital process which affects the characteristics of the recovered astronomical structure we seek to study. In this paper, we explore two data reduction methods for data taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array-2 (SCUBA-2) at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The JCMT Legacy Reduction 1 (JCMT LR1) and The Gould Belt Legacy Survey Legacy Release 1 (GBS LR1) reduction both use the same software (STARLINK) but differ in their choice of data reduction parameters. We find that the JCMT LR1 reduction is suitable for determining whether or not compact emission is present in a given region and the GBS LR1 reduction is tuned in a robust way to uncover more extended emission, which better serves more in-depth physical analyses of star-forming regions. Using the GBS LR1 method, we find that compact sources are recovered well, even at a peak brightness of only three times the noise, whereas the reconstruction of larger objects requires much care when drawing boundaries around the expected astronomical signal in the data reduction process. Incorrect boundaries can lead to false structure identification or it can cause structure to be missed. In the JCMT LR1 reduction, the extent of the true structure of objects larger than a point source is never fully recovered.

  19. Insights into the earliest stages of star cluster formationfrom Herschel Gould Belt survey observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Philippe; Ladjelate, Bilal; Könyves, Vera

    2015-08-01

    For a long time, the conventional wisdom has been that "clustered star formation" and "isolated (or distributed) star formation" represent two fundamentally distinct modes of the star formation process. Recent detailed infrared studies of the spatial distribution of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the solar neighborhood, however, suggest that there is a continuous distribution of YSO surface densities from a diffuse population to the densest groups or clusters, with no evidence for discrete modes of star formation (e.g. Bressert et al. 2010). Based on the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr) toward the nearest regions of "clustered" and "distributed" star formation, including the Ophiuchus and Taurus clouds, we will show how these two seemingly opposing views can be reconciled.The Herschel results point to the key role of the quasi-universal filamentary structure pervading the cold ISM (cf. André et al. 2014, Protostars and Planets VI). Indeed, a large fraction of the dense molecular gas is found to be in the form of filaments and most prestellar cores are located within dense, "supercritical" filaments. To a large extent, therefore, the spatial distribution of YSOs is inherited from the filamentary texture of molecular clouds, which is partly hierarchical and shaped by a combination of turbulent, magnetic, and gravitational effects. Wherever gravity dominates on large scales, a "hub-filament" system develops (cf. Myers 2009) and a protocluster is generated at the "hub" or junction of a converging network of filaments. More distributed star formation occurs along individual filaments with marginally supercritical masses per unit length.

  20. Effects of fouling on the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis (Jay) in Peter the Great Bay (Sea of Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabaev, D. D.

    2013-03-01

    A valuable mariculture object, the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten (= Patinopevten) yessoensis (Jay), after six hours long transportation by air and sowing on the bottom is fouled greater by epi- and endolythical organisms than the members of the native population. It is likely that the fouling negatively affects the specimens, those that were the largest before the sowing at the bottom were not found among those that reached puberty. The results of the effects of the endolythic polychaete Polydora brevipalpa and the barnacle Hesperibalanus hesperius on the growth rate of the Japanese scallop cultivated on the bottom of Peter the Great Bay (Sea of Japan) are provided in this paper.

  1. Virginia Woolf and Leslie Stephen: a father's contribution to psychosis and genius.

    PubMed

    Bond, A H

    1986-10-01

    Leslie Stephen, the father of Virginia Woolf, was a cacophony of contradictions. From all accounts, he was a bully, a manipulator, and a blustering, pessimistic, emotionally dishonest man. Although he could be lovable, charming, whimsical, encouraging, and deeply devoted to his family, he subjugated the adult women in his household and at least one son to exploitation and abuse, demanding (and receiving from his wife and step-daughter) almost total abnegation of self. Julia Stephen, in contrast, was an optimistic, seemingly selfless person, who characteristically presented herself in an "up" mood to the world. Virginia incorporated both parental moods into her character structure, as have a number of the author's cyclothymic patients. Therefore, it is postulated that pessimism and habitual deflating affronts on the part of one parent, in combination with a compulsive "good mood" on the part of the second parent, are a particularly lethal combination of character traits, which in their offspring may contribute to the rapid mood shifting characteristic of manic depression. In contrast to Julie, Stephen was a presence who could not be side-stepped. This combination of sweet and monstrous attributes in her father's nature, and again in the contrasting temperaments of the parental couple, must have been impossible to integrate for the small Virginia, who already was desperately engaged in the struggle for selfhood. She could not complete her development on the oedipal level, although she loved her father dearly, because identification with her mother meant further threat to an identity already weakened at the separation-individuation phase of development. Virginia's solution was to identify with her father in his character, his sexual identity, and his profession. Stephen, who was particularly devoted to Virginia, whom he regarded as an extension of himself, encouraged this identification, and served as her teacher and mentor. In that sense, he truly was the captain of the ship in her voyage To the Lighthouse, master of the currents that swept her onward to the grand light of her genius. A four-fold comparison of Virginia Woolf and Leslie Stephen is made concerning their respective ages of weaning, success in navigating both the rapproachment phase of separation-individuation and the oedipal period, and the ages at which their mothers died. It appears that Virginia lost her mother at those four critical periods when Leslie did not.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3771329

  2. Speciation in Western Scrub-Jays, Haldane’s rule, and genetic clines in secondary contact

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haldane’s Rule, the tendency for the heterogametic sex to show reduced fertility in hybrid crosses, can obscure the signal of gene flow in mtDNA between species where females are heterogametic. Therefore, it is important when studying speciation and species limits in female-heterogametic species like birds to assess the signature of gene flow in the nuclear genome as well. We studied introgression of microsatellites and mtDNA across a secondary contact zone between coastal and interior lineages of Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test for a signature of Haldane’s Rule: a narrower cline of introgression in mtDNA compared to nuclear markers. Results Our initial phylogeographic analysis revealed that there is only one major area of contact between coastal and interior lineages and identified five genetic clusters with strong spatial structuring: Pacific Slope, Interior US, Edwards Plateau (Texas), Northern Mexico, and Southern Mexico. Consistent with predictions from Haldane’s Rule, mtDNA showed a narrower cline than nuclear markers across a transect through the hybrid zone. This result is not being driven by female-biased dispersal because neutral diffusion analysis, which included estimates of sex-specific dispersal rates, also showed less diffusion of mtDNA. Lineage-specific plumage traits were associated with nuclear genetic profiles for individuals in the hybrid zone, indicating that these differences are under genetic control. Conclusions This study adds to a growing list of studies that support predictions of Haldane’s Rule using cline analysis of multiple loci of differing inheritance modes, although alternate hypotheses like selection on different mtDNA types cannot be ruled out. That Haldane’s Rule appears to be operating in this system suggests a measure of reproductive isolation between the Pacific Slope and interior lineages. Based on a variety of evidence from the phenotype, ecology, and genetics, we recommend elevating three lineages to species level: A. californica (Pacific Slope); A. woodhouseii (Interior US plus Edwards Plateau plus Northern Mexico); A. sumichrasti (Southern Mexico). The distinctive Edwards Plateau population in Texas, which was monophyletic in mtDNA except for one individual, should be studied in greater detail given habitat threat. PMID:24938753

  3. High latitudes and high genetic diversity: phylogeography of a widespread boreal bird, the gray jay (Perisoreus canadensis).

    PubMed

    van Els, Paul; Cicero, Carla; Klicka, John

    2012-05-01

    We describe range-wide phylogeographic variation in gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis), a boreal Nearctic corvid that occurs today primarily in recently glaciated regions. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA (1041 base pairs ND2 gene; N=205, 50 localities) revealed four reciprocally monophyletic groups. One widespread clade occurs across the North American boreal zone, from Newfoundland to Alaska and southwest into Utah. Three other clades occur at lower latitudes in the montane West in Colorado, the northern Rocky Mountains, and the Pacific Northwest respectively. The geographic distribution of clades in gray jays corresponds with a general pattern that is emerging for boreal taxa, having one widespread northern clade and one or more geographically restricted southwestern clades. Population genetic analyses indicate that the larger boreal clade is genetically structured and harbors significantly more genetic diversity than those clades occurring at lower latitudes. Species distribution modeling (SDM) revealed multiple putative Pleistocene refugia including several occurring at higher latitudes. We suggest that multiple post-glacial colonization routes, some of which originate from these northern refugia, are responsible for the relatively high genetic diversity at high latitudes. Conversely, lower latitude clades show little variation, probably as a result of historical restriction to smaller geographical areas with smaller long-term population sizes. This 'upside-down' pattern of genetic diversity contrasts with the conventional view that populations of north-temperate species occupying previously glaciated habitats should possess lower levels of diversity than their southern counterparts. PMID:22321688

  4. The genus Alphitobius Stephens (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Alphitobiini) in Africa and adjacent islands

    PubMed Central

    Schawaller, Wolfgang; Grimm, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Abstract All species of the genus Alphitobius Stephens, 1829 (Alphitobiini Reitter, 1917, subfamily Tenebrioninae Latreille, 1802) from Africa and adjacent islands are revised. New species: Alphitobius capitaneus sp. n. from Kenya. New synonyms: Cryptops ulomoides Solier, 1851, syn. n. of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1796); Alphitobius rufus Ardoin, 1976, syn. n. of Alphitobius hobohmi Koch, 1953); Peltoides (Micropeltoides) crypticoides Pic, 1916, syn. n. of Peltoides (Micropeltoides) opacus (Gerstaecker, 1871), comb. n. Homonym: Alphitobius ulomoides Koch, 1953 = Alphitobius arnoldi nom. n. New combinations from Alphitobius: Ulomoides basilewskyi (Ardoin, 1969), comb. n.; Peltoides (Micropeltoides) opacus (Gerstaecker, 1871), comb. n. Figures of all examined species are added and a species key is compiled. PMID:25009427

  5. Festschrift in the Honor of Stephen H. White’s 70th Birthday

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Symposium ‘Frontiers in membrane and membrane protein biophysics: experiments and theory’, held this year at the University of California, Irvine (August 19–20), celebrated the 70th Birthday of Stephen H. White by bringing together distinguished experimentalists and theoreticians to discuss the state of the art and future challenges in the field of membrane and membrane protein biophysics. The meeting and this special issue highlight the highly interdisciplinary nature of membrane and membrane protein biophysics, and the tremendous contributions that S. H. White and his lab have brought to the field. PMID:21191785

  6. Telling It Like It Is--And Like It Is Not: Fiction in the Service of Science in Jay Hosler's "The Sandwalk Adventures"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porat, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Biologist and graphic novelist Jay Hosler has long been introducing young readers to biological subjects through entertaining narratives combining strongly fictional elements with nonfictional ones. Extensive application of fiction to nonfictional subject matter is uncommon, even in graphic novels, but Hosler's "The Sandwalk Adventures"…

  7. Literacy and Democracy: Teacher Research and Composition Studies in Pursuit of Habitable Spaces. Further Conversations from the Students of Jay Robinson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischer, Cathy, Ed.; Schaafsma, David, Ed.

    This collection offers insights into what a democratic vision of literacy looks like in practice. Building on the work of teacher and literacy scholar Jay Robinson, the 10 essays in the collection explore the relationships between literacy and society. The essays pay tribute to Professor Robinson, who retired in 1966 from the University of…

  8. A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

  9. Library Research in Criminal Justice. An Introduction for Students at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzker, Marilyn

    This introductory guide to basic library research tools in the field of criminal justice was compiled for use by students at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice as part of the Library Instruction Program. Included are chapters on devising a search strategy; the use of the card catalog; encyclopedia and dictionaries; indexes and abstracts;

  10. In the matter of Stephen Dawson: right v. duty of health care.

    PubMed

    Kluge, E H

    1983-10-15

    In cases like that of Stephen Dawson the ethics of proxy decision-making are at stake. As long as patients are persons they have rights, the incompetent ones no less than those who are competent. The only difference is that in the case of incompetent persons the rights must be exercised by proxy. The import of the Stephen Dawson case is that by this precedent Canadian law now radically alters the status of incompetent minors in such a way that their rights are curtailed in two fundamental ways. First, the parameter of qualitative considerations that is available to any other person is removed from the armory of the decision-making criteria of incompetent minors and can no longer be employed by the proxy decision-makers. Second, what are rights in the case of competent individuals--the right to life and the right to health care--become duties. Ethically this dénouement is deplorable. The medical profession now not only faces the pragmatically unenviable task of having to save or sustain all incompetent minors so long as medical science will permit but will have to do so even at the cost of quality of life. I shall pass over in silence the ethics of the resource-allocation problem that now arises. As a medical ethicist I can only hope that the medical profession will soon see fit to challenge this decision on a formal basis. PMID:6225505

  11. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating in Serpens MWC 297 and its influence on local star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Allen, L. E.; Cieza, L. A.; Dunham, M. M.; Harvey, P. M.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm observations of the Serpens MWC 297 region, part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey of nearby star-forming regions. Simulations suggest that radiative feedback influences the star formation process and we investigate observational evidence for this by constructing temperature maps. Maps are derived from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes and a two-component model of the JCMT beam for a fixed dust opacity spectral index of β = 1.8. Within 40 arcsec of the B1.5Ve Herbig star MWC 297, the submillimetre fluxes are contaminated by free-free emission with a spectral index of 1.03 ± 0.02, consistent with an ultracompact H II region and polar winds/jets. Contamination accounts for 73 ± 5 per cent and 82 ± 4 per cent of peak flux at 450 μm and 850 μm, respectively. The residual thermal disc of the star is almost undetectable at these wavelengths. Young stellar objects (YSOs) are confirmed where SCUBA-2 850 μm clumps identified by the FELLWALKER algorithm coincide with Spitzer Gould Belt Survey detections. We identify 23 objects and use Tbol to classify nine YSOs with masses 0.09 to 5.1 M⊙. We find two Class 0, one Class 0/I, three Class I and three Class II sources. The mean temperature is 15 ± 2 K for the nine YSOs and 32 ± 4 K for the 14 starless clumps. We observe a starless clump with an abnormally high mean temperature of 46 ± 2 K and conclude that it is radiatively heated by the star MWC 297. Jeans stability provides evidence that radiative heating by the star MWC 297 may be suppressing clump collapse.

  12. A new species of Caenis Stephens, 1836 (Ephemeroptera: Caenidae) from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Lucas R C; Molineri, Carlos; Pinheiro, Ulisses

    2015-01-01

    A new species of the genus Caenis Stephens is described based on the male imago, female imago and egg stages from the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The male imago of Caenis gaucha sp. nov. is diagnosed as follows: body length of male 2.0-2.5 mm; base of antennal flagellum not dilated; forceps apically rounded, not fused to lateral margins of styliger plate; styliger plate short with posterior margin slightly sub-triangular; ratio of foreleg 1.7-2.2 × the length of hind leg, forceps length 4.4-6.0 × the width ½ from base, and distance between the extreme lateral points of the forceps bases 1.7-1.8 × forceps length. PMID:25947532

  13. Stephen Hall Receives 2012 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Hall, a freelance science writer and science-communication teacher, received the Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. Hall was honored for the article "At Fault?" published 15 September 2011 in Nature. The article examines the legal, personal, and political repercussions from a 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy for seismologists who had attempted to convey seismic risk assessments to the public. The 6.3 magnitude quake devastated the medieval town and caused more than 300 deaths. Six scientists and one government official were subsequently convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to prison for inadequately assessing and mischaracterizing the risks to city residents, despite the inexact nature of seismic risk assessment. The Sullivan award is for work published with a deadline pressure of more than 1 week.

  14. Solar space heating for the Visitors Center, Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system located at the Visitors' Center on the Stephens College Campus, Columbia, Missouri is discussed. The system is installed in a four-story, 15,000 square foot building. The solar energy system is an integral design of the building and utilizes 176 hydronic flat plate collectors which use a 50 percent water ethylene blycol solution and water-to-water heat exchanger. Solar heated water is stored in a 5,000 gallon water storage tank located in the basement equipment room. A natural gas fired hot water boiler supplies hot water when the solar energy heat supply fails to meet the demand. The designed solar contribution is 71 percent of the heating load.

  15. Globalization, Edu-Business and Network Governance: The Policy Sociology of Stephen J. Ball and Rethinking Education Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Sellar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    This paper traces developments across Stephen J. Ball's policy sociology in education "oeuvre" and considers their implications for doing research on education policy today. It begins with an account of his policy sociology trilogy from the 1990s, which outlined his conception of the policy cycle consisting of the contexts of…

  16. Globalization, Edu-Business and Network Governance: The Policy Sociology of Stephen J. Ball and Rethinking Education Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Sellar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    This paper traces developments across Stephen J. Ball's policy sociology in education "oeuvre" and considers their implications for doing research on education policy today. It begins with an account of his policy sociology trilogy from the 1990s, which outlined his conception of the policy cycle consisting of the contexts of

  17. School Choice Research in Five European Countries: The Circulation of Stephen Ball's Concepts and Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zanten, Agnès; Kosunen, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the influence of Stephen Ball's work on research on markets and school choice in five European countries (Finland, France, Norway, Spain, and Sweden). The main focus is on the intellectual circulation of ideas, but the authors also take into account the relationship between ideas and social and political changes, as well…

  18. A Historical Analysis of the Leadership and Strategic Plan of Chancellor Stephen R. Portch in the University System of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild-Pierce, Jennifer Elis

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation provides historical insight into the design and implementation of one strategic plan of a public higher education system in an effort to inform future similar strategic planning processes. On July 1, 1994, the Board of Regents appointed Stephen R. Portch the ninth Chancellor of the University System of Georgia. The timing was…

  19. A Historical Analysis of the Leadership and Strategic Plan of Chancellor Stephen R. Portch in the University System of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild-Pierce, Jennifer Elis

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation provides historical insight into the design and implementation of one strategic plan of a public higher education system in an effort to inform future similar strategic planning processes. On July 1, 1994, the Board of Regents appointed Stephen R. Portch the ninth Chancellor of the University System of Georgia. The timing was

  20. School Choice Research in Five European Countries: The Circulation of Stephen Ball's Concepts and Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zanten, Agns; Kosunen, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the influence of Stephen Ball's work on research on markets and school choice in five European countries (Finland, France, Norway, Spain, and Sweden). The main focus is on the intellectual circulation of ideas, but the authors also take into account the relationship between ideas and social and political changes, as well

  1. All of Us Are Present. The Stephens College Symposium. Women's Education: The Future (Columbia, Missouri, February 15-18, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Eleanor M., Ed.; And Others

    Women's education and the future are considered in 10 papers/summaries from a 1983 symposium at Stephens College. Four basic themes are addressed: effects of social change on women's lives; the diversity of women students (in age, racial/ethnic background, economic level); structure/content of the college curriculum; and the necessity to make…

  2. Chief Stephen's Parky: One Year in the Life of an Athapascan Girl. The Council for Indian Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandonnet, Ann

    This book tells the fictional story of Olga, the wife of Chief Stephen, leader of a Tanaina Athapascan village on Cook Inlet, northwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Olga works for one full year with great courage and independence trapping ground squirrels and gathering materials needed to tan, dye, and sew furs to make a parka for her husband. She uses…

  3. Chaetocnema Stephens, 1831 (Insecta, Coleoptera): proposed conservation of usage by designation of Altica hortensis Geoffroy, 1785 as the type species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this application, in relation to Article 70 of the Code, is to conserve the widespread usage of the generic name Chaetocnema Stephens, 1831 for a group for flea beetles (Chrysomelidae: Alticini) by validating Maulik’s (1926) designation of Altica hortensis Geoffroy, 1785 as the types ...

  4. The influence of nest attendance and provisioning on nestling stress physiology in the Florida scrub-jay.

    PubMed

    Rensel, Michelle A; Wilcoxen, Travis E; Schoech, Stephan J

    2010-02-01

    Stressful conditions during development may have lasting consequences for an animal's lifetime fitness. We investigated the degree to which parental provisioning and nest attendance influenced baseline levels of the stress hormone corticosterone in nestling Florida scrub-jays. Provisioning rates of male and female breeders and nest attendance of female breeders were recorded during focal watches conducted between days 3 and 5 post-hatch. A small blood sample was taken from each nestling on day 11 post-hatch and used to quantify levels of baseline corticosterone. The proportion of time spent by female breeders at a considerable distance from the nest was positively related to nestling corticosterone levels. Nestling corticosterone was also negatively related to parental provisioning rate, although this effect seemed to be secondary to the effect of the female's time away from the nest. These results indicate that parental behavior contributes to nestling stress physiology, which may in turn direct the formation of the adult phenotype and influence an individual's chances of survival. PMID:19879277

  5. Chromosomal mapping of tandem repeats in the Yesso Scallop, Patinopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1857), utilizing fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Yang, Zujing; Liao, Huan; Zhang, Zhengrui; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Construction of cytogenetic maps can provide important information for chromosome identification, chromosome evolution and genomic research. However, it hasn’t been conducted in many scallop species yet. In the present study, we attempted to map 12 fosmid clones containing tandem repeats by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1857). The results showed 6 fosmid clones were successfully mapped and distributed in 6 different pairs of chromosomes. Three clones were respectively assigned to a pair of metacentric chromosomes, a pair of submetacentric chromosomes and a pair of telocentric chromosomes and the remaining 3 clones showed their loci on three different pairs of subtelocentric chromosomes by co-hybridization. In summary, totally 8 pairs of chromosomes of the Yesso scallop were identified by 6 fosmid clones and two rDNA probes. Furthermore, 6 tandem repeats of 5 clones were sequenced and could be developed as chromosome specific markers for the Yesso scallop. The successful localization of fosmid clones will undoubtedly facilitate the integration of linkage groups with cytogenetic map and genomic research for the Yesso scallop. PMID:27186345

  6. The development of caching and object permanence in Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica): which emerges first?

    PubMed

    Salwiczek, Lucie H; Emery, Nathan J; Schlinger, Barney; Clayton, Nicola S

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies on the food-caching behavior of corvids have revealed complex physical and social skills, yet little is known about the ontogeny of food caching in relation to the development of cognitive capacities. Piagetian object permanence is the understanding that objects continue to exist even when they are no longer visible. Here, the authors focus on Piagetian Stages 3 and 4, because they are hallmarks in the cognitive development of both young children and animals. Our aim is to determine in a food-caching corvid, the Western scrub-jay, whether (1) Piagetian Stage 4 competence and tentative caching (i.e., hiding an item invisibly and retrieving it without delay), emerge concomitantly or consecutively; (2) whether experiencing the reappearance of hidden objects enhances the timing of the appearance of object permanence; and (3) discuss how the development of object permanence is related to behavioral development and sensorimotor intelligence. Our findings suggest that object permanence Stage 4 emerges before tentative caching, and independent of environmental influences, but that once the birds have developed simple object-permanence, then social learning might advance the interval after which tentative caching commences. PMID:19685971

  7. The Development of Caching and Object Permanence in Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica): Which Emerges First?

    PubMed Central

    Salwiczek, Lucie H.; Schlinger, Barney; Emery, Nathan J.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the food-caching behavior of corvids have revealed complex physical and social skills, yet little is known about the ontogeny of food caching in relation to the development of cognitive capacities. Piagetian object permanence is the understanding that objects continue to exist even when they are no longer visible. Here, the authors focus on Piagetian Stages 3 and 4, because they are hallmarks in the cognitive development of both young children and animals. Our aim is to determine in a food-caching corvid, the Western scrub-jay, whether (1) Piagetian Stage 4 competence and tentative caching (i.e., hiding an item invisibly and retrieving it without delay), emerge concomitantly or consecutively; (2) whether experiencing the reappearance of hidden objects enhances the timing of the appearance of object permanence; and (3) discuss how the development of object permanence is related to behavioral development and sensorimotor intelligence. Our findings suggest that object permanence Stage 4 emerges before tentative caching, and independent of environmental influences, but that once the birds have developed simple object-permanence, then social learning might advance the interval after which tentative caching commences. PMID:19685971

  8. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-01-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  9. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: low-mass protoplanetary discs from a SCUBA-2 census of NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, P.; Greaves, J. S.; Scholz, A.; Hatchell, J.; Holland, W. S.; JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2015-02-01

    NGC 1333 is a 1-2 Myr old cluster of stars in the Perseus molecular cloud. We used 850 μm data from the Gould Belt Survey with SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to measure or place limits on disc masses for 82 Class II sources in this cluster. Eight disc candidates were detected; one is estimated to have mass of about 9 MJup in dust plus gas, while the others host only 2-4 MJup of circumstellar material. None of these discs exceeds the threshold for the `minimum mass solar nebula' (MMSN). This reinforces previous claims that only a small fraction of Class II sources at an age of 1-2 Myr have discs exceeding the MMSN threshold and thus can form a planetary system like our own. However, other regions with similarly low fractions of MMSN discs (IC 348, UpSco, σ Ori) are thought to be older than NGC 1333. Compared with coeval regions, the exceptionally low fraction of massive discs in NGC 1333 cannot easily be explained by the effects of UV radiation or stellar encounters. Our results indicate that additional environmental factors significantly affect disc evolution and the outcome of planet formation by core accretion.

  10. Road load simulator tests of the Gould Phase I functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gourash, F.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  11. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. II. THE CEPHEUS FLARE OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Jason M.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Di Francesco, James E-mail: derek.ward-thompson@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2009-11-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; {approx}2 deg{sup 2}) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; {approx}8 deg{sup 2}) observations of the Cepheus Flare, which is associated with the Gould Belt, at an approximate distance of {approx}300 pc. Around 6500 sources are detected in all four IRAC bands, of which {approx}900 have MIPS 24 {mu}m detections. We identify 133 young stellar object (YSO) candidates using color-magnitude diagram techniques, and a large number of the YSO candidates are associated with the NGC 7023 reflection nebula. Cross-identifications were made with the Guide Star Catalog II and the IRAS Faint Source Catalog, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) were constructed. SED modeling was conducted to estimate the degree of infrared excess. It was found that a large majority of disks were optically thick accreting disks, suggesting that there has been little disk evolution in these sources. Nearest-neighbor clustering analysis identified four small protostellar groups (L1228, L1228N, L1251A, and L1251B) with 5-15 members each and the larger NGC 7023 association with 32 YSO members. The star-formation efficiency for cores with clusters of protostars and for those without clusters was found to be {approx}8% and {approx}1%, respectively. The cores L1155, L1241, and L1247 are confirmed to be starless down to our luminosity limit of L {sub bol} = 0.06 L {sub sun}.

  12. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-02-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  13. Abraham Lincoln loses a medical malpractice case, debates Stephen A. Douglas, and secures two murder acquittals.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen D; Kavaler, Florence

    2004-02-01

    An improperly healed fracture was the most common reason for the medical malpractice crisis between the 1830s and 1860s in the United States. As a practicing lawyer in Illinois, Abraham Lincoln defended physicians in medical malpractice law suits. One of these was Dr. Powers Ritchey, who was sued for malpractice in 1855. Lincoln agreed to represent Dr. Ritchey in 1858 as the case was appealed to the supreme court of Illinois. In the interim, Lincoln defended two indicted murderers and won acquittals for both. Between the two murder trials, Lincoln debated Stephen A. Douglas while running for U.S. Senator from Illinois. Lincoln believed that Ritchey's case was poorly represented in the lower court. Ritchey's prior attorneys did not file a bill of exceptions to the testimony of the plaintiff's expert medical witnesses. Lincoln attempted to rebut the allegation of a lack of reasonable medical care and diligence by Ritchey, and he sought to secure a new trial for his client. In its decision, the supreme court of Illinois did not find any error and affirmed the lower court's judgment. PMID:14768936

  14. Solar space heating for the visitors' center, Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Marion

    1980-06-01

    This document is the final report of the solar energy system located at the Visitors' Center on the Stephens College Campus, Columbia, Missouri. The system is installed in a four-story, 15,000 square foot building designed to include the college's Admission Office, nine guest rooms for overnight lodging for official guests of the college, a two-story art gallery, and a Faculty Lounge. The solar energy system is an integral design of the building and utilizes 176 Honeywell/Lennox hydronic flat-plate collectors which use a 50% water-ethylene glycol solution and water-to-water heat exchanger. Solar heated water is stored in a 5000 gallon water storage tank located in the basement equipment room. A natural gas fired hot water boiler supplies hot water when the solar energy heat supply fails to meet the demand. The designed solar contribution is 71% of the heating load. The demonstration period for this project ends June 30, 1984.

  15. Straight talk with...Stephen O'Brien. Interviewed by Elie Dolgin.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Stephen O'Brien joined the US National Cancer Institute as a post doc in 1971 and climbed the ranks to become head of the institute's Laboratory of Genomic Diversity, a position he held for 25 years. But, after four decades at the government agency, O'Brien was ready for something new. In December 2011, he stepped down and took up a three-year, $5 million 'megagrant' in Russia through a program started a year earlier by the Russian Ministry of Education and Science to attract big-name researchers to work at least part-time in that country. O'Brien used his money to help launch the Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics at Saint Petersburg State University. Although O'Brien is a cancer researcher, he has diverse scientific interests. He led the team that discovered the CCR5-Δ32 mutation that confers resistance to HIV, and he has helped document the remarkable genetic uniformity of African cheetahs. Recently, he and two California scientists started the Genome 10K project, which aims to sequence the genetic blueprints of 10,000 vertebrate species. On a trip back to the US, O'Brien spoke with Elie Dolgin about how comparative genomics and his new Russian center will help advance the search for new therapeutics. PMID:23295996

  16. Payer Perspectives on PCSK9 Inhibitors: A Conversation with Stephen Gorshow, MD, and James T. Kenney, RPh, MBA

    PubMed Central

    Mehr, Stanton R.

    2016-01-01

    The new proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors can have significant budget effects, depending on the breadth of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s approved labeling. American Health & Drug Benefits asked Stephen Gorshow, MD, Regional Medical Director, UnitedHealthcare, and James T. Kenney, RPh, MBA, Manager, Specialty and Pharmacy Contracts, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, to participate in a teleconference to better understand how payers are approaching the management of these agents. PMID:27066194

  17. Payer Perspectives on PCSK9 Inhibitors: A Conversation with Stephen Gorshow, MD, and James T. Kenney, RPh, MBA.

    PubMed

    Mehr, Stanton R

    2016-02-01

    The new proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors can have significant budget effects, depending on the breadth of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s approved labeling. American Health & Drug Benefits asked Stephen Gorshow, MD, Regional Medical Director, UnitedHealthcare, and James T. Kenney, RPh, MBA, Manager, Specialty and Pharmacy Contracts, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, to participate in a teleconference to better understand how payers are approaching the management of these agents. PMID:27066194

  18. Genetic analysis of adult plant, quantitative resistance to stripe rust in wheat cultivar 'Stephens' in multi-environment trials.

    PubMed

    Dolores Vazquez, M; James Peterson, C; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar; Chen, Xianming; Heesacker, Adam; Ammar, Karim; Crossa, Jose; Mundt, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    The wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar 'Stephens' has been grown commercially in the USA Pacific Northwest for 30 years. The durable resistance of 'Stephens' to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) was believed to be due to a combination of seedling and adult plant resistance genes. Multilocation field trials, diversity array technology (DArT), and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance. Recombinant inbred lines were assessed for stripe rust response in eight locations/years, five in 2008 and three in 2009. The data from Mt. Vernon, WA, differed from all other environments, and composite interval mapping (CIM) identified three QTL, QYrst.orr-1AL, QYrst.orr-4BS, and QYrpl.orr-6AL, which accounted for 12, 11, and 6% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. CIM across the remaining six environments identified four main QTL. Two QTL, QYrst.orr-2BS.2 and QYrst.orr-7AS, were detected in five of six environments and explained 11 and 15% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. Two other QTL, QYrst.orr-2AS and QYrpl.orr-4BL, were detected across four and three of six environments, and explained 19 and 9% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. The susceptible parent 'Platte' contributed QYrpl.orr-4BL and QYrpl.orr-6AL, with the remaining QTL originating from 'Stephens'. For each environment, additional minor QTL were detected, each accounting for 6-10% of the phenotypic variance. Different QTL with moderate effects were identified in both 'Stephens' and 'Platte'. Significant QTL × environment interactions were evident, suggesting that specificity to plant stage, pathogen genotype, and/or temperature was important. PMID:21912857

  19. [Book review] Conservation and Management of Neotropical Migrant Landbirds in the Northern Rockies and Great Plains, by David S. Dobkin, R. Gerald Wright, and Stephen C. Bunting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    Review of: Conservation and management of neotropical migrant landbirds in the Northern Rockies and Great Plains. Northwest Naturalist Books. David S. Dobkin, R. Gerald Wright, Stephen C. Bunting. University of Idaho Press, 1994. ISBN: 0893011681, 9780893011680.

  20. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. IV. Lupus V and VI Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merín, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J., II; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Harvey, Paul M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Peterson, Dawn; Tothill, Nick F. H.; Gould's Belt Team

    2011-04-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer "Core to Disk" (c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; ~79% in Lupus V and ~87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (AV ≈ 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  1. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: the effect of molecular contamination in SCUBA-2 observations of Orion A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudé, S.; Bastien, P.; Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Graves, S.; Hatchell, J.; Chapin, E. L.; Gibb, A. G.; Matthews, B.; JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-04-01

    Thermal emission from cold dust grains in giant molecular clouds can be used to probe the physical properties, such as density, temperature and emissivity in star-forming regions. We present the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA-2) shared-risk observations at 450 and 850 μm of the Orion A molecular cloud complex taken at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Previous studies showed that molecular emission lines can contribute significantly to the measured fluxes in those continuum bands. We use the Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme 12CO J = 3-2 integrated intensity map for Orion A in order to evaluate the molecular line contamination and its effects on the SCUBA-2 maps. With the corrected fluxes, we have obtained a new spectral index α map for the thermal emission of dust in the well-known integral-shaped filament. Furthermore, we compare a sample of 33 sources, selected over the Orion A molecular cloud complex for their high 12CO J = 3-2 line contamination, to 27 previously identified clumps in OMC 4. This allows us to quantify the effect of line contamination on the ratio of 850-450 μm flux densities and how it modifies the deduced spectral index of emissivity β for the dust grains. We also show that at least one Spitzer-identified protostellar core in OMC 5 has a 12CO J = 3-2 contamination level of 16 per cent. Furthermore, we find the strongest contamination level (44 per cent) towards a young star with disc near OMC 2. This work is part of the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey.

  2. Test series 1: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Gould NCX-2250 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J. S.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D A; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged, nuclear station, safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds; and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the end-of-life of a battery, given a seismic event. This report covers the first test series of an extensive program using 12-year old, lead-calcium, Gould NCX-2250 cells, from the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Station operated by the New York Power Authority. Seismic tests with three cell configurations were performed using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; multi-cell (three) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack; and single-cell tests specifically aimed towards examining propagation of pre-existing case cracks. In general the test philosophy was to monitor the electrical properties including discharge capacity of cells through a graduated series of g-level step increases until either the shake-table limits were reached or until electrical failure of the cells occurred. Of nine electrically active cells, six failed during seismic testing over a range of imposed g-level loads in excess of a 1-g ZPA. Post-test examination revealed a common failure mode, the cracking at the abnormally brittle, positive lead bus-bar/post interface; further examination showed that the failure zone was extremely coarse grained and extensively corroded. Presently accepted accelerated-aging methods for qualifying batteries, per IEEE Std. 535-1979, are based on plate growth, but these naturally-aged 12-year old cells showed no significant plate growth.

  3. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. V. OPHIUCHUS NORTH OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, J.; Terebey, S.; Huard, T.; Mamajek, E. E. E-mail: sterebe@calstatela.edu; and others

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer IRAC (2.1 deg{sup 2}) and MIPS (6.5 deg{sup 2}) observations of star formation in the Ophiuchus North (Oph N) molecular clouds. This fragmentary cloud complex lies on the edge of the Sco-Cen OB association, several degrees to the north of the well-known {rho} Oph star-forming region, at an approximate distance of 130 pc. The Oph N clouds were mapped as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt project under the working name 'Scorpius'. In the regions mapped, selected to encompass all the cloud with visual extinction A{sub V} > 3, 11 young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified, 8 from IRAC/MIPS color-based selection and 3 from Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) K{sub S} /MIPS colors. Adding to one source previously identified in L43, this increases the number of YSOcs identified in Oph N to 12. During the selection process, four color-based YSOcs were rejected as probable asymptotic giant branch stars and one as a known galaxy. The sources span the full range of YSOc classifications from Class 0/1 to Class III, and starless cores are also present. Twelve high extinction (A{sub V} > 10) cores are identified with a total mass of {approx}100 M{sub Sun }. These results confirm that there is little ongoing star formation in this region (instantaneous star formation efficiency <0.34%) and that the bottleneck lies in the formation of dense cores. The influence of the nearby Upper Sco OB association, including the 09V star {zeta} Oph, is seen in dynamical interactions and raised dust temperatures but has not enhanced levels of star formation in Oph N.

  4. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merin, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nick F. H.

    2011-04-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer 'Core to Disk' (c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; {approx}79% in Lupus V and {approx}87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A{sub V} {approx} 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  5. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  6. Congruent population structure inferred from dispersal behaviour and intensive genetic surveys of the threatened Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma cœrulescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coulon, A.; Fitzpatrick, J.W.; Bowman, R.; Stith, B.M.; Makarewich, C.A.; Stenzler, L.M.; Lovette, I.J.

    2008-01-01

    The delimitation of populations, defined as groups of individuals linked by gene flow, is possible by the analysis of genetic markers and also by spatial models based on dispersal probabilities across a landscape. We combined these two complimentary methods to define the spatial pattern of genetic structure among remaining populations of the threatened Florida scrub-jay, a species for which dispersal ability is unusually well-characterized. The range-wide population was intensively censused in the 1990s, and a metapopulation model defined population boundaries based on predicted dispersal-mediated demographic connectivity. We subjected genotypes from more than 1000 individual jays screened at 20 microsatellite loci to two Bayesian clustering methods. We describe a consensus method for identifying common features across many replicated clustering runs. Ten genetically differentiated groups exist across the present-day range of the Florida scrub-jay. These groups are largely consistent with the dispersal-defined metapopulations, which assume very limited dispersal ability. Some genetic groups comprise more than one metapopulation, likely because these genetically similar metapopulations were sundered only recently by habitat alteration. The combined reconstructions of population structure based on genetics and dispersal-mediated demographic connectivity provide a robust depiction of the current genetic and demographic organization of this species, reflecting past and present levels of dispersal among occupied habitat patches. The differentiation of populations into 10 genetic groups adds urgency to management efforts aimed at preserving what remains of genetic variation in this dwindling species, by maintaining viable populations of all genetically differentiated and geographically isolated populations.

  7. [Comparison of the fungal complexes of the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis (Jay, 1856) from different areas of the Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan].

    PubMed

    Borzykh, O G; Zvereva, L V

    2014-01-01

    Mycological investigation of the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis (Jay) (Bivalvia) collected in different areas of the Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan, was carried out. A total of 72 species of filamentous fungi belonging to 30 genera of ascomycetes, anamorphous fungi, and zygomycetes was isolated from the internal organs of the scallop. The species.diversity of mycelial fungi in the internal organs, especially of members of the generaAspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Chaetomium, was found to increase in polluted coastal waters. PMID:25844471

  8. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. VI. The Auriga-California Molecular Cloud Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Merin, Bruno; Miller, Jennifer F.; Terebey, Susan; Peterson, Dawn E.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70 and 160 micrometers observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg(exp 2) with IRAC and 10.47 deg2 with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkH(alpha) 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the fraction of YSOs in the region with disks relative to an estimate of the diskless YSO population. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15 - 20 times fewer stars.

  9. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the gould belt. VI. The Auriga-California molecular cloud observed with IRAC and MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Merín, Bruno; Terebey, Susan; Peterson, Dawn E.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 μm observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg{sup 2} with IRAC and 10.47 deg{sup 2} with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHα 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the relative fraction of YSOs in earlier (Class I and F) and later (Class II) classes compared to other clouds. We perform simple SED modeling of the YSOs with disks to compare the mid-IR properties to disks in other clouds and identify 14 classical transition disk candidates. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size, and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15-20 times fewer stars.

  10. THE HERSCHEL AND JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEYS: CONSTRAINING DUST PROPERTIES IN THE PERSEUS B1 CLUMP WITH PACS, SPIRE, AND SCUBA-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Matthews, B.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Drabek, E.; Hatchell, J.; Nutter, D.; Andre, Ph.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Koenyves, V.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J.-P.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Friesen, R.; Greaves, J.; Collaboration: JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Survey teams; and others

    2013-04-20

    We present Herschel observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey and SCUBA-2 science verification observations from the JCMT Gould Belt Survey of the B1 clump in the Perseus molecular cloud. We determined the dust emissivity index using four different techniques to combine the Herschel PACS+SPIRE data at 160-500 {mu}m with the SCUBA-2 data at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m. Of our four techniques, we found that the most robust method was filtering out the large-scale emission in the Herschel bands to match the spatial scales recovered by the SCUBA-2 reduction pipeline. Using this method, we find {beta} Almost-Equal-To 2 toward the filament region and moderately dense material and lower {beta} values ({beta} {approx}> 1.6) toward the dense protostellar cores, possibly due to dust grain growth. We find that {beta} and temperature are more robust with the inclusion of the SCUBA-2 data, improving estimates from Herschel data alone by factors of {approx}2 for {beta} and by {approx}40% for temperature. Furthermore, we find core mass differences of {approx}< 30% compared to Herschel-only estimates with an adopted {beta} = 2, highlighting the necessity of long-wavelength submillimeter data for deriving accurate masses of prestellar and protostellar cores.

  11. The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: mapping 13CO and C18O in Orion A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Davis, C. J.; Francesco, J. Di; Graves, S. F.; Nutter, D.; Richer, J. S.; Roberts, J. F.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.; Brunt, C.; Butner, H. M.; Cavanagh, B.; Chrysostomou, A.; Curtis, E. I.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Etxaluze, M.; Fich, M.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Greaves, J. S.; Hatchell, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Matthews, B.; Matthews, H.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Sadavoy, S.; Simpson, R. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Viti, S.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Yates, J.

    2012-05-01

    The Gould Belt Legacy Survey will map star-forming regions within 500 pc, using Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP), Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) and Polarimeter 2 (POL-2) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). This paper describes HARP observations of the J= 3 → 2 transitions of 13CO and C18O towards Orion A. The 15 arcsec resolution observations cover 5 pc of the Orion filament, including OMC 1 (including BN-KL and Orion bar), OMC 2/3 and OMC 4, and allow a comparative study of the molecular gas properties throughout the star-forming cloud. The filament shows a velocity gradient of ˜1 km s-1 pc-1 between OMC 1, 2 and 3, and high-velocity emission is detected in both isotopologues. The Orion Nebula and Bar have the largest masses and linewidths, and dominate the mass and energetics of the high-velocity material. Compact, spatially resolved emission from CH3CN, 13CH3OH, SO, HCOOCH3, CH3CHO and CH3OCHO is detected towards the Orion Hot Core. The cloud is warm, with a median excitation temperature of ˜24 K; the Orion Bar has the highest excitation temperature gas, at >80 K. The C18O excitation temperature correlates well with the dust temperature (to within 40 per cent). The C18O emission is optically thin, and the 13CO emission is marginally optically thick; despite its high mass, OMC 1 shows the lowest opacities. A virial analysis indicates that Orion A is too massive for thermal or turbulent support, but is consistent with a model of a filamentary cloud that is threaded by helical magnetic fields. The variation of physical conditions across the cloud is reflected in the physical characteristics of the dust cores. We find similar core properties between starless and protostellar cores, but variations in core properties with position in the filament. The OMC 1 cores have the highest velocity dispersions and masses, followed by OMC 2/3 and OMC 4. The differing fragmentation of these cores may explain why OMC 1 has formed clusters of high-mass stars, whereas OMC 4 produces fewer, predominantly low-mass stars.

  12. Conservation as virtue: a scientific and social process for conservation ethics.

    PubMed

    Van Houtan, Kyle S

    2006-10-01

    Most scientists take ethical arguments for conservation as given and focus on scientific or economic questions. Although nature conservation is often considered a just cause, it is given little further consideration. A lack of attention to ethical theory raises serious concerns for how conservation scientists conceive and practice ethics. I contrast two common ways scientists approach ethics, as demonstrated in the writings of Stephen Jay Gould and E. O. Wilson. Gould casts severe doubt as to whether any ethics are possible from science, whereas Wilson proposes science as the only path to ethics. I argue these two methods ultimately limit popular support for conservation and offer Alasdair MacIntyre's "virtue ethics" as an alternative. Unlike Gould and Wilson, MacIntyre provides an ethical theory that reconciles scientific inquiry and social traditions. Recent studies of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States affirm MacIntyre's claims and provide important insights for conservation today. These accounts argue that social solidarity and political success against segregation were possible only as rooted in the particular language, logic, and practices of a robust cultural tradition. If correct, conservation science should attend to several questions. On what basis can conservation achieve widespread cultural legitimacy? What are the particular social currencies for a conservation ethic? What role does science play in such a scheme? MacIntyre's careful positioning of scientific and social traditions provides a hopeful ethical direction for conservation. PMID:17002754

  13. A census of dense cores in the Aquila cloud complex: SPIRE/PACS observations from the Herschel Gould Belt survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, V.; André, Ph.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; Schneider, N.; Roy, A.; Didelon, P.; Maury, A.; Shimajiri, Y.; Di Francesco, J.; Bontemps, S.; Peretto, N.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Elia, D.; Griffin, M. J.; Hill, T.; Kirk, J.; Ladjelate, B.; Marsh, K.; Martin, P. G.; Motte, F.; Nguyên Luong, Q.; Pezzuto, S.; Roussel, H.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Schisano, E.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present and discuss the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS) observations in an 11 deg2 area of the Aquila molecular cloud complex at d 260 pc, imaged with the SPIRE and PACS photometric cameras in parallel mode from 70 μm to 500 μm. Using the multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm getsources, we identify a complete sample of starless dense cores and embedded (Class 0-I) protostars in this region, and analyze their global properties and spatial distributions. We find a total of 651 starless cores, 60% ± 10% of which are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, and they will likely form stars inthe future. We also detect 58 protostellar cores. The core mass function (CMF) derived for the large population of prestellar cores is very similar in shape to the stellar initial mass function (IMF), confirming earlier findings on a much stronger statistical basis and supporting the view that there is a close physical link between the stellar IMF and the prestellar CMF. The global shift in mass scale observed between the CMF and the IMF is consistent with a typical star formation efficiency of 40% at the level of an individual core. By comparing the numbers of starless cores in various density bins to the number of young stellar objects (YSOs), we estimate that the lifetime of prestellar cores is 1 Myr, which is typically 4 times longer than the core free-fall time, and that it decreases with average core density. We find a strong correlation between the spatial distribution of prestellar cores and the densest filaments observed in the Aquila complex. About 90% of the Herschel-identified prestellar cores are located above a background column density corresponding to AV 7, and 75% of them lie within filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unit length ≳16 M⊙/pc. These findings support a picture wherein the cores making up the peak of the CMF (and probably responsible for the base of the IMF) result primarily from the gravitational fragmentation of marginally supercritical filaments. Given that filaments appear to dominate the mass budget of dense gas at AV> 7, our findings also suggest that the physics of prestellar core formation within filaments is responsible for a characteristic "efficiency" {SFR/M_dense ˜ 5+2-2 × 10-8 yr-1} for the star formation process in dense gas. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Figures 18, 19, and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgHerschel column density and temperature maps (FITS format) and full Tables A.1 and A.2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A91

  14. Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeliseyev, Y. N.

    2013-03-19

    It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

  15. [Interactions between genetics and environment].

    PubMed

    Vineis, P

    1998-01-01

    From a scientific point of view, the idea that genes exert an important role in explaining human pathology has gained much popularity in recent decades. However, according to Stephen Jay Gould, the "genetic fallacy" has been repeatedly used to avoid environmental action. In the case of occupational cancer, genetic screening of workers for their susceptibility to the action of chemical carcinogens, on the basis of "metabolic polymorphisms", would be unacceptable because of racial discrimination, related to uneven racial distribution of most polymorphisms, for example, 90% of Africans and 10% of Asians have the "slow" acetylator genotype. Therefore, not only technical and scientific aspects of genetic susceptibility to cancer, but also ethical and social implication have to be considered. PMID:9673101

  16. The Scala naturae revisited: evolutionary scales and anagenesis in comparative psychology.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C B; Hodos, W

    1991-09-01

    Recent suggestions that evolutionary scales have a place in theorization about the evolution of behavior have been based on the concept of anagenesis, formerly associated with notions of biological progress. An associated concept is that of grades, often used as units of anagenetic advance. Advocates of anagenetic analysis in comparative psychology cite the writings of biologists Bernard Rensch, Julian Huxley, George Gaylord Simpson, and Stephen Jay Gould to support the usefulness of anagenesis but treat the positions of each of these theorists as if they were the same. In fact, they differ considerably in their definition of anagenesis and in its application to specific issues in evolution. The anagenetic approach is criticized as axiological and frequently anthropocentric. Although the formation of grades can be useful, a sequence of grades must not be assumed to represent historical stages in the evolution of specific structures or behaviors. PMID:1935002

  17. [Interactions between genetics and environment].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Vineis P

    1998-03-01

    From a scientific point of view, the idea that genes exert an important role in explaining human pathology has gained much popularity in recent decades. However, according to Stephen Jay Gould, the "genetic fallacy" has been repeatedly used to avoid environmental action. In the case of occupational cancer, genetic screening of workers for their susceptibility to the action of chemical carcinogens, on the basis of "metabolic polymorphisms", would be unacceptable because of racial discrimination, related to uneven racial distribution of most polymorphisms, for example, 90% of Africans and 10% of Asians have the "slow" acetylator genotype. Therefore, not only technical and scientific aspects of genetic susceptibility to cancer, but also ethical and social implication have to be considered.

  18. Self-organized criticality and punctuated equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Per; Boettcher, Stefan

    1997-02-01

    Many natural phenomena evolve intermittently, with periods of tranquillity interrupted by bursts of activity, rather than following a smooth gradual path. Examples include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, solar flares, gamma-ray bursts, and biological evolution. Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge have coined the term “punctuated equilibria” for this behavior. We argue that punctuated equilibria reflects the tendency of dynamical systems to evolve towards a critical state, and review recent work on simple models. A good metaphoric picture is one where the systems are temporarily trapped in valleys of deformable, interacting landscapes. Similarities with spin glasses are pointed out. Punctuated equilibria are essential for the emergence of complex phenomena. The periods of stasis allow the system to remember its past history; yet the intermittent events permit further change.

  19. The Ascent of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Brian L.

    2000-04-01

    From the revolutionary discoveries of Galileo and Newton to the mind-bending theories of Einstein and Heisenberg, from plate tectonics to particle physics, from the origin of life to universal entropy, and from biology to cosmology, here is a sweeping, readable, and dynamic account of the whole of Western science.In the approachable manner and method of Stephen Jay Gould and Carl Sagan, the late Brian L. Silver translates our most important, and often most obscure, scientific developments into a vernacular that is not only accessible and illuminating but also enjoyable. Silver makes his comprehensive case with much clarity and insight; his book aptly locates science as the apex of human reason, and reason as our best path to the truth. For all readers curious about--or else perhaps intimidated by--what Silver calls "the scientific campaign up to now", The Ascent of Science will be fresh, vivid, and fascinating reading.

  20. Social influence of a religious hero: the late Cardinal Stephen Kim Sou-hwan's effect on cornea donation and volunteerism.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyuhn-Suhck; Brown, William J; Kang, Seok

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the mediated influence of a celebrated religious hero in South Korea, Cardinal Stephen Kim, through two forms of involvement--parasocial interaction and identification--on intention toward cornea donation and volunteerism, and it investigated how the news media diffused of his death. A structural equation modeling analysis with a Web-based voluntary survey of more than 1,200 people in South Korea revealed a multistep social influence process, beginning with parasocial interaction with Cardinal Kim, leading to identification with him, which predicted intention toward cornea donation and volunteerism. Additional investigations found that news of Cardinal Kim's death diffused rapidly through media and interpersonal communication. Results of this study demonstrate that religious leaders who achieve a celebrity hero status can prompt public discussion of important issues rather quickly through extensive media coverage, enabling them to promote prosocial behavior and positively affect public health. PMID:21086210

  1. Singing from the Grave: DNA from a 180 Year Old Type Specimen Confirms the Identity of Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens)

    PubMed Central

    Price, Ben W.; Henry, Charles S.; Hall, Andie C.; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Duelli, Peter; Brooks, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Historically serving as repositories for morphologically-based taxonomic research, natural history collections are now increasingly being targeted in studies utilizing DNA data. The development of advanced molecular techniques has facilitated extraction of useable DNA from old specimens, including type material. Sequencing diagnostic molecular markers from type material enables accurate species designation, especially where modern taxonomic hypotheses confirm morphologically cryptic species complexes. One such example is Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens), which belongs to a complex of about 20 cryptic species, most of which can only be reliably distinguished by their pre-mating courtship songs or by DNA analysis. The subtle morphological variation in the group has led to disagreement over the previous designation of the lectotype for C. carnea, an issue that has been further compounded because Chrysoperla carnea is a highly valued biological control agent in arable crops. Archival DNA extraction and sequencing from the 180 year old lectotype specimen, combined with Bayesian and Likelihood based phylogenetic analyses of modern specimens from the entire complex, were used to establish unambiguously the true identity of Chrysoperla carnea. PMID:25853856

  2. Reproductive Ecology Of The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma Coerulescens) On John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Long-Term Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Geoffry M.; Breininger, David R.; Larson, Vicky L.; Oddy, Donna M.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Stolen, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    From 1988 to 2002 we studied the breeding ecology of Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. We examined phenology, clutch size, hatching failure rates, fledgling production, nest success, predation rates, sources egg and nestling mortality, and the effects of helpers on these measures. Nesting phenology was similar among sites. Mean clutch size at Titan was significantly larger than at HC or T4. Pairs with helpers did not produce larger clutches than pairs without helpers. Fledgling production at T4 was significantly greater than at HC and similar to Titan. Pairs with helpers at HC produced significantly more fledglings than pairs without helpers; helpers did not influence fledgling production at the other sites. Nest success at HC and Titan was low, 19% and 32% respectively. Nest success at T4 was 48% and was significantly greater than at HC. Average predation rates at all sites increased with season progression. Predation rates at all sight rose sharply by early June. The main cause of nest failure at all sites was predation, 93%.

  3. Surveillance for West Nile Virus and Vaccination of Free-Ranging Island Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma insularis) on Santa Cruz Island, California

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Winston; Morrison, Scott A.; Sillett, T. Scott; Caldwell, Luke; Wheeler, Sarah S.; Barker, Christopher M.; Cummings, Robert; Reisen, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) on mainland California poses an ongoing threat to the island scrub-jay (ISSJ, Aphelocoma insularis), a species that occurs only on Santa Cruz Island, California, and whose total population numbers <5000. Our report describes the surveillance and management efforts conducted since 2006 that are designed to understand and mitigate for the consequences of WNV introduction into the ISSJ population. We suspect that WNV would most likely be introduced to the island via the movement of infected birds from the mainland. However, antibody testing of >750 migrating and resident birds on the island from 2006 to 2009 indicated that WNV had not become established by the end of 2009. Several species of competent mosquito vectors were collected at very low abundance on the island, including the important mainland vectors Culex tarsalis and Culex quinquefasciatus. However, the island was generally cooler than areas of mainland California that experienced intense WNV transmission, and these lower temperatures may have reduced the likelihood of WNV becoming established because they do not support efficient virus replication in mosquitoes. A vaccination program was initiated in 2008 to create a rescue population of ISSJ that would be more likely to survive a catastrophic outbreak. To further that goal, we recommend managers vaccinate >100 ISSJ each year as part of ongoing research and monitoring efforts. PMID:21438695

  4. Diet and feeding behavior of the White-naped Jay, Cyanocorax cyanopogon (Wied, 1821) (Aves, Passeriformes, Corvidae) in a disturbed environment in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barros, R A M; Costa, C A; Pascotto, M C

    2014-11-01

    The White-naped Jay Cyanocorax cyanopogon (Wied, 1821) is an omnivorous and opportunistic species, with a multifarious diet. In view of the scarcity of available data in the literature, the aim was to investigate and describe the bird's diet, location of food items, foraging tactics, actual feeding behavior and intraspecific interactions, as a means of defining the items consumed. The study was carried out in a Cerrado area in the Araguaia Campus of the Federal University of Mato Grosso - UFMT, in Pontal do Araguaia, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, from August to December, 2006, and from April to October, 2010. All the feeding events were recorded through 136 hours of animal focal sampling, whereby it was shown that these birds predominantly consume animal nutrients, replenished by vegetable items and human food-waste. Arthropods were predominant in the diet, with ants as the most abundant and frequent item. The fruits, flowers and seeds of eleven plant species were also consumed. Food-waste, representing about 1/10 of the total, was constantly consumed even when other food sources were available. Although active among the various strata, foraging is mainly on the ground. In the event of food-scarcity, the strategy employed is the hierarchical deployment of the members of various-sized groups, with the avoidance of direct competition. This versatility during all seasons, confirms total adaptation to the anthropic environment surrounded by native habitats that characterized the study site. PMID:25627601

  5. Surveillance for West Nile virus and vaccination of free-ranging island scrub-jays (Aphelocoma insularis) on Santa Cruz Island, California.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Walter M; Vickers, Winston; Morrison, Scott A; Sillett, T Scott; Caldwell, Luke; Wheeler, Sarah S; Barker, Christopher M; Cummings, Robert; Reisen, William K

    2011-08-01

    Transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) on mainland California poses an ongoing threat to the island scrub-jay (ISSJ, Aphelocoma insularis), a species that occurs only on Santa Cruz Island, California, and whose total population numbers <5000. Our report describes the surveillance and management efforts conducted since 2006 that are designed to understand and mitigate for the consequences of WNV introduction into the ISSJ population. We suspect that WNV would most likely be introduced to the island via the movement of infected birds from the mainland. However, antibody testing of >750 migrating and resident birds on the island from 2006 to 2009 indicated that WNV had not become established by the end of 2009. Several species of competent mosquito vectors were collected at very low abundance on the island, including the important mainland vectors Culex tarsalis and Culex quinquefasciatus. However, the island was generally cooler than areas of mainland California that experienced intense WNV transmission, and these lower temperatures may have reduced the likelihood of WNV becoming established because they do not support efficient virus replication in mosquitoes. A vaccination program was initiated in 2008 to create a rescue population of ISSJ that would be more likely to survive a catastrophic outbreak. To further that goal, we recommend managers vaccinate >100 ISSJ each year as part of ongoing research and monitoring efforts. PMID:21438695

  6. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gourash, F.

    1984-02-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  7. Identification and mapping QTL for high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar 'Stephens'.

    PubMed

    Santra, D K; Chen, X M; Santra, M; Campbell, K G; Kidwell, K K

    2008-09-01

    High-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance from the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivar 'Stephens' has protected wheat crops from stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici for 30 years. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for HTAP resistance in Stephens through genetic linkage analysis and identify DNA markers linked to the QTL for use in marker-assisted breeding. Mapping populations consisted of 101 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) through single-seed descent from 'Stephens' (resistant) x 'Michigan Amber' (susceptible). F(5), F(6) and F(7) RILs were evaluated for stripe rust resistance at Pullman, WA in 1996, 1997 and 1998, respectively, whereas F(8) RILs were evaluated at Mt Vernon, WA, USA in 2005. The 101 F(8) RILs were evaluated with 250 resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP), 245 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 1 sequence tagged site (STS) markers for genetic linkage map construction. Two QTL, which explained 48-61% of the total phenotypic variation of the HTAP resistance in Stephens, were identified. QYrst.wgp-6BS.1 was within a 3.9-cM region flanked by Xbarc101 and Xbarc136. QYrst.wgp-6BS.2 was mapped in a 17.5-cM region flanked by Xgwm132 and Xgdm113. Both two QTL were physically mapped to the short arm of chromosome 6B, but in different bins. Validation and polymorphism tests of the flanking markers in 43 wheat genotypes indicated that the molecular markers associated with these QTL should be useful in marker-assisted breeding programs to efficiently incorporate HTAP resistance into new wheat cultivars. PMID:18584147

  8. Laparoscopy-assisted orchiopexy versus laparoscopic two-stage fowler stephens orchiopexy for nonpalpable testes: Comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Alzahem, Abdulrahman

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose: To assess the outcome of the primary laparoscopy-assisted orchiopexy (LAO) and the laparoscopic two-stage Fowler Stephens orchiopexy (FSO) for managing patients with nonpalpable testis in terms of safety, feasibility and efficacy. Materials and Methods: This study included 94 patients (110 nonpalpable testes) who underwent laparoscopy at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh between July 1998 and June 2012. Patients were evaluated postoperatively to check the location and size of testes and to exclude any other complications. Results: Mean age at presentation was 24+/−19 months (9-96 months). Orchiectomy was done for 5 atrophic testes. 36 open orchiopexy was done for 29 canalicular testes and 7 peeping testes. 35 LAO were done for 1 canalicular testis, 5 peeping testes, 16 low intraabdominal testes and 13 high intraabdominal testes. 34 FSO were done for 23 high intraabdominal testes, 9 low intraabdominal testes and 2 peeping testes. Median follow up was 12 months (1-84 months) and 6 patients were lost to follow up. The overall success rates for LAO and FSO were 88% and 63%, respectively. Overall testicular atrophy rates were 3% and 30% for LAO and FSO, respectively (OR 0.08 [95% CI, 0.01-0.69], P = 0.006). For high intraabdominal testes, the atrophy rates were 3% and 20% for LAO and FSO, respectively (OR 0.14 [95% CI, 0.02-1.21, P = 0.049).Testicular displacement rates were 9% and 7% for LAO and FSO, respectively (OR 1.5, 95% CI, 0.24-9.59, P = 0.514). Conclusions: Laparoscopy provides a safe and accurate modality for diagnosing and managing patients with nonpalpable testes. LAO appears to be feasible and effective in management of high intraabdominal testes. Further well-conducted comparative studies are needed. PMID:23798870

  9. Biodiversity of Spongosorites coralliophaga (Stephens, 1915) on coral rubble at two contrasting cold-water coral reef settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanidis, Georgios; Henry, Lea-Anne; Roberts, J. Murray; Witte, Ursula F. M.

    2016-03-01

    Cold-water coral reefs (CWRs) in the northeast Atlantic harbor diverse sponge communities. Knowledge of deep-sea sponge ecology is limited and this leaves us with a fragmented understanding of the ecological roles that sponges play in CWR ecosystems. We present the first study of faunal biodiversity associated with the massive demosponge Spongosorites coralliophaga (Stephens, 1915) that typically colonizes coral debris fields of CWRs. Our study focused on the sessile fauna inhabiting sponges mixed with coral rubble at two contrasting settings in the northeast Atlantic: the shallow inshore (120-190 m water depth) Mingulay Reef Complex (MRC) and the deep offshore (500-1200 m) Logachev Mound (LM) coral province. MRC is dominated by the scleractinian Lophelia pertusa, while LM is dominated by L. pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Nine sponge-coral rubble associations were collected from MRC and four from LM. Measurements of abundance, species richness, diversity, evenness, dry biomass, and composition of sessile fauna on sponge and coral rubble microhabitats were undertaken. Differences in community composition between the two regions were mainly a response to changes in fauna with depth. Fauna composition was also different between sponge and coral rubble within each region. Infauna constituted a minor component of the sponge-associated fauna in MRC but had a higher contribution in LM. Sponge and coral rubble sessile fauna in both regions was mainly composed of cnidarians and molluscs, similarly to some previous studies. Sponges' outer surfaces at MRC were colonized by a species-rich community with high abundance and biomass suggesting that S. coralliophaga at MRC acts as a settlement surface for various organisms but such a role is not the case at LM. This difference in the role of S. coralliophaga as a biological structure is probably related to differences in fauna composition with depth, bottom current speed, and the quantity/quality of food supplied to the benthos.

  10. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from the SCUBA-2 observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud and a virial analysis of its prestellar core population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; White, G. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Kirk, H.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; André, Ph.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Griffin, M. J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Könyves, V.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Spinoglio, L.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present the first observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud performed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We demonstrate methods for combining these data with previous HARP CO, Herschel, and IRAM N2H+ observations in order to accurately quantify the properties of the SCUBA-2 sources in Ophiuchus. We produce a catalogue of all of the sources found by SCUBA-2. We separate these into protostars and starless cores. We list all of the starless cores and perform a full virial analysis, including external pressure. This is the first time that external pressure has been included in this level of detail. We find that the majority of our cores are either bound or virialized. Gravitational energy and external pressure are on average of a similar order of magnitude, but with some variation from region to region. We find that cores in the Oph A region are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, while cores in the Oph C and E regions are pressure-confined. We determine that N2H+ is a good tracer of the bound material of prestellar cores, although we find some evidence for N2H+ freeze-out at the very highest core densities. We find that non-thermal linewidths decrease substantially between the gas traced by C18O and that traced by N2H+, indicating the dissipation of turbulence at higher densities. We find that the critical Bonnor-Ebert stability criterion is not a good indicator of the boundedness of our cores. We detect the pre-brown dwarf candidate Oph B-11 and find a flux density and mass consistent with previous work. We discuss regional variations in the nature of the cores and find further support for our previous hypothesis of a global evolutionary gradient across the cloud from south-west to north-east, indicating sequential star formation across the region.

  11. Stephen's Second Birthday

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Catherine C.

    1977-01-01

    A mother relates the first 2 years of development and treatment of her son with cystic hygroma, a rare condition which affects the lymph glands and causes tumors in the neck, tongue, and in more serious cases, the lungs. (SBH)

  12. Hawking, Stephen W (1942-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Cosmologist and theoretical astrophysicist, born in Oxford, England, where he studied physics at University College. Moved to Cambridge to take up research in general relativity and cosmology, became Lucasian professor (an appointment earlier held by ISAAC NEWTON, with whom Hawking has been compared). Hawking worked to develop a valid mathematical treatment of the `singularities' in the theor...

  13. From weird wonders to stem lineages: the second reclassification of the Burgess Shale fauna.

    PubMed

    Brysse, Keynyn

    2008-09-01

    The Burgess Shale, a set of fossil beds containing the exquisitely preserved remains of marine invertebrate organisms from shortly after the Cambrian explosion, was discovered in 1909, and first brought to widespread popular attention by Stephen Jay Gould in his 1989 bestseller Wonderful life: The Burgess Shale and the nature of history. Gould contrasted the initial interpretation of these fossils, in which they were 'shoehorned' into modern groups, with the first major reexamination begun in the 1960s, when the creatures were perceived as 'weird wonders', possessing unique body plans and unrelated to modern organisms. More recently, a third phase of Burgess Shale studies has arisen, which has not yet been historically examined. This third phase represents a revolutionary new understanding, brought about, I believe, by a change in taxonomic methodology that led to a new perception of the Burgess creatures, and a new way to comprehend their relationships with modern organisms. The adoption of cladistics, and its corollary, the stem group concept, has forged a new understanding of the Burgess Shale ... but has it also changed the questions we are allowed to ask about evolution? PMID:18761282

  14. Why don't zebras have machine guns? Adaptation, selection, and constraints in evolutionary theory.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Timothy

    2008-03-01

    In an influential paper, Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin (1979) contrasted selection-driven adaptation with phylogenetic, architectural, and developmental constraints as distinct causes of phenotypic evolution. In subsequent publications Gould (e.g., 1997a,b, 2002) has elaborated this distinction into one between a narrow "Darwinian Fundamentalist" emphasis on "external functionalist" processes, and a more inclusive "pluralist" emphasis on "internal structuralist" principles. Although theoretical integration of functionalist and structuralist explanations is the ultimate aim, natural selection and internal constraints are treated as distinct causes of evolutionary change. This distinction is now routinely taken for granted in the literature in evolutionary biology. I argue that this distinction is problematic because the effects attributed to non-selective constraints are more parsimoniously explained as the ordinary effects of selection itself. Although it may still be a useful shorthand to speak of phylogenetic, architectural, and developmental constraints on phenotypic evolution, it is important to understand that such "constraints" do not constitute an alternative set of causes of evolutionary change. The result of this analysis is a clearer understanding of the relationship between adaptation, selection and constraints as explanatory concepts in evolutionary theory. PMID:18331960

  15. Paleontology at the "high table"? Popularization and disciplinary status in recent paleontology.

    PubMed

    Sepkoski, David

    2014-03-01

    This paper examines the way in which paleontologists used "popular books" to call for a broader "expanded synthesis" of evolutionary biology. Beginning in the 1970s, a group of influential paleontologists, including Stephen Jay Gould, Niles Eldredge, David Raup, Steven Stanley, and others, aggressively promoted a new theoretical, evolutionary approach to the fossil record as an important revision of the existing synthetic view of Darwinism. This work had a transformative effect within the discipline of paleontology. However, by the 1980s, paleontologists began making their case to a wider audience, both within evolutionary biology, and to the general public. Many of their books-for example, Eldredge's provocatively-titled Unfinished Synthesis-explicitly argued that the received synthetic view of Darwinian evolution was incomplete, and that paleontological contributions such as punctuated equilibria, the hierarchical model of macroevolution, and the study of mass extinction dynamics offered a substantial corrective to evolutionary theory. This paper argues that books-far from being "mere popularizations" of scientific ideas-played an important role in disciplinary debates surrounding evolutionary theory during the 1980s, and in particular that paleontologists like Gould and Eldredge self-consciously adopted the book format because of the importance of that genre in the history of evolutionary biology. PMID:24346060

  16. Convergent evolution as natural experiment: the tape of life reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Powell, Russell; Mariscal, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Stephen Jay Gould argued that replaying the 'tape of life' would result in radically different evolutionary outcomes. Recently, biologists and philosophers of science have paid increasing attention to the theoretical importance of convergent evolution-the independent origination of similar biological forms and functions-which many interpret as evidence against Gould's thesis. In this paper, we examine the evidentiary relevance of convergent evolution for the radical contingency debate. We show that under the right conditions, episodes of convergent evolution can constitute valid natural experiments that support inferences regarding the deep counterfactual stability of macroevolutionary outcomes. However, we argue that proponents of convergence have problematically lumped causally heterogeneous phenomena into a single evidentiary basket, in effect treating all convergent events as if they are of equivalent theoretical import. As a result, the 'critique from convergent evolution' fails to engage with key claims of the radical contingency thesis. To remedy this, we develop ways to break down the heterogeneous set of convergent events based on the nature of the generalizations they support. Adopting this more nuanced approach to convergent evolution allows us to differentiate iterated evolutionary outcomes that are probably common among alternative evolutionary histories and subject to law-like generalizations, from those that do little to undermine and may even support, the Gouldian view of life. PMID:26640647

  17. Effects of mating status, sex ratio, and population density on longevity and offspring production of Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens) (Coleoptera: Cucujidae).

    PubMed

    White, N D; Bell, R J

    1993-01-01

    The life span and reproductive rate of the rusty grain beetle, Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens), were determined at different adult densities and sex ratios at 30 +/- 1 degree C, 75 +/- 5% relative humidity (RH), and with feed consisting of ground wheat plus wheat germ (4:1, w/w). The mean life spans of adult beetles were 32 weeks for adults individually isolated in separate vials, 22 to 25 weeks for adults of different strains kept one male and one female per vial, 24 weeks for a group of 30 virgin females together in one vial, 13 weeks for a group of 30 virgin males together in one vial, 14 weeks for groups with 10 males and 20 females per vial, 13 weeks for groups with 15 males and 15 females per vial, and 12 weeks for groups with 20 males and 10 females per vial. When kept one adult per vial, males and females had similar life spans; when kept one male and one female per vial, males lived longer; when kept in groups of 30 per vial females lived longer, except in the group which had a sex ratio of two males to one female; in this group life spans of males and females were the same. Females in separate vials with one male produced mean numbers of of offspring ranging from 389 for an inbred homozygous malathion-resistant strain to 514 for an outbred strain (genetically variable: GV). GV strain females in vials which had 10 males and 20 females produced a mean of 97 offspring, GV strain females in vials which had 15 males and 15 females produced a mean of 146 offspring, and GV strain females in vials which had 20 males and 10 females produced a mean of 216 offspring. The results of this study and similar studies on other insect species suggest that the life span of this insect is inversely related to the rate at which it expends energy and to injury incurred during copulation, and that oviposition rate decreases as the density of larvae and female adults increases. PMID:8137898

  18. Unravelling dropsy: from Marcello Malpighi's discovery of the capillaries (1661) to Stephen Hales' production of oedema in an experimental model (1733).

    PubMed

    Andreae, L; Fine, L G

    1997-01-01

    A modern understanding of oedema formation traditionally begins with Starling's description in 1898 of hydrostatic and oncotic forces acting on the capillary membrane. Clearly, hypotheses of oedema formation predating the knowledge of the existence of capillaries must have been incomplete. Marcello Malpighi first described capillaries in 1661, but although he displayed a good grasp of the principles of the Harveian circulation and believed that oedema fluid (the clinical entity dropsy) was derived from the blood rather than the tissues, we have found no evidence that he realised the central role played by his discovery. However, only 60 years later, Stephen Hales' Haemastaticks reveals the creation of an experimental model for dropsy which led him towards an understanding of oedema formation not far behind Starling. PMID:9189256

  19. The description of Centrorhynchus globirostris n. sp. (Acanthocephala: Centrorhynchidae) from the pheasant crow, Centropus sinensis (Stephens) in Pakistan, with gene sequence analysis and emendation of the family diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Omar M; Heckmann, Richard A; Wilson, Eric; Keele, Brianna; Khan, Aly

    2015-06-01

    A new species of Centrorhynchus (Centrorhynchidae) with receptacle insertion at the posterior third of the proboscis is described from the pheasant crow Centropus sinensis (Stephens) (Cuculidae) in Pakistan. Centrorhynchu sglobirostris n. sp. is similar to the 98 other known species of Centrorhynchus Lühe, 1911 in having long cylindrical trunk with anterior dilation and transverse anastomoses of the secondary lacunar vessels. However, specimens of C. globirostris differ from all other species of the genus by having a unique globular proboscis not divided into anterior proboscis with rooted hooks and posterior proboscis with rootless spines. Posterior hooks of C. globirostris emerge at the level of the receptacle insertion and are uniquely fully rooted. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of C. globirostris 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes reveals the genetic and evolutionary relationships between C. globirostris and other members of Centrorhynchidae which have representative orthologs in public databases. Comparison to known acanthocephalans confirms appropriate inclusion in the genus Centrorhynchus. PMID:25804972

  20. Local knowledge, environmental politics, and the founding of ecology in the United States. Stephen Forbes and "The Lake as a Microcosm" (1887).

    PubMed

    Schneider, D W

    2000-12-01

    Stephen Forbes's "The Lake as a Microcosm" is one of the founding documents of the science of ecology in the United States. By tracing the connections between scientists and local fishermen underlying the research on floodplain lakes presented in "The Lake as a Microcosm," this essay shows how the birth of ecology was tied to local knowledge and the local politics of environmental transformation. Forbes and the other scientists of the Illinois Natural History Survey relied on fishermen for manual labor, expertise in catching fish, and knowledge of the natural history of the fishes. As Forbes and his colleagues worked in close contact with fishermen, they also adopted many of their political concerns over the privatization of the floodplain and became politically active in supporting their interests. The close connection between scientists and local knowledge forced the ecologists to reframe the boundaries of ecology as objective or political, pure or applied, local or scientific. PMID:11284229

  1. "The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics" by Stephen Humphry--One Small Step for the Rasch Model, but Possibly One Giant Leap for Measurement in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzberger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Compared to traditional test theory, where person measures are typically referenced to the distribution of a population, item response theory allows for a much more meaningful interpretation of measures as they can be directly compared to item locations. However, Stephen Humphry shows that the crucial role of the unit of measurement has been

  2. "The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics" by Stephen Humphry--One Small Step for the Rasch Model, but Possibly One Giant Leap for Measurement in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzberger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Compared to traditional test theory, where person measures are typically referenced to the distribution of a population, item response theory allows for a much more meaningful interpretation of measures as they can be directly compared to item locations. However, Stephen Humphry shows that the crucial role of the unit of measurement has been…

  3. Post-exposure temperature influence on the toxicity of conventional and new chemistry insecticides to green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Afzal, Muhammad; Raza, Abu Bakar M.; Akram, Zeeshan; Waqar, Adil; Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad

    2014-01-01

    Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) is an important biological control agent currently being used in many integrated pest management (IPM) programs to control insect pests. The effect of post-treatment temperature on insecticide toxicity of a spinosyn (spinosad), pyrethroid (lambda cyhalothrin), organophosphate (chlorpyrifos) and new chemistry (acetamiprid) to C. carnea larvae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature coefficients of each insecticide tested were evaluated. From 20 to 40 °C, toxicity of lambda cyhalothrin and spinosad decreased by 2.15- and 1.87-fold while toxicity of acetamiprid and chlorpyrifos increased by 2.00 and 1.79-fold, respectively. The study demonstrates that pesticide effectiveness may vary according to environmental conditions. In cropping systems where multiple insecticide products are used, attention should be given to temperature variation as a key factor in making pest management strategies safer for biological control agents. Insecticides with a negative temperature coefficient may play a constructive role to conserve C. carnea populations. PMID:25972753

  4. Post-exposure temperature influence on the toxicity of conventional and new chemistry insecticides to green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Afzal, Muhammad; Raza, Abu Bakar M; Akram, Zeeshan; Waqar, Adil; Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad

    2015-05-01

    Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) is an important biological control agent currently being used in many integrated pest management (IPM) programs to control insect pests. The effect of post-treatment temperature on insecticide toxicity of a spinosyn (spinosad), pyrethroid (lambda cyhalothrin), organophosphate (chlorpyrifos) and new chemistry (acetamiprid) to C. carnea larvae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature coefficients of each insecticide tested were evaluated. From 20 to 40 °C, toxicity of lambda cyhalothrin and spinosad decreased by 2.15- and 1.87-fold while toxicity of acetamiprid and chlorpyrifos increased by 2.00 and 1.79-fold, respectively. The study demonstrates that pesticide effectiveness may vary according to environmental conditions. In cropping systems where multiple insecticide products are used, attention should be given to temperature variation as a key factor in making pest management strategies safer for biological control agents. Insecticides with a negative temperature coefficient may play a constructive role to conserve C. carnea populations. PMID:25972753

  5. My Most Memorable AAS Meeting, or How Stephen Hawking's Chauffeur and Chubby Wise's Fiddle Are Related to the Hubble Deep Field (At Least In My Mind and Experience!)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Sometimes, in the most extraordinary conditions and times, strange things happen which remind us of just how small a world we really inhabit, and how so many varied things may suddenly be juxtaposed in our lives, and in the lives of others. My most memorable AAS meeting involves not only the meeting but events while getting there. It was January 1996, and we had just finished our observations and initial data reduction of the Hubble Deep Field, the members of the HDF working group doggedly coming in to the STScI by various means over the December holidays and the New Year, in the midst of several blizzards which even closed STScI for a number of days. Not surprisingly, work on the HDF AAS presentations was ongoing until the last minute, until people left snowy Baltimore for sunny San Antonio. My street was plowed for the first time in a week a few hours before my 6AM flight, so after digging out my car, with no time for sleep, between 3AM and 6AM on the morning I left, I soon discovered my own surprising connections between Stephen Hawking's chauffeur, Chubby Wise's fiddle, and the Hubble Deep Field. I'll elaborate in this paper if you're curious!

  6. Use of organic petrology in sequence stratigraphic interpretations: Example from the Eocene-Oligocene boundary section, St. Stephens Quarry, Washington County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, M.A.; Hazel, J.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The type and preservation of organic matter is related to the depositional systems tract in which the sediments were deposited. Shelf sediments in the transgressive systems tract contain sparse, highly degraded phytoclasts whereas organic matter in the highstand systems tract is dominated by well-preserved phytoclasts introduced to the shelf during progradation. Because of this relationship, integration of data from organic petrology with sedimentologic and biostratigraphic results provides greater resolution in locating critical surfaces (sequence boundaries, transgressive surfaces, and surfaces of maximum starvation) that bound depositional systems tracts within the depositional sequence. The Eocene Oligocene shelf sediments exposed in St. Stephens Quarry provide an excellent example of the relationship between depositional systems tract and organic matter deposition. Deposition of the Shubuta Clay in the transgressive systems tract terminated with the surface of maximum starvation. This surface is marked by a thin (<2 cm), laterally extensive, phosphate-rich shell lag that contains only minor amounts of highly degraded phytoclasts. Graphic correlation of biostratigraphic data reveals a marine hiatus (120,000 years) within the shell lag. Deposition in the subsequent highstand systems tract resulted in an increase in well-preserved phytoclasts in the overlying Bumpnose Limestone and Red Bluff Clay. A transgressive surface forms the contact between the Red Bluff Clay and the Mint Springs Marl. Phytoclasts are less common and more degraded in the Mint Springs above the transgressive surface than in the Red Bluff below. No hiatus is observed at this surface, suggesting that the type 2 sequence boundary is conformable at this section and may exist in the Red Bluff below the transgressive surface. This integrated approach confirms and refines previous sequence stratigraphic work performed on this important Gulf Coast section.

  7. An Interview with Stephen King.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janeczko, Paul

    1980-01-01

    The author of five best-selling novels, including "Carrie,""Salem's Lot,""The Shining,""The Stand," and "The Dead Zone," discusses the teaching of creative writing at high school and college levels. (DF)

  8. Gray, Stephen (1666-1736)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer and scientist, born in Canterbury, Kent, England. Something of a scientific enigma, Gray at first devoted his energy to astronomy, observing eclipses, sunspots, the satellites of Jupiter, and communicating his results to the first Astronomer Royal, JOHN FLAMSTEED. He was interested in instrumentation and invented a microscope in which a drop of water was the lens. In his later years, h...

  9. Ultrastructure and molecular characterization of the microsporidium, Nosema chrysoperlae sp. nov., from the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) used for biological pest control.

    PubMed

    Bjørnson, S; Steele, T; Hu, Q; Ellis, B; Saito, T

    2013-09-01

    Lacewing larvae are generalist predators that are commercially available for aphid control on a variety of crops in both Europe and North America. Although lacewings are known for their symbiotic association with yeasts and bacteria, there are few reports of microsporidia in these natural enemies. An undescribed microsporidium was found in Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) during the routine examination of specimens that were obtained from a commercial insectary for biological pest control. The objective of this study was to describe the pathogen by means of ultrastructure, molecular characterization and tissue pathology. All stages of the microsporidium were diplokaryotic and developed in direct contact with the host cell cytoplasm. Merogony and sporogony were not observed. Mature spores measured 3.49±0.10×1.52±0.05μm and had an isofilar polar filament with 8-10 coils that were frequently arranged in a single row, although double rows were also observed. Spores contained a lamellar polaroplast and a relatively small and inconspicuous polar vacuole was observed in the posterior region of about half of the spores that were examined. Tubular structures, similar in appearance to those in Nosema granulosis were observed in both sporonts and in spores. A cluster of small tubules was also observed in the posterior region of some spores. Microsporidian spores were observed in cells of the proventriculus, diverticulum and in epithelial cells of the posterior midgut. The Malpighian tubules, ileum, and rectum were heavily infected. Spores were also observed in the fat body, peripheral region of the ganglia, within and between the flight muscles, and beneath the cuticle. Although the tissues adjacent to the ovaries were heavily infected, microsporidian spores were not observed within the developing eggs. Pathogen transmission was not studied directly because it was difficult to maintain microsporidia-infected C. carnea in the laboratory. The presence of microsporidian spores in the alimentary canal suggests that the pathogen is transmitted per os and horizontal transmission may occur when infected larvae or adults are cannibalized by uninfected larvae. Molecular analysis of the microsporidian genome showed that the pathogen described in this study was 99% similar to Nosema bombycis, N. furnacalis, N. granulosis and N. spodopterae. Based on information gained during this study, we propose that the microsporidium in C. carnea be given the name Nosema chrysoperlae sp. nov. PMID:23727346

  10. Toward a general theory of adaptive radiation: insights from microbial experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Kassen, Rees

    2009-06-01

    The history of life has been punctuated by unusually spectacular periods of evolutionary diversification called adaptive radiation. Darwin's finches in the Galapagos, cichlid fishes in African Rift and Nicaraguan crater lakes, and the emergence of mammals at the end of the Cretaceous are hallmark examples. Although we have learned much from these and other case studies about the mechanisms thought to drive adaptive radiations, convincing experimental tests of theory are often lacking for the simple reason that it is usually impossible to "rewind the tape of life," as Stephen Jay Gould was fond of saying, and run it again. This situation has changed dramatically in recent years with the increasing emphasis on the use of microbial populations which, because of their small size and rapid generation times, make possible the construction of replicated, manipulative experiments to study evolution in the laboratory. Here I review the contributions that microbial experimental evolution has made to our understanding of the ecological and genetic mechanisms underlying adaptive radiation. I focus on three major gaps in the theory of adaptive radiation--the paucity of direct tests of mechanism, the genetics of diversification, and the limits and constraints on the progress of radiations--with the aim of pointing the way toward the development of a more general theory of adaptive radiation. PMID:19566701

  11. Antievolutionism in the Antipodes: from protesting evolution to promoting creationism in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Numbers, R L; Stenhouse, J

    2000-09-01

    Like other English-speaking peoples around the world, New Zealanders began debating Darwinism in the early 1860s, shortly after the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species. Despite the opposition of some religious and political leaders - and even the odd scientist - biological evolution made deep inroads in a culture that increasingly identified itself as secular. The introduction of pro-evolution curricula and radio broadcasts provoked occasional antievolution outbursts, but creationism remained more an object of ridicule than a threat until the last decades of the twentieth century, when first American and then Australian creationists began fomenting antievolutionism among New Zealanders. Although Stephen Jay Gould assured them in 1986 that they had little to fear from so-called scientific creationism, because it was a 'peculiarly American' phenomenon, scientific creationism by the mid-1990s had captured the allegiance of an estimated five per cent of the country and proved especially attractive to Maori and Pacific Islanders. In 1992 New Zealand creationists formed their own antievolution society, Creation Science (NZ). PMID:11624666

  12. Synthetic biology: a challenge to mechanical explanations in biology?

    PubMed

    Morange, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In their plans to modify organisms, synthetic biologists have contrasted engineering and tinkering. By drawing this contrast between their endeavors and what has happened during the evolution of organisms by natural selection, they underline the novelty of their projects and justify their ambitions. Synthetic biologists are at odds with a long tradition that has considered organisms as "perfect machines." This tradition had already been questioned by Stephen Jay Gould in the 1970s and received a major blow with the comparison made by François Jacob between organisms and the results of "bricolage" (tinkering). These contrasts between engineering and tinkering, synthetic biology and evolution, have no raison d'être. Machines built by humans are increasingly inspired by observations made on organisms. This is not a simple reversal of the previous trend-the mechanical conception of organisms-in which the characteristics of the latter were explained by comparison with human-built machines. Relations between organisms and machines have always been complex and ambiguous. PMID:23502563

  13. French tradition and the rise of Evo-devo.

    PubMed

    Morange, Michel

    2007-12-01

    The limited value most French biologists attributed to Darwinism and Mendelism in the first half of the twentieth century, and their conviction that these theories were at best insufficient to explain evolution and development, probably created conditions propitious to the development of Evo-devo at the end of the century. The separation between embryology and evolution did not exist in French biology as it did in American genetics: explanations for these two phenomena were sought equally in the "organization" of the egg. The major contribution of French biologists to Evo-devo was clearly the invention of the notion of the regulatory gene by Jacob and Monod; not the operon model per se, but the introduction of a hierarchy between two different kinds of genes. The consequence, the rise of the developmental gene concept, was not immediate, and required the active role of other biologists such as Antonio Garcia-Bellido, Allan Wilson and Stephen Jay Gould. Various obstacles had to be overcome for this concept of developmental gene to be fully accepted. PMID:17990019

  14. Franz Samelson (1923-2015).

    PubMed

    Harris, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Franz Samelson, social psychologist and historian of psychology, died in Manhattan, Kansas, on March 16, 2015. Franz joined the Psychology Department at Kansas State University (KSU) in 1957 and rose through the ranks to retire as Professor in 1990. At KSU he taught social psychology informed by his dislike of narrow empiricism and a growing interest in historical topics. The history of social psychology, Franz believed, was distorted by post-World War II desires for value-free empiricism. Gordon Allport, he showed, created an origin myth for the field that suited his values, obscuring the ideological diversity of his predecessors. Turning to intelligence and intelligence testing, Franz's research again altered the scholarly landscape. Although it was long believed that psychologists' testing in World War I demonstrated the usefulness of their young science, Franz revealed this to be another disciplinary myth. Next, Franz showed that a popular history of IQ testing (Stephen Jay Gould's Mismeasure of Man) was distorted by the author's liberal enthusiasm-again showing his willingness to take on the political left as well as the right. PMID:26766769

  15. Interview with Jay O'Callahan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Don

    2008-01-01

    Usually stories have elements of risk, trouble, challenge, adventure. These elements are universal because they're part of life. A story gets exciting when someone takes a risk. With risk there's tension and with tension there's energy, and the energy draws us into who the story. NASA's work involves great risk. Sometimes, as with Challenger and Columbia, the result is tragedy. I had a sense the astronauts were invulnerable. They were so well trained, and the engineers behind them were superb. Nothing was going to go wrong. That's one of the reasons the Challenger crew's death moved people so deeply. Christa McAuliffe was not an engineer; she was a teacher and she died, and the whole space enterprise became very human. The Challenger lifted off and in seventy-three seconds the Space Shuttle disintegrated. Seventy-three seconds. That's a day I'll remember, like the day of Kennedy's death. The danger was there, but we were lulled into thinking the space flight was routine. My firm: job would be to talk with MAS people-scientists, engineers, astronauts. I'm sure that underneath the whole NASA enterprise there is a sense of wonder. Perhaps science and myth are coming together in NASA. The myths of old were often stories about the sun, the stars, and the moon. Now with NASA, we're going out there. NASA is turning our eyes heavenward just as the ancients did.

  16. Jay Carter Enterprises, Incorporated steam engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment (SCSE) selected an organic rankine cycle (ORC) engine driving a high speed permanent magnet alternator (PMA) as the baseline power conversion subsystem (PCS) design. The back-up conceptual PCS design is a steam engine driving an induction alternator delivering power directly to the grid. The development of the automotive reciprocating simple rankine cycle steam engine and how an engine of similar design might be incorporated into the SCSE is discussed. A description of the third generation automotive engine is included along with some preliminary test data. Tests were conducted with the third generation engine driving an induction alternator delivering power directly to the grid. The purpose of these tests is to further verify the effects of expander inlet temperature, input thermal power level, expansion ratio, and other parameters affecting engine performance to aid in the development of an SCSE PCS.

  17. Seeing Jay-Z in Taipei.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hua

    2011-01-01

    How does the newly arrived immigrant respond to the news that an identity already awaits him? How does an African American hip-hop artist translate his struggles and triumphs across oceanic divides? What significance do American demographic shifts have in a global context? Hsu's essay examines what happens once individuals or identities migrate beyond the contexts that first produced them. He explores a variety of circuits: the satellite communities of Asian immigrant students who arrived on American university campuses in the late 1960s; enduring debates about a "post-city" identity, spurred by advances in cheap, efficient, world-shrinking communication technologies; and the new affinities and categories of self-identification made possible by a present-day culture that prizes interactivity and participation. PMID:21473166

  18. School Law in Review, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Boards Association, Alexandria, VA. Council of School Attorneys.

    This book is a compilation of the presentations delivered at the National School Boards Association (NSBA) Council of School Attorneys Annual School Law Seminar on March 22-24, 2001, in San Diego, California. Presentations include: (1) "Religion and the Public Schools--What Hath the Supreme Court Wrought?" (Jay Worona and Patricia H. Gould); (2)

  19. School Law in Review, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Boards Association, Alexandria, VA. Council of School Attorneys.

    This book is a compilation of the presentations delivered at the National School Boards Association (NSBA) Council of School Attorneys Annual School Law Seminar on March 22-24, 2001, in San Diego, California. Presentations include: (1) "Religion and the Public Schools--What Hath the Supreme Court Wrought?" (Jay Worona and Patricia H. Gould); (2)…

  20. ‘Primum non nocere’: A review of Taking America off Drugs: Why Behavioral Therapy is More Effective for Treating ADHD, OCD, Depression and Other Psychological Problems by Stephen Ray Flora

    PubMed Central

    van Haaren, Frans

    2009-01-01

    Taking America off Drugs by Stephen Ray Flora provides an overview of effective behavioral interventions to treat a variety of mental health concerns, including depression and phobias. These disorders are better treated with behavioral than psychopharmacological interventions. Yet, the latter prevail in today's society. Taking America off Drugs provides the background to help us understand why, as it puts the treatment of behavioral disorders in the context of modern psychiatry and its relationship with the pharmaceutical industry. This review provides an overview and critical evaluation of the book, but it also extends its context by discussing the history of the treatment of mental illness and practices of the pharmaceutical-medical complex and by offering an optimistic scenario by which psychopharmacological agents will ultimately be replaced by interventions based on the principles of applied behavior analysis. PMID:22477708

  1. Statement of Stephen S. Trott, Associate Attorney General, United States Department of Justice before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control. House of Representatives concerning the Federal Government's Present and Future Efforts in Eradication, Interdiction, Law Enforcement, Education and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    Testimony of Associate Attorney General Stephen S. Trott on the federal government's present and future efforts in drug law enforcement before the Congressional Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control is presented in this document. Three topic areas are included in the testimony. The first topic of management initiatives discusses…

  2. Effects of pressure reductions in a proposed siphon water lift system at St. Stephen Dam, South Carolina, on mortality rates of juvenile American shad and blueback herring. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nestler, J.M.; Schilt, C.R.; Jones, D.P.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents results of studies to predict the mortality rate of juvenile blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) and American shad (A. sapidissima) associated with reduced pressure as they pass downstream through a proposed siphon water lift system at St. Stephen Dam, South Carolina. The primary function of the siphon is to increase attracting flow to better guide upstream migrating adult herring of both species into the existing fish lift for upstream passage. The US Army Engineer District, Charleston, wishes to consider the siphon as an alternative bypass route through the dam for downstream migrating juvenile and adult herring. A pressure-reduction testing system that emulates some of the pressure characteristics of the siphon was used to determine the approximate percentage of juvenile fishes that could be reasonably expected to be killed passing through the reduced pressures anticipated for the siphon water lift system. The testing system could duplicate the range of pressure change anticipated for the siphon lift system but could not obtain pressures lower than 4.1 psi, whereas pressures for some design alternatives may approach the theoretical minimum pressure of 0.0 psi. Study results indicate that the mortality rate is probably about 20 percent. Power analysis indicates that mortality rate above 30 percent is unlikely. Conducting additional mortality studies is recommended to refine predicted mortality rates. Measures should be taken to prevent juvenile fish from entering the siphon lift system if excessive mortality rates are observed.

  3. The Stephen H. Long Expedition (1819?1820), Titian R. Peale?s field illustrations, and the lost holotypes of the North American shrews Sorex brevicaudus Say and Sorex parvus Say (Mammalia: Soricidae) from the Philadelphia Museum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodman, N.

    2009-01-01

    While encamped for the winter of 1819?1820 at Engineer Cantonment along the Missouri River in present-day eastern Nebraska, members of Major Stephen Harriman Long?s Expedition to the Rocky Mountains collected a number of animals that were previously unknown. Among the mammals were two soricids that were subsequently described by Thomas Say as Sorex brevicaudus (Northern Short-tailed Shrew, Blarina brevicauda) and Sorex parvus (Least Shrew, Cryptotis parvus). The holotypes of these species were deposited and placed on public exhibit in the Philadelphia Museum, the predominant North American systematic collection of the early nineteenth century. Like most private museums of that era, the Philadelphia Museum eventually went out of business, and its collections were dispersed and, for the most part, lost. Fortunately, Titian R. Peale made a detailed field sketch of the two specimens soon after their capture and subsequently executed a watercolor based on that sketch. In addition, an engraving of the holotypes was published in the decade following the discovery of the two species. Illustrations of holotypes are taxonomically useful when they depict diagnostic characters of species. They take on added taxonomic significance in the absence of the holotypes. In the cases of Sorex brevicaudus and Sorex parvus, pictures provide strong confirmation of the taxonomic identities of these two species, as well as recording the early history of the specimens.

  4. [The Roots of Idiographic Paleontology: Karl Alfred von Zittel's Methodology and Conception of the Fossil Record].

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines Karl Alfred von Zittel’s practice in order to uncover the roots of so-called idiographic paleontology.The great American paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) defined the discipline of idiographic paleontology as illustration and description of the morphological features of extinct species. However, this approach does not investigate macroevolutionary patterns and processes. On the contrary, the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s implemented an epistemic methodology that illustrates macrovelutionary patterns and laws by combining idiographic data with a nomothetic form of explanation. This article elucidates the features of the idiographic data as well as the acquired knowledge coupled with this approach. First of all, Heinrich G. Bronn’s (1800–1862) statistical method is analyzed. Zittel’s practice arose as a reaction against the approximate conclusions reached by Bronn’s quantitative approach. Second, the details of Zittel’s methodology are described in order to bring out its peculiarities.The microscope played a pivotal role in creating and forming Zittel’s morphological data. This analysis sheds new light on the reasons behind the so-called ideographic paleontology, thus revising Gould’s historical reconstruction, as well as on the notion of paleontological data. However, even though Zittel aimed at reaching precise and stable conclusions,his data cannot be used for elucidating evolutionary mechanisms: they are scientific in a purely descriptive sense, but completely useless for biological investigations. Finally, this paper examines how Zittel’s methodology affects the contemporary paleobiological enterprise and thereby reflects upon the notion of natural history. PMID:26507378

  5. Spanish Flu and Early 20th-Century Expansion of a Coronary Heart Disease–Prone Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Azambuja, Maria Inês Reinert

    2004-01-01

    According to Stephen Jay Gould, “we have a strong preference for seeing trends as entities moving somewhere.” However, trends may instead be the product of relative expansions and contractions of different subpopulations constituting the system. Variation in attributes of coronary heart disease cases during the decline in coronary heart disease mortality suggests a change in the primary source-subpopulation of cases over time. It is proposed that an early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease–prone subpopulation, characterized by high serum-cholesterol phenotype and high case-fatality—which contributed to most of the coronary heart disease cases and deaths during the 1960s—may have been a late result of the 1918 influenza pandemic. The same unusual immune response to infection that in 1918 killed preferentially men, whites, and those born from 1880 to 1900 (20–40 years old) may have “primed” survivors of those birth cohorts to late coronary heart disease mortality. Ecologic evidence in favor of a birth cohort and geographic association between both epidemics is presented. Cross-reactive auto-immune response upon reinfection could explain the excess coronary heart disease deaths reported during influenza epidemics from the late 1920s onward. Mimicry between the viral hemagglutinin and the apolipoprotein B or the low-density lipoprotein receptor could be the link between infection and hypercholesterolemia. The extinction of those birth cohorts would result in a relative increase in cases coming from a 2nd subpopulation, which was characterized by insulin resistance and chronic expression of low-grade inflammation markers and was comparatively less vulnerable to die acutely from coronary heart disease. PMID:15061621

  6. Goethe's phenomenology of nature: a juvenilization of science.

    PubMed

    Skaftnesmo, Trond

    2009-01-01

    Empirical science is not a mere collection of facts. It builds theories and frames hypotheses within those theories. Empirical theories are stated as plausible answers to questions we pose to nature. According to the Galilean-Baconian tradition within science, these questions should basically explore the causes of observed phenomena, and further be restricted to the measurable and quantitative realm. Thus, the answers are generally expected to explain the effective causes behind the actual phenomena. By framing falsifiable hypotheses, the theories are tested against the empirical foundation on which they rest. In this way we try to relieve science from false theories. Thus, we have two epistemological levels: First, the theoretical level; the scientific theory explaining the phenomena, and second, the empirical level; the phenomena or facts verifying or falsifying those theories. According to the poet and multi-scientist Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832), there is however another way of science, namely an approach where these two levels fuse and become one. Goethe intended this approach to be a complementation of the Galilean-Baconian method, more than an alternative. He considered his "hypothesis-free method" to be a more comprehensive and secure way to understand nature. Whereas the Galilean-Baconian method aimed at explaining the effective causes of natural phenomena, in order to control and exploit nature for technical and industrial purposes, Goethe aimed at an exposition of the inherent meaning of the phenomena.We will explore, exemplify and discuss this approach with reference to the inherently Goethean phenomenology of evolution credited to the Dutch anatomist Louis Bolk (1866-1930), later commented and complemented by Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) and Jos Verhulst (1949 ). In the course of this presentation we will outline the Goethean approach as a method representing a juvenilization or in Bolk's terms, a fetalization of science. PMID:20077388

  7. Spanish flu and early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Azambuja, Maria Inês Reinert

    2004-01-01

    According to Stephen Jay Gould, "we have a strong preference for seeing trends as entities moving somewhere." However, trends may instead be the product of relative expansions and contractions of different subpopulations constituting the system. Variation in attributes of coronary heart disease cases during the decline in coronary heart disease mortality suggests a change in the primary source-subpopulation of cases over time. It is proposed that an early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation, characterized by high serum-cholesterol phenotype and high case-fatality--which contributed to most of the coronary heart disease cases and deaths during the 1960s--may have been a late result of the 1918 influenza pandemic. The same unusual immune response to infection that in 1918 killed preferentially men, whites, and those born from 1880 to 1900 (20-40 years old) may have "primed" survivors of those birth cohorts to late coronary heart disease mortality. Ecologic evidence in favor of a birth cohort and geographic association between both epidemics is presented. Cross-reactive auto-immune response upon reinfection could explain the excess coronary heart disease deaths reported during influenza epidemics from the late 1920s onward. Mimicry between the viral hemagglutinin and the apolipoprotein B or the low-density lipoprotein receptor could be the link between infection and hypercholesterolemia. The extinction of those birth cohorts would result in a relative increase in cases coming from a 2nd subpopulation, which was characterized by insulin resistance and chronic expression of low-grade inflammation markers and was comparatively less vulnerable to die acutely from coronary heart disease. PMID:15061621

  8. Stephen Marc: Photographer for Our Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Toni M. Shorter

    2012-01-01

    It is said that "a picture is worth a thousand words" as visual images can express complex and multilayered ideas. Sometimes photographic imagery is so strong and resonant of certain success, struggles, or events that it becomes key to a community or generation. As historic records, photographs are uniquely able to present not only success and…

  9. L'univers clos de Stephen Hawking.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrillat, H.

    Einstein had curved space, Hawking will curve time. Hawking's universe is a closed model, a 4-sphere, which encloses its own space and its own time. Nothing exists outside and without any time overlapping this 4-sphere, it cannot have a beginning, an evolution or an end. It only is. But such an absolute existence of this type of universe implies that its 3-dimensional sclices - which are our physical space - cannot have the same absolute state of being. Thus, they are necessarily transitory, with a beginning and an end, in time which is the 4th remaining dimension of the 4-sphere. Hawking absolute universe is the cause of time.

  10. Stephen Marc: Photographer for Our Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Toni M. Shorter

    2012-01-01

    It is said that "a picture is worth a thousand words" as visual images can express complex and multilayered ideas. Sometimes photographic imagery is so strong and resonant of certain success, struggles, or events that it becomes key to a community or generation. As historic records, photographs are uniquely able to present not only success and

  11. IN MY OPINION: Is Physics debatable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-01-01

    Stephen Jay Gould is, unfortunately, a palaeontologist. I write unfortunately because if he were a physicist we would all have benefited from his innumerable entertaining and informative essays [1]. His steady theme involves an obscure subject like palaeontology and why the subject links so strongly with the human condition. The key, of course, is evolution, and the light it sheds on what it means to be human. The new National Curriculum for England (and probably Wales) requires that pupils be taught: * how scientific controversies can arise from different ways of interpreting empirical evidence and models based on this evidence, and * ways in which scientific ideas may be affected by the context in which they develop, e.g. social, historical, moral and spiritual , and how these contexts may affect whether or not the ideas are accepted. Stephen Jay Gould produces an essay a month (in the US Natural History magazine) and so seems to have few problems in finding topics to write about that would fit well into one or both of the National Curriculum requirements. Good for biologists, but it doesn't seem to be so easy in physics. Admittedly Gould has to have recourse to a great number of historical cases - but he usually manages to link these with up-to-date issues. After all, he comes from a country where several states put `creation science' on a par with the Darwinian model of Earth history, so he has not only scope but need for encouraging some humane rationality. Can the history of physics provide such relevance? Does physics provide nice meaty controversies that might tempt the adolescent to think? We might be able to tell some stories with some level of drama, but it is hard for teachers to produce much enthusiasm in ordinary students at age 14 to 16 for controversies between Newton and Hooke, or Newton and Leibnitz (or Newton and most of his contemporaries, to be honest). They might be made to sympathize with Thomas Young, agonize over Boltzmann, celebrate with Einstein - but we are immediately into realms of physics outside the 14 - 16 curriculum, and perhaps this is just as well. Also, history is problematic. Apart from the possible aversion to dead white males, probably with beards, history is more complicated than we often think. It is easy to give wrong messages: science makes steady linear progress, modern scientists are so much smarter than these old folk who got so much of it wrong. To quote Gould [1, pp 83-4], talking about an 18th century British naturalist, a puzzled contemporary of Linnaeus: Mendes da Costa was an ordinary man in the midst of [a] great transition. ... By studying Mendes da Costa, we can best understand the fixed beliefs, the impact of novelty introduced by innovators, and, particularly, the intellectual impediments that his age posed to better comprehension of the natural world. We must learn to view these impediments with proper sympathy - not in the old style of condescension for an intellectual childhood to compare with our stunning maturity, but as a set of consistent and powerful beliefs, well suited to the culture of another time, held by reasonable people with raw intellects at least as good as ours.' I get from this that history may be best taught by historians - or at least, if by scientists, with a suitable humility. Some hard work will be required by teachers - or by anyone daring enough to provide resources suitable for tackling such problems in a way that not only makes enjoyable sense but encourages an interest and competence in physics by young people. The other main problem for physics teachers, of course, is that any attempt to deal with `different ways of interpreting empirical evidence' in contemporary physics meets a very steep and very high comprehension barrier. We are talking quantum physics, relativistic cosmology, condensed matter etc, etc. One answer might be to avoid pure physics completely and go for the jugular in technological applications. Plenty of scope here: communications, transport, energy, geophysics and climatology, just for starters. The idea will not be to deliver arcane knowledge about how things work, or even the wonderful physics that underpins them, but how these developments are this very minute affecting everyday living. And I guess that quite a lot of the developments were made and are just now being made by real people: alive, young(ish), and not necessarily male, white or bearded. But we could live with beards. Reference [1] For example, see Gould S J 1999 Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms (Vintage) It is also worth getting some help from Patrick Fullick and Mary Ratcliffe's book Teaching Ethical Aspects of Science (Bassett Press, 1996)

  12. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Jay Keasling: Biofuels

    ScienceCinema

    Jay Keasling

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  13. Style and Spectator Judgment in Fisher Ames's Jay Treaty Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manolescu, Beth Innocenti

    1998-01-01

    Describes reflective spectator judgment with respect to political judgment and rhetorical theory, and then proposes a method of stylistic analysis that may help to identify discursive features enabling reflective spectator judgment. Illustrates these discursive features (described as participatory forms) by performing a stylistic analysis of…

  14. Advising Jay: A Case Study Using a Situational Leadership Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerstrom, Alan C.

    2008-01-01

    Through a case study, I address the position that academic advising can be viewed as a developmental process. I present my specific experiences in applying Hersey and Blanchard's model of situational leadership (1969) during academic advising sessions. The model demonstrates that effective leadership is based on the appropriate balance of a…

  15. Meet the GPM Team: Jay Parker - Duration: 76 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    It takes hundreds of designers, engineers and technicians to build the largest spacecraft ever assembled at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the GPM Core Observatory. Check out a few of the team...

  16. Teaching Difficult Students: Blue Jays in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnezda, Nicole M.

    2004-01-01

    Here is an easy-to-read and inspiring text that explores the nature of young people and the effects traditional discipline strategies have on them. The author recommends humanistic approaches that promote personal growth in students rather than the common system of reward and punishment that aggravates underlying psychological issues and

  17. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Jay Keasling: Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Keasling

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  18. Effect of squeeze on electrostatic Trivelpiece-Gould wave damping

    SciTech Connect

    Ashourvan, Arash; Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2014-05-15

    We present a theory for increased damping of Trivelpiece-Gouid plasma modes on a nonneutral plasma column, due to application of a Debye shielded cylindrically symmetric squeeze potential φ{sub 1}. We present two models of the effect this has on the plasma modes: a 1D model with only axial dependence, and a 2D model that also keeps radial dependence in the squeezed equilibrium and the mode. We study the models using both analytical and numerical methods. For our analytical studies, we assume that φ{sub 1}/T≪1, and we treat the Debye shielded squeeze potential as a perturbation in the equilibrium Hamiltonian. Our numerical simulations solve the 1D Vlasov-Poisson system and obtain the frequency and damping rate for a self-consistent plasma mode, making no assumptions as to the size of the squeeze. In both the 1D and 2D models, damping of the mode is caused by Landau resonances at energies E{sub n} for which the particle bounce frequency ω{sub b}(E{sub n}) and the wave frequency ω satisfy ω=nω{sub b}(E{sub n}). Particles experience a non-sinusoidal wave potential along their bounce orbits due to the squeeze potential. As a result, the squeeze induces bounce harmonics with n > 1 in the perturbed distribution. The harmonics allow resonances at energies E{sub n}≤T that cause substantial damping, even when wave phase velocities are much larger than the thermal velocity. In the regime ω/k≫√(T/m) (k is the wave number) and T≫φ{sub 1}, the resonance damping rate has a |φ{sub 1}|{sup 2} dependence. This dependence agrees with the simulations and experimental results.

  19. Larval biology of the crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii (Gould): a synthesis.

    PubMed

    Forward, Richard B

    2009-06-01

    This synthesis reviews the physiological ecology and behavior of larvae of the benthic crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii, which occurs in low-salinity areas of estuaries. Larvae are released rhythmically around the time of high tide in tidal estuaries and in the 2-h interval after sunset in nontidal estuaries. As in most subtidal crustaceans, the timing of larval release is controlled by the developing embryos, which release peptide pheromones that stimulate larval release behavior by the female to synchronize the time of egg hatching. Larvae pass through four zoeal stages and a postlarval or megalopal stage that are planktonic before metamorphosis. They are retained near the adult population by means of an endogenous tidal rhythm in vertical migration. Larvae have several safeguards against predation: they undergo nocturnal diel vertical migration (DVM) and have a shadow response to avoid encountering predators, and they bear long spines as a deterrent. Photoresponses during DVM and the shadow response are enhanced by exposure to chemical cues from the mucus of predator fishes and ctenophores. The primary visual pigment has a spectral sensitivity maximum at about 500 nm, which is typical for zooplankton and matches the ambient spectrum at twilight. Larvae can detect vertical gradients in temperature, salinity, and hydrostatic pressure, which are used for depth regulation and avoidance of adverse environmental conditions. Characteristics that are related to the larval habitat and are common to other crab larval species are considered. PMID:19556592

  20. Dealing with the Elephant in the Corner; or, You Can't Avoid Religion If You Want to Teach the History of Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.

    2001-05-01

    Public expressions of the science and religion relationship are often that of conflict. In contrast many, if not most, Americans today privately hold that science and religion are, to use Stephen Jay Gould's phrase, "Non-overlapping Magisteria (NOMA);" that is, both may be valuable but they occupy fully separate and autonomous spheres of influence. This private view has contributed to the fact that efforts to guard public science education from the encroachment of anti-evolution interests have been argued largely on constitutional or "separation of church and state" grounds. As a consequence support within the religious communities for teaching the sciences of the history of nature has had little to do with those sciences themselves and instead has been based on political, namely first amendment, principles. In the past century historical studies of the science and religion relationship in Western culture indicate that the two have a much richer and more complex form of interaction than is recognized in the separatist or NOMA idea. It appears that the relationship is such that the scientific and the religious can not be effectively isolated (or insulated) from one another without both being distorted in some manner. This presentation will discuss how the development of the "Intelligent Design" movement represents a more profound challenge to public science education precisely because of its appeal to folk in religious communities that value both science and religion, and have an intuition of their more complex relationship. These are folk who are not religious "fundamentalists" or "biblical literalists," they do not expect that science must conform to religious doctrine. But they are open to so-called "scientific findings" that have apparent positive implications for their religious convictions. It will be argued that an effective response to the ID challenge in public science education will not be based primarily on a "separation of church and state" argument. It will require scientific, philosophical and religious critiques that are both at a higher level of sophistication and are accessible to the public in general and public science educators in particular. The strongest way to support something is to argue for it rather than to argue against that which challenges it. Religious community support for teaching the sciences of the history of nature will be most robust when such education is seen as obligatory rather than to be merely accepted as separate "way of knowing." But for this to happen it will need to be acknowledged by both the religious and the scientific communities that the scientific and the religious are not isolated from one another. The presentation will conclude by identifying some of the possible consequences such an acknowledgment will have for the scientific, religious and science education communities.

  1. Review of Stephen Arons's "Short Route to Chaos."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    "Short Route to Chaos" criticizes the Goals 2000 program, related educational reforms, and the agenda of the Religious Right from the viewpoint of the secular Left. Arons supports school choice, school and teacher independence from government regulation of instructional content, publicly funded schools, and equity in funding. (SLD)

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Tian Yi; Li, Lei; Xin, Tianrong; Wang, Yayu; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Cryptolestes ferrugineus (GenBank accession number KT182067) by the long PCR and primer walking method. The mitochondrial genome is a typical circular DNA molecule of 15 511 bp in length, and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a A + T-rich region (D-loop). The order of 37 genes was typical of insect mitochondrial DNA sequences described to date. The base composition of the genome is A (39.17%), T (37.24%), C (14.22%), and G (9.37%) with an A + T-rich hallmark as that of other invertebrate mitochondrial genomes. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codon and terminate with the stop codon T (AA) or TAG. The A + T-rich region is located between 12S rRNA and tRNA(Ile). In this study, the phylogenetic relationships of Coleoptera species were constructed based on the nucleotides sequences of 13 PCGs of mitogenomes. The molecular-based phylogeny supported the traditional morphological classification on relationships within Coleoptera species. PMID:26330111

  3. God's Turnstile: The Work of John Wheeler and Stephen Hawking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbye, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    Presents an excerpt from the book entitled "Lonely Hearts of the Cosmos." Provides narration of behind-the-scenes events in the lives, the scientific debates, and the intellectual triumphs of the two physicists responsible for inventing the concept of the black hole. (JJK)

  4. Music and eJay: An Opportunity for Creative Collaborations in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Marina; Breeze, Nick

    2008-01-01

    This paper draws on results of a research project InterActive Education: Teaching and Learning in the Information Age (see www.interactiveeducation.ac.uk). The overall aim of the project was to examine ways in which new technologies can be used in educational settings to enhance learning. Research was carried out across a range of school subjects:…

  5. Orion: Exploration Flight Test-1 Animation (with narration by Jay Estes) - Duration: 3 minutes, 22 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the proposed test flight of the Orion spacecraft in 2014. During the test, which is called Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), Orion will launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., per...

  6. Arrested Development: Revising Remediation at John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBeth, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Basic writing has played a large role in the history and institutional identity of the City University of New York (CUNY). From the Open Admissions era of Mina Shaughnessy to the present day, "remedial courses" at CUNY have been revised in response to different colleges' missions, curricular initiatives, university policies, and public opinion.…

  7. What is Radical Behaviorism? A Review of Jay Moore's Conceptual Foundations of Radical Behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2011-01-01

    B. F. Skinner founded both radical behaviorism and behavior analysis. His founding innovations included: a versatile preparation for studying behavior; explicating the generic nature of stimulus and response; a pragmatic criterion for defining behavioral units; response rate as a datum; the concept of stimulus control; the concept of verbal behavior; and explicating the explanatory power of contingencies. Besides these achievements, however, Skinner also made some mistakes. Subsequent developments in radical behaviorist thought have attempted to remedy these mistakes. Moore's book presents a “party line” version of radical behaviorism. It focuses narrowly on a few of Skinner's concepts (mostly mentalism and verbal behavior) and contains no criticism of his mistakes. In fact, Moore adds a few mistakes of his own manufacture; for example, he insists that the mental realm does not exist—an unprovable and distracting assertion. The book's portrayal of behavior analysis would have been current around 1960; it mentions almost none of the developments since then. It also includes almost no developments in radical behaviorism since Skinner. Moore's book would give an unwary reader a highly distorted picture of contemporary behavior analysis and radical behaviorism.

  8. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: constraints on prestellar core properties in Orion A North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salji, C. J.; Richer, J. S.; Buckle, J. V.; Hatchell, J.; Kirk, H.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-05-01

    We employ SCUBA-2 (Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2) observations of the Orion A North molecular cloud to derive column density and temperature maps. We apply a novel, Hessian-based structural identification algorithm for detection of prestellar cores to these data, allowing for automated generation of the prestellar mass function. The resulting mass function is observed to peak at 1.39^{+0.18}_{-0.19} M⊙, indicating a star-forming efficiency lower limit of ˜14 per cent when compared with the Orion nebula Cluster initial mass function (IMF) peak. Additionally, the prestellar mass function is observed to decay with a high-mass power-law exponent α =2.53^{+0.16}_{-0.14}, indicating approximate functional similarity with the Salpeter IMF (α = 2.35). This result, when combined with the results of previous investigations suggests a regional dependence of the star-forming efficiency.

  9. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STARLESS AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES IN GOULD BELT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Di Francesco, James; Bontemps, Sylvain; Megeath, S. Thomas; Allgaier, Erin; Rebull, Luisa M.; Carey, Sean; McCabe, Caer-Eve; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Padgett, Deborah; Gutermuth, Robert; Hora, Joe; Huard, Tracy; Muzerolle, James; Terebey, Susan

    2010-02-20

    Using data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue (850 {mu}m) and Spitzer Space Telescope (3.6-70 {mu}m), we explore dense cores in the Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, Serpens, and Orion molecular clouds. We develop a new method to discriminate submillimeter cores found by Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) as starless or protostellar, using point source photometry from Spitzer wide field surveys. First, we identify infrared sources with red colors associated with embedded young stellar objects (YSOs). Second, we compare the positions of these YSO candidates to our submillimeter cores. With these identifications, we construct new, self-consistent starless and protostellar core mass functions (CMFs) for the five clouds. We find best-fit slopes to the high-mass end of the CMFs of -1.26 +- 0.20, -1.22 +- 0.06, -0.95 +- 0.20, and -1.67 +- 0.72 for Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, and Orion, respectively. Broadly, these slopes are each consistent with the -1.35 power-law slope of the Salpeter initial mass function at higher masses, but suggest some differences. We examine a variety of trends between these CMF shapes and their parent cloud properties, potentially finding a correlation between the high-mass slope and core temperature. We also find a trend between core mass and effective size, but we are very limited by sensitivity. We make similar comparisons between core mass and size with visual extinction (for A{sub V} >= 3) and find no obvious trends. We also predict the numbers and mass distributions of cores that future surveys with SCUBA-2 may detect in each of these clouds.

  10. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: properties of star-forming filaments in Orion A North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salji, C. J.; Richer, J. S.; Buckle, J. V.; Francesco, J. Di; Hatchell, J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Ward-Thompson, D.; JCMT GBS Consortium

    2015-05-01

    We develop and apply a Hessian-based filament detection algorithm to submillimetre continuum observations of Orion A North. The resultant filament radial density profiles are fitted with beam-convolved line-of-sight Plummer-profiles using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The posterior distribution of the radial decay parameter demonstrates that the majority of filaments exhibit p = 1.5-3, with a mode at p = 2.2, suggesting deviation from the Ostriker p = 4 isothermal, equilibrium, self-gravitating cylinder. The spatial distribution of young stellar objects relative to the high column density filaments is investigated, yielding a lower limit on the star-forming age of the integral-shaped filament ˜1.4 Myr. Additionally, inferred lifetimes of filaments are examined which suggest long-term filament accretion, varying rates of star formation, or both. Theoretical filament stability measures are determined with the aid of HARP C18O J = 3-2 observations and indicate that the majority of filaments are gravitationally subcritical, despite the presence of young protostars. The results from this investigation are consistent with the one-dimensional accretion flow filament model recently observed in numerical simulations.

  11. Insights into the origin of the stellar initial mass function from Herschel Gould Belt survey observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Philippe; Roy, Arabindo; Arzoumanian, Doris

    2015-08-01

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is one of the most debated issues in astrophysics. Two major features of the IMF are 1) a fairly robust power-law slope at the high-mass end known since Salpeter (1955), and 2) a broad peak below 1 Mo corresponding to a characteristic stellar mass scale. In recent years, the dominant theoretical model proposed to account for these features has been the "gravo-turbulent fragmentation" picture, whereby the properties of interstellar turbulence lead to the Salpeter power law and gravity sets the characteristic mass scale (Jeans mass). I will discuss modifications to this picture based on extensive submillimeter imaging observations of nearby molecular clouds with the Herschel Space Observatory which set strong constraints on the formation process of prestellar cores.The Herschel results point to the key role of the quasi-universal filamentary structure pervading the cold interstellar medium and support a scenario in which star formation occurs in two main steps: first, the dissipation of kinetic energy in large-scale MHD flows (turbulent or not) generates ~ 0.1 pc-wide filaments in the cold ISM; second, the densest filaments grow and fragment into prestellar cores (and ultimately protostars) by gravitational instability above a critical threshold ~ 16 Mo/pc in mass per unit length or ~ 160 Mo/pc2 in gas surface density (AV ~ 8).In our observationally-driven scenario, the dense cores making up the peak of the prestellar core mass function (CMF) - likely responsible for the characteristic IMF mass scale - result from gravitational fragmentation of filaments near the critical threshold for global gravitational instability. The power-law tail of the CMF/IMF arises either from the characteristic power spectrum of initial density fluctuations measured along the Herschel filaments (Roy et al. submitted) or from the power-law distribution of masses per unit length observed for supercritical filaments.

  12. THE GOULD's BELT VERY LARGE ARRAY SURVEY. I. THE OPHIUCHUS COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Torres, Rosa M.; Boden, Andrew F.; Hartmann, Lee; Evans, Neal J. II; Briceño, Cesar; Tobin, John

    2013-09-20

    We present large-scale (∼2000 arcmin{sup 2}), deep (∼20 μJy), high-resolution (∼1'') radio observations of the Ophiuchus star-forming complex obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at λ = 4 and 6 cm. In total, 189 sources were detected, 56 of them associated with known young stellar sources, and 4 with known extragalactic objects; the other 129 remain unclassified, but most of them are most probably background quasars. The vast majority of the young stars detected at radio wavelengths have spectral types K or M, although we also detect four objects of A/F/B types and two brown dwarf candidates. At least half of these young stars are non-thermal (gyrosynchrotron) sources, with active coronas characterized by high levels of variability, negative spectral indices, and (in some cases) significant circular polarization. As expected, there is a clear tendency for the fraction of non-thermal sources to increase from the younger (Class 0/I or flat spectrum) to the more evolved (Class III or weak line T Tauri) stars. The young stars detected both in X-rays and at radio wavelengths broadly follow a Güdel-Benz relation, but with a different normalization than the most radioactive types of stars. Finally, we detect a ∼70 mJy compact extragalactic source near the center of the Ophiuchus core, which should be used as gain calibrator for any future radio observations of this region.

  13. RESPIRATION AND OSMOREGULATION OF THE ESTUARINE CRAB RHITHROPANOPEUS HARRISII (GOULD): EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE ALACHLOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of a sudden decrease in salinity and exposure to sublethal concentrations of the herbicide, Alachlor, on osmoregulation and respiration of the crab, Rhithropanopeus harrisii, were studied. 2. Crabs were hyperosmotic regulators at salinities below 24 ppt and became hyp...

  14. Is There Really A North American Plate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krill, A.

    2011-12-01

    Lithospheric plates are typically identified from earthquake epicenters and evidence such as GPS movements. But no evidence indicates a plate boundary between the North American and South American Plates. Some plate maps show them separated by a transform boundary, but it is only a fracture zone. Other maps show an "undefined plate boundary" or put no boundary between these two plates (check Google images). Early plate maps showed a single large American Plate, quite narrow east of the Caribbean Plate (Le Pichon 1968, Morgan 1968). The North and South American Plates became established by the leading textbook Earth (Press & Siever 1974). On their map, from a Scientific American article by John Dewey (1972), these new plates were separated by an "uncertain plate boundary." The reasons for postulating a North American Plate were probably more psychological than geological. Each of the other continents of the world had its own plate, and North American geologists naturally wanted theirs. Similarly, European geographers used to view Europe as its own continent. A single large plate should again be hypothesized. But the term American Plate would now be ambiguous ("Which plate, North or South?") Perhaps future textbook authors could call it the "Two-American Plate." Textbook authors ultimately decide such global-tectonic matters. I became aware of textbook authors' opinions and influence from my research into the history of Alfred Wegener's continental drift (see Fixists vs. Mobilists by Krill 2011). Leading textbook author Charles Schuchert realized that continental drift would abolish his cherished paleogeographic models of large east-west continents (Eria, Gondwana) and small oceans (Poseiden, Nereis). He and his junior coauthors conspired to keep drift evidence out of their textbooks, from the 1934-editions until the 1969-editions (Physical Geology by Longwell et al. 1969, Historical Geology by Dunbar & Waage 1969). Their textbooks ruled in America. Textbooks elsewhere, such as S.J. Shand (1933), E.B. Bailey (1939), and Arthur Holmes (1944), presented continental drift as a working hypothesis that could elegantly solve important geological problems. Americans were preconditioned to dislike continental drift theory, ever since James Dwight Dana taught in his Manual of Geology (1863...1895) that North America was the type continent of the world, and that it had stood alone since earliest time. Such beliefs sometimes trump geologic evidence. As noted by Stephen Jay Gould (1999) Sigmund Freud had much insight into the psychology of scientific revolutions: they involve a scientific development that shows humans to have lesser status than previously perceived. In the Copernican revolution (geocentrism vs. heliocentrism) humans no longer inhabited the center of the universe. In the Darwinian revolution (creationism vs. evolutionism) humans were no longer uniquely created. In the Wegenerian revolution (fixism vs. mobilism) North America was no longer uniquely created; it was just other fragment from Pangaea. North American geologists were pleased when Press & Siever gave them their own lithospheric plate. Being a global-tectonic killjoy, I would like to take away that small consolation as well. Or at least pose the question: Is there really a North American Plate?

  15. The insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) superfamily.

    PubMed

    Hwa, V; Oh, Y; Rosenfeld, R G

    1999-12-01

    Over the last decade, the concept of an IGFBP family has been well accepted, based on structural similarities and on functional abilities to bind IGFs with high affinities. The existence of other potential IGFBPs was left open. The discovery of proteins with N-terminal domains bearing striking structural similarities to the N terminus of the IGFBPs, and with reduced, but demonstrable, affinity for IGFs, raised the question of whether these proteins were "new" IGFBPs (22, 23, 217). The N-terminal domain had been uniquely associated with the IGFBPs and has long been considered to be critical for IGF binding. No other function has been confirmed for this domain to date. Thus, the presence of this important IGFBP domain in the N terminus of other proteins must be considered significant. Although these other proteins appear capable of binding IGF, their relatively low affinity and the fact that their major biological actions are likely to not directly involve the IGF peptides suggest that they probably should not be classified within the IGFBP family as provisionally proposed (22, 23). The conservation of this single domain, so critical to high-affinity binding of IGF by the six IGFBPs, in all of the IGFBP-rPs, as well, speaks to its biological importance. Historically, and perhaps, functionally, this has led to the designation of an "IGFBP superfamily". The classification and nomenclature for the IGFBP superfamily, are, of course, arbitrary; what is ultimately relevant is the underlying biology, much of which still remains to be deciphered. The nomenclature for the IGFBP related proteins was derived from a consensus of researchers working in the IGFBP field (52). Obviously, a more general consensus on nomenclature, involving all groups working on each IGFBP-rP, has yet to be reached. Further understanding of the biological functions of each protein should help resolve the nomenclature dilemma. For the present, redesignating these proteins IGFBP-rPs simplifies the multiple names already associated with each IGFBP related protein, and reinforces the concept of a relationship with the IGFBPs. Beyond the N-terminal domain, there is a lack of structural similarity between the IGFBP-rPs and IGFBPs. The C-terminal domains do share similarities to other internal domains found in numerous other proteins. For example, the similarity of the IGFBP C terminus to the thyroglobulin type-I domain shows that the IGFBPs are also structurally related to numerous other proteins carrying the same domain (87). Interestingly, the functions of the different C-terminal domains in members of the IGFBP superfamily include interactions with the cell surface or ECM, suggesting that, even if they share little sequence similarities, the C-terminal domains may be functionally related. The evolutionary conservation of the N-terminal domain and functional studies support the notion that IGFBPs and IGFBP-rPs together form an IGFBP superfamily. A superfamily delineates between closely related (classified as a family) and distantly related proteins. The IGFBP superfamily is therefore composed of distantly related families. The modular nature of the constituents of the IGFBP superfamily, particularly their preservation of an highly conserved N-terminal domain, seems best explained by the process of exon shuffling of an ancestral gene encoding this domain. Over the course of evolution, some members evolved into high-affinity IGF binders and others into low-affinity IGF binders, thereby conferring on the IGFBP superfamily the ability to influence cell growth by both IGF-dependent and IGF-independent means (Fig. 10). A final word, from Stephen Jay Gould (218): "But classifications are not passive ordering devices in a world objectively divided into obvious categories. Taxonomies are human decisions imposed upon nature--theories about the causes of nature's order. The chronicle of historical changes in classification provides our finest insight into conceptual revolutions PMID:10605625

  16. At Home in the Universe - The Search for the Laws of Self-Organization and Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Stuart

    1995-09-01

    A major scientific revolution has begun, a new paradigm that rivals Darwin's theory in importance. At its heart is the discovery of the order that lies deep within the most complex of systems, from the origin of life, to the workings of giant corporations, to the rise and fall of great civilizations. And more than anyone else, this revolution is the work of one man, Stuart Kauffman, a MacArthur Fellow and visionary pioneer of the new science of complexity. Now, in At Home in the Universe , Kauffman brilliantly weaves together the excitement of intellectual discovery and a fertile mix of insights to give the general reader a fascinating look at this new science--and at the forces for order that lie at the edge of chaos.We all know of instances of spontaneous order in nature--an oil droplet in water forms a sphere, snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry. What we are only now discovering, Kauffman says, is that the range of spontaneous order is enormously greater than we had supposed. Indeed, self-organization is a great undiscovered principle of nature. But how does this spontaneous order arise? Kauffman contends that complexity itself triggers self-organization, or what he calls "order for free," that if enough different molecules pass a certain threshold of complexity, they begin to self-organize into a new entity--a living cell. Kauffman uses the analogy of a thousand buttons on a rug--join two buttons randomly with thread, then another two, and so on. At first, you have isolated pairs; later, small clusters; but suddenly at around the 500th repetition, a remarkable transformation occurs--much like the phase transition when water abruptly turns to ice--and the buttons link up in one giant network. Likewise, life may have originated when the mix of different molecules in the primordial soup passed a certain level of complexity and self-organized into living entities (if so, then life is not a highly improbable chance event, but almost inevitable). Kauffman uses the basic insight of "order for free" to illuminate a staggering range of phenomena. We see how a single-celled embryo can grow to a highly complex organism with over two hundred different cell types. We learn how the science of complexity extends Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection: that self-organization, selection, and chance are the engines of the biosphere. And we gain insights into biotechnology, the stunning magic of the new frontier of genetic engineering--generating trillions of novel molecules to find new drugs, vaccines, enzymes, biosensors, and more. Indeed, Kauffman shows that ecosystems, economic systems, and even cultural systems may all evolve according to similar general laws, that tissues and terra cotta evolve in similar ways. And finally, there is a profoundly spiritual element to Kauffman's thought. If, as he argues, life were bound to arise, not as an incalculably improbable accident, but as an expected fulfillment of the natural order, then we truly are at home in the universe. Kauffman's earlier volume, The Origins of Order , written for specialists, received lavish praise. Stephen Jay Gould called it "a landmark and a classic." And Nobel Laureate Philip Anderson wrote that "there are few people in this world who ever ask the right questions of science, and they are the ones who affect its future most profoundly. Stuart Kauffman is one of these." In At Home in the Universe , this visionary thinker takes you along as he explores new insights into the nature of life.

  17. Climatic, biological, and strategic effects of nuclear war. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, September 12, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A panel of experts, including Carl Sagan, Jay Gould, and Edward Teller, testified along with climate and atmospheric science experts from the Soviet Union on the long-term effects of a nuclear war. The scientists warned that such an event could repeat the biological and climatic disruption that ended the age of dinosaurs 65 million years ago. The purpose of the hearing was to inform committee members about the nature and outcome of a nuclear winter. The scientists also described international research programs designed to ascertain these long-term effects. They pointed out that, while the effects of a single explosion are well known, little is known of overlapping effects from multiple explosions. Two appendices with additional material submitted for the record and additional questions and answers follows the testimony.

  18. History repeats itself: genomic divergence in copepods.

    PubMed

    Renaut, Sébastien; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-01

    Press stop, erase everything from now till some arbitrary time in the past and start recording life as it evolves once again. Would you see the same tape of life playing itself over and over, or would a different story unfold every time? The late Steven Jay Gould called this experiment replaying the tape of life and argued that any replay of the tape would lead evolution down a pathway radically different from the road actually taken (Gould 1989). This thought experiment has puzzled evolutionary biologists for a long time: how repeatable are evolutionary events? And if history does indeed repeat itself, what are the factors that may help us predict the path taken? A powerful means to address these questions at a small evolutionary scale is to study closely related populations that have evolved independently, under similar environmental conditions. This is precisely what Pereira et al. () set out to do using marine copepods Tigriopus californicus, and present their results in this issue of Molecular Ecology. They show that evolution can be repeatable and even partly predictable, at least at the molecular level. As expected from theory, patterns of divergence were shaped by natural selection. At the same time, strong genetic drift due to small population sizes also constrained evolution down a similar evolutionary road, and probably contributed to repeatable patterns of genomic divergence. PMID:27012819

  19. "...Separated by a Common Language": Reflections on Reading Tony Harland and Stephen Rowland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Janice

    2011-01-01

    When the author writes, her intention is to inform readers and to invite debate and discussion (or at least individual reflection) that continues after the work has been read and put aside. As a scientist with an interest in education, the author now feels able to submit some writings to a non-science educational journal, such as "Teaching in…

  20. The Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics (STEM) Initiative at Stephen F Austin State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruebel, Robert W.; Childs, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The Texas statewide assessment of academic skills in 1997 indicated that >55 % of the student population failed to master the mathematics objectives set by the test criteria and 42 % of the mathematics teachers at the secondary level in the East Texas region were categorized as underqualified to teach mathematics at that level. The issue of

  1. Want to Teach about SuperPACs? What We Can Learn from Stephen Colbert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of the SuperPACs in American politics is a major issue in the current election. SuperPACs, and the media campaigns they fund, also present a major challenge for media and democratic education. This article explores the issues surrounding SuperPACs and the rise of media in elections and politics in general, and presents some starting…

  2. THE MOTT FOUNDATION CHILDREN'S HEALTH CENTER--THE WORLD OF STEPHEN SHAKER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint Board of Education, MI.

    THE C.S. MOTT FOUNDATION CHILDREN'S HEALTH CENTER WAS BUILT TO SERVE CHILDREN OF THOSE BORDERLINE FAMILIES WHOSE INCOMES PROHIBIT PRIVATE MEDICAL CARE YET MAKE THEM INELIGIBLE FOR DIRECT RELIEF OF ANY KIND. THE NEED FOR SUCH A CENTER WAS PROVED BY THE CHILDREN'S 18,000 VISITS ANNUALLY FOR HEALTH CARE. WHILE PROVIDING CARE FOR CHILDREN WAS THE MAIN…

  3. Response to "Radiation therapeutic gain and Asian botanicals," by Stephen Sagar.

    PubMed

    Lawenda, Brian D

    2010-03-01

    Numerous botanical agents, many of which are used in whole medical system practices (i.e. traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurvedic medicine, etc.), have been shown to exhibit radiomodifying effects on tumors and normal tissues in-vitro and in-vivo studies. Some of these agents can enhance the therapeutic gain of radiation therapy by either acting as a radiosensitizer to tumor cells and/or as a radioprotector to normal cells. Botanical agents are comprised of multiple phytochemical compounds that may work individually or synergistically to not only improve radiation therapy outcomes, but may also exhibit a variety of anti-cancer effects as well. It will be important to evaluate these botanicals for efficacy, tumor specificity, and safety profiles before they can be recommended during radiation therapy. PMID:20308083

  4. Coaching Ourselves to Perform Multiplicity and Advocacy: A Response to Stephens and Mills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahnmann-Taylor, Melisa

    2014-01-01

    Cahnmann-Taylor draws on Boalian Theatre of the Oppressed to offer a practice for literacy teachers and coaches that can open up multiple perspectives and multiple levels of intentions and motivations for a teacher's decision making. She challenges coaches and teachers to engage in artistic examinations of multiplicity to move toward…

  5. Larval morphology of selected Quedius Stephens, 1829 (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Staphylinini) with comments on their subgeneric affiliation.

    PubMed

    Pietrykowska-Tudruj, Ewa; Czepiel-Mil, Katarzyna; Staniec, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The study concerns the larval morphology of eight Quedius species from four subgenera: Distichalius, Microsaurus, Quedius, and Raphirus. Mature larvae of three species: Q. (Microsaurus) brevis, Q. (M.) cruentus, and Q. (M.) microps are newly described. The hitherto poorly known larvae of five species: Q. (Raphirus) boops, Q. (Distichalius) cinctus, Q. (s. str.) fuliginosus, Q. (s. str.) molochinus and Q. (M.) mesomelinus, are redescribed. Illustrations of structural features are provided. The combination of characters that allow for distinguishing the known mature larvae of Quedius from closely related genera within the subtribe Quediina is specified. Diagnostic larval morphological characters for each of the subgenera are proposed. The analysis of morphological features within the genus Quedius, with the application of the Multi-Variate Statistic Package (MVSP), showed high distinctiveness of the subgenus Quedius and low coherence among species within the subgenus Microsaurus. The intraspecific variation in the number of bifurcate setae and their spacing on fore tibiae of Q. cinctus is presented. PMID:25081174

  6. "Gulliver's Travels" by Alfred Silver with Music by Stephen Naylor. Cue Sheet for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterfall, Milde; Flynn, Rosalind, Ed.

    Designed to be used before and after attending a musical adaptation of Jonathan's Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" (performed by the Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia), this cue sheet presents information about the performance and suggests activities that can be done with classmates, friends, or family members. Beginning with an illustration of aspects…

  7. The Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics (STEM) Initiative at Stephen F Austin State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruebel, Robert W.; Childs, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The Texas statewide assessment of academic skills in 1997 indicated that >55 % of the student population failed to master the mathematics objectives set by the test criteria and 42 % of the mathematics teachers at the secondary level in the East Texas region were categorized as underqualified to teach mathematics at that level. The issue of…

  8. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most

  9. A Commentary on "The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics" by Stephen Humphry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David

    2011-01-01

    This commentary examines the role of the unit from the perspective of the definition of measurement in physics as the ratio of two magnitudes, one of which is defined as the unit; it is an important and timely contribution to measurement in the social sciences. There are many different points that could be commented upon, but the author will…

  10. 76 FR 60889 - Stephen L. Reitman, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... substances properly if entrusted with a DEA registration.''' Id. (quoting Leonardo v. Lopez, M.D., 54 FR... has demonstrated his sobriety for only one year. See Lopez, 54 FR 36915; see also Robert L. Dougherty, M.D., 76 FR 16823 (2011); Robert A. Leslie, M.D., 64 FR 25908 (1999); Mary M. Miller, M.D., 63...

  11. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most…

  12. Caveat Emptor: A De-Constructive Reading of the Stealth Metaphysics of Stephen R. Covey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fenwick W.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the works of popular business and self-help gurus, focusing on the book The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. Argues that such works fail to meet minimal academic and research standards and questions their efficacy as instructional materials for educational-leadership training. (Contains 1 table and 54 references.) (WFA)

  13. Development of Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) on pollen from Bt-transgenic and conventional maize.

    PubMed

    Meissle, Michael; Zünd, Jan; Waldburger, Mario; Romeis, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) pollen is highly nutritious and can be used by predatory arthropods to supplement or replace a carnivorous diet. We demonstrate that maize pollen can be utilized by larvae of the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) under laboratory conditions. Complete development on maize pollen was not possible, but 25% of neonates reached the third instar. When only one instar was fed with pollen and the other two instars with eggs of Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), 58-87% of the larvae reached the pupal stage. The experiments included pollen produced by nine cultivars: three genetically modified (GM) cultivars expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis proteins Cry1Ab or Cry3Bb1, their corresponding non-transformed near-isolines, and three conventional cultivars. Maize cultivars were grown in two batches in a glasshouse. Their pollen differed by up to 59% in total protein content, 25% in C:N ratio, and 14% in grain diameter, but the differences were inconsistent and depended on the batch. Lacewing performance was not affected by maize cultivar. For environmental risk assessment of GM plants, in planta studies must consider the variability among conventional cultivars, individual plants, batches, and environmental conditions when evaluating the ecological significance of differences observed between GM and near-isolines. PMID:25082074

  14. Stephen Hall Receives 2012 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 L'Aquila earthquake was, and continues to be, a tragedy of enormous proportions. It was obviously a tragedy for the 309 people who perished in the event and for their loved ones, along with the many thousands rendered homeless by the event. It continues to be a civic tragedy for this medieval jewel of a city in the heart of the Abruzzo, which is still crippled nearly four years after the event. And it has been a tragic episode for the scientific community, which has seen seven Italian colleagues convicted of manslaughter and facing serious jail time if their appeals are unsuccessful.

  15. Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Prize in Cardiovascular Science: Predicting Cardiovascular Illnesses for the 21st Century, and the Unpredictable …

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Changes in our society such as the increasing cost of retirement and age redistribution toward a larger elderly population will require humans to remain highly functional until an advanced age. As a consequence, chronic illnesses that are primarily responsible for reducing functionality and life expectancy will require improved prevention and therapeutic strategies. In a global way, cardiovascular disease and cancer represent the most challenging disorders to maintaining the functional integrity of our fellow humans. A new theory has been derived from recent progress in our understanding of atherosclerosis as a key mechanism for cardiovascular disease and of cancer. Instructively, this theory provides a bridge at the stem cell level, linking most chronic disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 401–406. PMID:19035844

  16. 78 FR 18340 - The Neiman Marcus Group, Inc.; Dr.Jays.com, Inc., Eminent, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Notice and the news release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission administers... in mail, catalog, or Internet advertisements that the fur in any product is faux or fake or... and fake fur products (Paragraph III); and provide certain notices and compliance reports to...

  17. Interactions between the Avian Parasite, Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) and the Galapagos Flycatcher, Myiarchus magnirostris Gould (Passeriformes: Tyrannidae).

    PubMed

    Lincango, Piedad; Causton, Charlotte; Cedeño, Daniel; Castañeda, Johanna; Hillstrom, Alexandra; Freund, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    An incidental observation of the fly Philornis downsi parasitizing a Galapagos Flycatcher (Myiarchus magnirostris) nest has revealed new insights into the searching behavior and biology of this invasive fly parasite and its interactions with endemic landbirds in the Galapagos Islands. Observations suggest that P. downsi relies on olfactory cues, or olfactory cues combined with the activity of adult birds, to locate nests and that flies continue to visit nests when chicks are >3 d old. At least 200 eggs were laid by P. downsi in different parts of the nest and >40 early-instar larvae were found inside the head of one chick, with additional larvae found in the base of the nest. Parasitism was the likely cause of mortality of both chicks found in or near the nest. This description of P. downsi parasitizing chicks of M. magnirostris highlights the vulnerability of this endemic bird species to this invasive fly. PMID:26267462

  18. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea

    PubMed Central

    Katolikova, Marina; Khaitov, Vadim; Väinölä, Risto; Gantsevich, Michael; Strelkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME) and M. trossulus (MT), co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1) in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2) mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3) in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4) at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been overlooked in other contact zones. PMID:27044013

  19. Construction of cDNA subtractive library from pearl oyster ( Pinctada fucata Gould) with red color shell by SSH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yunyan; Huang, Liangmin; He, Maoxian

    2011-05-01

    The molecular basis of color polymorphism in the shells of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata is largely unknown. We developed a red-shelled family line and used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to screen for differentially expressed genes in red- and non-red-shelled pearl oysters. We constructed forward and reverse cDNA subtractive libraries consisting of 2 506 and 797 clones, respectively. Among 343 randomly selected clones in the forward library, 304 sequences were identified in GenBank using BLASTx and BLASTn. Of the 304 sequences, 13 showed no similarity to known sequences and 291 were matched with known genes of the pearl oyster, including shematrin-1, shematrin-2, shematrin-6, shematrin-7, nacrein, nacrein-like protein, aspein for shell matrix protein, glycine-rich protein, mantle gene 5, 28S, EST00031, EST00036, 16S, and COI. In the reverse library, 7 clones were sequenced and analyzed by BLAST. Two sequences shared similarity with EST00036 from the P. fucata subtraction cDNA library, four with the P. fucata mitochondrial gene for 16S rRNA and 1 with P. fucata shematrin-2. We evaluated the expression of 12 genes from the forward library using RT PCR. Two sequences matched with 16S and COI so were considered to be false positives. The remaining 10 sequences were differentially expression in the red-shelled pearl oysters. Our results suggest that differential expression of these genes may be related to color variation in the red-shelled family line of the pearl oyster.

  20. The James Clerk Maxwell telescope Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: a molecular line study of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Glenn J.; Drabek-Maunder, Emily; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Davis, C. J.; Gregson, Jon; Hatchell, Jenny; Etxaluze, Mireya; Stickler, Sarah; Buckle, Jane; Johnstone, Doug; Friesen, Rachel; Sadavoy, Sarah; Natt, Kieran. V.; Currie, Malcolm; Richer, J. S.; Pattle, Kate; Spaans, Marco; Francesco, James Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2015-02-01

    CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 3-2 observations are presented of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. The 13CO and C18O emission is dominated by the Oph A clump, and the Oph B1, B2, C, E, F, and J regions. The optically thin(ner) C18O line is used as a column density tracer, from which the gravitational binding energy is estimated to be 4.5 × 1039 J (2282 M⊙ km2 s-2). The turbulent kinetic energy is 6.3 × 1038 J (320 M⊙ km2 s-2), or seven times less than this, and therefore the Oph cloud as a whole is gravitationally bound. 30 protostars were searched for high-velocity gas, with 8 showing outflows, and 20 more having evidence of high-velocity gas along their lines of sight. The total outflow kinetic energy is 1.3 × 1038 J (67 M⊙ km2 s-2), corresponding to 21 per cent of the cloud's turbulent kinetic energy. Although turbulent injection by outflows is significant, but does not appear to be the dominant source of turbulence in the cloud. 105 dense molecular clumplets were identified, which had radii ˜0.01-0.05 pc, virial masses ˜0.1-12 M⊙, luminosities ˜0.001-0.1 K km s-1 pc-2, and excitation temperatures ˜10-50 K. These are consistent with the standard Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) based size-linewidth relationships, showing that the scaling laws extend down to size scales of hundredths of a parsec, and to subsolar-mass condensations. There is however no compelling evidence that the majority of clumplets are undergoing free-fall collapse, nor that they are pressure confined.

  1. Morphological and molecular characterization of Isospora manorinae n. sp. in a yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula wayensis) (Gould, 1840).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Jian, Fuchun; Ryan, Una

    2016-04-01

    A new Isospora (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) species is described from a single yellow-throated miner bird (Manorina flavigula) (subspecies M. f. wayensis) in Western Australia. Sporulated oocysts (n = 32) of this isolate are spherical to subspherical, 22.8 (20.3-23.8) × 18.3 (17.7-18.7) μm, with a shape index (length/width) of 1.25 (1.2-1.3); and a smooth and bilayered oocyst wall, 1.3 μm thick (outer layer 0.9 μm, inner 0.4 μm). A polar granule is present, but the micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. The sporocysts are lemon-shaped, 15.5 (14.6-15.8) × 9.5 (9.5-10.2) μm, with a shape index of 1.6. Stieda and substieda bodies are present, the Stieda body being knob-like and the substieda body being subspherical-shaped. A sporocyst residuum is present and composed of numerous granules of different size scattered among the sporozoites, a spheroid or subspheroid refractile body is present in the sporozoite. Morphologically, the oocysts from this isolate are different from those of all known valid Isospora spp. Molecular analysis was conducted at 3 loci; the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene. At the 18S locus, this new isolate exhibited 99.2% similarity to Isospora gryphoni and three other Isospora spp. Further analysis of a subgroup of 300 bp long 18S sequences (8), including Isospora anthochaerae was conducted. This new isolate grouped in a clade with I. anthochaerae and exhibited 99.3% similarity. At the 28S locus, this new isolate grouped with I. anthochaerae with which it shared 99.1% similarity. At the COI locus, this new isolate exhibited 96.8% similarity to Isospora sp. JCI-2015 from a spectacled warbler (Sylvia conspicillata) in Spain. Further analysis from a subgroup of shorter COI sequences (n = 13) was performed and this new isolate exhibited 99.1% similarity to I. anthochaerae. Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of Isospora, which is named Isospora manorinae n. sp. after its host, the yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula wayensis). PMID:26821297

  2. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. III. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF CORONA AUSTRALIS

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dawn E.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Forbrich, Jan; Patten, Brian M.; Caratti o Garatti, Alessio; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Dunham, Michael M.; Harvey, Paul M.; Evans, Neal J.; MerIn, Bruno; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Knez, Claudia; Prager, Brian

    2011-06-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC and MIPS observations of a 0.85 deg{sup 2} field including the Corona Australis (CrA) star-forming region. At a distance of 130 pc, CrA is one of the closest regions known to be actively forming stars, particularly within its embedded association, the Coronet. Using the Spitzer data, we identify 51 young stellar objects (YSOs) in CrA which include sources in the well-studied Coronet cluster as well as sources distributed throughout the molecular cloud. Twelve of the YSOs discussed are new candidates, one of which is located in the Coronet. Known YSOs retrieved from the literature are also added to the list, and a total of 116 candidate YSOs in CrA are compiled. Based on these YSO candidates, the star formation rate is computed to be 12 M{sub sun} Myr{sup -1}, similar to that of the Lupus clouds. A clustering analysis was also performed, finding that the main cluster core, consisting of 68 members, is elongated (having an aspect ratio of 2.36), with a circular radius of 0.59 pc and mean surface density of 150 pc{sup -2}. In addition, we analyze outflows and jets in CrA by means of new CO and H{sub 2} data. We present 1.3 mm interferometric continuum observations made with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) covering R CrA, IRS 5, IRS 7, and IRAS 18595-3712 (IRAS 32). We also present multi-epoch H{sub 2} maps and detect jets and outflows, study their proper motions, and identify exciting sources. The Spitzer and ISAAC/VLT observations of IRAS 32 show a bipolar precessing jet, which drives a CO(2-1) outflow detected in the SMA observations. There is also clear evidence for a parsec-scale precessing outflow, which is east-west oriented and originates in the SMA 2 region and likely driven by SMA 2 or IRS 7A.

  3. The W40 Region in the Gould Belt: An Embedded Cluster and H II Region at the Junction of Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Ojha, D. K.; Bachiller, Rafael; Samal, M. R.; Pirogov, L.

    2013-12-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the W40 star-forming region using infrared (IR) observations in the UKIRT JHK bands, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera bands, and Herschel PACS bands, 2.12 μm H2 narrowband imaging, and radio continuum observations from GMRT (610 and 1280 MHz), in a field of view (FoV) of ~34' × 40'. Archival Spitzer observations in conjunction with near-IR observations are used to identify 1162 Class II/III and 40 Class I sources in the FoV. The nearest-neighbor stellar surface density analysis shows that the majority of these young stellar objects (YSOs) constitute the embedded cluster centered on the high-mass source IRS 1A South. Some YSOs, predominantly the younger population, are distributed along and trace the filamentary structures at lower stellar surface density. The cluster radius is measured to be 0.44 pc—matching well with the extent of radio emission—with a peak density of 650 pc-2. The JHK data are used to map the extinction in the region, which is subsequently used to compute the cloud mass—126 M ⊙ and 71 M ⊙ for the central cluster and the northern IRS 5 region, respectively. H2 narrowband imaging shows significant emission, which prominently resembles fluorescent emission arising at the borders of dense regions. Radio continuum analysis shows that this region has a blister morphology, with the radio peak coinciding with a protostellar source. Free-free emission spectral energy distribution analysis is used to obtain physical parameters of the overall photoionized region and the IRS 5 sub-region. This multiwavelength scenario is suggestive of star formation having resulted from the merging of multiple filaments to form a hub. Star formation seems to have taken place in two successive epochs, with the first epoch traced by the central cluster and the high-mass star(s)—followed by a second epoch that is spreading into the filaments as uncovered by the Class I sources and even younger protostellar sources along the filaments. The IRS 5 H II region displays indications of swept-up material that has possibly led to the formation of protostars.

  4. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea.

    PubMed

    Katolikova, Marina; Khaitov, Vadim; Väinölä, Risto; Gantsevich, Michael; Strelkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME) and M. trossulus (MT), co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1) in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2) mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3) in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4) at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been overlooked in other contact zones. PMID:27044013

  5. A census of dense cores in the Taurus L1495 cloud from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Kirk, J. M.; André, Ph.; Griffin, M. J.; Könyves, V.; Palmeirim, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Benedettini, M.; Bresnahan, D. W.; Francesco, J. Di; Elia, D.; Motte, F.; Peretto, N.; Pezzuto, S.; Roy, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Schneider, N.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    We present a catalogue of dense cores in a ˜4° × 2° field of the Taurus star-forming region, inclusive of the L1495 cloud, derived from Herschel SPIRE and PACS observations in the 70 μm, 160 μm, 250 μm, 350 μm, and 500 μm continuum bands. Estimates of mean dust temperature and total mass are derived using modified blackbody fits to the spectral energy distributions. We detect 525 starless cores of which ˜10-20% are gravitationally bound and therefore presumably prestellar. Our census of unbound objects is ˜85% complete for M > 0.015 M⊙ in low density regions (A_V≲5 mag), while the bound (prestellar) subset is ˜85% complete for M > 0.1 M⊙ overall. The prestellar core mass function (CMF) is consistent with lognormal form, resembling the stellar system initial mass function, as has been reported previously. All of the inferred prestellar cores lie on filamentary structures whose column densities exceed the expected threshold for filamentary collapse, in agreement with previous reports. Unlike the prestellar CMF, the unbound starless CMF is not lognormal, but instead is consistent with a power-law form below 0.3 M⊙ and shows no evidence for a low-mass turnover. It resembles previously reported mass distributions for CO clumps at low masses (M≲0.3 M_⊙). The volume density PDF, however, is accurately lognormal except at high densities. It is consistent with the effects of self-gravity on magnetized supersonic turbulence. The only significant deviation from lognormality is a high-density tail which can be attributed unambiguously to prestellar cores.

  6. The W40 region in the gould belt: An embedded cluster and H II region at the junction of filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Samal, M. R.; Pirogov, L.

    2013-12-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the W40 star-forming region using infrared (IR) observations in the UKIRT JHK bands, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera bands, and Herschel PACS bands, 2.12 μm H{sub 2} narrowband imaging, and radio continuum observations from GMRT (610 and 1280 MHz), in a field of view (FoV) of ∼34' × 40'. Archival Spitzer observations in conjunction with near-IR observations are used to identify 1162 Class II/III and 40 Class I sources in the FoV. The nearest-neighbor stellar surface density analysis shows that the majority of these young stellar objects (YSOs) constitute the embedded cluster centered on the high-mass source IRS 1A South. Some YSOs, predominantly the younger population, are distributed along and trace the filamentary structures at lower stellar surface density. The cluster radius is measured to be 0.44 pc—matching well with the extent of radio emission—with a peak density of 650 pc{sup –2}. The JHK data are used to map the extinction in the region, which is subsequently used to compute the cloud mass—126 M {sub ☉} and 71 M {sub ☉} for the central cluster and the northern IRS 5 region, respectively. H{sub 2} narrowband imaging shows significant emission, which prominently resembles fluorescent emission arising at the borders of dense regions. Radio continuum analysis shows that this region has a blister morphology, with the radio peak coinciding with a protostellar source. Free-free emission spectral energy distribution analysis is used to obtain physical parameters of the overall photoionized region and the IRS 5 sub-region. This multiwavelength scenario is suggestive of star formation having resulted from the merging of multiple filaments to form a hub. Star formation seems to have taken place in two successive epochs, with the first epoch traced by the central cluster and the high-mass star(s)—followed by a second epoch that is spreading into the filaments as uncovered by the Class I sources and even younger protostellar sources along the filaments. The IRS 5 H II region displays indications of swept-up material that has possibly led to the formation of protostars.

  7. Extraordinary fossils reveal the nature of Cambrian life: a commentary on Whittington (1975) ‘The enigmatic animal Opabinia regalis, Middle Cambrian, Burgess Shale, British Columbia’

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Derek E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Harry Whittington's 1975 monograph on Opabinia was the first to highlight how some of the Burgess Shale animals differ markedly from those that populate today's oceans. Categorized by Stephen J. Gould as a ‘weird wonder’ (Wonderful life, 1989) Opabinia, together with other unusual Burgess Shale fossils, stimulated ongoing debates about the early evolution of the major animal groups and the nature of the Cambrian explosion. The subsequent discovery of a number of other exceptionally preserved fossil faunas of Cambrian and early Ordovician age has significantly augmented the information available on this critical interval in the history of life. Although Opabinia initially defied assignment to any group of modern animals, it is now interpreted as lying below anomalocaridids on the stem leading to the living arthropods. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750235

  8. Extraordinary fossils reveal the nature of Cambrian life: a commentary on Whittington (1975) 'The enigmatic animal Opabinia regalis, Middle Cambrian, Burgess Shale, British Columbia'.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Derek E G

    2015-04-19

    Harry Whittington's 1975 monograph on Opabinia was the first to highlight how some of the Burgess Shale animals differ markedly from those that populate today's oceans. Categorized by Stephen J. Gould as a 'weird wonder' (Wonderful life, 1989) Opabinia, together with other unusual Burgess Shale fossils, stimulated ongoing debates about the early evolution of the major animal groups and the nature of the Cambrian explosion. The subsequent discovery of a number of other exceptionally preserved fossil faunas of Cambrian and early Ordovician age has significantly augmented the information available on this critical interval in the history of life. Although Opabinia initially defied assignment to any group of modern animals, it is now interpreted as lying below anomalocaridids on the stem leading to the living arthropods. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750235

  9. 78 FR 35930 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    .... Stephens, SDT U/A 12-23-92 trust, MAD GST for CA Stephens trust, and MAD GST for SR Stephens trust; Sandra D. Stephens, Atlanta, Georgia, individually and as trustee of MAD Trust for S.D. Stephens, MAD GST for CA Stephens trust, and MAD GST for SR Stephens trust; Scott R. Stephens, Lake Panasofkee,...

  10. Optimal Short-Sighted Rules

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relevance of methodological transfers from behavioral ecology to experimental economics with respect to the elicitation of intertemporal preferences. More precisely our discussion will stem from the analysis of Stephens and Anderson’s (2001) seminal article. In their study with blue jays they document that foraging behavior typically implements short-sighted choice rules which are beneficial in the long run. Such long-term profitability of short-sighted behavior cannot be evidenced when using a self-control paradigm (one which contrasts in a binary way sooner smaller and later larger payoffs) but becomes apparent when ecological patch-paradigms (replicating economic situations in which the main trade-off consists in staying on a food patch or leaving for another patch) are implemented. We transfer this methodology in view of contrasting foraging strategies and self-control in human intertemporal choices. PMID:22973188

  11. Optimal short-sighted rules.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relevance of methodological transfers from behavioral ecology to experimental economics with respect to the elicitation of intertemporal preferences. More precisely our discussion will stem from the analysis of Stephens and Anderson's (2001) seminal article. In their study with blue jays they document that foraging behavior typically implements short-sighted choice rules which are beneficial in the long run. Such long-term profitability of short-sighted behavior cannot be evidenced when using a self-control paradigm (one which contrasts in a binary way sooner smaller and later larger payoffs) but becomes apparent when ecological patch-paradigms (replicating economic situations in which the main trade-off consists in staying on a food patch or leaving for another patch) are implemented. We transfer this methodology in view of contrasting foraging strategies and self-control in human intertemporal choices. PMID:22973188

  12. Comment on "Symplectic integration of magnetic systems" by Stephen D. Webb [J. Comput. Phys. 270 (2014) 570-576

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuangxi; Jia, Yuesong; Sun, Qizhi

    2015-02-01

    Webb [1] proposed a method to get symplectic integrators of magnetic systems by Taylor expanding the discrete Euler-Lagrangian equations (DEL) which resulted from variational symplectic method by making the variation of the discrete action [2], and approximating the results to the order of O (h2), where h is the time step. And in that paper, Webb thought that the integrators obtained by that method are symplectic ones, especially, he treated Boris integrator (BI) as the symplectic one. However, we have questions about Webb's results. Theoretically the transformation of phase-space coordinates between two adjacent points induced by symplectic algorithm should conserve a symplectic 2-form [2-5]. As proved in Refs. [2,3], the transformations induced by the standard symplectic integrator derived from Hamilton and the variational symplectic integrator (VSI) [2,6] from Lagrangian should conserve a symplectic 2-forms. But the approximation of VSI to O (h2) obtained by that paper is hard to conserve a symplectic 2-form, contrary to the claim of [1]. In the next section, we will use BI as an example to support our point and will prove BI not to be a symplectic one but an integrator conserving discrete phase-space volume.

  13. 78 FR 49469 - Stephen Glen Guerra, Inmate #98595-279, FCI Yazoo City Medium, Federal Correctional Institution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Notices, the most recent being that of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699 (August 16, 2012)), has continued the... Correctional Institution, P.O. Box 5888, Yazoo City, MS 39194; Order Denying Export Privileges On February 6...-279, FCI Yazoo City Medium, Federal Correctional Institution, P.O. Box 5888, Yazoo City, MS 39194,...

  14. The iPod Experiments: Michael Stephens Investigates Ways that Librarians Are Using This Popular Consumer Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Michael

    2005-01-01

    No other consumer electronic device has created such an impact on popular culture in recent years as the Apple iPod. Since iPod's release in November 2001, music fans have been able to carry upwards of 15,000 song files on those sleek devices with their trendy white headphones. Over ten million iPods have been sold--nearly half of them in the last…

  15. Reaching the Next Stephen Hawking: Five Ways to Help Students with Disabilities in Advanced Placement Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Lori A.; Potts, Elizabeth A.; Linz, Ed

    2013-01-01

    As the federal government encourages all students to attempt advanced math and science courses, more students with disabilities are enrolling in Advanced Placement (AP) science classes. AP science teachers can better serve these students by understanding the various types of disabilities (whether physical, learning, emotional, or behavioral),

  16. Reaching the Next Stephen Hawking: Five Ways to Help Students with Disabilities in Advanced Placement Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Lori A.; Potts, Elizabeth A.; Linz, Ed

    2013-01-01

    As the federal government encourages all students to attempt advanced math and science courses, more students with disabilities are enrolling in Advanced Placement (AP) science classes. AP science teachers can better serve these students by understanding the various types of disabilities (whether physical, learning, emotional, or behavioral),…

  17. Development and evaluation of sequential sampling plans for Cryptolestes ferrungineus (Stephens) (Coleoptera: Cucujidae) infesting farm-stored wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development and evaluation of appropriate sampling plans are needed for cost-effective management of stored-product insects. Sequential sampling plans, which are based on a variable sample size, are generally more cost effective than plans based on a fixed sample size. For adults of the rusty gr...

  18. Evaluation of the Sho-Vel-Tum Alkali-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP) Oil Recovery Project - Stephens County, OK

    SciTech Connect

    French, Troy

    1999-08-16

    Le Norman Energy Company conducted research on field application of alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) flooding as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's plan to maximize the production of our domestic oil resources. In addition to having substantial technical merit, the process uses chemicals that are environmentally acceptable. Le Norman's field project is located in the Sho-Vel-Tum (OK) oil field, which was a major producer of crude oil in past years, but has since been extensively waterflooded. This reservoir in this portion of the field is typical of many shallow reservoirs in the Oklahoma-Kansas area and is a good demonstration site for that area. The pay zones are located approximately 700 ft. deep, and this project is the shallowest field test for ASP flooding.

  19. NIMH during the tenure of Director Lewis L. Judd, M.D. (1987-1990): the decade of the brain and the four national research plans.

    PubMed

    Judd, L L

    1998-09-01

    My tenure at NIMH was an exhilarating, heady time of great satisfaction and achievement for all of us at the Institute. I have great affection and loyalty for NIMH, but my fondest memories are of the individuals who led and staffed the Institute's programs while I was there. One of the most gratifying aspects of my tenure was the opportunity to recruit and appoint people to new responsibilities and to interact with and support them as they grew into and beyond their positions of leadership within NIMH. When I left NIMH, I felt that the Institute's managers and staff were unparalleled in their creativity, competence, commitment, loyalty, and sheer hard work on behalf of the Institute and our field. My thanks and deep gratitude genuinely go out to the entire staff at NIMH during my tenure. However, a special debt of gratitude is owed to a group of colleagues and friends who, at my request, carried very heavy responsibilities and excelled in meeting them: Dr. Alan Leshner (Deputy Director of NIMH, now Director of NIDA); Dr. Stephen Koslow, Dr. Stephen Paul, Dr. Jack "Jay" Burke, Dr. David Segal, Dr. Ira Glick, Dr. Ellen Stover, Dr. Irene Levine, Dr. Daryl Kirsch, Dr. Rex Cowdry, Dr. Sam Keith, Dr. Delores Paron, Leroy Goldman, Richard Pine, William Fitzsimmons, Gordon Seidenberg, Lewis Steinberg, Gemma Weiblinger, George Halter, and my invaluable assistant, Margaret Shanley. PMID:9736861

  20. Jay L. King, Joseph D. Huxman, and Orion D. Billeter Assist Pilot Milt Thompson into the M2-F2 Attac

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    NASA research pilot Milt Thompson is helped into the cockpit of the M2-F2 lifting body research aircraft at NASA's Flight Research Center (now the Dryden Flight Research Center). The M2-F2 is attached to a wing pylon under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership. The flight was a captive flight with the pilot on-board. Milt Thompson flew in the lifting body throughout the flight, but it was never dropped from the mothership. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet.. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  1. Equal Opportunity Programming and Optimistic Program Assessment: First-Year Writing Program Design and Assessment at John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Tim; McBeth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    As Brian Huot and Ellen E. Schendel assert, when assessment has more than validation in mind, it "can become a means for proactive change" (208). In response to this idea of assessment as an optimistic and opportunistic enterprise, this article describes how the structural design of our "equal opportunity" writing program and…

  2. Fenitrothion, an organophosphorous insecticide, impairs locomotory function and alters body temperatures in Sminthopsis macroura (Gould 1845) without reducing metabolic rates during running endurance and thermogenic performance tests.

    PubMed

    Story, Paul G; French, Kris; Astheimer, Lee B; Buttemer, William A

    2016-01-01

    Endemic Australian mammal species are exposed to pesticides used for locust control as they occupy the same habitat as the target insect. The authors examined the impact of an ultra-low volume formulation of the organophosphorous insecticide fenitrothion (O,O-dimethyl-O-[3-methyl-4-nitrophenol]-phosphorothioate) on a suite of physiological measures that affect the ability of animals to survive in free-living conditions: locomotory and thermogenic functions, metabolic performance, body mass, and hematocrit and hemoglobin levels. Plasma and brain cholinesterase activity in relation to time since exposure to pesticide were also determined. An orally applied dose of 90 mg kg(-1) fenitrothion reduced running endurance in the stripe-faced dunnart, Sminthopsis macroura, by 80% the day after exposure concomitantly with a reduction of approximately 50% in plasma and 45% in brain acetylcholinesterase activity. These adverse effects disappeared by 10 d postexposure. Maximal metabolic rates reached during running were unaffected by pesticide, as were body mass and hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Maximal cold-induced metabolic rate (measured as peak 2 min metabolic rate attained during cold exposure), time taken to reach peak metabolic rate on cold exposure, cumulative total oxygen consumed during shivering thermogenesis, and body temperature before and after cold exposure were unaffected by fenitrothion. Dunnart rectal temperatures showed a reduction of up to 5 °C after exposure to fenitrothion but returned to pre-exposure levels by 10 d postdose. Such physiological compromises in otherwise asymptomatic animals demonstrate the importance of considering performance-based measures in pesticide risk assessments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:152-162. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26184692

  3. Laboratory analysis of the habitat occupancy of the crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii (Gould) in an invaded ecosystem: The north-eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurkse, Kristiina; Kotta, Jonne; Orav-Kotta, Helen; Pärnoja, Merli; Kuprijanov, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    The Harris mud crab (Rhithropanopeus harrisii) arrived to the Baltic Sea in 1936. It was not until the late 2000es when the species considerably expanded its distribution area towards the northern Baltic Sea and formed a viable and expanding population. This introduction represents an appearance of a completely new function, as such larger epibenthic predators were previously missing from north-eastern Baltic Sea. In order to assess potential impacts of the crab to the invaded ecosystem, knowledge of the crab habitat preferences is required. This study experimentally evaluated the habitat occupancy of the Harris mud crab. The crab stayed more in vegetated boulders compared to unvegetated boulders or sandy habitats. There was an interactive effect between the presence of prey and crab population density with prey availability increasing the crab's affinity towards less favored habitats when population densities were low. Increased aggression between crab individuals increased their affinity towards otherwise less occupied habitats. Less favored habitats were typically inhabited by smaller individuals and presence of prey increased occupancy of some habitats for larger crabs. The experiment demonstrated that the crab may inhabit a large variety of habitats with stronger affinity towards boulder fields covered with the brown macroalga Fucus vesiculosus. This implies stronger impact of crab in such habitats in the invaded ecosystem.

  4. VARIATION IN GROWTH, LIPID CLASS AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF THE MUD CRAB, RHITHROPANOPEUS HARRISII (GOULD) DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO AN INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE ANALOG (FENOXYCARB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the effects of fenoxycarb?, an insect juvenile hormone analog, on larval growth, and lipid class and fatty acid composition in first crabs of the mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii reared through total larval development in nominal water concentrations from 1 ...

  5. Theory and operation of the Gould 32/27 programs ABLE-2A and EBLE for the tropospheric air motion measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1986-01-01

    Software development for the Trospheric Air Motion Measurement Systems (TAMMS) is documented. In July/August the TAMMS was flown on the NASA/Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft for 19 mission for the ABLE-2A (Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment) in Brazil. In December 1985, several flights were performed to assess the contamination and boundary layer of the Electra. Position data, flow angles, pressure transducer measurements were recorded. The programs written for the ABLE-2A were modified due to timing considerations for this particular program. The 3-step programs written for EBLE (Electra Boundary Layer Experiment) are described. Power up and log-on procedures are discussed. A few editing techniques are described for modification of the programs.

  6. Large-Scale Simulation of the Effects of Climate Change on Runoff Erosion Following Extreme Wildfire Events Authors: Gould, Adam, Warren, Barber, Wagenbrenner, Robichaud, Wang, Cherkauer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, G.; Adam, J. C.; Barber, M. E.; Wagenbrenner, J. W.; Robichaud, P. R.; Wang, L.; Cherkauer, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Across the western U.S., there is clear concern for increases in wildfire occurrence, severity, and post-fire runoff erosion due to projected climate changes. The aim of this study was to advance our capability to simulate post-fire runoff erosion at scales larger than a single hillslope to examine the relative contribution of sediment being released to larger streams and rivers in response to wildfire. We applied the Variable Capacity Infiltration-Water Erosion Prediction Project (VIC-WEPP), a newly-developed physically-based modeling framework that combines large-scale hydrology with hillslope-scale runoff erosion, over the Salmon River basin (SRB) in central Idaho. We selected the SRB for this study because of recent research that suggested that forest wildfires are likely contributing the majority of coarser sands that settle in downstream navigation channels and in reservoirs, causing adverse impacts to aquatic life, navigation, and flood storage. Using the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR), burn intensity and severity maps show the regularity of wildfire occurrence in the SRB. These maps compare pre-fire images to next growing season images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper multispectral scanning sensor. Rather than implementing WEPP over all hillslopes within the SRB, we applied a representative hillslope approach. A monofractal scaling method downscales globally available 30 arc second digital elevation model (DEM) data to a 30 m resolution for simulations. This information determined the distribution of slope gradients within each VIC grid cell. This study applied VIC-WEPP over the 1979-2010 period and compared an ensemble of future climate simulations for the period of 2041-2070. For future scenarios, we only considered meteorological impacts on post-fire erosion and did not incorporate changes in future fire occurrence or severity. We ran scenarios for a variety of land cover and soil parameter sets, particularly those that relate to pre and post-fire characteristics, such as vegetative cover, interrill and rill erodibility factors, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Evaluation of runoff erosion at experimental sites, observed by the U.S. Forest Service, involved using Disturbed WEPP which showed reasonable first post-fire year annual erosion predictions. We evaluated VIC-WEPP by comparing sediment observations downstream of the SRB with simulated yields for both pre and post-fire conditions. Generation of maps showing erosion over the SRB for each of the scenarios show specific areas within the SRB to be high, moderate, or low runoff-induced post-fire erosion regions. Our methodology will enable forest managers in the region to incorporate the impacts of changes in meteorological events on runoff erosion into their strategic management plans.

  7. RETROGRADE AXONAL TRANSPORT OF PHOSPHOINOSITIDES AFTER INTRANEURAL INJECTION OF [3H]MYO-INOSITOL INTO THE RAT SCIATIC NERVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although autoradiography has demonstrated local incorporation of [3H]inositol into axonal phospholipids after intraneural injection (Gould, 1976; Gould et at., 1987b), retrograde axonal transport of phosphatidylinositol has only been demonstrated after injection of lipid precurso...

  8. HAVE YOU READ THIS?: Life, the universe(s) and everything

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1998-09-01

    One of the consequences of belonging to a book club is the pressure it exerts to buy something from each monthly brochure. Paying later by credit card also seems, utterly illogically, less traumatic than forking out real money in a bookshop. So I get to read books that might otherwise pass me by, some of which I even finish reading. The book of the year (1997) for me was undoubtedly The Life of the Cosmos by Lee Smolin. Lee Smolin is a physics professor at Penn State University, and his expertise is in the rarefied field of quantum gravity, an entity that not everyone agrees exists. At the age of 65 going on 16 the first thing that revived my anarchic tendencies was his account of how he came to be a physicist. It all started by his being refused entry to the advanced math (as they say) class at high school, because his teachers thought he wasn't good enough. So he decided to learn maths on his own. One thing led to another, and maths led to architecture, which led to geodesic domes, tensors, Einstein and then a teenage decision to devote his life to physics so that he could sort out the problems of linking quantum theory and gravity. What else was there for a `failed rock-and-roll star' to do? By this time he had been refused entry to the physics class at high school (blame possibly a mixture of rock-and-roll and politics; after all, this was California) so he taught himself enough to get into university anyway. I can understand how some students prosper in spite of their teachers, but this is the only one I have heard of who did so just to spite them. But all this happens in the first few pages. What was really fascinating about the book - which should entrance any sixth-former - is Smolin's ideas in physics. In developing these he avoids all equations and gives us clear and well-written accounts of cosmology, the evolution of stars and the universe, string theory, relativity, quantum physics and gravity, and the `dream of unification'. His approach may be too philosophical for some (see the review by B Carr in Physics World 10 December 1997, p 39) but don't be put off by his adoration of Leibnitz compared, say, with Newton. He is strongly critical of a `mechanical' world view, and a major strand in the book is that physics may be more like biology than most of us might like to think. Smolin's key idea is that universes are created in black holes, a basis on which he builds a cosmology in which relationships are more important than abstract concepts like space and time. When a new universe forms from a black hole the laws and constants are changed: G, e, h and the critical things like the fine-structure constant that cosmic anthropicists put forward as evidence for a purposive universe get changed. Sometimes they change a lot, sometimes in ways too small to have much effect. A kind of Darwinian survival effect takes over: successful universes are good at producing black holes and mature stars that can build up the heavy elements which allow life to develop. So our values of G, e, h etc have evolved. The more black holes they produce, the more likely it is that some of the baby universes are reasonably successful. So our universe is not unique, but just one of a set that has cosmological and physical properties that allow people like us to develop. The improbably anthropic universe we live in is as improbable as an eye or a peacock's tail. Just as Stephen Jay Gould teaches us that life as we know it is not designed but the result of more or less simple rules applied in an accidental, contingent history, so Smolin considers the universe(s). Galaxies have ecologies: `... our life is situated inside a nested hierarchy of self-organized systems that begin with our local ecologies and extend upwards at least to the galaxy.' Our universe is really very young - not much older than a typical star. The theory has testable predictions, to do with the formation of spiral arms in galaxies, supernovae and the rate of production of black holes. What is yet to be shown is exactly what happens in a black hole to make the changes in constants and laws, which is where quantum gravity comes in. Some quotes:

    This distinction between an equation that one believes to be a true mirror of nature and a game whose rules capture some observed regularity is often expressed by making a distinction between a theory and a model. The notion of a theory carries with it... the mysticism of the desire to capture reality in symbolic expression. A model is just a game, meant to mimic some aspect of the world whose observed regularities can be posited in some simple rules. ... At present the great question in theoretical physics is whether the desire to invent a beautiful equation that will capture the whole world will in the end succeed. Will there be a final game, and will it be of the kind that Newton, Maxwell and Einstein played? Against this we have the possibility that many questions about the world might be answered by playing games more analogous to those played by biologists.
    From black hole theory - no fields:
    The existence of a bound on the amount of information that can be contained in a region of space opposes directly one of the basic principles of twentieth-century physics, which is that the world is made of fields.
    I must stress that I do not know why Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is true. Neither, as far as I have been able to tell, does anyone else.
    Buy or borrow, read, enjoy. Anticipate the problem of having to divert more often than usual the attentions of your students back to the syllabus, at least until the new IoP syllabus comes along (?). Smolin L 1997 The Life of the Cosmos (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson) ISBN 0 297 81727 2.

  9. Toxicity and sublethal effects of six insecticides to last instar larvae and adults of the biocontrol agents Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Garzón, A; Medina, P; Amor, F; Viñuela, E; Budia, F

    2015-08-01

    To further develop Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies against crop pests, it is important to evaluate the effects of insecticides on biological control agents. Therefore, we tested the toxicity and sublethal effects (fecundity and fertility) of flonicamid, flubendiamide, metaflumizone, spirotetramat, sulfoxaflor and deltamethrin on the natural enemies Chrysoperla carnea and Adalia bipunctata. The side effects of the active ingredients of the insecticides were evaluated with residual contact tests for the larvae and adults of these predators in the laboratory. Flonicamid, flubendiamide, metaflumizone and spirotetramat were innocuous to last instar larvae and adults of C. carnea and A. bipunctata. Sulfoxaflor was slightly toxic to adults of C. carnea and was highly toxic to the L4 larvae of A. bipunctata. For A. bipunctata, sulfoxaflor and deltamethrin were the most damaging compounds with a cumulative larval mortality of 100%. Deltamethrin was also the most toxic compound to larvae and adults of C. carnea. In accordance with the results obtained, the compounds flonicamid, flubendiamide, metaflumizone and spirotetramat might be incorporated into IPM programs in combination with these natural enemies for the control of particular greenhouse pests. Nevertheless, the use of sulfoxaflor and deltamethrin in IPM strategies should be taken into consideration when releasing either of these biological control agents, due to the toxic behavior observed under laboratory conditions. The need for developing sustainable approaches to combine the use of these insecticides and natural enemies within an IPM framework is discussed. PMID:25828251

  10. Discussion of "Aeration, flow instabilities, and residual energy on pooled stepped spillways of embankment dams" by Stephen Felder and Hubert Chanson

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams provide overtopping protection and address a common deficiency in aging dams by providing increased spillway capacity. Pooled-stepped spillways offer a design alternative to the traditional flat-stepped spillways. Researchers from the University of Quee...

  11. Wrongful death claims. Harriton v Stephens. [2002] NSWSC 461. Edwards v Blomeley. [2002] NSWSC 460. Waller v James [2002] NSWSC 462.

    PubMed

    Devereux, John

    2002-11-01

    Studdert J in all three cases went to great length to summarise the global judicial position of "wrongful life" claims. He did not, however, examine in great length how or whether "wrongful life" claims or "wrongful birth" claims are reconcilable with tort and common law principles. Although the cases identify the difficulty in assessing and quantifying damages, they do not directly address the strict legal principles which apply in the assessment of damages. The main conclusion of the three judgments was that no duty of care is owed to the plaintiff in these circumstances and, even if a duty could be established, the impossibility of quantifying damages and public policy considerations warrant the rejection of such a claim: "thus conscience does make cowards of us all." The significance of the decisions cannot be understand. The decisions deny recognition of "wrongful life" claims in circumstances where a disabled person has incurred injuries en ventre sa mere (in the mother's womb) as a result of infections contracted by a plaintiff's mother or genetic material passed on by a plaintiff's parents. Some countries have now legislated for the abolition of "wrongful life and birth" suits. In January 2002 the French legislature passed a Bill overturning the "wrongful life" decision of the Cour de Cassation in Perruche (17 November 2000). As the issue now falls for ultimate determination by the French Senate, the French pro-life movement continues to lobby for the prohibition of "wrongful birth" suits as well. Furthermore, eight States in the United States have prohibited either one or both actions and the State of Michigan prohibited both actions in 2001. It is likely that all three cases will be appealed. The appeal in Harriton will re-examine the viability of a "wrongful life" claim in Australia whereas the cases of Edwards and Waller still need to determine the "wrongful birth" claims brought by the plaintiffs' parents. It is likely that the latter two cases will not be determined until the High Court has considered the Queensland "wrongful birth" case of Melchior v Cattanach, expected to be late in 2002. PMID:12497731

  12. 78 FR 38313 - Kings River Conservation District; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... study the feasibility of the Gould Weir Hydroelectric Project, to be located on the Kings River, near... facilities immediately downstream of the existing Gould weir. The second option would include the installation of facilities in a bypass channel adjacent to Gould weir. Based on a reconnaissance-level study...

  13. Gout: Personal Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Detecting and Treating Gout Gout: Personal Stories Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of ... Jay Hobby Jay Hobby’s Tips for Taking on Gout Somewhere high over the Atlantic on a flight ...

  14. 76 FR 12751 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Receipt of Applications for Incidental Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ...; 52 FR 20715). The listing became effective July 6, 1987. The applicants propose to mitigate the... Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) (scrub- jay) breeding, feeding, and sheltering habitat... approximately 1.75 acres (0.71 hectares (ha)) of scrub-jay breeding, feeding, and sheltering habitat...

  15. 75 FR 4839 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, St. Lucie County, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ..., Florida. In 1987, we listed this species as threatened (June 3, 1987; 52 FR 20715). The listing became... of Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) (scrub-jay) breeding, feeding, and sheltering habitat... anticipates taking approximately 1 acre (0.4 hectares (ha)) of Florida scrub-jay breeding, feeding...

  16. VARIATION IN GROWTH, LIPID CLASS AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF THE MUD CRAB, RHITHROPANOPEUS HARRISII (GOULD) DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO AN INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE ANALOG (FENOXYCARB(R))

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the effects of fenoxycarb?, an insect juvenile hormone (JH) analog, on larval growth, and lipid class and fatty acid composition in first crabs of the mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii reared through total larval development in nominal water concentrations fr...

  17. COMMITTEES: LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Karsten Danzmann, AEI/University of Hannover Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Alberto Lobo (Chair), ICE-CSIC and IEEC Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Peter Bender, University of Colorado Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Neil Cornish, Montana State University Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Craig Hogan, University of Washington Scott Hughes, MIT Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Sterl Phinney, Caltech Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Kip Thorne, Caltech Roger Blandford, Stanford University Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Carlos F Sopuerta,ICE-CSIC and IEEC Enrique Garcia-Berro, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Jay Marx, LIGO Laboratory Stephen Merkowitz, NASA/Goddard Benoit Mours, Laboratoire d'Annec Gijs Nelemans, IMAPP, Nijmegen Enric Verdaguer, University of Barcelona Clifford M Will, Washington University, St Louis Local Organising Committee (LOC) Anna Bertolín (IEEC) Priscilla Cañizares (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Carlos F Sopuerta (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Ivan Lloro (ICE-CSIC and IEEC),Chair Alberto Lobo (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Nacho Mateos (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Pilar Montes (IEEC) Miquel Nofrarias (IEEC) Juan Ramos-Castro (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) Josep Sanjuán (IEEC)

  18. Asteroids to Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugger, Phyllis M.

    2004-12-01

    Asteroid dedication; William Liller: Biographical Sketch; William Liller: Autobiographical Meanderings; Preface; List of Participants; Conference Photo; Part I. 1. Solar System Astronomy: Asteroids Joseph Veverka; 2. Sixteen years of stellar occultations James Elliott; 3. Comets to Quasars: Surface photometry from standard stars and the morphology of the galaxy-quasar interface Peter Usher; 4. Observing Solar Eclipses Jay Pasachoff; Part II. 5. Planetary Nebulae: new insights and opportunities Lawrence Aller; 6. Studies of planetary nebulae at radio wavelengths Yervant Terzian; 7. Optical identifications of compact galactic X-ray sources: Liller Lore Jonathan Grindlay; 8. Ages of globular clusters derived from BVRI CCD photometry Gonzalo Alcaino; 9. Stellar spectrum synthesis Jun Jugaku; 10. Mass exchange and stellar abundance anomalies Benjamin Peery; Part III. Extragalactic Astronomy: 11. The M31 globular cluster system John Huchra; 12. Spiral structure and star formation in galaxies Debra Elmegreen; 13. The discovery of hot coronae around early type galaxies William Forman and Christine Jones; 14. The morphology of clusters of galaxies, the formation efficiency of galaxies and the origin of the intracluster medium Christine Jones and William Forman; 15. Testing models for the dynamical evolution of clusters of galaxies Phyllis Lugger; 16. What is in the X-ray sky? Rudolph Schild; 17. Einstein deep surveys Stephen Murray, Christine Jones and William Forman; Part IV. History, Lore and Archaeoastronomy: 18. Robert Wheeler Willson: His Life and Legacy Barbara Welther; 19. The great mnemonics contest Owen Gingerich; 20. Hetu'u Rapanui: The archaeoastronomy of Easter Island William Liller; Indexes; Names; Objects; Subjects.

  19. Creating a multi-gas proxy for Delta 14C and atmospheric fossil fuel-CO2. Kevin Coakley, John Miller , Scott Lehman, Stephen Montzka, Colm Sweeney, Arlyn Andrews , Ben Miller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, K. J.; Miller, J. B.; Lehman, S.; Montzka, S. A.; Andrews, A. E.; Miller, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    The C14:C12 ratio of atmospheric CO2 (expressed as Delta 14C) is the gold standard measurement to derive the portion of observed atmospheric CO2 gradients resulting from combustion of fossil fuels (CO2-ff). This is because fossil fuels are devoid of 14C, unlike all other sources and sinks that impact atmospheric Delta14C. With enough 14C measurements, independent, 'top-down', estimation of US fossil fuel-CO2 emissions should be possible. However, our ability to make carbon-14 measurements is severely constrained by cost, accessibility to accelerator mass spectrometers (AMS) and the volume of air required to make high precision (~0.2 %) measurements of 14CO2 (mixing ratio is ~ 4e-16 mol/mol). Thus, Delta 14C is currently measured in only a small subset of NOAA/ESRL Global Monitoring Division (GMD) tall-tower and aircraft air samples. Here, we present a Projection Pursuit Regression (PPR) model to predict CO2-ff measured at different times and altitudes in terms of surrogate gases that are more widespread and relatively inexpensive to measure. This method would, in effect, allow expansion of Delta 14C measurements by factor of ~3 or 4 throughout North America. To create a proxy for CO2-ff, we take advantage of the observed correlations between (Delta 14C-derrived) CO2-ff and regional-scale enhancements of a wide array of anthropogenic gases, like CO, SF6, and halo- and hydro-carbons. We select the complexity and form of the PPR model by cross validation where validation data prediction error is minimized. In cross validation, the prediction model is based on the training data and not the validation data. We quantify prediction model performance with test data excluded from the model development process. According to cross validation, the PPR model is superior to a simpler linear model. Comparison with test CO2-ff data shows that CO2-ff can be predicted with a root mean square error of 1.1 ppm, only slightly higher than the Delta 14C-precision limit for CO2-ff of 1 ppm. Applying the PPR model to the large NOAA/ESRL/GMD database of surrogate gases, we can create a large set of synthetic CO2-ff data for the US. Finally, we will discuss the application of this large data set of lower-precision CO2-ff to top down determination of US fossil fuel CO2 emissions by presenting results from an Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE).

  20. Pacific Northwest (U.S.) In: Conversion to Sustainable Agriculture: Principles, Processes, and Practices. Stephen R. Gliessman, Martha Rosemeyer, and Sean Swezey (Editors). CRC Press Advances in Agroecology Series

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture represents a critical land use throughout the Pacific Northwest (PNW). It makes important contributions to the region’s economy, the nation’s food supply and to regional ecosystem services including air, water, and soil quality. As in many other regions of the U.S., adverse environmental...

  1. Exercises for Keeping Pianists' Hands in Top Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Some pianists have idiosyncratic ways of keeping their hands and fingers relaxed. Glenn Gould, for example, religiously soaked his digits in hot water before performing or recording. While the jury is still out on the effectiveness of Gould's routine, there are plenty of other exercises and practices that will keep a pianist's fingers limber.…

  2. Pen and Paper vs. the Machine: Writers Composing in Hard Copy and Computer Conditions. CDC Technical Report No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Christina; Hayes, John R.

    A study was conducted to replicate partially John Gould's study using more advanced machines and editors, and to test several of Colette Daiute's hypotheses about writing with the computer. Gould's study indicated that expert writers using text editors required 50% more time to compose on text editors than on hard copy, and the extra time did not

  3. Pen and Paper vs. the Machine: Writers Composing in Hard Copy and Computer Conditions. CDC Technical Report No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Christina; Hayes, John R.

    A study was conducted to replicate partially John Gould's study using more advanced machines and editors, and to test several of Colette Daiute's hypotheses about writing with the computer. Gould's study indicated that expert writers using text editors required 50% more time to compose on text editors than on hard copy, and the extra time did not…

  4. 9. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, situation plan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, situation plan and profile on center line (June 12, 1937, original drawing on file in Structures Section, Utah Department of Transportation, Salt Lake City, Utah). SHEET NO. 1 OF 6 SHEETS. - Gould Wash Bridge, Spanning Gould Wash at State Route 9, Hurricane, Washington County, UT

  5. 14. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, reinforced rod ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, reinforced rod specifications (June 12, 1937, original drawing on file in Structures Section, Utah Department of Transportation, Salt Lake City, Utah). SHEET NO. 6 OF 6 SHEETS. - Gould Wash Bridge, Spanning Gould Wash at State Route 9, Hurricane, Washington County, UT

  6. 13. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, plans and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, plans and elevations (June 12, 1937, original drawing on file in Structures Section, Utah Department of Transportation, Salt Lake City, Utah). SHEET NO. 5 OF 6 SHEETS. - Gould Wash Bridge, Spanning Gould Wash at State Route 9, Hurricane, Washington County, UT

  7. 10. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, half plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, half plans and elevation (June 12, 1937, original drawing on file in Structures Section, Utah Department of Transportation, Salt Lake City, Utah). SHEET NO. 2 OF 6 SHEETS. - Gould Wash Bridge, Spanning Gould Wash at State Route 9, Hurricane, Washington County, UT

  8. 12. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, half plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, half plans and abutment elevation (June 12, 1937, original drawing on file in Structures Section, Utah Department of Transportation, Salt Lake City, Utah). SHEET NO. 4 OF 6 SHEETS. - Gould Wash Bridge, Spanning Gould Wash at State Route 9, Hurricane, Washington County, UT

  9. 11. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, half plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of photocopy of bridge drawing, half plans and footings (June 12, 1937, original drawing on file in Structures Section, Utah Department of Transportation, Salt Lake City, Utah). SHEET NO. 3 OF 6 SHEETS. - Gould Wash Bridge, Spanning Gould Wash at State Route 9, Hurricane, Washington County, UT

  10. 75 FR 34074 - Postal Pricing Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...: Stephen L. Sharfman, General Counsel, at stephen.sharfman@prc.gov or 202-789-6824. SUPPLEMENTARY... marginal discount. \\6\\ Direct Testimony of Stuart Elliott (COS-T-2) on Behalf of Capital One Services,...

  11. 76 FR 37142 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Incidental Take Permit Application; Proposed Low...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...; 52 FR 20715). The listing became effective July 6, 1987. The applicant proposes to mitigate for the... about 0.23 acre of Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) (scrub-jay) breeding, feeding, and... breeding, feeding, and sheltering habitat incidental to land preparation for construction of a...

  12. Weighing Photons Using Bathroom Scales: A Thought Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Jay Orear, in his introductory physics text, defined the weight of a person as the reading one gets when standing on a (properly calibrated) bathroom scale. Here we will use Jay's definition of weight in a thought experiment to measure the weight of a photon. The thought experiment uses the results of the Pound-Rebka-Snider experiments, Compton…

  13. Ozette, a remnant potato variety introduced by Spanish explorers to the Olympic Peninsula of Washington in the 1700’s

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jay Garner, Univ. of Idaho Extension Potato Specialist, obtained a tuber of Ozette (April of 1987) from a rancher on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington, not far from the Makah Indian Reservation. The Makah elders told Jay that Spanish explorers brought the potatoes to Neah Bay. The Spanish left t...

  14. Weighing Photons Using Bathroom Scales: A Thought Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Jay Orear, in his introductory physics text, defined the weight of a person as the reading one gets when standing on a (properly calibrated) bathroom scale. Here we will use Jay's definition of weight in a thought experiment to measure the weight of a photon. The thought experiment uses the results of the Pound-Rebka-Snider experiments, Compton

  15. 75 FR 25797 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; General Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... methods: 1. www.regulations.gov : Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments. 2. E-mail: bortzer.jay@epa.gov . 3. Fax: (312) 692-2054. 4. Mail: Jay Bortzer, Chief, Air Programs Branch (AR-18J), U...: Andy Chang, Environmental Engineer, Criteria Pollutant Section, Air Programs Branch (AR-18J),...

  16. From the Classroom to the Community: Exploring the Role of Education during Incarceration and Reentry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazzell, Diana; Crayton, Anna; Mukamal, Debbie A.; Solomon, Amy L.; Lindahl, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing the pressing need to explore the issues surrounding education, incarceration, and reentry, the Prisoner Reentry Institute at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Urban Institute hosted the Reentry Roundtable on Education on March 31 and April 1, 2008, at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. The two-day…

  17. Brain cholinesterase inhibition in songbirds from pecan groves sprayed with phosaline and disulfoton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Seginak, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Disulfoton at 0.83 kg/ha caused moderate to severe brain cholinesterase (ChE) depression in 11 of 15 blue jays collected in pecan groves 6-7 hr after the application. Phosalone at 0.83 kg/ha to pecan groves caused only slight ChE inhibition in a few blue jays and red-bellied woodpeckers.

  18. 78 FR 45260 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... properties identified in this Notice (i.e., acreage, floor plan, existing sanitary facilities, exact street... security Reasons: Secured Area Institutional Storage Facility 66220 Scrub Jay Rd. CCAFS FL 32925... Storage Facility 66221 Scrub Jay Rd. CCAFS FL 32925 Landholding Agency: NASA Property Number:...

  19. The Geologic Story of Arches National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Stanley William

    1975-01-01

    According to former Superintendent Bates Wilson (1956), Prof. Lawrence M. Gould, of the University of Michigan, was the first to recognize the geologic and scenic values of the Arches area in eastern Utah and to urge its creation as a national monument. Mrs. Faun McConkie Tanner told me that Professor Gould, who had done a thesis problem in the nearby La Sal Mountains, was first taken through the area by Marv Turnbow, third owner of Wolfe cabin. (See p. 12.) When Professor Gould went into ecstasy over the beautiful scenery, Turnbow replied, 'I didn't know there was anything unusual about it.'

  20. Letters in this Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    Reforming the General Chemistry Textbook individual letters by Edward T. Samulski; Stephen J. Hawkes; Stephen J. Fisher; J. Stephen Hartman; A. R. H. Cole; Stanley Pine, Ronald Archer, and Herbert Kaesz; Jimmy Reeves; Robert Hill; and Brock Spencer, C. Bradley Moore and Nedah Rose. Re: article by R. J. Gillespie The author replies

  1. 76 FR 56471 - Membership of the Senior Executive Service Standing Performance Review Boards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... TECHNOLOGY/CIO. MARTIN, STEPHEN K DEPUTY ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION... CHARGE, CHARLOTTE. HERKINS, STEPHEN C SPECIAL AGENT IN CHARGE, SAN FRANCISCO. HOOVER, WILLIAM J SPECIAL... DEPUTY DIRECTOR, TEDAC. RUBENSTEIN, STEPHEN R CHIEF COUNSEL. STOOP, THERESA R SPECIAL AGENT IN...

  2. SMITH FARM FROM COOK ROAD, LOOKING WEST. (The farm buildings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SMITH FARM FROM COOK ROAD, LOOKING WEST. (The farm buildings from left to right are: granary, garage, Gould house, and barn. The Olympic Mountains are visible in the distance.) - Smith Farm, 399 Ebey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  3. Temperate grass response to timing of grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing management has a significant impact on pasture growth. We determined how timing of grazing influences grass productivity, yield distribution, and persistence. Meadow fescue [Schedonorus pratensis (Huds.) P. Beauv.], orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), quackgrass [Elymus repens (L.) Gould...

  4. Temperate Perennial Grass Response to Defoliation Height and Interval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency and extent to which temperate perennial grasses are defoliated influences their productivity and persistence. Field-grown tillers of meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.), orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), common quackgrass [Elymus repens (L.) Gould], and reed canarygrass (Phala...

  5. Review of the dWind Model Conceptual Results

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, Ian; Gleason, Michael; Preus, Robert; Sigrin, Ben

    2015-09-16

    This presentation provides an overview of the dWind model, including its purpose, background, and current status. Baring-Gould presented this material as part of the September 2015 WINDExchange webinar.

  6. 53. DETAIL OF HONEYWELL PROPELLANT UTILIZATION TEST SET (RIGHT); ASSOCIATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. DETAIL OF HONEYWELL PROPELLANT UTILIZATION TEST SET (RIGHT); ASSOCIATED GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDER (LEFT) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  8. 76 FR 19127 - Notice of Lodging of Settlement Agreement Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... County, TN (O4RO); (15) Still Meadow Battery Superfund Site, Valrico, FL (O4A2); (16) Magic Marker/Gould...) Operating Industries Superfund Site, Monterey Park, CA (O958); (20) Hamburg Old Gas Station Superfund...

  9. 44. 'Submarine Torpedo Tube Foundation and Towers,' Y&D Drawing 226855, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. 'Submarine Torpedo Tube Foundation and Towers,' Y&D Drawing 226855, approved by Bureau of Ordnance. Dated 20 October 1943. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  10. 25. Aerial photograph dated 20 June 1942, showing north end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Aerial photograph dated 20 June 1942, showing north end of Gould Island from the northeast (caption on photo is in error). Shop and power plant under construction at left, firing pier under construction at far right. Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  11. 27. Aerial photograph dated 14 October 1943 taken directly over ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Aerial photograph dated 14 October 1943 taken directly over Gould Island. Completed complex shown at north end of the island (to right in photograph), including power plant, shop, frame approach, firing pier, and small harbor formed by finger pier off east side of firing pier. Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  12. Ring Around the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croswell, Ken

    2005-07-01

    Gould's Belt, the most prominent starry feature in the Sun's neighborhood, is a zone of large supergiant stars including the Orion constellation; the bright stars of Canis Major, the Southern Cross, Centaurus, and Lupus; and the brightest stars of the Pupis, Vela, and Carina constellations. Its most prominent feature is its 20-degree tilt to the plane of the Milky Way. Gould's Belt was first noticed in 1847 by Englishman John F. W. Herschel while observing from the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa. Later, Benjamin A. Gould, the first American to earn a doctoral degree in astronomy and the founder of The Astronomical Journal, traced the belt around the entire sky. More recent studies of Gould's Belt show evidence of more than just superstars. When massive stars like those in Gould's Belt explode, they leave behind pulsars and black holes. In the 1990's several dozen gamma-ray sources were discovered to track along the path of Gould's Belt around the sky, possible evidence of the explosion of brilliant stars at an earlier time. X-ray studies suggest that the belt may actually be a disk.

  13. Eavesdropping squirrels reduce their future value of food under the perceived presence of cache robbers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kenneth A; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2008-03-01

    Caching behavior frequently occurs within a social context that may include heterospecific cache pilferers. All else equal, the value of cacheable food should decline as the probability of cache recovering declines. We manipulated gray squirrels' (Sciurus carolinensis) estimate of the probability of cache recovery using experimental playbacks of the vocalizations of a potential cache robber, the blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata). We used giving-up densities (GUDs) to quantify relative changes in squirrels' valuation of cacheable and noncacheable foods. We collected GUDs during playback experiments to test whether squirrels (1) eavesdrop on vocalizations to detect jay presence, (2) devalue cacheable food in the (perceived) presence of jays (i.e., perceive jays as cache pilferers), and (3) are sensitive to distant effects (i.e., lower devaluation of cacheable food at sites far from the perceived location of jays). Consistent with our predictions, squirrels decreased the value of cacheable hazelnuts by two nuts, on average, during jay playbacks, but only at foraging stations near the jay playback sites. We conclude that through eavesdropping, squirrels assess site-specific risks of cache pilfering and alter their caching behavior to reduce the likelihood of pilferage. Evidence suggests that tree seed consumers in eastern deciduous forests exist within a complex communication network. PMID:18220481

  14. Comment on “Observations of ammonia, nitric acid, and fine particles in a rural gas production region” by Yi Li, Florian M. Schwandnera, H. James Sewell, Angela Zivkovich, Mark Tigges, Suresh Raja, Stephen Holcomb, John V. Molenar, Lincoln Sherman, Cassie Archuleta, Taehyoung Lee and Jeffrey L. Collett Jr. Atmospheric Environment (in press)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Gavin J.

    2014-05-01

    An artefact of the detection of nitric acid (HNO3) by denuder methods is discussed. This artefact arises from the likely reaction of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on the denuder train resulting in the report of some fraction of N2O5 as HNO3.

  15. Skeletal muscle gene expression after myostatin knockout in mature mice Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: S. Welle, Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave., Box 693, Rochester, NY 14642 (e-mail: stephen_welle@urmc.rochester.edu).

    PubMed Central

    Welle, Stephen; Cardillo, Andrew; Zanche, Michelle; Tawil, Rabi

    2009-01-01

    There is much interest in developing anti-myostatin agents to reverse or prevent muscle atrophy in adults, so it is important to characterize the effects of reducing myostatin activity after normal muscle development. For assessment of the effect of loss of myostatin signaling on gene expression in muscle, RNA from mice with postdevelopmental myostatin knockout was analyzed with oligonucleotide microarrays. Myostatin was undetectable in muscle within 2 wk after Cre recombinase activation in 4-month-old male mice with floxed myostatin genes. Three months after myostatin depletion, muscle mass had increased 26% (vs. 2% after induction of Cre activity in mice with normal myostatin genes), at which time the expression of several hundred genes differed in knockout and control mice at nominal P < 0.01. In contrast to previously reported effects of constitutive myostatin knockout, postdevelopmental knockout did not downregulate expression of genes encoding slow isoforms of contractile proteins or genes encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism. Several collagen genes were expressed at 20–50% lower levels in the myostatin-deficient muscles, which had ∼25% less collagen than normal muscles as reflected by hydroxyproline content. Most of the other genes affected by myostatin depletion have not been previously linked to myostatin signaling. Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that Smads are not the only transcription factors with reduced activity after myostatin depletion. These data reinforce other evidence that myostatin regulates collagen production in muscle and demonstrate that many of the previously reported effects of constitutive myostatin deficiency do not occur when myostatin is knocked out in mature muscles. PMID:19509079

  16. 75 FR 53958 - Meeting of the Board of Advisors to the Presidents of the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ...), notice is hereby given that the following meeting of the Board of Advisors (BOA) to the Presidents of the... BOA, contact Ms. Jaye Panza, Naval Postgraduate School, 1 University Circle, Monterey, CA...

  17. Immunology Faculty

    Cancer.gov

    Chair Restifo, Nicholas Steering Committee Ashwell, Jonathan Berzofsky, Jay Hodes, Richard Kidd, Geoff Linet, Martha Mackall, Crystal Oppenheim, Joost Pastan, Ira Rosenberg, Steven Schiller, John Schlom, Jeffrey Singer, Alfred Udey, Mark Wiltrout, Robert

  18. 78 FR 52965 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Receipt of Application for Incidental Take Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... anticipates taking about 1.49 acres of foraging, breeding, and sheltering habitat used by the Florida scrub... anticipates taking 1.49 acre of Florida scrub-jay breeding, feeding, and sheltering habitat for...

  19. West Branch Pennsylvania Canal, Lock No. 34 Lock Keeper's House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West Branch Pennsylvania Canal, Lock No. 34 Lock Keeper's House, South of State Route 664 along North bank of West Branch of Susquehanna River, 2,000 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  20. "The 'Effects' of Infant Day Care Reconsidered" Reconsidered: Risks for Parents, Children, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison

    1988-01-01

    Reviews Jay Belsky's "The 'Effects' of Infant Day Care Reconsidered," and offers a different conclusion: that the mother's attitudes toward the infant and toward her employment status may mediate day care effects on attachment and aggression. (SKC)

  1. 75 FR 8719 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisition of Shares of Bank or Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ..., Utah, and Steven Jay Lund, of Provo, Utah; to acquire voting shares of Community Bancorporation, Pleasant Grove, Utah, and thereby indirectly acquire voting shares of Western Community Bank, Orem,...

  2. J. Saunders Redding: A Case Study of the Black Intellectual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mootry, Maria K.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the debate between Jay Saunders Redding and Imamu Amiri Baraka regarding the role of Black Studies in American Studies. Intersperses excerpts from and analysis of Redding's work with an interview conducted with him in 1980. (GC)

  3. Vaccine Working Group

    Cancer.gov

    Chair Berzofsky, Jay Steering Committee Gress, Ronald Helman, Lee Mackall, Crystal Schlom, Jeffrey Trinchieri, Giorgio Yarchoan, Robert Members Barchi, Joseph Barrett, John Baseler, Michael Beetham, Patricia Berkower, Ira Boron, Matt Brown, Kevin Casadei,

  4. 76 FR 36612 - U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. The members of the Commission... Senate confirmation as of this writing: Anne Wedner of Illinois. Ms. Wedner will replace Mr. Jay...

  5. Explorations Precursor Robotic Missions (xPRM) - Duration: 44 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Jay Jenkins delivers a presentation from the Exploration Precursor Robotic Missions (xPRM) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose...

  6. Survey of leucocytozoon in in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Noblet, R; Moore, H S; Noblet, G P

    1976-01-01

    An extensive survey of birds for Leucocytozoon in South Carolina during the summer of 1972 revealed that Blue Jays, Purple Grackles and domestic chickens were commonly infected. No alternate hosts were found for Leucocytozoon smithi of turkeys. PMID:819913

  7. Special Section: Preventing, Detecting, and Treating Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... husband Jay Monahan first learned that he had colon cancer. Monahan died nine months after that, at age ... time, Couric has become a tireless advocate for colon cancer screening, early detection, and prevention to try to ...

  8. J. E. McPherson, educator and researcher extraordinaire: Biographical sketch and list of publications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biographical sketch of Dr. John E. (Jay) McPherson, emeritus professor at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, highlighting his teaching and research career is presented and a list of his 183 publications is provided....

  9. 76 FR 43691 - Unique Device Identification for Postmarket Surveillance and Enforcement; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ...-mail, and telephone number. For those without Internet access, please contact Jay Crowley (see Contact..., information about lodging, and other relevant information on the Internet at http://www.fda.gov/UDI . Comments... Sentinel Initiative, on the Internet at...

  10. 5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, INTERIOR CANAL WALL (Original Fabric) Bald ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, INTERIOR CANAL WALL (Original Fabric) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  11. 2. VIEW SOUTH, LOCK ENTRANCE Bald Eagle CrossCut Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, LOCK ENTRANCE - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  12. 17. DETAIL OF FRAGMENTS FROM WEST GATE (off site) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL OF FRAGMENTS FROM WEST GATE (off site) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  13. Endangered and Threatened Species at Kennedy Space Center Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galdolfi, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Throughout my internship, I assisted with the long-term monitoring of the Florida Scrub- Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a threatened species endemic to Florida. The Florida Scrub Jay diet consists of insects and small vertebrates throughout most of the year; however, during the winter their primary diet is acorns because the insect population is low. Furthermore, the Florida Scrub-Jay is a habitat specialist that lives in a disappearing plant community called the scrub, which consists of sand live oak, myrtle oak and chapman oak. The Florida Scrub-Jay is considered threatened because its numbers are decreasing primarily due to the loss of habitat that it needs to survive. Scrub habitat is highly desirable for human development because it is high, dry, and sandy. Periodic controlled burns maintain the scrub in a low, open condition favored by Scrub-Jays. Florida Scrub-Jays build their nests approximately 3-5 feet (approximately 1.5 m) above the ground in shrubby oaks (Breininger 153), mate for life and are cooperative breeders; which means that the young jays remain in their natal territory for at least a year to help their parents defend their territory, feed the young, and mob predators. (Breininger 152). I assisted in conducting monthly censuses at long-term monitoring sites and a juvenile in July survey to determine reproductive success for the year. In addition, to Scrub-Jay monitoring, I also had the opportunity to assist with some long term monitoring of ecosystem recovery. Scrub is a fire maintained system. Fire maintains the structure of scrub necessary for many of the threatened species that reside in the scrub habitat.

  14. 14. SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTHSOUTHEAST AT CABINETS CONTAINING HIGH VOLTAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST AT CABINETS CONTAINING HIGH VOLTAGE EQUIPMENT - Portland General Electric Company, Stephens Substation, 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  15. 77 FR 59185 - Notice of Administrative Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... (``Proposed Agreement'') associated with the Browning Lumber Company Superfund Site, Boone County, West... Agreement would resolve potential EPA claims under Section 107(a) of CERCLA, against Stephen C....

  16. TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER DERIVED FROM THE DESTRUCTION OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    May 15, 2002
    Abstract submitted by Stephen H. Gavett for American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) annual meeting October 7-11, 2002 in Charlotte, NC.

    TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER DERIVED FROM THE DESTRUCTION OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER
    Stephen H ...

  17. Rethinking Interventions To Combat Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhavnani, Reena

    This book arose as a result of the findings of the Stephen Lawrence murder inquiry, particularly the relationship to education and training about racism. Sir William Macpherson began his inquiry in 1998 following the racially motivated murder of Stephen Lawrence. The inquiry examined the causes of Lawrence's death, lessons to be learned from it,…

  18. 75 FR 51204 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To Remove the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... Stephens' kangaroo rat as endangered on September 30, 1988 (53 FR 38465). We published a draft recovery plan for the Stephens' kangaroo rat on June 23, 1997 (62 FR 33799; Service 1997, pp. 1-71), but it has... substantial information to indicate that the petitioned action may be warranted (69 FR 21567), and...

  19. Reply to Humphreys' and Parsons'"Piagetian Tasks Measure Intelligence and Intelligence Tests Assess Cognitive Development."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; Stephens, Beth

    1980-01-01

    Relationships among Piagetian reasoning assessments and standard measures of intelligence and achievement were determined in 1972 by Stephens, McLaughlin, Miller, and Glass (EJ 055 112). The data were reanalyzed by Humphreys and Parsons in 1979 (EJ 218 642). In reply, Glass and Stephens note fallacies in Humphreys' and Parsons' reasoning.…

  20. 77 FR 72873 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Adrianne Louise......... 07400 Miami. ] Smith Stephen J 23849 Miami. Burns Elizabeth A 22719 Milwaukee... Stephen 04716 Otay Mesa. Kramer John Wade 03516 Pembina. Kramer Mary Lee 07741 Pembina. Anderson Richard L.... Nichols Mary Lou 14039 Tampa. Madden John L 16629 Tampa. Elliott Julian E 15140 Tampa. Moritsugu Erika...

  1. Work Papers of the Summer Intitute of Linguistics, 1993. University of North Dakota Session, Volume 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Robert A., Ed.; Meyer, Jim, Ed.

    This volume of work papers from the Summer Institute of Linguistics includes the following: "Goals and Indirect Objects in Seri" (Stephen A. Marlett); "Seri Kinship Terminology" (Mary B. Moser and Stephen A. Marlett); "Quiegolani Zapotec Phonology" (Sue Regnier); "Role and Reference Grammar" (Robert D. Van Valin, Jr.); "The Binding Properties of…

  2. 77 FR 73457 - Nominations for Membership on the Ocean Research Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Navy Nominations for Membership on the Ocean Research Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of request for nominations. SUMMARY: The Ocean Research Advisory Panel... Stephen D. Martin, US Navy, at stephen.d.martin@navy.mil . Contact Information: Office of Naval...

  3. Effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on prolactin secretion in three species of passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Vleck, C M; Patrick, D J

    1999-01-01

    Previous work on domesticated species has indicated that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is an important prolactin-releasing factor in these birds, but no comparative work in passerine birds has been reported. This study showed that iv injections of VIP (50-100 microg/kg body mass) result in a dramatic, but transitory, rise in plasma prolactin in Mexican jays (Aphelocoma ultramarina). Significant increases in prolactin were also observed following VIP injection in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and zebra finches (Poephilla guttata). At the dosage we used, maximum levels of prolactin attained were slightly lower (Mexican jays) or very similar (blue jay and zebra finch) to the maximum prolactin levels observed in other, breeding birds of the same species. In zebra finches that initially had low prolactin, VIP injection resulted in a greater than 10-fold increase in prolactin within 10 min, but those individuals that already had elevated prolactin showed no further increase in response to VIP. Slow-release pellets of VIP implanted subcutaneously in Mexican jays and releasing 10 or 15 microg VIP/day (two or three pellets) produced a significant increase in plasma prolactin (78 and 92% rise, respectively) compared to birds with placebo pellets or with with one pellet releasing only 5 microg/day. PMID:9882553

  4. Fatal hemoprotozoal infections in multiple avian species in a zoological park.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Shannon T; Snowden, Karen; Marlar, Annajane B; Garner, Michael; Lung, Nancy P

    2007-06-01

    Over a 3-yr span, two juvenile lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor), two green jays (Cyanocorax yncas glaucescens), and two Montezuma oropendolas (Psarocolius montezuma) died peracutely with no premonitory signs at a zoological park in the southern United States. At necropsy, the birds were in excellent body condition. Except for one green jay, the coelomic cavities were filled with a dark serosanguineous fluid. Splenomegaly and hepatomegaly were present. The livers were tan to purple with numerous, randomly distributed red-to-black foci, ranging in size from 1 to 4 mm. The predominant histopathologic finding, except in one green jay, was large protozoal cysts in the hepatic parenchyma. Histologically, the protozoal cysts were restricted to the liver, and none were identified in the skeletal muscle, spleen, or other tissues. Frozen tissue samples harvested at necropsy had a nested polymerase chain reaction assay performed to amplify the mitochondrial cytochrome B gene of the protozoa. The amplified gene sequences were compared with reference cytochrome B gene sequences for avian Plasmodium spp., Haemoproteus spp., and Leucocytozoon spp. The protozoal parasite within the hepatic parenchyma from the Montezuma oropendolas and the lesser flamingos was identified as Haemoproteus spp. Both green jays had Plasmodium spp. isolated from the submitted tissue samples. The peracute nature of the infections precluded any successful medical intervention, making prevention by exclusion the principal means to control hemoprotozoal transmission. There are no reports in the literature documenting identified fatal hemoprotozoal infections in oropendolas, green jays, or lesser flamingos. PMID:17679516

  5. Campus and Capitol: Higher Education and the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, W. John, Ed.

    Seven papers and an extensive annotated bibliography deal with the relationship of State and Federal government to higher education. The authors and titles of the papers are (1) Samuel B. Gould, "The University and State Government: Fears and Realities," (2) Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr., "Maintaining Institutional Identity and Autonomy in Coordinated…

  6. Reliability of the Service Need Assessment Profile (SNAP): A Measure of Support for People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guscia, Roma; Harries, Julia; Kirby, Neil; Nettelbeck, Ted; Taplin, John

    2005-01-01

    Measures for estimating costs associated with the provision of disability services in Australia have not previously been available. Because such instruments are scarce worldwide, decisions about funding services have relied more on historical precedent and less on individual need. Recognising the necessity for an objective measure, Gould (1998)

  7. Notice of release of 'Bannock II' thickspike wheatgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) announces the cultivar release of 'Bannock II' thickspike wheatgrass [Elymus lanceolatus (Scribn. & J.G. Sm.) Gould]. 'Bannock II', a five clone synthetic, is the result of hybridization among selected genotypes from thickspike wheatgrass cultivars 'Bann...

  8. Adult Development: Implications for Adult Education. Overview. ERIC Digest No. 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michele

    Various researchers, including Carl Jung, Charlotte Buhler, Erik Erikson, and Robert Havighurst, have formulated sequential models of adult development. More recent investigators, such as Daniel Levinson, Roger Gould, and Gail Sheehy have formulated age-related sequential models of adult development that view the various stages of adulthood in…

  9. Tapping Timbers: A Barn Rises from the Hands of Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    Gould Farm, the oldest therapeutic community in the United States, uses the rural farming lifestyle and a multigenerational community to serve adults with psychiatric disabilities. The Timber Framers Guild helped raise a barn there as one of its community service projects. The barn will be used to enhance the farm's food processing and vocational…

  10. In and Out 101 Activities to Enrich the Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Patricia; And Others

    Activities developed and used with children and adults participating in the program offerings of the Edwin Gould Outdoor Education Centers are presented. Information describing most activities includes name, description of the activity, objectives, supervision or help required, procedures, time involved, size of area required, materials,…

  11. In and Out 101 Activities to Enrich the Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Patricia; And Others

    Activities developed and used with children and adults participating in the program offerings of the Edwin Gould Outdoor Education Centers are presented. Information describing most activities includes name, description of the activity, objectives, supervision or help required, procedures, time involved, size of area required, materials,

  12. The effects of a winter cover crop on Diabrotica Virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) populations and beneficial arthropod communities in no-till maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of an autumn-planted, spring-killed, grass cover crop (Elymus trachycaulus [Link] Gould ex Shinners) on populations of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte and its predator community were evaluated in South Dakota maize fields over two seasons. Abundance, size, and sex ratio of D. virg...

  13. 78 FR 55737 - Notice of Service Delivery Area Designation for the Tejon Indian Tribe

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... in the Federal Register (FR). ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed to Ms. Betty Gould, Regulations... of SDAs in the June 21, 2007 FR Notice (72 FR 34262-01). The SDAs function as CHSDAs for the purposes... the Tribal governing body, the SDA for the Tribe was agreed upon. The purpose of this FR Notice is...

  14. Beyond the Four Walls: Teacher Professionalism in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Diane

    In the spring of 1986 the United Federation of Teachers and the Edwin Gould Foundation for Children embarked on a six-month study, visiting schools and talking with staff about what comprises and influences teacher professionalism. This booklet presents nine case studies that illustrate teacher professionalism in actual New York City public school…

  15. 78 FR 14834 - Major Portion Prices and Due Date for Additional Royalty Payments on Indian Gas Production in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... Office of Natural Resources Revenue Major Portion Prices and Due Date for Additional Royalty Payments on... Secretary, Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR), Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Final regulations.... Gregory J. Gould, Director, Office of Natural Resources Revenue. BILLING CODE 4310-T2-P...

  16. Ramsey patterns for multiquantum transitions in fountain experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McColm, D.

    1996-12-01

    Ramsey patterns for radio-frequency multiquantum transitions among Zeeman levels of the ground state of thallium, cesium, and francium have been calculated. The narrowing of these patterns observed earlier by Gould is predicted to occur only when both static electric and magnetic fields are present. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. The Scientific Method: Is It Still Useful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Scott B.; James, Linda

    2004-01-01

    While the scientific method is a logical, orderly way to solve a problem or answer a question, it is not a magical formula that is too complicated for nonscientists to comprehend (Keeton and Gould 1986). The scientific method may include a variety of steps, processes, and definitions. It should not be seen as a single series of steps, with no…

  18. Resident Program Guide: Hillside Outdoor Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Bonnie

    Founded in 1972 as part of the private, non-profit Edwin Gould Outdoor Education Centers, the Hillside Outdoor Education Center offers services to various educational groups by providing residential experiences for students and faculty, day-visit programs, school-site outdoor education programs, teacher workshops, college courses in outdoor…

  19. Resident Program Guide: Hillside Outdoor Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Bonnie

    Founded in 1972 as part of the private, non-profit Edwin Gould Outdoor Education Centers, the Hillside Outdoor Education Center offers services to various educational groups by providing residential experiences for students and faculty, day-visit programs, school-site outdoor education programs, teacher workshops, college courses in outdoor

  20. Wind Energy Workforce Development: A Roadmap to a Wind Energy Educational Infrastructure (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2011-05-01

    Wind Powering America national technical director Ian Baring-Gould made this presentation about workforce development in the wind energy industry to an audience at the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference in Anaheim. The presentation outlines job projections from the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report and steps to take at all levels of educational institutions to meet those projections.

  1. Some Recent Russian Pedagogical Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunatov, Rasio

    1975-01-01

    The article discusses three Russian language textbooks for speakers of English which represent a new trend in Russian pedagogical materials, that of minicourses for specialists in specific disciplines. The three textbooks are: S. H. Gould, "Russian for Mathematicians" (New York, 1972), G. P. M. Walker, "Russian for Librarians" (London, 1973), and…

  2. Surgical approach for combined ankle and subtalar joint chronic mechanical instability.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kyle S; Catanzariti, Alan R; Mendicino, Michael R; Mendicino, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Combined ankle and subtalar joint instability can lead to severe disability of the lower extremity. Multiple procedures have been described for hindfoot and ankle instability, including anatomic and non-anatomic reconstructions. The authors present their technique consisting of a free autogenous split peroneus longus tendon graft combined with a modified Brostrom-Gould repair. PMID:23499457

  3. How Research Helped Us to Move from Awareness to Action and Then to Systems Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Patricia; Grant, Jim

    2004-01-01

    How can an organisation move from awareness raising, in the form of natural history poster production, to the development of systems that change organisations? Through close integration of research and practice, the Gould League has achieved this transformation. It began with extensive research into best practice environmental education, going…

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM A DUAL CATALYST EQUIPPED VEHICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test program was initiated to characterize exhaust gas emissions from an automobile equipped with a dual catalyst system. The dual catalyst system was designed by Gould, Inc. to reduce emissions of engine exhaust hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides. It basically ...

  5. Registration of 'FirstStrike' Slender Wheatgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'FirstStrike' slender wheatgrass [Elymus trachycaulus (Link) Gould ex Shinners] was developed by a research team at the USDA-ARS-Forage and Range Research Laboratory and collaborators at the United States Army - Engineer Research and Development Center and was released on 16 October 2006. FirstStri...

  6. How Research Helped Us to Move from Awareness to Action and Then to Systems Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Patricia; Grant, Jim

    2004-01-01

    How can an organisation move from awareness raising, in the form of natural history poster production, to the development of systems that change organisations? Through close integration of research and practice, the Gould League has achieved this transformation. It began with extensive research into best practice environmental education, going

  7. Positioning Faculty Support as a Strategy in Assuring Quality Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hong; Gould, Lawrence V.; King, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of online programs and courses at Fort Hays State University (FHSU), the university has faced the challenge of supporting faculty members as they transition to online teaching. Hong Wang, Lawrence V. Gould, and Dennis King share the comprehensive approach the university has developed, an approach that depends on effective…

  8. The Scientific Method: Is It Still Useful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Scott B.; James, Linda

    2004-01-01

    While the scientific method is a logical, orderly way to solve a problem or answer a question, it is not a magical formula that is too complicated for nonscientists to comprehend (Keeton and Gould 1986). The scientific method may include a variety of steps, processes, and definitions. It should not be seen as a single series of steps, with no

  9. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF GRANARY SHOWING ADDITION, LOOKING NORTH. (When the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF GRANARY SHOWING ADDITION, LOOKING NORTH. (When the granary was adapted into a family home, an addition was added onto the west faade. The Gould house is visible in the distance, at the left.) - Smith Farm, Granary, 399 Ebey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  10. 54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET (LEFT) AND ASSOCIATED GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS (RIGHT). ELAPSED TIME COUNTER SITS ATOP AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. 15. Interior firstlevel view looking north within rear section of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior first-level view looking north within rear section of firing pier. Debris includes a junked torpedo firing tube mounted on a dolly. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  12. 19. Interior first level view looking north within forward (north) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Interior first level view looking north within forward (north) section of firing pier. Objects pictured include torpedo cart (left), floor-mounted roller tray (extending to lower right), and (at center rear), deck-type firing tube. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  13. Lonely Courage, Commemorative Confrontation, and Communal Therapy: William James Remembers the Massachusetts 54th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stob, Paul

    2012-01-01

    On May 31, 1897, William James, one of America's most influential philosophers and psychologists, delivered the first civic oration of his career. The principal orator at the dedication of the Robert Gould Shaw memorial in Boston, James did what commemorative speakers are not supposed to do. He chose to be confrontational and divisive in a…

  14. Ezra Pound and Chinese Poetics: Teaching Anglo-American Imagist Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, Whitney C.

    The Anglo-American Imagist movement, begun in England by Ezra Pound in 1909 and flourishing through 1918, claimed to have drawn inspiration from Chinese and Japanese poetic forms. The promoters of Imagism, which included Hilda Doolittle, John Gould Fletcher, Richard Aldington, and later, Amy Lowell and William Carlos Williams, were attempting to…

  15. Repetitive Behaviour and Play in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honey, Emma; Leekam, Sue; Turner, Michelle; McConachie, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The view of a triad of impairments [(Wing and Gould (1979). "Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 9," 11-30] in which impaired imagination is linked with repetitive behaviour is widely accepted. However this categorisation differs from the international classification systems, which link imagination to communication impairments rather…

  16. The Green Bank Ammonia Survey: Initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Friesen, Rachel; and the GBT Ammonia Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    The past several years have seen a tremendous advancement in our ability to characterize the structure of nearby molecular clouds and the substructures in which dense star-forming cores are born. These advances include identifying and classifying the young protostellar population (Spitzer c2d and Gould Belt surveys) and the dense cores and larger filaments and clumps which form the cores and YSOs (Herschel and JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Surveys). The power of these legacy surveys lies in the large areal coverage and consistency in observing strategies between nearby molecular clouds. A major gap in the present data is a comparable survey to characterize the dense gas properties. Kinematics and gas temperatures are key to understanding the history and future fate of star-forming material, and these are not accessible from the primarily continuum-based measurements in the legacy surveys described above. We have begun an ambitious legacy survey for the GBT, the Green Bank Ammonia Survey (GAS), to map NH3 emission toward all the northern Gould Belt star forming regions where Av > 7. The Gould Belt is a ring of young stars and star-forming regions that contains nearly all the ongoing, predominantly low-mass star formation within 500 pc of the Sun. Here we present the initial results from the survey.

  17. Quality of Life for the Camberwell Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadle-Brown, Julie; Murphy, Glynis; DiTerlizzi, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite the acknowledged difficulties of measuring satisfaction for people with intellectual disabilities, the current study examined the quality of life (QoL) of the Camberwell Cohort, a total population sample of people with severe intellectual disability and/or autism [Wing & Gould, "Epidemiology and Classification," 9, 1979, 11].…

  18. The Camberwell Cohort 25 Years On: Characteristics and Changes in Skills over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadle-Brown, Julie; Murphy, Glynis; Wing, Lorna

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study presents data on the characteristics of the Camberwell Cohort, 25 years after they were first assessed in the 1970s [Wing & Gould (1979) "Journal of Autism and Childhood Schizophrenia" vol. 9, pp. 11-29]. It also presents data on changes over time which adds to that presented in Beadle-Brown et al. ["Journal of Intellectual…

  19. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Regulators Workshop: Lessons from Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian

    2015-09-03

    Ian Baring-Gould presented these lessons learned from wind energy to an audience of marine hydrokinetic regulators. Lessons learned spanned the areas of technology advances, using collaborative approaches to involve key stakeholders; using baseline studies to measure and prioritize wildlife impacts, and look at avoidance and mitigation options early in the process.

  20. Reliability of the Service Need Assessment Profile (SNAP): A Measure of Support for People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guscia, Roma; Harries, Julia; Kirby, Neil; Nettelbeck, Ted; Taplin, John

    2005-01-01

    Measures for estimating costs associated with the provision of disability services in Australia have not previously been available. Because such instruments are scarce worldwide, decisions about funding services have relied more on historical precedent and less on individual need. Recognising the necessity for an objective measure, Gould (1998)…