Sample records for stephen jay gould

  1. Directed Evolution of the Promiscuous Esterase Activity of Carbonic Anhydrase II Stephen McQ. Gould and Dan S. Tawfik*

    E-print Network

    Tawfik, Dan S.

    Directed Evolution of the Promiscuous Esterase Activity of Carbonic Anhydrase II Stephen McQ. Gould activity of an existing enzyme can confer an evolutionary advantage by providing an immediate response to examine how this process might take place. Human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) is an enzyme that evolved

  2. Pinyon Jay

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Pinyon jays coevolved as non-migratory mutualists with pinyon pines. Jays disperse the large wingless seed of pinyon pines over long distances, which can result in relatively rapid colonization. At the same time, the jays obtain energy and nutrients from the seeds. Although closely associated with...

  3. Bluefield Blue Jays Internships

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Bluefield Blue Jays Internships General Internship Start Date: Mid May 2014 JOB DESCRIPTION: The Bluefield Blue Jays, Appalachian League Affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays is looking for an individual: #12;The Bluefield Blue Jays, Appalachian League Affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays is looking

  4. Jay B. Nash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jable, J. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Jay B. Nash's accomplishments and professional service have long been recognized by physical educators. This article examines the major forces and events that made him one of the most important leaders in American physical education. (MT)

  5. Curriculum Vit LAURENTOLIVIER JAY

    E-print Network

    Jay, Laurent O.

    of Mathematics, Lund University, Sweden. #12; Laurent­Olivier Jay, April 2002 2 . Visiting Post­Doctoral Fellow Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. . Visiting Post­Doctoral Fellow, March­April 1998, Department of Mathematics, University of Geneva, Switzerland. . Post­Doctoral Associate, February 1997

  6. Curriculum Vit Laurent O. JAY

    E-print Network

    Jay, Laurent O.

    in Computer Science, 1990. · B.Sc. degree in Computer Science, 1989. Research topics and main interests. Math., Vol. 111, pp. 63-76, 1999. · L.O. Jay, H. Kim, Y. Saad, and J. Chelikowski: Electronic structure, 1997. #12;· L.R. Petzold, J.B. Rosen, P.E. Gill, L.O. Jay, and K. Park: Numerical optimal control

  7. The Role of Linear Objective Functions in Barrier Methods \\Lambda Stephen Wright y and Florian Jarre z

    E-print Network

    Wright, Steve

    The Role of Linear Objective Functions in Barrier Methods \\Lambda Stephen Wright y and Florian. We are particularly interested in the case of linear f , that is, f(x) = g T x: (2) The logarithmic; ¯+ ). Unfortunately, as shown in Conn, Gould, and Toint [1] and Wright [6] for example, the Newton direction may

  8. “Anting” in Blue Jays

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Thomas; Aneshansley, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Summary Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines), is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants. Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is a strategy by which birds render ants fit for ingestion. Formicine ants are ordinarily protected by their formic acid-containing spray. Being wiped into the bird’s plumage causes them to discharge that spray, without harm to the bird, to the point of almost total emptying of the glandular sac in which the secretion is stored. The ants are therefore essentially secretion-free by the time they are swallowed. Further evidence indicates that it is the ant’s possession of the acid sac that triggers the anting behavior in the bird. If F. exsectoides are surgically deprived of their acid sac, they are eaten by the birds without first being subjected to anting. Data are also presented indicating that the ant’s crop, which is especially capacious in formicines (its contents may amount to over 30% of the formicine’s mass), and which appears to survive the anting procedure intact, constitutes, at least when laden, a valuable component of the trophic package that the bird accesses by anting. PMID:19169379

  9. Animal behaviour Eurasian jays (Garrulus

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    * Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK *Author for correspondence (nsc22@cam.ac.uk). Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) have been shown to overcome present, despite experiencing a conflicting current motivation. We argue that these data address the criticisms

  10. 24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island from the northeast. Complex under construction includes shop building (large rectangle at north end of island, and firing pier (at far right). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  11. Variation of Western Scrub-Jay and Mexican Jay (Corvidae) vocalizations in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Coldren, Mary Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    I recorded vocalizations of allopatric populations of Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica texana and A. c. woodhouseii) and Mexican Jays (A. ultramarine couchii) at eight sites in Texas. While many call types were inconsistent in structure...

  12. Adaptive Geographic Variation in Western Scrub-Jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth Bardwell; Craig W. Benkman; William R. Gould

    2001-01-01

    Bill size and shape of Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) vary geographically in relation to habitat. Scrub-jays occupying pinyon-juniper woodlands (''pine'' scrub-jays) have relatively long, shallow bills, while scrub-jays occupying oak woodlands (''oak'' scrub-jays) have relatively stout, decurved bills. We captured five pine and five oak scrub-jays, and submitted them to feeding trials on pinyon pine (Pinus mon- ophylla) cones and

  13. Stephen Giovannoni

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The site features a research profile of Stephen Giovannoni, Professor of Microbiology and Director of the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program at Oregon State University. Giovannoni's research focuses on discovering new organisms in oceans, alpine lakes, and the oceanic lithosphere with long-term goals of understanding the cellular adaptations and ecology of prokaryotes in nature by focusing on species that are abundant and important in biogeochemical cycles. The site provides research descriptions, a list of selected publications, and links to Giovannoni's laboratory home page, Oregon State University, the Microbiology Department, the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, and the home page and index of faculty for the Center for Gene Research and Biotechnology.

  14. Florida Scrub Jay mortality on roadsides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Breininger, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Brevard County, Florida supports two of the three largest remaining Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens) populations, with about 1870 birds on Kennedy Space Center and 920 birds on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Breininger 1989). Between 24 may and 5 June 1989, four Scrub Jay carcasses were collected on two roadsides in Brevard County apparently killed by vehicles.

  15. From weird wonders to stem lineages: the second reclassification of the Burgess Shale fauna

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keynyn Brysse

    2008-01-01

    The Burgess Shale, a set of fossil beds containing the exquisitely preserved remains of marine invertebrate organisms from shortly after the Cambrian explosion, was discovered in 1909, and first brought to widespread popular attention by Stephen Jay Gould in his 1989 bestseller Wonderful life: The Burgess Shale and the nature of history. Gould contrasted the initial interpretation of these fossils,

  16. 29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing pier (still possessing third and fourth levels) in foreground. Pitched roof extending from south end of firing pier marks location of frame approach between pier and shop building (center rear) and power plant (to right of shop). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  17. Stephen Hawking Quantum Gravity

    E-print Network

    Visser, Matt

    Stephen Hawking and Quantum Gravity Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint Louis USA Science Saturdays 4 Nov 2000 #12; Stephen Hawking and Quantum Gravity Abstract: Through research, Stephen Hawking has captured a place in the popular imagina- tion. Quantum gravity in its various

  18. AUDIBILITY THRESHOLDS OF THE BLUE JAY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEVEN M. COHEN; WILLIAM C. STEBBINS; DAVID B. MOODY

    1978-01-01

    The audibility thresholds of two Blue Jays were measured behaviorally using operant conditioning and psychophysical techniques. The jays responded to pure tones between 0.25 and 10 kHz. Their thresholds are similar to those reported for seven other passerines. This indicates that passerines are somewhat less sensitive than man in the detection of sounds in the 1 to 4 kHz range

  19. Large-Scale Knowledge Graph Identification using PSL Jay Pujara jay@cs.umd.edu

    E-print Network

    Getoor, Lise

    Large-Scale Knowledge Graph Identification using PSL Jay Pujara jay@cs.umd.edu Hui Miao hui, PA 15213 Abstract Building a web-scale knowledge graph, which captures information about entities noise and infer missing information in the knowledge graph, we propose knowledge graph identification

  20. Effects of weevil larvae on acorn use by blue jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Dixon; W. Carter Johnson; Curtis S. Adkisson

    1997-01-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta \\u000a cristata L.) are important consumers and dispersers of the nuts of oaks and other fagaceous trees in eastern North America. Acorns\\u000a compose much of the jay diet, especially during the autumn when jays may consume or cache a significant portion of an acorn\\u000a crop. However, jays do not appear to possess physiological adaptations for countering the protein-binding

  1. 50 CFR 21.46 - Depredation order for depredating scrub jays and Steller's jays in Washington and Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Washington and Oregon may, without a permit, take scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens ) and Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri ) when found committing or about to commit serious depredations to nut crops on the premises owned or...

  2. 50 CFR 21.46 - Depredation order for depredating scrub jays and Steller's jays in Washington and Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Washington and Oregon may, without a permit, take scrub jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens ) and Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri ) when found committing or about to commit serious depredations to nut crops on the premises owned or...

  3. UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN 20052007 John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    and requirements of the University and its constituent colleges without notice. Tuition and fees set forthUNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN 20052007 John Jay College of Criminal Justice THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW of the John Jay College Undergraduate Bulletin, please click on "Academics" at the John Jay College web site

  4. NESTING FISH CROWS ADOPT A FLEDGLING BLUE JAY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A fledgling Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) appeared in a Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus) nest containing young nestlings. The jay was fed by both adult crows for 12 d before it disappeared, representing only the second recorded instance of interspecific feeding by a member of the family Corvidae. The jay probably entered the nest on its own after fledging from a

  5. tephen Jay Gould, l'un des grands palon-tologues et biologistes de l'volution du

    E-print Network

    Marden, James

    locomotion des animaux: qu'ils nagent, courent ou volent, il est possible de dégager des lois quantitatives communes aux différents modes de locomotion et indépendantes de l'espèce considérée. Qui plus est, ces lois. Les principaux modes de locomotion que sont la course, la nage et le vol diffèrent par nombre de

  6. F. Jay Breidt Colorado State University

    E-print Network

    model Our idea: nonparametric model-assisted prediction from kernel regression or other "smoother" #12F. Jay Breidt Colorado State University Jean D. Opsomer Iowa State University Local Inferences via Nonparametric Model-Assisted Methods #12;FUNDING SOURCE This presentation was developed under the STAR Research

  7. The three faces of Jay S. Rosenblatt.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Alison S

    2007-01-01

    This essay provides an account of the development of Jay S. Rosenblatt's approach and contributions to the study of maternal behavior and the mother-young relationship, focusing on the role in that development of his life as painter, analyst, and scientist. It is personal perspective. PMID:17186510

  8. Knowledge Graph Identification Jay Pujara1

    E-print Network

    Getoor, Lise

    Knowledge Graph Identification Jay Pujara1 , Hui Miao1 , Lise Getoor1 , and William Cohen2 1 Dept into a knowledge graph. The ex- tractions form an extraction graph and we refer to the task of removing noise graph as knowledge graph identification. In order to perform this task, we must reason jointly about

  9. The Hopeful Traveler Jay Bryan Nash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup, Harvey M., Comp.

    This book is one of a series of publications preserving the best writing and speeches of outstanding leaders of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. Jay Bryan Nash was one of the founders of the Alliance. The speeches and essays by Nash in this collection are, for the most part, appearing in published form…

  10. POPULATION DYNAMICS OF BLUE JAYS AT A BIRD FEEDER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARGARET B. HICKEY; MARGARET CLARK BRITTINGHAM

    1991-01-01

    &sraxr.-Hickey color banded and monitored 2373 Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) from 1953 until 1976 at her bird-feeder in Madison, Wisconsin. The mean annual survival rate of Blue Jays calculated from reobservation and recapture data by the Jolly-Seber method was 0.54. The annual survival rates ofjuvenile and adult jays calculated from band returns by the life table approach were 0.45 and

  11. Retrospective Cognition by Food-Caching Western Scrub-Jays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Kort, S.R.; Dickinson, A.; Clayton, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    Episodic-like memory, the retrospective component of cognitive time travel in animals, needs to fulfil three criteria to meet the behavioral properties of episodic memory as defined for humans. Here, we review results obtained with the cache-recovery paradigm with western scrub-jays and conclude that they fulfil these three criteria. The jays…

  12. Visual Detection of Cryptic Prey by Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Pietrewicz, A T; Kamil, A C

    1977-02-11

    Blue jays learned to respond differentially to the presence or absence of Catocala moths in slides. This detection of the moths by the jays was affected by the background upon which the moth was placed and its body orientation, thus providing an objective measure of crypticity. These procedures are useful for the study of visual detection of prey. PMID:17732294

  13. Visual Detection of Cryptic Prey by Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra T. Pietrewicz; Alan C. Kamil

    1977-01-01

    Blue jays learned to respond differentially to the presence or absence of Catocala moths in slides. This detection of the moths by the jays was affected by the background upon which the moth was placed and its body orientation, thus providing an objective measure of crypticity. These procedures are useful for the study of visual detection of prey.

  14. Acorn dispersal by the blue jay ( Cyanocitta cristata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Darley-Hill; W. Carter Johnson

    1981-01-01

    Blue jays transported and cached 133,000 acorns from a stand of Quercus palustris trees in Blacksburg, Virginia, representing 54% of the total mast crop. A further 20% (49,000) of the mast crop was eaten by jays at the collecting site. A large proportion of the nuts remaining beneath the collecting trees was parasitized by curculionid larvae. The number of nuts

  15. Losing Jay: A Meditation on Teaching while Grieving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Blaise Astra

    2009-01-01

    The author's partner Jay died on May 23, 2006. It was sudden and unexpected--he was 31, the author was 30. Her grief was prolonged and agonizing, and she has since learned that doctors refer to her condition as "complicated grief." Truly, she is not sure how she survived the first year after Jay's death. She certainly was not convinced she wanted…

  16. CHEMISTRY 12500 Stephen Hoffmann

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    CHEMISTRY 12500 Fall 2014 Instructor Stephen Hoffmann Office = ARMS 1343 Phone = 765-494-5740 Email@purdue.edu Required Course Materials · Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6th Edition, by M. S. Silberberg, McGraw-Hill, 2014. [ISBN: 978-1-2593-79567] · Chemistry 12500 Laboratory Manual, Fall 2014

  17. Profile of Stephen Hawking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen Lehman

    2011-01-01

    Although Stephen Hawking's early academic career lacked focus, the development of motor neuron disease straining against his hopes for a fulfilling life pulled the young scientist's work together. He has since become the world's most famous scientist due, in part, to his strong belief that science should be accessible to the general public. Hawking has published frequently for the academic

  18. Contrasting genetic structures in sister species of North American scrub-jays

    E-print Network

    Potts, Wayne

    scrub-jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) breed communally, are restricted to xeric sandy scrub habitat, generally disperse fewer than three territory diameters. Closely related Western scrub-jays (A. californica geographic distance; scrub-jay; metapopulation 1. INTRODUCTION The Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens

  19. JayDoc HistoWeb

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scarbrough, Marc.

    1996-01-01

    JayDoc HistoWeb, provided by two medical students at the University of Kansas, is a frames-based site that provides hundreds of microscopic anatomical images, topically arranged in 19 categories ranging from blood & bone marrow to vascular system. Each image is accompanied by a short annotation and scale bar. Interested users have the option of clicking a button for a much larger view. Note that though this site is extremely graphical and may be a challenge to those with slow connections, it is a treasure house of anatomical information.

  20. Acorn selection by Mexican jays: a test of a tri-trophic symbiotic relationship hypothesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Andrew Hubbard; Guy R. McPherson

    1997-01-01

    By caching acorns, jays serve as important dispersal agents for oak (Quercus) species. Yet little is known about which acorn characteristics affect selection by jays. In the traditional model of jay\\/oak\\u000a symbiosis, large, brown, ripe acorns free of invertebrate parasites (e.g., Curculio acorn weevils) are selected by jays. Recently, it has been suggested that a tri-trophic relationship between oaks, jays,

  1. Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SGFMOMA) has mounted a retrospective exhibition of the work of Jay DeFeo (1929-1989), who was active in the Bay area from the 1950s to the 1980s. The show will be on view at SFMOMA until February 3, 2013; on the website, select the Related Multimedia tab to see a selection of audio and video resources on DeFeo. Possibly most moving is Bruce Conner's film on DeFeo's most famous painting, "The Rose" (1958ââ?¬â??66). DeFeo worked on the painting for eight years, until it took up an entire room of the apartment she shared with her husband, Wally Hedrick (1928-2003) and weighed roughly a ton. Conner's short film documents the day when "The Rose" was removed, since DeFeo and Hedrick had been evicted. It was shown twice in California, in 1969. Another video, "The afterlife of Jay DeFeo's The Rose" documents the conservation of "The Rose" in June of 1995, after spending 25 years in storage. After conservation, "The Rose" travelled to New York City, where it was featured in the Whitney Museum's exhibition, "Beat Culture and the New America, 1950-1965."

  2. That Darwin and Haeckel were Complicit in Nazi Biology Robert J. Richards

    E-print Network

    Richards, Robert J.

    1 Myth 19 That Darwin and Haeckel were Complicit in Nazi Biology Robert J. Richards [Haeckel. Stephen Jay Gould, Ontogeny and Phylogeny (1977)1 No matter how crooked the road was from Darwin to Hitler, clearly Darwinism and eugenics smoothed the path for Nazi ideology, especially for the Nazi stress

  3. Stephen Hawking's Universe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website accompanies the Public Broadcasting Service's (PBS) series of television programs, based on the work of physicist Stephen Hawking, which address ideas and questions about the universe. Topics discussed include explanations of quarks, quasars, neutrinos, wormholes, ancient to current ideas about the universe, unsolved mysteries, and information about past astronomers such as: Kepler, Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Galileo. A teacher's guide and a list of links to related sites are also included. The accompanying video is available through mail order.

  4. Geographic variation in Mexican jays (Aphelocoma ultramarina): local differentiation, polyphyly or hybridization?

    PubMed

    Bhagabati, Nirmal K; Brown, Jerram L; Bowen, Bonnie S

    2004-09-01

    Studies of genetic variation within highly variable taxa can provide valuable insight into the factors influencing biological diversification. We examined six microsatellite loci, a nuclear intron and the mitochondrial control region to determine if the Mexican jay subspecies Aphelocoma ultramarina couchii and A. u. potosina have hybridized with western scrub-jays (A. californica). We suspected hybridization because these Mexican Jay populations resemble scrub-jays in several traits. We sampled six Mexican jay (N = 105) and four scrub-jay (N = 78) populations. Suspected hybrid Mexican Jay populations did not share any mitochondrial types or intron alleles with scrub-jays. All microsatellite alleles found in the suspected hybrid Mexican jay populations are also found in the control Mexican jay populations. Genetic distance-based trees from microsatellites supported reciprocal monophyly of Mexican jays and scrub-jays with bootstrap support > 80%. We randomized genotypes among populations to test scenarios consistent with hybridization. In some areas where Mexican jays and scrub-jays occur in sympatry or geographical proximity, randomization tests yield results expected under hybridization (100% support for seven of nine scenarios). However, these populations were not the primary candidates for hybridization based on phenotype. Even if low-level hybridization did occur, hybridization does not appear to be the main reason some Mexican jay populations resemble scrub-jays more than others. The scrub-jay-like traits in these populations may be due to drift, adaptation or plasticity. Alternatively, ancient hybridization, followed by selection for scrub-jay like traits in some Mexican jay populations, might have given rise to the observed variation. PMID:15315684

  5. Continuous Gaussian Mixture Modeling Stephen Aylward1 and Stephen Pize?

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Continuous Gaussian Mixture Modeling Stephen Aylward1 and Stephen Pize? 1Department of Radiology 2 vectors has a Gaussian distribution, those samples have a generalized projective Gaussian distribution will demonstrate that GPGDs are better represented by continuous Gaussian mixture models (CGMMs) than fmite

  6. RepRoduction in StelleR'S JayS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI): individual chaRacteRiSticS and behavioRal StRategieS

    E-print Network

    Black, Jeff

    RepRoduction in StelleR'S JayS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI): individual chaRacteRiSticS and behavioRal St, behavioral syndrome, Cyanocitta stelleri, exploration, reproductive performance, risk taking, Steller's Jay. La reproduction chez Cyanocitta stelleri : caractéristiques individuelles et stratégies

  7. Gene Flow in Scrub Jays: Frequency and Direction of Movement

    E-print Network

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    1991-11-01

    Based on strong differences in plumage coloration between coastal California (californica subspecies group) and Great Basin (woodhousesii subspecies group) populations of Scrub Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens), museum specimens representing gene flow...

  8. Publication List Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    . Sacks and Stephen G. Simpson, The -finite injury method, Annals of Mathematical Logic, 4, 1972, pp. 343 of the ramified analytical hierarchy, Annals of Mathematical Logic, 10, 1976, pp. 1­32. 1 #12;[8] Stephen G of unsolvability: a survey of results, in: Handbook of Mathematical Logic, edited by J. Barwise, North

  9. Identifying vocalizations and their possible function in Texas Blue Jays

    E-print Network

    Jeter-Edwards, Julie

    1989-01-01

    of Texas at San Antonio Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Keith Arnold I recorded 19 different calls in the repertoire of the Blue Jay, Cyanocitta cristoto. Sonagrams were made of these calls and physical aspects of their structure including duration.... Breakdown of call types given in response to the different playback types. 51 FIGURE 21. Most commonly observed activities during playbacks. . . . . . . . 56 INTRODUCTION The Blue Jay, Cyanocitts cristata, belongs to the family Corvidae, order...

  10. A temporal shift in Steller's jay predation on bird eggs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn E. Sieving; Mary F. Willson

    2000-01-01

    Artificial-nest experiments conducted near Juneau, Alaska, indicated that Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri) may undergo a marked shift in foraging pattern and possibly nest-predation behavior triggered by fledging of their own chicks. In an early-June sampling of predation on artificial nests containing quail eggs, egg losses and jay activity levels were significantly higher in forest adjacent to human-created edge than in

  11. Aversion/attraction of blue jays to microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, F E; Dowd, C; Byman, D; Schlinger, B A; Battista, S P; Kunz, T H

    1984-11-01

    Aversion/attraction experiments were conducted to determine whether birds can perceive the presence of 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwave irradiation by observing whether Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) exhibit an attraction or an aversion to the field when exposed to 25 and 50 mW/cm2. At power densities of 25 and 50 mW/cm2 Blue Jays exhibit an aversion to microwave irradiation. PMID:6522499

  12. Solutions for Jay and Other Underrepresented Gifted Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Jay, an African American male, was placed in the gifted class in fifth grade. He lined up with his new class on the first day of school, but refused to enter the classroom. He was angry that he had been placed in the class with "those kids" and wanted to be in the other class where his friends were. Each day thereafter, Jay struggled with being…

  13. Strategies of spatial learning for food storing in scrub jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shigeru Watanabe

    2005-01-01

    Western scrub jays (Aphelocoma californica) hide food and rely on spatial memory to recover their caches at a later date. To do this cache-and-recovery, they can use both spatial and site-specific cues. I examined these cues in an experimental setting. The experiment established that scrub jays, like other food storers, prefer to rely on the location of the caching tray

  14. The Gould Belt 'MISFITS' Survey: The Real Solar Neighborhood Protostars

    E-print Network

    Heiderman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    We present an HCO$^{+}$ J=3-2 survey of Class 0+I and Flat SED young stellar objects (YSOs) found in the Gould Belt clouds by surveys with Spitzer. Our goal is to provide a uniform Stage 0+I source indicator for these embedded protostar candidates. We made single point HCO$^{+}$ J = 3-2 measurements toward the source positions at the CSO and APEX of 546 YSOs (89% of the Class 0+I + Flat SED sample). Using the criteria from van Kempen et al. (2009), we classify sources as Stage 0+I or bona fide protostars and find that 84% of detected sources meet the criteria. We recommend a timescale for the evolution of Stage 0+I (embedded protostars) of 0.54 Myr. We find significant correlations of HCO$^{+}$ integrated intensity with ${\\alpha}$ and $T_{bol}$ but not with $L_{bol}$. The detection fraction increases smoothly as a function of ${\\alpha}$ and $L_{bol}$, while decreasing smoothly with $T_{bol}$. Using the Stage 0+I sources tightens the relation between protostars and high extinction regions of the cloud; 89% of ...

  15. Rethinking Software Connectors Stephen Kell

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    Rethinking Software Connectors Stephen Kell University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory 15 JJ on software connectors shows significant dis- agreement on both their definition and their relationships with components, coordinators and adaptors. We propose a precise characterisation of connectors, discuss how

  16. Positive transfer from successive reversal training to learning set in blue jays ( Cyanocitta cristata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan C. Kamil; Thony B. Jones; Alexandra Pietrewicz; John E. Mauldin

    1977-01-01

    Five blue jays received 160 successive reversal training (SRT) problems and were then tested on 96 learning set (LS) problems. During LS testing, SRT birds performed at higher levels than did 5 jays that had received an equivalent amount of experience on a single problem (SP), but they performed at lower levels than did 5 jays that had received 160

  17. WEST NILE VIRUS DETECTION IN THE ORGANS OF NATURALLY INFECTED BLUE JAYS (CYANOCITTA CRISTATA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samantha E. J. Gibbs; Angela E. Ellis; Daniel G. Mead; Andrew B. Allison; J. Kevin Moulton; Elizabeth W. Howerth; David E. Stallknecht

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are an effective indicator species for West Nile virus (WNV) and may be regionally important in surveillance efforts. The sites of WNV replication and sensitivity of virus detection techniques are undefined for blue jays. The objectives of this study were to describe the gross and microscopic pathology associated with natural WNV infection in blue jays, as

  18. œFaithful Portraits of Our Hearts: Images of the Jay Family, 1725“1814

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Pencak

    2009-01-01

    Portraits played a major role in the lives of the family of Chief Justice John Jay during his generation and those of his father and grandfather. Most of the surviving portraits were executed explicitly for family members before, during, or after trans-Atlantic journeys. Further, the modest character of Jay and his wife, Sarah Livingston Jay, comes across in likenesses devoid

  19. Accreditation John Jay College of Criminal Justice is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    Accreditation John Jay College of Criminal Justice is accredited by the Middle States Commission, John Jay's accreditation was reaffirmed in 2008 upon submission of its 5-year Periodic Review Report occurring in spring 2013. To maintain accreditation, John Jay must demonstrate to colleagues from peer

  20. JOhn Jay COllege This Bulletin is neither a contract nor an offer to contract between the

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    Bulletin JOhn Jay COllege #12;This Bulletin is neither a contract nor an offer to contract between semester, preferably before registering for the upcoming term. #12;John Jay College 1 Thank you for considering the graduate programs of John Jay College of Criminal Justice. A world leader in educating

  1. John Jay College This Bulletin is neither a contract nor an offer to contract between the

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    Bulletin John Jay College 2014-2015 #12;This Bulletin is neither a contract nor an offer semester, preferably before registering for the upcoming term. #12;John Jay College 1 Thank you for considering the graduate programs of John Jay College of Criminal Justice. A world leader in educating

  2. Interacting cache memories: Evidence for flexible memory use by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola S. Clayton; Kara Shirley Yu; Anthony Dickinson

    2003-01-01

    When Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) cached and recovered perishable crickets, N. S. Clayton, K. S. Yu, and A. Dickinson (2001) reported that the jays rapidly learned to search for fresh crickets after a 1-day retention interval (RI) between caching and recovery but to avoid searching for perished crickets after a 4-day RI. In the present experiments, the jays generalized their

  3. Interacting Cache Memories: Evidence for Flexible Memory Use by Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola S. Clayton; Kara Shirley Yu; Anthony Dickinson

    2003-01-01

    When Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) cached and recovered perishable crickets, N. S. Clayton, K. S. Yu, and A. Dickinson (2001) reported that the jays rapidly learned to search for fresh crickets after a 1-day retention interval (RI) between caching and recovery but to avoid searching for perished crickets after a 4-day RI. In the present experiments, the jays generalized their

  4. Food Caching by Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) Is Sensitive to the Conditions at Recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola S. Clayton; Joanna Dally; James Gilbert; Anthony Dickinson

    2005-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) cached perishable and nonperishable food items, which they could recover after both short and long retention intervals. When perishable items were always degraded at recovery, jays decreased the number of perishable items cached and increased their caching of nonperishable items, relative to a control group whose caches were always fresh at recovery. Jays reduced the number

  5. The rationality of animal memory: Complex caching strategies of western scrub jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicky Clayton; Nathan Emery; Anthony Dickinson

    Scrub jays cache perishable and non-perishable foods, and their caches may be pilfered by conspecifics. Caching and recovery by scrub jays is psychologically rational in the sense that these behaviours responded appropriately to conditions that should have changed the birds' beliefs and desires. For example scrub jays were allowed to cache worms and peanuts in a visuospatially distinct tray. At

  6. The Gould Belt 'MISFITS' Survey: The Real Solar Neighborhood Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda; Evans, Neal J., II

    2015-06-01

    We present an HCO+ J=3\\to 2 survey of Class 0+I and Flat SED young stellar objects (YSOs) found in the Gould Belt clouds by surveys with Spitzer. Our goal is to provide a uniform Stage 0+I source indicator for these embedded protostar candidates. We made single point HCO+ J=3\\to 2 measurements toward the source positions at the CSO and APEX of 546 YSOs (89% of the Class 0+I + Flat SED sample). Using the criteria from van Kempen et al., we classify sources as Stage 0+I or bona fide protostars and find that 84% of detected sources meet the criteria. We recommend a timescale for the evolution of Stage 0+I (embedded protostars) of 0.54 Myr. We find significant correlations of HCO+ integrated intensity with ? and Tbol but not with Lbol. The detection fraction increases smoothly as a function of ? and Lbol, while decreasing smoothly with Tbol. Using the Stage 0+I sources tightens the relation between protostars and high extinction regions of the cloud; 89% of Stage I sources lie in regions with AV > 8 mag. Class 0+I and Flat SED YSOs that are not detected in HCO+ have, on average, a factor of ?2 higher Tbol and a factor of ?5 lower Lbol than YSOs with HCO+ detections. We find less YSO contamination, defined as the number of undetected YSOs divided by the total number surveyed, for sources with Tbol ? 600 K and Lbol ? 1 L?. The contamination percentage is >90% at AV < 4 mag and decreases as AV increases.

  7. Arboviral infection in two species of wild jays (Aves: Corvidae): evidence for population impacts.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Stark, Lillian M; Woolfenden, Glen E; Fitzpatrick, John W; Day, Jonathan F

    2004-03-01

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to three mosquito-borne arboviruses in blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata, and Florida scrub-jays, Aphelocoma coerulescens, to identify the effects on host survival, the influence of sex and age on infection, and the temporal patterns of antibody prevalence. Blood samples from 306 blue jays and 219 Florida scrub-jays were collected at Archbold Biological Station (Lake Placid, FL) from April 1994 through December 1995. Sera were analyzed for hemagglutination-inhibition antibody to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses, and neutralizing antibodies to EEE, Highlands J (HJ), and SLE viruses. Overall, 31.4% of blue jay samples and 22.1% of scrub-jay samples had antibodies to EEE. Antibodies to HJ were detected in slightly >15% of samples in each jay species, and SLE was detected in <3% of the samples in each jay species. A single EEE virus isolation was made from the blood of an 11-d-old scrub-jay nestling. Survival of adult blue jays seropositive to EEE was significantly lower than that of seronegative birds based on resight rates, but infection did not seem to affect survival of adult or juvenile Florida scrub-jays. PMID:15061281

  8. Optimization Algorithms in Machine Learning Stephen Wright

    E-print Network

    Wright, Steve

    /µ. Sometimes discuss convex quadratic f : f (x) = 1 2 xT Ax, where µI A LI. Stephen Wright (UWOptimization Algorithms in Machine Learning Stephen Wright University of Wisconsin-Madison NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010 Stephen Wright (UW-Madison) Optimization in Machine Learning NIPS Tutorial, 6 Dec 2010

  9. VI. ICRF HEATING D. B. BATCHELOR (ORNL), M. D. CARTER (ORNL), R. H. GOULDING (ORNL),

    E-print Network

    VI. ICRF HEATING D. B. BATCHELOR (ORNL), M. D. CARTER (ORNL), R. H. GOULDING (ORNL), D. J. HOFFMAN (ORNL), J. C. HOSEA (PPPL), E. F. JAEGER (ORNL), S. M. KAm (PPPL), T. K. MAU (UCLA), C. K. PHILLIPS (PPPL), P. M. RYAN (ORNL), J. E. SCHAR,ER (Unher,ity of Wisconsin), D. W. SWAIN (ORNL), J. S. TOLLIVER

  10. Resonant tunneling diode with spin polarized injector A. Slobodskyy, C. Gould,a

    E-print Network

    Sánchez, David

    Resonant tunneling diode with spin polarized injector A. Slobodskyy, C. Gould,a T. Slobodskyy, G the current-voltage characteristics of a II-VI semiconductor resonant tunneling diode coupled to a diluted spintronics devices is a structure based on magnetic semiconductor reso- nant tunneling diodes RTDs which has

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMPHIPLOID HYBRIDS BETWEEN PSEUDOROEGNERIA SPICATA (PURSH.) A. LOVE AND ELYMUS LANCEOLATUS (SCRIBNER & SMITH) GOULD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An amphiploid derivative from hybrids between bluebunch wheatgrass (2n=2x=14) [Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) A. Love] and thickspike wheatgrass (2n=4x=28) [Elymus lanceolatus (Scribner and Smith) (Gould] was developed to compare cytological, morphological, anatomical, and seed charateristics betwe...

  12. Carcass Ultrasound Scanning for Breeding Cattle Selection Kevin Gould, MSU Extension Beef Educator

    E-print Network

    Carcass Ultrasound Scanning for Breeding Cattle Selection Kevin Gould, MSU Extension Beef Educator Why do we use ultrasound? Ultrasound technology allows for the capture and standardization of carcass Evaluation ultrasound Expected Progeny Difference (EPD) values. Ultrasound EPDs are equivalent to carcass

  13. by Paula Gould Image above is an optical micrograph of a self-healing

    E-print Network

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    by Paula Gould Image above is an optical micrograph of a self-healing polymer. Microcapsules the biological healing process and their own solution to self-repair. It is a handy comparison. The idea appeal. Yet, while the project goals can be described in simple terms, generating a self-healing

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (JAY-TH00400022) on Town Highway 40, crossing Jay Branch, Jay, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

    1997-01-01

    8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.15-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily pasture on the upstream and downstream left overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The downstream right overbank of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Jay Branch Tributary has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 26 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 40.5 mm (0.133 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Jay Branch Tributary is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel skew and the opening-skew-to-roadway are zero degrees. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the left and right abutments, at the upstream right wingwall, and at the downstream left wingwall. There was also type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream left and downstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.7 to 1.1 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Left abutment scour ranged from 4.6 to 4.9 ft. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Right abutment scour ranged from 4.0 to 5.0 ft. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information i

  15. Electrochemical Isotope Effect and Lithium Isotope Separation Jay R. Black,

    E-print Network

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Electrochemical Isotope Effect and Lithium Isotope Separation Jay R. Black, Grant Umeda, Bruce Dunn May 19, 2009; E-mail: akavner@ucla.edu The electrochemical separation of lithium isotopes is of growing interest due to the need for pure 6 Li and 7 Li isotopes in the nuclear industry.1 Here we present

  16. Adaptive Optics in Astronomy Jay J. McCarthy

    E-print Network

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Adaptive Optics in Astronomy Jay J. McCarthy NW Computational Intelligence Laboratory Portland State University Abstract ­ The field of adaptive optics (AO) has developed as a means to correct is intended to be a brief introduction to the field of adaptive optics with an emphasis the role of AO

  17. Evidence of Learning: A Conversation with Jay McTighe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Judith

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jay McTighe, an educational author and consultant. In his conversation, McTighe discussed best ways to find out how well students are learning and the evidence of understanding that teachers and administrators must see. He also talked about the five steps to support appropriate assessments. These steps…

  18. Invasive Species Traits Jay, Josia, Rebecca, Alexandra, Vincent

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Introduction? McGregor et al, Diversity & Distributions 2012 #12;Pinus contorta #12;Species Statu s Fire engelmanii 0 2 28 3.5 45 13 Pinus lambertiana 0 2 40 4 216 49 Pinus banksiana 1 0 3 3.5 3 2 Pinus contorta 1Invasive Species Traits of Pinus. Jay, Josia, Rebecca, Alexandra, Vincent #12;. Traits thats

  19. Blue jay and fox squirrel damage preference among pecan trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Grant Huggins

    1995-01-01

    The relationship of eight native pecan (Carya illinoensis) tree characteristics and blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) and fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) nut damage levels was examined in five southcentral Oklahoma pecan groves during the 1991 and 1992 crop cycles. Each tree's nut length, width, total mass, kernel mass, per cent kernel, distance from the grove's edge, trunk area, and canopy area

  20. Search Image Formation in the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra T. Pietrewicz; Alan C. Kamil

    1979-01-01

    Blue jays trained to detect Catocala moths in slides were exposed to two types of slide series containing these moths: series of one species and series of two species intermixed. In one-species series, detection ability increased with successive encounters with one prey type. No similar effect occurred in two-species series. These results are a direct demonstration of a specific search

  1. AVERSION/ATTRACTION OF BLUE JAYS TO MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aversion/attraction experiments were conducted to determine whether birds can perceive of 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwave irradiation by observing whether Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) exhibit an attraction or an aversion to the field when exposed to 25 and 50 microwaves/sq ...

  2. Stochastic search in a forest revisited Jay Sethuraman

    E-print Network

    Sethuraman, Jay

    Stochastic search in a forest revisited Jay Sethuraman John N. Tsitsiklis November 12, 2005 Abstract We consider a generalization of the model of stochastic search in an out-forest, introduced and studied by Denardo, Rothblum, and Van der Heyden [1]. We provide a simple proof of the optimality of index

  3. Chemistry Program F. Jay Taylor Undergraduate Teaching Award Nominee Information

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    Danny Eddy Chemistry Program F. Jay Taylor Undergraduate Teaching Award Nominee Information Enrollment and Retention Quarter Courses Taught Enrollment % Retention Fall 2009 General Chemistry 100 (003) 70 96% General Chemistry 100 (004) 69 99% University Seminar 100 (019) 29 100% Winter 2009

  4. Testosterone and social and reproductive behaviour in Aphelocoma jays.

    PubMed

    Vleck; Brown

    1999-11-01

    When there is a direct relationship between testosterone level and payoff in reproductive success through aggression, testosterone levels should be elevated. Elevated testosterone, however, has fitness costs, particularly a decreased tendency to display parental care. Thus the pattern of testosterone secretion in males should vary with the social and mating system. Western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma californica woodhouseii, form monogamous pairs on territories during the breeding season. Mexican jays, A. ultramarina, live in large, stable groups and up to five females within a group attempt nesting each spring. In both species, testosterone levels rose rapidly in March and peak levels did not differ. Elevated testosterone levels were only observed for about 3 weeks in the monogamous western scrub-jay, but were observed into May in Mexican jays, a reflection of prolonged opportunity for males to mate with multiple females and continual interaction with other competing males. In Mexican jays, nonbreeding yearlings had lower testosterone levels than all other age groups. Testosterone in males owning nests did not differ from that in other adult males, many of whom engage in extrapair fertilizations. Testosterone was elevated throughout the incubation phase, but was significantly lower when chicks were present in any nest in the group. Nearly all birds in the group fed all chicks. These observations support the hypothesis that testosterone is elevated when male-male competition is frequent and mating opportunities depend on the outcome of that competition, and testosterone is decreased when the necessity for parental or alloparental care would make its effects deleterious. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10564596

  5. Stephen F. Austin State University Stephen F. Austin

    E-print Network

    Long, Nicholas

    Flynn Associate Dean John Goodall 10/25/2013 #12;Stephen F. Austin State University College of Forestry Conservation Center (PWCC) Co-Directors David & Jo Treadaway Associate Dean Hans Williams 10/25/2013 #12 East Texas Historical Association Scott Sosebee Military Science Ltc. David Miller Languages, Cultures

  6. STEPHEN SMITH William Dawson Scholar

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    STEPHEN SMITH William Dawson Scholar D E G R E E S D. Phil. (Oxford University) 1992 · LLB (Toronto S E A R C H ) tephen Smith is interested in the moral dimensions of the law, which does not merely. Professor Smith has focused much of his research on private law, and in particular the law of contract

  7. Synchronous Reactive Systems Stephen Edwards

    E-print Network

    Heterogeneity and Ptolemy Semantics of the SR Domain Scheduling the SR Domain 2 #12;STEPHEN EDWARDS Reactive Systems Heterogeneity and Ptolemy Semantics of the SR Domain Scheduling the SR Domain 7 #12 SYSTEMS Heterogeneity in Ptolemy Ptolemy: A system for rapid prototyping of heterogeneous systems

  8. Autonomous Underwater Gliders Wood, Stephen

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    26 Autonomous Underwater Gliders Wood, Stephen Florida Institute of Technology United States and environmental data gathering capacities. Included in these types are autonomous underwater gliders that have four classes of underwater gliders: 1) those that use mechanical or electrical means of changing

  9. Publication List Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    of Mathematical Logic, 4, 1972, pp. 343~367. [2] Stephen G. Simpson, Admissible Ordinals and Recursion Theory deonition of the ramioed analytical hierarchy, Annals of Mathematical Logic, 10, 1976, pp. 1: Handbook of Mathematical Logic, edited by J. Barwise, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1977, pp. 631

  10. Form Perception Stephen Grossberg1

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Form Perception Stephen Grossberg1 Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems Center for Adaptive Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA Running title: Form Perception Key Words: Object perception, Perceptual grouping, Surface perception, Figure-ground perception Invited article for the Encyclopedia

  11. Stephen Hawking's Universe. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Malcolm H.; Rameau, Jonathan D.

    This program guide is meant to help teachers assist their students in viewing the six-part public television series, "Stephen Hawking's Universe." The guide features program summaries that give background information and brief synopses of the programs; previewing activities that familiarize students with the subject; vocabulary that gives…

  12. UBIAS Conference Stephen J. Toope

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    , a lack that persists today across the globe. Where he left off, however, and where I think universitiesUBIAS Conference Stephen J. Toope Page 1 of 8 Conference of the University-Based Institutes J. Toope President and Vice-Chancellor The University of British Columbia Thank you, Janis, for your

  13. Piagetian object permanence and its development in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius).

    PubMed

    Zucca, Paolo; Milos, Nadia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2007-04-01

    Object permanence in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) was investigated using a complete version of the Uzgiris and Hunt scale 1. Nine hand-raised jays were studied, divided into two groups according to their different developmental stages (experiment 1, older jays: 2-3 months old, n = 4; experiment 2, younger jays: 15 days old, n = 5). In the first experiment, we investigated whether older jays could achieve piagetian stage 6 of object permanence. Tasks were administered in a fixed sequence (1-15) according to the protocols used in other avian species. The aim of the second experiment was to check whether testing very young jays before their development of "neophobia" could influence the achievement times of piagetian stages. Furthermore, in this experiment tasks were administered randomly to investigate whether the jays' achievement of stage 6 follows a fixed sequence related to the development of specific cognitive abilities. All jays tested in experiments 1 and 2 fully achieved piagetian stage 6 and no "A not B" errors were observed. Performance on visible displacement tasks was better than performance on invisible ones. The results of experiment 2 show that "neophobia" affected the response of jays in terms of achievement times; the older jays in experiment 1 took longer to pass all the tasks when compared with the younger, less neophobic, jays in experiment 2. With regard to the achieving order, jays followed a fixed sequence of acquisition in experiment 2, even if tasks were administered randomly, with the exception of one subject. The results of these experiments support the idea that piagetian stages of cognitive development exist in avian species and that they progress through relatively fixed sequences. PMID:17242935

  14. Cache protection strategies by western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma californica: implications for social cognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanna M. Dally; Nathan J. Emery; Nicola S. Clayton

    2005-01-01

    Food-caching western scrub-jays cache items themselves, and use observational spatial memory to steal the caches of others. Our aim in this study was to investigate the strategies used by scrub-jays to reduce cache theft by conspecifics. In three experiments, scrub-jays were allowed to cache wax worms in two different locations. In experiment 1, the birds preferred to hide items in

  15. Adaptive Units for Conservation: Population Distinction and Historic Extinctions in the Island Scrub-Jay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KATHLEEN S. DELANEY; ROBERT K. WAYNE

    2005-01-01

    The Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis )i sf ound on Santa Cruz Island, California, and is the only insular bird species in the continental United States. We typed seven microsatellite loci and sequenced a portion of the mitochondrial DNA control region of Island Scrub-Jays and their closest mainland relative, the Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica), to assess levels of variability and effective

  16. Who's watching influences caching effort in wild Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri).

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Ryan S; Gabriel, Pia O; Black, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri) often store food and return to retrieve the stored items at a later time. Between caching and consumption, stored food has the potential to be pilfered by conspecific observers. We investigated whether individually marked Steller's jays in suburban neighborhoods of Arcata, California, USA, adjusted cache concealment effort when in the presence of conspecifics. Both male and female jays traveled the shortest distances to cache when alone, traveled further when a mate was present, and traveled furthest when neighbors from adjacent territories were present. These results suggest that Steller's jays recognize and respond to social contexts when concealing food items. PMID:25001401

  17. Search Image Formation in the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Pietrewicz, A T; Kamil, A C

    1979-06-22

    Blue jays trained to detect Catocala moths in slides were exposed to two types of slide series containing these moths: series of one species and series of two species intermixed. In one-species series, detection ability increased with successive encounters with one prey type. No similar effect occurred in two-species series. These results are a direct demonstration of a specific search image. PMID:17813172

  18. Molecular systematics and evolution of the Cyanocorax jays

    E-print Network

    Bonaccorso, Elisa; Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2010-03-01

    of all other NWJ genera (Cyanocitta cristata, Aphelocoma coerulescens, Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus, and Cyanolyca viridicyanus), which data were drawn from previous studies (Espinosa de los Monteros and Cracraft, 1997; Cicero and Johnson, 2001; Ericson et...]; “Cissilopha” sp. in Texas, [J. Eitniear, pers. comm.]). Also among NWJs, the Blue Jay, Cyanocitta cristata, is at least partially migratory in the northern portion of its range (Pitelka, 1946), a pattern repeated in several species of Corvus (Madge and Burn...

  19. Cryptic plumage signaling in Aphelocoma Scrub-Jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eli S. Bridge; Jennifer Hylton; Muir D. Eaton; Louis Gamble; Stephan J. Schoech

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of avian vision and plumage coloration have revealed a surprising degree of cryptic sexual dimorphism, with\\u000a many examples of male–female differences in UV reflectance that are invisible to humans. We examined the potential for male–female\\u000a and adult–subadult differences in plumage coloration in the genus Aphelocoma. This group of jays comprises 10 phylogenetic species, which are found across southern

  20. Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Memorial To Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts Fifty-Fourth Regiment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Gallery site offers images, history, and resources relating to sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous bronze bas relief, unveiled in 1897, commemorating Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th, the first and most famous Black regiment of the Civil War, distinctly honored for its valiancy in battle. Users can examine full-screen photographs of the entire relief or focus in on user-selected segments of the sculpture. The site provides histories of the regiment, Robert Gould Shaw, and the artist, including the story of how the sculpture evolved from a relatively modest (and conventional) equestrian statue of Shaw to its final form, featuring the intensely realized figures of African-American infantrymen on the march. There are also resources for teachers, comprised of lesson plans, a bibliography, and links to related sites.

  1. Goulds Belt, Interstellar Clouds, and the Eocene-Oligocene Helium-3 Spike

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2015-01-01

    Drag from hydrogen in the interstellar cloud which formed Gould's Belt may have sent small meteoroids with embedded helium to the Earth, perhaps explaining part or all of the (sup 3) He spike seen in the sedimentary record at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Assuming the Solar System passed through part of the cloud, meteoroids in the asteroid belt up to centimeter size may have been dragged to the resonances, where their orbital eccentricities were pumped up into Earth-crossing orbits.

  2. Foraging dynamics in Steller's jays: size and viability of cacheable food Christina Rockwell*, Pia O. Gabriel 1

    E-print Network

    Black, Jeff

    and storage viability. Steller's jays, Cyanocitta stelleri, which cache seeds for later consumption, may in storage. Western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma cal- ifornica, and Steller's jays, Cyanocitta stelleri, sample acceptance 16 July 2013 Available online 23 August 2013 MS. number: A13-00284R Keywords: caching Cyanocitta

  3. Pilfering Eurasian jays use visual and acoustic information to locate caches.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Rachael C; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-11-01

    Pilfering corvids use observational spatial memory to accurately locate caches that they have seen another individual make. Accordingly, many corvid cache-protection strategies limit the transfer of visual information to potential thieves. Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) employ strategies that reduce the amount of visual and auditory information that is available to competitors. Here, we test whether or not the jays recall and use both visual and auditory information when pilfering other birds' caches. When jays had no visual or acoustic information about cache locations, the proportion of available caches that they found did not differ from the proportion expected if jays were searching at random. By contrast, after observing and listening to a conspecific caching in gravel or sand, jays located a greater proportion of caches, searched more frequently in the correct substrate type and searched in fewer empty locations to find the first cache than expected. After only listening to caching in gravel and sand, jays also found a larger proportion of caches and searched in the substrate type where they had heard caching take place more frequently than expected. These experiments demonstrate that Eurasian jays possess observational spatial memory and indicate that pilfering jays may gain information about cache location merely by listening to caching. This is the first evidence that a corvid may use recalled acoustic information to locate and pilfer caches. PMID:24889656

  4. NUT SELECTION BY CAPTIVE BLUE JAYS: IMPORTANCE OF AVAILABILITY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEED DISPERSAL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey E. Moore; Robert K. Swihart

    2006-01-01

    We assessed dietary preference of 14 captive Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) for different food types under different conditions of availability. In four separate feeding trials, we provisioned jays with the following: Trial 1, two nuts each of white oak (Quercus alba), pin oak (Q. palustris), black oak (Q. velutina), northern red oak (Q. rubra), and shagbark hickory (Carya ovata); Trial

  5. Tool-making and tool-using in the northern blue jay.

    PubMed

    Jones, T B; Kamil, A C

    1973-06-01

    Laboratory-raised Northeirn blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) have been observed tearing pieces from pages of newspaper and utilizing them as tools to rake in food pellets which were otherwise out of reach. The frequency of this behavior was dependenit upon the motivational state of the jay and the presence of food pellets. PMID:17806587

  6. The detection of cryptic prey by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) I: the effects of travel time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALAN C. KAMIL; FREDERIC LINDSTROM; JERRILYNN PETERS

    1985-01-01

    The behaviour of blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) hunting for dispersed, cryptic prey was investigated in an operant simulation in which jays were trained to search projected images for noctuid moths. Each image contained either a single moth or no moth. Each trial was structured so as to simulate travelling between patches, searching within patches, and attacking and handling each moth

  7. Tool-Making and Tool-Using in the Northern Blue Jay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thony B. Jones; Alan C. Kamil

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory-raised Northern blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) have been observed tearing pieces from pages of newspaper and utilizing them as tools to rake in food pellets which were otherwise out of reach. The frequency of this behavior was dependent upon the motivational state of the jay and the presence of food pellets.

  8. NUT SELECTION BY CAPTIVE BLUE JAYS: IMPORTANCE OF AVAILABILITY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEED DISPERSAL

    E-print Network

    Swihart, Robert K. "Rob"

    Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) for different food types under different conditions of availability words: Cyanocitta cristata, discrete choice model, jays, oaks, selection. Seleccio´n de Bellotas por Cyanocitta cristata en Cautiverio : Importancia de la Disponibilidad e Implicancias para la Dispersio´n de

  9. Scrub Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) Form Integrated Memories of the Multiple Features of Caching Episodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola S. Clayton; Kara Shirley Yu; Anthony Dickinson

    2001-01-01

    Four experiments examined whether food-storing scrub jays remember when and where they cached different foods. The scrub jays cached and recovered perishable and nonperishable foods in visuospatially distinct and trial-unique cache sites. They rapidly learned to avoid searching for foods that had perished by the time of recovery, while continuing to search for the same foods after shorter retention intervals

  10. Food-Caching Western Scrub-Jays Keep Track of Who Was Watching When

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanna M. Dally; Nathan J. Emery; Nicola S. Clayton

    2006-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) hide food caches for future consumption, steal others' caches, and engage in tactics to minimize the chance that their own caches will be stolen. We show that scrub-jays remember which individual watched them during particular caching events and alter their recaching behavior accordingly. We found no evidence to suggest that a storer's use of cache protection

  11. Sampling and information acquisition by western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma californica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom A. Langen; Robert M. Gibson

    1998-01-01

    Animals often make choices based on cues that provide uncertain information about the value of alternative options. To examine how this uncertainty affects sampling behaviour, western scrub-jays were studied in the field during selection of single food items to scatter-hoard. Nine habituated birds were videotaped at feeders during repeated presentations of pairs of unshelled peanuts that varied in size. Jays

  12. The Control of Food-Caching Behavior by Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Selvino R. de Kort; Sérgio P. C. Correia; Dean M. Alexis; Anthony Dickinson; Nicola S. Clayton

    2007-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) did not show extinction when caching behavior was never rewarded and they had no choice of where to cache the food. However, when the jays had the choice of caching items in 2 different locations or during 2 successive episodes, and only 1 of each was always rewarded at recovery, they rapidly learned to cache in

  13. Biology of Cooperative-Breeding Scrub Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) of Oaxaca, Mexico

    E-print Network

    Burt, D. Brent; Peterson, A. Townsend

    1993-04-01

    We studied a cooperative-breeding population of Scrub Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in Oaxaca, Mexico. The jays occupied territories 1.5 ha in average size located in a wide range of habitats and were found in temporally stable groups of two to six...

  14. Mast-producing trees and the geographical ecology of western scrub-jays

    E-print Network

    Patricelli, Gail

    abundance and variability of western scrub-jays Aphelocoma californica based on 48 yr of Audubon Christmas. In general, populations of A. c. californica along the Pacific coast were related to oaks, with populations these relationships can be within closely related taxa. Scrub-jays (Aphelocoma spp.) are widely distributed

  15. Pathogenicity of Haemoproteus danilewskyi, Kruse, 1890, in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Homer, Bruce L; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    Although the impact of blood parasite infections on passerine birds is potentially great, little is known of their pathologic effects. We studied Haemoproteus danilewskyi in experimentally infected captive and naturally infected free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) to determine patterns of infection and examine the pathologic effects of the parasite on the host. Physiologic changes, such as elevated numbers of lymphocytes, heterophils, basophils, eosinophils, and monocytes and decreased packed cell volume in the peripheral blood were associated with the erythrocytic phase of experimental infections of captive juvenile jays. Sublethal pathologic changes associated with the pre-erythrocytic phase of infections were observed in the liver, lung, and spleen. Schizonts were observed in the pulmonary capillaries of a 1 yr old jay necropsied 31 days post-inoculation, but not in 20 juvenile jays necropsied 57 days post-inoculation. In free-ranging naturally infected jays plasma protein concentration increased with density of natural infections. PMID:12685080

  16. The control of food-caching behavior by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica).

    PubMed

    de Kort, Selvino R; Correia, Sérgio P C; Alexis, Dean M; Dickinson, Anthony; Clayton, Nicola S

    2007-10-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) did not show extinction when caching behavior was never rewarded and they had no choice of where to cache the food. However, when the jays had the choice of caching items in 2 different locations or during 2 successive episodes, and only 1 of each was always rewarded at recovery, they rapidly learned to cache in the rewarded location or episode. When the jays had learned during training trials that their caches were always moved to 1 of 2 locations they did not cache in, then on the test trial they cached in the location that had been previously rewarded. To test whether these jays avoided the location in which their caches had been pilfered or chose the rewarded location, the procedure was repeated to include a 3rd location that was never rewarded. The jays avoided the pilfered location but cached equally in the rewarded and nonrewarded locations. PMID:17924785

  17. Western scrub-jays conceal auditory information when competitors can hear but cannot see

    PubMed Central

    Stulp, Gert; Emery, Nathan J.; Verhulst, Simon; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2009-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) engage in a variety of cache-protection strategies to reduce the chances of cache theft by conspecifics. Many of these strategies revolve around reducing visual information to potential thieves. This study aimed to determine whether the jays also reduce auditory information during caching. Each jay was given the opportunity to cache food in two trays, one of which was filled with small pebbles that made considerable noise when cached in (‘noisy’ tray), whereas the other one contained soil that made little detectable noise when cached in (‘quiet’ tray). When the jays could be heard, but not seen, by a competitor, they cached proportionally less food items in the ‘noisy’ substrate than when they cached alone in the room, or when they could be seen and heard by competitors. These results suggest that western scrub-jays know when to conceal auditory information, namely when a competitor cannot see but can hear the caching event. PMID:19605383

  18. Western scrub-jays conceal auditory information when competitors can hear but cannot see.

    PubMed

    Stulp, Gert; Emery, Nathan J; Verhulst, Simon; Clayton, Nicola S

    2009-10-23

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) engage in a variety of cache-protection strategies to reduce the chances of cache theft by conspecifics. Many of these strategies revolve around reducing visual information to potential thieves. This study aimed to determine whether the jays also reduce auditory information during caching. Each jay was given the opportunity to cache food in two trays, one of which was filled with small pebbles that made considerable noise when cached in ('noisy' tray), whereas the other one contained soil that made little detectable noise when cached in ('quiet' tray). When the jays could be heard, but not seen, by a competitor, they cached proportionally less food items in the 'noisy' substrate than when they cached alone in the room, or when they could be seen and heard by competitors. These results suggest that western scrub-jays know when to conceal auditory information, namely when a competitor cannot see but can hear the caching event. PMID:19605383

  19. Author! Author! Picture Artist: Stephen Gammell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This column presents a brief biography of illustrator Stephen Gammell, well-known for both his black-and-white and his brightly colored children's picture book art. Stephen Gammell has made a long career illustrating children's stories and poems. The first book he illustrated, "A Nutty Business" (written by Ida Chittum), was published in 1973 and…

  20. Planning for the future by western scrub-jays.

    PubMed

    Raby, C R; Alexis, D M; Dickinson, A; Clayton, N S

    2007-02-22

    Knowledge of and planning for the future is a complex skill that is considered by many to be uniquely human. We are not born with it; children develop a sense of the future at around the age of two and some planning ability by only the age of four to five. According to the Bischof-Köhler hypothesis, only humans can dissociate themselves from their current motivation and take action for future needs: other animals are incapable of anticipating future needs, and any future-oriented behaviours they exhibit are either fixed action patterns or cued by their current motivational state. The experiments described here test whether a member of the corvid family, the western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica), plans for the future. We show that the jays make provision for a future need, both by preferentially caching food in a place in which they have learned that they will be hungry the following morning and by differentially storing a particular food in a place in which that type of food will not be available the next morning. Previous studies have shown that, in accord with the Bischof-Köhler hypothesis, rats and pigeons may solve tasks by encoding the future but only over very short time scales. Although some primates and corvids take actions now that are based on their future consequences, these have not been shown to be selected with reference to future motivational states, or without extensive reinforcement of the anticipatory act. The results described here suggest that the jays can spontaneously plan for tomorrow without reference to their current motivational state, thereby challenging the idea that this is a uniquely human ability. PMID:17314979

  1. Jay Honeycutt visits with STS-72 crew after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Director Jay Honeycutt (second from left) visits with the STS-72 astronauts as they inspect the orbiter Endeavour following an early morning end-of-mission landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Mission Specialist Winston E. Scott; Honeycutt; Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao; Pilot Brent W. Jett Jr.; Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who represents the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Commander Brian Duffy. Hidden behind Jett is the sixth STS-72 crew member, Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry. Endeavour touched down on Runway 15 at 2:41:41 a.m. EST.

  2. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the western pearlshell mussel, Margaritifera falcata (Gould).

    PubMed

    Chong, Jer Pin; Box, Jayne Brim; Nez, Donna A; Mock, Karen E

    2009-05-01

    Ten microsatellite loci were isolated from the western pearlshell, Margaritifera falcata (Gould, 1850) and characterized in populations from Washington and Montana, USA. We also assessed eight microsatellite loci developed in M. margaritifera, two of which showed utility. Both of our test populations showed significant heterozygote deficiencies at most loci, consistent with a hermaphroditic life history. Populations differed markedly with respect to allelic richness, allele frequencies and numbers of identical multilocus genotypes. This panel of loci should prove useful in describing gene flow and genetic diversity patterns among M. falcata populations, information that should aid future conservation efforts. PMID:21564817

  3. Careful cachers and prying pilferers: Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) limit auditory information available to competitors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Rachael C; Clayton, Nicola S

    2013-02-01

    Food-storing corvids use many cache-protection and pilfering strategies. We tested whether Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) reduce the transfer of auditory information to a competitor when caching and pilfering. We gave jays a noisy and a quiet substrate to cache in. Compared with when alone, birds cached less in the noisy substrate when with a conspecific that could hear but could not see them caching. By contrast, jays did not change the amount cached in the noisy substrate when they were with a competitor that could see and hear them caching compared with when they were alone. Together, these results suggest that jays reduce auditory information during caching as a cache-protection strategy. By contrast, as pilferers, jays did not attempt to conceal their presence from a cacher and did not prefer a silent viewing perch over a noisy one when observing caching. However, birds vocalized less when watching caching compared with when they were alone, when they were watching a non-caching conspecific or when they were watching their own caches being pilfered. Pilfering jays may therefore attempt to suppress some types of auditory information. Our results raise the possibility that jays both understand and can attribute auditory perception to another individual. PMID:23222444

  4. Careful cachers and prying pilferers: Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) limit auditory information available to competitors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rachael C.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2013-01-01

    Food-storing corvids use many cache-protection and pilfering strategies. We tested whether Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) reduce the transfer of auditory information to a competitor when caching and pilfering. We gave jays a noisy and a quiet substrate to cache in. Compared with when alone, birds cached less in the noisy substrate when with a conspecific that could hear but could not see them caching. By contrast, jays did not change the amount cached in the noisy substrate when they were with a competitor that could see and hear them caching compared with when they were alone. Together, these results suggest that jays reduce auditory information during caching as a cache-protection strategy. By contrast, as pilferers, jays did not attempt to conceal their presence from a cacher and did not prefer a silent viewing perch over a noisy one when observing caching. However, birds vocalized less when watching caching compared with when they were alone, when they were watching a non-caching conspecific or when they were watching their own caches being pilfered. Pilfering jays may therefore attempt to suppress some types of auditory information. Our results raise the possibility that jays both understand and can attribute auditory perception to another individual. PMID:23222444

  5. Jay Apt, Paulina Jaramillo, and Stephen Rose Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center (CEIC)'s RenewElec Project

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    electric generators. 9 · Solar: ­ Photovoltaic (solar panels) ­ Solar thermal (concentrated solar;Renewable Electric Generators · Wind: at 7 to 9 cents per kWh, one of the least costly low- pollution with mirrors to heat a fluid that then heats water to steam used in a generator) ­ Utility-scale PV produces

  6. Food caching by western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) is sensitive to the conditions at recovery.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Nicola S; Dally, Joanna; Gilbert, James; Dickinson, Anthony

    2005-04-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) cached perishable and nonperishable food items, which they could recover after both short and long retention intervals. When perishable items were always degraded at recovery, jays decreased the number of perishable items cached and increased their caching of nonperishable items, relative to a control group whose caches were always fresh at recovery. Jays reduced the number of nonperishable items cached, however, when highly preferred food items were degraded only after the long retention intervals. The findings are discussed in terms of the role of retrospective and prospective processes in the control of caching. PMID:15839770

  7. . Stephen C. Porter, 1934-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackray, Glenn D.; An, Zhisheng

    2015-05-01

    Professor Stephen C. Porter, the long-term former editor of Quaternary Research and a leader in the development of interdisciplinary Quaternary science, died in Santa Barbara, California, on February 19, 2015, at the age of 80.

  8. Stephen Fosterâ??s Sketchbook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Raised in and around Pittsburgh during the 19th century, Stephen Foster grew up singing in an all-male secret club and receiving some modest musical training from a local German immigrant, Henry Kleber. He soon became intensely interested in song-writing, and his first published song, â??Open Thy Lattice Loveâ?, appeared when he was 18. Of course, he went on to write around 285 songs, including such old chestnuts as â??Beautiful Dreamerâ?, â??Camptown Racesâ?, and of course â??Oh! Susannaâ?. The University of Pittsburghâ??s Digital Library has digitized his sketchbook and placed it online for the general web-browsing public. Visitors can search the sketchbook by song title, or simply browse the pages at their leisure. There are a number of real finds here, including drafts of â??While the Bowl Goes Roundâ? and â??Thou Art the Queen of My Songâ?.

  9. Professor Stephen W. Hawking's Site

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Professor Stephen Hawking, the Cambridge University scholar and author of A Brief History of Time, has been called the greatest mind in physics since Albert Einstein. His Web Site (maintained by Graduate Assistant Chris Burgoyne) gives a description of his life, achievements, and his struggle with the physically debilitating disease ALS, or Lou Gehrig's Disease. The sites lecture links page gives descriptions of and downloadable Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files of past lectures and colloquiums, while the news link page provides information on current events, such as the Professors recent sixtieth birthday. The site is easy to navigate and offers physics novices and experts interesting reading regarding the works and life a person whose name will certainly be remembered along side Einstein and Galileo.

  10. DATES TO REMEMBER May 8 Forage Field Day -Jay Research Farm

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    Field Day - Jay Research Farm IN THIS ISSUE PAGE CORN Conservation Tillage for Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Exemption for Tolerance on Soybean Seed Treatment / University of Florida / Christine Taylor W addill, Director. #12;2 Conservation Tillage for Cotton A Cotton

  11. Western scrub-jay funerals: cacophonous aggregations in response to dead conspecifics

    E-print Network

    McElreath, Richard

    acceptance 25 July 2012 Available online xxx MS. number: A12-00867R Keywords: Aphelocoma californica bird-jays, Aphelocoma californica, and is similar to the response to a predator (a great horned owl, Bubo virginianus

  12. The effects of prey depletion on the patch choice of foraging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALAN C. KAMIL; SONJA I. YOERG

    1985-01-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) were trained to hunt for non-cryptic moths presented in projected images. On each trial, the jays chose one of two patches to hunt in: (1) a uniform, 'non-depleting' patch with constant prey density of 0.25; or (2) a 'depleting' patch in which prey density changed during the foraging bout. In the depleting patch, the initial prey

  13. Tool-use and instrumental learning in the Eurasian jay ( Garrulus glandarius )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucy G. Cheke; Christopher D. Bird; Nicola S. Clayton

    2011-01-01

    Recent research with Rooks has demonstrated impressive tool-using abilities in captivity despite this species’ classification\\u000a as a non-tool-user in the wild. Here, we explored whether another non-tool-using corvid, the Eurasian Jay, would be capable\\u000a of similar feats and investigated the relative contributions of causal knowledge and instrumental conditioning to the birds’\\u000a performance on the tasks. Five jays were tested on

  14. Food-caching western scrub-jays keep track of who was watching when.

    PubMed

    Dally, Joanna M; Emery, Nathan J; Clayton, Nicola S

    2006-06-16

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) hide food caches for future consumption, steal others' caches, and engage in tactics to minimize the chance that their own caches will be stolen. We show that scrub-jays remember which individual watched them during particular caching events and alter their recaching behavior accordingly. We found no evidence to suggest that a storer's use of cache protection tactics is cued by the observer's behavior. PMID:16709747

  15. Identifying vocalizations and their possible function in Texas Blue Jays 

    E-print Network

    Jeter-Edwards, Julie

    1989-01-01

    I a 6 x 5 0 I' ' 4 l II ' fs'I f4'I I a g p 5 Z 4 a 2 0. 2 0. 4 0. 6 0. 6 1. 0 1. 2 1. 4 1. 6 SECONDS 62 SS 66 SECONDS 1 I a 6 5 0 4 2 ( t' 41 I' If' I jIe 6. 2 6 4 O I O. S 1. 6 1. 2 1. 4 1. 6 1. 0 SECONDS Fig. 5.... 6 SECONDS I r cc 5 X 5 0 4 ec 2 2 , 'W4WI~I41 "ll I 'I (iI N I I 5 0 4 bc " Dl, ~ ll 48 I I f It f I I I I I f I cc 6 5 0 4 bc 2 I 18ll II 5n ( ?, l 02 0. 4 06 0. 0 10 1. 2 02 04 SECONDS SECONDS Fig. 2. Ditonal jay...

  16. Dynamics and Phylogenetic Implications of MtDNA Control Region Sequences in New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Saunders; Scott V. Edwards

    2000-01-01

    .   To study the evolution of mtDNA and the intergeneric relationships of New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae), we sequenced the entire\\u000a mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) from 21 species representing all genera of New World jays, an Old World jay, crows,\\u000a and a magpie. Using maximum likelihood methods, we found that both the transition\\/transversion ratio (?) and among site rate

  17. Apparent predation by Gray Jays, Perisoreus canadensis, on Long-toed Salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum, in the Oregon Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, M.P.; Pearl, C.A.; Bury, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    We report observations of Gray Jays (Perisoreus canadensis) appearing to consume larval Long-toed Salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum) in a drying subalpine pond in Oregon, USA. Corvids are known to prey upon a variety of anuran amphibians, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of predation by any corvid on aquatic salamanders. Long-toed Salamanders appear palatable to Gray Jays, and may provide a food resource to Gray Jays when salamander larvae are concentrated in drying temporary ponds.

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchell, J.; Wilson, T.; Drabek, E.; Curtis, E.; Richer, J.; Nutter, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Ward-Thompson, D.; JCMT GBS Consortium

    2013-02-01

    We present observations of NGC 1333 from SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 ?m. Temperature maps are derived from 450 and 850 ?m ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index ? = 1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC 1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other young stars in the IR/optically visible cluster and embedded protostars. Other luminous protostars are also identified by temperature rises at the 17 arcsec resolution of the ratio maps (0.02 pc assuming a distance of 250 pc for Perseus). The extensive heating raises the possibility that the radiative feedback may lead to increased masses for the next generation of stars.

  19. Comparison of Porter-Gould constitutive model with Compression Test data for HTPB/Sugar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Philip; Gould, Peter; Huntington-Thresher, William; Drodge, Daniel; Proud, William

    2007-06-01

    QinetiQ has been developing the physically based QinetiQ Porter-Gould (P-G) model for the mechanical response of PBXs over a number of years and applying to solving real scenarios involving impact and blast. The main difficulty with these models is predicting the intermediate strain rate regime where the relaxation time for the polymer is of the same order as the duration of the Hopkinson bar test. The other main issue is the ability of the model to predict the stress/strain data as a function of temperature up to and through the glass transition temperature. The paper presents predictions from the QinetiQ P-G model compared to quasi-static compression and Hopkinson bar compression test data and discusses the results in terms of requirements for future developments of the model.

  20. Comparison of Porter-Gould Constitutive Model with Compression Test Data for Htpb/sugar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, R.; Porter, D.; Church, P.; Gould, P.; Andrews, T.; Proud, B.; Drodge, D.; Siviour, C.

    2007-12-01

    We have been developing the physically based QinetiQ Porter-Gould (P-G) model for the mechanical response of PBXs over a number of years and applying it to the solution of real scenarios involving impact and blast. The main difficulty with these models is predicting the intermediate strain rate regime where the relaxation time for the polymer is of the same order as the duration of the loading (e.g. as in a Hopkinson bar test). The other main issue is the ability of the model to predict the stress/strain data as a function of temperature up to and through the glass transition temperature. The paper presents predictions from the QinetiQ P-G model compared to quasi-static compression and Hopkinson bar compression test data and discusses the results in terms of requirements for future developments of the model.

  1. Observation of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in a plasma-filled backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, X.; Garate, E.; Prohaska, R.; Benford, Gregory

    1992-06-01

    Trivelpiece-Gould modes (TG modes) have been observed with frequencies up to the background plasma frequency in a plasma-filled X-band backward wave oscillator. The TG mode emission was broadband with observed frequencies ranging from 2.6 GHz, the lower limit of our frequency diagnostic, to f(p), the plasma frequency. Mode competition between the TG modes and the X-band TM(01) mode prevailed when the background plasma density was below 6 x 10 exp 11/cu cm (f(p) about 7 GHz). At a critical background plasma density of n(cr) about 8 x 10 exp 11/cu cm (f(p) about 8 GHz), a sudden power enhancement appeared simultaneously in both X band and the TG modes. Power enhancements in S and J bands were up to 8 and 3 dB, respectively, with the X band enhanced up to a factor of 6.

  2. The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: a first look at Serpens with HARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, S. F.; Richer, J. S.; Buckle, J. V.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Owen, J. E.; Brunt, C.; Butner, H. M.; Cavanagh, B.; Chrysostomou, A.; Curtis, E. I.; Davis, C. J.; Etxaluze, M.; Francesco, J. Di; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R. K.; Greaves, J. S.; Hatchell, J.; Johnstone, D.; Matthews, B.; Matthews, H.; Matzner, C. D.; Nutter, D.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Roberts, J. F.; Sadavoy, S.; Simpson, R. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Viti, S.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Yates, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Gould Belt Legacy Survey on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's has observed a region of 260 arcmin2 in 12CO J= 3 ? 2 emission, and a 190 arcmin2 subset of this in 13CO and C18O towards the Serpens molecular cloud. We examine the global velocity structure of the non-outflowing gas, and calculate excitation temperatures and opacities. The large-scale mass and energetics of the region are evaluated, with special consideration for high-velocity gas. We find the cloud to have a mass of 203 M?, and to be gravitationally bound, and that the kinetic energy of the outflowing gas is approximately 70 per cent of the turbulent kinetic energy of the cloud. We identify compact outflows towards some of the submillimetre Class 0/I sources in the region.

  3. Cache protection strategies by western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica): hiding food in the shade.

    PubMed

    Dally, Joanna M; Emery, Nathan J; Clayton, Nicola S

    2004-12-01

    In the presence of conspecifics, food-caching western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) implement a variety of strategies to reduce the chances of cache theft. This experiment aimed to determine whether the jays could exploit an environmental variable, the level of ambient light, to reduce the transfer of visual information to potential pilferers. Each jay was allowed to cache non-degradable food in two trays, one of which was well lit, whereas the other was in shadow. In some trials the birds cached in private and in others they were observed; however, they always recovered their caches in private. When observed the jays preferentially cached in the shaded tray, whereas both trays were used equally when caching in private. By caching in shaded sites, the quality and transfer of visual information available to the observer may be reduced, thereby making the location of cache sites less certain. These results suggest that western scrub-jays may selectively cache in the shade as a strategy to reduce the chance of cache theft by observing conspecifics. PMID:15801583

  4. SMALL-SCALE DIVERGENCE IN EGG COLOR ALONG AN ELEVATION GRADIENT IN THE MEXICAN JAY (APHELOCOMA ULTRAMARINA)

    E-print Network

    McCormack, John E.

    SMALL-SCALE DIVERGENCE IN EGG COLOR ALONG AN ELEVATION GRADIENT IN THE MEXICAN JAY (APHELOCOMA through the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions website, http. Here, we report the existence of extreme variation in egg color in a population of Mexican Jays

  5. Uranium occurrences on the Blue Jay Claim, White Signal District, Grant County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry C.; Bauer, Herman L., Jr.

    1951-01-01

    A discovery of secondary uranium minerals on the Blue Jay claim was reported in 1949 and the occurrence was examined by the authors in March 1950, The Blue Jay claim is about three-fourths of a mile south of White Signal, Grant County, N. Mex. in sees, 23 and 26, T. 20 3., R. 15 W. , New Mexico principal meridian. The Blue Jay claim is underlain by a pre-Cambrian granite mass that was intruded by numerous dikes ranging from rhyolite to basalt in composition. Abnormal radioactivity and secondary uranium minerals occur in altered rocks near oxidized quart z-pyrite veins. Forty-four samples ranged in grade from 0.001 to 0.11 percent uranium. The intermediate and basic rocks seem to have been the more favorable host rocks for the deposition of secondary uranium minerals, possibly because of their higher phosphate content.

  6. No evidence of temporal preferences in caching by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica)?

    PubMed Central

    Thom, James M.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and other animals often favour immediate gratification over long-term gain. Primates, including humans, appear more willing to wait for rewards than other animals, such as rats or pigeons. Another group displaying impressive patience are the corvids, which possess large brains and show sophisticated cognitive abilities. Here, we assess intertemporal choice in one corvid species, the Western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica). These birds cache food for future consumption and respond flexibly to future needs. Cache-theft and cache-degradation are time-dependent processes in scrub-jay ecology that might necessitate sensitivity to delays between caching and retrieval. We adopt a caching paradigm with delays of up to 49 h. Across two experiments we find no evidence of a preference for earlier recovery. We highlight the possibility that, although scrub-jays can discriminate between the present and the future, they may not understand how far into the future an event will occur. PMID:24378212

  7. No evidence of temporal preferences in caching by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica).

    PubMed

    Thom, James M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-03-01

    Humans and other animals often favour immediate gratification over long-term gain. Primates, including humans, appear more willing to wait for rewards than other animals, such as rats or pigeons. Another group displaying impressive patience are the corvids, which possess large brains and show sophisticated cognitive abilities. Here, we assess intertemporal choice in one corvid species, the Western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica). These birds cache food for future consumption and respond flexibly to future needs. Cache-theft and cache-degradation are time-dependent processes in scrub-jay ecology that might necessitate sensitivity to delays between caching and retrieval. We adopt a caching paradigm with delays of up to 49 h. Across two experiments we find no evidence of a preference for earlier recovery. We highlight the possibility that, although scrub-jays can discriminate between the present and the future, they may not understand how far into the future an event will occur. PMID:24378212

  8. Interacting Cache memories: evidence for flexible memory use by Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica).

    PubMed

    Clayton, Nicola S; Yu, Kara Shirley; Dickinson, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    When Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) cached and recovered perishable crickets, N. S. Clayton, K. S. Yu, and A. Dickinson (2001) reported that the jays rapidly learned to search for fresh crickets after a 1-day retention interval (RI) between caching and recovery but to avoid searching for perished crickets after a 4-day RI. In the present experiments, the jays generalized their search preference for crickets to intermediate RIs and used novel information about the rate of decay of crickets presented during the RI to reverse these search preferences at recovery. The authors interpret this reversal as evidence that the birds can integrate information about the caching episode with new information presented during the RI. PMID:12561130

  9. Stephen F Austin Linear, Quadratic, Polynomial,

    E-print Network

    Hubbard, Keith

    the useful algebraic operation of completing the square, and how to solve quadratic equations. Then we sections--one discusses com- plex numbers (needed to solve arbitrary quadratic equations) and one dis- cusses systems of equations and matrices. 117 #12;Stephen F Austin 118 chapter 2 Linear, Quadratic

  10. A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root

  11. Beginners' Old English Dr Stephen Graham

    E-print Network

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    who has not had the opportunity to do the JF course Early English Language i.e. TSM students, transferring students and visiting students. The course offers a basic introduction to Old English through onceBeginners' Old English EN2052 Dr Stephen Graham Option: Hilary Term This option is open to anyone

  12. Obituary: Andrew Stephen Wilson, 1947-2008

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvain Veilleux

    2009-01-01

    On 24 May 2008, Andrew Stephen Wilson passed away at the age of 61, in his home in Silver Spring, Maryland, from complications resulting from a painful spinal illness. Andrew was arguably one of the first truly multi-wavelength astronomers of his generation. His scientific work on active galactic nuclei [AGN] spanned the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the radio to the

  13. BIOS 3010: Ecology Dr Stephen Malcolm

    E-print Network

    Malcolm, Stephen

    BIOS 3010: Ecology Dr Stephen Malcolm Fall 2013 BONUS POINT OPPORTUNITY 3: Write a single-spaced (1983, Science 221: 636-639) and explain what the title "Santa Rosalia was a goat" refers to. Please November BONUS POINT OPPORTUNITY 4: Write a single-spaced paragraph of up to a page in length

  14. SMALL FREE NEGATIVE IONS R. STEPHEN BERRY

    E-print Network

    Berry, R. Stephen

    SMALL FREE NEGATIVE IONS R. STEPHEN BERRY Department of Chemistry and The James Franck Institute surveys the restricted subject of properties of iso- lated atomic and small molecular negative ions. By so exclude from our discussion the vast group of problems associated with large polyatomic negative ions

  15. Access Control for SAR Systems Stephen Quirolgico

    E-print Network

    Access Control for SAR Systems Stephen Quirolgico Vincent Hu Tom Karygiannis NIST IR 7815 #12;NIST IR 7815 Access Control for SAR Systems ii C O M P U T E R S E C U R I T Y Access Control for SAR Control for SAR Systems iii Reports on Computer Systems Technology The Information Technology Laboratory

  16. Concise Concrete Syntax Stephen Tse Steve Zdancewic

    E-print Network

    Zdancewic, Steve

    Concise Concrete Syntax Stephen Tse Steve Zdancewic University of Pennsylvania Abstract We of programming languages. Our work is an ex- tension of syntax definition formalism (SDF) and concrete datatypes and precedence at the level of production rules instead of lexical tokens such that a concrete syntax grammar

  17. Logic and Mathematics Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Logic and Mathematics Stephen G. Simpson Department of Mathematics Pennsylvania State University http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson/ April 30, 1999 This article is an overview of logic and the philosophy. Contents 1 Logic 2 1.1 Aristotelean logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1

  18. Randomized Parallel Algorithms in Optimization Stephen Wright

    E-print Network

    central memory, evalute g := fik (x); 3 for nonzero components gv do xv xv - gv ; Wright (UWRandomized Parallel Algorithms in Optimization Stephen Wright University of Wisconsin-Madison July 2013 Wright (UW-Madison) Random Parallel Optimization July 2013 1 / 52 #12;Collaborators @ UW

  19. Stephen J. Toope Page 1 of 15

    E-print Network

    Handy, Todd C.

    up sleeping through a revolution." Good morning. It has been a pleasure to be here with you today--are in danger of sleeping through a revolution we did not see coming and do not yet fully understand. Greater to digital technologies. Globalization of #12;CBIE Stephen J. Toope Page 3 of 15 communication

  20. Does multiple seed loading in Blue Jays result in selective dispersal of smaller acorns?

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Andrew W; Kachmar, Michael; Lichti, Nathanael; Swihart, Robert K; Stratford, Jeffrey A; Steele, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Studies from both tropical and temperate systems show that scatter-hoarding rodents selectively disperse larger seeds farther from their source than smaller seeds, potentially increasing seedling establishment in larger-seeded plants. Size-biased dispersal is evident in many oaks (Quercus) and is true both across and within species. Here, we predict that intraspecifc variation in seed size also influences acorn dispersal by the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata Linnaeus), but in an opposite manner. Blue Jays are gape-limited and selectively disperse smaller acorn species (e.g. pin oaks [Quercus palustris Münchh]), but often carry several acorns in their crop during a single dispersal event. We predict that jays foraging on smaller acorns will load more seeds per trip and disperse seeds to greater distances than when single acorns are carried in the bill. To test this, we presented free-ranging Blue Jays with pin oak acorns of different sizes over a 2-year period. In each of 16 experimental trials, we monitored the birds at a feeding station with remote cameras and determined the number of acorns removed and the distance acorns were dispersed when cached. Jays were significantly more likely to engage in multiple seed loading with smaller seeds in both years of the study. During the second year, these smaller acorns were dispersed farther than larger acorns, and during the first year, larger acorns were dispersed farther, revealing an inconsistent response to seed size during our study. We suggest that in some circumstances, multiple seed loading by Blue Jays may favor dispersal in some plant species. PMID:21910843

  1. West Nile virus detection in the organs of naturally infected blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Samantha E J; Ellis, Angela E; Mead, Daniel G; Allison, Andrew B; Moulton, J Kevin; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Stallknecht, David E

    2005-04-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are an effective indicator species for West Nile virus (WNV) and may be regionally important in surveillance efforts. The sites of WNV replication and sensitivity of virus detection techniques are undefined for blue jays. The objectives of this study were to describe the gross and microscopic pathology associated with natural WNV infection in blue jays, as well as determine the most appropriate tissues to be used for virus isolation, reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques. Blue jays were collected in Georgia, USA, between May and September 2001. Initial screening by virus isolation indicated that 36 of 59 blue jays chosen for evaluation were WNV positive. From this group, 20 positive and five negative birds were chosen to compare virus detection techniques. Six positive and five negative birds were selected for histopathology examination. Splenomegaly and poor body condition were the most consistent gross findings among positive birds. The most consistent histopathologic findings in the tissues of WNV-positive blue jays were mononuclear leukocytosis and epicarditis/myocarditis. Brain, heart, and lung had the highest viral titers, and WNV antigen was most often detected by IHC in heart, kidney, liver, and lung. Reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction proved to be the most sensitive diagnostic test applied in this study irrespective of the tissue type. Brain tissue could be used effectively for both virus isolation and RT-nPCR, and this tissue is simple to remove and process. The success of IHC is highly dependent on tissue selection, and the use of multiple tissues including heart, kidney, liver, or lung is recommended. PMID:16107670

  2. A New Population Estimate for the Florida Scrub Jay on Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1989-01-01

    The variable circular plot method was used to sample avifauna within different vegetation types determined from aerial imagery. The Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens) population was estimated to range between 1,415 and 3,603 birds. Approximately half of the scrub and slash pine habitat appeared to be unused by Florida Scrub Jay, probably because the slash pine cover was too dense or the oak cover was too sparse. Results from the study suggest that the entire state population may be much lower than believed because the size of two of the three largest populations may have been overestimated.

  3. Neurogenesis in the mossy chiton, Mopalia muscosa (Gould) (Polyplacophora): evidence against molluscan metamerism.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas; Brückner, Martin; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2002-08-01

    Neurogenesis in the chiton Mopalia muscosa (Gould, 1846) was investigated by applying differential interference contrast microscopy, semithin serial sectioning combined with reconstruction techniques, as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy for the detection of fluorescence-conjugated antibodies against serotonin and FMRFamide. The ontogeny of serotonergic nervous structures starts with cells of the apical organ followed by those of the cerebral commissure, whereas the serotonergic prototroch innervation, pedal system, and the lateral cords develop later. In addition, there are eight symmetrically arranged serotonergic sensory cells in the dorsal pretrochal area of the larva. FMRFamide-positive neural elements include the cerebral commissure, specific "ampullary" sensory cells in the pretrochal region, as well as the larval lateral and pedal system. In the early juvenile the cerebral system no longer stains with either of the two antibodies and the pedal system lacks anti-FMRFamide immunoreactivity. Outgroup comparison with all other molluscan classes and related phyla suggests that the cord-like, nonganglionized cerebral system in the Polyplacophora is a reduced condition rather than a primitive molluscan condition. The immunosensitivity of the pedal commissures develops from posterior to anterior, suggesting independent serial repetition rather than annelid-like conditions and there is no trace of true segmentation during nervous system development. Polyplacophoran neurogenesis and all other available data on the subject contradict the idea of a segmented molluscan stem species. PMID:12112126

  4. The modified Broström-Gould procedure--early results using a newly described surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Andy P; Ajis, Adam; Kazi, Hussain

    2014-09-01

    Ankle lateral ligament injuries are one of the most common sporting injuries, with the majority being successfully treated conservatively. However, reconstruction is required if this fails. We present the clinical results of a newly described surgical technique of triple-breasting the lateral ligament complex using suture anchors. Sixteen patients (18 ankles) were treated with this new technique. The mean duration of symptoms was 77 months. The mean follow-up was 25 months. All patients underwent an arthroscopy followed by lateral ligament reconstruction by this new technique. Additional pathology included osteoarthritis (2), ankle impingement due to anterior cheilus (2), osteochondral defects (3) and non-union of fracture of anterior process of calcaneus. Additional procedures above diagnostic arthroscopy, soft tissue debridement and modified Broström-Gould repair included debridement and microfracture (3), open excision of anterior calcaneal process (1) and arthroscopic anterior ankle cheilectomy (2). At final follow-up, all ankles were subjectively and objectively stable. Mean AOFAS score improved from 53 to 88. This was statistically significant (p<0.05). Eight patients had resumed normal pre-injury level of activities (including sports), 8 had some reduction in normal level of activity. The early results of our modification show it to be safe, successful and comparable with previously published series with all patients having objectively and subjectively stable ankles at final follow-up. PMID:25103713

  5. Intelligent prognostics tools and e-maintenance Jay Lee a,*, Jun Ni b

    E-print Network

    Michigan, University of

    and prediction of a particular product's performance, ultimately enable proactive maintenance to prevent machineIntelligent prognostics tools and e-maintenance Jay Lee a,*, Jun Ni b , Dragan Djurdjanovic b , Hai Qiu a , Haitao Liao c a NSF Center for Intelligent Maintenance System, University of Cincinnati, USA b

  6. Thin Points for Brownian Motion Amir Dembo Yuval Peres y Jay Rosen z Ofer Zeitouni x

    E-print Network

    Thin Points for Brownian Motion Amir Dembo #3; Yuval Peres y Jay Rosen z Ofer Zeitouni x Abstract Let T (x; r) denote the occupation measure of the ball of radius r centered at x for Brownian motion f for Brownian motion, i.e., points x on the Brownian path such that for some sequence of radii #3; Research

  7. Sparse Representations for Fast, OneShot Learning Kenneth Yip Gerald Jay Sussman

    E-print Network

    examples. Our model has been implemented as a computer program. The program ex­ hibits phonologicalSparse Representations for Fast, One­Shot Learning Kenneth Yip Gerald Jay Sussman Artificial Humans rapidly and reliably learn many kinds of regularities and general­ izations. We propose a novel

  8. EVALUATING THREAT ASSESSMENT FOR MULTI-STAGE CYBER ATTACKS Shanchieh Jay Yang

    E-print Network

    Jay Yang, Shanchieh

    EVALUATING THREAT ASSESSMENT FOR MULTI-STAGE CYBER ATTACKS Shanchieh Jay Yang Rochester Institute, NY Abstract-- Current practices to defend against cyber attacks are typically reactive yet passive cyber attack scenarios. Our results show that commonly used false positives and false negatives

  9. Molecular Caulk: A Pore Sealing Technology for Ultra-low k Dielectrics Jay J. Senkevich1

    E-print Network

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Molecular Caulk: A Pore Sealing Technology for Ultra-low k Dielectrics Jay J. Senkevich1 developed a pore sealing technology, which may allow the successful integration of these materials. We have, poly(p-xylylene), is selective with respect to copper and can completely seal porous-MSQ (methyl

  10. Asymmetry of Columbia River tidal plume fronts David A. Jay a,

    E-print Network

    Hickey, Barbara

    Asymmetry of Columbia River tidal plume fronts David A. Jay a, , Jiayi Pan a , Philip M. Orton b California current Upwelling Columbia River tidal plume dynamics can be explained in terms of two asymmetries). Here, we consider the interaction of the Columbia River plume with the California Current

  11. A Lighting Model for Fast Rendering of Forest Ecosystems Robert Geist Jay Steele

    E-print Network

    Westall, James M.

    parallel problem, together with careful management of the database that comprises the targeted plant is closely tied to careful integration of the plant database with the spatial partitioning of the sceneA Lighting Model for Fast Rendering of Forest Ecosystems Robert Geist Jay Steele Clemson University

  12. The Surface Electrical Properties Experiment Gene Simmons, 1 David 14. StrangvJay,2

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    D. Cubley/+ G. LaTorraca,l J. D. Redman, 5 J. Rossiter, 6 and R. 14atts6 Abstract The surfaceThe Surface Electrical Properties Experiment Gene Simmons, 1 David 14. StrangvJay,2 L. Bannister,3/m. J.l -magnetic permeability - henries/m. w- rotational frequency (w = 21rf, f- frequency in hz

  13. Mitigation of Sea Ice Contamination in QuikSCAT Wind Retrieval Weston Jay Hullinger

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    Mitigation of Sea Ice Contamination in QuikSCAT Wind Retrieval Weston Jay Hullinger A thesis All Rights Reserved #12;#12;ABSTRACT Mitigation of Sea Ice Contamination in QuikSCAT Wind Retrieval. However in the polar oceans, the presence of sea ice in or near the measurement footprint can adversely

  14. Delayed Visual and Haptic Feedback in a Reciprocal Tapping Task Caroline Jay Roger Hubbold

    E-print Network

    Manchester, University of

    Delayed Visual and Haptic Feedback in a Reciprocal Tapping Task Caroline Jay Roger Hubbold Advanced to considerable investigation, far less is known about the consequences of delayed haptic feedback. The current study investigates whether delaying haptic, and/or visual feedback in a simple reciprocal tapping task

  15. Phytate phosphorus utilization in the growing pig A. POINTILLART, Marie-Elise JAY, Nicole FONTAINE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Phytate phosphorus utilization in the growing pig A. POINTILLART, Marie-Elise JAY, Nicole FONTAINE LN.R.A., Station de Recherche.; de Nutrition, 78350 Jouy-en-Josns At least 2/3 of the phosphorus consumed by the pig are phytates. To analyse the interrelationships between phytate phosphorus

  16. Numerical Evidence that the Motion of Pluto is Chaotic Gerald Jay Sussman; Jack Wisdom

    E-print Network

    Wisdom, Jack

    Numerical Evidence that the Motion of Pluto is Chaotic Gerald Jay Sussman; Jack Wisdom Science, New@jstor.org. http://www.jstor.org Wed Oct 17 16:36:12 2007 #12;Numerical Evidence That the Motion of Pluto for 845 million years. This integration indicates that the long-term mo- tion of the planet Pluto

  17. John Jay College Confidential Informant Study Reveals Weaknesses in New Jersey Police Practices

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    John Jay College Confidential Informant Study Reveals Weaknesses in New Jersey Police Practices Justice faculty who investigated how closely the use of confidential informants conformed to New Jersey policy. The study revealed inconsistent policies governing the use of confidential informants at all

  18. PATHOGENICITY OF HAEMOPROTEUS DANILEWSKYI, KRUSE, 1890, IN BLUE JAYS (CYANOCITTA CRISTATA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary C. Garvin; Bruce L. Homer; Ellis C. Greiner

    Although the impact of blood parasite infections on passerine birds is potentially great, little is known of their pathologic effects. We studied Haemoproteus danilewskyi in exper- imentally infected captive and naturally infected free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata )t o determine patterns of infection and examine the pathologic effects of the parasite on the host. Physiologic changes, such as elevated numbers

  19. EPIZOOTIOLOGY OF HAEMOPROTEUS DANILEWSKYI (HAEMOSPORINA: HAEMOPROTEIDAE) IN BLUE JAYS (CYANOCITTA CRISTATA) IN SOUTHCENTRAL FLORIDA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary C. Garvin; Ellis C. Greiner

    Prevalence and density of Haemoproteus danilewskyi was studied in a population of free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida (USA) from May 1992 to December 1995. Prevalence of infection was 27% for data combined over years, seasons, ages, and sexes. Prevalence did not vary between sexes or among years, but increased with age and varied with season, being highest

  20. Jay Rummel, Five Valley Trilogy, acrylic, 3-panel, 1977-1982

    E-print Network

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    , tapestry, 1986 Clarice Dreyer, cast aluminum fountain Jay Laber Charging Forward metal (car parts), 2002 David Secrest Infra- structure, wrought steel with pattern, welded exfoliated surfaces David Secrest (ties), mixed media Tim Holmes, Body Inhab- its the Soul, cast bronze Rudy Autio, Montana Horses

  1. Parasites and Parasitism (CAMB 549) Course organizer: Jay Farrell ( farrellj@vet.upenn.edu) 217 Rosenthal

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Parasites and Parasitism (CAMB 549) Course organizer: Jay Farrell ( farrellj@vet.upenn.edu) 217 and control of Chagas disease (Levy) 9/28 -- Parasite invasion/egress (Greenbaum) 9/30 -- Filariasis: balancing host protection and immunopathology (Nair) 10/14 -- Innate immunity to helminth parasites

  2. Parasites and Parasitism (CAMB 549) Course organizer: Jay Farrell ( farrellj@vet.upenn.edu) 207 Rosenthal

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Parasites and Parasitism (CAMB 549) Course organizer: Jay Farrell ( farrellj@vet.upenn.edu) 207 and Plasmodium (Roos) 9/29 -- Helminth biology (Beiting) 10/1 -- Filariasis pathogenesis (Lok) 10/4 ­ Parasite protection and immunopathology (Nair) 10/15 -- Innate immunity to helminth parasites (Artis) 10

  3. Handbook of Graph Theory. Edited by Jonathan L. Gross and Jay Yellen. CRC Press,

    E-print Network

    Beezer, Robert A.

    Handbook of Graph Theory. Edited by Jonathan L. Gross and Jay Yellen. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, 2004. ISBN 1-58488-090-2, Harcover. 1167 pp., $119.95. The "CRC Handbook" is well-known to any-familiarity to greatly expand its "Handbook" series. One of the newest entries to join titles such as the Hand- book

  4. RNAi for Treating Honey Bee Diseases Yanping (Judy) Chen and Jay D. Evans

    E-print Network

    Delaplane, Keith S.

    1 RNAi for Treating Honey Bee Diseases Yanping (Judy) Chen and Jay D. Evans USDA-ARS Beltsville Bee occurred through serendipity. RNA interference (RNAi), a natural process to turn off gene activity famously known as RNAi (Fire et al., 1998). The discovery of RNAi has been viewed as a major breakthrough

  5. Reverse Engineering Self-Modifying Code: Unpacker Extraction Saumya Debray Jay Patel

    E-print Network

    Debray, Saumya

    Reverse Engineering Self-Modifying Code: Unpacker Extraction Saumya Debray Jay Patel Department}@cs.arizona.edu Abstract--An important application of binary-level reverse engineering is in reconstructing the internal such functionality can be helpful for reverse engineering the code. This paper describes a technique for identifying

  6. Reverse Engineering SelfModifying Code: Unpacker Extraction Saumya Debray Jay Patel

    E-print Network

    Debray, Saumya

    Reverse Engineering Self­Modifying Code: Unpacker Extraction Saumya Debray Jay Patel Department}@cs.arizona.edu Abstract---An important application of binary­level reverse engineering is in reconstructing the internal unpacking and code that does not; identifying such functionality can be helpful for reverse engineering

  7. Astronaut Jay Buckey participates in emergency bailout training in the WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Wearing a launch and entry suit and navigating a one person life raft, Astronaut Jay C. Buckey, M.D., participates in emergency bailout training in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Dr. Buckey is an alternate payload specialist for the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) mission. Nearby is a SCUBA-equipped diver who assisted in the training exercises.

  8. Western scrub-jays ( Aphelocoma californica) use cognitive strategies to protect their caches from thieving conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Emery, Nathan J; Dally, Joanna M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2004-01-01

    Food caching birds hide food and recover the caches when supplies are less abundant. There is, however, a risk to this strategy because the caches are susceptible to pilfering by others. Corvids use a number of different strategies to reduce possible cache theft. Scrub-jays with previous experience of pilfering other's caches cached worms in two visuospatially distinct caching trays either in private or in the presence of a conspecific. When these storers had cached in private, they subsequently observed both trays out of reach of a conspecific. When these storers had cached in the presence of a conspecific, they subsequently watched the observer pilfering from one of the trays while the other tray was placed in full view, but out of reach. The storers were then allowed to recover the remaining caches 3 h later. Jays cached more worms when they were observed during caching. At the time of recovery, they re-cached more than if they had cached in private, selectively re-caching outside of the trays in sites unbeknown to potential thieves. In addition, after a single pilfering trial, the jays switched their recovery strategy from predominantly checking their caches (i.e. returning to a cache site to see whether the food remained there) to predominantly eating them. Re-caching remained constant across the three trials. These results suggest that scrub-jays use flexible, cognitive caching and recovery strategies to aid in reducing potential future pilfering of caches by conspecifics. PMID:12827547

  9. INFLUENCE OF BILL SHAPE ON ECTOPARASITE LOAD IN WESTERN SCRUB-JAYS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brett R. Moyer; A. Townsend Peterson; Dale H. Clayton

    2002-01-01

    Populations of the Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) have bills specialized for feeding in their respective habitats. Populations in oak habitat have hooked bills, whereas those in pinyon habitat have pointed bills with a reduced maxillary overhang. Work on other bird species shows that the bill overhang is essential for efficient preening to con- trol ectoparasites. Given the importance of this

  10. Western scrub-jays ( Aphelocoma californica ) use cognitive strategies to protect their caches from thieving conspecifics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathan J. Emery; Joanna M. Dally; Nicola S. Clayton

    2004-01-01

    Food caching birds hide food and recover the caches when supplies are less abundant. There is, however, a risk to this strategy because the caches are susceptible to pilfering by others. Corvids use a number of different strategies to reduce possible cache theft. Scrub-jays with previous experience of pilfering other's caches cached worms in two visuospatially distinct caching trays either

  11. Comparing alternative models to empirical data: cognitive models of western scrub-jay foraging behavior.

    PubMed

    Luttbeg, Barney; Langen, Tom A

    2004-02-01

    Animals often select one item from a set of candidates, as when choosing a foraging site or mate, and are expected to possess accurate and efficient rules for acquiring information and making decisions. Little is known, however, about the decision rules animals use. We compare patterns of information sampling by western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) when choosing a nut with three decision rules: best of n (BN), flexible threshold (FT), and comparative Bayes (CB). First, we use a null hypothesis testing approach and find that the CB decision rule, in which individuals use past experiences to make nonrandom assessment and choice decisions, produces patterns of behavior that more closely correspond to observed patterns of nut sampling in scrub-jays than the other two rules. This approach does not allow us to quantify how much better CB is at predicting scrub-jay behavior than the other decision rules. Second, we use a model selection approach that uses Akaike Information Criteria to quantify how well alternative models approximate observed data. We find that the CB rule is much more likely to produce the observed patterns of scrub-jay behavior than the other rules. This result provides some of the best empirical evidence of the use of Bayesian information updating by a nonhuman animal. PMID:14970927

  12. Comparing Alternative Models to Empirical Data: Cognitive Models of Western Scrub?Jay Foraging Behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barney Luttbeg

    2004-01-01

    Animals often select one item from a set of candidates, as when choosing a foraging site or mate, and are expected to possess accurate and efficient rules for acquiring information and making decisions. Little is known, however, about the decision rules animals use. We compare patterns of information sampling by western scrub- jays (Aphelocoma californica) when choosing a nut with

  13. Western scrub-jays anticipate future needs independently of their current motivational state.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sérgio P C; Dickinson, Anthony; Clayton, Nicola S

    2007-05-15

    Planning for the future has been considered to be a uniquely human trait [1-3]. However, recent studies challenge this hypothesis by showing that food-caching Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) can relate their previous experience as thieves to the possibility of future cache theft by another bird [4], are sensitive to the state of their caches at recovery ([5] and S. De Kort, S.P.C.C., D. Alexis, A.D., and N.S.C., unpublished data), and can plan for tomorrow's breakfast [6]. Although these results suggest that scrub-jays are capable of future planning, the degree to which these birds act independently of their current motivational state is a matter of contention. The Bischof-Köhler hypothesis [1] holds that nonhuman animals cannot anticipate and act toward the satisfaction of a future need not currently experienced or cued by their present motivational state. Using specific satiety to control for the jays' current and future motivational states, here we specifically test this hypothesis by dissociating current and future motivational states. We report that Western scrub-jays anticipate the recovery of their caches, as well as their own future needs, by acting independently of their current motivational state and immediate needs. The fact that the birds act in favor of a future need as opposed to the current one challenges the hypothesis that this ability is unique to humans. PMID:17462894

  14. Western scrub-jay funerals: cacophonous aggregations in response to dead conspecifics

    E-print Network

    McElreath, Richard

    -reducing behavioural modification in western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma californica, and is similar to the response acceptance 25 July 2012 Available online 27 August 2012 MS. number: A12-00867R Keywords: Aphelocoma californica bird cacophonous aggregation cues of risk dead conspecific response to dead risk assessment

  15. Visual coverage and scanning behavior in two corvid species: American crow and Western scrub jay.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban; O'Rourke, Colleen; Pitlik, Todd

    2010-12-01

    Inter-specific differences in the configuration of avian visual fields and degree of eye/head movements have been associated with foraging and anti-predator behaviors. Our goal was to study visual fields, eye movements, and head movements in two species of corvids: American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Western scrub jay (Aphelocoma californica). American crows had wider binocular overlap, longer vertical binocular fields, narrower blind areas, and higher amplitude of eye movement than Western scrub jays. American crows can converge their eyes and see their own bill tip, which may facilitate using different foraging techniques (e.g., pecking, probing) and manufacturing and handing rudimentary tools. Western scrub jays had a higher head movement rate than American crows while on the ground, and the opposite between-species difference was found when individuals were perching. Faster head movements may enhance the ability to scan the environment, which may be related to a higher perceived risk of predation of Western scrub jays when on the ground, and American crows when perching. The visual field configuration of these species appears influenced mostly by foraging techniques while their scaning behavior, by predation risk. PMID:20803204

  16. Mast-producing trees and the geographical ecology of western scrub-jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter D. Koenig; Alan H. Krakauer; William B. Monahan; Joseph Haydock; Johannes M. H. Knops; William J. Carmen

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the relationship between population abundance and variability of western scrub-jays Aphelocoma californica based on 48 yr of Audubon Christmas Bird Counts and the resources on which they depend as indexed by the diversity and abundance of mast-producing oaks and pines and, for California, estimates of acorn production based on a statewide survey. In general, populations of A. c.

  17. Re-caching by Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) Cannot Be Attributed to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Thom, James M.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2013-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) live double lives, storing food for the future while raiding the stores of other birds. One tactic scrub-jays employ to protect stores is “re-caching”—relocating caches out of sight of would-be thieves. Recent computational modelling work suggests that re-caching might be mediated not by complex cognition, but by a combination of memory failure and stress. The “Stress Model” asserts that re-caching is a manifestation of a general drive to cache, rather than a desire to protect existing stores. Here, we present evidence strongly contradicting the central assumption of these models: that stress drives caching, irrespective of social context. In Experiment (i), we replicate the finding that scrub-jays preferentially relocate food they were watched hiding. In Experiment (ii) we find no evidence that stress increases caching. In light of our results, we argue that the Stress Model cannot account for scrub-jay re-caching. PMID:23326366

  18. Re-caching by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) cannot be attributed to stress.

    PubMed

    Thom, James M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2013-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) live double lives, storing food for the future while raiding the stores of other birds. One tactic scrub-jays employ to protect stores is "re-caching"-relocating caches out of sight of would-be thieves. Recent computational modelling work suggests that re-caching might be mediated not by complex cognition, but by a combination of memory failure and stress. The "Stress Model" asserts that re-caching is a manifestation of a general drive to cache, rather than a desire to protect existing stores. Here, we present evidence strongly contradicting the central assumption of these models: that stress drives caching, irrespective of social context. In Experiment (i), we replicate the finding that scrub-jays preferentially relocate food they were watched hiding. In Experiment (ii) we find no evidence that stress increases caching. In light of our results, we argue that the Stress Model cannot account for scrub-jay re-caching. PMID:23326366

  19. c 1997 by Jay H. Lee, Jin Hoon Choi, and Kwang Soon Lee DYNAMIC MATRIX CONTROL

    E-print Network

    Hong, Deog Ki

    Matrix Control Proposed by C. Cutler at Shell later became the President of DMCC. Based on a system.1.1 OVERVIEW OF COMPUTER CONTROL Computer Control System 50 #12;c 1997 by Jay H. Lee, Jin Hoon Choi, and Kwang ect of impulse response - 9 n s.t.Hn+1 = Hn+2 = = 0: Finite Impulse Response" reasonable for stable

  20. The FMS MOM4 User Guide Stephen Griffies

    E-print Network

    The FMS MOM4 User Guide Stephen Griffies Niki Zadeh ........................................................................................................................2 1.1. What is MOM? .........................................................................................................2 1.2. MOM4 Releases

  1. Exclusion in corvids: the performance of food-caching Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius).

    PubMed

    Shaw, Rachael C; Plotnik, Joshua M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2013-11-01

    Choice by exclusion involves selecting a rewarded stimulus by rejecting alternatives that are unlikely to be rewarded. It has been proposed that in corvids, exclusion is an adaptive specialization for caching that, together with object permanence and observational spatial memory, enhances a bird's ability to keep track of the contents of caches. Thus, caching species are predicted to perform well in tasks requiring exclusion. We tested this prediction by assessing the performance of Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius), a highly specialized cacher, in a two-way object choice task in which food was hidden in 1 of 2 cups. Consistent with the corvids' capacity for observational spatial memory, jays were highly accurate when shown the location of the food reward. However, the jays failed to exclude the empty cup when shown its contents. This failure to select the baited cup when shown the empty cup was possibly due to jays attending to the experimenter's movements and erroneously selecting the empty cup by responding to these local enhancement cues. To date, no corvids have been tested in an auditory two-way object choice task. Testing exclusion in the auditory domain requires that a bird use the noise produced when the baited cup is shaken to locate the reward. Although jays chose the baited cup more frequently than predicted by chance, their performance did not differ from trials controlling for the use of conflicting cues provided by the experimenter. Overall, our results provide little support for the hypothesis that caching has shaped exclusion abilities in corvids. PMID:23668696

  2. The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: a first look at Taurus with HARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. J.; Chrysostomou, A.; Hatchell, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Buckle, J. V.; Nutter, D.; Fich, M.; Brunt, C.; Butner, H.; Cavanagh, B.; Curtis, E. I.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; di Francesco, J.; Etxaluze, M.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J. S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Matthews, B.; Matthews, H.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Richer, J. S.; Roberts, J.; Sadavoy, S.; Simpson, R. J.; Tothill, N.; Tsamis, Y.; Viti, S.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, Glenn J.; Yates, J.

    2010-06-01

    As part of a James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Legacy Survey of star formation in the Gould Belt, we present early science results for Taurus. CO J = 3 -2 maps have been secured along the north-west ridge and bowl, collectively known as L 1495, along with deep 13CO and C18O J = 3 -2 maps in two subregions. With these data, we search for molecular outflows, and use the distribution of flows, Herbig-Haro (HH) objects and shocked H2 line-emission features, together with the population of young stars, protostellar cores and starless condensations to map star formation across this extensive region. In total, 21 outflows are identified. It is clear that the bowl is more evolved than the ridge, harbouring a greater population of T Tauri stars and a more diffuse, more turbulent ambient medium. By comparison, the ridge contains a much younger, less widely distributed population of protostars which, in turn, is associated with a greater number of molecular outflows. We estimate the ratio of the numbers of pre-stellar to protostellar cores in L 1495 to be ~1.3-2.3, and of gravitationally unbound starless cores to (gravitationally bound) pre-stellar cores to be ~1. If we take previous estimates of the protostellar lifetime of ~5 × 105 yr, this indicates a pre-stellar lifetime of 9(+/-3) × 105 yr. From the number of outflows, we also crudely estimate the star formation efficiency in L 1495, finding it to be compatible with a canonical value of 10-15 per cent. We note that molecular outflow-driving sources have redder near-infrared colours than their HH jet-driving counterparts. We also find that the smaller, denser cores are associated with the more massive outflows, as one might expect if mass build-up in the flow increases with the collapse and contraction of the protostellar envelope.

  3. Anim. Behav.,1985,33, 1068-1079 The detection of cryptic prey by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata)

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Anim. Behav.,1985,33, 1068-1079 The detection of cryptic prey by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) I (Cyanocitta cristata) hunting for dispersed, cryptic prey was investigated in an operant simulation in which

  4. A Modular Control System for Remote Subsea Eric Stephen Smith

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    for the degree of Master of Science In Ocean Engineering Melbourne, Florida July, 2003 #12;ii © Copyright 2003 by Eric Stephen Smith Stephen L. Wood, Ph.D., P.E. Assistant Professor Ocean Engineering Principle Advisor Andrew Zborowski, Ph.D. Professor and Program Chair Ocean Engineering Héctor Gutierrez, Ph.D., P

  5. Vector Space Models of Lexical Meaning Stephen Clark

    E-print Network

    Koehn, Philipp

    stephen.clark@cl.cam.ac.uk A draft chapter for the Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Contemporary Semantics job: clark macro: handbook.cls date/time: 25-Mar-2014/9:41 #12;2 Stephen Clark 1 Introduction Much of this Handbook is based on ideas from Formal Semantics, in which the meanings of phrases or sentences

  6. Stephen F. Austin State University Student Organization Handbook

    E-print Network

    Long, Nicholas

    2010-2011 Stephen F. Austin State University Student Organization Handbook Statement of Involvement The University And Student Organizations Aside from the supervision exercised through the Office of Student of Stephen F. Austin State University, the University recognizes registered student organizations

  7. Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager

    E-print Network

    Levi, Ran

    Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager 01224 438607 sylvia.stephen@abdn.ac.uk Contact us: The Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health offers a bespoke service to the food industry We also offer guidance and advice on when a nutritional claim can be made on your product Back of pack

  8. Bonneville Power Administration Stephen J. (Steve) Wright, Administrator

    E-print Network

    at the Bonneville Power Administration in the agency's conservation office as an entry-level GS-9. Today, he is BPA, particularly wind power, to the region and at the same time provide greater reliability. Wind on BPA's systemBonneville Power Administration Stephen J. (Steve) Wright, Administrator Stephen J. Wright

  9. From normal brain and behavior to schizophrenia StephenGrossberg

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    From normal brain and behavior to schizophrenia StephenGrossberg January, 2003 TechnicNeural Systems 677 BeaconStreet Boston, MA 02215 #12;FROM NORMAL BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR TO SCHIZOPHRENIA Stephen the environment, focus attention and act upon motivationally important events, and cope with unexpectedevents

  10. Avian Theory of Mind and counter espionage by food-caching western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanna M. Dally; Nathan J. Emery; Nicola S. Clayton

    2010-01-01

    Food-caching scrub-jays hide food for future consumption and rely on memory to recover their caches at a later date. These caches are susceptible to pilfering by other individuals, however. Consequently, jays engage in a number of counter-strategies to protect their hidden items, caching most of them behind barriers, or using shade and distance as a way of reducing what the

  11. The scientific legacy of Stephen Rothman.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bickers, David R

    2015-04-01

    The year 2014 marks the centennial of events that led to the First World War ("the war to end all wars") following the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand of the crumbling Austro-Hungarian Empire. It also marks the 120th anniversary of the birth of Stephen Rothman and the 60th anniversary of the publication of his epic textbook The Physiology and Biochemistry of the Skin. In this review, we document our belief that Rothman had a seismic impact on moving investigative dermatology from a medical backwater to a scientific discipline that can hold its own with any other specialty. PMID:25373439

  12. Stephen H. Schneider (1945-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, Ben; Solomon, Susan

    2010-10-01

    Stephen H. Schneider, a pioneering climate scientist, prolific author, and inspirational teacher, passed away on 19 July 2010 while on travel in Europe. He was 65. As is clear from the outpouring of testimonials since his passing, atmospheric science has lost a towering figure, one whose impact as a scientist and communicator was exceeded only by his extraordinary human qualities. Steve Schneider touched lives; built bridges of communication to the public, to policy makers, and across disciplines; and established a distinguished record of seminal scientific breakthroughs.

  13. , 20133054, published 5 February 20142812014Proc. R. Soc. B Richard G. Santangelo, Jennifer Emerson, Fred Gould, Coby Schal and David G. Heckel

    E-print Network

    , Fred Gould, Coby Schal and David G. Heckel Astrid T. Groot, Gerhard Schöfl, Ollie Inglis, Susanne for correspondence: Astrid T. Groot e-mail: a.t.groot@uva.nl Electronic supplementary material is available at http in a moth sex pheromone blend: genetic basis and behavioural consequences Astrid T. Groot1,2,4,5, Gerhard

  14. Mapping Florida Scrub Jay habitat for purposes of land-use management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.; Provancha, Mark J.; Smith, Rebecca B.

    1991-01-01

    Geographical information system (GIS) applications were used to map areas of primary and secondary Florida Scrub Jay habitat on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) using vegetation and soils maps. Data from field studies were used for accuracy assessment and evaluating the importance of mapping classes. Primary habitat accounts for 15 percent of the potential habitat and contained 57 percent of the Florida Scrub Jay population on KSC. Proximity analysis identified potential population centers, which were 44 percent of the potential habitat and contained 86 percent of the population. This study is an example of how remote sensing and GIS applications can provide information for land-use planning, habitat management, and the evaluation of cumulative impacts.

  15. Epizootiology of Haemoproteus danilewskyi (Haemosporina: Haemoproteidae) in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    Prevalence and density of Haemoproteus danilewskyi was studied in a population of free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida (USA) from May 1992 to December 1995. Prevalence of infection was 27% for data combined over years, seasons, ages, and sexes. Prevalence did not vary between sexes or among years, but increased with age and varied with season, being highest in June-July and lowest in November-January. Parasite density did not vary between sexes or among seasons, but was higher in younger birds when controlling for season. To determine periods of natural transmission, seasonal patterns of infection were compared with previous month abundance of the biting fly vectors. Mean monthly prevalence of H. danilewskyi in older jays was positively correlated with previous month abundance of Culicoides edeni and C. arboricola, both capable of sporogonic development of H. danilewskyi. PMID:12685063

  16. Rapid divergence and postglacial colonization in western North American Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri).

    PubMed

    Burg, Theresa M; Gaston, Anthony J; Winker, Kevin; Friesen, Vicki L

    2005-10-01

    Post-Pleistocene avian colonization of deglaciated North America occurred from multiple refugia, including a coastal refugium in the northwest. The location of a Pacific Coastal refugium is controversial; however, multiple lines of evidence suggest that it was located near the Queen Charlotte Islands (also known as Haida Gwaii). The Queen Charlotte Islands contain a disproportionately large number of endemic plants and animals including the Steller's jay Cyanocitta stelleri carlottae. Using five highly variable microsatellite markers, we studied population structure among eight populations of Steller's jay (N = 150) from geographical areas representing three subspecies in western North America: C. s. carlottae, C. s. stelleri and C. s. annectens. Microsatellite analyses revealed genetic differentiation between each of the three subspecies, although more extensive sampling of additional C. s. annectens populations is needed to clarify the level of subspecies differentiation. High levels of population structure were found among C. s. stelleri populations with significant differences in all but two pairwise comparisons. A significant isolation by distance pattern was observed amongst populations in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. In the C. s. carlottae population, there was evidence of reduced genetic variation, higher number of private alleles than northern C. s. stelleri populations and higher levels of divergence between Queen Charlotte Island and other populations. We were unable to reject the hypothesis that the Queen Charlotte Islands served as a refugium during the Pleistocene. Steller's jay may have colonized the Queen Charlotte Islands near the end of the last glaciation or persisted throughout the Pleistocene, and this subspecies may thus represent a glacial relic. The larger number of private alleles, despite reduced genetic variation, morphological distinctiveness and high divergence from other populations suggests that the Queen Charlotte Island colonization pre-dates that of the mainland. Furthermore, our results show rapid divergence in Steller's jay populations on the mainland following the retreat of the ice sheets. PMID:16202093

  17. “Anting” in Blue Jays: evidence in support of a food-preparatory function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Eisner; Daniel Aneshansley

    2008-01-01

    Summary.  Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines),\\u000a is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants.\\u000a Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is

  18. Learning-set behavior in the learning-set experienced blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan C. Kamil; Michael Lougee; Ruth I. Shulman

    1973-01-01

    Conducted a series of experiments with object-discrimination learning-set (ODLS) experienced blue jays. Exp. I demonstrated long-term retention of the ability to solve new ODLS problems, short-term retention loss of intraproblem information concerning specific problems after 2 acquisition trials, and a higher percentage correct following a reinforced Trial 1 response than following a nonreinforced Trial 1 response. Exp. II demonstrated that

  19. Discrimination and generalization of leaf damage by blue jays ( Cyanocitta cristata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela G. Real; Ruth Iannazzi; Alan C. Kamil; Bernd Heinrich

    1984-01-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) responded to projected black-and-white silhouettes of cherry leaves that were either undamaged or were damaged by either\\u000a cryptic caterpillars that disguise leaf damage due to their feeding or by noncryptic caterpillars that do not disguise leaf\\u000a damage due to their feeding. Pecks to the key on which the images were projected were reinforced only if interresponse

  20. STS-90 P.S. Jay Buckey and Pilot Scott Altman arrive at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D. (at left), and Pilot Scott Altman arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility in preparation for the launch of Columbia on April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT from KSC's Launch Pad 39B. The launch of Neurolab on STS-90, which will be the second mission of 1998, is scheduled to last nearly 17 days.

  1. Observational visuospatial encoding of the cache locations of others by western scrub-jays ( Aphelocoma californica )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shigeru Watanabe; Nicola S. Clayton

    2007-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) hide food and rely on spatial memory to recover their caches at a later date. They also rely on observational spatial memory\\u000a to steal caches made by other individuals. Successful pilfering may require an understanding of allocentric space because\\u000a the observer will often be in a different position from the demonstrator when the caching event occurs.

  2. Visual coverage and scanning behavior in two corvid species: American crow and Western scrub jay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esteban Fernández-Juricic; Colleen O’Rourke; Todd Pitlik

    2010-01-01

    Inter-specific differences in the configuration of avian visual fields and degree of eye\\/head movements have been associated\\u000a with foraging and anti-predator behaviors. Our goal was to study visual fields, eye movements, and head movements in two species\\u000a of corvids: American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Western scrub jay (Aphelocoma californica). American crows had wider binocular overlap, longer vertical binocular fields, narrower

  3. Western scrub-jays allocate longer observation time to more valuable information.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arii; Grodzinski, Uri; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-07-01

    When humans mentally reconstruct past events and imagine future scenarios, their subjective experience of mentally time travelling is accompanied by the awareness of doing so. Despite recent popularity of studying episodic memory in animals, such phenomenological consciousness has been extremely difficult to demonstrate without agreed behavioural markers of consciousness in non-linguistic subjects. We presented western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) with a task requiring them to allocate observing time between two peepholes to see food being hidden in either of two compartments, one where observing the hiding location was necessary to later relocate the food, and another where food could easily be found without watching. Jays first separately experienced these consequences of possessing information in each compartment and subsequently, once given a choice, made more looks and spent more time looking into the compartment where information was necessary than into the compartment where it was unnecessary. Thus, the jays can collect information to solve a future problem. Moreover, they can differentiate sources of information according to their potential value and modify behaviour to efficiently collect important, usable information. This is the first evidence of metacognition in a species that passes the behavioural criteria for both retrospective and prospective mental time travel. PMID:24322875

  4. The effects of low levels of light at night upon the endocrine physiology of western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica).

    PubMed

    Schoech, Stephan J; Bowman, Reed; Hahn, Thomas P; Goymann, Wolfgang; Schwabl, Ingrid; Bridge, Eli S

    2013-11-01

    Florida scrub-jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in the suburbs breed earlier than jays in native habitat. Amongst the possible factors that influence this advance (e.g., food availability, microclimate, predator regime, etc.), is exposure to artificial lights at night (LAN). LAN could stimulate the reproductive axis of the suburban jays. Alternatively, LAN could inhibit pineal melatonin (MEL), thus removing its inhibitory influence on the reproductive axis. Because Florida scrub-jays are a threatened species, we used western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) to investigate the effects of LAN upon reproductive hormones and melatonin. Jays were held under conditions in which the dark-phase of the light:dark cycle was without illumination and then under low levels of LAN. Under both conditions, birds were exposed first to short-days (9.5L:14.5D) that were gradually increased to long-days (14.5L:9.5D). At various times, blood samples were collected during the light part of the cycle to measure reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone, LH; testosterone, T; and estradiol, E2 ). Similarly, samples to assess melatonin were collected during the dark. In males, LAN caused a depression in LH levels and levels were ?4× greater under long- than short-days. In females, there was no effect of LAN or photoperiod upon LH. LAN resulted in depressed T levels in females, although there was no effect on T in males. E2 levels in both sexes were lower under LAN than under an unlighted dark-phase. Paradoxically, MEL was higher in jays under LAN, and under long-days. MEL did not differ by sex. LAN disrupted the extraordinarily strong correlation between T and E2 that existed under unlighted nocturnal conditions. Overall, our findings fail to support the hypothesis that LAN stimulates the reproductive axis. Rather, the data demonstrate that LAN tends to inhibit reproductive hormone secretion, although not in a consistent fashion between the sexes. PMID:23970442

  5. Arthroscopic Broström repair with Gould augmentation via an accessory anterolateral port for lateral instability of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kentaro; Takao, Masato; Miyamoto, Wataru; Innami, Ken; Matsushita, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Although several arthroscopic surgical techniques for the treatment of lateral instability of the ankle have been introduced recently, some concern remains over their procedural complexity, complications, and unclear clinical outcomes. We have simplified the arthroscopic technique of Broström repair with Gould augmentation. This technique requires only two small skin incisions for two ports (medial midline and accessory anterolateral ports), without needing a percutaneous procedure or extension of the skin incisions. The anterior talofibular ligament is reattached to its anatomical footprint on the fibula with suture anchor, under arthroscopic view. The inferior extensor retinaculum is directly visualized through the accessory anterolateral port and is attached to the fibula with another suture anchor under arthroscopic view via the anterolateral port. The use of two small ports offers a procedure that is simple to perform and less morbid for patients. PMID:25015792

  6. When self-consciousness breaks G. Lynn Stephens & G. Graham

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    When self-consciousness breaks G. Lynn Stephens & G. Graham Cambridge, Mas. : MIT Press, 2000, as the authors finally admit, much remains to be learnt on self-consciousness, the book offers two important

  7. AN ELECTROMAGNETIC INVERSE PROBLEM IN CHIRAL STEPHEN R. MCDOWALL

    E-print Network

    McDowall, Stephen

    AN ELECTROMAGNETIC INVERSE PROBLEM IN CHIRAL MEDIA STEPHEN R. MCDOWALL Abstract. We consider determines the electromagnetic parameters, namely the conductivity, electric permittivity, magnetic to the electromagnetic fields, the equations governing these fields change from a single second order elliptic partial

  8. Polyarginine as a multifunctional fusion tag STEPHEN M. FUCHS1

    E-print Network

    Raines, Ronald T.

    Polyarginine as a multifunctional fusion tag STEPHEN M. FUCHS1 AND RONALD T. RAINES1,2 1 Department sulfate (Fuchs and Raines 2004; Gonc¸ alves et al. 2005). The length and composition of the cationic

  9. Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor

    E-print Network

    Adali, Tulay

    Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor Syntactic and semantic, natural language processing, intelligent agents Dr. Milton Halem, Research Professor Scientific computing. Marjorie J. McShane, Research Assistant Professor Computationally tractable descriptions of language

  10. Diversity of Pseudomonas strains isolated with King's B and Gould's S1 agar determined by repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction, 16S rDNA sequencing and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy characterisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaare Johnsen; Preben Nielsen

    1999-01-01

    King's B and Gould's S1 agar were compared with regard to the isolation of Pseudomonas from four environmental samples. In all samples, King's B gave the highest number of colony-forming units, and in some environments, there were more fluorescent colony-forming units on King's B as well. However, almost all types grew on Gould's S1, which enabled us to isolate a

  11. Habitat-specific breeder survival of Florida Scrub-Jays: Inferences from multistate models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breininger, D.R.; Nichols, J.D.; Carter, G.M.; Oddy, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying habitat-specific survival and changes in habitat quality within disturbance-prone habitats is critical for understanding population dynamics and variation in fitness, and for managing degraded ecosystems. We used 18 years of color-banding data and multistate capture-recapture models to test whether habitat quality within territories influences survival and detection probability of breeding Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) and to estimate bird transition probabilities from one territory quality state to another. Our study sites were along central Florida's Atlantic coast and included two of the four largest metapopulations within the species range. We developed Markov models for habitat transitions and compared these to bird transition probabilities. Florida Scrub-Jay detection probabilities ranged from 0.88 in the tall territory state to 0.99 in the optimal state; detection probabilities were intermediate in the short state. Transition probabilities were similar for birds and habitat in grid cells mapped independently of birds. Thus, bird transitions resulted primarily from habitat transitions between states over time and not from bird movement. Survival ranged from 0.71 in the short state to 0.82 in the optimal state, with tall states being intermediate. We conclude that average Florida Scrub-Jay survival will remain at levels that lead to continued population declines because most current habitat quality is only marginally suitable across most of the species range. Improvements in habitat are likely to be slow and difficult because tall states are resistant to change and the optimal state represents an intermediate transitional stage. The multistate modeling approach to quantifying survival and habitat transition probabilities is useful for quantifying habitat transition probabilities and comparing them to bird transition probabilities to test for habitat selection in dynamic environments. ?? 2009 by the Ecological society ot America.

  12. Experimental West Nile virus infection in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Weingartl, H M; Neufeld, J L; Copps, J; Marszal, P

    2004-07-01

    Ten crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and three blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata), species indigenous to North America, were intravenously inoculated with 10(3) PFU of West Nile virus (WNV) strain NY99 for production of positive tissues for Canadian surveillance. Both species developed clinical signs 4 days postinoculation (dpi). Virus was detected in blood, cloacal and tracheal swabs, and in a number of organs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and virus isolation (titers reaching over 10(7) PFU/0.1 g). Virus appeared as early as 1 dpi in blood (10(2)-10(3) PFU/ml) and spleen (10(3)-10(4) PFU/0.1 g of tissue), whereas kidney, liver, intestine, gonads, heart, skeletal muscle, and lung tested positive for WNV in a later stage of the infection. Immunostaining (IHC) using heterologous rabbit anti-WNV polyclonal antiserum detected viral antigen in a wide range of organs, starting at 2 dpi. Detection of WNV antigen in the brain of blue jays and crows by IHC was laborious as only few cells, not present in all sections, would stain positive. Mononuclear cells appeared to be an important target for virus replication, contributing to virus spread throughout tissues during the infection. This conclusion was based on the positive IHC staining of these cells in organs before virus antigen detection in parenchymal cells and supported by virus isolation and RT-PCR-positive results in white blood cells. The inability of blue jays and crows to perch and fly may reflect weakness due to generalized infection and marked skeletal muscle involvement, although involvement of the central nervous system cannot be excluded. PMID:15232136

  13. Temporal predictability in food availability: effects upon the reproductive axis in Scrub-Jays.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Eli S; Schoech, Stephan J; Bowman, Reed; Wingfield, John C

    2009-01-01

    Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in a suburban environment with year-round access to multiple sources of abundant, human-source foods consistently breed earlier each year and have lower baseline levels of circulating corticosterone (CORT) than jays in a nearby wildland setting. These findings suggest that food supplies influence CORT levels, which in turn may partially determine the timing of reproduction. However, wildland birds with access to high-quality supplemental foods did not advance breeding or lower CORT levels to the degree observed in the suburbs. Therefore, rather than quality or quantity of food consumed, the perception of a reliable and predictable food supply may be an important factor in determining laying dates. If a predictable food supply accelerates the reproductive process, it follows that food provided on an unpredictable schedule may slow reproduction. We subjected captive Western Scrub-Jays (A. californica) to a 30-day photoperiod transition from short- to long-days and tested whether birds with access to food on an unpredictable schedule exhibited delayed or reduced production of reproductive hormones compared with birds given food on a predictable schedule. Baseline CORT concentrations increased slightly during the experiment, but did not differ between treatment groups. Birds with unpredictable food had slightly lower testosterone levels relative to controls, but there was no effect on estradiol or luteinizing hormone. Our findings offer weak support for the hypothesis that an unpredictable food supply will delay the onset of reproduction; however, the artificial lab environment may limit the application of these findings to free-living populations. PMID:18756528

  14. Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) overcome their current desires to anticipate two distinct future needs and plan for them appropriately.

    PubMed

    Cheke, Lucy G; Clayton, Nicola S

    2012-04-23

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) have been shown to overcome present satiety to cache food they will desire in the future. Here, we show that another corvid, the Eurasian jay (Garrulus glandarius), can distinguish between two distinct future desires and plan for each appropriately, despite experiencing a conflicting current motivation. We argue that these data address the criticisms of previous work, and suggest a way in which associative learning processes and future-oriented cognition may combine to allow prospective behaviour. PMID:22048890

  15. Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) overcome their current desires to anticipate two distinct future needs and plan for them appropriately

    PubMed Central

    Cheke, Lucy G.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2012-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) have been shown to overcome present satiety to cache food they will desire in the future. Here, we show that another corvid, the Eurasian jay (Garrulus glandarius), can distinguish between two distinct future desires and plan for each appropriately, despite experiencing a conflicting current motivation. We argue that these data address the criticisms of previous work, and suggest a way in which associative learning processes and future-oriented cognition may combine to allow prospective behaviour. PMID:22048890

  16. STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey is suited up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D., prepares for launch during suit-up activities in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Buckey and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Buckey is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body -- the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

  17. Mycoplasma sturni from blue jays and northern mockingbirds with conjunctivitis in Florida.

    PubMed

    Ley, D H; Geary, S J; Berkhoff, J E; McLaren, J M; Levisohn, S

    1998-04-01

    Northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) and blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in a Florida (USA) wildlife care facility developed clinical signs and gross lesions suggestive of the ongoing outbreak of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) conjunctivitis in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) and American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis). Mycoplasmal organisms were cultured from conjunctival/corneal swabs of birds with sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and/or epiphora. All of the isolates tested were identified as Mycoplasma sturni by indirect immunofluorescence. Mycoplasma sturni as well as MG should be considered in the differential diagnosis of songbirds with conjunctivitis. PMID:9577796

  18. Concomitant mycotic and verminous pneumonia in a blue jay from Georgia.

    PubMed

    Young, E A; Cornish, T E; Little, S E

    1998-07-01

    An emaciated, moribund, male blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) was collected in Georgia (USA) and died shortly after capture. Necropsy revealed nine large nematodes identified as Diplotriaena tricuspis in the thoracic and abdominal air sacs and within the pericardial sac. Multiple mycotic granulomas also were observed in the lungs and air sacs, and fungal culture of these lesions yielded pure growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. Histologic examination of the lungs revealed disseminated granulomatous inflammation containing both larvated nematode eggs and abundant fungal hyphae. This is the first description of concomitant A. fumigatus and D. tricuspis infection in a bird. PMID:9706574

  19. STS-79 MISSION SPECIALISTS JOHN E. BLAHA AND JAY APT IN SLIDEWIRE BASKET DURING TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Clad in their launch/entry suits, STS-79 Mission Specialists John E. Blaha (left) and Jay Apt test the fit of a slidewire basket on the emergency egress system at Launch Pad 39A. The six astronauts assigned to the fourth Shuttle-Mir docking flight are completing Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. A dress rehearsal for launch, the TCDT includes emergency egress training at the launch pad and culminates with a simulated countdown. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is undergoing preparations for liftoff on STS-79 no earlier than Sept. 12.

  20. STS-90 P.S. Jay Buckey in white room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D., is assisted by NASA and USA closeout crew members immediately preceding launch for the nearly 17-day Neurolab mission. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Linnehan and six fellow crew members will shortly enter the orbiter at KSC's Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:19 p.m. EDT, April 17.

  1. After grazing exclusion, is there any modification of strategy for two guerrilla species: Elymus repens (L.) Gould and Agrostis stolonifera (L.)?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Amiaud; Blaise Touzard; Anne Bonis; Jan-Bernard Bouzillé

    2008-01-01

    Elymus repens (L.) Gould and Agrostis stolonifera (L.), are competitive grasses with guerrilla strategy that invade grasslands with a low stocking rate. In this work, we tested\\u000a the hypotheses that grazing exclusion facilitates vegetative development of rhizomes and stolons of these clonal grasses and\\u000a that such change is a key mechanism for their abundance in set-aside grasslands. The competitive capacities

  2. The Virtual Tea Room: Integrating Video into Everyday Life Stephen GILES, David ABRAMSON

    E-print Network

    Abramson, David

    The Virtual Tea Room: Integrating Video into Everyday Life Stephen GILES, David ABRAMSON School, Victoria, 3145 Australia {stephen.giles, david.abramson} @csse.monash.edu.au Abstract The impact of new

  3. African mitochondrial DNA tree, Stephen OppenheimerSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Oppenheimer DNAi Location:Applications>Human origins>migrations>Paths out of Africa Geneticist Stephen Oppenheimer talks about the mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome lineages of our ancestors.

  4. Human migrations: paths out of Africa, Stephen OppenheimerSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Oppenheimer DNAi Location:Applications>Human origins>migrations>taking the southern route Geneticist Stephen Oppenheimer talks about the climatic and physical obstacles faced by humans migrating out of Africa.

  5. Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) infestation on medium-sized mammals and blue jays in northwestern Illinois.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, A; Kitron, U; Jones, C J; Slajchert, T L

    1993-09-01

    High prevalence of infestation of five species of medium-sized mammals and blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata (L.), by immature Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman and Corwin was found in Castle Rock State Park in northwestern Illinois during May-August 1991. Raccoons, Procyon lotor L., and opossums, Didelphis virginiana Kerr, were infested with the highest larval densities and were trapped primarily in bottomland forest and ecotone habitats. All species had similar nymphal densities, except the eastern cottontails, Sylvilagus floridanus Allen, which were infested with fewer nymphs. Infestation by I. dammini is reported for the first time for fox squirrels, Sciurus niger E. G. St. Hilaire, and for the first time in the midwestern United States for blue jays, C. cristata. These two species were hosts for nymphs in upland forest habitat. Molting rates varied among ticks that fed on different host species and among larvae that fed on individuals of the same species. Molting rate is proposed as an important factor in determining the relative importance of a host species to I. dammini population dynamics. PMID:8254647

  6. Efficacy of three vaccines in protecting Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) from experimental infection with West Nile virus: implications for vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma insularis).

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarah S; Langevin, Stanley; Woods, Leslie; Carroll, Brian D; Vickers, Winston; Morrison, Scott A; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Reisen, William K; Boyce, Walter M

    2011-08-01

    The devastating effect of West Nile virus (WNV) on the avifauna of North America has led zoo managers and conservationists to attempt to protect vulnerable species through vaccination. The Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis) is one such species, being a corvid with a highly restricted insular range. Herein, we used congeneric Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test the efficacy of three WNV vaccines in protecting jays from an experimental challenge with WNV: (1) the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator(®) DNA equine vaccine, (2) an experimental DNA plasmid vaccine, pCBWN, and (3) the Merial Recombitek(®) equine vaccine. Vaccine efficacy after challenge was compared with naïve and nonvaccinated positive controls and a group of naturally immune jays. Overall, vaccination lowered peak viremia compared with nonvaccinated positive controls, but some WNV-related pathology persisted and the viremia was sufficient to possibly infect susceptible vector mosquitoes. The Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA equine vaccine and the pCBWN vaccine provided humoral immune priming and limited side effects. Five of the six birds vaccinated with the Merial Recombitek vaccine, including a vaccinated, non-WNV challenged control, developed extensive necrotic lesions in the pectoral muscle at the vaccine inoculation sites, which were attributed to the Merial vaccine. In light of the well-documented devastating effects of high morbidity and mortality associated with WNV infection in corvids, vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays with either the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA vaccine or the pCBWN vaccine may increase the numbers of birds that would survive an epizootic should WNV become established on Santa Cruz Island. PMID:21438693

  7. Efficacy of Three Vaccines in Protecting Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) from Experimental Infection with West Nile Virus: Implications for Vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma insularis)

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarah S.; Langevin, Stanley; Woods, Leslie; Carroll, Brian D.; Vickers, Winston; Morrison, Scott A.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Reisen, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The devastating effect of West Nile virus (WNV) on the avifauna of North America has led zoo managers and conservationists to attempt to protect vulnerable species through vaccination. The Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis) is one such species, being a corvid with a highly restricted insular range. Herein, we used congeneric Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test the efficacy of three WNV vaccines in protecting jays from an experimental challenge with WNV: (1) the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator® DNA equine vaccine, (2) an experimental DNA plasmid vaccine, pCBWN, and (3) the Merial Recombitek® equine vaccine. Vaccine efficacy after challenge was compared with naïve and nonvaccinated positive controls and a group of naturally immune jays. Overall, vaccination lowered peak viremia compared with nonvaccinated positive controls, but some WNV-related pathology persisted and the viremia was sufficient to possibly infect susceptible vector mosquitoes. The Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA equine vaccine and the pCBWN vaccine provided humoral immune priming and limited side effects. Five of the six birds vaccinated with the Merial Recombitek vaccine, including a vaccinated, non-WNV challenged control, developed extensive necrotic lesions in the pectoral muscle at the vaccine inoculation sites, which were attributed to the Merial vaccine. In light of the well-documented devastating effects of high morbidity and mortality associated with WNV infection in corvids, vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays with either the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA vaccine or the pCBWN vaccine may increase the numbers of birds that would survive an epizootic should WNV become established on Santa Cruz Island. PMID:21438693

  8. The influence of the Columbia River plume on cross-shelf transport of zooplankton.1 Jay O. Peterson1*

    E-print Network

    Hickey, Barbara

    The influence of the Columbia River plume on cross-shelf transport of zooplankton.1 2 Jay O relationship between plankton and a tidally modulated river plume. During a strong ebb-17 tide, zooplankton of phytoplankton and21 zooplankton an average of 7 m deeper into the water column beneath the plume and up to22 10

  9. WELL-POSEDNESS OF NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTAL FLOW IN L3 JAY LAWRENCE HINEMAN AND CHANGYOU WANG

    E-print Network

    Wang, Changyou

    to the Ossen-Frank model in the static theory of liquid crystals. It is a macroscopic continuum description of the microscopic orientation field d of rod-like liquid crystals. The current form of system (1.1) was firstWELL-POSEDNESS OF NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTAL FLOW IN L3 uloc(R3 ) JAY LAWRENCE HINEMAN AND CHANGYOU

  10. IS NEST PREDATION BY STELLER'S JAYS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI) INCIDENTAL OR THE RESULT OF A SPECIALIZED SEARCH STRATEGY?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stacey M. Vigallon; John M. Marzluff

    2005-01-01

    Decreased nest success and elevated levels of nest predation have been linked to changes in landscape configuration and increased edge. However, our current understanding of the mechanics of nest predation is limited. Using radiotelemetry and artificial nest experiments, we studied the ranging and nest- predation behavior of the Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) in the managed forests of western Washington. Steller's

  11. Validity of Haptic Cues and Its Effect on Priming Visual Spatial Attention J. Jay Young & Hong Z. Tan

    E-print Network

    Tan, Hong Z.

    Validity of Haptic Cues and Its Effect on Priming Visual Spatial Attention J. Jay Young & Hong Z. Tan Haptic Interface Research Laboratory Purdue University 1285 EE Building West Lafayette, IN 47907 cross-modal links in attention between haptics and vision. A visual change-detection task was used

  12. Regularity and uniqueness of the heat flow of biharmonic maps Jay Hineman, Tao Huang, and Changyou Wang

    E-print Network

    Wang, Changyou

    Regularity and uniqueness of the heat flow of biharmonic maps Jay Hineman, Tao Huang, and Changyou, we first establish regularity of the heat flow of biharmonic maps into the unit sphere SL RL+1 under for the heat flow of biharmonic maps is follows. For 0 map u W1,2 2 ( × [0, T], N

  13. Patterns of West Nile virus infection in Ohio blue jays: implications for initiation of the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Smith, Jennifer; Ohajuruka, Ojimadu A; Grimes, Sheila

    2004-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first detected in North America in New York City in 1999 and rapidly moved westward. Understanding the mechanisms by which the amplification cycle is reinitiated each year increases our ability to predict epizootics and geographic expansion of the disease. Such understanding is enhanced by knowledge of the patterns of infection in the vertebrate reservoir hosts. Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) may serve as reservoir hosts for WNV. We examined the influence of age and date on the prevalence of WNV in jay carcasses in Ohio during May-August 2002. Percent of carcasses that were infected increased significantly with time from 3% in May to more than 90% by August. We found no difference in prevalence between juvenile (nestlings and fledglings) and adult jays early in the season, which contradicts the expected pattern if the majority of the adults sampled in 2002 had been exposed to the virus in 2001. Therefore, jays infected in 2001 were unlikely to have been important in initiating the 2002 virus cycle in Ohio. PMID:15155993

  14. Nest success and the timing of nest failure of Florida Scrub-Jays in suburban and wildland habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reed Bowman; Glen E. Woolfenden

    Urbanization has broad and complex effects on ecological systems. Many of these effects are likely to influence nest success of birds, some positively and others negatively, thus complex interactions among effects are likely to exist that influence patterns of success. Nest success of Florida Scrub-Jays did not differ between a suburban and wildland population or across a human density gradient

  15. Design, Modeling, and Capacity Planning for Micro-Solar Power Sensor Jay Taneja, Jaein Jeong, David Culler

    E-print Network

    Culler, David E.

    Design, Modeling, and Capacity Planning for Micro-Solar Power Sensor Networks Jay Taneja, Jaein,jaein,culler}@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract This paper describes a systematic approach to building micro-solar power subsystems for wireless of engineering, sizing, and analyzing the power subsystem. Many tools and calculators are available for macro-solar

  16. Reduction of spin diffusion artifacts from 2D zfr-INADEQUATE MAS NMR spectra Jay H. Baltisberger

    E-print Network

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    Reduction of spin diffusion artifacts from 2D zfr-INADEQUATE MAS NMR spectra Jay H. Baltisberger s t r a c t The primary shortcoming of the z-filtered refocused INADEQUATE MAS NMR pulse sequence and diversity of experiments that work well under MAS conditions has been a continued goal of many researchers

  17. Forum: Let there be light Jay Apt and Lester Lave say power blackouts are too frequent, dangerous

    E-print Network

    officials have promised to end outages -- but a major power failure still occurs about three times a yearForum: Let there be light Jay Apt and Lester Lave say power blackouts are too frequent, dangerous of human error. The problems uncovered by the blackout are ripe for the kind of change that transformed

  18. A three translational DoFs parallel cube-manipulator Xin-Jun Liu*, Jay il Jeong, and Jongwon Kim

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jongwon

    A three translational DoFs parallel cube-manipulator Xin-Jun Liu*, Jay il Jeong, and Jongwon KimFs) parallel cube-manipulator. The parallel manipulators are the topol- ogy architectures of the DELTA robot sides of a cube, for such reason we call this type of manipulator the parallel cube

  19. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy Survey of Nearby Star-forming Regions in the Gould Belt

    E-print Network

    D. Ward-Thompson; J. Di Francesco; J. Hatchell; M. R. Hogerheijde; P. Bastien; S. Basu; I. Bonnell; J. Bowey; C. Brunt; J. Buckle; H. Butner; B. Cavanagh; A. Chrysostomou; E. Curtis; C. J. Davis; W. R. F. Dent; E. van Dishoeck; M. G. Edmunds; M. Fich; J. Fiege; L. Fissel; P. Friberg; R. Friesen; W. Frieswijk; G. A. Fuller; A. Gosling; S. Graves; J. S. Greaves; F. Helmich; R. E. Hills; W. S. Holland; M. Houde; R. Jayawardhana; D. Johnstone; G. Joncas; H. Kirk; J. M. Kirk; L. B. G. Knee; B. Matthews; H. Matthews; C. Matzner; G. H. Moriarty-Schieven; D. Naylor; D. Nutter; R. Padman; R. Plume; J. M. C. Rawlings; R. O. Redman; M. Reid; J. S. Richer; R. Shipman; R. J. Simpson; M. Spaans; D. Stamatellos; Y. Tsanis; S. Viti; B. Weferling; G. J. White; A. P. Whitworth; J. Wouterloot; J. Yates; M. Zhu

    2007-07-02

    This paper describes a James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) legacy survey that has been awarded roughly 500 hrs of observing time to be carried out from 2007 to 2009. In this survey we will map with SCUBA-2 (Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array 2) almost all of the well-known low-mass and intermediate-mass star-forming regions within 0.5 kpc that are accessible from the JCMT. Most of these locations are associated with the Gould Belt. From these observations we will produce a flux-limited snapshot of star formation near the Sun, providing a legacy of images, as well as point-source and extended-source catalogues, over almost 700 square degrees of sky. The resulting images will yield the first catalogue of prestellar and protostellar sources selected by submillimetre continuum emission, and should increase the number of known sources by more than an order of magnitude. We will also obtain CO maps with the array receiver HARP (Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme), in three CO isotopologues, of a large typical sample of prestellar and protostellar sources. We will then map the brightest hundred sources with the SCUBA-2 polarimeter (POL-2), producing the first statistically significant set of polarization maps in the submillimetre. The images and source catalogues will be a powerful reference set for astronomers, providing a detailed legacy archive for future telescopes, including ALMA, Herschel and JWST.

  20. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. IV. Lupus V and VI Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    E-print Network

    Spezzi, Loredana; Mer?n, Bruno; Allen, Lori E; Evans, Neal J; Jørgensen, Jes K; Bourke, Tyler L; Cieza, Lucas A; Dunham, Michael M; Harvey, Paul M; Huard, Tracy L; Peterson, Dawn; Tothill, Nick F H

    2011-01-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer "Core to Disk" (c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including 2 transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main sequence star from previous optical, near-IR and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; ~79% in Lupus V and ~87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photo-evapo...

  1. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-02-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  2. How western scrub-jays ( Aphelocoma californica ) select a nut: effects of the number of options, variation in nut size, and social competition among foragers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom A. Langen

    1999-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) often visually assess and handle several whole (unshelled) peanuts before selecting one to transport and cache; this behavior\\u000a is a search for a preferred heavy nut. I repeatedly video-taped individually identifiable jays as they landed on a feeding\\u000a platform and chose from presentations of peanuts that varied in the number of items or in the distribution

  3. Hormone levels and infection of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Schoech, Stephan J

    2006-06-01

    Annual spring relapse of blood parasite infections in birds is believed to be the result of hormonal changes associated with breeding. As part of a larger study on the epizootiology of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in blue jays in south-central Florida, we studied the relationship between H. danilewskyi infections and levels of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosterone. We found a positive association between intensity of H. danilewskyi infection and corticosterone levels in females but not in males. We also found no association between infection and levels of prolactin, luteinizing hormone, progesterone, testosterone, or estradiol in males or females. In addition, we found a positive relationship between levels of corticosterone and handling time and between corticosterone and testosterone levels. We suggest a possible influence of corticosterone on spring relapse of Haemoproteus spp. infections in birds but provide no support for the influence of breeding hormones on relapse of these parasites. PMID:16884020

  4. OPTIMIZING MONSANTO'S SUPPLY CHAIN UNDER UNCERTAIN DEMAND Stephen C. Graves*

    E-print Network

    Graves, Stephen C.

    OPTIMIZING MONSANTO'S SUPPLY CHAIN UNDER UNCERTAIN DEMAND Stephen C. Graves* Professor Modeling Specialist Monsanto Co., 800 N. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63167, previously at Massachusetts Institute of Technology 314-694-2345 Mitchell J. Pulwer* Supply Chain Manager Monsanto Co., 800 N. Lindbergh

  5. Display Design for the Eye and Mind Stephen M. Kosslyn

    E-print Network

    Laidlaw, David

    Display Design for the Eye and Mind Stephen M. Kosslyn Department of Psychology Harvard University digests, books, newspapers, and other sources. The talk will conclude with some reflections about ways Lindsley Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and Associate Psychologist in the Department

  6. Organic Vegetable Gardening1 James M. Stephens2

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    CIR375 Organic Vegetable Gardening1 James M. Stephens2 1. This document is CIR375, one of a series Successful vegetable gardens are not accidental. They are the results of planning, constant care, and the will to make things grow. Among the many things a vegetable garden may offer toward a satisfying experience

  7. Non-Euclidean Spring Embedders Stephen G. Kobourov

    E-print Network

    Kobourov, Stephen G.

    Non-Euclidean Spring Embedders Stephen G. Kobourov University of Arizona Kevin Wampler University on extending the Euclidean notions of distance, angle, and force-interactions to smooth non-Euclidean: force-directed algorithms, spring embedders, non-Euclidean geometry 1 Introduction Some of the most

  8. Union-Find with Constant Time Deletions Stephen Alstrup1

    E-print Network

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    Union-Find with Constant Time Deletions Stephen Alstrup1 , Inge Li Gørtz1 , Theis Rauhe1 , Mikkel. A union-find data structure maintains a collection of disjoint sets under makeset, union and find operations. Kaplan, Shafrir and Tar- jan [SODA 2002] designed data structures for an extension of the union

  9. Towards Information Assurance (IA) Curricular Guidelines Stephen Cooper,

    E-print Network

    Wetzel, Susanne

    and Information Science Education General Terms Security. Keywords Information Assurance, IA, Education, StandardsTowards Information Assurance (IA) Curricular Guidelines Stephen Cooper, Leader Stanford University assurance and information security are serious worldwide concerns. Computer security is one of the three new

  10. Stephen Crews Lab February 21, 2009 Drosophila Embryo Collection

    E-print Network

    Crews, Stephen

    Stephen Crews Lab February 21, 2009 1 Drosophila Embryo Collection 1. Prepare grape juice/agarose plates and yeast mixture for food. 2. Set up an embryo collection cage: use a tripour beaker with small your collection. 3. Determine the collection and aging times you need to get embryos at the stage

  11. Stephen Crews Lab February 21, 2009 Embryo Fixation

    E-print Network

    Crews, Stephen

    Stephen Crews Lab February 21, 2009 1 Embryo Fixation 1) Collect embryos on grape juice/agar plates 2) Rinse embryos with water (a squirt bottle works well) into a collection vial. We use collection. 3) Rinse the embryos well with water making sure to rid them of all yeast and other debris. 4

  12. Stephen R. Boucher Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    ;Governments and Enterprise Formation in Rural China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, 2009 and Michael Carter, "Encouraging Development: Randomized Encouragement Designs in Agriculture," American Projects, 2011, Inter American Development Bank, Washington D.C. · Stephen R. Boucher, Oded Stark and J

  13. Stephen R. Barley School of Engineering 787 Mayfield Avenue

    E-print Network

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    VITA Stephen R. Barley School of Engineering 787 Mayfield Avenue Management Science and Engineering and Innovation, University College London #12;Barley 2 2007-08 Visiting Professor Said Business School, Oxford Leonardi, P. M., D. E. Bailey and S. R. Barley. (Forthcoming) "The Lure of the Virtual." Organization

  14. Testing the fracture of spectacle lenses Stephen K. Lucas1

    E-print Network

    Lucas, Stephen

    International is a company based in Adelaide which produces a wide range of optical lenses, including those optical technicians experimenting in a garage in Adelaide. Their goal was to cast spectacle lenses fromTesting the fracture of spectacle lenses Stephen K. Lucas1 and James M. Hill2 Abstract SOLA

  15. Sexual selection and mating systems Stephen M. Shuster1

    E-print Network

    Shuster, Stephen M.

    Sexual selection and mating systems Stephen M. Shuster1 Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5640 Sexual selection is among the most powerful of all at the expense of other individuals within the same sex. Darwin was first to recognize the power of sexual

  16. Seeding The Garden1 James M. Stephens2

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    HS506 Seeding The Garden1 James M. Stephens2 1. This document is HS506, one of a series Starting Your Garden with Seeds For each vegetable you plan to grow in your garden, you will have to decide whether to start it from seed, from plants, or from plant parts. The main advantage in starting directly

  17. Representing Numbers Using Fibonacci Variants Stephen K. Lucas

    E-print Network

    Lucas, Stephen

    Representing Numbers Using Fibonacci Variants Stephen K. Lucas Department of Mathematics Dunlap [4] and Va- jda [17]. Fibonacci numbers are defined by the recurrence relation fn = fn-1 + fn-2 of Fibonacci numbers is that every natural number can be uniquely represented by a sum of distinct non

  18. A recursive Meat-axe algorithm Stephen P. Glasby

    E-print Network

    Glasby, Stephen

    A recursive Meat-axe algorithm Stephen P. Glasby Central Washington University November 2009 S. P. Glasby (CWU) A recursive Meat-axe algorithm 1 / 17 #12;Overview 1 Four Meat-axe problems: Invar, Cent, Iso, Subfield 2 Non-recursive Meat-axe algorithm 3 Changing field: scaling up F E; scaling down E F 4

  19. Elementary structural analysis for PEPA Stephen Gilmore, Jane Hillston

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Stephen

    Elementary structural analysis for PEPA Stephen Gilmore, Jane Hillston and Laura Recalde December investigation can be avoided at the cost of a more efficient structural analysis. A second, more important process the absence of liveness property would not and so the preliminary structural analysis equips

  20. Between Traditions: Stephen Ball and the Critical Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Ball's work has deservedly received a good deal of attention. In this article, I detail a number of tasks in which the critical sociologist of education--as a "public intellectual"--should engage. I then place Ball's work within these tasks and evaluate his contributions to them. In the process, I show that one of the…

  1. Toward Valid Measurement of Stephen Pepper's World Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    Two measures of the "world hypotheses" of Stephen Pepper were mailed to 100 sociobiologists, 87 behaviorists, 79 personality psychologists, and 45 human developmentalists. The World Hypothesis Scale (WHS) was designed to measure Pepper's four world views: (1) formism; (2) mechanism; (3) organicism; and (4) contextualism. The Organicism-Mechanism…

  2. Magnetic discrimination that will satisfy regulators? Stephen D. Billings1

    E-print Network

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Magnetic discrimination that will satisfy regulators? Stephen D. Billings1 , John M. Stanley2 that are not too adverse, we believe that discrimination using magnetics can be structured in a way that would total-field magnetic data collected over the Guthrie Road and Limestone Hills sites in Montana

  3. Arithmetic Circuit Complexity and Motion Planning Stephen R. Tate

    E-print Network

    Tate, Steve

    This dissertation presents the results of my research in two areas: parallel algorithms/circuit complexity, and algorithmic motion planning. The chapters on circuit complexity examine the parallel complexity of severalArithmetic Circuit Complexity and Motion Planning Stephen R. Tate Dissertation successfully

  4. Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair

    E-print Network

    Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair James G. Berryman University features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical cor­ relation functions using modern

  5. Godel's Incompleteness Theorem for Computer Users Stephen A. Fenner

    E-print Network

    Fenner, Stephen

    of the Incompleteness theorem, the Fixed Point theorem, and L¨ob's theorem. 1 Introduction In 1931, Kurt G¨odel provedG¨odel's Incompleteness Theorem for Computer Users Stephen A. Fenner November 16, 2007 Abstract We sketch a short proof of G¨odel's Incompleteness theorem, based on a few reason- ably intuitive facts

  6. Reducing Disorder in Artificial Kagome Ice Stephen A. Daunheimer,1

    E-print Network

    Li, Teng

    Reducing Disorder in Artificial Kagome Ice Stephen A. Daunheimer,1 Olga Petrova,2 Oleg Tchernyshyov,2 and John Cumings1,* 1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland prediction [5]. Divergent relaxation times and quenched disorder in samples have been cited as possible

  7. by Stephen A. Edwards Retrocomputing on an FPGA

    E-print Network

    by Stephen A. Edwards Retrocomputing on an FPGA Reconstructing an 80's-Era Home Computer to myself in 2007, I implemented an 1980s-era Apple II+ in VHDL to run on an Altera DE2 FPGA board. The original Apple II+ used a tri-state data bus, but FPGA cores do not support such complex electrical

  8. Transferable skills training: how to make a poster Stephen Eglen

    E-print Network

    Eglen, Stephen

    Transferable skills training: how to make a poster Stephen Eglen Cambridge Computational Biology about ways to present your work. 2 / 16 #12;Why give a poster? · Posters are often regarded as second normally to present their work. Don't assume acceptance of your poster means it has undergone standard peer

  9. Fertilizing The Garden1 James M. Stephens2

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    HS505 Fertilizing The Garden1 James M. Stephens2 1. This document is HS505, one of a series Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension. FERTILIZERS All plants must have food or other medium in which they are growing. Generally, plant food is in the form of commercial fertilizer

  10. Dr. Stephen Volz Associate Director for Flight Programs

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    Dr. Stephen Volz Associate Director for Flight Programs Earth Science Division, Science Mission Missions Instruments Airborne Science NASA Earth Science Data Systems Contributions Data Systems measurements Modeling Analyses of non-NASA mission data Conducting an Applied Science program to improve

  11. Safety Stocks in Manufacturing Systems Stephen C. Graves*

    E-print Network

    Graves, Stephen C.

    Safety Stocks in Manufacturing Systems by Stephen C. Graves* WP 1894-87 January 1987 revised June feedback on an earlier draft. #12;ABSTRACT Within manufacturing systems, inventories perform various that is needed because the manufacturing environment is not deterministic and is not uncapacitated. Ineffect, we

  12. An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G. Simpson Department of Mathematics place on July 27, 2011 as part of the Infinity and Truth Workshop held at the Institute for Mathematical: Can there be an objective justification for the concept "actual infinity"? Of course this question

  13. An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G. Simpson*

    E-print Network

    An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G is a record of my contribution to a panel discussion which took place on July 27, 2011 as part of the Infinity justification for the concept "actual infinity"? Of course this question would be incomprehensible without some

  14. An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G. Simpson #

    E-print Network

    An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G. Simpson # Department of Mathematics place on July 27, 2011 as part of the Infinity and Truth Workshop held at the Institute for Mathematical: Can there be an objective justification for the concept ``actual infinity''? Of course this question

  15. Biomolecular Science of Liposome-Nanoparticle , Stephen M. Anthony2

    E-print Network

    Granick, Steve

    Biomolecular Science of Liposome-Nanoparticle Constructs Yan Yu1 , Stephen M. Anthony2 , Sung Chul by allowing nanoparticles to adsorb to the outer leaflet of liposomes, are found to be stabilized against with colloids of the conventional type. At the single- liposome level, the distribution of diffusion

  16. MERRA Data Access and Stephen Berrick GES DISC, NASA GSFC

    E-print Network

    MERRA Data Access and Services Stephen Berrick GES DISC, NASA GSFC Dana Ostrenga GES DISC, NASA Center (GES DISC) is the archive for the MERRA data and provides a number of data access methods and data sensors, ground measurements, and models, including MERRA. These include Aqua AIRS, Aura HIRDLS

  17. Symbolic Computation versus Computer Algebra by Stephen M. Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    Symbolic Computation versus Computer Algebra by Stephen M. Watt Ontario Research Centre for Computer Algebra University of Western Ontario London, Canada We observe that "symbolic computation" and "computer algebra" are really two different things and that neither one sufficiently addresses the prob

  18. Graphical modelling of process algebras with Stephen Gilmore

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Stephen

    for future incorporation include queueing networks. DrawNET is a framework which can be used to edit modelsGraphical modelling of process algebras with DrawNET Stephen Gilmore Laboratory for Foundations languages of process algebras and other state-based modelling formalisms. We have extended the DrawNET

  19. Thermoelectric Transport Properties of Individual Bismuth Nanowires Stephen B. Cronina

    E-print Network

    Cronin, Steve

    Thermoelectric Transport Properties of Individual Bismuth Nanowires Stephen B. Cronina , Yu bismuth is a poor thermoelectric material because, as a semimetal, the coexistence of holes and electrons that if the overlap of the conduction and valence bands (38meV at 77K) could be removed, Bi could then have a ZT

  20. Elements of MOM4p1 STEPHEN M. GRIFFIES

    E-print Network

    Elements of MOM4p1 STEPHEN M. GRIFFIES NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton, USA of version 4.1 of the Modular Ocean Model (MOM). This document should be referenced as ELEMENTS OF MOM4P1.gfdl.noaa.gov/fms. Information about how to download and run MOM4 can be found at the GFDL Flexible Modeling System (FMS) web

  1. Making Computer Algebra More Symbolic Stephen M. Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    Making Computer Algebra More Symbolic Stephen M. Watt Abstract This paper is a step to bring closer" and the view of "computer algebra." Symbolic computation may be seen as working with expression trees representing math- ematical formulae and applying various rules to transform them. Computer algebra may be seen

  2. Precision-Timed (PRET) Machines Stephen A. Edwards

    E-print Network

    Precision-Timed (PRET) Machines Stephen A. Edwards Department of Computer Science, Columbia. Precision-Timed (PRET) Machines ­ p. 2/29 #12;Another Major Historical Event In 2006, Lee and Edwards did not invent reduced precision-timed computers (PRET machines). S. Edwards and E. A. Lee, "The Case

  3. Linear Preserver Problems Chi-Kwong Li and Stephen Pierce

    E-print Network

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    Linear Preserver Problems Chi-Kwong Li and Stephen Pierce Linear preserver problems is an active A Mn. (2) A linear operator satisfying (2) is called a linear preserver of the determinant func- tion or simply a determinant preserver. Since det(A) = det(At ), it follows that if det(M N) = 1, then the linear

  4. Is the western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica) really an underdog among food-caching corvids when it comes to hippocampal volume and food caching propensity?

    PubMed

    Pravosudov, Vladimir V; de Kort, Selvino R

    2006-01-01

    Food caching has been linked to better performance on spatial memory tasks and enlarged hippocampal volume in both birds and mammals. Within food-caching birds, it has also been predicted that species less reliant on stored food should have inferior spatial memory and a smaller hippocampus compared to species that depend heavily on food caches. Several comparisons suggest that North American corvids have a significantly smaller hippocampus and overall brain volume compared to the Eurasian corvid species and that western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) have a smaller hippocampus compared to the more specialized Clark's nutcracker. Here we present the largest data set of scrub-jay brains and, in contrast to previous reports, show that relative to body mass western scrub-jays have a brain size similar to the largest brain size of Eurasian corvids. The relative hippocampal volume of scrub-jays is also among the largest of all investigated corvids. These findings may not be surprising considering that scrub-jays have been reported to have remarkable cognitive capacities such as episodic-like memory and experience projection. Our data suggest that many previously made assumptions about western scrub-jays as less specialized food hoarders might be an oversimplification and that simple categorization of species into specialized and non-specialized hoarders might not provide useful insights into the evolution of memory and the hippocampus. PMID:16219995

  5. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre [Research and Scientific Support Department, ESTEC (ESA), Keplerlaan, 1, P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Merin, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC (ESA), P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Allen, Lori E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Joergensen, Jes K. [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Oester Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cieza, Lucas A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Huard, Tracy L. [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Tothill, Nick F. H. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer 'Core to Disk' (c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; {approx}79% in Lupus V and {approx}87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A{sub V} {approx} 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  6. Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc.Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc. Energy Savings Effects ofEnergy Savings Effects of

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Conservation DistrictOjai Water Conservation District #12;Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc.Daniel B Watershed Protection DistrictVentura County Watershed Protection District State of California Department of Water ResourcesState of California Department of Water Resources Casitas Municipal Water District

  7. Can male Eurasian jays disengage from their own current desire to feed the female what she wants?

    PubMed Central

    Ostoji?, Ljerka; Legg, Edward W.; Shaw, Rachael C.; Cheke, Lucy G.; Mendl, Michael; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans' predictions of another person's behaviour are regularly influenced by what they themselves might know or want. In a previous study, we found that male Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) could cater for their female partner's current desire when sharing food with her. Here, we tested the extent to which the males' decisions are influenced by their own current desire. When the males' and female's desires matched, males correctly shared the food that was desired by both. When the female's desire differed from their own, the males' decisions were not entirely driven by their own desires, suggesting that males also took the female's desire into account. Thus, the male jays' decisions about their mates' desires are partially biased by their own desire and might be based upon similar processes as those found in humans. PMID:24671829

  8. HABITAT-USE PATTERNS IN COOPERATIVE AND NON-COOPERATIVE BREEDING BIRDS: TESTING PREDICTIONS WITH WESTERN SCRUB-JAYS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. BRENT BURT

    I propose a method to test extensions of models concerning the maintenance of cooperative breeding systems that examines patterns of habitat use relative to the distri- bution of habitat components among territories. I analyzed habitat use and behavioral time budget data for a Texas population of the Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica). As a non-cooperative population, one of two habitat-use patterns

  9. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. VI. The Auriga-California Molecular Cloud Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Merin, Bruno; Miller, Jennifer F.; Terebey, Susan; Peterson, Dawn E.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70 and 160 micrometers observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg(exp 2) with IRAC and 10.47 deg2 with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkH(alpha) 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the fraction of YSOs in the region with disks relative to an estimate of the diskless YSO population. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15 - 20 times fewer stars.

  10. Delay Optimization Using SOP Balancing Alan Mishchenko Robert Brayton Stephen Jang Victor Kravets

    E-print Network

    Mishchenko, Alan

    Delay Optimization Using SOP Balancing Alan Mishchenko Robert Brayton Stephen Jang Victor Kravets Department of EECS, University of California, Berkeley Agate Logic Inc. IBM Corporation {alanmi, brayton

  11. The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: mapping 13CO and C18O in Orion A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Davis, C. J.; Francesco, J. Di; Graves, S. F.; Nutter, D.; Richer, J. S.; Roberts, J. F.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.; Brunt, C.; Butner, H. M.; Cavanagh, B.; Chrysostomou, A.; Curtis, E. I.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Etxaluze, M.; Fich, M.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Greaves, J. S.; Hatchell, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Matthews, B.; Matthews, H.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Sadavoy, S.; Simpson, R. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Viti, S.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Yates, J.

    2012-05-01

    The Gould Belt Legacy Survey will map star-forming regions within 500 pc, using Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP), Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) and Polarimeter 2 (POL-2) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). This paper describes HARP observations of the J= 3 ? 2 transitions of 13CO and C18O towards Orion A. The 15 arcsec resolution observations cover 5 pc of the Orion filament, including OMC 1 (including BN-KL and Orion bar), OMC 2/3 and OMC 4, and allow a comparative study of the molecular gas properties throughout the star-forming cloud. The filament shows a velocity gradient of ˜1 km s-1 pc-1 between OMC 1, 2 and 3, and high-velocity emission is detected in both isotopologues. The Orion Nebula and Bar have the largest masses and linewidths, and dominate the mass and energetics of the high-velocity material. Compact, spatially resolved emission from CH3CN, 13CH3OH, SO, HCOOCH3, CH3CHO and CH3OCHO is detected towards the Orion Hot Core. The cloud is warm, with a median excitation temperature of ˜24 K; the Orion Bar has the highest excitation temperature gas, at >80 K. The C18O excitation temperature correlates well with the dust temperature (to within 40 per cent). The C18O emission is optically thin, and the 13CO emission is marginally optically thick; despite its high mass, OMC 1 shows the lowest opacities. A virial analysis indicates that Orion A is too massive for thermal or turbulent support, but is consistent with a model of a filamentary cloud that is threaded by helical magnetic fields. The variation of physical conditions across the cloud is reflected in the physical characteristics of the dust cores. We find similar core properties between starless and protostellar cores, but variations in core properties with position in the filament. The OMC 1 cores have the highest velocity dispersions and masses, followed by OMC 2/3 and OMC 4. The differing fragmentation of these cores may explain why OMC 1 has formed clusters of high-mass stars, whereas OMC 4 produces fewer, predominantly low-mass stars.

  12. Stephen Hawking : A Life in Science 2nd Ed.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Gribbin

    2002-01-01

    Stephen Hawking is no ordinary scientist. With a career that began over thirty years ago at Cambridge University, he has managed to do more than perhaps any other scientist to broaden our basic understanding of the universe. His theoretical work on black holes and his progress in advancing our knowledge of the origin and nature of the cosmos have been groundbreaking if not downright revolutionary. This publication from the National Academies Press can be downloaded for a fee.

  13. John Jay College has a variety of classrooms, laboratories, meeting rooms, and other spaces which may be requested for a class or an event. Depending on the nature of the event and the date of the event, one or more offices will work to fulfill your space

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    John Jay College has a variety of classrooms, laboratories, meeting rooms, and other spaces which If your event is for a John Jay department: Christine Baerga If your event is for an agency outside of John Jay: Cheryl D'Antonio Events Planning Office in Space Planning and Capital Projects 212

  14. Motivational control of caching behaviour in the scrub jay, Aphelocoma coerulescens.

    PubMed

    Clayton; Dickinson

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the motivational control of caching behaviour in scrub jays using a two-stage procedure to examine the effects of prefeeding and/or precaching (stage 1) on subsequent caching behaviour (stage 2). Experiment 1 demonstrated that both prefeeding and precaching reduced the subsequent caching of both edible (peanuts) and inedible (stones) items. The reduction in caching was greatest when the items available for storing were the same in the two stages. This item specificity was confirmed in experiment 2 using two food types, peanuts and dog food kibbles. The final experiment demonstrated that the effect of prefeeding on subsequent caching can also be food specific, in that birds that received food in a powdered form that they could eat, but not cache in stage 1, showed a reduction in subsequent caching in stage 2 only when the food type was the same in the two stages. These results suggest that caching behaviour is controlled by both the feeding system and an independent caching system, and that this control is mediated by the incentive value of the specific items rather than by a general motivational state. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10049484

  15. "Anting" in Blue Jays: evidence in support of a food-preparatory function.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Thomas; Aneshansley, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines), is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants. Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is a strategy by which birds render ants fit for ingestion. Formicine ants are ordinarily protected by their formic acid-containing spray. Being wiped into the bird's plumage causes them to discharge that spray, without harm to the bird, to the point of almost total emptying of the glandular sac in which the secretion is stored. The ants are therefore essentially secretion-free by the time they are swallowed. Further evidence indicates that it is the ant's possession of the acid sac that triggers the anting behavior in the bird. If F. exsectoides are surgically deprived of their acid sac, they are eaten by the birds without first being subjected to anting. Data are also presented indicating that the ant's crop, which is especially capacious in formicines (its contents may amount to over 30% of the formicine's mass), and which appears to survive the anting procedure intact, constitutes, at least when laden, a valuable component of the trophic package that the bird accesses by anting. PMID:19169379

  16. Visual search and attention in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata): Associative cuing and sequential priming.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Bond, Alan B; Burks, Marianna; Kamil, Alan C

    2014-04-01

    Visual search for complex natural targets requires focal attention, either cued by predictive stimulus associations or primed by a representation of the most recently detected target. Because both processes can focus visual attention, cuing and priming were compared in an operant search task to evaluate their relative impacts on performance and to determine the nature of their interaction in combined treatments. Blue jays were trained to search for pairs of alternative targets among distractors. Informative or ambiguous color cues were provided before each trial, and targets were presented either in homogeneous blocked sequences or in constrained random order. Initial task acquisition was facilitated by priming in general, but was significantly retarded when targets were both cued and primed, indicating that the two processes interfered with each other during training. At asymptote, attentional effects were manifested mainly in inhibition, increasing latency in miscued trials and decreasing accuracy on primed trials following an unexpected target switch. A combination of cuing and priming was found to interfere with performance in such unexpected trials, apparently a result of the limited capacity of working memory. Because the ecological factors that promote priming or cuing are rather disparate, it is not clear whether they ever simultaneously contribute to natural predatory search. PMID:24893217

  17. Signaling for food and sex? Begging by reproductive female white-throated magpie-jays

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jesse M. S.; Langen, Tom A.; Berg, Elena C.

    2012-01-01

    Food begging is common in nutritionally dependent young of many animals, but structurally homologous calls recur in adult signal repertoires of many species. We propose eight functional hypotheses for begging in adults; these stem from observations in birds but apply broadly to other taxa in which begging occurs. Adult cooperatively-breeding white-throated magpie-jays (Calocitta formosa) use loud begging vocalizations, particularly near the nest site during reproduction. We analysed the social context and behavioural phenology of loud calling and allofeeding in this species and compared these with predictions from each functional hypothesis. We found that reproductive females are the primary producers of beg calls, and their begging peaks during the fertile period when reproductive conflict among males and females was highest. Loud begging rates correlated positively with provisioning rates, but females called more in the pre-incubation fertile period than after they initiated incubation. Based on the context, phenology and active space of the signal, we conclude that female loud begging vocalizations function to signal nutritional need to group members, but also have been evolutionarily co-opted to advertise fertility to potential extra-pair partners. The location of calling is likely a consequence of nest guarding by breeding females to prevent intraspecific brood parasitism. PMID:23293376

  18. Visual Search and Attention in Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata): Associative Cuing and Sequential Priming

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Bond, Alan B.; Burks, Marianna; Kamil, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Visual search for complex natural targets requires focal attention, either cued by predictive stimulus associations or primed by a representation of the most recently detected target. Since both processes can focus visual attention, cuing and priming were compared in an operant search task to evaluate their relative impacts on performance and to determine the nature of their interaction in combined treatments. Blue jays were trained to search for pairs of alternative targets among distractors. Informative or ambiguous color cues were provided prior to each trial, and targets were presented either in homogeneous blocked sequences or in constrained random order. Initial task acquisition was facilitated by priming in general, but was significantly retarded when targets were both cued and primed, indicating that the two processes interfered with each other during training. At asymptote, attentional effects were manifested mainly in inhibition, increasing latency in miscued trials and decreasing accuracy on primed trials following an unexpected target switch. A combination of cuing and priming was found to interfere with performance in such unexpected trials, apparently a result of the limited capacity of working memory. Because the ecological factors that promote priming and cuing are rather disparate, it is not clear whether they ever jointly and simultaneously contribute to natural predatory search. PMID:24893217

  19. Geographic variation in the community structure of lice on western scrub-jays.

    PubMed

    Bush, Sarah E; Harbison, Christopher W; Slager, David L; Peterson, A Townsend; Price, Roger D; Clayton, Dale H

    2009-02-01

    Parasites are incredibly diverse. An important factor in the evolution of this diversity is the fact that many parasite species are restricted to 1, or just a few, host species. In addition, some parasites exhibit geographic specificity that is nested within their specificity to a particular species of host. The environmental factors that restrict parasites to particular regions within the host's range are poorly understood, and it is often difficult to know whether such patterns of geographic specificity are real, or merely artifacts of uneven host sampling. For over a decade, we sampled communities of ectoparasitic lice (Phthiraptera) from western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) throughout their range in the United States, and found 3 common species of lice. Philopterus crassipes was found throughout the host range, whereas the other 2 species of lice had more restricted distributions. Brueelia deficiens was found only on the woodhouseii host subspecies group, and Myrsidea sp. was found largely on the californica host subspecies group. We suggest that differential tolerance to arid conditions and interspecific competition has led to the restricted geographic distributions of these 2 species of lice. PMID:18576864

  20. Evidence suggesting that desire-state attribution may govern food sharing in Eurasian jays

    PubMed Central

    Ostoji?, Ljerka; Shaw, Rachael C.; Cheke, Lucy G.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2013-01-01

    State-attribution is the ability to ascribe to others an internal life like one’s own and to understand that internal, psychological states such as desire, hope, belief, and knowledge underlie others’ actions. Despite extensive research, comparative studies struggle to adequately integrate key factors of state-attribution that have been identified by evolutionary and developmental psychology as well as research on empathy. Here, we develop a behavioral paradigm to address these issues and investigate whether male Eurasian jays respond to the changing desire-state of their female partners when sharing food. We demonstrate that males feed their mates flexibly according to the female’s current food preference. Critically, we show that the males need to see what the female has previously eaten to know what food she will currently want. Consequently, the males’ sharing pattern was not simply a response to their mate’s behavior indicating her preference as to what he should share, nor was it a response to the males’ own desire-state. Our results raise the possibility that these birds may be capable of ascribing desire to their mates. PMID:23382187

  1. Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving Dynamometer Stephen Rehmeyer Pepe

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving Dynamometer by Stephen Rehmeyer Pepe Sc, Berkeley Spring 2007 #12;Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving Dynamometer Copyright c 2007 by Stephen Rehmeyer Pepe #12;Abstract Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving

  2. Interpretive Leadership FOR 573-501, Stephen F. Austin State University

    E-print Network

    Coble, Theresa G.

    SYLLABUS 1 Interpretive Leadership FOR 573-501, Stephen F. Austin State University Fall 2010 Class St. Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, TX 75962-6109 Office Phone: 936.468.1354 Cell of Tea: One Man's Mission to Fight Terrorism and Build Nations...One School at a Time. New York: Penguin

  3. Interpretive Leadership FOR 573-501, Stephen F. Austin State University

    E-print Network

    Coble, Theresa G.

    SYLLABUS 1 Interpretive Leadership FOR 573-501, Stephen F. Austin State University Fall 2011 Class St. Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, TX 75962-6109 Office Phone: 936.468.1354 Cell of Tea: One Man's Mission to Fight Terrorism and Build Nations...One School at a Time. New York: Penguin

  4. LRH: STEPHEN L. DOBSON ET AL. RRH: WOLBACHIA SUPERINFECTION IN AEDES ALBOPICTUS

    E-print Network

    Dobson, Stephen L.

    1 LRH: STEPHEN L. DOBSON ET AL. RRH: WOLBACHIA SUPERINFECTION IN AEDES ALBOPICTUS TITLE: ORIGIN OF WOLBACHIA SUPERINFECTION IN AEDES ALBOPICTUS BY SEQUENTIAL POPULATION REPLACEMENT AUTHORS: Stephen L. Dobson-infection followed by the subsequent superinfection invasion. Relative to uninfected females, superinfected Aedes

  5. Perspectives on the Design of Musical Auditory Interfaces Grgory Lepltre and Stephen A. Brewster

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    Perspectives on the Design of Musical Auditory Interfaces Grégory Leplâtre and Stephen A. Brewster://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~{gregory,stephen} Abstract This paper addresses the issue of music as a communication medium in auditory human- computer interfaces. So far, psychoacoustics has had a great influence on the development of auditory interfaces

  6. Linear Compression of Digital Ink via Point Selection Vadim Mazalov and Stephen M. Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    Linear Compression of Digital Ink via Point Selection Vadim Mazalov and Stephen M. Watt Ontario, Canada vmazalov@uwo.ca, Stephen.Watt@uwo.ca Abstract--We present a method to compress digital ink based. Keywords-digital ink; compression; sandwich algorithm; functional approximation I. INTRODUCTION Handwriting

  7. A review of "Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief." by Walter Stephens 

    E-print Network

    Thomas Moisan

    2004-01-01

    , was, in Stephens?s view, a profound and longstanding fear within the Church of the abyss, the fear, in Stephens?s precious riff on Franklin Roosevelt, that ?we have nothing to fear but nothing to fear itself ?(355). Ambitious as this theme is...

  8. Smart Control of a Geothermally Heated Bridge Deck Stephen C. Jenks (o) 580-767-4374

    E-print Network

    Jenks 1 Smart Control of a Geothermally Heated Bridge Deck Stephen C. Jenks (o) 580-767-4374 Conoco Inc. (f) 580-767-6316 P.O. Box 1267 Stephen.C.Jenks@conoco.com Ponca City, OK 74602-1267 James R-ROM Paper revised from original submittal. #12;Jenks 2 Abstract. This manuscript describes the "smart

  9. Autecology of the tailed jay butterfly Graphium agamemnon (Lepidoptera : Rhopalocera : Papilionidae).

    PubMed

    Ramana, S P Venkata; Atluri, J B; Reddi, C Subba

    2003-07-01

    The Tailed Jay Graphium agamemnon is one of the attractive papilionid butterflies that enliven the environment of Visakhapatnam. It occurs throughout the year. It lays eggs singly on young leaves of the mast tree Polyalthia longifolia var. pendula (Annonaceae). The eggs take 3-4 days to hatch. The larvae go through 5 instars over a period of 15-16 days. The pupal period is 13-14 days. The total period from egg to adult emergence spans over 33-36 days. Based on this short life cycle, and larval and pupal development success studied every month, this butterfly can be multivoltine with a minimum of 7-8 broods in a year. Both CI and GR decreased with the age of larva, their average figures being 3.78 and 0.43 respectively. AD values are high (average 92%) and decreased through successive instars. Both ECD and ECI followed a similar pattern with an increase from instar I up to II, then a decrease up to IV and again an increase in instar V and the highest value is with fifth instar. Adults frequently visited flowers (12-35 flowers in a min) spending 1.0 to 3.2 seconds on a flower. The nectar concentration ranged between 16 and 58%. Peak foraging activity mostly fell between 0900-1000 h. The proboscis received pollen in most of the floral species visited, thus satisfying one of the characteristics of butterfly pollination. Being a fast and strong flier it is treated as "high energy" pollinator promoting cross-pollination. PMID:15259606

  10. Journal of Machine Learning Research 9 (2008) 2699-2731 Submitted 5/08; Published 12/08 Learning Bounded Treewidth Bayesian Networks

    E-print Network

    Gould, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Jerusalem, 91905, Israel Stephen Gould SGOULD@STANFORD.EDU Department of Electrical Engineering Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305, USA Editor: David Maxwell Chickering Abstract With the increased availability

  11. Three who made an association: I. Sir William Osler, 1849-1919 II. George Milbry Gould, 1848-1922 III. Margaret Ridley Charlton, 1858-1931 and the founding of the Medical Library Association, Philadelphia, 1898.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, F K

    1996-01-01

    The careers and personalities of the three founders of the Medical Library Association, Sir William Osler, George Milbry Gould, and Margaret Ridley Charlton are outlined, followed by a review of their role in the founding of the association. The career of Sir William Osler is well documented in existing literature, both in medical history and medical librarianship; the biographies of George Milbry Gould and Margaret Ridley Charlton are less known, and this article describes their lives in relation to the founding of the association. The issue of responsibility for the association's founding is explored, and primary recognition is attributed to Margaret Charlton. The author attempts to follow the tradition of Harvey Cushing in his The Life of Sir William Osler in allowing the characters to speak in their own words as much as possible. Images PMID:8883979

  12. Three who made an association: I. Sir William Osler, 1849-1919. II. George Milbry Gould, 1848-1922. III. Margaret Ridley Charlton, 1858-1931 and the founding of the Medical Library Association, Philadelphia, 1898.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, F K

    1998-01-01

    The careers and personalities of the three founders of the Medical Library Association, Sir William Osler, George Milbry Gould, and Margaret Ridley Charlton are outlined, followed by a review of their role in the founding of the association. The career of Sir William Osler is well documented in existing literature, both in medical history and medical librarianship; the biographies of George Milbry Gould and Margaret Ridley Charlton are less known, and this article describes their lives in relation to the founding of the association. The issue of responsibility for the association's founding is explored, and primary recognition is attributed to Margaret Charlton. The author attempts to follow the tradition of Harvey Cushing in his The Life of Sir William Osler in allowing the characters to speak in their own words as much as possible. Images PMID:9578937

  13. Jay et al. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2013, 13:130 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6947/13/130

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Jay et al. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2013, 13:130 http approaches. Costs can be estimated from a variety of data sources, including insurance claims, billing to identify cases or estimate medical expenditures [5]. In parallel to ad hoc surveys that are often temporary

  14. New Method to Measure Packing Densities of Self-Assembled Thiolipid Julia Kunze, Jay Leitch, Adrian L. Schwan, Robert J. Faragher, Renate Naumann,

    E-print Network

    Dutcher, John

    series is performed using a gold electrode covered with a self-assembled monolayer. The charge densitiesNew Method to Measure Packing Densities of Self-Assembled Thiolipid Monolayers Julia Kunze, Jay- assembled (SAM) at a gold electrode surface we propose a new method to determine the charge number per

  15. Conference on Invasive Species in Natural Areas, October 2529, 2010, Coeur D'Alene, ID. Bruce Maxwell, Lisa Rew, Jay Rotella, Tyler Brummer and Patrick Lawrence

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of Yellowstone National Park (NRYNP) by Linaria dalmatica was documented from initial introduction in a garden Maxwell, Lisa Rew, Jay Rotella, Tyler Brummer and Patrick Lawrence Predicting invasion of Linaria dalmatica in the Northern Range of Yellowstone National Park The invasion of the Northern Range

  16. Initial evidence of path integration in desert sand scorpions. Douglas D. Gaffin, Jay E. Vinnedge, Tristan N. Barker; University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA

    E-print Network

    Gaffin, Doug

    Initial evidence of path integration in desert sand scorpions. Douglas D. Gaffin, Jay E. Vinnedge Serendipitous example suggests path integration Sand slip method Sand slip experiments support path integration: Gentle scratching of the sand surface (dotted lines) with the tip of a thin stick enticed a scorpion

  17. Selenium Concentrations in Surf Scoter Jennifer Hunt1, John Ross1, Jay Davis1, Sarah Lowe1, Jim Lovvom2, Dave Crane3, Brad Burkholder3

    E-print Network

    Selenium Concentrations in Surf Scoter Jennifer Hunt1, John Ross1, Jay Davis1, Sarah Lowe1, Jim Discussion The 2002 data show that Se concentrations in Suisun Bay surf scoter and greater scaup prey predominantly on P. amurensis. · Surf Scoter (see Figure 2) · 2002 Se tissue concentration

  18. A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

  19. A first-generation microsatellite-based genetic linkage map of the Siberian jay (Perisoreus infaustus): insights into avian genome evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonja Jaari; Meng-Hua Li; Juha Merilä

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic resources for the majority of free-living vertebrates of ecological and evolutionary importance are scarce. Therefore, linkage maps with high-density genome coverage are needed for progress in genomics of wild species. The Siberian jay (Perisoreus infaustus; Corvidae) is a passerine bird which has been subject to lots of research in the areas of ecology and evolutionary biology. Knowledge of

  20. Manipulation and writing with Ag nanocrystals on Si,,111...-7 7 S. Jay Chey, Lin Huang, and J. H. Weaver

    E-print Network

    Weaver, John H.

    Manipulation and writing with Ag nanocrystals on Si,,111...-7 7 S. Jay Chey, Lin Huang, and J. H nanocrystals derived from up to 200 000 atoms was performed using the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and delivery technique,11 we have been able to produce Ag nanocrystals with up to 200 000 atoms that can

  1. Physiology and Functional Anatomy I: (Bio 40000) Syllabus, Fall 2007 Dr. Jay Edelman --Office: MR-734; Phone x8461; jedelman@sci.ccny.cuny.edu

    E-print Network

    Lombardi, John R.

    Physiology and Functional Anatomy I: (Bio 40000) ­ Syllabus, Fall 2007 Dr. Jay Edelman -- Office analysis of lever systems can explain how muscles create movement 2. Understand the anatomy and physiology, excitable membranes NS 1-11, 25- 36 Physiology of frog muscle Oct. 9 Excitable membranes, action potentials

  2. Telling It Like It Is--And Like It Is Not: Fiction in the Service of Science in Jay Hosler's "The Sandwalk Adventures"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porat, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Biologist and graphic novelist Jay Hosler has long been introducing young readers to biological subjects through entertaining narratives combining strongly fictional elements with nonfictional ones. Extensive application of fiction to nonfictional subject matter is uncommon, even in graphic novels, but Hosler's "The Sandwalk Adventures"…

  3. TECHBOOKS Journal: ASTR MS Code: 190R1 PIPS No: DO00005160 DISK 10-11-2004 15:47 Pages: 11 YOUNG CLOSE-BY NEUTRON STARS: THE GOULD BELT

    E-print Network

    Popov, Sergei

    of close young neutron stars. In compar- ison with our previous investigation we use a different neutronUNCO RRECTED PRO O F TECHBOOKS Journal: ASTR MS Code: 190R1 PIPS No: DO00005160 DISK 10-11-2004 15:47 Pages: 11 YOUNG CLOSE-BY NEUTRON STARS: THE GOULD BELT VS. THE GALACTIC DISC 1 2 S.B. POPOV1,2 , R

  4. "BECAUSE SOME STORIES DO LIVE FOREVER": STEPHEN KING'S THE DARK TOWER SERIES AS MODERN ROMANCE

    E-print Network

    McMurray, Rachel Elizabeth

    2012-05-31

    Stephen King's Dark Tower series is a seven-volume work that contains elements from myths, fairy tales, American westerns, legends, popular culture, Gothic literature, and medieval romance. Few scholars have engaged with this series, most likely due...

  5. AUTO-RECTIFICATION OF USER PHOTOS Krishnendu Chaudhury, Stephen DiVerdi, Sergey Ioffe

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    AUTO-RECTIFICATION OF USER PHOTOS Krishnendu Chaudhury, Stephen DiVerdi, Sergey Ioffe krish@google.com, diverdi@google.com, sioffe@google.com ABSTRACT The image auto rectification project at Google aims

  6. The Construction Information Gateway Stephen R Lockley, Construction Informatics, Newcastle University

    E-print Network

    Amor, Robert

    The Construction Information Gateway Stephen R Lockley, Construction Informatics, Newcastle University Robert Amor, Building Research Establishment Affiliations: Keith Montague, Construction Industry.K. construction industry by: improving the quality and efficiency of buildings and building projects by sharing

  7. Jurassic sequences of the Hebrides Basin, Isle of Skye, Scotland STEPHEN P. HESSELBO*

    E-print Network

    Hesselbo, Stephen P.

    Jurassic sequences of the Hebrides Basin, Isle of Skye, Scotland STEPHEN P. HESSELBO* and ANGELA L the Outer Isles to the mainland SE of Skye, showing structural disposition of the main Mesozoic sedimentary

  8. MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE EARLY CRETACEOUS WEALDEN GROUP, ISLE OF WIGHT Conall Mac Niocaill, & Stephen Hesselbo

    E-print Network

    Niocaill, Conall Mac

    MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE EARLY CRETACEOUS WEALDEN GROUP, ISLE OF WIGHT Conall Mac Niocaill, & Stephen Hesselbo The Wealden Group sediments exposed on the Isle of Wight (IOW) were deposited in coastal

  9. Mapping into LUT Structures Sayak Ray Alan Mishchenko Niklas Een Robert Brayton Stephen Jang Chao Chen

    E-print Network

    Mishchenko, Alan

    Mapping into LUT Structures Sayak Ray Alan Mishchenko Niklas Een Robert Brayton Stephen Jang Chao, brayton}@eecs.berkeley.edu {sjang, chaochen}@agatelogic.com Abstract Mapping into K-input lookup tables (K

  10. STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson smiles as he is assisted with his ascent/reentry flight suit by a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. He has been a NASA employee since 1975 and has worked at Ames and Langley Research Centers. Robinson holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering and is a licensed pilot. He will assist Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. with the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA- SPAS-2) free-flyer and conduct Comet Hale-Bopp observations with the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System. Robinson will also coordinate photo and television data operations during the mission. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery is the CRISTA-SPAS- 2. Other payloads on the 11-day mission include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments.

  11. STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson gives a thumbs up as he dons his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with the help of suit tech George Brittingham (lower right). The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  12. Translational research into intertemporal choice: the Western scrub-jay as an animal model for future-thinking.

    PubMed

    Thom, James M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2015-03-01

    Decisions often involve outcomes that will not materialise until later, and choices between immediate gratification and future consequences are thought to be important for human health and welfare. Combined human and animal research has identified impulsive intertemporal choice as an important factor in drug-taking and pathological gambling. In this paper, we give an overview of recent research into intertemporal choice in non-human animals, and argue that this work could offer insight into human behaviour through the development of animal models. As an example, we discuss the role of future-thinking in intertemporal choice, and review the case for the Western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica) as an animal model of such prospective cognition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall. PMID:25225036

  13. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: First results from the SCUBA-2 observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud and a virial analysis of its prestellar core population

    E-print Network

    Pattle, K; Kirk, J M; White, G J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Buckle, J; Beaulieu, S F; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Hatchell, J; Kirk, H; Jenness, T; Johnstone, D; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Walker-Smith, S; Di Francesco, J; Hogerheijde, M R; André, Ph; Bastien, P; Bresnahan, D; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Griffin, M J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Knee, L B G; Könyves, V; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Rumble, D; Sadavoy, S; Spinoglio, L; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the first observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud performed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We demonstrate methods for combining these data with previous HARP CO, Herschel, and IRAM N$_{2}$H$^{+}$ observations in order to accurately quantify the properties of the SCUBA-2 sources in Ophiuchus. We produce a catalogue of all of the sources found by SCUBA-2. We separate these into protostars and starless cores. We list all of the starless cores and perform a full virial analysis, including external pressure. This is the first time that external pressure has been included in this level of detail. We find that the majority of our cores are either bound or virialised. Gravitational energy and external pressure are on average of a similar order of magnitude, but with some variation from region to region. We find that cores in the Oph A region are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, while cores in the Oph C and ...

  14. Effects of nutritional restrictions during post-hatching development on adrenocortical function in western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica).

    PubMed

    Pravosudov, Vladimir V; Kitaysky, Alexander S

    2006-01-01

    Altricial birds grow rapidly during post-hatching period and are developmentally sensitive to variations in food supply. Limited food results in elevated corticosterone levels in chicks of semi-precocial birds but it is not clear whether altricial songbirds show similar adrenocortical stress response to nutritional restrictions during early development. It is also unknown how nutritional stress during early development affects the adrenocortical function later in life in altricial birds which show tremendous variation in the magnitude of adrenocortical stress response. Using western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica), we experimentally demonstrated that moderate food restrictions (65% of ad libitum) during post-hatching development caused significant elevation of baseline corticosterone levels in nest-bound chicks. Compared to controls, 1-year-old scrub-jays that experienced nutritional deficits during post-hatching development also showed a marginally significant trend to have stronger adrenocortical stress response and significantly greater degree of fluctuating asymmetry in bone and feather measurements. Thus, our results demonstrated that developing altricial birds show adrenocortical response to nutritional deficits, which might produce long-term changes in responsiveness of the adrenal system. Our study suggests that baseline corticosterone levels are a good indicator of physiological conditions of developing birds and that individual variance in adrenocortical stress response commonly observed in many species might, at least in part, be explained by environmental conditions during early development. Considering that nutritional restrictions during early development are linked to many permanent changes including impaired cognitive abilities, corticosterone levels in developing young might be a reliable predictor of their future fitness. PMID:16102756

  15. History of Influences in the Development of Intelligence Theory and Testing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Monson, John A.

    Developed by two professors of education at Indiana University, this Website gives a comprehensive overview of the field of intelligence theory and testing from Plato to the present day. Using an "interactive map," the site offers a timeline of the major figures in the field and their affiliations with one another. Users can click on names, time periods, or schools to access more in-depth information. The site's "Hot Topics" section is particularly interesting, giving substantial material relating to some of the most controversial issues in intelligence theory, including an extensive section-by-section summary of the bestseller The Bell Curve and article-length rebuttals by scholars, including one by anthropologist Stephen Jay Gould.

  16. The economic basis of cooperation: tradeoffs between selfishness and generosity

    E-print Network

    Stevens, Jeffrey

    in controlled-payoff games by using captive blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata. This investigation used a special. This study extends the study of Clements and Stephens (1995), which found that blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata

  17. Significance of a basal melanin layer to production of non-iridescent structural plumage color: evidence from an amelanotic Steller's jay (Cyanocitta stelleri).

    PubMed

    Shawkey, Matthew D; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2006-04-01

    Non-iridescent structural plumage color is typically produced by coherent scattering of light within a matrix of keratin and air (a ;spongy layer') in feather barbs. It remains unclear what role, if any, the basal melanin layer underlying this spongy layer plays in the production of coloration. Amelanism in birds with structural color is a ;natural experiment' in which melanin pigmentation is lost, allowing us to identify the effects of the loss of melanin on structural color production. Here we use full-spectrum spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier analysis to compare the color and nanostructure of an amelanotic Steller's jay (Cyanocitta stelleri Gmelin) feather with a normal blue Steller's jay feather. As a control, we also examined a white domestic chicken (Gallus gallus Linnaeus) feather. The pale amelanotic jay feather had a broad reflectance curve with a blue/green peak, while the typical blue feather had a typical distinct bell-shaped blue curve with a UV/violet peak. The white chicken feather had a typical white reflectance curve with no discrete peaks. Electron microscopy revealed that both the amelanotic and blue feather barbs contained well-formed spongy layers that were of the correct size and arrangement to produce their measured peak reflectance values, whereas the chicken feather had no spongy layer. The washed-out color of the amelanotic jay feather was thus most probably caused by the loss of the basal melanin layer, suggesting that melanin functions to absorb incoherently scattered white light from the feather barb thereby increasing the purity of the color produced by the spongy layer. PMID:16547296

  18. A new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the white-throated magpie jay Calocitta formosa (Passeriformes: Corvidae) from Costa Rica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve J. Upton; Tom A. Langen; Timothy F. Wright

    1995-01-01

    A new species of isosporan (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is reported from two magpie jays Calocitta formosa (Swainson) (Passeriformes: Corvidae) from Costa Rica. Oöcysts of Isospora calocitta n. sp. are spherical to subpherical, 28.8 × 27.7 (26.5–31.0 × 25.0–29.5) m and have a shape index (length\\/width) of 1.04 (1.00–1.11). A micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but 1–3 polar granules are present.

  19. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from the SCUBA-2 observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud and a virial analysis of its prestellar core population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; White, G. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Kirk, H.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; André, Ph.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Griffin, M. J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Könyves, V.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Spinoglio, L.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present the first observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud performed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We demonstrate methods for combining these data with previous HARP CO, Herschel, and IRAM N2H+ observations in order to accurately quantify the properties of the SCUBA-2 sources in Ophiuchus. We produce a catalogue of all of the sources found by SCUBA-2. We separate these into protostars and starless cores. We list all of the starless cores and perform a full virial analysis, including external pressure. This is the first time that external pressure has been included in this level of detail. We find that the majority of our cores are either bound or virialized. Gravitational energy and external pressure are on average of a similar order of magnitude, but with some variation from region to region. We find that cores in the Oph A region are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, while cores in the Oph C and E regions are pressure-confined. We determine that N2H+ is a good tracer of the bound material of prestellar cores, although we find some evidence for N2H+ freeze-out at the very highest core densities. We find that non-thermal linewidths decrease substantially between the gas traced by C18O and that traced by N2H+, indicating the dissipation of turbulence at higher densities. We find that the critical Bonnor-Ebert stability criterion is not a good indicator of the boundedness of our cores. We detect the pre-brown dwarf candidate Oph B-11 and find a flux density and mass consistent with previous work. We discuss regional variations in the nature of the cores and find further support for our previous hypothesis of a global evolutionary gradient across the cloud from south-west to north-east, indicating sequential star formation across the region.

  20. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.; Orchiston, Wayne

    2011-11-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, which Herschel rejected. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston, FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston - not Herschel - who coined the term 'asteroid' to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  1. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, most of which sound quite ludicrous. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston- not Herschel- who coined the term "asteroid" to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  2. Genetic analysis of adult plant, quantitative resistance to stripe rust in wheat cultivar Stephens in multi-environment trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar ‘Stephens’ has been grown commercially in the USA Pacific Northwest for 30 years. The durable resistance of ‘Stephens’ to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) was believed to be due to a combination of seedling and adult plant resistance genes. ...

  3. The development of caching and object permanence in Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica): which emerges first?

    PubMed

    Salwiczek, Lucie H; Emery, Nathan J; Schlinger, Barney; Clayton, Nicola S

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies on the food-caching behavior of corvids have revealed complex physical and social skills, yet little is known about the ontogeny of food caching in relation to the development of cognitive capacities. Piagetian object permanence is the understanding that objects continue to exist even when they are no longer visible. Here, the authors focus on Piagetian Stages 3 and 4, because they are hallmarks in the cognitive development of both young children and animals. Our aim is to determine in a food-caching corvid, the Western scrub-jay, whether (1) Piagetian Stage 4 competence and tentative caching (i.e., hiding an item invisibly and retrieving it without delay), emerge concomitantly or consecutively; (2) whether experiencing the reappearance of hidden objects enhances the timing of the appearance of object permanence; and (3) discuss how the development of object permanence is related to behavioral development and sensorimotor intelligence. Our findings suggest that object permanence Stage 4 emerges before tentative caching, and independent of environmental influences, but that once the birds have developed simple object-permanence, then social learning might advance the interval after which tentative caching commences. PMID:19685971

  4. The Development of Caching and Object Permanence in Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica): Which Emerges First?

    PubMed Central

    Salwiczek, Lucie H.; Schlinger, Barney; Emery, Nathan J.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the food-caching behavior of corvids have revealed complex physical and social skills, yet little is known about the ontogeny of food caching in relation to the development of cognitive capacities. Piagetian object permanence is the understanding that objects continue to exist even when they are no longer visible. Here, the authors focus on Piagetian Stages 3 and 4, because they are hallmarks in the cognitive development of both young children and animals. Our aim is to determine in a food-caching corvid, the Western scrub-jay, whether (1) Piagetian Stage 4 competence and tentative caching (i.e., hiding an item invisibly and retrieving it without delay), emerge concomitantly or consecutively; (2) whether experiencing the reappearance of hidden objects enhances the timing of the appearance of object permanence; and (3) discuss how the development of object permanence is related to behavioral development and sensorimotor intelligence. Our findings suggest that object permanence Stage 4 emerges before tentative caching, and independent of environmental influences, but that once the birds have developed simple object-permanence, then social learning might advance the interval after which tentative caching commences. PMID:19685971

  5. Please cite this article in press as: Gould, M., et al., Judgments of approach speed for motorcycles across different lighting levels and the effect of an improved tri-headlight configuration. Accid. Anal. Prev. (2012), doi:10.1016/j.aap.2012.02.002

    E-print Network

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: Gould, M., et al., Judgments of approach speed for motorcycles across different lighting levels and the effect of an improved tri-headlight configuration. Accid. Anal. Prev. (2012), doi:10.1016/j.aap.2012.02.002 Judgments of approach speed for motorcycles across

  6. CONVEX APPROACHES TO MODEL WAVELET SPARSITY PATTERNS Nikhil S. Rao, Robert D. Nowak, Stephen J. Wright

    E-print Network

    Kingsbury, Nick

    superior denoising results com- pared to independent coefficient-wise thresholding/shrinkage meth- ods sparse representations in the wavelet domain, and this has led to many approaches to image reconstructionCONVEX APPROACHES TO MODEL WAVELET SPARSITY PATTERNS Nikhil S. Rao, Robert D. Nowak, Stephen J

  7. Gaze Step Distributions Reflect Fixations and Saccades: A Comment on Stephen and Mirman (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogartz, Richard S.; Staub, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In three experimental tasks Stephen and Mirman (2010) measured gaze steps, the distance in pixels between gaze positions on successive samples from an eyetracker. They argued that the distribution of gaze steps is best fit by the lognormal distribution, and based on this analysis they concluded that interactive cognitive processes underlie eye…

  8. Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb

    E-print Network

    Hart, Evan

    Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb, sinkholes and other drainage features control the temporal and spatial pattern of sediment storage across storage function of sinkholes and caves has not been investigated using a sediment budget approach

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Periclase (MgO) from First Principles Stephen Stackhouse*

    E-print Network

    Stixrude, Lars

    Thermal Conductivity of Periclase (MgO) from First Principles Stephen Stackhouse* Department thermal conductivity k of periclase (MgO) up to conditions representative of the Earth's core, 83.10.Rs Thermal conductivity is central to our understanding of planetary evolution as it sets

  10. Morphing Planar Graphs in Spherical Space Stephen G. Kobourov and Matthew Landis

    E-print Network

    Kobourov, Stephen G.

    Morphing Planar Graphs in Spherical Space Stephen G. Kobourov and Matthew Landis Department of intersection-free planar graph morphing, and in particular, a generalization from Euclidean space to spherical space. We show that there exists a continuous and intersection- free morph between two sphere drawings

  11. Active Learning from Multiple Noisy Labelers with Varied Costs Yaling Zheng, Stephen Scott

    E-print Network

    Scott, Stephen D.

    Active Learning from Multiple Noisy Labelers with Varied Costs Yaling Zheng, Stephen Scott a different cost and accuracy. We address the active learning problem with multiple labelers where each in the literature. Keywords-active learning; multiple labelers; noisy labelers; algorithms; adjusted cost I

  12. A Study Guide for Stephen B. Oates' "The Fires of Jubilee: Nat Turner's Fierce Rebellion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Ron

    2006-01-01

    This document is a study guide for Stephen B. Oates biography of Nat Turner, "The Fires of Jubilee." The book is a practical reading vehicle for introducing Nat Turner to secondary students in grades 11 and 12. Oates divides his work into four parts, which could provide the basis for four reading assignments, although the sections are not of equal…

  13. How Large Is the World Wide Web? Adrian Dobra Stephen E. Fienberg

    E-print Network

    Fienberg, Stephen E.

    How Large Is the World Wide Web? Adrian Dobra Stephen E. Fienberg National Institute of Department of the World Wide Web is extremely difficult because sampling directly from the Web is not possible. Several of the World Wide Web. Keywords Contingency tables; Markov chain Monte Carlo methods; Multiple­recapture models

  14. Indian River to look at outsourcing more government By Henry A. Stephens

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Indian River to look at outsourcing more government services By Henry A. Stephens Wednesday. The County Commission agreed to outsource the snack bar, however, and the next year it rebounded with $45 County Administrator Joe Baird outsourced. That followed outsourcing the golf course maintenance in 1996

  15. A Single-Step Maximum A Posteriori Update for Bearing-Only SLAM Stephen Tully

    E-print Network

    Choset, Howie

    A Single-Step Maximum A Posteriori Update for Bearing-Only SLAM Stephen Tully Department for the Kalman formulation of undelayed bearing-only SLAM. The estimation update step is cast as an optimiza via a formulation of bearing-only FastSLAM. With experiments, we demonstrate accurate and convergent

  16. Iterated Filters for Bearing-Only SLAM Stephen Tully, Hyungpil Moon, George Kantor, and Howie Choset

    E-print Network

    Choset, Howie

    Iterated Filters for Bearing-Only SLAM Stephen Tully, Hyungpil Moon, George Kantor, and Howie step for the problem of bearing-only SLAM. We focus on an undelayed approach that initializes a landmark after only one bearing measurement. Traditionally, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) has been used

  17. Molecular Dynamics Study of Silica-Alumina Interfaces Slawomir Blonski and Stephen H. Garofalini*

    E-print Network

    Garofalini, Stephen H.

    Molecular Dynamics Study of Silica-Alumina Interfaces Slawomir Blonski and Stephen H. Garofalini: October 30, 1995X Computer simulations of silica-alumina interface formation by a sol-gel process were species. Hydroxyl groups originally present on the alumina surface played a crucial role in formation

  18. The Isomorphism Conjecture Holds Relative to an Oracle Stephen Fenner Lance Fortnowy

    E-print Network

    Fortnow, Lance

    The Isomorphism Conjecture Holds Relative to an Oracle Stephen Fenner Lance Fortnowy Stuart A the usual generic sets by allowing limited in nite encoding into the oracle. We then show that the Berman-Hartmanis isomorphism conjecture BH77] holds relative to any sp-generic oracle, i.e., for any symmetric perfect generic

  19. Shapefile Overlay Using a Doubly-Connected Edge List Phil Katz and Stephen St.Vincent

    E-print Network

    Danner, Andrew

    Shapefile Overlay Using a Doubly-Connected Edge List Phil Katz and Stephen St.Vincent Swarthmore easily perform shapefile overlay operations: in- tersection, difference, and union. Our algorithm runs) Figure 1: Examples of shapefile overlays. (a) The original polygons in set S. Here, we have two over

  20. Wind Turbine Pitch Optimization Benjamin Biegel Morten Juelsgaard Matt Kraning Stephen Boyd Jakob Stoustrup

    E-print Network

    Wind Turbine Pitch Optimization Benjamin Biegel Morten Juelsgaard Matt Kraning Stephen Boyd Jakob-controlled wind tur- bine. When placed in a wind field, the turbine experiences several mechanical loads, which measurements, with no knowledge of the wind field or wind turbine model. I. INTRODUCTION Wind turbines

  1. Lane Reservation for Highways (Position Paper) Nishkam Ravi, Stephen Smaldone, and Liviu Iftode

    E-print Network

    Iftode, Liviu

    Lane Reservation for Highways (Position Paper) Nishkam Ravi, Stephen Smaldone, and Liviu Iftode reservation system for highways. The idea is to allow drivers to reserve a slot on a high-priority lane points on the highway. We describe the design of our system, the challenges that need to be solved

  2. LEISHMANIA AND THE LEISHMANIASES Peter J. Myler Stephen M. Beverley Angela K. Cruz

    E-print Network

    Beverley, Stephen M.

    LEISHMANIA AND THE LEISHMANIASES Peter J. Myler á Stephen M. Beverley á Angela K. Cruz Deborah E The Leishmania genome project: new insights into gene organization and function Published online: 15 August 2001 Ó Springer-Verlag 2001 Abstract The sequencing of Leishmania major Friedlin chromosome 1 (Chr1), Chr

  3. Microfluidics in structural biology: smaller, faster. . . better Carl Hansen and Stephen R Quake

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Carl L.

    Microfluidics in structural biology: smaller, faster. . . better Carl Hansen and Stephen R Quakeà Microfluidic technologies promise unprecedented savings in cost and time through the integration of complex of this vision a reality, facilitating the first large-scale integration of microfluidic plumbing with biological

  4. A Guide to LP, The Larch Stephen J. Garland and John V. Guttag

    E-print Network

    Garland, Stephen J.

    of knowledge in all aspects of computer systems research. Our current work includes exploring high Equipment Corporation. c Stephen J. Garland and John V. Guttag 1991. Reprinted by permission of the authors. All rights reserved. iv #12;Abstract This guide provides an introduction to LP (the Larch Prover

  5. Intrusion Activity Projection for Cyber Situational Shanchieh J. Yang1, Stephen Byers1,

    E-print Network

    Jay Yang, Shanchieh

    attacks. This work discusses ways to project the progression of cyber attacks, enabling analysts of projecting attack actions comes from the fact that not only cyber attacks are diverse and constantly changingIntrusion Activity Projection for Cyber Situational Awareness Shanchieh J. Yang1, Stephen Byers1

  6. The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore,

    E-print Network

    Hillston, Jane

    The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore, Maria Luisa Guerriero of Edinburgh, Scotland 1 Introduction Bio-PEPA [1, 2] is a timed process algebra designed specifically simulation and probabilistic model-checking. The context of application we consider is that of bio- chemical

  7. The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore,

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Stephen

    The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore, Maria Luisa Guerriero of Edinburgh, Scotland I. INTRODUCTION Bio-PEPA [1], [2] is a timed process algebra designed specifically simulation and probabilistic model-checking. The context of application we consider is that of bio- chemical

  8. Light-trapping in dye-sensitized solar cells Stephen Foster* and Sajeev John

    E-print Network

    John, Sajeev

    Light-trapping in dye-sensitized solar cells Stephen Foster* and Sajeev John We demonstrate numerically that photonic crystal dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) can provide at least a factor of one researched is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). These cells are inexpensive to make and boast power

  9. Little's Law John D.C. Little and Stephen C. Graves

    E-print Network

    Graves, Stephen C.

    Chapter 5 Little's Law John D.C. Little and Stephen C. Graves Massachusetts Institute of Technology are important measurements for a manager. Little's Law relates these two metrics via the average rate of the bottles she has been drinking. This is a good task for Little's Law. D. Chhajed and TJ. Lowe (eds

  10. Vision-based Mapping with Backward Correction Stephen Se David Lowe, Jim Little

    E-print Network

    Lowe, David

    slippages or long- term drifts occur, or when the robot closes the loop, i.e., returns to a previouslyVision-based Mapping with Backward Correction Stephen Se David Lowe, Jim Little MD Robotics) natural landmarks and building a 3D map simultaneously on our mobile robot equipped with Triclops

  11. Vision-based Mapping with Backward Correction Stephen Se David Lowe, Jim Little

    E-print Network

    Little, Jim

    Vision-based Mapping with Backward Correction Stephen Se David Lowe, Jim Little MD Robotics and building a 3D map simultaneously on our mobile robot equipped with Triclops, a trinocular stereo system does not allow backward correction. Therefore, it may have problems when large slippages or long- term

  12. A Bayesian Approach to Concept Drift Stephen H. Bach Marcus A. Maloof

    E-print Network

    Maloof, Mark

    A Bayesian Approach to Concept Drift Stephen H. Bach Marcus A. Maloof Department of Computer with concept drift, we placed a probability distribution over the location of the most-recent drift point. We of maximizing classification accuracy. A common problem in online classification tasks is concept drift, which

  13. Stephen T. Trumbo Zhi-Yong Huang Gene E. Robinson Division of labor between undertaker specialists

    E-print Network

    Holsinger, Kent

    Stephen T. Trumbo á Zhi-Yong Huang á Gene E. Robinson Division of labor between undertaker development (Jeanne 1988; Lenoir 1987; Robinson and Page 1988). Inter-individual variation among workers (reviewed by Robinson 1992; see also Cal- derone and Page 1991; Giray and Robinson 1994). There also

  14. A second-order system for polytime reasoning based on Gradel's Stephen Cook and Antonina Kolokolova

    E-print Network

    Penn, Gerald

    A second-order system for polytime reasoning based on Gradel's theorem Stephen Cook and Antonina-order system V 1 -Horn of bounded arithmetic formalizing polynomial- time reasoning, based on Gradel's [11] second-order Horn characterization of P. Our system has comprehension over P predicates (de#12;ned by Gradel

  15. The hearing gene Prestin reunites echolocating bats Gang Li*, Jinhong Wang*, Stephen J. Rossiter

    E-print Network

    Cotton, James

    The hearing gene Prestin reunites echolocating bats Gang Li*, Jinhong Wang*, Stephen J. Rossiter by the recently discovered protein prestin, encoded by the gene Prestin. Echolocating bats use ultrasound- ment of Prestin in the evolution of bat echolocation, we sequenced the coding region in echolocating

  16. Modeling of hydrophilic wafer bonding by molecular dynamics simulations David A. Litton and Stephen H. Garofalinia)

    E-print Network

    Garofalini, Stephen H.

    Modeling of hydrophilic wafer bonding by molecular dynamics simulations David A. Litton and Stephen for publication 31 December 2000 The role of moisture in hydrophilic wafer bonding was modeled using molecular Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1351538 I. INTRODUCTION Wafer bonding technology takes advantage

  17. Nonlinear InterferometricVibrational Imaging Daniel L. Marks and Stephen A. Boppart*

    E-print Network

    Boppart, Stephen

    and end with the mole- cule in the ground state. To describe CARS, we denote the electric field incidentNonlinear InterferometricVibrational Imaging Daniel L. Marks and Stephen A. Boppart* Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University

  18. Collapsible 3D GIS Visualization Suwen Wang, Robert R. Beiko, Stephen Brooks

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Stephen

    Collapsible 3D GIS Visualization Suwen Wang, Robert R. Beiko, Stephen Brooks Dalhousie University. Introduction As an essential component of GIS systems, visualization helps the user comprehend and analyze and workstations, 3D rendering has become widespread which has allowed GIS visualization research to explore

  19. Structural properties of materials created through freeze casting Stephen A. Barr a

    E-print Network

    Mohseni, Hooman

    Structural properties of materials created through freeze casting Stephen A. Barr a , Erik Luijten; Porous material; Molecular dynamics simulations; Freeze casting 1. Introduction Strong, lightweight and biomedical implants. One method to create such materials is freeze casting, in which an aqueous suspension

  20. Filtering and Ranking for Social Media Arlind Kopliku* --Paul Thomas** --Stephen Wan*** --Ccile

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Paul

    Filtering and Ranking for Social Media Monitoring Arlind Kopliku* -- Paul Thomas** -- Stephen Wan.wan,cecile.paris}@csiro.au ABSTRACT. Social media monitoring is fast becoming a staple activity for public relations, or products in social media. However, this task is not trivial because: 1) the mentions may be found across

  1. Elementary structural analysis for PEPA Stephen Gilmore, Jane Hillston \\Lambda and Laura Recalde y

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Stephen

    Elementary structural analysis for PEPA Stephen Gilmore, Jane Hillston \\Lambda and Laura Recalde y investigation can be avoided at the cost of a more efficient structural analysis. A second, more important process the absence of liveness property would not and so the preliminary structural analysis equips

  2. Panlingual Lexical Translation via Probabilistic Inference Mausam, Stephen Soderland, Oren Etzioni

    E-print Network

    Mausam

    translation is a valuable component in knowledge-based Machine Transla- tion (MT) systems, e.g., (Carbonell etPanlingual Lexical Translation via Probabilistic Inference Mausam, Stephen Soderland, Oren Etzioni to translate be- tween a pair of languages is a translation dictionary. Unfor- tunately, dictionaries exist

  3. Fuel treatment longevity in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest Scott L. Stephens a,

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Scott L.

    Fuel treatment longevity in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest Scott L. Stephens a, , Brandon M t Understanding the longevity of fuel treatments in terms of their ability to maintain fire behavior and effects, forest structure, and predicted fire behavior changed 7-years after initial treatments. Three dif- ferent

  4. Improved Routing Wasps for Distributed Factory Control Vincent A. Cicirello and Stephen F. Smith

    E-print Network

    Cicirello, Vincent A.

    Improved Routing Wasps for Distributed Factory Control Vincent A. Cicirello and Stephen F. Smith approach to coordinating factory routing and scheduling based on a computational model of wasp behavior. The natural multi-agent sys- tem of the wasp colony is highly effective in self- organizing the allocation

  5. THE SPECTRUM OF OCEANIC VARIABILITY (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington

    E-print Network

    Riser, Stephen C.

    THE SPECTRUM OF OCEANIC VARIABILITY (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington riser = = = = + + + + + + + + = + + = = + + It has been assumed here that f(t) is periodic with period T. The spectrum of f , , is then defined-time) spectrum: #12;The global 2-D spectrum of sea level from Topex/Poseidon [Wunsch and Stammer, 1995

  6. Some Like it Hot? Thermal Feedback for Mobile Devices Graham Wilson, Martin Halvey, Stephen A. Brewster

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    Some Like it Hot? Thermal Feedback for Mobile Devices Graham Wilson, Martin Halvey, Stephen A@gmail.com ABSTRACT Thermal stimulation is a rich, emotive and salient feedback channel that is well suited to HCI, but one that is yet to be fully investigated. Thermal feedback may be suited to envi- ronments

  7. Power/Knowledge for Educational Theory: Stephen Ball and the Reception of Foucault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chia-Ling

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the significance of the concept of power/knowledge in educational theory. The argument proceeds in two main parts. In the first, I consider aspects of Stephen J. Ball's highly influential work in educational theory. I examine his reception of Foucault's concept of power/knowledge and suggest that there are problems in his…

  8. Wrestling with Stephen and Matilda: Planning Challenging Enquiries to Engage Year 7 in Medieval Anarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougall, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    McDougall found learning about Stephen and Matilda fascinating, was sure that her pupils would also and designed an enquiry to engage them in "the anarchy" of 1139-1153 AD. Pupils enjoyed exploring "the anarchy" and learning about it enhanced their knowledge and understanding of the medieval period considerably. However, McDougall argues, story…

  9. Multi-product pricing for electric Shmuel S. Oren, Stephen A. Smith and Robert B. Wilson

    E-print Network

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Multi-product pricing for electric power Shmuel S. Oren, Stephen A. Smith and Robert B. Wilson This paper describes methods for determining the prices for a discrete set of interrelated products oflered by a single supplier. Each product has a fixed marginal rate per unit, the demand for each product depends

  10. Landscapes and E#ective Fitness Peter F. Stadler ,+,#,# and Christopher R. Stephens

    E-print Network

    Stadler, Peter F.

    Landscapes and E#ective Fitness Peter F. Stadler ¶,+,#,# and Christopher R. Stephens@nuclecu.unam.mx # Address for correspondence Abstract. The concept of a fitness landscape arose in theoretical biology, while that of e#ective fitness has its origin in evolutionary computation. Both have emerged as useful

  11. Single-Ballot Risk-Limiting Audits Using Convex Optimization Stephen Checkoway

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    Single-Ballot Risk-Limiting Audits Using Convex Optimization Stephen Checkoway UC San Diego Anand. · First, audits must be risk-limiting [22]. If the audit certifies the outcome reported in the initial enough ev- idence that the reported outcome is incorrect when it actually is. An audit is risk

  12. Stephen C. Pratt Decentralized control of drone comb construction in honey bee colonies

    E-print Network

    Pratt, Stephen

    Stephen C. Pratt Decentralized control of drone comb construction in honey bee colonies Received with two types of comb distinguished by cell size: large cells for rearing males (drone comb) and small of drone comb in a nest is governed by negative feedback from drone comb already constructed. This feedback

  13. Glassy states of clusters with pairwise atomic interactions R. Stephen Berrya)

    E-print Network

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Glassy states of clusters with pairwise atomic interactions R. Stephen Berrya) Department, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412, Russia Received 28 November 2001; accepted 17 December 2002 The glassy state of argon is examined from the standpoint that this state of a system is an ensemble of frozen excited

  14. The software design of the Gemini 8m telescopes Stephen Wampler

    E-print Network

    The software design of the Gemini 8m telescopes Stephen Wampler Gemini 8m Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85726 ABSTRACT The design of the software for the Gemini 8m Telescopes is nearly. Keywords: telescope software design, design processes, Gemini software 1. INTRODUCTION The Gemini 8m

  15. Book Review of Stephen L. Adler's, "Quantum theory as an emergent phenomenon."

    E-print Network

    Philip Pearle

    2006-02-07

    In Stephen Adler's book, "Quantum theory as an emergent phenomenon," the author starts from a classical mechanics structure and "derives" the formalism of quantum theory, together with wave function collapse dynamics, the latter providing the interpretation of quantum theory. A detailed outline of the author's argument is presented in this book review.

  16. Celebrating Stephen Robertson's Retirement Djoerd Hiemstra, John Tait, Andrew MacFarlane, Nick Belkin

    E-print Network

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    .Sc. in Information Science at City University, before beginning a Ph.D. at University College London, under the renowned Information Scientist B. C. Brookes. Stephen was always more mathematically sophisticated than most Information Scientists having taken a First in mathematics at Cambridge, and this engagement

  17. The Humanities and Interrater Reliability: A Response to R. Stephen RiCharde

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick, Arend

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's critique of R. Stephen RiCharde's argument in his essay on the humanities and interrater reliability in the July-August 2008 issue of "Assessment Update." RiCharde suggests that the humanities' historical commitment to a dialectical pedagogy, a "nonlinear" process that values disagreement and debate, is at odds…

  18. Argo: Past, Present, and Future (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington

    E-print Network

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Argo: Past, Present, and Future (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington riser;ALACE trajectories were used to map quantitatively the geostrophic streamfunction in the vicinity ocean and was carried out from 1985- 1997. P15 #12;The present status of the Argo profiling float array

  19. DECOMPOSITION RESULTS FOR GRAM MATRIX DETERMINANTS TEODOR BANICA AND STEPHEN CURRAN

    E-print Network

    Banica, Teodor

    DECOMPOSITION RESULTS FOR GRAM MATRIX DETERMINANTS TEODOR BANICA AND STEPHEN CURRAN Abstract. We study the Gram matrix determinants for the groups Sn, On, Bn, Hn, for their free versions S+ n , O+ n representation theory invariants of the quantum group are encoded in a certain associated matrix Gkn, called Gram

  20. Characterizing the SPHINX Speech Recognition Kartik K. Agaram Stephen W. Keckler Doug Burger

    E-print Network

    Keckler, Stephen W.

    Characterizing the SPHINX Speech Recognition System Kartik K. Agaram Stephen W. Keckler Doug Burger SPHINX, a system for speaker independent, large vocabulary, continuous speech recognition. We #12;nd that SPHINX in particular, and speech recognition systems in gen- eral, display behavior that is substantially

  1. Lisman, Stephen A., Professor and Director of Clinical Training and Director of the Psychologi-

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    251 Lisman, Stephen A., Professor and Director of Clinical Training and Director of the Psychologi memory, human factors psychology. (1998) Witt, Diane, Assistant Professor, PhD, 1989, University of Maryland: Hypothalamic neuropeptides: localization and function. (1996) Psychology FACULTY *Year of initial

  2. ANALYSIS OF MPI PROGRAMS STEPHEN F. SIEGEL AND GEORGE S. AVRUNIN

    E-print Network

    Avrunin, George S.

    ANALYSIS OF MPI PROGRAMS STEPHEN F. SIEGEL AND GEORGE S. AVRUNIN Abstract. We investigate (MPI). We de- velop a formal model of a subset of MPI, and then prove a number of theorems about (MPI), which defines the precise syntax and semantics for a library of functions for writing message

  3. A Parameterized Stereo Vision Core for FPGAs Stephen Longfield, Jr. and Mark L. Chang

    E-print Network

    Chang, Mark L.

    A Parameterized Stereo Vision Core for FPGAs Stephen Longfield, Jr. and Mark L. Chang Franklin W a parameterized stereo vision core suitable for a wide range of FPGA targets and stereo vision applications and simpler implementation of high-performance stereo vision systems. This implementation utilizes the Census

  4. Mechanical response functions of finite-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates Stephen Choi,1,2

    E-print Network

    Mukamel, Shaul

    with arbitrary spatial and temporal profiles. The time-domain response functions or their frequency-dependent linear response functions of one-dimensional trapped BEC in the time and the frequency domainsMechanical response functions of finite-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates Stephen Choi,1

  5. Space in Language and Cognition : Explorations in Cognitive Diversity Stephen C. Levinson

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Space in Language and Cognition : Explorations in Cognitive Diversity Stephen C. Levinson Language, Culture & Cognition 5 Cambridge University Press, 2003 xxiii 389p The relation between language answer. S. Levinson's monograph `Space in Language and Cognition' (henceforth SILC) is about the relation

  6. Mobile Multi-Actuator Tactile Displays Eve Hoggan, Sohail Anwar and Stephen A. Brewster

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    hold and touch. State-of-the-art tactile feedback displays for mobile device users already ensure highMobile Multi-Actuator Tactile Displays Eve Hoggan, Sohail Anwar and Stephen A. Brewster Glasgow. In an effort to create richer tactile feedback and mobile applications that make use of the entire hand

  7. Time Warp Sports for Internet Television DAN R. OLSEN, BRETT PARTRIDGE, and STEPHEN LYNN

    E-print Network

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    16 Time Warp Sports for Internet Television DAN R. OLSEN, BRETT PARTRIDGE, and STEPHEN LYNN Brigham Young University Internet-based video delivery offers new opportunities for interactive television. The creation and usability of interactive television is very different from desktop or web-based interaction

  8. Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b

    E-print Network

    Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b, mountain landscapes where debris flows are common, their deposition commonly forms valley-spanning dams these dams causes alluviation in what would otherwise be bedrock channels. In this paper, the effects

  9. Two-Point Gait: Decoupling Gait from Body Shape Stephen Lombardi, Ko Nishino

    E-print Network

    Nishino, Ko

    , for instance, inherently entangle body shape and gait. For gait analysis and recog- nition, decouplingTwo-Point Gait: Decoupling Gait from Body Shape Stephen Lombardi, Ko Nishino Drexel University, Japan {makihara,yagi}@am.sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp Abstract Human gait modeling (e.g., for person

  10. ARWin -A Desktop Augmented Reality Window Manager Stephen DiVerdi, Daniel Nurmi, Tobias Hollerer

    E-print Network

    Hollerer, Tobias

    ARWin - A Desktop Augmented Reality Window Manager Stephen DiVerdi, Daniel Nurmi, Tobias H.ucsb.edu Figure 1. A typical ARWin desktop, as seen through a video see- through head-worn display (Sony LDI-A55, business card, flowers, web browser, clock. Abstract We present ARWin, a single user 3D augmented reality

  11. Inverting the Turing Jump in Complexity Theory Stephen A. Fenner \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Fenner, Stephen

    Inverting the Turing Jump in Complexity Theory Stephen A. Fenner \\Lambda Computer Science Department University of Southern Maine Abstract This paper investigates the invertibility of certain analogs­jump operators are not invertible, i.e., there is a PSPACE­hard (resp. EXP­hard) set that is not p­ time Turing

  12. The Compleat Teacher-Scholar: An Interview with Stephen F. Davis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskist, William

    2009-01-01

    Stephen F. Davis is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Emporia State University. He served as the 2002-2003 Knapp Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at the University of San Diego. Currently, he is Distinguished Guest Professor at Morningside College and Visiting Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Texas Wesleyan University. Since…

  13. Predicting oligomeric assemblies: N-mers a primer Stephen R. Comeau a

    E-print Network

    Vajda, Sandor

    Predicting oligomeric assemblies: N-mers a primer Stephen R. Comeau a , Carlos J. Camacho b molecular assemblies of homo-oligomers. Given the number of N-mers and the 3D structure of one monomer, the method samples all the possible symmetries that N-mers can be assembled. Based on a scoring function

  14. Member Faculty Term 1. Stephen Brooks (Chair) Faculty of Computer Science 2009-2014

    E-print Network

    Brownstone, Rob

    -2015 12. Christopher Hartt Faculty of Agriculture 2013-2016 Student Voting 1 Student Senator, appointedMember Faculty Term 1. Stephen Brooks (Chair) Faculty of Computer Science 2009-2014 2. Richard Devlin Schulich School of Law 2011-2014 3. David Black Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences 2011-2014 4

  15. Digital Ink Compression via Functional Approximation Vadim Mazalov and Stephen M. Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    Digital Ink Compression via Functional Approximation Vadim Mazalov and Stephen M. Watt University ink traces as points in a func- tion space has proven useful for online recognition. Ink trace orthogonal series. This representation captures the shape of the ink traces with a small number of coef

  16. A Collaborative Interface for Multimodal Ink and Audio Documents Amit Regmi and Stephen M. Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    A Collaborative Interface for Multimodal Ink and Audio Documents Amit Regmi and Stephen M. Watt and to archive multi-party communication sessions that involve audio and digital ink on a shared canvas be used to represent, to transmit, to record and to synchronize ink and audio channels. We find Ink

  17. Investigating GIS and Smoothing for Maximum Entropy Taggers James R. Curran and Stephen Clark

    E-print Network

    Curran, James R.

    the convergence rate of the algorithm. However, the extra book keeping required for IIS means that GIS is oftenInvestigating GIS and Smoothing for Maximum Entropy Taggers James R. Curran and Stephen Clark in the Gener- alised Iterative Scaling (GIS) estimation algorithm, and techniques for model smoothing. We show

  18. Investigating GIS and Smoothing for Maximum Entropy Taggers James R. Curran and Stephen Clark

    E-print Network

    Koehn, Philipp

    Investigating GIS and Smoothing for Maximum Entropy Taggers James R. Curran and Stephen Clark in the Gener­ alised Iterative Scaling (GIS) estimation algorithm, and techniques for model smoothing. We show analytically and empirically that the correction feature, assumed to be required for the correct­ ness of GIS

  19. PHOTOMETRIC ACCURACY OF DECONVOLVED SIMULATED ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES Stephen R. McNeil

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    PHOTOMETRIC ACCURACY OF DECONVOLVED SIMULATED ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES Stephen R. McNeil Department ABSTRACT A study of the photometric accuracy of deconvolved astronomical images was undertaken by processing two simulated images with several well-known algorithms. The simulations consisted of an image

  20. Mantle discontinuities beneath Southern Africa Stephen S. Gao,1,2

    E-print Network

    van der Lee, Suzan

    Mantle discontinuities beneath Southern Africa Stephen S. Gao,1,2 Paul G. Silver,3 Kelly H. Liu,1] Seismic velocity discontinuities within the top 1000 km of the Earth beneath southern Africa are imaged, we are in an ideal position to characterize the discontinuity structure beneath southern Africa. [3

  1. The origin and early radiation of dinosaurs Stephen L. Brusatte a,b,

    E-print Network

    Benton, Michael

    The origin and early radiation of dinosaurs Stephen L. Brusatte a,b, , Sterling J. Nesbitt a online 4 May 2010 Keywords: dinosaurs diversification evolution Jurassic paleontology Triassic Dinosaurs of modern ecosystems. Although the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous has been

  2. Tripping with Stephen Gaskin: An Exploration of a Hippy Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Gabriel Patrick

    2012-01-01

    For the last 40 years, Stephen Gaskin has been an adult educator on the fringe, working with tens of thousands of adults in the counterculture movement in pursuit of social change regarding marijuana legalization, women's rights, environmental justice issues and beyond. Gaskin has written 11 books about his experiences teaching and learning…

  3. The Cerebellum: A Neuronal Learning Machine? Jennifer L. Raymond, Stephen G. Lisberger, Michael D. Mauk'

    E-print Network

    Born, Richard

    The Cerebellum: A Neuronal Learning Machine? Jennifer L. Raymond, Stephen G. Lisberger, Michael D of the role of the cerebellum in motor learning. Behavioral and physiological data about classical. Mauk' Comparison of two seemingly quite different behaviors yields a surprisingly consistent picture

  4. Six Degree-of-Freedom Haptic Display of Polygonal Models Arthur Gregory Ajith Mascarenhas Stephen Ehmann

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    , as out- lined by McNeeley et al. [MPT99]. The existing fast haptic rendering algorithms developed for 3 to date, only approximate haptic rendering technique for mostly static environments, such as the one basedSix Degree-of-Freedom Haptic Display of Polygonal Models Arthur Gregory Ajith Mascarenhas Stephen

  5. Molecular Modeling of the Short-Side-Chain Perfluorosulfonic Acid Membrane Stephen J. Paddison*

    E-print Network

    Elliott, James

    Molecular Modeling of the Short-Side-Chain Perfluorosulfonic Acid Membrane Stephen J. Paddison is a first principles based molecular modeling investigation of the possible role of the side chain of the polymer having two pendant side chains of distinct separation (with chemical formula: CF3CF(O(CF2)2- SO3H

  6. Finding phase separation in the tJ model numerically C. Stephen Hellberg y

    E-print Network

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    Finding phase separation in the t­J model numerically C. Stephen Hellberg y Complex Systems Theory of low hole doping, the model phase separates at all interaction strengths. The Heisenberg model ? ¸ t, i.e., outside the physical region of the model. Numerically, phase separation difficult to see

  7. Bandit-Based Algorithms for Budgeted Learning Kun Deng Chris Bourke Stephen Scott Julie Sunderman

    E-print Network

    Scott, Stephen D.

    Bandit-Based Algorithms for Budgeted Learning Kun Deng Chris Bourke Stephen Scott Julie Sunderman to purchase of which exam- ples in the budgeted learning model based on algorithms for the multi-armed bandit a hypothesis based on the available at- tribute/label pairs, an active learner must also choose which instances

  8. Field-Based Interpretive Programs FOR 570-501, 588, Stephen F. Austin State University

    E-print Network

    Coble, Theresa G.

    learning styles, as well as how to apply this understanding to the development of conducted activities. 4.D. Assistant Professor Forest Recreation & Interpretation Arthur Temple college of Forestry P. O. Box 6109, SFA Station 419 East College Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, TX 75962-6109 Phone: 936

  9. in the Leech Helobdella stagnalis Kelsey Banister, Jenna Callaway, Rebecca Beresic-Perrins, Stephen Shuster

    E-print Network

    Shuster, Stephen M.

    in the Leech Helobdella stagnalis Kelsey Banister, Jenna Callaway, Rebecca Beresic-Perrins, Stephen for the hermaphroditic leech, Helobdella stagnalis to outcross (cross-fertilization) or self-fertilize is poorly known from parent, and offspring survival between isolated individuals and mating pairs. Leeches were

  10. Artifacts as Instant Messaging Buddies Saul Greenberg, Stephen Voida, Nathan Stehr and Kimberly Tee

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    robustness of an unaltered, commercial instant messaging (IM) system. Our main contribution is to treat an artifact, such as a document, as a first- class instant messaging "buddy." Our system, Artifact Buddy1 Artifacts as Instant Messaging Buddies Saul Greenberg, Stephen Voida, Nathan Stehr and Kimberly

  11. A stochastic Lagrangian model for acceleration in turbulent flows Stephen B. Popea)

    E-print Network

    A stochastic Lagrangian model for acceleration in turbulent flows Stephen B. Popea) Sibley School; accepted 17 April 2002; published 3 June 2002 A stochastic model is developed for the acceleration of a fluid particle in anisotropic and inhomogeneous turbulent flows. The model consists of an ordinary

  12. A Citizen's Guides to Democracy Inaction: Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's Comic Rhetorical Criticism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Don J. Waisanen

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the discourse of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, two of the most prominent political comedians in America. Kenneth Burke's theories of perspective by incongruity and the comic frame provide a general structure for surveying Stewart and Colbert's comic strategies on their nightly television shows, and their roles across various media events. Stewart and Colbert use three rhetorical

  13. Exploiting Hyponymy in Extracting Relations and Enhancing Ontologies Bhushan Mandhani Stephen Soderland

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Exploiting Hyponymy in Extracting Relations and Enhancing Ontologies Bhushan Mandhani Stephen Soderland Dept. of Computer Science University of Washington Seattle USA 98195 Abstract Relation extraction that for a given relation, there might exist certain patterns which, if present in the graph of relationships

  14. Gravity-Based Robotic Cloth Folding Jur van den Berg, Stephen Miller, Ken Goldberg, Pieter Abbeel

    E-print Network

    Abbeel, Pieter

    Gravity-Based Robotic Cloth Folding Jur van den Berg, Stephen Miller, Ken Goldberg, Pieter Abbeel Abstract We consider how the tedious chore of folding clothes can be performed by a robot. At the core of our approach is the definition of a cloth model that allows us to reason about the geometry rather

  15. Parametrized Shape Models for Clothing Stephen Miller, Mario Fritz, Trevor Darrell, Pieter Abbeel

    E-print Network

    Abbeel, Pieter

    Parametrized Shape Models for Clothing Stephen Miller, Mario Fritz, Trevor Darrell, Pieter Abbeel Abstract-- We consider the problem of recognizing the con- figuration of clothing articles when crudely shape models for clothing articles. Each clothing category has its own shape model, and the variety

  16. Fan-out: Measuring Human Control of Multiple Robots Dan R. Olsen Jr., Stephen Bart Wood

    E-print Network

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    be operated is called the fan-out of a human-robot team. Robots that have high neglect tolerance and lower for an individual to control multiple robots simultaneously. We refer to this as the fan-out of a human-robot teamFan-out: Measuring Human Control of Multiple Robots Dan R. Olsen Jr., Stephen Bart Wood Brigham

  17. Flame synthesis of aligned tungsten oxide nanowires Fusheng Xu and Stephen D. Tsea

    E-print Network

    Tse, Stephen D.

    Flame synthesis of aligned tungsten oxide nanowires Fusheng Xu and Stephen D. Tsea Department-crystal WO2.9 nanowires are grown directly from tungsten substrates at high rates using a flame synthesis , and growth rates 1 m/min. Growth occurs by the vapor-solid mechanism, with local gas-phase temperature 1720 K

  18. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins Stephen C. Riley a,

    E-print Network

    Marsden, Ellen

    . Thompson k , Andrew M. Muir d , Charles C. Krueger l a U. S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center k U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center, Hammond Bay Biological Station, 11188 Ray RoadLake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins Stephen C. Riley a, , Thomas R

  19. What's So Funny about Stephen Toulmin?: Using Cartoons to Teach the Toulmin Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunk-Chavez, Beth L.

    2004-01-01

    The Toulmin model of argument was introduced in 1958 by British philosopher Stephen Toulmin in "The Uses of Argument" and adapted by compositionists in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Consisting of six parts--claim, support, warrant, backing, rebuttal, and qualifiers--the model provides a means for composition students "to describe the process by…

  20. FireCrystal: Understanding Interactive Behaviors in Dynamic Web Pages Stephen Oney and Brad Myers

    E-print Network

    Myers, Brad A.

    in the actual web page UI to see the associated code. FireCrystal may be especially useful for developers who to helping with them. 1.2. HTML, CSS, Javascript, and the DOM In most interactive web pages, the HTMLFireCrystal: Understanding Interactive Behaviors in Dynamic Web Pages Stephen Oney and Brad Myers

  1. Concurrent Models of Computation for Embedded Software Edward Lee and Stephen Neuendorffer

    E-print Network

    routers), Simulink with Real-Time Workshop (created for embedded control software), and LustreConcurrent Models of Computation for Embedded Software Edward Lee and Stephen Neuendorffer to the traditional problem of computation, namely trans- formation of data, than to the problems of embedded soft

  2. Fault Tolerance and Avoidance in Biomedical Systems Shane Stephens & Gernot Heiser

    E-print Network

    Heiser, Gernot

    of embedded biomedical applications has several important properties that have influenced the design of BiFault Tolerance and Avoidance in Biomedical Systems Shane Stephens & Gernot Heiser School of reasons that biomedical systems execute without errors. One useful approach to- wards error-free software

  3. Frequency-Based Coloring of the Audio Waveform Display Stephen V. Rice

    E-print Network

    Rice, Stephen V.

    Frequency-Based Coloring of the Audio Waveform Display Stephen V. Rice The University to represent the frequency content to make sounds more visible. Audio-editing systems are enhanced-track audio-editing system presents one waveform display for each track. However, frequency information

  4. Iowa Breeding Bird Atlas project completion Principal Investigator: Stephen J. Dinsmore

    E-print Network

    Koford, Rolf R.

    Iowa Breeding Bird Atlas project completion Principal Investigator: Stephen J. Dinsmore Student: · Complete breeding bird atlas work on grid-based blocks during the 2012 field season. · Complete data entry) to assist with the completion of the second Iowa Breeding Bird Atlas project. Results: During the 2012

  5. EXTREME VALUE STATISTICS FOR NOVELTY DETECTION IN BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL Stephen J. Roberts

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    EXTREME VALUE STATISTICS FOR NOVELTY DETECTION IN BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL PROCESSING Stephen J. Roberts]. An analytic approach to the statistics of outliers exists namely extreme value theory. Extreme value theory `abnormal' events which are outside our expected data extremes for outlier detection or for rejecting

  6. LETTER Communicated by Stephen Strother Brain Reading Using Full Brain Support Vector Machines for

    E-print Network

    Bucci, David J.

    LETTER Communicated by Stephen Strother Brain Reading Using Full Brain Support Vector Machines kinds of clas- sifiers to attempt to "read out" the contents of brain activity as indexed by f@tractatus.rutgers.edu Yaroslav O. Halchenko yoh@psychology.rutgers.edu Rutgers Mind/Brain Analysis Laboratories, Psychology

  7. Bipolar Electrodes for Rapid Screening of Electrocatalysts Stephen E. Fosdick and Richard M. Crooks*

    E-print Network

    Bipolar Electrodes for Rapid Screening of Electrocatalysts Stephen E. Fosdick and Richard M. Crooks, of bipolar electrodes (BPEs). Because the electrochemical activity of the two poles is directly coupled via for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The top frame of Scheme 1a shows an array of three bipolar electrodes

  8. Current status of native fish species in Kansas STEPHEN G. HASLOUER,1

    E-print Network

    Gido, Keith B.

    Current status of native fish species in Kansas STEPHEN G. HASLOUER,1 MARK E. EBERLE,2 DAVID R DONALD G. HUGGINS7 AND WILLIAM J. STARK2 1. Division of Environment, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, 1000 SW Jackson St., Topeka, Kansas 66612 (shasloue@kdhe.state.ks.us) 2. Department of Biological

  9. Stephen D. Heglund, Ph.D., ARNP University of Central Florida College of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Stephen D. Heglund, Ph.D., ARNP University of Central Florida College of Nursing 12201 Research, Emergency Nursing Research 2004 MSN University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Family Primary Care Clinical of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Indian River community College Nursing Education Nursing Nunrsing Educator

  10. MATH 681: TIME SERIES ANALYSIS Instructor : David A. Stephens (Burnside 1235)

    E-print Network

    Stephens, David A.

    : Introduction to Time Series and Forecasting (2nd Edition) by P. J. Brockwell and R. A. Davis. Web Site : http and EM Algorithm 1 #12;6. FINANCIAL TIME SERIES MODELS 6.1 Parameter-Driven Models 6.2 ObservationMATH 681: TIME SERIES ANALYSIS Instructor : David A. Stephens (Burnside 1235) Email : d

  11. A Privacy-Aware Architecture For Demand Response Systems Stephen Wicker, Robert Thomas

    E-print Network

    Wicker, Stephen

    A Privacy-Aware Architecture For Demand Response Systems Stephen Wicker, Robert Thomas School architectures that realize the benefits of demand response without requiring that AMI data be centrally this problem by applying privacy-aware design practices to the development of demand response architectures

  12. Dynamic Balance Force Control for Compliant Humanoid Robots Benjamin J. Stephens, Christopher G. Atkeson

    E-print Network

    Dynamic Balance Force Control for Compliant Humanoid Robots Benjamin J. Stephens, Christopher G), for determining full body joint torques based on desired COM motion and contact forces for compliant humanoid, requiring compliant mechanisms and controllers that are stable but also safe and robust to unknown

  13. Interest Management in Agent-based Distributed Simulations Lihua Wang Stephen John Turner Fang Wang

    E-print Network

    Hybinette, Maria

    simulations, social simulations, games etc. Recently, there is a trend of using agents in distributedInterest Management in Agent-based Distributed Simulations Lihua Wang Stephen John Turner Fang Wang Singapore 639798 E-mail: {PG00960276, ASSJTurner, PG01538896}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract Distributed simulation

  14. Congruent population structure inferred from dispersal behaviour and intensive genetic surveys of the threatened Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma cœrulescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coulon, A.; Fitzpatrick, J.W.; Bowman, R.; Stith, B.M.; Makarewich, C.A.; Stenzler, L.M.; Lovette, I.J.

    2008-01-01

    The delimitation of populations, defined as groups of individuals linked by gene flow, is possible by the analysis of genetic markers and also by spatial models based on dispersal probabilities across a landscape. We combined these two complimentary methods to define the spatial pattern of genetic structure among remaining populations of the threatened Florida scrub-jay, a species for which dispersal ability is unusually well-characterized. The range-wide population was intensively censused in the 1990s, and a metapopulation model defined population boundaries based on predicted dispersal-mediated demographic connectivity. We subjected genotypes from more than 1000 individual jays screened at 20 microsatellite loci to two Bayesian clustering methods. We describe a consensus method for identifying common features across many replicated clustering runs. Ten genetically differentiated groups exist across the present-day range of the Florida scrub-jay. These groups are largely consistent with the dispersal-defined metapopulations, which assume very limited dispersal ability. Some genetic groups comprise more than one metapopulation, likely because these genetically similar metapopulations were sundered only recently by habitat alteration. The combined reconstructions of population structure based on genetics and dispersal-mediated demographic connectivity provide a robust depiction of the current genetic and demographic organization of this species, reflecting past and present levels of dispersal among occupied habitat patches. The differentiation of populations into 10 genetic groups adds urgency to management efforts aimed at preserving what remains of genetic variation in this dwindling species, by maintaining viable populations of all genetically differentiated and geographically isolated populations.

  15. Out of Gondwanaland; the evolutionary history of cooperative breeding and social behaviour among crows, magpies, jays and allies

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Jan; Ericson, Per G.P

    2006-01-01

    Cooperative breeding is comparatively rare among birds in the mainly temperate and boreal Northern Hemisphere. Here we test if the distribution of breeding systems reflects a response to latitude by means of a phylogenetic analysis using correlates with geographical range among the corvids (crows, jays, magpies and allied groups). The corvids trace their ancestry to the predominantly cooperative ‘Corvida’ branch of oscine passerines from the Australo-Papuan region on the ancient Gondwanaland supercontinent, but we could not confirm the ancestral state of the breeding system within the family, while family cohesion may be ancestral. Initial diversification among pair-breeding taxa that are basal in the corvid phylogeny, represented by genera such as Pyrrhocorax and Dendrocitta, indicates that the corvid family in its current form could have evolved from pair-breeding ancestors only after they had escaped the Australo-Papuan shield. Within the family, cooperative breeding (alloparental care/family cohesion) is strongly correlated to latitude and its predominance in species maintaining a southerly distribution indicates a secondary evolution of cooperative breeding in the lineage leading away from the basal corvids. Multiple transitions show plasticity in the breeding system, indicating a response to latitude rather than evolutionary inertia. The evolutionary background to the loss of cooperative breeding among species with a northerly distribution is complex and differs between species, indicating a response to a variety of selection forces. Family cohesion where the offspring provide alloparental care is a main route to cooperatively breeding groups among corvids. Some corvid species lost only alloparental care, while maintaining coherent family groups. Other species lost family cohesion and, as a corollary, they also lost the behaviour where retained offspring provide alloparental care. PMID:16600890

  16. Medical Image Synthesis via Monte Carlo Simulation James Z. Chen, Stephen M. Pizer, Edward L. Chaney, Sarang Joshi

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    Medical Image Synthesis via Monte Carlo Simulation James Z. Chen, Stephen M. Pizer, Edward L. Chaney, Sarang Joshi Medical Image Display & Analysis Group, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill realistic, synthetic medical images for characterizing the performance of segmentation methods

  17. A Spatial Median Filter for Noise Removal in Digital Images James Church, Dr. Yixin Chen, and Dr. Stephen Rice

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yixin

    . Stephen Rice Computer Science and Information System, University of Mississippi jcchurch@olemiss.edu,{ychen,rice the red, green, and blue chro- matic intensities. At a pixel studied, a smoothing fil- ter takes

  18. Design of the Subaru laser guide star adaptive optics module Makoto Watanabea, Hideki Takamia, Naruhisa Takatoa, Stephen Colleya, Michael Eldreda,

    E-print Network

    Iye, Masanori

    , Naruhisa Takatoa, Stephen Colleya, Michael Eldreda, Thomas Kanea, Olivier Guyona, Masayuki Hattoria, Miwa and electronics (except computers) are stored in the racks below and nearby the optical bench. Figure 1 shows

  19. A Power Optimization Toolbox for Logic Synthesis and Mapping Alan Mishchenko Robert Brayton Stephen Jang Kevin Chung

    E-print Network

    Mishchenko, Alan

    A Power Optimization Toolbox for Logic Synthesis and Mapping Alan Mishchenko Robert Brayton Stephen Innovations {alanmi, brayton}@eecs.berkeley.edu sjang@logic-mill.com kevin.chung@rogers.com Abstract The paper

  20. Opinder Bawa Jo Anna Gould

    E-print Network

    Yamamoto, Keith

    (contractor) Ryan Phelan Svc Desk Tech Jade Chin Svc Desk Tech Service Desk Svetlana Milter Luis Campos (contractor) Victor Vargas (contractor) Salvador Mora (contractor) Archana Ashwin (contractor) 1 Swarnim

  1. Pat Gould -5026 Director, ITMS

    E-print Network

    Administrator Abdallah Majed - 5616 Storage and Cloud Administrator Storage Team Jason Dillon - 5966 System Support OfficerSrini Sankaran - 7987 Junior System Administrator Kevin Lai - 7858 Service Desk Analyst

  2. From weird wonders to stem lineages: the second reclassification of the Burgess Shale fauna.

    PubMed

    Brysse, Keynyn

    2008-09-01

    The Burgess Shale, a set of fossil beds containing the exquisitely preserved remains of marine invertebrate organisms from shortly after the Cambrian explosion, was discovered in 1909, and first brought to widespread popular attention by Stephen Jay Gould in his 1989 bestseller Wonderful life: The Burgess Shale and the nature of history. Gould contrasted the initial interpretation of these fossils, in which they were 'shoehorned' into modern groups, with the first major reexamination begun in the 1960s, when the creatures were perceived as 'weird wonders', possessing unique body plans and unrelated to modern organisms. More recently, a third phase of Burgess Shale studies has arisen, which has not yet been historically examined. This third phase represents a revolutionary new understanding, brought about, I believe, by a change in taxonomic methodology that led to a new perception of the Burgess creatures, and a new way to comprehend their relationships with modern organisms. The adoption of cladistics, and its corollary, the stem group concept, has forged a new understanding of the Burgess Shale ... but has it also changed the questions we are allowed to ask about evolution? PMID:18761282

  3. Preliminary characteristics of the prothrombin converting enzyme from venom of Stephen's banded snake ( Hoplocephalus stephensii)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Weinstein; V. Williams; J. White

    2001-01-01

    Stephen's banded snake (Hoplocephalus stephensii) is an infrequently encountered Australian elapid species. The crude venom contains coagulant activity and the component responsible is a prothrombin activator requiring factor V for activity. SDS-PAGE of the isolated native protein revealed two bands at 23 and 36kDa. These findings indicate that the procoagulant is similar to that found in the Australian tiger snake

  4. 1 Particle Filters for Non-Stationary ICA Richard Everson 1 and Stephen Roberts 2

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    .1) #12; 2 Richard Everson, Stephen Roberts In order for the problem to be well posed, the mixing matrix of the observations is related [19] to the joint source density by: p(x t j A) = p(s t ) j det Aj (1.3) Hence the log likelihood of the observation x t is log l = log j det Aj + log p(s t ) (1.4) and the normalised log

  5. Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent Emery; Russell Friedman; Andreas Speer; R. James Long

    2011-01-01

    R. James Long is a contributing author, “The Division of the Waters (Gen. 1,6-7): The History of a Conundrum and its Resolution by the Early Oxford Masters” , pp. 41-62.\\u000aBook description: This book is a gift to Stephen Brown in honor of his 75th birthday. The 35 contributions to this Festschrift are disposed in five parts: Metaphysics and Natural

  6. A review of "Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief." by Walter Stephens 

    E-print Network

    William E. Engel

    2003-01-01

    is still very much with us, as Stephens points out from entries in the Catholic Encyclopedia, as well as with reference to ?modern fundamentalist Christians professing shock and horror at demonic influences in Halloween celebrations or the Harry Potter... ends with a clarion call to find new answers using the old Cui bono: ?To what degree does Christian mortality continue to be invoked, even in post-Chris- tian, secularized forms, to reinforce belief in spirits and human immortality?? (371). Tough...

  7. Virginia Woolf and Leslie Stephen: a father's contribution to psychosis and genius.

    PubMed

    Bond, A H

    1986-10-01

    Leslie Stephen, the father of Virginia Woolf, was a cacophony of contradictions. From all accounts, he was a bully, a manipulator, and a blustering, pessimistic, emotionally dishonest man. Although he could be lovable, charming, whimsical, encouraging, and deeply devoted to his family, he subjugated the adult women in his household and at least one son to exploitation and abuse, demanding (and receiving from his wife and step-daughter) almost total abnegation of self. Julia Stephen, in contrast, was an optimistic, seemingly selfless person, who characteristically presented herself in an "up" mood to the world. Virginia incorporated both parental moods into her character structure, as have a number of the author's cyclothymic patients. Therefore, it is postulated that pessimism and habitual deflating affronts on the part of one parent, in combination with a compulsive "good mood" on the part of the second parent, are a particularly lethal combination of character traits, which in their offspring may contribute to the rapid mood shifting characteristic of manic depression. In contrast to Julie, Stephen was a presence who could not be side-stepped. This combination of sweet and monstrous attributes in her father's nature, and again in the contrasting temperaments of the parental couple, must have been impossible to integrate for the small Virginia, who already was desperately engaged in the struggle for selfhood. She could not complete her development on the oedipal level, although she loved her father dearly, because identification with her mother meant further threat to an identity already weakened at the separation-individuation phase of development. Virginia's solution was to identify with her father in his character, his sexual identity, and his profession. Stephen, who was particularly devoted to Virginia, whom he regarded as an extension of himself, encouraged this identification, and served as her teacher and mentor. In that sense, he truly was the captain of the ship in her voyage To the Lighthouse, master of the currents that swept her onward to the grand light of her genius. A four-fold comparison of Virginia Woolf and Leslie Stephen is made concerning their respective ages of weaning, success in navigating both the rapproachment phase of separation-individuation and the oedipal period, and the ages at which their mothers died. It appears that Virginia lost her mother at those four critical periods when Leslie did not.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3771329

  8. Stephen Hawking Physics Colloquium Lectures (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Hawking

    These lectures by Stephen Hawking are divided into physics colloquium lectures (where at least undergraduate knowledge of physics is assumed), and public lectures. The public lectures include: The Beginning of Time, The Nature of Space and Time, Space and Time Warps, Does God Play Dice, and Life in the Universe. The physics colloquium lectures include: Inflation: An Open and Shut Case; Gravitational Entropy; Quantum Cosmology, M-theory and the Anthropic Principle; Rotation, Nut Charge, and Anti de Sitter Space; Stability of AdS and Phase Transitions; and The Future of Quantum Cosmology.

  9. A review of "Royal Survivor: A Life of Charles II." by Stephen Coote 

    E-print Network

    Bryan N.S. Gooch

    2002-01-01

    of Charles II. New York: St. Martin?s Press, 2000. xiv + 396 pp. Includes b & w plates. $27.95. (First published in the UK by Hodder and Stoughton.) Review by BRYAN N.S. GOOCH, UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA. Stephen Coote?s Royal Survivor is more than a well...-re- searched, cohesive, and engaging biography of Charles II, for it takes into account the political, social, and cultural issues of Charles II?s era, detailing concerns and events within Britain and on the Continent before and after the Restoration. Coote?s...

  10. 76 FR 68500 - Performance Review Board Appointments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ...Clark, Horace Connell, Jamie Cribley, Bud Cruickshank, Walter Davis, Mark Dohner, Cynthia Eller, Sharon Ellis, Steven...Gary Frost, Herbert Gary, Arthur Gillette, Jodi Glenn, Douglas Glomb, Stephen Gonzales-Schreiner, Roseann Gould,...

  11. RETALIATE: Learning Winning Policies in First-Person Shooter Games Megan Smith, Stephen Lee-Urban, Hctor Muoz-Avila

    E-print Network

    Muñoz-Avila, Héctor

    learning have been successfully applied in digital games (Fu & Houlette, 2003). This lack of applicationRETALIATE: Learning Winning Policies in First-Person Shooter Games Megan Smith, Stephen Lee; Salustowicz et al., 1998). However, RL has seen little use in digital games aside from static, turn

  12. Themester Course Proposal: Good and Evil in Ancient Egypt. Instructor: Stephen Vinson, Associate Professor, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    Themester Course Proposal: Good and Evil in Ancient Egypt. Instructor: Stephen Vinson, Associate@indiana.edu; 6-6736 Ancient Egypt has one of the world's oldest documented religious and ethical traditions ­ goes back to the Fifth Dynasty of Egypt's Old Kingdom, around 2600 BCE, and continued for as long

  13. A Pandemic Influenza Modeling and Visualization Tool Ross Maciejewski, Philip Livengood, Stephen Rudolph, Timothy F. Collins, David S. Ebert

    E-print Network

    Maciejewski, Ross

    A Pandemic Influenza Modeling and Visualization Tool Ross Maciejewski, Philip Livengood, Stephen Abstract The National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza outlines a plan for community response to a potential pandemic influenza scenario. Spread vectors based on the point of origin and distance traveled over time

  14. Subdiffusive axial transport of granular materials in a long drum mixer Zeina S. Khan and Stephen W. Morris

    E-print Network

    Morris, Stephen W.

    Subdiffusive axial transport of granular materials in a long drum mixer Zeina S. Khan and Stephen W horizontal drum. The smaller component moves toward the axis of rotation and forms a buried core, which diffusive as previously assumed. We find that is nearly independent of the grain type and drum rotation

  15. SHRiMP: Accurate Mapping of Short Color-space Reads Stephen M. Rumble1,2

    E-print Network

    Levis, Philip

    SHRiMP: Accurate Mapping of Short Color-space Reads Stephen M. Rumble1,2 , Phil Lacroute3 genomic studies of non-model species. In this paper we present SHRiMP - the SHort Read Mapping Package hits. We use SHRiMP to map reads from a newly sequenced Ciona savignyi individual to the reference

  16. Load Reduction of Wind Turbines Using Receding Horizon Control Mohsen Soltani, Rafael Wisniewski, Per Brath, and Stephen Boyd

    E-print Network

    Load Reduction of Wind Turbines Using Receding Horizon Control Mohsen Soltani, Rafael Wisniewski, Per Brath, and Stephen Boyd Abstract-- Large scale wind turbines are lightly damped mechanical% respectively, when compared to a conventional controller. I. INTRODUCTION The size of wind turbine structures

  17. Influence of roads on the endangered Stephens' kangaroo rat ( Dipodomys stephensi): are dirt and gravel roads different?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel E. Brock; Douglas A. Kelt

    2004-01-01

    Roads can have major impacts on animal distribution and movement patterns by destroying or creating habitat, and by acting as both barriers and corridors for movement. Using a combination of live trapping and spool and line tracking, we compare the relative abundance, mass, and demographic turnover of the endangered Stephens' kangaroo rat (Dipodomys stephensi) on dirt and gravel roads in

  18. 3B.2. Environment and early evolution of the 8 May 2009 "Super Derecho" Stephen F. Corfidi*

    E-print Network

    3B.2. Environment and early evolution of the 8 May 2009 "Super Derecho" Stephen F. Corfidi* 1 the complex environment and early evolution of the remarkable derecho-producing convective system that crossed part of the central United States on 8 May 2009 (Fig. 1a). The derecho (Johns and Hirt 1987) severely

  19. Bias in Molecular Dynamics Averages due to Finite Step Size Stephen D. Bond and Robert D. Skeel

    E-print Network

    Skeel, Robert

    Bias in Molecular Dynamics Averages due to Finite Step Size Stephen D. Bond and Robert D. Skeel the deterministic case. In molecular dynamics (MD) it is assumed that time averages of "physically meaningful func for estimating and correcting bias in averages computed from molecular dynamics sim- ulation. Variations

  20. Helminths from 9 Species of Geckos (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Sri Lanka STEPHEN R. GOLDBERG,1,6

    E-print Network

    Austin, Christopher C.

    Helminths from 9 Species of Geckos (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Sri Lanka STEPHEN R. GOLDBERG,1@lsu.edu) ABSTRACT: Nine species of geckos from Sri Lanka were examined for helminths: Calodactylodes illingworthorum serendibensis. Mean number of helminth species per infected gecko was 1.3 6 0.5 (range 1­3). Nineteen new hosts