Sample records for stephen jay gould

  1. Science and the Humanities: Stephen Jay Gould's Quest to Join the High Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Stephen Jay Gould was a scientist, a paleobiologist, who was also a professional-level historian of science. This essay explores Gould's work, showing how he used the history of science to further his agenda as a working scientist.

  2. Science and the Humanities: Stephen Jay Gould's Quest to Join the High Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Jay Gould was a scientist, a paleobiologist, who was also a professional-level historian of science. This essay explores Gould's work, showing how he used the history of science to further his agenda as a working scientist.

  3. Stephen Jay Gould, Jack Sepkoski, and the ‘Quantitative Revolution’ in American Paleobiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Sepkoski

    2005-01-01

    During the 1970s, a “revolution” in American paleobiology took place. It came about in part because a group of mostly young, ambitious paleontologists adapted many of the quantitative methodologies and techniques developed in fields including biology and ecology over the previous several decades to their own discipline. Stephen Jay Gould, who was then just beginning his career, joined others in

  4. Claiming Darwin: Stephen Jay Gould in contests over evolutionary orthodoxy and public perception, 1977-2002.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Myrna Perez

    2014-03-01

    This article analyzes the impact of the resurgence of American creationism in the early 1980s on debates within post-synthesis evolutionary biology. During this period, many evolutionists criticized Harvard biologist Stephen Jay Gould for publicizing his revisions to traditional Darwinian theory and opening evolution to criticism by creationists. Gould's theory of punctuated equilibrium was a significant source of contention in these disputes. Both he and his critics, including Richard Dawkins, claimed to be carrying the mantle of Darwinian evolution. By the end of the 1990s, the debate over which evolutionary thinkers were the rightful heirs to Darwin's evolutionary theory was also a conversation over whether Darwinism could be defended against creationists in the broader cultural context. Gould and others' claims to Darwin shaped the contours of a political, religious and scientific controversy. PMID:24457049

  5. This view of science: Stephen Jay Gould as historian of science and scientific historian, popular scientist and scientific popularizer.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Michael B

    2002-08-01

    Science historian Ronald Numbers once remarked that the two most influential historians of science of the 20th century were Thomas Kuhn and Stephen Jay Gould. All historians are deeply familiar with Kuhn's work and influence, and most know of the remarkable impact Gould has had on evolutionary theory through both his professional and popular works. But little attention has been paid to the depth, scope, and importance of Gould's rôle as historian and philosopher of science, and his use of popular science exposition to reinforce old knowledge and generate new. This paper presents the results of an extensive quantitative content analysis of Gould's 22 books, 101 book reviews, 479 scientific papers, and 300 Natural History essays, in terms of their subject matter (Evolutionary Theory, History and Philosophy of Science, Natural History, Paleontology/Geology, Social Science/Commentary), and thematic dichotomies (Theory-Data, Time's Arrow-Time's Cycle, Adaptationism- Nonadaptationalism, Punctuationism-Gradualism, Contingency-Necessity). Special emphasis is placed on the interaction between the subjects and themata, how Gould has used the history of science to reinforce his evolutionary theory (and vice versa), and how his philosophy of science has influenced both his evolutionary theory and his historiography. That philosophy can best be summed up in a quotation from Charles Darwin, frequently cited by Gould: 'All observation must be for or against some view if it is to be of any service'. Gould followed Darwin's advice throughout his career, including his extensive writings on the history and philosophy of science. PMID:12503565

  6. This View of Science: Stephen Jay Gould as Historian of Science and Scientific Historian, Popular Scientist and Scientific Popularizer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermer, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the results of an extensive quantitative content analysis of Gould's 22 books, 101 book reviews, 479 scientific papers, and 300 Natural History essays, in terms of subject matter, and thematic dichotomies. Emphasizes the interaction between the subjects and themata, how Gould has used the history of science to reinforce his evolutionary…

  7. Stephen Jay Kline on systems, or physics, complex systems, and the gap between.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2011-06-01

    At the end of his life, Stephen Jay Kline, longtime professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, completed a book on how to address complex systems. The title of the book is 'Conceptual Foundations of Multi-Disciplinary Thinking' (1995), but the topic of the book is systems. Kline first establishes certain limits that are characteristic of our conscious minds. Kline then establishes a complexity measure for systems and uses that complexity measure to develop a hierarchy of systems. Kline then argues that our minds, due to their characteristic limitations, are unable to model the complex systems in that hierarchy. Computers are of no help to us here. Our attempts at modeling these complex systems are based on the way we successfully model some simple systems, in particular, 'inert, naturally-occurring' objects and processes, such as what is the focus of physics. But complex systems overwhelm such attempts. As a result, the best we can do in working with these complex systems is to use a heuristic, what Kline calls the 'Guideline for Complex Systems.' Kline documents the problems that have developed due to 'oversimple' system models and from the inappropriate application of a system model from one domain to another. One prominent such problem is the Procrustean attempt to make the disciplines that deal with complex systems be 'physics-like.' Physics deals with simple systems, not complex ones, using Kline's complexity measure. The models that physics has developed are inappropriate for complex systems. Kline documents a number of the wasteful and dangerous fallacies of this type.

  8. The Glenn Gould Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Library of Canada hosts this collection of materials related to the eccentric, but brilliant Toronto-born concert pianist Glenn Gould. The Library has posted audio archival tapes of Gould in recording sessions and playing at home, two searchable databases of its voluminous collection of his papers (only the catalog entries are available here), two chronologies, a Gould bibliography, lists of films, videos and radio broadcasts made by and about Gould as well as selections of writings by and about Gould. There is a good bit of Gouldiana here that will interest only Gould fanatics or biographers, but the site also includes such valuable items as Gould's essay on "The Prospects of Recording" -- his manifesto declaring the superiority of recorded performances to live ones-and the self-referential "Glenn Gould Interviews Glenn Gould about Glenn Gould."

  9. Pinyon Jay

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Pinyon jays coevolved as non-migratory mutualists with pinyon pines. Jays disperse the large wingless seed of pinyon pines over long distances, which can result in relatively rapid colonization. At the same time, the jays obtain energy and nutrients from the seeds. Although closely associated with...

  10. The Gould Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    This review is devoted to studies of the Gould belt and the Local system. Since the Gould belt is the giant stellar-gas complex closest to the sun, its stellar component is characterized, along with the stellar associations and diffuse clusters, cold atomic and molecular gas, high-temperature coronal gas, and dust contained in it. Questions relating to the kinematic features of the Gould belt are discussed and the most interesting scenarios for its origin and evolution are examined.

  11. The Papers of John Jay

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Contributor to The Federalist, the first Chief Justice of the United States and a two-term governor of New York, John Jay gave much of himself to the fledgling nation. Given that he was an alumnus of Columbia University, it is fitting that this institution has created this omnibus of his collected papers and placed them online. Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Florence Gould Foundation, the Jay materials may be searched by the name of the writer, name of the recipient, date of composition, name of holding institution, and accession number. Along with an extended biographical essay, the site also features four background papers. The papers include hypertext links to germane digitized documents held in the archive and deal with topics such as Jay's work on the treaty of 1794 with the British and his work with France throughout the 1770s. Overall, this is a fine repository of primary documents relating to one of America's early statesmen.

  12. Jay Play

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Hall of Science

    1981-01-01

    In this outdoor activity, learners find out the color of food that jays prefer and then try to change the birds' preference by altering the taste of the food with salt. Learners consider how color recognition is important to bird and human, and how birds learn and adapt.

  13. Gould Belt Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Leticia; Loinard, Laurent; Dzib, Sergio

    2013-07-01

    Using archive VLA data and recent observations on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array it is worked on a semi-automatic python/CASA code to select, reduce and plot several young stars belonging to the Ophiuchus core. This code mean to help to select observations made along the 30 years of the VLA done in the selected area with the wide configurations A and B, and in the X and C band, to determine their position and compare it with the most recent ones. In this way it is possible to determinate their proper motion with very high precision. It is presented the phases of the process and our first results worked on three well know stars: S1, DoAr 21 and VLA1623. This is the tip of a bigger work that includes Taurus molecular cloud and other important recent star formation regions belonging to the Gould Belt. Our goal is to support the most suitable among several theories about Gould Belt origin or provide a new one taking in count the dynamics of those regions.

  14. “Anting” in Blue Jays

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Thomas; Aneshansley, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Summary Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines), is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants. Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is a strategy by which birds render ants fit for ingestion. Formicine ants are ordinarily protected by their formic acid-containing spray. Being wiped into the bird’s plumage causes them to discharge that spray, without harm to the bird, to the point of almost total emptying of the glandular sac in which the secretion is stored. The ants are therefore essentially secretion-free by the time they are swallowed. Further evidence indicates that it is the ant’s possession of the acid sac that triggers the anting behavior in the bird. If F. exsectoides are surgically deprived of their acid sac, they are eaten by the birds without first being subjected to anting. Data are also presented indicating that the ant’s crop, which is especially capacious in formicines (its contents may amount to over 30% of the formicine’s mass), and which appears to survive the anting procedure intact, constitutes, at least when laden, a valuable component of the trophic package that the bird accesses by anting. PMID:19169379

  15. Dealing with the Elephant in the Corner; or, You Can't Avoid Religion If You Want to Teach the History of Nature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Miller

    2001-01-01

    Public expressions of the science and religion relationship are often that of conflict. In contrast many, if not most, Americans today privately hold that science and religion are, to use Stephen Jay Gould's phrase, \\

  16. Book Reviews Stephanie Pace Marshall, Judith A. Scheppler, and Michael J. Palmisano, ed., Science Literacy for the

    E-print Network

    Hobson, Art

    for fishing, horticulture, eco- tourism, hunting, automobile repair, dinosaurs, and gambling probabilities (Stephen Jay Gould); Led- erman's efforts to reexamine the high-school science curriculum and to encourage

  17. Animal behaviour Eurasian jays (Garrulus

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    Animal behaviour Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) overcome their current desires to anticipate* Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK *Author planning; corvid 1. INTRODUCTION Animals regularly act in the present to secure future benefits; however

  18. Stephen Giovannoni

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The site features a research profile of Stephen Giovannoni, Professor of Microbiology and Director of the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program at Oregon State University. Giovannoni's research focuses on discovering new organisms in oceans, alpine lakes, and the oceanic lithosphere with long-term goals of understanding the cellular adaptations and ecology of prokaryotes in nature by focusing on species that are abundant and important in biogeochemical cycles. The site provides research descriptions, a list of selected publications, and links to Giovannoni's laboratory home page, Oregon State University, the Microbiology Department, the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, and the home page and index of faculty for the Center for Gene Research and Biotechnology.

  19. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  20. John Jay College www.cuny.edu/undergraduate

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . hunter.cuny.edu John Jay............... John Jay College of Criminal Justice College, The City College of New York, College of Staten Island, Hunter College, John Jay College College Borough of Manhattan C.C. Lehman College #12;Baruch Brooklyn City CSI Hunter JohnJay Lehman Medgar

  1. Kinematics of Gould's Belt: Model and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, E. J.; Moreno, E.; Franco, J.

    Using the available data for nearby stars we derive the velocity ellipsoid of dwarf O-B5.5 stars belonging to the Gould Belt (GB). The resulting vertex deviation for the whole sample is negative (l ~ -70^°) and this value is modified to l~ 20^° when the members of the Pleiades moving group are removed from the sample. This implies the existence of, at least, two different kinematic groups defining the GB system. We also model the evolution of a supershell in the solar neighborhood, and obtain a fit to the shape and kinematics of the gas in GB. Assuming that the expanding shell is also forming stars, we obtain the corresponding velocity fields for the shell and its newly formed stars. The average vertex deviation value resulting from these models for the new stars is l~ 20^°, and is consistent with the observed value when the Pleiades moving group members are excluded from the GB.

  2. The discrete Gould transform and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hoang M.; Aburdene, Maurice

    2006-02-01

    We present a new discrete transform, the Gould transform (DGT). The transform has many interesting mathematical properties. For example, the forward and inverse transform matrices are both lower triangular, with constant diagonals and sub-diagonals and both can be factored into the product of binary matrices. The forward transform can be used to detect edges in digital images. If G is the forward transform matrix and y is the image, then the two dimensional DGT, GyG T can be used directly to detect edges. Ways to improve the edge detection technique is to use the "combination of forward and backward difference", G T(Gy) to better identify the edges. For images that tend to have vertical and horizontal edges, we can further improve the technique by shifting rows (or columns), and then use the technique to detect edges, essentially applying the transform in the diagonal directions.

  3. Stephen Hawking Quantum Gravity

    E-print Network

    Visser, Matt

    Stephen Hawking and Quantum Gravity Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint Louis USA Science Saturdays 4 Nov 2000 #12; Stephen Hawking and Quantum Gravity Abstract: Through research, Stephen Hawking has captured a place in the popular imagina- tion. Quantum gravity in its various

  4. 29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing pier (still possessing third and fourth levels) in foreground. Pitched roof extending from south end of firing pier marks location of frame approach between pier and shop building (center rear) and power plant (to right of shop). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  5. AUDIBILITY THRESHOLDS OF THE BLUE JAY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEVEN M. COHEN; WILLIAM C. STEBBINS; DAVID B. MOODY

    1978-01-01

    The audibility thresholds of two Blue Jays were measured behaviorally using operant conditioning and psychophysical techniques. The jays responded to pure tones between 0.25 and 10 kHz. Their thresholds are similar to those reported for seven other passerines. This indicates that passerines are somewhat less sensitive than man in the detection of sounds in the 1 to 4 kHz range

  6. Effects of weevil larvae on acorn use by blue jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Dixon; W. Carter Johnson; Curtis S. Adkisson

    1997-01-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta \\u000a cristata L.) are important consumers and dispersers of the nuts of oaks and other fagaceous trees in eastern North America. Acorns\\u000a compose much of the jay diet, especially during the autumn when jays may consume or cache a significant portion of an acorn\\u000a crop. However, jays do not appear to possess physiological adaptations for countering the protein-binding

  7. Development of polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellites for pinyon jays ( Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph D. Busch; Russell Benford; Talima Pearson; Eldon Palmer; Russell P. Balda; Paul Keim

    2009-01-01

    The pinyon jay (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) is a primary seed disperser of pinyon pines (Pinus edulis and P. monophylla). Both the pinyon jay and the pinyon pines are experiencing significant decline. While the pinyon jay is a species of management\\u000a value and conservation concern, little is known about its fecundity, among-flock dispersal, and population differentiation.\\u000a We initiated genetic studies in pinyon jays

  8. NESTING FISH CROWS ADOPT A FLEDGLING BLUE JAY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A fledgling Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) appeared in a Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus) nest containing young nestlings. The jay was fed by both adult crows for 12 d before it disappeared, representing only the second recorded instance of interspecific feeding by a member of the family Corvidae. The jay probably entered the nest on its own after fledging from a

  9. What currency do scatter-hoarding gray jays maximize?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. A. Waite; R. C. Ydenberg

    1994-01-01

    Gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis) cache thousands of food items during each summer for use during the subsequent winter. Previous work on the economics of gray jay scatter-hoarding behavior was based on the assumption that the jays maximize the rate at which they store food energy; alternative currencies were not considered. Here we develop and test models based on two currencies,

  10. 8. VIEW OF COMBINATION GEAR HOBBING MACHINE (Gould & Eberhardt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF COMBINATION GEAR HOBBING MACHINE (Gould & Eberhardt, Newark, New Jersey. Patented No. 2103) AND LATHE (W.E. Shipley Machiner Co. Metal Working Machinery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1913). - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  11. Variation of Western Scrub-Jay and Mexican Jay (Corvidae) vocalizations in Texas

    E-print Network

    Coldren, Mary Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    of Australian ravens (genus Corvus) based on vocal differences. Hardy (1969) divided the New World jays into two groups based on plumage and vocalizations. Hardy and Raitt's 1977 study indicated that two subspecies of Cyanocorm srrnblasiana had not yet...

  12. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-print Network

    Westall, James M.

    Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele and Robert Geist Clemson University Abstract. Real execution environments can make ray-tracing competitive in execution time. In this vein, Geist et al. [2 geometry. As a result, the common method e-mail: jesteel@cs.clemson.edu e-mail: geist@cs.clemson.edu #12

  13. The Three Faces of Jay S. Rosenblatt

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    : as painter, analyst, and scientist.'' In preparing for this I had the opportunity to talk with Jay over e of Animal Behavior, Rutgers University. The IAB was joined with the Psychology Department in the mid-90s gland development during pregnancy derived through self-licking (Roth & Rosenblatt, 1966, 1967, 1968

  14. A RANK FOR RIGHT CONGRUENCES ON INVERSE VICTORIA GOULD

    E-print Network

    Gould, Victoria

    A RANK FOR RIGHT CONGRUENCES ON INVERSE SEMIGROUPS VICTORIA GOULD Abstract. The sandwich rank, or S­rank, of a right congruence # on a semi­ group S is the Cantor­Bendixson rank of # in the lattice of right congruences RC of S with respect to a topology we call the finite type topology. If ev­ ery # # RC possesses S­rank

  15. POPULATION DYNAMICS OF BLUE JAYS AT A BIRD FEEDER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARGARET B. HICKEY; MARGARET CLARK BRITTINGHAM

    1991-01-01

    &sraxr.-Hickey color banded and monitored 2373 Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) from 1953 until 1976 at her bird-feeder in Madison, Wisconsin. The mean annual survival rate of Blue Jays calculated from reobservation and recapture data by the Jolly-Seber method was 0.54. The annual survival rates ofjuvenile and adult jays calculated from band returns by the life table approach were 0.45 and

  16. Observational spatial memory in Clark's nutcrackers and Mexican jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PETER A. BEDNEKOFF; RUSSELL P. BALDA

    1996-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that pinyon jays,Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus, can remember the locations at which they have seen conspecifics cache food. Pinyon jays are both highly dependent on cached food and live in large social groups. To examine the importance of food caching and social living for observational spatial memory, Clark's nutcrackers,Nucifraga columbiana, and Mexican jays,Aphelocoma ultramarina, were tested on the

  17. Publication List Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Publication List Stephen G. Simpson simpson@math.psu.edu http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson/ Pennsylvania are not included.) [1] Gerald E. Sacks and Stephen G. Simpson, The ff-onite injury method, Annals

  18. Publication List Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Publication List Stephen G. Simpson simpson@math.psu.edu http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson. Sacks and Stephen G. Simpson, The -finite injury method, Annals of Mathematical Logic, 4, 1972, pp. 343­367. [2] Stephen G. Simpson, Admissible Ordinals and Recursion Theory, Ph. D. Thesis, Massachusetts

  19. Publication List Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Publication List Stephen G. Simpson simpson@math.psu.edu http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson. Sacks and Stephen G. Simpson, The #­finite injury method, Annals of Mathematical Logic, 4, 1972, pp. 343--367. [2] Stephen G. Simpson, Admissible Ordinals and Recursion Theory, Ph. D. Thesis, Massachusetts

  20. UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN 20052007 John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN 20052007 John Jay College of Criminal Justice THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW;Contents GENERAL INFORMATION 1 John Jay College of Criminal Justice xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx The College 1 Requirements 9 Undergraduate Curricula: Majors 63 Computer Information Systems in Criminal Justice and Public

  1. Acorn dispersal by the blue jay ( Cyanocitta cristata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Darley-Hill; W. Carter Johnson

    1981-01-01

    Blue jays transported and cached 133,000 acorns from a stand of Quercus palustris trees in Blacksburg, Virginia, representing 54% of the total mast crop. A further 20% (49,000) of the mast crop was eaten by jays at the collecting site. A large proportion of the nuts remaining beneath the collecting trees was parasitized by curculionid larvae. The number of nuts

  2. Visual Detection of Cryptic Prey by Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra T. Pietrewicz; Alan C. Kamil

    1977-01-01

    Blue jays learned to respond differentially to the presence or absence of Catocala moths in slides. This detection of the moths by the jays was affected by the background upon which the moth was placed and its body orientation, thus providing an objective measure of crypticity. These procedures are useful for the study of visual detection of prey.

  3. Visual Detection of Cryptic Prey by Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Pietrewicz, A T; Kamil, A C

    1977-02-11

    Blue jays learned to respond differentially to the presence or absence of Catocala moths in slides. This detection of the moths by the jays was affected by the background upon which the moth was placed and its body orientation, thus providing an objective measure of crypticity. These procedures are useful for the study of visual detection of prey. PMID:17732294

  4. Retrospective Cognition by Food-Caching Western Scrub-Jays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Kort, S.R.; Dickinson, A.; Clayton, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    Episodic-like memory, the retrospective component of cognitive time travel in animals, needs to fulfil three criteria to meet the behavioral properties of episodic memory as defined for humans. Here, we review results obtained with the cache-recovery paradigm with western scrub-jays and conclude that they fulfil these three criteria. The jays

  5. Adult Gray Jay Captures an Adult Black-capped Chickadee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DOUGLAS C. TOZER; MARTHA L. ALLEN

    2004-01-01

    We observed an adult Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) that had captured an adult Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) in Al- gonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada, during win- ter. Aerial pursuit of small, adult birds and an instance of capture and predation of a juvenile bird by a Gray Jay have been reported previously. Here, we present the first documented case of

  6. Losing Jay: A Meditation on Teaching while Grieving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Blaise Astra

    2009-01-01

    The author's partner Jay died on May 23, 2006. It was sudden and unexpected--he was 31, the author was 30. Her grief was prolonged and agonizing, and she has since learned that doctors refer to her condition as "complicated grief." Truly, she is not sure how she survived the first year after Jay's death. She certainly was not convinced she wanted…

  7. Profile of Stephen Hawking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen Lehman

    2011-01-01

    Although Stephen Hawking's early academic career lacked focus, the development of motor neuron disease straining against his hopes for a fulfilling life pulled the young scientist's work together. He has since become the world's most famous scientist due, in part, to his strong belief that science should be accessible to the general public. Hawking has published frequently for the academic

  8. JayDoc HistoWeb

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scarbrough, Marc.

    1996-01-01

    JayDoc HistoWeb, provided by two medical students at the University of Kansas, is a frames-based site that provides hundreds of microscopic anatomical images, topically arranged in 19 categories ranging from blood & bone marrow to vascular system. Each image is accompanied by a short annotation and scale bar. Interested users have the option of clicking a button for a much larger view. Note that though this site is extremely graphical and may be a challenge to those with slow connections, it is a treasure house of anatomical information.

  9. Acorn selection by Mexican jays: a test of a tri-trophic symbiotic relationship hypothesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Andrew Hubbard; Guy R. McPherson

    1997-01-01

    By caching acorns, jays serve as important dispersal agents for oak (Quercus) species. Yet little is known about which acorn characteristics affect selection by jays. In the traditional model of jay\\/oak\\u000a symbiosis, large, brown, ripe acorns free of invertebrate parasites (e.g., Curculio acorn weevils) are selected by jays. Recently, it has been suggested that a tri-trophic relationship between oaks, jays,

  10. Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SGFMOMA) has mounted a retrospective exhibition of the work of Jay DeFeo (1929-1989), who was active in the Bay area from the 1950s to the 1980s. The show will be on view at SFMOMA until February 3, 2013; on the website, select the Related Multimedia tab to see a selection of audio and video resources on DeFeo. Possibly most moving is Bruce Conner's film on DeFeo's most famous painting, "The Rose" (1958ââ?¬â??66). DeFeo worked on the painting for eight years, until it took up an entire room of the apartment she shared with her husband, Wally Hedrick (1928-2003) and weighed roughly a ton. Conner's short film documents the day when "The Rose" was removed, since DeFeo and Hedrick had been evicted. It was shown twice in California, in 1969. Another video, "The afterlife of Jay DeFeo's The Rose" documents the conservation of "The Rose" in June of 1995, after spending 25 years in storage. After conservation, "The Rose" travelled to New York City, where it was featured in the Whitney Museum's exhibition, "Beat Culture and the New America, 1950-1965."

  11. Stephen Hawking's Universe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website accompanies the Public Broadcasting Service's (PBS) series of television programs, based on the work of physicist Stephen Hawking, which address ideas and questions about the universe. Topics discussed include explanations of quarks, quasars, neutrinos, wormholes, ancient to current ideas about the universe, unsolved mysteries, and information about past astronomers such as: Kepler, Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Galileo. A teacher's guide and a list of links to related sites are also included. The accompanying video is available through mail order.

  12. Mind the Gap (or Mending It): Qualitative Research and Interdisciplinarity in Kinesiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vertinsky, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the perceived gap between the humanities and social sciences, and the sciences in kinesiology faculties and departments as interdisciplinary pressures mount in an increasingly complex world. I use an historical lens to highlight past difficulties in working across the two solitudes and describe Stephen Jay Gould's efforts to…

  13. By Mike Perricone, Office of Public Affairs Psychologist Oliver Sacks has Robin

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    of Jodie Foster. Biologist Stephen Jay Gould muses about the Red Sox in the PBS megadocumentary "Baseball of the best plain- language literature in particle physics might not yet have reached stardom, but their books central to the state of physics today, so crucial to our final under- standing of the structure of matter

  14. NEW ACQUISITIONS OCT-NOV.13 2009

    E-print Network

    : the dynamic character of movements BL 240.2 .G68 1999 Gould, Stephen Jay Rocks of ages: science and religion .E5 B76 2007 Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich, 1770-1831. Vorlesungen uber die Philosophie der Religion. English Lectures on the philosophy of religion B 3313 .G42 E55 2008 Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1844

  15. IN MY OPINION: Is Physics debatable?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Dobson

    2000-01-01

    Stephen Jay Gould is, unfortunately, a palaeontologist. I write unfortunately because if he were a physicist we would all have benefited from his innumerable entertaining and informative essays [1]. His steady theme involves an obscure subject like palaeontology and why the subject links so strongly with the human condition. The key, of course, is evolution, and the light it sheds

  16. The Trying Out of the Essay: How Scientific Essayists Compose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Diane

    Six scientific essayists were interviewed to gain some understanding of their writing processes. The writers were Roger Sawin, who writes for "Horticulture"; Harold Morowitz who writes for "Hospital Practices,""Science 82" and "Science 83"; Stephen Jay Gould who writes for "Natural History"; Jeremy Bernstein who writes for the "New Yorker" and…

  17. Darwin's Revolution in Thought: An Illustrated Lecture. Teaching Guide and Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    "Darwin's Revolution in Thought" is Stephen Jay Gould's definitive treatise on Charles Darwin. This 50-minute classroom edition videotaped lecture is structured in the form of a paradox and three riddles about Darwin's life. Each is designed to shed light on one of the key features of the theory of natural selection, its philosophical radicalism,…

  18. RepRoduction in StelleR'S JayS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI): individual chaRacteRiSticS and behavioRal StRategieS

    E-print Network

    Black, Jeff

    RepRoduction in StelleR'S JayS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI): individual chaRacteRiSticS and behavioRal St, behavioral syndrome, Cyanocitta stelleri, exploration, reproductive performance, risk taking, Steller's Jay. La reproduction chez Cyanocitta stelleri : caractéristiques individuelles et stratégies

  19. The Task of the Referee Alan Jay Smith

    E-print Network

    Torr, Philip H. S.

    The Task of the Referee * Alan Jay Smith Computer Science Division EECS Department University professional. Typically, referees learn to ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ * Prof. Smith's research

  20. Electrochemical Isotope Effect and Lithium Isotope Separation Jay R. Black,

    E-print Network

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Electrochemical Isotope Effect and Lithium Isotope Separation Jay R. Black, Grant Umeda, Bruce Dunn lithium were plated from solutions of 1 M LiClO4 in propylene carbonate (PC) on planar nickel electrodes

  1. Structure and Information Stephen Binns

    E-print Network

    Binns, Stephen

    of a Turing Machine. Stephen Binns Structure and Information #12;Alan Turing's Machines A Turing machine (TM and Information #12;Alan Turing's Machines A Turing machine (TM) consists of an infinite (in one direction) tape that it can be captured by the mathematically definable concept of a Turing Machine. Stephen Binns Structure

  2. Aversion/attraction of blue jays to microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, F E; Dowd, C; Byman, D; Schlinger, B A; Battista, S P; Kunz, T H

    1984-11-01

    Aversion/attraction experiments were conducted to determine whether birds can perceive the presence of 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwave irradiation by observing whether Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) exhibit an attraction or an aversion to the field when exposed to 25 and 50 mW/cm2. At power densities of 25 and 50 mW/cm2 Blue Jays exhibit an aversion to microwave irradiation. PMID:6522499

  3. A temporal shift in Steller's jay predation on bird eggs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn E. Sieving; Mary F. Willson

    2000-01-01

    Artificial-nest experiments conducted near Juneau, Alaska, indicated that Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri) may undergo a marked shift in foraging pattern and possibly nest-predation behavior triggered by fledging of their own chicks. In an early-June sampling of predation on artificial nests containing quail eggs, egg losses and jay activity levels were significantly higher in forest adjacent to human-created edge than in

  4. Time Restored - The Harrison Timekeepers and R.T. Gould, the Man Who Knew (Almost) Everything

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Jonathan

    2006-09-01

    This is the story of Rupert T. Gould (1890-1948), the polymath and horologist. A remarkable man, Lt Cmdr Gould made important contributions in an extraordinary range of subject areas throughout his relatively short and dramatically troubled life. From antique clocks to scientific mysteries, from typewriters to the first systematic study of the Loch Ness Monster, Gould studied and published on them all. With the title The Stargazer, Gould was an early broadcaster on the BBC's Children's Hour when, with his encyclopaedic knowledge, he became known as The Man Who Knew Everything. Not surprisingly, he was also part of that elite group on BBC radio who formed The Brains Trust, giving on-the-spot answers to all manner of wide ranging and difficult questions. With his wide learning and photographic memory, Gould awed a national audience, becoming one of the era's radio celebrities. During the 1920s Gould restored the complex and highly significant marine timekeepers constructed by John Harrison (1693-1776), and wrote the unsurpassed classic, The Marine Chronometer, its History and Development . Today he is virtually unknown, his horological contributions scarcely mentioned in Dava Sobel's bestseller Longitude. The TV version of Longitude, in which Jeremy Irons played Rupert Gould, did at least introduce Gould's name to a wider public. Gould suffered terrible bouts of depression, resulting in a number of nervous breakdowns. These, coupled with his obsessive and pedantic nature, led to a scandalously-reported separation from his wife and cost him his family, his home, his job, and his closest friends. In this first-ever biography of Rupert Gould, Jonathan Betts, the Royal Observatory Greenwich's Senior Horologist, has given us a compelling account of a talented but flawed individual. Using hitherto unknown personal journals, the family's extensive collection of photographs, and the polymath's surviving records and notes, Betts tells the story of how Gould's early life, his naval career, and his celebrity status came together as this talented Englishman restored part of Britain's--and the world's--most important technical heritage: John Harrison's marine timekeepers.

  5. The Bardeen-Stephen theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John R. Clem

    1991-01-01

    The experimental situation that prompted the theory is reviewed, the essentials of the Bardeen-Stephen theory are sketched, and several extensions are mentioned, particularly those that are needed to understand the high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors.

  6. In this issue: Stephen Humphries

    E-print Network

    Seamons, Kent E.

    ,000. The recipient also receives for the year the sculpture Wildfire by Helaman Ferguson, a former member of the BYU Wildfire, Sculpture by Helaman Ferguson Stephen Humphries Sculpture, Wildfire by Helaman Ferguson #12;(SA

  7. Stephen Schwandt: "Master of Conversation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the life and work of Stephen Schwandt, a mystery writer who incorporates elements of the mystery genre into his nonmystery novels. Suggests that the major strength of his novels is the characters. (RS)

  8. Volunteer Application Please return application to: Kellee Hanson | Gould-Simpson 935A | 1040 E. 4th Street | Tucson, AZ 85721-0091 | Fax: (520) 626-1352

    E-print Network

    Holliday, Vance T.

    Volunteer Application Please return application to: Kellee Hanson | Gould-Simpson 935A | 1040 E. 4 application to: Kellee Hanson | Gould-Simpson 935A | 1040 E. 4th Street | Tucson, AZ 85721-0091 | Fax: (520

  9. The Stephen Lawrence Inquiry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In 1993, 18-year-old Stephen Lawrence was stabbed to death in London in a racially motivated attack. Lawrence's killers have not been successfully prosecuted, and, as this report released by the UK Home Office on February 24 reveals, the London police inquiry into the crime displayed "professional incompetence and institutional racism." Undoubtedly the most infamous racial murder in recent British history, Lawrence's death, the police investigation, and the far-reaching government inquiry which followed are being regarded as a milestone in British race relations, inspiring new private and government initiatives to improve relations as well as proposals for extensive changes in the UK policing and judicial systems. Users can read the full text of Sir William Macpherson's 352 page report at the UK Sationary Office site.

  10. Interacting cache memories: Evidence for flexible memory use by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola S. Clayton; Kara Shirley Yu; Anthony Dickinson

    2003-01-01

    When Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) cached and recovered perishable crickets, N. S. Clayton, K. S. Yu, and A. Dickinson (2001) reported that the jays rapidly learned to search for fresh crickets after a 1-day retention interval (RI) between caching and recovery but to avoid searching for perished crickets after a 4-day RI. In the present experiments, the jays generalized their

  11. The rationality of animal memory: Complex caching strategies of western scrub jays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicky Clayton; Nathan Emery; Anthony Dickinson

    Scrub jays cache perishable and non-perishable foods, and their caches may be pilfered by conspecifics. Caching and recovery by scrub jays is psychologically rational in the sense that these behaviours responded appropriately to conditions that should have changed the birds' beliefs and desires. For example scrub jays were allowed to cache worms and peanuts in a visuospatially distinct tray. At

  12. Positive transfer from successive reversal training to learning set in blue jays ( Cyanocitta cristata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan C. Kamil; Thony B. Jones; Alexandra Pietrewicz; John E. Mauldin

    1977-01-01

    Five blue jays received 160 successive reversal training (SRT) problems and were then tested on 96 learning set (LS) problems. During LS testing, SRT birds performed at higher levels than did 5 jays that had received an equivalent amount of experience on a single problem (SP), but they performed at lower levels than did 5 jays that had received 160

  13. WEST NILE VIRUS DETECTION IN THE ORGANS OF NATURALLY INFECTED BLUE JAYS (CYANOCITTA CRISTATA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samantha E. J. Gibbs; Angela E. Ellis; Daniel G. Mead; Andrew B. Allison; J. Kevin Moulton; Elizabeth W. Howerth; David E. Stallknecht

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are an effective indicator species for West Nile virus (WNV) and may be regionally important in surveillance efforts. The sites of WNV replication and sensitivity of virus detection techniques are undefined for blue jays. The objectives of this study were to describe the gross and microscopic pathology associated with natural WNV infection in blue jays, as

  14. Inequality and the Dayton Tax-Budget Plan Jay Coggins and Dane Smith

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    Inequality and the Dayton Tax-Budget Plan Jay Coggins and Dane Smith Department of Applied Economics University of Minnesota March 6, 2013 Jay Coggins and Dane Smith Inequality and the Dayton Tax Jay Coggins and Dane Smith Inequality and the Dayton Tax-Budget Plan #12;Size of chart needed for Ray

  15. The Gould Belt 'MISFITS' Survey: The Real Solar Neighborhood Protostars

    E-print Network

    Heiderman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    We present an HCO$^{+}$ J=3-2 survey of Class 0+I and Flat SED young stellar objects (YSOs) found in the Gould Belt clouds by surveys with Spitzer. Our goal is to provide a uniform Stage 0+I source indicator for these embedded protostar candidates. We made single point HCO$^{+}$ J = 3-2 measurements toward the source positions at the CSO and APEX of 546 YSOs (89% of the Class 0+I + Flat SED sample). Using the criteria from van Kempen et al. (2009), we classify sources as Stage 0+I or bona fide protostars and find that 84% of detected sources meet the criteria. We recommend a timescale for the evolution of Stage 0+I (embedded protostars) of 0.54 Myr. We find significant correlations of HCO$^{+}$ integrated intensity with ${\\alpha}$ and $T_{bol}$ but not with $L_{bol}$. The detection fraction increases smoothly as a function of ${\\alpha}$ and $L_{bol}$, while decreasing smoothly with $T_{bol}$. Using the Stage 0+I sources tightens the relation between protostars and high extinction regions of the cloud; 89% of ...

  16. Stephen S. Shatz and Jean Gallier

    E-print Network

    Gallier, Jean

    Algebra by Stephen S. Shatz and Jean Gallier Department of Mathematics Department of Computer and Information Science University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA c Stephen S. Shatz & Jean Gallier

  17. Arboviral infection in two species of wild jays (Aves: Corvidae): evidence for population impacts.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Stark, Lillian M; Woolfenden, Glen E; Fitzpatrick, John W; Day, Jonathan F

    2004-03-01

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to three mosquito-borne arboviruses in blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata, and Florida scrub-jays, Aphelocoma coerulescens, to identify the effects on host survival, the influence of sex and age on infection, and the temporal patterns of antibody prevalence. Blood samples from 306 blue jays and 219 Florida scrub-jays were collected at Archbold Biological Station (Lake Placid, FL) from April 1994 through December 1995. Sera were analyzed for hemagglutination-inhibition antibody to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses, and neutralizing antibodies to EEE, Highlands J (HJ), and SLE viruses. Overall, 31.4% of blue jay samples and 22.1% of scrub-jay samples had antibodies to EEE. Antibodies to HJ were detected in slightly >15% of samples in each jay species, and SLE was detected in <3% of the samples in each jay species. A single EEE virus isolation was made from the blood of an 11-d-old scrub-jay nestling. Survival of adult blue jays seropositive to EEE was significantly lower than that of seronegative birds based on resight rates, but infection did not seem to affect survival of adult or juvenile Florida scrub-jays. PMID:15061281

  18. First results from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Palmeirim, P.; André, Ph.; Griffin, M. J.; Hargrave, P. J.; Könyves, V.; Bernard, J.-P.; Nutter, D. J.; Sibthorpe, B.; Di Francesco, J.; Abergel, A.; Arzoumanian, D.; Benedettini, M.; Bontemps, S.; Elia, D.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Men'shchikov, A.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Peretto, N.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Schisano, E.; Schneider, N.; Testi, L.; White, G.

    2013-06-01

    The whole of the Taurus region (a total area of 52 deg2) has been observed by the Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) instruments at wavelengths of 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 ?m as part of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. In this paper we present the first results from the part of the Taurus region that includes the Barnard 18 and L1536 clouds. A new source-finding routine, the Cardiff Source-finding AlgoRithm (CSAR), is introduced, which is loosely based on CLUMPFIND, but that also generates a structure tree, or dendrogram, which can be used to interpret hierarchical clump structure in a complex region. Sources were extracted from the data using the hierarchical version of CSAR and plotted on a mass-size diagram. We found a hierarchy of objects with sizes in the range 0.024-2.7 pc. Previous studies showed that gravitationally bound prestellar cores and unbound starless clumps appeared in different places on the mass-size diagram. However, it was unclear whether this was due to a lack of instrumental dynamic range or whether they were actually two distinct populations. The excellent sensitivity of Herschel shows that our sources fill the gap in the mass-size plane between starless and pre-stellar cores, and gives the first clear supporting observational evidence for the theory that unbound clumps and (gravitationally bound) prestellar cores are all part of the same population, and hence presumably part of the same evolutionary sequence.

  19. AVERSION/ATTRACTION OF BLUE JAYS TO MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aversion/attraction experiments were conducted to determine whether birds can perceive of 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwave irradiation by observing whether Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) exhibit an attraction or an aversion to the field when exposed to 25 and 50 microwaves/sq ...

  20. Search Image Formation in the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra T. Pietrewicz; Alan C. Kamil

    1979-01-01

    Blue jays trained to detect Catocala moths in slides were exposed to two types of slide series containing these moths: series of one species and series of two species intermixed. In one-species series, detection ability increased with successive encounters with one prey type. No similar effect occurred in two-species series. These results are a direct demonstration of a specific search

  1. Blue jay and fox squirrel damage preference among pecan trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Grant Huggins

    1995-01-01

    The relationship of eight native pecan (Carya illinoensis) tree characteristics and blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) and fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) nut damage levels was examined in five southcentral Oklahoma pecan groves during the 1991 and 1992 crop cycles. Each tree's nut length, width, total mass, kernel mass, per cent kernel, distance from the grove's edge, trunk area, and canopy area

  2. Contextual Information Portals Jay Chen, Trishank Karthik, Lakshminaryanan Subramanian

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Lakshminarayanan

    Contextual Information Portals Jay Chen, Trishank Karthik, Lakshminaryanan Subramanian jchen to their curriculum. This paper presents the design of Contextual Information Portals, searchable in- formation portals that contain a vertical slice of the Web about arbitrary topics tailored to a specific context

  3. Invasive Species Traits Jay, Josia, Rebecca, Alexandra, Vincent

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Introduction? McGregor et al, Diversity & Distributions 2012 #12;Pinus contorta #12;Species Statu s Fire engelmanii 0 2 28 3.5 45 13 Pinus lambertiana 0 2 40 4 216 49 Pinus banksiana 1 0 3 3.5 3 2 Pinus contorta 1Invasive Species Traits of Pinus. Jay, Josia, Rebecca, Alexandra, Vincent #12;. Traits thats

  4. The distribution and status of Sichuan Grey Jay ( Perisoreus internigrans )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sun Yue-Hua; Jia Chen-Xi; Fang Yun

    2001-01-01

    Summary The Sichuan Grey Jay is one of the least known endemic bird species in China, distributed in Gansu, Sichuan, Qinghai and Tibet in west China. The species inhabits the mountain spruce-fir conifer forest, at the altitude between 2 900 m to 3 800 m. Males are slightly larger than females. 31.3 % (n=19) of the individuals were found to

  5. DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ECONOMICS By Jay R. Lund,1

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ECONOMICS By Jay R. Lund,1 Associate Member, ASCE ABSTRACT: Recent difficulties in siting dredged material disposal facilities are increasing interests in alternative disposal or reuse of dredged material and the possible adverse consequences of any increases in the generation

  6. The Development of a Psychological Aesthetic: Jay Hambidge & Charles Henry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinnie, Harold J.

    This article reviews several movements in late 19th and early 20th century art and psychological research that are related to the early Greek method of proportional analysis generally known as the Golden Section. The document discusses the work of the artist Jay Hambidge on the nature of Greek art and design and his theory of dynamic symmetry.…

  7. Jay Melosh was right! Earthquake acoustics can trigger fault rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. McSaveney; T. R. Davies

    2009-01-01

    We insert dynamic fragmentation into Jay Melosh's acoustic fluidization hypothesis as the mechanism for providing sufficient energy in a granular material to cause it to become a dense granular flow with low strength and resistance. A defect in previous analyses of acoustic fluidization was in treating it only as pressure-wave propagation, and finding that too much energy was required to

  8. Adaptive Optics in Astronomy Jay J. McCarthy

    E-print Network

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Adaptive Optics in Astronomy Jay J. McCarthy NW Computational Intelligence Laboratory Portland State University Abstract ­ The field of adaptive optics (AO) has developed as a means to correct for the phase disturbances of an optical signal by understanding the medium through which it passes. This paper

  9. MFR PAPER 1145 GILBERT B. PAULEY, MARTIN W. NEWMAN, and EDITH GOULD

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1145 GILBERT B. PAULEY, MARTIN W. NEWMAN, and EDITH GOULD Seru m Changes in the Blue Crab protein and hemocyanin that could be accurately correlated with the severity of the dis- ease. Newman of Fisheries, Univer- sity of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. Martin W. Newman is with the Pathobiology

  10. by Paula Gould Image above is an optical micrograph of a self-healing

    E-print Network

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    by Paula Gould Image above is an optical micrograph of a self-healing polymer. Microcapsules containing a red healing agent are beginning to rupture as a crack progresses through the material. (Courtesy- healing materials currently under development, and you are likely to hear the same analogy drawn between

  11. 'Filling Bellies and Brains': The Educational and Political Thought of Frederick James Gould.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manton, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the pioneering efforts concerning moral education and educational reform by British educator Frederick James Gould. Discusses the application of his socialistic ideas to further three causes: (1) socialism and secularism; (2) positivism; and (3) a form of middle class radicalism. (KDR)

  12. Relationship between biofouling and growth of the pearl oyster pinctada fucata (Gould) in Kuwait, Arabian Gulf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Murad-B. M. Mohammad

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from a three-year investigation of the relationship between accumulations of marine fouling organisms and growth of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata (Gould). Estimates are provided of the diversity of the foulers, and data on certain hydrological features of the experimental site are also given.

  13. Thermally excited TrivelpieceGould modes as a pure electron plasma temperature diagnostica...

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Thermally excited Trivelpiece­Gould modes as a pure electron plasma temperature diagnostica... F; accepted 19 December 2002 Thermally excited plasma modes are observed in trapped, near-thermal by thermal fluctuations in both the plasma and the receiver electronics. The thermal emission spectra

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMPHIPLOID HYBRIDS BETWEEN PSEUDOROEGNERIA SPICATA (PURSH.) A. LOVE AND ELYMUS LANCEOLATUS (SCRIBNER & SMITH) GOULD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An amphiploid derivative from hybrids between bluebunch wheatgrass (2n=2x=14) [Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) A. Love] and thickspike wheatgrass (2n=4x=28) [Elymus lanceolatus (Scribner and Smith) (Gould] was developed to compare cytological, morphological, anatomical, and seed charateristics betwe...

  15. The role of TrivelpieceGould waves in antenna coupling to helicon waves Donald Arnush

    E-print Network

    Chen, Francis F.

    waves are undamped. In that case, antenna-plasma-coupling calculations predict infinite resonances by the helicon waves. They also showed that the major channel for plasma heating is coupling to helicon wavesThe role of Trivelpiece­Gould waves in antenna coupling to helicon waves Donald Arnush Electrical

  16. Carcass Ultrasound Scanning for Breeding Cattle Selection Kevin Gould, MSU Extension Beef Educator

    E-print Network

    Carcass Ultrasound Scanning for Breeding Cattle Selection Kevin Gould, MSU Extension Beef Educator Why do we use ultrasound? Ultrasound technology allows for the capture and standardization of carcass Evaluation ultrasound Expected Progeny Difference (EPD) values. Ultrasound EPDs are equivalent to carcass

  17. Autonomous Underwater Gliders Wood, Stephen

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    chemicals. Thus, dangerous substances in the sea can be detected earlier and their harmful effects can26 Autonomous Underwater Gliders Wood, Stephen Florida Institute of Technology United States to make complex studies on topics such as the effect of metals, pesticides and nutrients on fish abundance

  18. Synchronous Reactive Systems Stephen Edwards

    E-print Network

    Players ­ Real-time controllers Anti-lock braking systems Industrial process controllers 3 #12;STEPHEN EDWARDS SYNCHRONOUS REACTIVE SYSTEMS The Digital Approach Why do we build digital systems? Voltage noise is unavoidable Discretization plus non-linearity can filter out low-level noise completely Complex systems

  19. Stephen R. Beard Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Stephen R. Beard Curriculum Vitae Contact Information Department of Computer Science Princeton Engineer, June 2012 to December 2012 Tigerstone Labs, Princeton, NJ Develop compiler technology for use Update WIFI device to new hardware, multi-sensor support, assist in troubleshooting and debugging Summer

  20. Form Perception Stephen Grossberg1

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Form Perception Stephen Grossberg1 Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems Center for Adaptive Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA Running title: Form Perception Key Words: Object perception, Perceptual grouping, Surface perception, Figure-ground perception Invited article for the Encyclopedia

  1. Stephen Hawking's Universe. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Malcolm H.; Rameau, Jonathan D.

    This program guide is meant to help teachers assist their students in viewing the six-part public television series, "Stephen Hawking's Universe." The guide features program summaries that give background information and brief synopses of the programs; previewing activities that familiarize students with the subject; vocabulary that gives…

  2. An Interview with Stephen Vitiello

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Vitiello is a world-renowned contemporary sound artist whom the author has known as a colleague for several years. This article presents an interview about the overall body of Vitiello's work to date, and his thoughts on teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University. The interview explores the creative and noncreative tensions between…

  3. STEPHEN T. HOLMES, Ph.D. Office of Academic Initiatives

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    . and Stephen T. Holmes. Profiling Violent Crimes. 4rd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 2006 Stephen T. Holmes. Holmes and Stephen T. Holmes. Practical Suicide Investigations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 2003 Stephen T Offending. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage 2002 Holmes, Ronald M. and Stephen T. Holmes. Profiling Violent Crimes. 3

  4. Food, audience and sex effects on pinyon jay ( Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Dahlin; R. P. Balda; C. Slobodchikoff

    2005-01-01

    Pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) have a complex social system that may require a complex communication system. They need to interact with multiple flock members, and they form life-long pair-bonds. We researched whether pinyon jays would selectively vocalize depending on the presence or absence of food and certain flock members. We recorded the vocalizations of nine pinyon jays (four pair-bonds and

  5. Who's watching influences caching effort in wild Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri).

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Ryan S; Gabriel, Pia O; Black, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri) often store food and return to retrieve the stored items at a later time. Between caching and consumption, stored food has the potential to be pilfered by conspecific observers. We investigated whether individually marked Steller's jays in suburban neighborhoods of Arcata, California, USA, adjusted cache concealment effort when in the presence of conspecifics. Both male and female jays traveled the shortest distances to cache when alone, traveled further when a mate was present, and traveled furthest when neighbors from adjacent territories were present. These results suggest that Steller's jays recognize and respond to social contexts when concealing food items. PMID:25001401

  6. Search Image Formation in the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Pietrewicz, A T; Kamil, A C

    1979-06-22

    Blue jays trained to detect Catocala moths in slides were exposed to two types of slide series containing these moths: series of one species and series of two species intermixed. In one-species series, detection ability increased with successive encounters with one prey type. No similar effect occurred in two-species series. These results are a direct demonstration of a specific search image. PMID:17813172

  7. Circuit reconstruction tools today Stephen J Smith

    E-print Network

    Born, Richard

    Circuit reconstruction tools today Stephen J Smith To understand how a brain processes information, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States Corresponding author: Smith

  8. The Gould's Belt Very Large Array Survey. III. The Orion Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounkel, Marina; Hartmann, Lee; Loinard, Laurent; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Dzib, Sergio A.; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L.; Torres, Rosa M.; Boden, Andrew F.; Evans, Neal J., II; Briceño, Cesar; Tobin, John

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a high-sensitivity (60 ?Jy), large-scale (2.26 deg2) survey obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array as part of the Gould's Belt Survey program. We detected 374 and 354 sources at 4.5 and 7.5 GHz, respectively. Of these, 148 are associated with previously known young stellar objects (YSOs). Another 86 sources previously unclassified at either optical or infrared wavelengths exhibit radio properties that are consistent with those of young stars. The overall properties of our sources at radio wavelengths such as their variability and radio to X-ray luminosity relation are consistent with previous results from the Gould's Belt Survey. Our detections provide target lists for follow-up Very Long Baseline Array radio observations to determine their distances as YSOs are located in regions of high nebulosity and extinction, making it difficult to measure optical parallaxes.

  9. Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Memorial To Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts Fifty-Fourth Regiment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Gallery site offers images, history, and resources relating to sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous bronze bas relief, unveiled in 1897, commemorating Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th, the first and most famous Black regiment of the Civil War, distinctly honored for its valiancy in battle. Users can examine full-screen photographs of the entire relief or focus in on user-selected segments of the sculpture. The site provides histories of the regiment, Robert Gould Shaw, and the artist, including the story of how the sculpture evolved from a relatively modest (and conventional) equestrian statue of Shaw to its final form, featuring the intensely realized figures of African-American infantrymen on the march. There are also resources for teachers, comprised of lesson plans, a bibliography, and links to related sites.

  10. Analytic wave solution with helicon and Trivelpiece-Gould modes in an annular plasma

    E-print Network

    Walker, Mitchell

    -Gould solutions from Faraday's law �E = iB, pre-Maxwell Ampère's law �B = µ0J, and using the following form of Ohm's law to express plasma current J in terms of wave electric field E, iJ = ce �J-2 pe0E, where and radial components, B and Br, respectively, can be expressed in terms of Bz by use of Eqs. (1) and (2

  11. Foraging dynamics in Steller's jays: size and viability of cacheable food Christina Rockwell*, Pia O. Gabriel 1

    E-print Network

    Black, Jeff

    and storage viability. Steller's jays, Cyanocitta stelleri, which cache seeds for later consumption, may in storage. Western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma cal- ifornica, and Steller's jays, Cyanocitta stelleri, sample acceptance 16 July 2013 Available online 23 August 2013 MS. number: A13-00284R Keywords: caching Cyanocitta

  12. NUT SELECTION BY CAPTIVE BLUE JAYS: IMPORTANCE OF AVAILABILITY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEED DISPERSAL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey E. Moore; Robert K. Swihart

    2006-01-01

    We assessed dietary preference of 14 captive Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) for different food types under different conditions of availability. In four separate feeding trials, we provisioned jays with the following: Trial 1, two nuts each of white oak (Quercus alba), pin oak (Q. palustris), black oak (Q. velutina), northern red oak (Q. rubra), and shagbark hickory (Carya ovata); Trial

  13. NUT SELECTION BY CAPTIVE BLUE JAYS: IMPORTANCE OF AVAILABILITY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEED DISPERSAL

    E-print Network

    Swihart, Robert K. "Rob"

    Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) for different food types under different conditions of availability words: Cyanocitta cristata, discrete choice model, jays, oaks, selection. Seleccio´n de Bellotas por Cyanocitta cristata en Cautiverio : Importancia de la Disponibilidad e Implicancias para la Dispersio´n de

  14. Tool-making and tool-using in the northern blue jay.

    PubMed

    Jones, T B; Kamil, A C

    1973-06-01

    Laboratory-raised Northeirn blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) have been observed tearing pieces from pages of newspaper and utilizing them as tools to rake in food pellets which were otherwise out of reach. The frequency of this behavior was dependenit upon the motivational state of the jay and the presence of food pellets. PMID:17806587

  15. The detection of cryptic prey by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) I: the effects of travel time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALAN C. KAMIL; FREDERIC LINDSTROM; JERRILYNN PETERS

    1985-01-01

    The behaviour of blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) hunting for dispersed, cryptic prey was investigated in an operant simulation in which jays were trained to search projected images for noctuid moths. Each image contained either a single moth or no moth. Each trial was structured so as to simulate travelling between patches, searching within patches, and attacking and handling each moth

  16. Tool-Making and Tool-Using in the Northern Blue Jay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thony B. Jones; Alan C. Kamil

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory-raised Northern blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) have been observed tearing pieces from pages of newspaper and utilizing them as tools to rake in food pellets which were otherwise out of reach. The frequency of this behavior was dependent upon the motivational state of the jay and the presence of food pellets.

  17. Scrub Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) Form Integrated Memories of the Multiple Features of Caching Episodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola S. Clayton; Kara Shirley Yu; Anthony Dickinson

    2001-01-01

    Four experiments examined whether food-storing scrub jays remember when and where they cached different foods. The scrub jays cached and recovered perishable and nonperishable foods in visuospatially distinct and trial-unique cache sites. They rapidly learned to avoid searching for foods that had perished by the time of recovery, while continuing to search for the same foods after shorter retention intervals

  18. Fall 2011 -Computer Science Colloquia From DNA to Jay-Z: How Ideas from Bioinformatics

    E-print Network

    Mayfield, John

    Fall 2011 - Computer Science Colloquia From DNA to Jay-Z: How Ideas from Bioinformatics Can Automate Finding Rhymes in Rap Music From DNA to Jay-Z: How Ideas from Bioinformatics Can Automate Finding designed a system for automatic rhyme annotation. Our approach is founded on several bioinformatics ideas

  19. Pathogenicity of Haemoproteus danilewskyi, Kruse, 1890, in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Homer, Bruce L; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    Although the impact of blood parasite infections on passerine birds is potentially great, little is known of their pathologic effects. We studied Haemoproteus danilewskyi in experimentally infected captive and naturally infected free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) to determine patterns of infection and examine the pathologic effects of the parasite on the host. Physiologic changes, such as elevated numbers of lymphocytes, heterophils, basophils, eosinophils, and monocytes and decreased packed cell volume in the peripheral blood were associated with the erythrocytic phase of experimental infections of captive juvenile jays. Sublethal pathologic changes associated with the pre-erythrocytic phase of infections were observed in the liver, lung, and spleen. Schizonts were observed in the pulmonary capillaries of a 1 yr old jay necropsied 31 days post-inoculation, but not in 20 juvenile jays necropsied 57 days post-inoculation. In free-ranging naturally infected jays plasma protein concentration increased with density of natural infections. PMID:12685080

  20. Author! Author! Picture Artist: Stephen Gammell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This column presents a brief biography of illustrator Stephen Gammell, well-known for both his black-and-white and his brightly colored children's picture book art. Stephen Gammell has made a long career illustrating children's stories and poems. The first book he illustrated, "A Nutty Business" (written by Ida Chittum), was published in 1973 and…

  1. On the Notions of Mother Nature and the Balance of Nature and Their Implications for Conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis E. Jelinski

    \\u000a The evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould (1996, p. 57) wrote, “The most erroneous stories are the ones we think we know\\u000a best - and therefore never scrutinize or question.” This essay addresses two intertwining narratives that demand close scrutiny\\u000a - Mother Nature and the Balance of Nature. Both are common in environmental discourse and generally accepted without question.\\u000a For example,

  2. Contrivances: Orchids and the Pandas Thumb

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Craig Nelson

    In this lesson, students read and discuss selected and edited excerpts from the essays of Stephen Jay Gould on the subject of contrivances. Students learn that many features of modern organisms reflect the structure of their ancestors in ways that are not adaptive. They also learn that one of the best indicators of evolution is not the examples of perfect adaptations, but of the relatively imperfect contrivances, structures modified and used for functions quite different than the ancestral functions of those same structures.

  3. Teaching the Classics: The Origin of Species as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Many (including the author) argue that reading the classics in the field should be part of a scientist's education. However, how you read the classics can be very different depending on whether you read them as a historian or as a practicing scientist. This point will be made by comparing two readings of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, and by looking at the use that Stephen Jay Gould made of the history of science in his quest to promote his scientific ideas.

  4. Volunteer Application Please return application to: Kellee Ellingson | kelleeh@email.arizona.edu | Gould-Simpson 929B | 1040 E. 4th Street | Tucson, AZ 85721

    E-print Network

    Fay, Noah

    @email.arizona.edu | Gould-Simpson 929B | 1040 E. 4th Street | Tucson, AZ 85721 Fax: (520) 626-1352 | For more information | kelleeh@email.arizona.edu | Gould-Simpson 929B | 1040 E. 4th Street | Tucson, AZ 85721 Fax: (520) 626

  5. Careful cachers and prying pilferers: Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) limit auditory information available to competitors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rachael C.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2013-01-01

    Food-storing corvids use many cache-protection and pilfering strategies. We tested whether Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) reduce the transfer of auditory information to a competitor when caching and pilfering. We gave jays a noisy and a quiet substrate to cache in. Compared with when alone, birds cached less in the noisy substrate when with a conspecific that could hear but could not see them caching. By contrast, jays did not change the amount cached in the noisy substrate when they were with a competitor that could see and hear them caching compared with when they were alone. Together, these results suggest that jays reduce auditory information during caching as a cache-protection strategy. By contrast, as pilferers, jays did not attempt to conceal their presence from a cacher and did not prefer a silent viewing perch over a noisy one when observing caching. However, birds vocalized less when watching caching compared with when they were alone, when they were watching a non-caching conspecific or when they were watching their own caches being pilfered. Pilfering jays may therefore attempt to suppress some types of auditory information. Our results raise the possibility that jays both understand and can attribute auditory perception to another individual. PMID:23222444

  6. Food caching by western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) is sensitive to the conditions at recovery.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Nicola S; Dally, Joanna; Gilbert, James; Dickinson, Anthony

    2005-04-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) cached perishable and nonperishable food items, which they could recover after both short and long retention intervals. When perishable items were always degraded at recovery, jays decreased the number of perishable items cached and increased their caching of nonperishable items, relative to a control group whose caches were always fresh at recovery. Jays reduced the number of nonperishable items cached, however, when highly preferred food items were degraded only after the long retention intervals. The findings are discussed in terms of the role of retrospective and prospective processes in the control of caching. PMID:15839770

  7. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the western pearlshell mussel, Margaritifera falcata (Gould).

    PubMed

    Chong, Jer Pin; Box, Jayne Brim; Nez, Donna A; Mock, Karen E

    2009-05-01

    Ten microsatellite loci were isolated from the western pearlshell, Margaritifera falcata (Gould, 1850) and characterized in populations from Washington and Montana, USA. We also assessed eight microsatellite loci developed in M. margaritifera, two of which showed utility. Both of our test populations showed significant heterozygote deficiencies at most loci, consistent with a hermaphroditic life history. Populations differed markedly with respect to allelic richness, allele frequencies and numbers of identical multilocus genotypes. This panel of loci should prove useful in describing gene flow and genetic diversity patterns among M. falcata populations, information that should aid future conservation efforts. PMID:21564817

  8. Professor Stephen W. Hawking's Site

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Professor Stephen Hawking, the Cambridge University scholar and author of A Brief History of Time, has been called the greatest mind in physics since Albert Einstein. His Web Site (maintained by Graduate Assistant Chris Burgoyne) gives a description of his life, achievements, and his struggle with the physically debilitating disease ALS, or Lou Gehrig's Disease. The sites lecture links page gives descriptions of and downloadable Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files of past lectures and colloquiums, while the news link page provides information on current events, such as the Professors recent sixtieth birthday. The site is easy to navigate and offers physics novices and experts interesting reading regarding the works and life a person whose name will certainly be remembered along side Einstein and Galileo.

  9. ELMR: Lightweight Mobile Health Records Arvind Kumar, Amey Purandare, Jay Chen, Arthur Meacham, Lakshminarayanan Subramanian

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Lakshminarayanan

    1 ELMR: Lightweight Mobile Health Records Arvind Kumar, Amey Purandare, Jay Chen, Arthur Meacham functionality in J2ME, and integrated it into an HIV treatment application we are developing for use by African

  10. Socialiy, social learning and individual differences in rooks, jackdaws and Eurasian jays

    E-print Network

    Federspiel, Ira Gil

    2010-06-08

    as a more general process (Lefebvre & Palameta 1988). Although difficult to interpret, a study with highly social, cooperatively breeding pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) and less social Clark?s nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) suggests...

  11. MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R. Lund

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R University of California, Davis April 2003 #12;MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme;TABLE OF CONTENTS i INTRODUCTION

  12. The effects of prey depletion on the patch choice of foraging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALAN C. KAMIL; SONJA I. YOERG

    1985-01-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) were trained to hunt for non-cryptic moths presented in projected images. On each trial, the jays chose one of two patches to hunt in: (1) a uniform, 'non-depleting' patch with constant prey density of 0.25; or (2) a 'depleting' patch in which prey density changed during the foraging bout. In the depleting patch, the initial prey

  13. Geographic Variation in the Ontogeny of Beak Coloration of Gray-Breasted Jays (Aphelocoma ultramarina)

    E-print Network

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    1991-05-01

    . Novit. 2606:1- 37. The Condor 93:44@52 Q The Cooper Ornithological Society 1991 GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN THE ONTOGENY OF BEAK COLORATION OF GRAY-BREASTED JAYS (APHELOCOMA ULTRAMARINA)’ A. TOWNSEND b’ERSON* Committee On Evolutionary Biology..., The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 Key words: Gray-breasted Jay; Aphelocoma ultra- marina; beak coloration; ontogeny; maturation; geo- graphic variation; sociality. The three species ofjays in the genus Aphelocoma have been the subject of interest...

  14. Food-caching western scrub-jays keep track of who was watching when.

    PubMed

    Dally, Joanna M; Emery, Nathan J; Clayton, Nicola S

    2006-06-16

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) hide food caches for future consumption, steal others' caches, and engage in tactics to minimize the chance that their own caches will be stolen. We show that scrub-jays remember which individual watched them during particular caching events and alter their recaching behavior accordingly. We found no evidence to suggest that a storer's use of cache protection tactics is cued by the observer's behavior. PMID:16709747

  15. Tool-use and instrumental learning in the Eurasian jay ( Garrulus glandarius )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucy G. Cheke; Christopher D. Bird; Nicola S. Clayton

    2011-01-01

    Recent research with Rooks has demonstrated impressive tool-using abilities in captivity despite this species’ classification\\u000a as a non-tool-user in the wild. Here, we explored whether another non-tool-using corvid, the Eurasian Jay, would be capable\\u000a of similar feats and investigated the relative contributions of causal knowledge and instrumental conditioning to the birds’\\u000a performance on the tasks. Five jays were tested on

  16. The Gould Belt, the de Vaucouleurs-Dolidze belt, and the Orion arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    Based on masers with measured trigonometric parallaxes, we have redetermined the spatial orientation parameters of the Local (Orion) arm. Using 23 sources (the Gould Belt objects were excluded), we have found that their spatial distribution can be approximated by a very narrow ellipsoid elongated in the direction L 1 = 77.1° ± 2.9° whose symmetry plane is inclined to the Galactic plane at an angle of 5.6° ± 0.2°. The longitude of the ascending node of the symmetry plane is . A newestimate for the pitch angle of the Local spiral arm has been obtained by an independent method: i = 12.9° ± 2.9°. Previously, a belt of young B stars, the de Vaucouleurs-Dolidze belt, was pointed out on the celestial sphere with parameters close to such an orientation. We have refined the spatial orientation parameters of this belt based on a homogeneous sample of protostars. The de Vaucouleurs-Dolidze belt can be identified with the Local arm, with the belt proper as a continuous band on the celestial sphere like the Gould Belt being absent due to the peculiarities of the spatial orientation of the Local arm. Using the entire sample of 119 Galactic masers, we have shown that the third axis of their position ellipsoid has no deviation from the direction to the Galactic pole: B 3 = 89.7° ± 0.1°.

  17. Habitat model for the Florida Scrub Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida. The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provides habitat for one of the three largest populations of the Florida Scrub Jay. This threatened bird occupies scrub, slash pine flatwoods, disturbed scrub, and coastal strand on KSC. Densities of Florida Scrub Jays were shown to vary with habitat characteristics but not necessarily with vegetation type. Relationships between Florida Scrub Jay densities and habitat characteristics were used to develop a habitat model to provide a tool to compare alternative sites for new facilities and to quantify environmental impacts. This model is being tested using long term demographic studies of colorbanded Florida Scrub Jays. Optimal habitat predicted by the model has greater than or equal to 50 percent of the shrub canopy comprised of scrub oaks, 20-50 percent open space or scrub oak vegetation within 100 m of a ruderal edge, less than or equal to 15 percent pine canopy cover, a shrub height of 120-170 cm, and is greater than or equal to 100 m from a forest. This document reviews life history, social behavior, food, foraging habitat, cover requirements, characteristics of habitat on KSC, and habitat preferences of the Florida Scrub Jay. Construction of the model and its limitations are discussed.

  18. Laboratory observations of electron energization and associated lower-hybrid and TrivelpieceGould wave turbulence during magnetic

    E-print Network

    Egedal, Jan

    -bandwidth, and impedance-matched Langmuir probes. The observed modes, identified by their characteristic frequency Trivelpiece­Gould or gradients in the fast electron population lower-hybrid . © 2010 American Institute "x" geometry compatible with fast inflow and outflow. At the same time, if the current sheet thins

  19. Dynamics and Phylogenetic Implications of MtDNA Control Region Sequences in New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Saunders; Scott V. Edwards

    2000-01-01

    .   To study the evolution of mtDNA and the intergeneric relationships of New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae), we sequenced the entire\\u000a mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) from 21 species representing all genera of New World jays, an Old World jay, crows,\\u000a and a magpie. Using maximum likelihood methods, we found that both the transition\\/transversion ratio (?) and among site rate

  20. Apparent predation by Gray Jays, Perisoreus canadensis, on Long-toed Salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum, in the Oregon Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, M.P.; Pearl, C.A.; Bury, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    We report observations of Gray Jays (Perisoreus canadensis) appearing to consume larval Long-toed Salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum) in a drying subalpine pond in Oregon, USA. Corvids are known to prey upon a variety of anuran amphibians, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of predation by any corvid on aquatic salamanders. Long-toed Salamanders appear palatable to Gray Jays, and may provide a food resource to Gray Jays when salamander larvae are concentrated in drying temporary ponds.

  1. books & arts Stephen hawking: a BiOgraphy

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    books & arts On our bookshelf Stephen hawking: a BiOgraphy By kriStine LarSen Prometheus: 2007. 215 pp. $16.95 (pbk) Stephen Hawking is possibly the most written-about scientist of his generation. His about his physics and his life. A search of Amazon for Stephen Hawking yields 219 publications in the UK

  2. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchell, J.; Wilson, T.; Drabek, E.; Curtis, E.; Richer, J.; Nutter, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Ward-Thompson, D.; JCMT GBS Consortium

    2013-02-01

    We present observations of NGC 1333 from SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 ?m. Temperature maps are derived from 450 and 850 ?m ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index ? = 1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC 1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other young stars in the IR/optically visible cluster and embedded protostars. Other luminous protostars are also identified by temperature rises at the 17 arcsec resolution of the ratio maps (0.02 pc assuming a distance of 250 pc for Perseus). The extensive heating raises the possibility that the radiative feedback may lead to increased masses for the next generation of stars.

  3. Pinyon jays use transitive inference to predict social dominance.

    PubMed

    Paz-Y-Miño C, Guillermo; Bond, Alan B; Kamil, Alan C; Balda, Russell P

    2004-08-12

    Living in large, stable social groups is often considered to favour the evolution of enhanced cognitive abilities, such as recognizing group members, tracking their social status and inferring relationships among them. An individual's place in the social order can be learned through direct interactions with others, but conflicts can be time-consuming and even injurious. Because the number of possible pairwise interactions increases rapidly with group size, members of large social groups will benefit if they can make judgments about relationships on the basis of indirect evidence. Transitive reasoning should therefore be particularly important for social individuals, allowing assessment of relationships from observations of interactions among others. Although a variety of studies have suggested that transitive inference may be used in social settings, the phenomenon has not been demonstrated under controlled conditions in animals. Here we show that highly social pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) draw sophisticated inferences about their own dominance status relative to that of strangers that they have observed interacting with known individuals. These results directly demonstrate that animals use transitive inference in social settings and imply that such cognitive capabilities are widespread among social species. PMID:15306809

  4. Cache protection strategies by western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica): hiding food in the shade.

    PubMed

    Dally, Joanna M; Emery, Nathan J; Clayton, Nicola S

    2004-12-01

    In the presence of conspecifics, food-caching western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) implement a variety of strategies to reduce the chances of cache theft. This experiment aimed to determine whether the jays could exploit an environmental variable, the level of ambient light, to reduce the transfer of visual information to potential pilferers. Each jay was allowed to cache non-degradable food in two trays, one of which was well lit, whereas the other was in shadow. In some trials the birds cached in private and in others they were observed; however, they always recovered their caches in private. When observed the jays preferentially cached in the shaded tray, whereas both trays were used equally when caching in private. By caching in shaded sites, the quality and transfer of visual information available to the observer may be reduced, thereby making the location of cache sites less certain. These results suggest that western scrub-jays may selectively cache in the shade as a strategy to reduce the chance of cache theft by observing conspecifics. PMID:15801583

  5. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF A GREAT HORNED OWL DECOY ON THE BEHAVIOR OF JUVENILE AND ADULT GRAY JAYS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. MONTEVECCHI; A. D. MACCARONE

    The effects of a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) decoy on the feeding behavior of adult and juvenile Gray Jays (Perisoreus canadensis) were tested by comparing the feeding activity of the jays in the presence of the decoy with that in the presence of a Ring-necked Duck mount and in the absence of other species' models. The owl decoy had

  6. Jay R. Rooker 1, David G. Itano 2 1 Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Jay R. Rooker 1, David G. Itano 2 1 Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology 2 University of Hawaii, Joint Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Research, Pelagic Fisheries Research Program #12;Jay R. Rooker 1, David G. Itano 2 1 Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology 2 University of Hawaii

  7. No evidence of temporal preferences in caching by Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica)?

    PubMed Central

    Thom, James M.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and other animals often favour immediate gratification over long-term gain. Primates, including humans, appear more willing to wait for rewards than other animals, such as rats or pigeons. Another group displaying impressive patience are the corvids, which possess large brains and show sophisticated cognitive abilities. Here, we assess intertemporal choice in one corvid species, the Western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica). These birds cache food for future consumption and respond flexibly to future needs. Cache-theft and cache-degradation are time-dependent processes in scrub-jay ecology that might necessitate sensitivity to delays between caching and retrieval. We adopt a caching paradigm with delays of up to 49 h. Across two experiments we find no evidence of a preference for earlier recovery. We highlight the possibility that, although scrub-jays can discriminate between the present and the future, they may not understand how far into the future an event will occur. PMID:24378212

  8. by STEPHEN POLLOCK THE outdoor tennis court

    E-print Network

    by STEPHEN POLLOCK THE outdoor tennis court at Perth Arena is slated to remain unused for 51 weeks recreation needs, I call on the Barnett government to open this tennis court for locals and to also population John Hyde wants locals to be able to use the tennis court at Perth Arena, but the managers say no

  9. Stephen Chanock Contributes Invited Perspective on TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen J. Chanock, M.D., Division Director, discusses the role of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) in understanding how germline variation informs the landscape of somatic alterations in cancer. He explains how findings from TCGA have generated new sets of questions that will shape future molecular epidemiology studies.

  10. Infrared Imaging with COAST John Stephen Young

    E-print Network

    Young, John

    Infrared Imaging with COAST John Stephen Young St John's College, Cambridge and CavendishD. thesis worth reading. I hope that is not the case here. This is, however, the only page not written, Professor John Baldwin, for always being available to give advice and encouragement, and for assisting

  11. ON OCCULT PERIOD MAPS STEPHEN KUDLA

    E-print Network

    Rapoport, Michael

    ON OCCULT PERIOD MAPS STEPHEN KUDLA AND MICHAEL RAPOPORT In memoriam Jonathan Rogawski Abstract We interpret the"occult" period maps of Allcock, Carlson, Toledo [2, 3], resp. of Looijenga, Swierstra [20, 21", or "occult" period maps in this context? This is done in order to make the distinction with the usual period

  12. 2009 Fall Congregation Professor Stephen J. Toope

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    1 2009 Fall Congregation Professor Stephen J. Toope President and Vice-Chancellor, The University in a particularly Christian view of salvation after life, after time, to speak to the real threats of people between Lord Krishna and the brilliant warrior prince, Arjuna, and occurs on the battlefield before

  13. Stephen D. Hursting, PhD, MPH

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Stephen Hursting is Professor and Chair of the Department of Nutritional Sciences at The University of Texas (UT) at Austin. He is also the McKean-Love Chair of Nutrition, Molecular and Cellular Sciences at the University of Texas and is Professor of Molecular Carcinogenesis at the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr.

  14. A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root

  15. HOW TO BE FAIR Stephen Brookes

    E-print Network

    Treuille, Adrien

    HOW TO BE FAIR Stephen Brookes Carnegie Mellon University School of Computer Science 1 #12;FOCUS and liveness fairness assumptions THEME Dispelling myths about fairness 2 #12;SHARED-VARIABLE PROGRAMS transformers 4 #12;WHAT IS FAIRNESS? · an assumption no process is ignored forever · an abstraction every

  16. PRESENTATION OF AWARDS Stephen O. Dean, President

    E-print Network

    , Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. In selecting Prof. Wirth, the FusionPRESENTATION OF AWARDS Stephen O. Dean, President Fusion Power Associates Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium December 4-5, 2007 #12;2007 LEADERSHIP AWARDS · Fusion Power Associates

  17. Stephen P. Lynch Karen A. Thole

    E-print Network

    Thole, Karen A.

    Stephen P. Lynch Karen A. Thole Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania. The measured differences in heat transfer for the various midpassage gap flowrates tested did not appear that the presence of slots and gaps has significant effects on the endwall film-cooling effectiveness and heat

  18. Not only size matters: Acorn selection by the European jay ( Garrulus glandarius)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Josep; Pausas, Juli G.

    2007-05-01

    A strong selection for acorn characteristics is expected to have evolved in the mutualistic relationship between the European jay ( Garrulus glandarius) and the oak ( Quercus spp.). Bossema's pioneer work suggested that jays do not select acorns randomly, but rather they preferentially select some size and species. Preference for some seeds over others may have implications on plant community dynamics by conferring advantages (or disadvantages) on the selected (avoided) seed characteristics. In this paper we test to what extent jays select acorns by species and/or by size and the relation between these two traits in Mediterranean oak species. The experiments consist of a set of field tests in which acorns from four different coexisting Mediterranean oak species ( Quercus ilex, Quercus faginea, Quercus suber, and Quercus coccifera) were placed in artificial feeders accessible to wild jays. The acorns were previously measured to control individual acorn characteristics. Using video-recording techniques, we followed jay activity and the fate of each acorn (sequence of acorn selection and method of transport). Q. ilex acorns were preferred over other acorns, and Q. coccifera acorns were avoided when other acorns were available. Preference for Q. faginea and Q. suber acorns was intermediate, that is, they were preferred over Q. coccifera acorns but not over Q. ilex acorns. Large acorns were also preferred although acorn species selection was stronger than size selection. Jays selected species and size both by visual means and by using acorn area as an indicator of size. Acorns wider than 17-19 mm were carried in the bill because of throat limitation. Our results confirm Bossema's study on temperate oaks and extend it to Mediterranean oak species, revealing implications on mixed oak forest dynamics.

  19. Does multiple seed loading in Blue Jays result in selective dispersal of smaller acorns?

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Andrew W; Kachmar, Michael; Lichti, Nathanael; Swihart, Robert K; Stratford, Jeffrey A; Steele, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Studies from both tropical and temperate systems show that scatter-hoarding rodents selectively disperse larger seeds farther from their source than smaller seeds, potentially increasing seedling establishment in larger-seeded plants. Size-biased dispersal is evident in many oaks (Quercus) and is true both across and within species. Here, we predict that intraspecifc variation in seed size also influences acorn dispersal by the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata Linnaeus), but in an opposite manner. Blue Jays are gape-limited and selectively disperse smaller acorn species (e.g. pin oaks [Quercus palustris Münchh]), but often carry several acorns in their crop during a single dispersal event. We predict that jays foraging on smaller acorns will load more seeds per trip and disperse seeds to greater distances than when single acorns are carried in the bill. To test this, we presented free-ranging Blue Jays with pin oak acorns of different sizes over a 2-year period. In each of 16 experimental trials, we monitored the birds at a feeding station with remote cameras and determined the number of acorns removed and the distance acorns were dispersed when cached. Jays were significantly more likely to engage in multiple seed loading with smaller seeds in both years of the study. During the second year, these smaller acorns were dispersed farther than larger acorns, and during the first year, larger acorns were dispersed farther, revealing an inconsistent response to seed size during our study. We suggest that in some circumstances, multiple seed loading by Blue Jays may favor dispersal in some plant species. PMID:21910843

  20. West Nile virus detection in the organs of naturally infected blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Samantha E J; Ellis, Angela E; Mead, Daniel G; Allison, Andrew B; Moulton, J Kevin; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Stallknecht, David E

    2005-04-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are an effective indicator species for West Nile virus (WNV) and may be regionally important in surveillance efforts. The sites of WNV replication and sensitivity of virus detection techniques are undefined for blue jays. The objectives of this study were to describe the gross and microscopic pathology associated with natural WNV infection in blue jays, as well as determine the most appropriate tissues to be used for virus isolation, reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques. Blue jays were collected in Georgia, USA, between May and September 2001. Initial screening by virus isolation indicated that 36 of 59 blue jays chosen for evaluation were WNV positive. From this group, 20 positive and five negative birds were chosen to compare virus detection techniques. Six positive and five negative birds were selected for histopathology examination. Splenomegaly and poor body condition were the most consistent gross findings among positive birds. The most consistent histopathologic findings in the tissues of WNV-positive blue jays were mononuclear leukocytosis and epicarditis/myocarditis. Brain, heart, and lung had the highest viral titers, and WNV antigen was most often detected by IHC in heart, kidney, liver, and lung. Reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction proved to be the most sensitive diagnostic test applied in this study irrespective of the tissue type. Brain tissue could be used effectively for both virus isolation and RT-nPCR, and this tissue is simple to remove and process. The success of IHC is highly dependent on tissue selection, and the use of multiple tissues including heart, kidney, liver, or lung is recommended. PMID:16107670

  1. Cytology and Fertility of Advanced Populations of Elymus lanceolatus (Scribn. & Smith) Gould Elymus caninus (L.) L. Hybrids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin B. Jensen

    ifdevelopedamphiploidsaretohaveanimpactindevel- oping new cultivars. Little is known regarding the effect Within the wheatgrasses and wildryes, amphiploids are frequently of advanced amphiploid generations on meiotic stability madeasameansforintrogressingdesirabletraitsandrestoringfertility and fertility within the wheatgrasses and wildryes. in hybrids between diverse species. This study reports the cytology, fer- MostoftheperennialgrassspeciesinthetribeTriticeae tility, and morphological characteristics of Elymus lanceolatus(Scribn. & Smith)Gould, E.caninus(L.)L., theirF1hybrids, advancedgenerations are allopolyploids that

  2. A New Population Estimate for the Florida Scrub Jay on Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1989-01-01

    The variable circular plot method was used to sample avifauna within different vegetation types determined from aerial imagery. The Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens) population was estimated to range between 1,415 and 3,603 birds. Approximately half of the scrub and slash pine habitat appeared to be unused by Florida Scrub Jay, probably because the slash pine cover was too dense or the oak cover was too sparse. Results from the study suggest that the entire state population may be much lower than believed because the size of two of the three largest populations may have been overestimated.

  3. GeneChip® technology, Stephen FodorSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Fodor DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>genetic profiling>Stephen Fodor GeneChip® technology Stephen Fodor talks about bringing the knowledge gathered by the Human Genome Project to the individual researcher.

  4. Gene profile and response to treatment, Stephen FodorSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Fodor DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>genetic profiling>Stephen Fodor Gene profile and therapy Stephen Fodor talks about how an individual's gene expression profile can help determine what therapies might work best.

  5. Perception for collision avoidance and autonomous driving Romuald Aufrre, Jay Gowdy, Christoph Mertz*

    E-print Network

    Wang, Chieh-Chih "Bob"

    enforcement of drunk driving laws) but the drivers themselves have not necessarily improved. CurrentlyPerception for collision avoidance and autonomous driving Romuald Aufrère, Jay Gowdy, Christoph. The earlier work of the group concentrated on road following, cross-country driving, and obstacle detection

  6. EPIZOOTIOLOGY OF HAEMOPROTEUS DANILEWSKYI (HAEMOSPORINA: HAEMOPROTEIDAE) IN BLUE JAYS (CYANOCITTA CRISTATA) IN SOUTHCENTRAL FLORIDA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary C. Garvin; Ellis C. Greiner

    Prevalence and density of Haemoproteus danilewskyi was studied in a population of free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida (USA) from May 1992 to December 1995. Prevalence of infection was 27% for data combined over years, seasons, ages, and sexes. Prevalence did not vary between sexes or among years, but increased with age and varied with season, being highest

  7. PATHOGENICITY OF HAEMOPROTEUS DANILEWSKYI, KRUSE, 1890, IN BLUE JAYS (CYANOCITTA CRISTATA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary C. Garvin; Bruce L. Homer; Ellis C. Greiner

    Although the impact of blood parasite infections on passerine birds is potentially great, little is known of their pathologic effects. We studied Haemoproteus danilewskyi in exper- imentally infected captive and naturally infected free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata )t o determine patterns of infection and examine the pathologic effects of the parasite on the host. Physiologic changes, such as elevated numbers

  8. The Contradictions of Contemporary Culture: A Tribute to Norman Jay Levitt (1943-2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Norman Jay Levitt was the author's good friend, collaborator, and co-author. He was--above, before, and after politics--an honest inquirer. His socio-cultural views evolved continuously. Levitt, truth-seeker and liberal, was impatient with, and a devastating critic of, the political correctness and--even worse--the philosophic triviality that…

  9. The Secret Gripes of Professor Klein: An AP-IB By Jay Mathews

    E-print Network

    Klein, David

    The Secret Gripes of Professor Klein: An AP-IB Drama By Jay Mathews Washington Post Staff Writer's analysis of AP and IB did not turn out the way either of them hoped. On June 4, Klein submitted his report on two courses, AP Calculus AB and IB Mathematics SL. Klein's analysis of AP and IB math was more

  10. PACKAGING STUDY FOR A 512-CHANNEL INTRAOCULAR EPIRETINAL Jay Han-Chieh Chang1

    E-print Network

    Emami-Neyestanak, Azita

    to surgical consideration. An implant mechanical model, i.e., a real device but without real IC chips is ongoing for a real implant with working IC chips. The IC chips are independently developed by Manuel MongePACKAGING STUDY FOR A 512-CHANNEL INTRAOCULAR EPIRETINAL IMPLANT Jay Han-Chieh Chang1 , Yang Liu1

  11. Interruptions improve choice performance in gray jays: prolonged information processing versus minimization of costly errors.

    PubMed

    Waite, Thomas A

    2002-12-01

    Under the assumption that selection favors minimization of costly errors, erroneous choice may be common when its fitness cost is low. According to an adaptive-choice model, this cost depends on the rate at which an animal encounters the choice: the higher this rate, the smaller the cost of choosing a less valuable option. Errors should thus be more common when interruptions to foraging are shorter. A previous experiment supported this prediction: gray jays, Perisoreus canadensis, were more error prone when subjected to shorter delays to access to food rewards. This pattern, though, is also predicted by an attentional-constraints model. Because the subjects were able to inspect the rewards during delays, their improved performance when subjected to longer delays could have been a byproduct of the experimentally prolonged opportunity for information processing. To evaluate this possibility, a follow-up experiment manipulated both delay to access and whether rewards could be inspected during delays. Depriving jays of the opportunity to inspect rewards (using opaque lids) induced only a small, nonsignificant increase in error rate. This effect was independent of length of delay and so the jays' improved performance when subjected to longer delays was not simply a byproduct of prolonged information processing. More definitively, even when the jays were prevented from inspecting rewards during delays, their performance improved when subjected to longer delays. The findings are thus consistent with the adaptive-choice model. PMID:12461598

  12. Context-dependent violations of rational choice in honeybees ( Apis mellifera ) and gray jays ( Perisoreus canadensis )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharoni Shafir; Tom A. Waite; Brian H. Smith

    2002-01-01

    Contrary to the theory of rational choice, adding an alternative to a set of available options often affects people's judgement of the preexisting options. Here, we show that honeybees (Apis mellifera) and gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis) are also influenced by the addition of an option to a choice set (i.e., by a change in local context). Like humans, our subjects

  13. Predator-induced plasticity in nest visitation rates in the Siberian jay (Perisoreus infaustus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sönke Eggers; Michael Griesser; Jan Ekmana

    2005-01-01

    Bird nestlings may be at risk not only from starvation but also from predators attracted to the nest by parental feeding visits. Hence, parents could trade reduced visitation rates for a lower predation risk. Here, through field data and an experiment, we show plasticity in daily patterns of nest visitation in the Siberian jay, Perisoreus infaustus, in response to predator

  14. Speciation in the highlands of Mexico: genetic and phenotypic divergence in the Mexican jay (Aphelocoma ultramarina)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. McCormack; A. Townsend Peterson; E. Bonaccorso; Thomas B. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The pine-oak woodlands of the Mexican highlands harbour significant biological diversity, yet little is known about the evolutionary history of organisms inhabiting this region. We assessed genetic and phenotypic differentiation in 482 individuals representing 27 populations of the Mexican jay (Aphelocoma ultramarina) — a widespread bird species of the Mexican highlands — to test whether populations in the central and

  15. The Emergence of Self Terrence W. Deacon, James W. Haag and Jay Ogilvy1

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 The Emergence of Self Terrence W. Deacon, James W. Haag and Jay Ogilvy1 Starting small Rene Descartes' now legendary claim--"I think therefore I am"--sets the challenge for a theory of self. Who or what is this "I" of which Descartes speaks? This is one of those irritating puzzles that perennially re

  16. Carbon K-edge XANES spectromicroscopy of natural graphite Jay A Brandesa,*, George D. Codyb

    E-print Network

    Long, Bernard

    Carbon K-edge XANES spectromicroscopy of natural graphite Jay A Brandesa,*, George D. Codyb: Received 27 November 2007 Accepted 2 June 2008 Available online 18 June 2008 A B S T R A C T Carbon K indistinguishable from highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, but contained a wide variety of internal structures

  17. Taxonomic Classification for Web-based Videos Yang Song, Ming Zhao, Jay Yagnik, and Xiaoyun Wu

    E-print Network

    Tomkins, Andrew

    , there hasn't Root People & Society Arts & Entertainment Sports Games News Music & Audio TV & Video HumorTaxonomic Classification for Web-based Videos Yang Song, Ming Zhao, Jay Yagnik, and Xiaoyun Wu Categorizing web-based videos is an important yet chal- lenging task. The difficulties arise from large data

  18. Visual coverage and scanning behavior in two corvid species: American crow and Western scrub jay.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban; O'Rourke, Colleen; Pitlik, Todd

    2010-12-01

    Inter-specific differences in the configuration of avian visual fields and degree of eye/head movements have been associated with foraging and anti-predator behaviors. Our goal was to study visual fields, eye movements, and head movements in two species of corvids: American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Western scrub jay (Aphelocoma californica). American crows had wider binocular overlap, longer vertical binocular fields, narrower blind areas, and higher amplitude of eye movement than Western scrub jays. American crows can converge their eyes and see their own bill tip, which may facilitate using different foraging techniques (e.g., pecking, probing) and manufacturing and handing rudimentary tools. Western scrub jays had a higher head movement rate than American crows while on the ground, and the opposite between-species difference was found when individuals were perching. Faster head movements may enhance the ability to scan the environment, which may be related to a higher perceived risk of predation of Western scrub jays when on the ground, and American crows when perching. The visual field configuration of these species appears influenced mostly by foraging techniques while their scaning behavior, by predation risk. PMID:20803204

  19. The care of young Piñon Jays ( Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus ) and their integration into the flock

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane H. Balda

    1978-01-01

    Summary Piñon Jays live year round in a social flock that may number from 50 to 300 birds. Young birds form into creches immediately after leaving the nest. Begging calls are important in the formation of creches. In these creches young interact with each other and with their parents. This study was designed to 1. gain an understanding of the

  20. INTERGENERIC RELATIONSHIPS OF THE NEW WORLD JAYS INFERRED FROM CYTOCHROME b GENE SEQUENCES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALEJANDRO ESPINOSA DE LOS MONTEROS; JOEL CRACRAFT

    The six genera of corvids endemic to the Americas (i.e., Aphelocoma, Calo- citta, Cyanocitta, Cyanocorax, Cyanolyca, and Gymnorhinus) form the assemblage that most ornithologists call the New World jays. The intergeneric relationships among these six gen- era are explored using complete sequences from the cytochrome b gene (1,143 bp) along with 29 morphological characters. A consistent phylogenetic hypothesis was obtained

  1. John Jay College Confidential Informant Study Reveals Weaknesses in New Jersey Police Practices

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    and ACLU Criminal Law Reform Project have released a study today, authored by John Jay College of Criminal's criminal justice system NEWARK, NJ, June 27, 2010 ­ The American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey of criminal investigations. "Because the practice of using informants in criminal investigations has

  2. Mass Mortality of the Mountain Chicken Frog Jay King, DVM, MS

    E-print Network

    Mass Mortality of the Mountain Chicken Frog Jay King, DVM, MS The Commonwealth of Dominica terrestrial frog commonly known as the crapaud or mountain chicken frog (Figure 1). In the past, this species receiving reports from the South- ern Forest Range of sick and dead frogs (Figure 2). These reports

  3. Prolactin and helping behaviour in the cooperatively breeding Florida scrub-jay, Apheloma e. coerulesens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEPHAN J. SCHOECH; RONALD L. MUMME; JOHN C. WINGFIELD

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between parental and alloparental behaviours and prolactin was examined by measuring plasma levels of prolactin in cooperatively breeding Florida scrub-jays during three breeding seasons. The seasonal trends were similar to those in several other avian species, with low prolactin titres during the pre-nesting phase that steadily increased to a maximum during the incubation and nestling periods. Females had

  4. Fluctuation in entanglement positions via elastic slip-links Jay D. Schieber1,a

    E-print Network

    Schieber, Jay D.

    Fluctuation in entanglement positions via elastic slip-links Jay D. Schieber1,a and Kazushi Horio1 of slip-link positions via the implementation of elastic slip-links. The level of description is similar to our previously proposed slip-link model, wherein we use the entanglement position in space as dynamic

  5. Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, Floyd Michael

    2010-10-01

    The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly during his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

  6. The link between magnetic fields and filamentary clouds: bimodal cloud orientations in the Gould Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-bai; Fang, Min; Henning, Thomas; Kainulainen, Jouni

    2013-12-01

    The orientations of filamentary molecular clouds in the Gould Belt and their local intercloud media (ICM) magnetic fields are studied using near-infrared dust extinction maps and optical stellar polarimetry data. These filamentary clouds are a few-to-10 pc in length, and we find that their orientations tend to be either parallel or perpendicular to the mean field directions of the local ICM. This bimodal distribution is not found in cloud simulations with super-Alfvénic turbulence, in which the cloud orientations should be random. ICM magnetic fields that are dynamically important compared to inertial range turbulence and self-gravity can readily explain both field-filament configurations. Previous studies commonly recognize that strong magnetic fields can guide gravitational contraction and result in filaments perpendicular to them, but few discuss the fact that magnetic fields can also channel sub-Alfvénic turbulence to form filaments aligned with them. This strong-field scenario of cloud formation is also consistent with the constant field strength observed from ICM to clouds and is possible to explain the `hub-filament' cloud structure and the density threshold of cloud gravitational contraction.

  7. Neurogenesis in the mossy chiton, Mopalia muscosa (Gould) (Polyplacophora): evidence against molluscan metamerism.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas; Brückner, Martin; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2002-08-01

    Neurogenesis in the chiton Mopalia muscosa (Gould, 1846) was investigated by applying differential interference contrast microscopy, semithin serial sectioning combined with reconstruction techniques, as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy for the detection of fluorescence-conjugated antibodies against serotonin and FMRFamide. The ontogeny of serotonergic nervous structures starts with cells of the apical organ followed by those of the cerebral commissure, whereas the serotonergic prototroch innervation, pedal system, and the lateral cords develop later. In addition, there are eight symmetrically arranged serotonergic sensory cells in the dorsal pretrochal area of the larva. FMRFamide-positive neural elements include the cerebral commissure, specific "ampullary" sensory cells in the pretrochal region, as well as the larval lateral and pedal system. In the early juvenile the cerebral system no longer stains with either of the two antibodies and the pedal system lacks anti-FMRFamide immunoreactivity. Outgroup comparison with all other molluscan classes and related phyla suggests that the cord-like, nonganglionized cerebral system in the Polyplacophora is a reduced condition rather than a primitive molluscan condition. The immunosensitivity of the pedal commissures develops from posterior to anterior, suggesting independent serial repetition rather than annelid-like conditions and there is no trace of true segmentation during nervous system development. Polyplacophoran neurogenesis and all other available data on the subject contradict the idea of a segmented molluscan stem species. PMID:12112126

  8. Anim. Behav.,1985,33, 1068-1079 The detection of cryptic prey by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata)

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Anim. Behav.,1985,33, 1068-1079 The detection of cryptic prey by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) I (Cyanocitta cristata) hunting for dispersed, cryptic prey was investigated in an operant simulation in which

  9. Jay Melosh was right! Earthquake acoustics can trigger fault rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSaveney, M. J.; Davies, T. R.

    2009-12-01

    We insert dynamic fragmentation into Jay Melosh’s acoustic fluidization hypothesis as the mechanism for providing sufficient energy in a granular material to cause it to become a dense granular flow with low strength and resistance. A defect in previous analyses of acoustic fluidization was in treating it only as pressure-wave propagation, and finding that too much energy was required to maintain collisional grain flow. This defect vanishes if both pressure and shear waves are considered, and fluidization becomes much less energy demanding as induced transient Mohr-Coulomb frictional slip in a dense granular flow. Our earlier analyses of dynamic fragmentation lacked detail of the mechanism by which the effect of fracturing an individual grain was transmitted to the wider granular mass. This is now seen as release of elastic-strain energy when a grain’s elastic limit is reached and it fails by brittle fracture. Suddenly released elastic-strain energy is propagated through the rest of the grain mass as elastic-strain energy (“rock noise” and seismic energy). Its passing between grains at contacts results in fluctuations of existing grain-contact forces. As shear and normal components of each contact force vary independently, their ratio also varies. Whenever the ratio of shear to normal forces at a contact exceeds its static friction coefficient, the contact slips; a simple application of the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion (under ambient pore-fluid pressure and any cohesion). The closer that static forces are to inducing motion in the grain mass (general Mohr-Coulomb failure), the smaller the transient changes are needed to induce relative grain motion. Hence, the energy requirements of the transient forces need not be large, and decrease as the externally applied static force increases. The net effect of induced transient slip between grains that would not otherwise have slipped is a cumulative grain-mass deformation at lower overall load than would otherwise be required. That is, the acoustics of grain breakage can induce general shear in a grain mass subject to a shear stress otherwise insufficient to induce shear. Grain-contact forces and within-grain stresses are highly variable from grain to grain, even in a static grain mass. If some grains are already stressed to close to their elastic limit, they may break during the transmission of transient elastic strain (i.e. when the Griffith brittle-failure criterion is met), suddenly releasing elastic-strain energy to the wider grain mass. The energy is rich in large amplitudes at short wavelengths to induce large rates of force change at grain contacts, and the likelihood of large slip. Since large shear rates induce high grain stresses, this process is self-reinforcing. The reduction in shear strength is proportional to grain-mass fraction simultaneously fragmenting, and the wave amplitude of the elastic strain energy released. This mechanism operates independently of pore-fluid pressure when brittle grain breakages are occurring. Save for the additional production of fractured grains, the effect of a small fragmenting-grain fraction is indistinguishable from that of a very substantial pore pressure; thus, in the presence of evidence of grain breakage, fluid pressure is undeterminable.

  10. The Effect of Modified Brostrom-Gould Repair for Lateral Ankle Instability on In Vivo Tibiotalar Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Wainright, William B; Spritzer, Charles E.; Lee, Jun Young; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle instability leads to an increased risk of tibiotalar joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have found abnormal tibiotalar joint motions with lateral ankle instability that may contribute to this increased incidence of osteoarthritis, including increased anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under weight-bearing loading. Surgical repairs for lateral ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of repair on in vivo ankle motion are not well understood. Hypothesis The modified Broström-Gould lateral ligament reconstruction decreases anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under in vivo weight-bearing loading conditions. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seven patients underwent modified Brostöm-Gould repair for unilateral lateral ankle instability. Ankle joint kinematics as a function of increasing body weight were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and biplanar fluoroscopy. Tibiotalar kinematics were measured in unstable ankles preoperatively and postoperatively at a mean follow-up of 12 months, as well as in the uninjured contralateral ankles of the same individuals. Results Surgical repair resulted in statistically significant decreases in anterior translation of the talus (0.9±0.3mm, p=0.018) at 100% bodyweight and internal rotation of the talus at 75% (2.6±0.8°, p=0.019) and 100% (2.7±0.8°, p=0.013) bodyweight compared to ankle kinematics measured before repair. No statistically significant differences were detected between repaired ankles and contralateral normal ankles. Conclusion The modified Broström-Gould repair improved the abnormal joint motion observed in patients with lateral ankle instability, decreasing anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus. Clinical Relevance Altered kinematics may contribute to the tibiotalar joint degeneration that occurs with chronic lateral ankle instability. The findings of the current study support the efficacy of this repair in improving the abnormal ankle motion observed in these patients. PMID:22886690

  11. 77 FR 61003 - Stephen C. Delaney, Jr.: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ...Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0405] Stephen C. Delaney, Jr.: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and...the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring Stephen C. Delaney, Jr. for a period of 5 years from...

  12. From normal brain and behavior to schizophrenia StephenGrossberg

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    From normal brain and behavior to schizophrenia StephenGrossberg January, 2003 TechnicNeural Systems 677 BeaconStreet Boston, MA 02215 #12;FROM NORMAL BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR TO SCHIZOPHRENIA Stephen Psychopathology Technical ReportCAS/CNS TR-2003-001 #12;Linking Brain to Behavior in Normals and Schizophrenics

  13. Generalised Domain Model Acquisition from Action Traces Stephen Cresswell

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    Generalised Domain Model Acquisition from Action Traces Stephen Cresswell The Stationery Office St. Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1PD, UK stephen.cresswell@tso.co.uk Peter Gregory Computer for the domain expert to also be an expert at modelling tran- sition systems. The LOCM system (Cresswell, Mc

  14. Visual Recognition of Multi-Agent Action Stephen Sean Intille

    E-print Network

    Visual Recognition of Multi-Agent Action by Stephen Sean Intille B.S.E., University of Pennsylvania (1992) S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1994) Submitted to the Program in Media Arts #12;2 #12;3 Visual Recognition of Multi-Agent Action by Stephen Sean Intille Submitted to the Program

  15. Kindness in the Art Classroom: Kind Thoughts on Stephen Rowland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article is a response to Stephen Rowland's article, "Kindness," which appeared in "London Review of Education," November 2009. Much to my amazement, Stephen Rowland's article was the only one I found when I did a global database search on "kindness in education". I had thought that I would find reams of information in the databases on the…

  16. Some conservation results on weak Konig's Stephen G. Simpson 1

    E-print Network

    Some conservation results on weak KË?onig's lemma Stephen G. Simpson 1 Department of Mathematics, U. Kohlenbach [8] Email adresses: simpson@math.psu.edu (Stephen G. Simpson), tanaka@math.tohoku.ac.jp (Kazuyuki Tanaka), yamazaki@mi.cias.osakafu­u.ac.jp (Takeshi Yamazaki). URL: www.math.psu.edu/simpson

  17. Some conservation results on weak Konig's Stephen G. Simpson 1

    E-print Network

    Some conservation results on weak K¨onig's lemma Stephen G. Simpson 1 Department of Mathematics. In a different context, U. Kohlenbach [8] Email adresses: simpson@math.psu.edu (Stephen G. Simpson), tanaka@math.tohoku.ac.jp (Kazuyuki Tanaka), yamazaki@mi.cias.osakafu-u.ac.jp (Takeshi Yamazaki). URL: www.math.psu.edu/simpson

  18. Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager

    E-print Network

    Levi, Ran

    Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager 01224 438607 sylvia.stephen@abdn.ac.uk Contact us: The Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health offers a bespoke service to the food industry We also offer guidance and advice on when a nutritional claim can be made on your product Back of pack

  19. Epizootiology of Haemoproteus danilewskyi (Haemosporina: Haemoproteidae) in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    Prevalence and density of Haemoproteus danilewskyi was studied in a population of free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida (USA) from May 1992 to December 1995. Prevalence of infection was 27% for data combined over years, seasons, ages, and sexes. Prevalence did not vary between sexes or among years, but increased with age and varied with season, being highest in June-July and lowest in November-January. Parasite density did not vary between sexes or among seasons, but was higher in younger birds when controlling for season. To determine periods of natural transmission, seasonal patterns of infection were compared with previous month abundance of the biting fly vectors. Mean monthly prevalence of H. danilewskyi in older jays was positively correlated with previous month abundance of Culicoides edeni and C. arboricola, both capable of sporogonic development of H. danilewskyi. PMID:12685063

  20. Predation risk induces changes in nest-site selection and clutch size in the Siberian jay

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Sönke; Griesser, Michael; Nystrand, Magdalena; Ekman, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that an individual should reduce its reproductive efforts by laying a smaller clutch size when high risk of nest predation reduces the value of current reproduction. Evidence in favour of this ‘nest predation hypothesis’, however, is scarce and based largely on correlative analyses. Here, we manipulated perceived risk of nest predation in the Siberian jay Perisoreus infaustus using playback involving a mixture of calls by corvid nest predators in the vicinity of nest sites. In response to being exposed to this acoustic cue simulating increased risk of nest predation, the jays chose a nest site offering more protective covering and reduced clutch size. This is the first experimental demonstration of clutch size adjustment and nest site selection as a result of phenotypic plasticity in an open nesting passerine reflecting a facultative response to the perceived risk of nest predation. PMID:16608689

  1. Mapping Florida Scrub Jay habitat for purposes of land-use management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.; Provancha, Mark J.; Smith, Rebecca B.

    1991-01-01

    Geographical information system (GIS) applications were used to map areas of primary and secondary Florida Scrub Jay habitat on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) using vegetation and soils maps. Data from field studies were used for accuracy assessment and evaluating the importance of mapping classes. Primary habitat accounts for 15 percent of the potential habitat and contained 57 percent of the Florida Scrub Jay population on KSC. Proximity analysis identified potential population centers, which were 44 percent of the potential habitat and contained 86 percent of the population. This study is an example of how remote sensing and GIS applications can provide information for land-use planning, habitat management, and the evaluation of cumulative impacts.

  2. Learning-set behavior in the learning-set experienced blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan C. Kamil; Michael Lougee; Ruth I. Shulman

    1973-01-01

    Conducted a series of experiments with object-discrimination learning-set (ODLS) experienced blue jays. Exp. I demonstrated long-term retention of the ability to solve new ODLS problems, short-term retention loss of intraproblem information concerning specific problems after 2 acquisition trials, and a higher percentage correct following a reinforced Trial 1 response than following a nonreinforced Trial 1 response. Exp. II demonstrated that

  3. “Anting” in Blue Jays: evidence in support of a food-preparatory function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Eisner; Daniel Aneshansley

    2008-01-01

    Summary.  Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines),\\u000a is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants.\\u000a Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is

  4. Discrimination and generalization of leaf damage by blue jays ( Cyanocitta cristata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela G. Real; Ruth Iannazzi; Alan C. Kamil; Bernd Heinrich

    1984-01-01

    Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) responded to projected black-and-white silhouettes of cherry leaves that were either undamaged or were damaged by either\\u000a cryptic caterpillars that disguise leaf damage due to their feeding or by noncryptic caterpillars that do not disguise leaf\\u000a damage due to their feeding. Pecks to the key on which the images were projected were reinforced only if interresponse

  5. Fertilization and Harvest Season of Eastern Gamagrass at Ona and Jay, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Kalmbacher; L. S. Dunavin; F. G. Martin

    1990-01-01

    Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides L.) can be found throughout Florida and might be used for range rehabilitation. Gamagrass was established on north (Jay) and south Florida ranges (Ona) with (4200 kg ha-' dolomite and annual 56-14-51 kg ha-' of N-P-K) and without fertilizer and was cut (25.cm stubble) when plants reached 0.45 m tall (referred to as '45'); cut June

  6. Rapid divergence and postglacial colonization in western North American Steller's jays (Cyanocitta stelleri).

    PubMed

    Burg, Theresa M; Gaston, Anthony J; Winker, Kevin; Friesen, Vicki L

    2005-10-01

    Post-Pleistocene avian colonization of deglaciated North America occurred from multiple refugia, including a coastal refugium in the northwest. The location of a Pacific Coastal refugium is controversial; however, multiple lines of evidence suggest that it was located near the Queen Charlotte Islands (also known as Haida Gwaii). The Queen Charlotte Islands contain a disproportionately large number of endemic plants and animals including the Steller's jay Cyanocitta stelleri carlottae. Using five highly variable microsatellite markers, we studied population structure among eight populations of Steller's jay (N = 150) from geographical areas representing three subspecies in western North America: C. s. carlottae, C. s. stelleri and C. s. annectens. Microsatellite analyses revealed genetic differentiation between each of the three subspecies, although more extensive sampling of additional C. s. annectens populations is needed to clarify the level of subspecies differentiation. High levels of population structure were found among C. s. stelleri populations with significant differences in all but two pairwise comparisons. A significant isolation by distance pattern was observed amongst populations in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. In the C. s. carlottae population, there was evidence of reduced genetic variation, higher number of private alleles than northern C. s. stelleri populations and higher levels of divergence between Queen Charlotte Island and other populations. We were unable to reject the hypothesis that the Queen Charlotte Islands served as a refugium during the Pleistocene. Steller's jay may have colonized the Queen Charlotte Islands near the end of the last glaciation or persisted throughout the Pleistocene, and this subspecies may thus represent a glacial relic. The larger number of private alleles, despite reduced genetic variation, morphological distinctiveness and high divergence from other populations suggests that the Queen Charlotte Island colonization pre-dates that of the mainland. Furthermore, our results show rapid divergence in Steller's jay populations on the mainland following the retreat of the ice sheets. PMID:16202093

  7. Visual coverage and scanning behavior in two corvid species: American crow and Western scrub jay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esteban Fernández-Juricic; Colleen O’Rourke; Todd Pitlik

    2010-01-01

    Inter-specific differences in the configuration of avian visual fields and degree of eye\\/head movements have been associated\\u000a with foraging and anti-predator behaviors. Our goal was to study visual fields, eye movements, and head movements in two species\\u000a of corvids: American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Western scrub jay (Aphelocoma californica). American crows had wider binocular overlap, longer vertical binocular fields, narrower

  8. ROOSTING BEHAVIOR OF THE PllqON JAY IN AUTUMN AND WINTER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RUSSELL P. BALDA; MICHAEL L. MORRISON; THOMAS R. BEMENT

    ABSTRttCT.--This study describes the overt roosting and arousal behavior, associated environ- mental and biological variables, and possible selective factors experienced by a flock of about 80 color-marked Pition Jays in northern Arizona. Birds roosted in the same 70-ha pine forest on 22 occasions between October and March. Birds arrived on the roosting grounds 1-2 h before going to roost and

  9. Observational visuospatial encoding of the cache locations of others by western scrub-jays ( Aphelocoma californica )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shigeru Watanabe; Nicola S. Clayton

    2007-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) hide food and rely on spatial memory to recover their caches at a later date. They also rely on observational spatial memory\\u000a to steal caches made by other individuals. Successful pilfering may require an understanding of allocentric space because\\u000a the observer will often be in a different position from the demonstrator when the caching event occurs.

  10. Food, audience and sex effects on pinyon jay (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) communication.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, C R; Balda, R P; Slobodchikoff, C

    2005-01-31

    Pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) have a complex social system that may require a complex communication system. They need to interact with multiple flock members, and they form life-long pair-bonds. We researched whether pinyon jays would selectively vocalize depending on the presence or absence of food and certain flock members. We recorded the vocalizations of nine pinyon jays (four pair-bonds and one single male) in response to different audience types. The calls of the test bird were recorded after it was given either an empty food cup or one containing 50 pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) seeds, and the bird was in the presence of one of the following audience types: (1) two males and two females including subject's mate; (2) two males and two females excluding subject's mate; (3) four males excluding mate; (4) three females excluding mate; and (5) no audience. Birds gave fewer calls when there was food. When alone, birds called in a manner that may maximize long-distance transmission. Trends indicate that birds call differently to their mate. A sex effect was also found in that males and females called in a distinct manner, possibly reflecting differences in dominance status. Overall, birds responded to the presence or absence of an audience. PMID:15639383

  11. Squeeze and Nonlinear Effects in Trivelpiece-Gould and Electron Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashourvan, Arash

    We study the enhanced damping of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in a nonneutral plasma column, due to application of a Debye-shielded cylindrically symmetric squeeze potential phi1. Damping of these plasma modes is caused by additional Landau resonances at energies En for which the particle bounce frequency ob (En) and the wave frequency o satisfy o = n ob (En). In the first chapter we assume a smooth squeeze of finite width and find that additional resonances induced by the squeeze cause substantial damping, even in the large wave phase velocity compared to thermal velocity regime. For o/k >>(T /m )1/2 and phi1 << T , the resonance damping rate has a |phi1|2 dependence. This dependence agrees with the simulations and experimental results. In chapter 2 a narrow partition-like squeeze is added to an unsqeezed 1D plasma and we evaluate the plasma heating, caused by cylindrically symmetric plasma modes. As in chapter 1, collisionless heating is enhanced by the squeeze, due to additional resonances, even when o/k >> ? T /m. Adding collisions to the theory broadens these resonances and also creates a boundary layer at the separatrix between trapped and passing particles. This further enhances the heating at o/kv s < 1, where vs is the separatrix velocity. We study the nonlinear interaction of TG waves in chapter 3. We obtain corrections to the forms and frequencies of weakly nonlinear modes. Futhermore, we study the decay instability between a dominant axial mode m = 2 and a small amplitude mode m = 1, using both analytical and numerical techniques. In chapter 4, we study nonlinear interactions of the novel Electron Acoustic Waves in a 1D plasma. Here, we use a weakly nonlinear analysis of a 1D Vlasov-Poisson system, in a modified Maxwellian equilibrium, flattened at the phase velocity of the waves. Using numerical simulation of the 1D Vlasov-Poisson system, we study the unstable collapse of an EAW mode m = 2 to an EAW mode m = 1 and compare the numerically-obtained exponential growth rates to the analytically obtained results.

  12. A Markov decision process for managing habitat for Florida scrub-jays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Fred A.; Breininger, David R.; Duncan, Brean W.; Nichols, James D.; Runge, Michael C.; Williams, B. Ken

    2011-01-01

    Florida scrub-jays Aphelocoma coerulescens are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act due to loss and degradation of scrub habitat. This study concerned the development of an optimal strategy for the restoration and management of scrub habitat at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which contains one of the few remaining large populations of scrub-jays in Florida. There are documented differences in the reproductive and survival rates of scrubjays among discrete classes of scrub height (<120 cm or "short"; 120-170 cm or "optimal"; .170 cm or "tall"; and a combination of tall and optimal or "mixed"), and our objective was to calculate a state-dependent management strategy that would maximize the long-term growth rate of the resident scrub-jay population. We used aerial imagery with multistate Markov models to estimate annual transition probabilities among the four scrub-height classes under three possible management actions: scrub restoration (mechanical cutting followed by burning), a prescribed burn, or no intervention. A strategy prescribing the optimal management action for management units exhibiting different proportions of scrub-height classes was derived using dynamic programming. Scrub restoration was the optimal management action only in units dominated by mixed and tall scrub, and burning tended to be the optimal action for intermediate levels of short scrub. The optimal action was to do nothing when the amount of short scrub was greater than 30%, because short scrub mostly transitions to optimal height scrub (i.e., that state with the highest demographic success of scrub-jays) in the absence of intervention. Monte Carlo simulation of the optimal policy suggested that some form of management would be required every year. We note, however, that estimates of scrub-height transition probabilities were subject to several sources of uncertainty, and so we explored the management implications of alternative sets of transition probabilities. Generally, our analysis demonstrated the difficulty of managing for a species that requires midsuccessional habitat, and suggests that innovative management tools may be needed to help ensure the persistence of scrub-jays at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The development of a tailored monitoring program as a component of adaptive management could help reduce uncertainty about controlled and uncontrolled variation in transition probabilities of scrub-height and thus lead to improved decision making.

  13. The Stephen L. Bloom Scholarship at Stevens Institute of Technology was established in 2011 in memory of Stephen L. Bloom, Professor of

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Roe

    The Stephen L. Bloom Scholarship at Stevens Institute of Technology was established in 2011 in memory of Stephen L. Bloom, Professor of Computer Science from 1977 to 2010, by his many friends and accomplishment in music or the fine arts. Daniel Schuler, the current recipient of the Stephen L. Bloom

  14. Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor

    E-print Network

    Adali, Tulay

    Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor Syntactic and semantic, multi-engine NLP applications Dr. Richard Chang, Associate Professor Computational complexity theory, natural language processing, intelligent agents Dr. Milton Halem, Research Professor Scientific computing

  15. Optically accessible high-pressure combustion apparatus Stephen D. Tsea)

    E-print Network

    Tse, Stephen D.

    Optically accessible high-pressure combustion apparatus Stephen D. Tsea) Department of Mechanical optically accessible high-pressure combustion apparatus is presented. The apparatus provides optical access measurements, alleviating the extreme overpressures encountered in high-pressure combustion processes within

  16. Nonstationary Logistic Regression William D. Penny and Stephen J. Roberts

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    Nonstationary Logistic Regression William D. Penny and Stephen J. Roberts Technical Report, Neural propose an online learning algorithm for training a logistic regression model on nonstationary classification problems. The nonstationarity is captured by modelling the weights in a logistic regression

  17. AN ELECTROMAGNETIC INVERSE PROBLEM IN CHIRAL STEPHEN R. MCDOWALL

    E-print Network

    McDowall, Stephen

    AN ELECTROMAGNETIC INVERSE PROBLEM IN CHIRAL MEDIA STEPHEN R. MCDOWALL Abstract. We consider determines the electromagnetic parameters, namely the conductivity, electric permittivity, magnetic to the electromagnetic fields, the equations governing these fields change from a single second order elliptic partial

  18. SA Innovation Lecture Stephen Shapiro - Duration: 1:21:17.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Stephen Shapiro, one of Americaâ??s foremost innovation advisers, joined us on January 19th to show us how innovation isnâ??t just about generating occasional new ideas; itâ??s about making it a re...

  19. 01 Sets and Models of WKL 0 Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    01 Sets and Models of WKL 0 Stephen G. Simpson Department of Mathematics Pennsylvania State University www.math.psu.edu/simpson. G. Simpson, Lecture Notes in Logic, Volume 21, Association for Symbolic Logic, 2005, pp. 352

  20. Baire categoricity and 01 induction Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Baire categoricity and 01 induction Stephen G. Simpson Department of Mathematics Pennsylvania State University http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson simpson@math.psu.edu First draft: February 24, 2012 This draft

  1. Cone avoidance and randomness preservation Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Cone avoidance and randomness preservation Stephen G. Simpson Park, PA 16802, USA http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson simpson randomness. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification: Primary 03D32, Secondary 68Q30, 03D28, 03F30. Simpson

  2. Almost everywhere domination and superhighness Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Almost everywhere domination and superhighness Stephen G. Simpson Pennsylvania State University http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson/ simpson by some function which is Turing computable from B. Dobrinen and Simpson have shown

  3. Jessica J. Stephens Email: stepjess@umich.edu

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Paul N.

    course entitled The History of Sexuality (HIST 327) September 2012- present Tutor at the Stephen M. Ross course entitled Roman Sports (CLCIV 372) January 2012- May 2012 Graduate Student Instructor, University

  4. STS-110 Crew Interview: Stephen Frick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Pilot Stephen Frick is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Frick outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Frick discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  5. STS-114 Crew Interview: Stephen Robinson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Stephen Robinson, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2), of the STS-114 space mission is seen during a prelaunch interview. He discusses his duties as flight engineer, Extravehicular Activity 2 (EVA 2) spacewalker, and medical officer. Robinson answers questions about his interests in spaceflight and the specific goals of the mission. He identifies this mission as the International Space Station Resupply Mission because supplies and experiments are brought to the International Space Station and Expedition 6 crew of Commander Kenneth Bowersox, and Flight Engineers Donald Pettit and Nikolai Budarin are returning to Earth. Lastly, he talks about the docking of the Space Shuttle Atlantis with the International Space Station. He looks forward to this experience in space.

  6. How GeneChip® was developed (Part I), Stephen FodorSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Fodor DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>genetic profiling>Stephen Fodor How the chip was developed (Part I) Stephen Fodor discusses the experiments that laid the groundwork for GeneChip® technology.

  7. Sociality and social learning in two species of corvids: the pinyon jay (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) and the Clark's nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana).

    PubMed

    Templeton, J J; Kamil, A C; Balda, R P

    1999-12-01

    The hypothesis that social learning is an adaptive specialization for social living predicts that social species should learn better socially than they do individually, but that nonsocial species should not exhibit a similar enhancement of performance under social learning conditions. The authors compared individual and social learning abilities in 2 corvid species: the highly social pinyon jay (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) and the less social Clark's nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana). The birds were tested on 2 different tasks under individual and social learning conditions. Half learned a motor task individually and a discrimination task socially; the other half learned the motor task socially and the discrimination task individually. Pinyon jays learned faster socially than they did individually, but nutcrackers performed equally well under both learning conditions. Results support the hypothesis that social learning is an adaptive specialization for social living in pinyon jays. PMID:10608569

  8. Arthroscopic Broström repair with Gould augmentation via an accessory anterolateral port for lateral instability of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kentaro; Takao, Masato; Miyamoto, Wataru; Innami, Ken; Matsushita, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Although several arthroscopic surgical techniques for the treatment of lateral instability of the ankle have been introduced recently, some concern remains over their procedural complexity, complications, and unclear clinical outcomes. We have simplified the arthroscopic technique of Broström repair with Gould augmentation. This technique requires only two small skin incisions for two ports (medial midline and accessory anterolateral ports), without needing a percutaneous procedure or extension of the skin incisions. The anterior talofibular ligament is reattached to its anatomical footprint on the fibula with suture anchor, under arthroscopic view. The inferior extensor retinaculum is directly visualized through the accessory anterolateral port and is attached to the fibula with another suture anchor under arthroscopic view via the anterolateral port. The use of two small ports offers a procedure that is simple to perform and less morbid for patients. PMID:25015792

  9. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating in Serpens MWC 297 and its influence on local star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Allen, L. E.; Cieza, L. A.; Dunham, M. M.; Harvey, P. M.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bastien, P.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450 and 850 ?m observations of the Serpens MWC 297 region, part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey of nearby star-forming regions. Simulations suggest that radiative feedback influences the star formation process and we investigate observational evidence for this by constructing temperature maps. Maps are derived from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes and a two-component model of the JCMT beam for a fixed dust opacity spectral index of ? = 1.8. Within 40 arcsec of the B1.5Ve Herbig star MWC 297, the submillimetre fluxes are contaminated by free-free emission with a spectral index of 1.03 ± 0.02, consistent with an ultracompact H II region and polar winds/jets. Contamination accounts for 73 ± 5 per cent and 82 ± 4 per cent of peak flux at 450 ?m and 850 ?m, respectively. The residual thermal disc of the star is almost undetectable at these wavelengths. Young stellar objects (YSOs) are confirmed where SCUBA-2 850 ?m clumps identified by the FELLWALKER algorithm coincide with Spitzer Gould Belt Survey detections. We identify 23 objects and use Tbol to classify nine YSOs with masses 0.09 to 5.1 M?. We find two Class 0, one Class 0/I, three Class I and three Class II sources. The mean temperature is 15 ± 2 K for the nine YSOs and 32 ± 4 K for the 14 starless clumps. We observe a starless clump with an abnormally high mean temperature of 46 ± 2 K and conclude that it is radiatively heated by the star MWC 297. Jeans stability provides evidence that radiative heating by the star MWC 297 may be suppressing clump collapse.

  10. Habitat-specific breeder survival of Florida Scrub-Jays: Inferences from multistate models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breininger, D.R.; Nichols, J.D.; Carter, G.M.; Oddy, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying habitat-specific survival and changes in habitat quality within disturbance-prone habitats is critical for understanding population dynamics and variation in fitness, and for managing degraded ecosystems. We used 18 years of color-banding data and multistate capture-recapture models to test whether habitat quality within territories influences survival and detection probability of breeding Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) and to estimate bird transition probabilities from one territory quality state to another. Our study sites were along central Florida's Atlantic coast and included two of the four largest metapopulations within the species range. We developed Markov models for habitat transitions and compared these to bird transition probabilities. Florida Scrub-Jay detection probabilities ranged from 0.88 in the tall territory state to 0.99 in the optimal state; detection probabilities were intermediate in the short state. Transition probabilities were similar for birds and habitat in grid cells mapped independently of birds. Thus, bird transitions resulted primarily from habitat transitions between states over time and not from bird movement. Survival ranged from 0.71 in the short state to 0.82 in the optimal state, with tall states being intermediate. We conclude that average Florida Scrub-Jay survival will remain at levels that lead to continued population declines because most current habitat quality is only marginally suitable across most of the species range. Improvements in habitat are likely to be slow and difficult because tall states are resistant to change and the optimal state represents an intermediate transitional stage. The multistate modeling approach to quantifying survival and habitat transition probabilities is useful for quantifying habitat transition probabilities and comparing them to bird transition probabilities to test for habitat selection in dynamic environments. ?? 2009 by the Ecological society ot America.

  11. Experimental West Nile virus infection in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Weingartl, H M; Neufeld, J L; Copps, J; Marszal, P

    2004-07-01

    Ten crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and three blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata), species indigenous to North America, were intravenously inoculated with 10(3) PFU of West Nile virus (WNV) strain NY99 for production of positive tissues for Canadian surveillance. Both species developed clinical signs 4 days postinoculation (dpi). Virus was detected in blood, cloacal and tracheal swabs, and in a number of organs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and virus isolation (titers reaching over 10(7) PFU/0.1 g). Virus appeared as early as 1 dpi in blood (10(2)-10(3) PFU/ml) and spleen (10(3)-10(4) PFU/0.1 g of tissue), whereas kidney, liver, intestine, gonads, heart, skeletal muscle, and lung tested positive for WNV in a later stage of the infection. Immunostaining (IHC) using heterologous rabbit anti-WNV polyclonal antiserum detected viral antigen in a wide range of organs, starting at 2 dpi. Detection of WNV antigen in the brain of blue jays and crows by IHC was laborious as only few cells, not present in all sections, would stain positive. Mononuclear cells appeared to be an important target for virus replication, contributing to virus spread throughout tissues during the infection. This conclusion was based on the positive IHC staining of these cells in organs before virus antigen detection in parenchymal cells and supported by virus isolation and RT-PCR-positive results in white blood cells. The inability of blue jays and crows to perch and fly may reflect weakness due to generalized infection and marked skeletal muscle involvement, although involvement of the central nervous system cannot be excluded. PMID:15232136

  12. STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey is suited up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D., prepares for launch during suit-up activities in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Buckey and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Buckey is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body -- the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

  13. Concomitant mycotic and verminous pneumonia in a blue jay from Georgia.

    PubMed

    Young, E A; Cornish, T E; Little, S E

    1998-07-01

    An emaciated, moribund, male blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) was collected in Georgia (USA) and died shortly after capture. Necropsy revealed nine large nematodes identified as Diplotriaena tricuspis in the thoracic and abdominal air sacs and within the pericardial sac. Multiple mycotic granulomas also were observed in the lungs and air sacs, and fungal culture of these lesions yielded pure growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. Histologic examination of the lungs revealed disseminated granulomatous inflammation containing both larvated nematode eggs and abundant fungal hyphae. This is the first description of concomitant A. fumigatus and D. tricuspis infection in a bird. PMID:9706574

  14. Mycoplasma sturni from blue jays and northern mockingbirds with conjunctivitis in Florida.

    PubMed

    Ley, D H; Geary, S J; Berkhoff, J E; McLaren, J M; Levisohn, S

    1998-04-01

    Northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) and blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in a Florida (USA) wildlife care facility developed clinical signs and gross lesions suggestive of the ongoing outbreak of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) conjunctivitis in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) and American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis). Mycoplasmal organisms were cultured from conjunctival/corneal swabs of birds with sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and/or epiphora. All of the isolates tested were identified as Mycoplasma sturni by indirect immunofluorescence. Mycoplasma sturni as well as MG should be considered in the differential diagnosis of songbirds with conjunctivitis. PMID:9577796

  15. TCGA Status Report and Insights from Leadership - Stephen Chanock, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos TCGA Status Report and Insights from Leadership - Stephen Chanock TCGA Status Report and Insights from Leadership - Stephen Chanock, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012 You will need Adobe Flash Player 8

  16. In Memoriam: Stephen Bloom (July 13, 1940October 11, 2010) Saturday, April 23, 2011

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Roe

    In Memoriam: Stephen Bloom (July 13, 1940­October 11, 2010) Program Saturday, April 23, 2011 8 (bassoon) Stephen L. Bloom graduated with a B.A. in Mathematics from Swarthmore College in 1962 with High

  17. Colonizing Europe, Stephen OppenheimerSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Oppenheimer DNAi Location:Applications>Human origins>migrations>Colonizing Europe eneticist Stephen Oppenheimer talks about the climatic conditions that would have allowed modern humans to colonize Europe.

  18. Human migrations: paths out of Africa, Stephen OppenheimerSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Oppenheimer DNAi Location:Applications>Human origins>migrations>taking the southern route Geneticist Stephen Oppenheimer talks about the climatic and physical obstacles faced by humans migrating out of Africa.

  19. African mitochondrial DNA tree, Stephen OppenheimerSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Oppenheimer DNAi Location:Applications>Human origins>migrations>Paths out of Africa Geneticist Stephen Oppenheimer talks about the mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome lineages of our ancestors.

  20. Making DNA chips, Stephen FodorSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Fodor DNAi Location:Manipulation>Techniques>large-scale analysis GeneChips®, step by step Stephen Fodor talks about the photolithographic technique used to synthesize pieces of DNA on the surface of GeneChips®.

  1. Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) infestation on medium-sized mammals and blue jays in northwestern Illinois.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, A; Kitron, U; Jones, C J; Slajchert, T L

    1993-09-01

    High prevalence of infestation of five species of medium-sized mammals and blue jays, Cyanocitta cristata (L.), by immature Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman and Corwin was found in Castle Rock State Park in northwestern Illinois during May-August 1991. Raccoons, Procyon lotor L., and opossums, Didelphis virginiana Kerr, were infested with the highest larval densities and were trapped primarily in bottomland forest and ecotone habitats. All species had similar nymphal densities, except the eastern cottontails, Sylvilagus floridanus Allen, which were infested with fewer nymphs. Infestation by I. dammini is reported for the first time for fox squirrels, Sciurus niger E. G. St. Hilaire, and for the first time in the midwestern United States for blue jays, C. cristata. These two species were hosts for nymphs in upland forest habitat. Molting rates varied among ticks that fed on different host species and among larvae that fed on individuals of the same species. Molting rate is proposed as an important factor in determining the relative importance of a host species to I. dammini population dynamics. PMID:8254647

  2. Social cognition by food-caching corvids. The western scrub-jay as a natural psychologist.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Nicola S; Dally, Joanna M; Emery, Nathan J

    2007-04-29

    Food-caching corvids hide food, but such caches are susceptible to pilfering by other individuals. Consequently, the birds use several counter strategies to protect their caches from theft, e.g. hiding most of them out of sight. When observed by potential pilferers at the time of caching, experienced jays that have been thieves themselves, take further protective action. Once the potential pilferers have left, they move caches those birds have seen, re-hiding them in new places. Naive birds that had no thieving experience do not do so. By focusing on the counter strategies of the cacher when previously observed by a potential pilferer, these results raise the intriguing possibility that re-caching is based on a form of mental attribution, namely the simulation of another bird's viewpoint. Furthermore, the jays also keep track of the observer which was watching when they cached and take protective action accordingly, thus suggesting that they may also be aware of others' knowledge states. PMID:17309867

  3. Historical biogeography and speciation in the neotropical highlands: molecular phylogenetics of the jay genus Cyanolyca.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2009-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were studied in the genus Cyanolyca, an assemblage of jays distributed from Mexico south to Bolivia. Given its fragmented distribution along the humid forests of the Neotropics, the genus Cyanolyca is a model group for exploring hypotheses on biogeography and speciation. Phylogenetic analyses were based on two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci; taxon sampling includes all species in the genus and most subspecies. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses produced trees that were congruent and highly robust at both terminal and deep nodes of the phylogeny. Cyanolyca comprises two major clades: one contains the Mesoamerican "dwarf" jays, and the other consists of two main groups--C. cucullata+C. pulchra and the "core" South American species. Prior hypotheses of relationships were explored statistically using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian approaches. Dispersal-Vicariance analysis revealed the importance of the Northern Andes as a major center for biological diversification, and the effects of dispersal across the Panamanian Land Bridge in the composition of South American and Mesoamerican avifaunas. Phylogenetic patterns are highly congruent with an allopatric mode of speciation. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of the biogeography of Neotropical montane forests. PMID:19135159

  4. Stephen's Guide to the Logical Fallacies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Downes, an information architect with a background in philosophy, created this site with the aim of identifying, indexing, and describing "all known logical fallacies." A logical fallacy can be defined as an error in reasoning in which a conclusion appears to follow from a set of premises but in reality does not. Downes groups the fallacies into thirteen categories, such as Fallacies of Distraction, Inductive Fallacies, and Syllogistic Errors. Each fallacy (over 50 in all) is described with its name, definition, examples of how it might be used in an argument, and how the argument can be proven fallacious. The How to Use this Guide section of the site provides a helpful introduction, and a robust bibliography offers possibilities for further study of logic. In addition, users may register at the site (no fee) to gain access to discussion boards on the topic. The author notes that his Guide "is intended to help you in your own thinking, not to help you demolish someone else's argument." Regardless of how a reader uses the information, however, the site remains an interesting and fun investigation of how logical arguments are constructed.

  5. Effects of DNA variation on health, Stephen FodorSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Fodor DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>genetic profiling>Stephen Fodor Effects of DNA variation on health Stephen Fodor talks about the need to look broadly across the genome to find the relationship between genes and health in different people.

  6. BIOS 3010: Ecology Dr Stephen Malcolm Lab 9 page -1 BIOS 3010: ECOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Malcolm, Stephen

    BIOS 3010: Ecology Dr Stephen Malcolm Lab 9 page - 1 BIOS 3010: ECOLOGY Dr Stephen Malcolm.4 full- #12;BIOS 3010: Ecology Dr Stephen Malcolm Lab 9 page - 2 grown larvae/m2 and that of these, 6.2/m-axis) plotted against time (year) on the x-axis. Which kx values do you think are most responsible for overall

  7. Efficacy of Three Vaccines in Protecting Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) from Experimental Infection with West Nile Virus: Implications for Vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma insularis)

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarah S.; Langevin, Stanley; Woods, Leslie; Carroll, Brian D.; Vickers, Winston; Morrison, Scott A.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Reisen, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The devastating effect of West Nile virus (WNV) on the avifauna of North America has led zoo managers and conservationists to attempt to protect vulnerable species through vaccination. The Island Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma insularis) is one such species, being a corvid with a highly restricted insular range. Herein, we used congeneric Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test the efficacy of three WNV vaccines in protecting jays from an experimental challenge with WNV: (1) the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator® DNA equine vaccine, (2) an experimental DNA plasmid vaccine, pCBWN, and (3) the Merial Recombitek® equine vaccine. Vaccine efficacy after challenge was compared with naïve and nonvaccinated positive controls and a group of naturally immune jays. Overall, vaccination lowered peak viremia compared with nonvaccinated positive controls, but some WNV-related pathology persisted and the viremia was sufficient to possibly infect susceptible vector mosquitoes. The Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA equine vaccine and the pCBWN vaccine provided humoral immune priming and limited side effects. Five of the six birds vaccinated with the Merial Recombitek vaccine, including a vaccinated, non-WNV challenged control, developed extensive necrotic lesions in the pectoral muscle at the vaccine inoculation sites, which were attributed to the Merial vaccine. In light of the well-documented devastating effects of high morbidity and mortality associated with WNV infection in corvids, vaccination of Island Scrub-Jays with either the Fort Dodge West Nile-Innovator DNA vaccine or the pCBWN vaccine may increase the numbers of birds that would survive an epizootic should WNV become established on Santa Cruz Island. PMID:21438693

  8. Argo: A System for Distributed Collaboration Hania Gajewska, Jay Kistler, Mark S. Manasse, and David D. Redell

    E-print Network

    Manasse, Mark S. - Microsoft Research

    Argo: A System for Distributed Collaboration Hania Gajewska, Jay Kistler, Mark S. Manasse 94301 ABSTRACT The goal of the Argo system is to allow medium-sized groups of users to collaborate-to-face meetings In support of this goal, Argo combines high quality multi-party digital video and full

  9. Patterns of West Nile virus infection in Ohio blue jays: implications for initiation of the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Tarvin, Keith A; Smith, Jennifer; Ohajuruka, Ojimadu A; Grimes, Sheila

    2004-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first detected in North America in New York City in 1999 and rapidly moved westward. Understanding the mechanisms by which the amplification cycle is reinitiated each year increases our ability to predict epizootics and geographic expansion of the disease. Such understanding is enhanced by knowledge of the patterns of infection in the vertebrate reservoir hosts. Blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) may serve as reservoir hosts for WNV. We examined the influence of age and date on the prevalence of WNV in jay carcasses in Ohio during May-August 2002. Percent of carcasses that were infected increased significantly with time from 3% in May to more than 90% by August. We found no difference in prevalence between juvenile (nestlings and fledglings) and adult jays early in the season, which contradicts the expected pattern if the majority of the adults sampled in 2002 had been exposed to the virus in 2001. Therefore, jays infected in 2001 were unlikely to have been important in initiating the 2002 virus cycle in Ohio. PMID:15155993

  10. Ka-Band Link Optimization with Rate Adaptation Jun Sun, Jay Gao, Shervin Shambayati, and Eytan Modiano

    E-print Network

    Modiano, Eytan

    Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 Email: {Jay.L.Gao, Shervin.Shambayati}@jpl.nasa.gov Abstract-- On Administration, and at MIT, under NASA Space Communication Project grant number NAG3-2835. 1. INTRODUCTION Ka Orbiter (MRO), uses constant rate transmission. Specifically, during a particular communication session

  11. Variations on Sun's role in climate change Peter Foukal, Diedrich Schmidt, Wim Klaassen, Jay Gulledge, Anthony D. Socci et al.

    E-print Network

    Scafetta, Nicola

    , and the consequent change in climates, since 1900 is largely due to solar variability. Climates are often definedVariations on Sun's role in climate change Peter Foukal, Diedrich Schmidt, Wim Klaassen, Jay Institute of Physics, S-0031-9228-0810-220-4 In their Opinion piece "Is Climate Sensitive to Solar

  12. Experimental Study of Parametric Autoresonance in Faraday waves Oded Ben-David, Michael Assaf, Jay Fineberg, and Baruch Meerson

    E-print Network

    Fineberg, Jay

    Experimental Study of Parametric Autoresonance in Faraday waves Oded Ben-David, Michael Assaf, Jay of Faraday waves. We experimentally demonstrate that phase locking to low amplitude driving can generate] and later [6] for nonlinear Faraday waves: stand- ing gravity waves on a free surface of a fluid which

  13. Experimental Study of Parametric Autoresonance in Faraday Waves Oded Ben-David, Michael Assaf, Jay Fineberg, and Baruch Meerson

    E-print Network

    Meerson, Baruch

    Experimental Study of Parametric Autoresonance in Faraday Waves Oded Ben-David, Michael Assaf, Jay nonlinear waves is achieved via parametric autoresonance of Faraday waves. We experimentally demonstrate Faraday waves: standing gravity waves on a free surface of a fluid which are excited parametrically

  14. IS NEST PREDATION BY STELLER'S JAYS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI) INCIDENTAL OR THE RESULT OF A SPECIALIZED SEARCH STRATEGY?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stacey M. Vigallon; John M. Marzluff

    2005-01-01

    Decreased nest success and elevated levels of nest predation have been linked to changes in landscape configuration and increased edge. However, our current understanding of the mechanics of nest predation is limited. Using radiotelemetry and artificial nest experiments, we studied the ranging and nest- predation behavior of the Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) in the managed forests of western Washington. Steller's

  15. Using Mobile Agents for Analyzing Intrusion in Computer Networks Jay Aslam Marco Cremonini David Kotz Daniela Rus

    E-print Network

    Aslam, Javed

    Using Mobile Agents for Analyzing Intrusion in Computer Networks Jay Aslam Marco Cremonini David Kotz Daniela Rus Department of Computer Science, Institute for Security Technology Studies Dartmouth College Hanover, NH 03755 Today hackers disguise their attacks by launching them form a set of compromised

  16. Using Mobile Agents for Analyzing Intrusion in Computer Networks # Jay Aslam Marco Cremonini David Kotz Daniela Rus +

    E-print Network

    Aslam, Javed

    Using Mobile Agents for Analyzing Intrusion in Computer Networks # Jay Aslam Marco Cremonini David Kotz Daniela Rus + Department of Computer Science, Institute for Security Technology Studies Dartmouth College Hanover, NH 03755 Today hackers disguise their attacks by launching them form a set of compromised

  17. Design, Modeling, and Capacity Planning for Micro-Solar Power Sensor Jay Taneja, Jaein Jeong, David Culler

    E-print Network

    Culler, David E.

    Design, Modeling, and Capacity Planning for Micro-Solar Power Sensor Networks Jay Taneja, Jaein,jaein,culler}@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract This paper describes a systematic approach to building micro-solar power subsystems for wireless of engineering, sizing, and analyzing the power subsystem. Many tools and calculators are available for macro-solar

  18. A three translational DoFs parallel cube-manipulator Xin-Jun Liu*, Jay il Jeong, and Jongwon Kim

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jongwon

    This paper concerns the presentation and analysis of a type of three translational degrees of freedom (Do with three translational degrees of freedom have been playing important roles in the industrial applicationsA three translational DoFs parallel cube-manipulator Xin-Jun Liu*, Jay il Jeong, and Jongwon Kim

  19. David Wells 1, Jay Rooker 1, David Itano 2 1 Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    David Wells 1, Jay Rooker 1, David Itano 2 1 Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology 2) signatures in otoliths reported for tunas in both the Atlantic Ocean (Rooker et al. 2008a, 2008b) and Pacific Ocean (Rooker et al. 2003); global-scale differences in ambient water chemistry also reported (Le

  20. 78 FR 18340 - The Neiman Marcus Group, Inc.; Dr.Jays.com, Inc., Eminent, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ...animal name for three products: a Snorkel Jacket by Crown Holder; a Fur/Leather Vest by Knoles & Carter; and a New York Subway Leather Bomber Jacket by United Face. It further alleges that DrJays sold at least 241 units. The proposed complaint...

  1. The Lloyd Sealy Library of John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Academic Library, Special Library, or Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The Lloyd Sealy Library of John Jay College of Criminal Justice started as a small collection of books in the corner of the New York City Police Academy. A little over four decades later, it now contains one of the best collections of criminal justice materials in the world. Despite fiscal setbacks and tough times for the University and the…

  2. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy Survey of Nearby Star-forming Regions in the Gould Belt

    E-print Network

    D. Ward-Thompson; J. Di Francesco; J. Hatchell; M. R. Hogerheijde; P. Bastien; S. Basu; I. Bonnell; J. Bowey; C. Brunt; J. Buckle; H. Butner; B. Cavanagh; A. Chrysostomou; E. Curtis; C. J. Davis; W. R. F. Dent; E. van Dishoeck; M. G. Edmunds; M. Fich; J. Fiege; L. Fissel; P. Friberg; R. Friesen; W. Frieswijk; G. A. Fuller; A. Gosling; S. Graves; J. S. Greaves; F. Helmich; R. E. Hills; W. S. Holland; M. Houde; R. Jayawardhana; D. Johnstone; G. Joncas; H. Kirk; J. M. Kirk; L. B. G. Knee; B. Matthews; H. Matthews; C. Matzner; G. H. Moriarty-Schieven; D. Naylor; D. Nutter; R. Padman; R. Plume; J. M. C. Rawlings; R. O. Redman; M. Reid; J. S. Richer; R. Shipman; R. J. Simpson; M. Spaans; D. Stamatellos; Y. Tsanis; S. Viti; B. Weferling; G. J. White; A. P. Whitworth; J. Wouterloot; J. Yates; M. Zhu

    2007-07-02

    This paper describes a James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) legacy survey that has been awarded roughly 500 hrs of observing time to be carried out from 2007 to 2009. In this survey we will map with SCUBA-2 (Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array 2) almost all of the well-known low-mass and intermediate-mass star-forming regions within 0.5 kpc that are accessible from the JCMT. Most of these locations are associated with the Gould Belt. From these observations we will produce a flux-limited snapshot of star formation near the Sun, providing a legacy of images, as well as point-source and extended-source catalogues, over almost 700 square degrees of sky. The resulting images will yield the first catalogue of prestellar and protostellar sources selected by submillimetre continuum emission, and should increase the number of known sources by more than an order of magnitude. We will also obtain CO maps with the array receiver HARP (Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme), in three CO isotopologues, of a large typical sample of prestellar and protostellar sources. We will then map the brightest hundred sources with the SCUBA-2 polarimeter (POL-2), producing the first statistically significant set of polarization maps in the submillimetre. The images and source catalogues will be a powerful reference set for astronomers, providing a detailed legacy archive for future telescopes, including ALMA, Herschel and JWST.

  3. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: low-mass protoplanetary discs from a SCUBA-2 census of NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, P.; Greaves, J. S.; Scholz, A.; Hatchell, J.; Holland, W. S.; JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2015-02-01

    NGC 1333 is a 1-2 Myr old cluster of stars in the Perseus molecular cloud. We used 850 ?m data from the Gould Belt Survey with SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to measure or place limits on disc masses for 82 Class II sources in this cluster. Eight disc candidates were detected; one is estimated to have mass of about 9 MJup in dust plus gas, while the others host only 2-4 MJup of circumstellar material. None of these discs exceeds the threshold for the `minimum mass solar nebula' (MMSN). This reinforces previous claims that only a small fraction of Class II sources at an age of 1-2 Myr have discs exceeding the MMSN threshold and thus can form a planetary system like our own. However, other regions with similarly low fractions of MMSN discs (IC 348, UpSco, ? Ori) are thought to be older than NGC 1333. Compared with coeval regions, the exceptionally low fraction of massive discs in NGC 1333 cannot easily be explained by the effects of UV radiation or stellar encounters. Our results indicate that additional environmental factors significantly affect disc evolution and the outcome of planet formation by core accretion.

  4. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. IV. Lupus V and VI Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    E-print Network

    Spezzi, Loredana; Mer?n, Bruno; Allen, Lori E; Evans, Neal J; Jørgensen, Jes K; Bourke, Tyler L; Cieza, Lucas A; Dunham, Michael M; Harvey, Paul M; Huard, Tracy L; Peterson, Dawn; Tothill, Nick F H

    2011-01-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer "Core to Disk" (c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including 2 transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main sequence star from previous optical, near-IR and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; ~79% in Lupus V and ~87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photo-evapo...

  5. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-01-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  6. Hormone levels and infection of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Schoech, Stephan J

    2006-06-01

    Annual spring relapse of blood parasite infections in birds is believed to be the result of hormonal changes associated with breeding. As part of a larger study on the epizootiology of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in blue jays in south-central Florida, we studied the relationship between H. danilewskyi infections and levels of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosterone. We found a positive association between intensity of H. danilewskyi infection and corticosterone levels in females but not in males. We also found no association between infection and levels of prolactin, luteinizing hormone, progesterone, testosterone, or estradiol in males or females. In addition, we found a positive relationship between levels of corticosterone and handling time and between corticosterone and testosterone levels. We suggest a possible influence of corticosterone on spring relapse of Haemoproteus spp. infections in birds but provide no support for the influence of breeding hormones on relapse of these parasites. PMID:16884020

  7. Jay's Collectibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappel, James J.; Gillman, Jason R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in collectibles of many types, as indicated by the popularity of television programs such as the History Channel's "Pawn Stars" and "American Pickers" and the Public Broadcasting Service's "Antiques Road Show." The availability of online auction sites such as eBay has enabled many people to collect items of interest as a…

  8. How western scrub-jays ( Aphelocoma californica ) select a nut: effects of the number of options, variation in nut size, and social competition among foragers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom A. Langen

    1999-01-01

    Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) often visually assess and handle several whole (unshelled) peanuts before selecting one to transport and cache; this behavior\\u000a is a search for a preferred heavy nut. I repeatedly video-taped individually identifiable jays as they landed on a feeding\\u000a platform and chose from presentations of peanuts that varied in the number of items or in the distribution

  9. HopeBy Tim Stephens wentai Liu is an elec-

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yi

    Sivaprakasam, who earned his Ph.D. with Liu and is now a research sci- entist manag- ing Liu's lab of about 20HopeBy Tim Stephens wentai Liu is an elec- tronics wizard whose work is enabling the develop- ment engineering at UC Santa Cruz, Liu is a pio- neer in the field of bioelec- tronics, collaborating with medical

  10. Godel's Incompleteness Theorem for Computer Users Stephen A. Fenner

    E-print Network

    Fenner, Stephen

    of the Incompleteness theorem, the Fixed Point theorem, and L¨ob's theorem. 1 Introduction In 1931, Kurt G¨odel provedG¨odel's Incompleteness Theorem for Computer Users Stephen A. Fenner November 16, 2007 Abstract We sketch a short proof of G¨odel's Incompleteness theorem, based on a few reason- ably intuitive facts

  11. Fertilizing The Garden1 James M. Stephens2

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    HS505 Fertilizing The Garden1 James M. Stephens2 1. This document is HS505, one of a series Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension. FERTILIZERS All plants must have food or other medium in which they are growing. Generally, plant food is in the form of commercial fertilizer

  12. TOP DOWN VENTILATION AND COOLING Stephen A. Gage

    E-print Network

    Linden, Paul F.

    TOP DOWN VENTILATION AND COOLING Stephen A. Gage G.R. Hunt P.F. Linden This paper examines the problems inherent in passively ventilating and cooling low and medium rise urban buildings. We focus openings in passive displacement ventilation systems. A solution is suggested. The concept that is examined

  13. Feng Shui for Standard ML Programmers Stephen Gilmore

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Stephen

    Feng Shui for Standard ML Programmers Stephen Gilmore LFCS, Edinburgh Abstract. Feng Shui. Programmers working with sophisticated programming languages such as Standard ML want to achieve correctness-effective creation of Stan- dard ML programs which are both beautiful and correct. Introduction It may seem fanciful

  14. Improving Pen-Based Mathematical Interfaces Stephen Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    Improving Pen-Based Mathematical Interfaces Stephen Watt Computer Science Department, The University of Western Ontario, Canada watt@scl.csd.uwo.ca Abstract Pen-based user interfaces offer mathematical formulae with a digital pen can be much more natural than using a keyboard. Machine recognition

  15. The Theory of Penning Ionization R. Stephen Berry

    E-print Network

    Berry, R. Stephen

    The Theory of Penning Ionization R. Stephen Berry Radiation Research, Vol. 59, No. 2. (Aug., 1974@jstor.org. http://www.jstor.org Mon Nov 19 16:09:10 2007 #12;The Theory of Penning Ionization1 Theoretical Chemistry Department, Oxjord University, Oxford2 BERRY,R. S. The Theory of Penning Ionization. Radiat. Res

  16. The Stephen and NancyGrand Water Research

    E-print Network

    Agricultural Management Practices for Reducing Water Pollution and Hypoxia in Large Water Bodies in the WorldThe Stephen and NancyGrand Water Research Institute The Dahlia Greidinger International Symposium: Global Climate Change, Environmental Risks and Water Scarcity Appendix 1- Symposium Program 404 Crop

  17. Updated 12-11 Stephen T. Bell, PE

    E-print Network

    for NASA's Project Prometheus space nuclear power development, for which Mr. Bell was the head reactorUpdated 12-11 Stephen T. Bell, PE Branch Head, Advanced Reactor Design Naval Reactors Mr. Steve Engineering Division in May 2008. Mr. Bell was selected by Admiral Donald (NR's fifth director) to head

  18. Probabilistic Soft Logic for Social Good Stephen H. Bach

    E-print Network

    Getoor, Lise

    events in social media, posts and users of- ten have to be accurately geolocated, i.e., identified of social-media posts is 2.0 : PostMentionsEntity(P, E) IsLocation(E) HasLocation(P, E) . The rule relatesProbabilistic Soft Logic for Social Good Stephen H. Bach Computer Science Dept. U. of Maryland

  19. The Case for the Precision Timed (PRET) Machine Stephen Edwards

    E-print Network

    instruction sets. It is again time for a change in direction in computer architecture. Architectures currentlyThe Case for the Precision Timed (PRET) Machine Stephen Edwards Edward A. Lee Electrical of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made

  20. Algebraic Geometry Jean Gallier # and Stephen S. Shatz ##

    E-print Network

    Gallier, Jean

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 2 Dimension, Local Theory, Projective Geometry 67 2.1 Dimension TheoryAlgebraic Geometry Jean Gallier # and Stephen S. Shatz ## # Department of Computer and Information@math.upenn.edu June 17, 2005 #12; 2 #12; Contents 1 Elementary Algebraic Geometry 5 1.1 History and Problems

  1. Optical constants of carbon dioxide ice Stephen G. Warren

    E-print Network

    Warren, Stephen

    Optical constants of carbon dioxide ice Stephen G. Warren Laboratory measurements of the absorption: the absorption coefficientkabs(units of inverse length) and the refractive index mRe. They are combined as real and imaginary parts of the complex indexof refraction m(X) = mRe(X)- imim(X),where Xis the wavelength in vacuum

  2. Stephen Laubach "History of Ecology in Research and Education"

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    of Ecosystems: The Ecology of Subtle Human Effects and Populated Areas. New York: Springer-Verlag. McStephen Laubach "History of Ecology in Research and Education" Department: Curriculum Members: Jim Stewart, curriculum design Bill Cronon, environmental history History of Ecology Allee

  3. Leading Change From Where You Are Prof. Stephen J. Toope

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    in Beijing at Beihang University. UBC has a longstanding relationship with Beihang University and just last in ways that are uniquely dependent upon the physical places our institutions hold on earth and #12;Leading Change From Where You Are Prof. Stephen J. Toope Page 3 of 22 upon the complex human things

  4. Electronic Properties of Bismuth Nanowires Stephen B. Cronina

    E-print Network

    Cronin, Steve

    Electronic Properties of Bismuth Nanowires Stephen B. Cronina , Yu-Ming Linb , Oded Rabinc , Marcie alumina templates with molten bismuth has been used to synthesize single crystalline bismuth nanowires. INTRODUCTION Bismuth is an interesting material to study on the nanoscale because bulk Bi has very small

  5. Making Computer Algebra More Symbolic Stephen M. Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    Making Computer Algebra More Symbolic Stephen M. Watt Abstract This paper is a step to bring closer" and the view of "computer algebra." Symbolic computation may be seen as working with expression trees representing math- ematical formulae and applying various rules to transform them. Computer algebra may be seen

  6. Representing Numbers Using Fibonacci Variants Stephen K. Lucas

    E-print Network

    Lucas, Stephen

    Representing Numbers Using Fibonacci Variants Stephen K. Lucas Department of Mathematics Dunlap [4] and Va- jda [17]. Fibonacci numbers are defined by the recurrence relation fn = fn-1 + fn-2 of Fibonacci numbers is that every natural number can be uniquely represented by a sum of distinct non

  7. Communicated by Stephen Gallant A "Thermal" Perceptron Learning Rule

    E-print Network

    Frean, Marcus

    Communicated by Stephen Gallant A "Thermal" Perceptron Learning Rule Marcus Frean Physiological Laboratory, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EG, England The thermal perceptron is a simple extension setting for a temperature parameter, To, has been found, then the thermal perceptron outper- forms

  8. Discovery of antivirals against smallpox Stephen C. Harrisona,b

    E-print Network

    Walter, Peter

    Discovery of antivirals against smallpox Stephen C. Harrisona,b , Bruce Albertsc , Ellie Ehrenfeldd, is caused by the variola virus, a member of the poxviridae family. In the 20th cen- tury alone, smallpox small- pox. However, given the substantial side effects, the risks associated with the smallpox vaccine

  9. Dynamic Logistic Regression William D. Penny and Stephen J. Roberts

    E-print Network

    Penny, Will

    Dynamic Logistic Regression William D. Penny and Stephen J. Roberts fw.penny, s---We propose an online learning algorithm for training a logistic regression model on nonstationary classi­ fication problems. The nonstationarity is captured by mod­ elling the weights in a logistic regression

  10. Computer Aided Ferret Design Selina Siu, Stephen Mann

    E-print Network

    Mann, Stephen

    the large range of expressive postures a ferret can assume, mod- elling and animating the ferret is an idealComputer Aided Ferret Design Selina Siu, Stephen Mann University of Waterloo {ssiu of modelling a fer- ret as a driving force, we improved the user interface for cylindrical pasting; we looked

  11. Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair

    E-print Network

    Permeability and Relative Permeability in Rocks Stephen C. Blair James G. Berryman University features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical cor­ relation functions using modern

  12. Stephen D. Mossman, Partner Mattson Ricketts Davies Stewart & Calkins

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    rel Wickersham et. al. v. Dunnigan National Scenic River Area & the Niobrara Council ·Snake River;Snake River Litigation Plaintiffs, downstream and adjacent landowners, filed suit against the NebraskaStephen D. Mossman, Partner Mattson Ricketts Davies Stewart & Calkins The Impact of Niobrara River

  13. Art is I, Science is We Stephen M. Strakowski, MD

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    Clinical Departments Preclinical Research Services Basic Departments CCHMC Research Services VAMC ResearchArt is I, Science is We Stephen M. Strakowski, MD Senior Associate Dean of Research UCCOM Vice-President of Research, UC Health The Dr. Stanley & Mickey Kaplan Professor and Chairman, Department of Psychiatry

  14. Magnetic discrimination that will satisfy regulators? Stephen D. Billings1

    E-print Network

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Magnetic discrimination that will satisfy regulators? Stephen D. Billings1 , John M. Stanley2 Montana Army National Guard, P.O. Box 4789, Helena, Montana, 59604 Abstract Discrimination that are not too adverse, we believe that discrimination using magnetics can be structured in a way that would

  15. StephenF.AustinStateUniversity DepartmentofHistory

    E-print Network

    Long, Nicholas

    StephenF.AustinStateUniversity DepartmentofHistory P.O.Box13013-SFAStation Nacogdoches,TX75962-3103 Non-ProfitOrg. U.S.Postage PAID PERMITNO.1 Nacogdoches,TX 75961 M.A. in History With an Emphasis tourism · private corporations and media companies The Department of History M.A. in History Your

  16. Keystone effects of the endangered Stephens' kangaroo rat ( Dipodomys stephensi)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel E. Brock; Douglas A. Kelt

    2004-01-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys) have been argued to exert keystone effects because they interact strongly with other species, and their removal results in major changes in community structure. We evaluated the nature and magnitude of such impacts by the endangered Stephens' kangaroo rat (Dipodomys stephensi), employing an exclosure experiment to determine how the removal of this species impacted relative cover by

  17. 1 Sets and Models of WKL0 Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    0 1 Sets and Models of WKL0 Stephen G. Simpson Department of Mathematics Pennsylvania State University www.math.psu.edu/simpson/ First draft: April 10, 2000 This draft: September 6, 2013 Abstract We appeared in Reverse Mathematics 2001, edited by S. G. Simpson, Lecture Notes in Logic, Volume 21

  18. 1 Sets and Models of WKL 0 Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    # 0 1 Sets and Models of WKL 0 Stephen G. Simpson Department of Mathematics Pennsylvania State University www.math.psu.edu/simpson/ First draft: April 10, 2000 This draft: September 6, 2013 Abstract We has appeared in Reverse Mathematics 2001, edited by S. G. Simpson, Lecture Notes in Logic, Volume 21

  19. Almost everywhere domination and superhighness Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Almost everywhere domination and superhighness Stephen G. Simpson Pennsylvania State University http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson/ simpson@math.psu.edu First draft: July 5, 2006 This draft: October 15 is Turing computable from B. Dobrinen and Simpson have shown that the almost everywhere domination property

  20. Almost everywhere domination and superhighness Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    Almost everywhere domination and superhighness Stephen G. Simpson Pennsylvania State University http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson/ simpson@math.psu.edu First draft: July 5, 2006 This draft: October 15 computable from B. Dobrinen and Simpson have shown that the almost everywhere domination property and some

  1. An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G. Simpson

    E-print Network

    An objective justification for actual infinity? Stephen G. Simpson Department of Mathematics Pennsylvania State University http://www.math.psu.edu/simpson simpson@math.psu.edu First draft: August 9, 2011 philosophical system which emphasizes the central role of objectivity. Simpson's participation in the Infinity

  2. Alexander H. Stephens: reluctant secessionist and confederate leader

    E-print Network

    Owens, James Leggette

    1966-01-01

    I 1Grl'u l(I VII v- O' Vln . iovle, tne Western sr. d Atlantic Psilroad. tc connect Augusta with Tenne ee. Thc ispact of his ixalden speech before . he kiouse nelpec. carry ti e i:I irher. 't sec -ed to le floundering and marked Stephens as a...

  3. Detecting Exercise Induced Stress using the Photoplethysmogram Stephen Paul Linder*

    E-print Network

    Linder, Stephen

    of exercise on the cardiovascular system has been studied extensively using a wide range of physiological1 Detecting Exercise Induced Stress using the Photoplethysmogram Stephen Paul Linder* spl in the photoplethysmographs (PPG) of exercising individuals may be useful for noninvasively detecting hemodynamic stressors

  4. SOME MODEST ADVICE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS Stephen C. Stearns

    E-print Network

    Garland Jr., Theodore

    - 1 - SOME MODEST ADVICE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS Stephen C. Stearns Always Prepare for the Worst Some of the greatest catastrophes in graduate education could have been avoided by a little intelligent foresight become unsupportive - or even hostile. Plan for alternatives. Nobody Cares About You In fact, some

  5. Using Stephen Crane's "Maggie" To Teach the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerwin, David; Manolios, Vassilios; Popodopoulos, Lia

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a lesson plan designed for an eleventh-grade U.S. history class in which the students learn about the Progressive Era by reading Stephen Crane's "Maggie: A Girl of the Streets." Explains that students analyze point of view, role play a talk show, write an essay, and complete a long-term research project. (CMK)

  6. Arithmetic Circuit Complexity and Motion Planning Stephen R. Tate

    E-print Network

    Tate, Steve

    This dissertation presents the results of my research in two areas: parallel algorithms/circuit complexity, and algorithmic motion planning. The chapters on circuit complexity examine the parallel complexity of severalArithmetic Circuit Complexity and Motion Planning Stephen R. Tate Dissertation successfully

  7. Non-Euclidean Spring Embedders Stephen G. Kobourov

    E-print Network

    Kobourov, Stephen G.

    : force-directed algorithms, spring embedders, non-Euclidean geometry 1 Introduction Some of the mostNon-Euclidean Spring Embedders Stephen G. Kobourov University of Arizona Kevin Wampler University on extending the Euclidean notions of distance, angle, and force-interactions to smooth non-Euclidean

  8. Sonia H. Stephens, PhD Phone: (407) 823-4843, Email: sonia.stephens@ucf.edu, Skype: soniahstephens

    E-print Network

    Central Florida, University of

    . · S. H. Stephens. March 2011. "Images as scientific representations of reality: Global climate change Signs monitoring plan. Natural Resource Report NPS/PACN/NRR- 2006/003. National Park Service, Fort Network Vital Signs monitoring plan: Phase III (draft) report. National Park Service, Pacific Island

  9. Delayed breeding in the cooperatively breeding Florida scrub-jay ( Aphelocoma coerulescens ): inhibition or the absence of stimulation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan J. Schoech; Ronald L. Mumme; John C. Wingfield

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether fundamental differences exist in the reproductive physiology of breeder and nonbreeder Florida scrub-jays\\u000a (Aphelocoma coerulescens), we compared plasma levels of testosterone (T) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in males, and estradiol (E2) and LH in females. Although male breeders had higher overall T and larger testes, nonbreeders’ T paralleled that of breeders,\\u000a and their testes were more than

  10. Uncertainty-based grade modelling of kimberlite: A case study of the Jay kimberlite pipe, EKATI Diamond Mine, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sara; Leuangthong, Oy; Crawford, Barbara; Oshust, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Understanding uncertainty in resource models is a significant requirement of mineral resource evaluation. Geostatistical simulation is one method that can be used to quantify uncertainty and Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGS) is one of the easiest techniques to understand and implement. Using SGS provides both a spatial model of a given variable and the ranges around that variable at any number of scales. The Jay kimberlite pipe is located in the southeastern quadrant of the EKATI property. Drilling to date has identified three kimberlitic domains characterized by varying lithological properties. These domains are not separated by hard contacts, but rather by boundaries that are transitional. Within these domains, vertical trends exist; in particular, diamond grade increases with depth. For these reasons, Jay required an in-depth investigation of the best uncertainty-based grade modelling method to use. Grade was modelled by organic SGS and by using the stepwise conditional transform (SCT) to incorporate a trend into the simulation routine. Although the SGS results were valid, they did not fully reproduce the trend and therefore, the results did not fully match the geological interpretation of the deposit. The SCT results reproduced the trend, however, did not correspond to the variability of the data and therefore under-represented the actual uncertainty in the model. This was confirmed through detailed uncertainty calculation and probabilistic resource classification. Therefore, the SGS model was chosen as the preferred uncertainty-based grade model for the Jay pipe.

  11. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. V. OPHIUCHUS NORTH OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, J. [Astrophysics Group, Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Terebey, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Huard, T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mamajek, E. E., E-mail: hatchell@astro.ex.ac.uk, E-mail: sterebe@calstatela.edu, E-mail: thuard@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, P.O. Box 270171, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); and others

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer IRAC (2.1 deg{sup 2}) and MIPS (6.5 deg{sup 2}) observations of star formation in the Ophiuchus North (Oph N) molecular clouds. This fragmentary cloud complex lies on the edge of the Sco-Cen OB association, several degrees to the north of the well-known {rho} Oph star-forming region, at an approximate distance of 130 pc. The Oph N clouds were mapped as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt project under the working name 'Scorpius'. In the regions mapped, selected to encompass all the cloud with visual extinction A{sub V} > 3, 11 young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified, 8 from IRAC/MIPS color-based selection and 3 from Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) K{sub S} /MIPS colors. Adding to one source previously identified in L43, this increases the number of YSOcs identified in Oph N to 12. During the selection process, four color-based YSOcs were rejected as probable asymptotic giant branch stars and one as a known galaxy. The sources span the full range of YSOc classifications from Class 0/1 to Class III, and starless cores are also present. Twelve high extinction (A{sub V} > 10) cores are identified with a total mass of {approx}100 M{sub Sun }. These results confirm that there is little ongoing star formation in this region (instantaneous star formation efficiency <0.34%) and that the bottleneck lies in the formation of dense cores. The influence of the nearby Upper Sco OB association, including the 09V star {zeta} Oph, is seen in dynamical interactions and raised dust temperatures but has not enhanced levels of star formation in Oph N.

  12. Test series 1: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Gould NCX-2250 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J. S.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D A; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged, nuclear station, safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds; and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the end-of-life of a battery, given a seismic event. This report covers the first test series of an extensive program using 12-year old, lead-calcium, Gould NCX-2250 cells, from the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Station operated by the New York Power Authority. Seismic tests with three cell configurations were performed using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; multi-cell (three) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack; and single-cell tests specifically aimed towards examining propagation of pre-existing case cracks. In general the test philosophy was to monitor the electrical properties including discharge capacity of cells through a graduated series of g-level step increases until either the shake-table limits were reached or until electrical failure of the cells occurred. Of nine electrically active cells, six failed during seismic testing over a range of imposed g-level loads in excess of a 1-g ZPA. Post-test examination revealed a common failure mode, the cracking at the abnormally brittle, positive lead bus-bar/post interface; further examination showed that the failure zone was extremely coarse grained and extensively corroded. Presently accepted accelerated-aging methods for qualifying batteries, per IEEE Std. 535-1979, are based on plate growth, but these naturally-aged 12-year old cells showed no significant plate growth.

  13. Astronaut Stephen Oswald and fellow crew members on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Stephen S. Oswald (center), STS-67 mission commander, is seen with two of his fellow crew members and an experiment which required a great deal of his time on the middeck of the Earth orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld inputs mission data on a computer while listening to a cassette. Astronaut William G. Gregory (right edge of frame), pilot, consults a check list. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), not in use here, can be seen in upper center.

  14. An interview with: Stephen Paliska on valet parking.

    PubMed

    Paliska, S

    1993-04-01

    Stephen Paliska is general manager and co-founder, with his brother, Paul, of Professional Parking Services, Inc., based in Irvine, CA. The company has been in operation for eight years. PPS's 600 valets provide parking services for more than 80 clients, including hotels, shopping centers, restaurants, and hospitals. In this interview, Paliska discusses the benefits and some potential risks of valet parking and spells out how a training program for valet attendants should be carried out. PMID:10125271

  15. Stephen Hawking : A Life in Science 2nd Ed.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Gribbin

    2002-01-01

    Stephen Hawking is no ordinary scientist. With a career that began over thirty years ago at Cambridge University, he has managed to do more than perhaps any other scientist to broaden our basic understanding of the universe. His theoretical work on black holes and his progress in advancing our knowledge of the origin and nature of the cosmos have been groundbreaking if not downright revolutionary. This publication from the National Academies Press can be downloaded for a fee.

  16. SR-71 Pilot Stephen (Steve) D. Ishmael

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA research pilot Stephen D. Ishmael is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Ishmael was one of two NASA research pilots assigned to the SR-71 high speed research program in the early 1990s at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994), Edwards, California. Ishmael became a NASA research pilot in 1977. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the follow

  17. Obituary: Andrew Stephen Wilson, 1947-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    On 24 May 2008, Andrew Stephen Wilson passed away at the age of 61, in his home in Silver Spring, Maryland, from complications resulting from a painful spinal illness. Andrew was arguably one of the first truly multi-wavelength astronomers of his generation. His scientific work on active galactic nuclei [AGN] spanned the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the radio to the X-rays. Andrew was born in Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, on 26 March 1947. He was the younger of two brothers whose births were separated by the Second World War. His father, Norman, came from a relatively affluent family who were coal merchants. His mother, Mary, came from a less comfortable background, one of seven children, daughter of a skilled cabinet maker/French polisher, who went through a very hard time during the depression. As a teacher, she placed enormous value on hard work and education as a way of gaining advancement in life. When Andrew was four, the family moved to Skipton, a nice market town in the Yorkshire dales. Andrew went to a small village school until age eleven when he entered Ermysted's Grammar School. He was an enthusiastic soccer and cricket player. He never lost his enthusiasm for soccer and supported the local soccer team, Leeds United, for all his life. Andrew also followed the Yorkshire county cricket team. Andrew's interest in astronomy stemmed from the fact that at Ermysted's Grammar School someone donated a four-inch refracting telescope, so he and his friends used to go back in the evenings to investigate the rings of Saturn, the moons of Jupiter, and various nebulae. While an undergraduate at Cambridge, Andrew joined the astronomy club and ground an 8-inch mirror by hand as a part of a telescope that he set up in the backyard of his parents' house. Andrew spent hours observing with this telescope, and it was the wonder of the family. At Cambridge, Andrew obtained his bachelor's degree with first-class honors in 1969. During a short visit in London with his fellow students to celebrate the end of their exams, Andrew met Finnish summer student, Kaija Kettunen, whom he married in 1975 in her home town of Lieksa, Finland. They had a son, Daniel, now living in South Riding, Virginia, and a daughter, Caroline, living in Oakland, California. In 1973, Andrew obtained his doctorate degree in physics at the Cavendish Laboratory, working under the direction of Martin Ryle, winner of the 1974 Nobel Prize in physics. Andrew's PhD was dedicated to a study of the Crab Nebula at the highest radio frequencies at which the Cambridge One-mile Telescope could operate. This work, which included both intensity and polarization data, was a triumph of perseverance and skill in the reduction of an extremely complex data set. This experience stood him in excellent stead for his future career. After his PhD, Andrew went on to be a postdoctoral research fellow at Sterrewacht, Leiden, Netherlands, and then at the Astronomy Centre of the University of Sussex, England. By that time, Andrew wanted to leave England, because he thought that he would be able to secure a permanent position in astronomy faster in another country. He also loved traveling and getting to know other cultures, and he learned foreign languages easily. In 1978, Andrew and his wife had two choices: One was to accept a position at the European Southern Observatory in Garching and the other was to come to the University of Maryland. Together they decided to come to the United States rather than go to Germany because of the language and culture. Andrew remained at the University of Maryland for his entire career. He was a scientist of extraordinary productivity and impact over his lifetime: He wrote more than three-hundred scientific publications and accumulated more than 11,000 citations to this large body of work. In the 1970s and 1980s, he pioneered the use of radio telescopes for the study of active galactic nuclei, writing in collaboration with his students a number of seminal papers that are still standard references in the field today. In the last 15 years, Andrew becam

  18. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. VI. The Auriga-California Molecular Cloud Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Merin, Bruno; Miller, Jennifer F.; Terebey, Susan; Peterson, Dawn E.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70 and 160 micrometers observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg(exp 2) with IRAC and 10.47 deg2 with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkH(alpha) 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the fraction of YSOs in the region with disks relative to an estimate of the diskless YSO population. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15 - 20 times fewer stars.

  19. Signaling for food and sex? Begging by reproductive female white-throated magpie-jays.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jesse M S; Langen, Tom A; Berg, Elena C

    2009-09-01

    Food begging is common in nutritionally dependent young of many animals, but structurally homologous calls recur in adult signal repertoires of many species. We propose eight functional hypotheses for begging in adults; these stem from observations in birds but apply broadly to other taxa in which begging occurs. Adult cooperatively-breeding white-throated magpie-jays (Calocitta formosa) use loud begging vocalizations, particularly near the nest site during reproduction. We analysed the social context and behavioural phenology of loud calling and allofeeding in this species and compared these with predictions from each functional hypothesis. We found that reproductive females are the primary producers of beg calls, and their begging peaks during the fertile period when reproductive conflict among males and females was highest. Loud begging rates correlated positively with provisioning rates, but females called more in the pre-incubation fertile period than after they initiated incubation. Based on the context, phenology and active space of the signal, we conclude that female loud begging vocalizations function to signal nutritional need to group members, but also have been evolutionarily co-opted to advertise fertility to potential extra-pair partners. The location of calling is likely a consequence of nest guarding by breeding females to prevent intraspecific brood parasitism. PMID:23293376

  20. "Anting" in Blue Jays: evidence in support of a food-preparatory function.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Thomas; Aneshansley, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines), is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants. Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is a strategy by which birds render ants fit for ingestion. Formicine ants are ordinarily protected by their formic acid-containing spray. Being wiped into the bird's plumage causes them to discharge that spray, without harm to the bird, to the point of almost total emptying of the glandular sac in which the secretion is stored. The ants are therefore essentially secretion-free by the time they are swallowed. Further evidence indicates that it is the ant's possession of the acid sac that triggers the anting behavior in the bird. If F. exsectoides are surgically deprived of their acid sac, they are eaten by the birds without first being subjected to anting. Data are also presented indicating that the ant's crop, which is especially capacious in formicines (its contents may amount to over 30% of the formicine's mass), and which appears to survive the anting procedure intact, constitutes, at least when laden, a valuable component of the trophic package that the bird accesses by anting. PMID:19169379

  1. Visual Search and Attention in Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata): Associative Cuing and Sequential Priming

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Bond, Alan B.; Burks, Marianna; Kamil, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Visual search for complex natural targets requires focal attention, either cued by predictive stimulus associations or primed by a representation of the most recently detected target. Since both processes can focus visual attention, cuing and priming were compared in an operant search task to evaluate their relative impacts on performance and to determine the nature of their interaction in combined treatments. Blue jays were trained to search for pairs of alternative targets among distractors. Informative or ambiguous color cues were provided prior to each trial, and targets were presented either in homogeneous blocked sequences or in constrained random order. Initial task acquisition was facilitated by priming in general, but was significantly retarded when targets were both cued and primed, indicating that the two processes interfered with each other during training. At asymptote, attentional effects were manifested mainly in inhibition, increasing latency in miscued trials and decreasing accuracy on primed trials following an unexpected target switch. A combination of cuing and priming was found to interfere with performance in such unexpected trials, apparently a result of the limited capacity of working memory. Because the ecological factors that promote priming and cuing are rather disparate, it is not clear whether they ever jointly and simultaneously contribute to natural predatory search. PMID:24893217

  2. Visual search and attention in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata): Associative cuing and sequential priming.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Bond, Alan B; Burks, Marianna; Kamil, Alan C

    2014-04-01

    Visual search for complex natural targets requires focal attention, either cued by predictive stimulus associations or primed by a representation of the most recently detected target. Because both processes can focus visual attention, cuing and priming were compared in an operant search task to evaluate their relative impacts on performance and to determine the nature of their interaction in combined treatments. Blue jays were trained to search for pairs of alternative targets among distractors. Informative or ambiguous color cues were provided before each trial, and targets were presented either in homogeneous blocked sequences or in constrained random order. Initial task acquisition was facilitated by priming in general, but was significantly retarded when targets were both cued and primed, indicating that the two processes interfered with each other during training. At asymptote, attentional effects were manifested mainly in inhibition, increasing latency in miscued trials and decreasing accuracy on primed trials following an unexpected target switch. A combination of cuing and priming was found to interfere with performance in such unexpected trials, apparently a result of the limited capacity of working memory. Because the ecological factors that promote priming or cuing are rather disparate, it is not clear whether they ever simultaneously contribute to natural predatory search. PMID:24893217

  3. Evidence suggesting that desire-state attribution may govern food sharing in Eurasian jays

    PubMed Central

    Ostoji?, Ljerka; Shaw, Rachael C.; Cheke, Lucy G.; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2013-01-01

    State-attribution is the ability to ascribe to others an internal life like one’s own and to understand that internal, psychological states such as desire, hope, belief, and knowledge underlie others’ actions. Despite extensive research, comparative studies struggle to adequately integrate key factors of state-attribution that have been identified by evolutionary and developmental psychology as well as research on empathy. Here, we develop a behavioral paradigm to address these issues and investigate whether male Eurasian jays respond to the changing desire-state of their female partners when sharing food. We demonstrate that males feed their mates flexibly according to the female’s current food preference. Critically, we show that the males need to see what the female has previously eaten to know what food she will currently want. Consequently, the males’ sharing pattern was not simply a response to their mate’s behavior indicating her preference as to what he should share, nor was it a response to the males’ own desire-state. Our results raise the possibility that these birds may be capable of ascribing desire to their mates. PMID:23382187

  4. The Cultures and History of America: The Jay I. Kislak Collection at the Library of Congress

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Library of Congress has a number of important documents and historical items due to the kindness of persons who have amassed broad collections over the years, and then subsequently donated them for the use and consideration of the general public. One such gift is that which is profiled in this fine online collection. The Jay I. Kislak Collection includes a number of rare maps and books, and is largely focused around the early years of European exploration and early Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica. Moving through the collection, visitors can view a selection of these fine documents, including a 1493 transcription of Columbus's account of his 1492 voyage and a handbook for priests created by Dominicans working in the Guatemalan highlands. One real find on this site is the interactive presentation of the famed 1678 work, _The Buccaneers of America_. Through this presentation, visitors can listen along to a reading of various passages from this extremely dramatic account of Alexander Exquemelin (who is thought to be a French surgeon who worked with buccaneers) and view the pages of this original document.

  5. Direct and relational representation during transitive list linking in pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus).

    PubMed

    Wei, Cynthia A; Kamil, Alan C; Bond, Alan B

    2014-02-01

    The authors used the list-linking procedure (Treichler & Van Tilburg, 1996) to explore the processes by which animals assemble cognitive structures from fragmentary and often contradictory data. Pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) were trained to a high level of accuracy on 2 implicit transitive lists, A > B > C > D > E and 1 > 2 > 3 > 4 > 5. They were then given linkage training on E > 1, the single pair that linked the 2 lists into a composite, 10-item hierarchy. Following linkage training, the birds were tested on nonadjacent probe pairs drawn both from within (B-D and 2-4) and between (D-1, E-2, B-2, C-3) each original list. Linkage training resulted in a significant transitory disruption in performance, and the adjustment to the resulting implicit hierarchy was far from instantaneous. Detailed analysis of the course of the disruption and its subsequent recovery provided important insights into the roles of direct and relational encoding in implicit hierarchies. PMID:24188622

  6. Signaling for food and sex? Begging by reproductive female white-throated magpie-jays

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jesse M. S.; Langen, Tom A.; Berg, Elena C.

    2012-01-01

    Food begging is common in nutritionally dependent young of many animals, but structurally homologous calls recur in adult signal repertoires of many species. We propose eight functional hypotheses for begging in adults; these stem from observations in birds but apply broadly to other taxa in which begging occurs. Adult cooperatively-breeding white-throated magpie-jays (Calocitta formosa) use loud begging vocalizations, particularly near the nest site during reproduction. We analysed the social context and behavioural phenology of loud calling and allofeeding in this species and compared these with predictions from each functional hypothesis. We found that reproductive females are the primary producers of beg calls, and their begging peaks during the fertile period when reproductive conflict among males and females was highest. Loud begging rates correlated positively with provisioning rates, but females called more in the pre-incubation fertile period than after they initiated incubation. Based on the context, phenology and active space of the signal, we conclude that female loud begging vocalizations function to signal nutritional need to group members, but also have been evolutionarily co-opted to advertise fertility to potential extra-pair partners. The location of calling is likely a consequence of nest guarding by breeding females to prevent intraspecific brood parasitism. PMID:23293376

  7. Mind the gap: genetic distance increases with habitat gap size in Florida scrub jays.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Aurélie; Fitzpatrick, John W; Bowman, Reed; Lovette, Irby J

    2012-08-23

    Habitat gap size has been negatively linked to movement probability in several species occupying fragmented landscapes. How these effects on movement behaviour in turn affect the genetic structure of fragmented populations at local scales is less well known. We tested, and confirmed, the hypothesis that genetic differentiation among adjacent populations of Florida scrub jays--an endangered bird species with poor dispersal abilities and a high degree of habitat specialization--increases with the width of habitat gaps separating them. This relationship was not an artefact of simple isolation-by-distance, as genetic distance was not correlated with the Euclidean distance between geographical centroids of the adjacent populations. Our results suggest that gap size affects movement behaviour even at remarkably local spatial scales, producing direct consequences on the genetic structure of fragmented populations. This finding shows that conserving genetic continuity for specialist species within fragmented habitat requires maintenance or restoration of preserve networks in which habitat gaps do not exceed a species-specific threshold distance. PMID:22357936

  8. The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: mapping 13CO and C18O in Orion A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Davis, C. J.; Francesco, J. Di; Graves, S. F.; Nutter, D.; Richer, J. S.; Roberts, J. F.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.; Brunt, C.; Butner, H. M.; Cavanagh, B.; Chrysostomou, A.; Curtis, E. I.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Etxaluze, M.; Fich, M.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Greaves, J. S.; Hatchell, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Matthews, B.; Matthews, H.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Sadavoy, S.; Simpson, R. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Viti, S.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Yates, J.

    2012-05-01

    The Gould Belt Legacy Survey will map star-forming regions within 500 pc, using Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP), Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) and Polarimeter 2 (POL-2) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). This paper describes HARP observations of the J= 3 ? 2 transitions of 13CO and C18O towards Orion A. The 15 arcsec resolution observations cover 5 pc of the Orion filament, including OMC 1 (including BN-KL and Orion bar), OMC 2/3 and OMC 4, and allow a comparative study of the molecular gas properties throughout the star-forming cloud. The filament shows a velocity gradient of ˜1 km s-1 pc-1 between OMC 1, 2 and 3, and high-velocity emission is detected in both isotopologues. The Orion Nebula and Bar have the largest masses and linewidths, and dominate the mass and energetics of the high-velocity material. Compact, spatially resolved emission from CH3CN, 13CH3OH, SO, HCOOCH3, CH3CHO and CH3OCHO is detected towards the Orion Hot Core. The cloud is warm, with a median excitation temperature of ˜24 K; the Orion Bar has the highest excitation temperature gas, at >80 K. The C18O excitation temperature correlates well with the dust temperature (to within 40 per cent). The C18O emission is optically thin, and the 13CO emission is marginally optically thick; despite its high mass, OMC 1 shows the lowest opacities. A virial analysis indicates that Orion A is too massive for thermal or turbulent support, but is consistent with a model of a filamentary cloud that is threaded by helical magnetic fields. The variation of physical conditions across the cloud is reflected in the physical characteristics of the dust cores. We find similar core properties between starless and protostellar cores, but variations in core properties with position in the filament. The OMC 1 cores have the highest velocity dispersions and masses, followed by OMC 2/3 and OMC 4. The differing fragmentation of these cores may explain why OMC 1 has formed clusters of high-mass stars, whereas OMC 4 produces fewer, predominantly low-mass stars.

  9. How GeneChip® was developed (Part II), Stephen FodorSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Stephen Fodor DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>genetic profiling>Stephen Fodor How the chip was developed (Part II) Stephen Fodor continues his discussion of the experiments that laid the groundwork for GeneChip® technology.

  10. MINIMAL COMPLETE SHIDOKU SYMMETRY GROUPS ELIZABETH ARNOLD, REBECCA FIELD, STEPHEN LUCAS, AND LAURA TAALMAN

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    MINIMAL COMPLETE SHIDOKU SYMMETRY GROUPS ELIZABETH ARNOLD, REBECCA FIELD, STEPHEN LUCAS, AND LAURA;2 ELIZABETH ARNOLD, REBECCA FIELD, STEPHEN LUCAS, AND LAURA TAALMAN 5 7 8 2 3 9 1 6 8 9 2 7 5 2 1 7 8 6 4 8 9

  11. The Letter from Leon County Jail: Patricia Stephens Due and the Tallahassee, Florida Civil Rights Movement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marna R. Weston

    2005-01-01

    Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) student Patricia Stephens sat down at the Woolworth’s lunch counter on Monroe Street in Tallahassee, Florida on Saturday February 20, 1960 and attempted to order food. When she and a group of eleven others were ordered to leave the counter they refused and were arrested. This thesis examines portions of Stephens’ correspondence during her

  12. Stephen Fodor, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-10-06

    Stephen Fodor is Chairman and CEO of Affymetrix, Inc. In the early 1990s, Stephen Fodor and his team developed a technique to produce miniature arrays of biological molecules. Their work led to the first DNA chip, and became the basis of techniques for large-scale genomic studies.

  13. The Nature of Space and Time by Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose

    E-print Network

    Preskill, John

    The Nature of Space and Time by Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose Reviewed by John Preskill 26 on the debate, and who could be better qualified than Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose? Arguably, the two most by Hawking. Furthermore, both authors are justly admired for the lucidity of their writings and lectures

  14. Spatial audio in small screen device displays Ashley Walker and Stephen Brewster

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    Spatial audio in small screen device displays Ashley Walker and Stephen Brewster Department:ashley,stephen@dcs.gla.ac.uk keywords: interface design, 3D audio, delay affordance, usability testing Our work addresses problem of techniques - from the graphical to the audio domain - for exploiting space in information representation

  15. Reading Stephen King: Issues of Censorship, Student Choice, and Popular Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Brenda Miller, Ed.; Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.; Chandler, Kelly, Ed.

    This collection of essays grew out of the "Reading Stephen King Conference" held at the University of Maine in 1996. Stephen King's books have become a lightning rod for the tensions around issues of including "mass market" popular literature in middle and high school English classes and of who chooses what students read. King's fiction is among…

  16. Pressure-Based Menu Selection for Mobile Devices Graham Wilson, Craig Stewart and Stephen A. Brewster

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    Pressure-Based Menu Selection for Mobile Devices Graham Wilson, Craig Stewart and Stephen A.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~stephen ABSTRACT Despite many successes in desktop applications, little work has looked at the use of pressure-visual feedback. This study examined pressure input on a mobile device using a single Force Sensing Resistor (FSR

  17. Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeliseyev, Y. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Akademicheskaya St., 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2013-03-19

    It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

  18. The Herschel Gould Belt Survey in Chamaeleon II. Properties of cold dust in disks around young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzi, L.; Cox, N. L. J.; Prusti, T.; Merín, B.; Ribas, Á.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Winston, E.; Kóspál, Á.; Royer, P.; Vavrek, R.; André, Ph.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Testi, L.; Bressert, E.; Ricci, L.; Men'shchikov, A.; Könyves, V.

    2013-07-01

    Context. We report on the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS) of the Chamaeleon II (Cha II) star-forming region, focusing on the detection of Class I to III young stellar objects (YSOs). Aims: We aim at characterizing the circumstellar material around these YSOs and at understanding which disk parameters are most likely constrained by the new HGBS data, which are expected to be crucial for studying the transition from optically thick disks to evolved debris-type disks. Methods: We recovered 29 of the 63 known YSOs in Cha II with a detection in at least one of the PACS/SPIRE pass-bands: 3 Class I YSOs (i.e.,100%), 1 flat source (i.e., 50%), 21 Class II objects (i.e., 55%), 3 Class III objects (i.e, 16%), and the unclassified far-infrared source IRAS 12522-7640. We explored PACS/SPIRE colors of this sample and modeled their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the optical to Herschel's wavelengths with the RADMC-2D radiative transfer code. Results: We find that YSO colors are typically confined to the following ranges: -0.7 ? log (F70 / F160) ? 0.5, -0.5 ? log (F160 / F250) ? 0.6, 0.05 ? log (F250 / F350) ? 0.25 and -0.1 ? log (F350 / F500) ? 0.5. These color ranges are expected to be only marginally contaminated by extragalactic sources and field stars and, hence, provide a useful YSO selection tool when applied together. We were able to model the SED of 26 of the 29 detected YSOs. We discuss the degeneracy/limitations of our SED fitting results and adopted the Bayesian method to estimate the probability of different values for the derived disk parameters. The Cha II YSOs present typical disk inner radii ?0.1 AU, as previously estimated in the literature on the basis of Spitzer data. Our probability analysis shows that, thanks to the new Herschel data, the lower limits to the disk mass (Mdisk) and characteristic radius (RC) are well constrained, while the flaring angle (1 + ?) is only marginally constrained. The lower limit to RC is typically around 50 AU. The lower limits to Mdisk are proportional to the stellar masses with a typical 0.3% ratio, i.e., in the range estimated in the literature for young Class II stars and brown dwarfs across a broad range of stellar masses. The estimated flaring angles, although very uncertain, point toward very flat disks (1 + ? ?1.2), as found for low-mass M-type YSO samples in other star-forming regions. Thus, our results support the idea that disk properties show a dependence on stellar properties. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables 2 and 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. High latitudes and high genetic diversity: phylogeography of a widespread boreal bird, the gray jay (Perisoreus canadensis).

    PubMed

    van Els, Paul; Cicero, Carla; Klicka, John

    2012-05-01

    We describe range-wide phylogeographic variation in gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis), a boreal Nearctic corvid that occurs today primarily in recently glaciated regions. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA (1041 base pairs ND2 gene; N=205, 50 localities) revealed four reciprocally monophyletic groups. One widespread clade occurs across the North American boreal zone, from Newfoundland to Alaska and southwest into Utah. Three other clades occur at lower latitudes in the montane West in Colorado, the northern Rocky Mountains, and the Pacific Northwest respectively. The geographic distribution of clades in gray jays corresponds with a general pattern that is emerging for boreal taxa, having one widespread northern clade and one or more geographically restricted southwestern clades. Population genetic analyses indicate that the larger boreal clade is genetically structured and harbors significantly more genetic diversity than those clades occurring at lower latitudes. Species distribution modeling (SDM) revealed multiple putative Pleistocene refugia including several occurring at higher latitudes. We suggest that multiple post-glacial colonization routes, some of which originate from these northern refugia, are responsible for the relatively high genetic diversity at high latitudes. Conversely, lower latitude clades show little variation, probably as a result of historical restriction to smaller geographical areas with smaller long-term population sizes. This 'upside-down' pattern of genetic diversity contrasts with the conventional view that populations of north-temperate species occupying previously glaciated habitats should possess lower levels of diversity than their southern counterparts. PMID:22321688

  20. A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

  1. Initial evidence of path integration in desert sand scorpions. Douglas D. Gaffin, Jay E. Vinnedge, Tristan N. Barker; University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA

    E-print Network

    Gaffin, Doug

    Initial evidence of path integration in desert sand scorpions. Douglas D. Gaffin, Jay E. Vinnedge Serendipitous example suggests path integration Sand slip method Sand slip experiments support path integration: Gentle scratching of the sand surface (dotted lines) with the tip of a thin stick enticed a scorpion

  2. A first-generation microsatellite-based genetic linkage map of the Siberian jay (Perisoreus infaustus): insights into avian genome evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonja Jaari; Meng-Hua Li; Juha Merilä

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic resources for the majority of free-living vertebrates of ecological and evolutionary importance are scarce. Therefore, linkage maps with high-density genome coverage are needed for progress in genomics of wild species. The Siberian jay (Perisoreus infaustus; Corvidae) is a passerine bird which has been subject to lots of research in the areas of ecology and evolutionary biology. Knowledge of

  3. PAIRING PATTERNS AND FITNESS IN A FREE-RANGING POPULATION OF PINYON JAYS: WHAT DO THEY REVEAL ABOUT MATE CHOICE?‘ 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Marzluff; Russell P. Balda

    Abstract. Pairing in 141 pairs of Pinyon Jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) was assor- tative for age, but was random for bill length and body weight. Assortative pairing for age may be favored because similar-aged partners produced slightly more young than dissimilar- aged ones and their young survived longer than young from dissimilar-aged pairs. We expected pairing to be disassortative for size

  4. A state-dependent sex difference in spatial memory in pinyon jays, Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus: mated females forget as predicted by natural history

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AIMEE S. DUNLAP; B ONNIE B. CHEN; PETER A. B EDNEKOFF; TOM M. G REENE; RUSSELL P. B ALDA

    2006-01-01

    Based on differing roles during the breeding season, male pinyon jays are predicted to be more accurate than females in recovering cached seeds over long retention intervals. We additionally predicted that males should be able to accurately recover caches made by their mates over short and long retention in- tervals. We conducted four experiments to test these predictions. During experiment

  5. Literacy and Democracy: Teacher Research and Composition Studies in Pursuit of Habitable Spaces. Further Conversations from the Students of Jay Robinson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischer, Cathy, Ed.; Schaafsma, David, Ed.

    This collection offers insights into what a democratic vision of literacy looks like in practice. Building on the work of teacher and literacy scholar Jay Robinson, the 10 essays in the collection explore the relationships between literacy and society. The essays pay tribute to Professor Robinson, who retired in 1966 from the University of…

  6. ~1.~~ THE YELLOW DWARF FORM OF THE COTTON APHID, AflIlS I Lawrence R. Wilhoit and Jay A. Rosenheim

    E-print Network

    Rosenheim, Jay A.

    ~1.~~ THE YELLOW DWARF FORM OF THE COTTON APHID, AflIlS I GossvPll I Lawrence R. Wilhoit and Jay A. Rosenheim University of California, Davis, CA The cotton aphid, AphisgossypiiGlover, varies in size and color. During the summer, small yellow forms predominate. while during the spring and fall the aphids

  7. Speciation in Western Scrub-Jays, Haldane’s rule, and genetic clines in secondary contact

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haldane’s Rule, the tendency for the heterogametic sex to show reduced fertility in hybrid crosses, can obscure the signal of gene flow in mtDNA between species where females are heterogametic. Therefore, it is important when studying speciation and species limits in female-heterogametic species like birds to assess the signature of gene flow in the nuclear genome as well. We studied introgression of microsatellites and mtDNA across a secondary contact zone between coastal and interior lineages of Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica) to test for a signature of Haldane’s Rule: a narrower cline of introgression in mtDNA compared to nuclear markers. Results Our initial phylogeographic analysis revealed that there is only one major area of contact between coastal and interior lineages and identified five genetic clusters with strong spatial structuring: Pacific Slope, Interior US, Edwards Plateau (Texas), Northern Mexico, and Southern Mexico. Consistent with predictions from Haldane’s Rule, mtDNA showed a narrower cline than nuclear markers across a transect through the hybrid zone. This result is not being driven by female-biased dispersal because neutral diffusion analysis, which included estimates of sex-specific dispersal rates, also showed less diffusion of mtDNA. Lineage-specific plumage traits were associated with nuclear genetic profiles for individuals in the hybrid zone, indicating that these differences are under genetic control. Conclusions This study adds to a growing list of studies that support predictions of Haldane’s Rule using cline analysis of multiple loci of differing inheritance modes, although alternate hypotheses like selection on different mtDNA types cannot be ruled out. That Haldane’s Rule appears to be operating in this system suggests a measure of reproductive isolation between the Pacific Slope and interior lineages. Based on a variety of evidence from the phenotype, ecology, and genetics, we recommend elevating three lineages to species level: A. californica (Pacific Slope); A. woodhouseii (Interior US plus Edwards Plateau plus Northern Mexico); A. sumichrasti (Southern Mexico). The distinctive Edwards Plateau population in Texas, which was monophyletic in mtDNA except for one individual, should be studied in greater detail given habitat threat. PMID:24938753

  8. Three who made an association: I. Sir William Osler, 1849-1919 II. George Milbry Gould, 1848-1922 III. Margaret Ridley Charlton, 1858-1931 and the founding of the Medical Library Association, Philadelphia, 1898.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, F K

    1996-01-01

    The careers and personalities of the three founders of the Medical Library Association, Sir William Osler, George Milbry Gould, and Margaret Ridley Charlton are outlined, followed by a review of their role in the founding of the association. The career of Sir William Osler is well documented in existing literature, both in medical history and medical librarianship; the biographies of George Milbry Gould and Margaret Ridley Charlton are less known, and this article describes their lives in relation to the founding of the association. The issue of responsibility for the association's founding is explored, and primary recognition is attributed to Margaret Charlton. The author attempts to follow the tradition of Harvey Cushing in his The Life of Sir William Osler in allowing the characters to speak in their own words as much as possible. Images PMID:8883979

  9. Three who made an association: I. Sir William Osler, 1849-1919. II. George Milbry Gould, 1848-1922. III. Margaret Ridley Charlton, 1858-1931 and the founding of the Medical Library Association, Philadelphia, 1898.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, F K

    1998-01-01

    The careers and personalities of the three founders of the Medical Library Association, Sir William Osler, George Milbry Gould, and Margaret Ridley Charlton are outlined, followed by a review of their role in the founding of the association. The career of Sir William Osler is well documented in existing literature, both in medical history and medical librarianship; the biographies of George Milbry Gould and Margaret Ridley Charlton are less known, and this article describes their lives in relation to the founding of the association. The issue of responsibility for the association's founding is explored, and primary recognition is attributed to Margaret Charlton. The author attempts to follow the tradition of Harvey Cushing in his The Life of Sir William Osler in allowing the characters to speak in their own words as much as possible. Images PMID:9578937

  10. Conservation as virtue: a scientific and social process for conservation ethics.

    PubMed

    Van Houtan, Kyle S

    2006-10-01

    Most scientists take ethical arguments for conservation as given and focus on scientific or economic questions. Although nature conservation is often considered a just cause, it is given little further consideration. A lack of attention to ethical theory raises serious concerns for how conservation scientists conceive and practice ethics. I contrast two common ways scientists approach ethics, as demonstrated in the writings of Stephen Jay Gould and E. O. Wilson. Gould casts severe doubt as to whether any ethics are possible from science, whereas Wilson proposes science as the only path to ethics. I argue these two methods ultimately limit popular support for conservation and offer Alasdair MacIntyre's "virtue ethics" as an alternative. Unlike Gould and Wilson, MacIntyre provides an ethical theory that reconciles scientific inquiry and social traditions. Recent studies of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States affirm MacIntyre's claims and provide important insights for conservation today. These accounts argue that social solidarity and political success against segregation were possible only as rooted in the particular language, logic, and practices of a robust cultural tradition. If correct, conservation science should attend to several questions. On what basis can conservation achieve widespread cultural legitimacy? What are the particular social currencies for a conservation ethic? What role does science play in such a scheme? MacIntyre's careful positioning of scientific and social traditions provides a hopeful ethical direction for conservation. PMID:17002754

  11. Stephen Baylin, M.D., Explains the Difference Between Genetics and Epigenetics

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen Baylin, M.D., at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discusses the how alterations in DNA are deciphered in a combined effort with The Cancer Genome Atlas at the National Cancer Institute to decode the brain cancer genome.

  12. Compositional Reachability in Petri Nets Julian Rathke, Pawel Sobocinski, and Owen Stephens

    E-print Network

    Sobocinski, Pawel

    Compositional Reachability in Petri Nets Julian Rathke, Pawel Soboci´nski, and Owen Stephens ECS, University of Southampton, UK Abstract. We introduce a divide-and-conquer algorithm for a modified version

  13. Importing Ontological Information into Planning Domain Models Lee McCluskey and Stephen Cresswell

    E-print Network

    McCluskey, Thomas Leo

    Importing Ontological Information into Planning Domain Models Lee McCluskey and Stephen Cresswell School of Computing and Engineering The University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH, UK lee,s.n.cresswell

  14. Object-based Interpolation via Cores Derek T. Puff, David Eberly, Stephen M. Pizer,

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Object-based Interpolation via Cores Derek T. Puff, David Eberly, Stephen M. Pizer, Departments-mail: puff@rad.unc.edu, eberly@cs.unc.edu, smp@cs.unc.edu ABSTRACT We propose an object-based interpolation

  15. The Complexity of Genetic Susceptibility to Cancer - Stephen J. Chanock, M.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen J. Chanock, M.D., Director of NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, gave the 11th Jeffrey M. Trent Lecture in Cancer Research, titled "The Complexity of Genetic Susceptibility to Cancer".

  16. Stephen Chanock Delivers the Jeffrey M. Trent Lecture in Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen Chanock delivers the 11th annual Jeffrey M. Trent Lecture in Cancer Research, titled "The Complexity of Genetic Susceptibility to Cancer. The lecture was sponsored by the National Human Genome Research Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health.

  17. Stephen F. Austin State University: Forest Resources Institute

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-31

    Truly, the Forest Resources Institute (FRI) at Stephen F. Austin State University is a "friend of the forest." It's part of the Institute's mission statement. The FRI works to "serve all legitimate stakeholders in the southern forest without preference." On the website, visitors can learn more about the FRI, its history, and its ongoing research projects. In the Research area, visitors can read summaries of work on road sediments, fire prevention and management, and small watersheds in the South. Moving on, the GIS Resources area includes spatial data sets for Louisiana, links to related data sources, and a range of Texas maps. Finally, users should not miss the Landowner Briefs area. Here they will find a set of documents designed for landowners dealing with various forest-based issues. The titles here include "Area Control of Unwanted Woody Stems With A Foliar Spray" and "Shotgun Application for Individual Woody Stem Control."

  18. Translational research into intertemporal choice: the Western scrub-jay as an animal model for future-thinking.

    PubMed

    Thom, James M; Clayton, Nicola S

    2015-03-01

    Decisions often involve outcomes that will not materialise until later, and choices between immediate gratification and future consequences are thought to be important for human health and welfare. Combined human and animal research has identified impulsive intertemporal choice as an important factor in drug-taking and pathological gambling. In this paper, we give an overview of recent research into intertemporal choice in non-human animals, and argue that this work could offer insight into human behaviour through the development of animal models. As an example, we discuss the role of future-thinking in intertemporal choice, and review the case for the Western scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica) as an animal model of such prospective cognition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall. PMID:25225036

  19. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: First results from the SCUBA-2 observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud and a virial analysis of its prestellar core population

    E-print Network

    Pattle, K; Kirk, J M; White, G J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Buckle, J; Beaulieu, S F; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Hatchell, J; Kirk, H; Jenness, T; Johnstone, D; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Walker-Smith, S; Di Francesco, J; Hogerheijde, M R; André, Ph; Bastien, P; Bresnahan, D; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Griffin, M J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Knee, L B G; Könyves, V; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Rumble, D; Sadavoy, S; Spinoglio, L; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the first observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud performed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We demonstrate methods for combining these data with previous HARP CO, Herschel, and IRAM N$_{2}$H$^{+}$ observations in order to accurately quantify the properties of the SCUBA-2 sources in Ophiuchus. We produce a catalogue of all of the sources found by SCUBA-2. We separate these into protostars and starless cores. We list all of the starless cores and perform a full virial analysis, including external pressure. This is the first time that external pressure has been included in this level of detail. We find that the majority of our cores are either bound or virialised. Gravitational energy and external pressure are on average of a similar order of magnitude, but with some variation from region to region. We find that cores in the Oph A region are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, while cores in the Oph C and ...

  20. The Spitzer Gould Belt Survey of Large Nearby Interstellar Clouds: Discovery of a Dense Embedded Cluster in the Serpens-Aquila Rift

    E-print Network

    R. A. Gutermuth; T. L. Bourke; L. E. Allen; P. C. Myers; S. T. Megeath; B. C. Matthews; J. K. Jørgensen; J. Di Francesco; D. Ward-Thompson; T. L. Huard; T. Y. Brooke; M. M. Dunham; L. A. Cieza; P. M. Harvey; N. L. Chapman

    2007-12-19

    We report the discovery of a nearby, embedded cluster of young stellar objects, associated filamentary infrared dark cloud, and 4.5 micron shock emission knots from outflows detected in Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared imaging of the Serpens-Aquila Rift obtained as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We also present radial velocity measurements of the region from molecular line observations obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) that suggest the cluster is co-moving with the Serpens Main embedded cluster 3 degrees to the north. We therefore assign it the same distance, 260 pc. The core of the new cluster, which we call Serpens South, is composed of an unusually large fraction of protostars (77%) at high mean surface density (>430 pc^-2) and short median nearest neighbor spacing (3700 AU). We perform basic cluster structure characterization using nearest neighbor surface density mapping of the YSOs and compare our findings to other known clusters with equivalent analyses available in the literature.

  1. Significance of a basal melanin layer to production of non-iridescent structural plumage color: evidence from an amelanotic Steller's jay (Cyanocitta stelleri).

    PubMed

    Shawkey, Matthew D; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2006-04-01

    Non-iridescent structural plumage color is typically produced by coherent scattering of light within a matrix of keratin and air (a ;spongy layer') in feather barbs. It remains unclear what role, if any, the basal melanin layer underlying this spongy layer plays in the production of coloration. Amelanism in birds with structural color is a ;natural experiment' in which melanin pigmentation is lost, allowing us to identify the effects of the loss of melanin on structural color production. Here we use full-spectrum spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier analysis to compare the color and nanostructure of an amelanotic Steller's jay (Cyanocitta stelleri Gmelin) feather with a normal blue Steller's jay feather. As a control, we also examined a white domestic chicken (Gallus gallus Linnaeus) feather. The pale amelanotic jay feather had a broad reflectance curve with a blue/green peak, while the typical blue feather had a typical distinct bell-shaped blue curve with a UV/violet peak. The white chicken feather had a typical white reflectance curve with no discrete peaks. Electron microscopy revealed that both the amelanotic and blue feather barbs contained well-formed spongy layers that were of the correct size and arrangement to produce their measured peak reflectance values, whereas the chicken feather had no spongy layer. The washed-out color of the amelanotic jay feather was thus most probably caused by the loss of the basal melanin layer, suggesting that melanin functions to absorb incoherently scattered white light from the feather barb thereby increasing the purity of the color produced by the spongy layer. PMID:16547296

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Andrea McCrea, Eric Tam, Fengchao Yin, Jason Hoel, Justin Chan, Luke Debruijn, Stephen Coburn

    E-print Network

    , Fengchao Yin, Jason Hoel, Justin Chan, Luke Debruijn, Stephen Coburn UBC Botanical Gardens Conceptual of a project/report". #12;2013 CIVL 445 - Group 20 Andrea McCrea ( Eric Tam ( Justin Chan ( Stephen Coburn

  3. The Ascent of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Brian L.

    2000-04-01

    From the revolutionary discoveries of Galileo and Newton to the mind-bending theories of Einstein and Heisenberg, from plate tectonics to particle physics, from the origin of life to universal entropy, and from biology to cosmology, here is a sweeping, readable, and dynamic account of the whole of Western science.In the approachable manner and method of Stephen Jay Gould and Carl Sagan, the late Brian L. Silver translates our most important, and often most obscure, scientific developments into a vernacular that is not only accessible and illuminating but also enjoyable. Silver makes his comprehensive case with much clarity and insight; his book aptly locates science as the apex of human reason, and reason as our best path to the truth. For all readers curious about--or else perhaps intimidated by--what Silver calls "the scientific campaign up to now", The Ascent of Science will be fresh, vivid, and fascinating reading.

  4. History of Influences in the Development of Intelligence Theory and Testing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Monson, John A.

    Developed by two professors of education at Indiana University, this Website gives a comprehensive overview of the field of intelligence theory and testing from Plato to the present day. Using an "interactive map," the site offers a timeline of the major figures in the field and their affiliations with one another. Users can click on names, time periods, or schools to access more in-depth information. The site's "Hot Topics" section is particularly interesting, giving substantial material relating to some of the most controversial issues in intelligence theory, including an extensive section-by-section summary of the bestseller The Bell Curve and article-length rebuttals by scholars, including one by anthropologist Stephen Jay Gould.

  5. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.; Orchiston, Wayne

    2011-11-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, which Herschel rejected. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston, FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston - not Herschel - who coined the term 'asteroid' to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  6. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, most of which sound quite ludicrous. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston- not Herschel- who coined the term "asteroid" to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  7. Reverse Mathematics 2001. edited by Stephen G. Simpson, Lecture Notes in Logic, vol. 21. A K Peters, Ltd., Wellesley, Massachusetts, x + 401 pp.--therein

    E-print Network

    Berger, Ulrich

    Reverse Mathematics 2001. edited by Stephen G. Simpson, Lecture Notes in Logic, vol. 21. A K Peters. Pp. 349­351. (22) Stephen G. Simpson. 0 1 sets and models of WKL0. Pp. 352­378. (23) Kazuyuki Tanaka program in mathematical logic, pioneered by Harvey Friedman, Stephen Simpson, John Steel, and others

  8. An investigation of mixing in a three-stream turbulent jet David H. Rowinski and Stephen B. Pope

    E-print Network

    An investigation of mixing in a three-stream turbulent jet David H. Rowinski and Stephen B. Pope of mixing in a three-stream turbulent jet David H. Rowinskia) and Stephen B. Pope Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850, USA (Received 3 January

  9. Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates Stephen T. Buckland Andrew J. Plumptre Len Thomas Eric A. Rexstad

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Len

    1 1 2 3 4 5 Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates Stephen T. Buckland · Andrew transect surveys for primates Corresponding author: S.T. Buckland, CREEM, The Observatory, Buchanan Gardens 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 Design and Analysis of Line Transect Surveys for Primates Stephen T. Buckland

  10. A review of "Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief." by Walter Stephens

    E-print Network

    William E. Engel

    2003-01-01

    to its source? in every sense of the term. Walter Stephens. Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002. xv + 451 pp. + 16 halftones + 2 diagrams. Cloth $35.00; Paper $20.00. Review by WILLIAM E..., based on only several (though to be sure, important) sections, thus ?distort- ing their understanding of every aspect of the book, starting with misogyny? (33). And yet, as Stephens is quick to point out, questions of sex and gender are central...

  11. Circulating carotenoid concentrations are positively correlated with later clutch initiation in Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens).

    PubMed

    Heiss, Rebecca S; Cohen, Alan A; Bowman, Reed; Boughton, Raoul K; Bridge, Eli; McGraw, Kevin J; Schoech, Stephan J

    2011-02-01

    Antioxidants play key roles in preventing free radical damage to various molecules, cells, and tissues, but it is not well understood how variation in antioxidant levels may relate to the reproductive success or health of wild animals. We explored the relationship between circulating antioxidant concentrations and both body condition and timing of reproduction in male and female Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a cooperatively breeding passerine bird. We examined whether levels of uric acid, vitamin E, and carotenoids (all potentially important antioxidants) were linked to body condition and timing of reproduction, two measures that are directly related to reproductive success. Antioxidant concentrations were not correlated with body condition, but they were related to timing of first clutch initiation, though not always in the predicted direction. Elevated circulating levels of carotenoids were associated with delayed clutch initiation in female breeders. Relatively higher vitamin E levels in control birds were associated with earlier clutch initiation, whereas male breeders that received long-term food supplementation had elevated levels of vitamin E and delayed reproduction. Several potential explanations for the link between elevated levels of antioxidants and delayed clutch initiation are discussed. Separate explanations for each sex include, but are not limited to, oxidative stress as a result of territory defense efforts in males, different dietary regimes due to supplementation, and mobilized plasma antioxidants in females that were coping with a stressor. PMID:21328560

  12. An Overview of Present NoSQL Solutions and Features Tak-Lon (Stephen) Wu

    E-print Network

    of Informatics and Computing Indiana University, Bloomington, IN taklwu@indiana.edu Abstract NoSQL Database an overview of modern NoSQL database solutions and discusses their challenges, features, and use cases. 1An Overview of Present NoSQL Solutions and Features Tak-Lon (Stephen) Wu Computer Science, School

  13. Book Review of Stephen L. Adler's, "Quantum theory as an emergent phenomenon."

    E-print Network

    Philip Pearle

    2006-02-07

    In Stephen Adler's book, "Quantum theory as an emergent phenomenon," the author starts from a classical mechanics structure and "derives" the formalism of quantum theory, together with wave function collapse dynamics, the latter providing the interpretation of quantum theory. A detailed outline of the author's argument is presented in this book review.

  14. Argo: Past, Present, and Future (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington

    E-print Network

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Argo: Past, Present, and Future (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington riser ocean and was carried out from 1985- 1997. P15 #12;The present status of the Argo profiling float array Canonical Argo mission 0-2000 m; T, S, p (0.005 °C; 0.01 PSU ; 2.5 dbar) t = 10 days 4-5 years/200

  15. Observations of Internal Gravity Waves by Argo Floats TYLER D. HENNON AND STEPHEN C. RISER

    E-print Network

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Observations of Internal Gravity Waves by Argo Floats TYLER D. HENNON AND STEPHEN C. RISER School wave field near a depth of 1000 m using data from a set of 194 Argo floats equipped with Iridium of internal waves using data collected from a suite of profiling floats deployed as part of the global Argo

  16. The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore,

    E-print Network

    Hillston, Jane

    The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore, Maria Luisa Guerriero of Edinburgh, Scotland 1 Introduction Bio-PEPA [1, 2] is a timed process algebra designed specifically simulation and probabilistic model-checking. The context of application we consider is that of bio- chemical

  17. The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore,

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Stephen

    The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore, Maria Luisa Guerriero of Edinburgh, Scotland I. INTRODUCTION Bio-PEPA [1], [2] is a timed process algebra designed specifically simulation and probabilistic model-checking. The context of application we consider is that of bio- chemical

  18. Energy-Based Control of Coronal Biped Balance and Stepping Benjamin J. Stephens

    E-print Network

    marginal and a 1-step lookahead is adequate. Robot Experiments We have performed preliminary experimentsEnergy-Based Control of Coronal Biped Balance and Stepping Benjamin J. Stephens Carnegie Mellon University Abstract Linear Biped Model Coronal Energy Control Coronal Stepping Control LR L ww Dy Dy D y

  19. Estimating bird abundance: making methods STEPHEN T. BUCKLAND, STUART J. MARSDEN and RHYS E. GREEN

    E-print Network

    Buckland, Steve

    Estimating bird abundance: making methods work STEPHEN T. BUCKLAND, STUART J. MARSDEN and RHYS E. GREEN Summary In many bird monitoring surveys, no attempt is made to estimate bird densities or abundance. Instead, counts of one form or another are made, and these are assumed to correlate with bird

  20. The Water Budget of the Kuparuk River Basin, Alaska* STEPHEN J. DRY

    E-print Network

    Dery, Stephen

    moisture for the Kuparuk River basin on the North Slope of Alaska is presented. Numerical simulations. In turn, this would lead to a drying out of soils on the North Slope of Alaska. Barber et al. (2000The Water Budget of the Kuparuk River Basin, Alaska* STEPHEN J. DÃ?RY Lamont-Doherty Earth

  1. Missouri River Multiple Species Inventory Monitoring Principal Investigator: Stephen J. Dinsmore

    E-print Network

    Koford, Rolf R.

    Missouri River Multiple Species Inventory Monitoring Principal Investigator: Stephen J. Dinsmore and invertebrates in accordance with the Multiple Species Inventory and Monitoring (MSIM) protocols at 1520 sites along the Missouri River. 2. Estimate probability of occupancy and abundance for select species

  2. Stephen E. McLaughlin Computer Science and Engineering Pennsylvania State University

    E-print Network

    Smith, Adam D.

    . December, 2013. Devin J. Pohly, Stephen McLaughlin, Patrick McDaniel, and Kevin Butler. Hi-Fi: Collecting and Defenses in Sequential Control Systems Advisor: Dr. Patrick McDaniel The Pennsylvania State University M Home Electricity Usage Profiles Advisor: Dr. Patrick McDaniel The Pennsylvania State University B

  3. Non-linear Metric Learning Dor Kedem, Stephen Tyree, Kilian Q. Weinberger

    E-print Network

    Weinberger, Kilian

    Non-linear Metric Learning Dor Kedem, Stephen Tyree, Kilian Q. Weinberger Dept. of Comp. Sci novel metric learning algorithms, 2 -LMNN and GB-LMNN, which are explicitly designed to be non-linear the computational benefits of a linear mapping from linear metric learn- ing, but uses a non-linear 2 -distance

  4. Simulating Cartoon Style Animation Stephen Chenney Mark Pingel Rob Iverson Marcin Szymanski

    E-print Network

    DeCarlo, Doug

    Simulating Cartoon Style Animation Stephen Chenney Mark Pingel Rob Iverson Marcin Szymanski a challenging topic. Another large problem is related to interdependence between rendering style and animation University of Wisconsin at Madison Abstract Traditional hand animation is in many cases superior to simu

  5. THE SPECTRUM OF OCEANIC VARIABILITY (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington

    E-print Network

    Riser, Stephen C.

    THE SPECTRUM OF OCEANIC VARIABILITY (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington riser = = = = + + + + + + + + = + + = = + + It has been assumed here that f(t) is periodic with period T. The spectrum of f , , is then defined-time) spectrum: #12;The global 2-D spectrum of sea level from Topex/Poseidon [Wunsch and Stammer, 1995

  6. Code Generation for Receding Horizon Control Jacob Mattingley Yang Wang Stephen Boyd

    E-print Network

    -- Receding horizon control (RHC), also known as model predictive control (MPC), is a general purpose control predictive con- trol (MPC) [1], [2], [3], [4] is a form of feedback control system that first became popularCode Generation for Receding Horizon Control Jacob Mattingley Yang Wang Stephen Boyd Abstract

  7. A Context for Pen-Based Mathematical Computing Elena Smirnova Stephen M. Watt

    E-print Network

    Watt, Stephen M.

    A Context for Pen-Based Mathematical Computing Elena Smirnova Stephen M. Watt Ontario Research an architectural framework for pen-based mathematical computing. From the outset, we require that the framework be integrated with suitable elements for pen computing, document processing and computer algebra. We demonstrate

  8. ON A THEOREM OF OSSA DAVID COPELAND JOHNSON AND W. STEPHEN WILSON

    E-print Network

    Wilson, W. Stephen

    ON A THEOREM OF OSSA DAVID COPELAND JOHNSON AND W. STEPHEN WILSON (Communicated by Thomas G. Goodwillie) Abstract. If V is an elementary abelian 2-group, Ossa proved that the con- nective K-theory of BV splits into copies of Z/2 and of the connective K- theory of the infinite real projective space. We give

  9. A Study Guide for Stephen B. Oates' "The Fires of Jubilee: Nat Turner's Fierce Rebellion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Ron

    2006-01-01

    This document is a study guide for Stephen B. Oates biography of Nat Turner, "The Fires of Jubilee." The book is a practical reading vehicle for introducing Nat Turner to secondary students in grades 11 and 12. Oates divides his work into four parts, which could provide the basis for four reading assignments, although the sections are not of equal…

  10. Foot Tapping for Mobile Interaction Andrew Crossan, Stephen Brewster, Alexander Ng

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    Foot Tapping for Mobile Interaction Andrew Crossan, Stephen Brewster, Alexander Ng Department}@dcs.gla.ac.uk ABSTRACT In this paper we present an initial investigation of foot tapping as a mechanism for interacting with a mobile device without removing it from a pocket. We compare a foot tapping technique for menu interaction

  11. NOVEMBER 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1723 AFFILIATIONS: HAYNES, LUO, AND STEPHENS--Department of

    E-print Network

    Lombardi, John R.

    NOVEMBER 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1723 AFFILIATIONS: HAYNES, LUO, AND STEPHENS, CO 80523 E-mail: haynes@atmos.colostate.edu DOI:10.1175/BAMS-88-11-1723 ©2007 American Meteorological to the meteorological unit of radar reflectivity, expressed in decibels (dBZ). Retrievals of quantities like cloud water

  12. Frequency-Based Coloring of the Audio Waveform Display Stephen V. Rice

    E-print Network

    Rice, Stephen V.

    Frequency-Based Coloring of the Audio Waveform Display Stephen V. Rice The University to represent the frequency content to make sounds more visible. Audio-editing systems are enhanced-track audio-editing system presents one waveform display for each track. However, frequency information

  13. A state space model for cochlear mechanics Stephen J. Elliott,a

    E-print Network

    Allen, Jont

    A state space model for cochlear mechanics Stephen J. Elliott,a Emery M. Ku, and Ben Lineton micromechanical elements coupled via the cochlear fluid. The stability of this time domain model can be easily, as well as the micromechanical behavior of the individual parts of the cochlear partition. Such models

  14. At left, the late Stephen Perrine Dey II, with Douglas Fisher at the annual New Jersey

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    At left, the late Stephen Perrine Dey II, with Douglas Fisher at the annual New Jersey Breeders' luncheon in Mount Holly in January 2010. Photo credit: Horse News Report to the New Jersey State Board, and his death deeply jolted the entire New Jersey agricultural community. At the time of his death, Doc

  15. How Large Is the World Wide Web? Adrian Dobra Stephen E. Fienberg

    E-print Network

    Fienberg, Stephen E.

    How Large Is the World Wide Web? Adrian Dobra Stephen E. Fienberg National Institute of Department of the World Wide Web is extremely difficult because sampling directly from the Web is not possible. Several of the World Wide Web. Keywords Contingency tables; Markov chain Monte Carlo methods; Multiple­recapture models

  16. A review of "Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief." by Walter Stephens

    E-print Network

    Thomas Moisan

    2004-01-01

    the ?general reader,? it is a valuable addition to Donne studies. Walter Stephens. Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002. xv + 451 pp. $35.00. Review by THOMAS MOISAN, SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY...

  17. in the Leech Helobdella stagnalis Kelsey Banister, Jenna Callaway, Rebecca Beresic-Perrins, Stephen Shuster

    E-print Network

    Shuster, Stephen M.

    in the Leech Helobdella stagnalis Kelsey Banister, Jenna Callaway, Rebecca Beresic-Perrins, Stephen for the hermaphroditic leech, Helobdella stagnalis to outcross (cross-fertilization) or self-fertilize is poorly known. In order to establish whether H. stagnalis is capable of self-fertilization and to measure any possible

  18. Bipolar Electrodes for Rapid Screening of Electrocatalysts Stephen E. Fosdick and Richard M. Crooks*

    E-print Network

    Bipolar Electrodes for Rapid Screening of Electrocatalysts Stephen E. Fosdick and Richard M. Crooks, of bipolar electrodes (BPEs). Because the electrochemical activity of the two poles is directly coupled via for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The top frame of Scheme 1a shows an array of three bipolar electrodes

  19. Growing Businesses Organically on the Social Farm Stephen Smaldone Vivek Pathak Liviu Iftode

    E-print Network

    Iftode, Liviu

    into business ownershipby providing an open portal to broadly advertise and reach consumers in new ways. OnlineGrowing Businesses Organically on the Social Farm Stephen Smaldone Vivek Pathak Liviu Iftode October 21, 2009 Abstract We propose to create and operate businesses on top of online social networks

  20. Microfluidics in structural biology: smaller, faster. . . better Carl Hansen and Stephen R Quake

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Carl L.

    Microfluidics in structural biology: smaller, faster. . . better Carl Hansen and Stephen R QuakeÃ? Microfluidic technologies promise unprecedented savings in cost and time through the integration of complex of this vision a reality, facilitating the first large-scale integration of microfluidic plumbing with biological

  1. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING January 2013 37 Marek K. Jakubowski and Scott Stephens with the Depart-

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Maggi

    of Environmental Engineering, University of California - Merced. Brandon Collins is with the USDA Forest Service. Jakubowski, Qinghua Guo, Brandon Collins, Scott Stephens, and Maggi Kelly conditions, and the effects of past (van Wagtendonk et al., 1998; Miller et al., 2009). In response to this risk, the US Forest Service

  2. Neural network predictions with error bars \\Lambda William D. Penny and Stephen J. Roberts

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    Neural network predictions with error bars \\Lambda William D. Penny and Stephen J. Roberts Neural ABSTRACT When a neural network makes a prediction it will have an error that can be decomposed into the six for estimating each of these components of error in linear and nonlinear neural networks. In the nonlinear case

  3. Neural Networks for Vision and Image Processing eds. Gail A. Carpenter and Stephen Grossberg

    E-print Network

    Földiák, Peter

    Neural Networks for Vision and Image Processing eds. Gail A. Carpenter and Stephen Grossberg MIT.ce-Va.ria,nt Visua.1 At,tention' 16. D. Casasent: `Optics and Neural Nets' 17. R. Hecht-Nielsen: `Neural Networks for the Perception of Sta.tic Form and Moving Form?' 11. S. Grossberg and E. Mignolla,: `Neura.1 Dynamics of Visual

  4. Mantle layering across central South America Kelly H. Liu and Stephen S. Gao

    E-print Network

    Gao, Stephen Shangxing

    and mantle plumes; KEYWORDS: mantle discontinuities, subduction, 410, 660, Nazca Citation: Liu, K. H., S. S that the subducted slab appears to be deflected horizontally by the 660-km discontinuity, and that the oceanic mantleMantle layering across central South America Kelly H. Liu and Stephen S. Gao Department of Geology

  5. Mantle discontinuities beneath Southern Africa Stephen S. Gao,1,2

    E-print Network

    van der Lee, Suzan

    Mantle discontinuities beneath Southern Africa Stephen S. Gao,1,2 Paul G. Silver,3 Kelly H. Liu,1 Experiment. The Moho, 410, and 660 kilometer discontinuities are clearly detected. The mean mantle transition transitions in the mantle. Some discontinuities are ubiquitous, such as the Moho, and the 410 and 660

  6. Dynamic Balance Force Control for Compliant Humanoid Robots Benjamin J. Stephens, Christopher G. Atkeson

    E-print Network

    Atkeson, Christopher G.

    Dynamic Balance Force Control for Compliant Humanoid Robots Benjamin J. Stephens, Christopher G the regulation of forces, requiring compliant mechanisms and controllers that are stable but also safe and robust tasks that is suitable for compliant force- controlled humanoid robots. While humanoid robots are very

  7. Dynamic Balance Force Control for Compliant Humanoid Robots Benjamin J. Stephens, Christopher G. Atkeson

    E-print Network

    Dynamic Balance Force Control for Compliant Humanoid Robots Benjamin J. Stephens, Christopher G, requiring compliant mechanisms and controllers that are stable but also safe and robust to unknown that is suitable for compliant force- controlled humanoid robots. While humanoid robots are very complex systems

  8. Stephen D. Heglund, Ph.D., ARNP University of Central Florida College of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Stephen D. Heglund, Ph.D., ARNP University of Central Florida College of Nursing 12201 Research, Emergency Nursing Research 2004 MSN University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Family Primary Care Clinical of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Indian River community College Nursing Education Nursing Nunrsing Educator

  9. Renormalization group study of a kinetically constrained model for strong glasses Stephen Whitelam,1

    E-print Network

    Garrahan, Juan P.

    derive a dynamic field theory for a kinetically constrained model, based on the Fredrickson-Andersen and time scales, and for space dimension d 2, the behavior of the model is governed by a zeroRenormalization group study of a kinetically constrained model for strong glasses Stephen Whitelam

  10. The software design of the Gemini 8m telescopes Stephen Wampler

    E-print Network

    The software design of the Gemini 8m telescopes Stephen Wampler Gemini 8m Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85726 ABSTRACT The design of the software for the Gemini 8m Telescopes is nearly. Keywords: telescope software design, design processes, Gemini software 1. INTRODUCTION The Gemini 8m

  11. Flame synthesis of aligned tungsten oxide nanowires Fusheng Xu and Stephen D. Tsea

    E-print Network

    Tse, Stephen D.

    Flame synthesis of aligned tungsten oxide nanowires Fusheng Xu and Stephen D. Tsea Department-crystal WO2.9 nanowires are grown directly from tungsten substrates at high rates using a flame synthesis tungsten oxide materials have attracted considerable attention due to their unique properties

  12. Perceptron Training for a Wide-Coverage Lexicalized-Grammar Parser Stephen Clark

    E-print Network

    Koehn, Philipp

    Perceptron Training for a Wide-Coverage Lexicalized-Grammar Parser Stephen Clark Oxford University@it.usyd.edu.au Abstract This paper investigates perceptron training for a wide-coverage CCG parser and com- pares the perceptron with a log-linear model. The CCG parser uses a phrase-structure pars- ing model and dynamic

  13. The role of evolution in the invasion process Stephen J. Novak*

    E-print Network

    Lintilhac, Philip M.

    The role of evolution in the invasion process Stephen J. Novak* Department of Biology, Boise State). The negative conse- quences of invasions include loss of native biological diversity and community struc- ture, that little research has focused on the evolu- tionary aspects of biological invasions and addressed how

  14. Automatic Volume Control for Auditory Stephen Brewster, Andrew Crossan and Murray

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    is common in the music/audio recording industry where recording level is altered in response to the amplitude of the sound being recorded. If the input signal is quiet then the gain is increased so]@dcs.gla.ac.uk Web: www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~stephen 1 Introduction The use of sound output (speech and non-speech sounds

  15. Fuel treatment longevity in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest Scott L. Stephens a,

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Scott L.

    Fuel treatment longevity in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest Scott L. Stephens a, , Brandon M t Understanding the longevity of fuel treatments in terms of their ability to maintain fire behavior and effects, forest structure, and predicted fire behavior changed 7-years after initial treatments. Three dif- ferent

  16. Modelling eruption cycles and decay of mud volcanoes Anna Zoporowski*, Stephen A. Miller

    E-print Network

    Manga, Michael

    Modelling eruption cycles and decay of mud volcanoes Anna Zoporowski*, Stephen A. Miller March 2009 Available online 31 March 2009 Keywords: Mud volcano model Cyclic eruption Conduit processes Viscous flow a b s t r a c t Recent debates about the eruptive behavior of mud volcanoes

  17. A model for turbulent mixing based on shadow-position conditioning Stephen B. Pope

    E-print Network

    ://pof.aip.org/authors #12;PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 110803 (2013) A model for turbulent mixing based on shadow-position conditioning Stephen B. Popea) Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, 254 with idealized non-premixed combustion shows that the SPMM correctly yields stable combustion, whereas simpler

  18. Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1

    E-print Network

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1 and W. R. Peltier1 the configuration of the Arctic Ocean, which was almost entirely enclosed by continents at that time, leads in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08605, doi:10.1029/2008GL033263. 1

  19. Marine biota response to clastic sediment influx: A quantitative approach Stephen W. Lokier a,

    E-print Network

    Ali, Mohammed

    Marine biota response to clastic sediment influx: A quantitative approach Stephen W. Lokier a anthropogenically related) to marine carbonate environments over longer time periods. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction There is a long-standing hypothesis that either constant or punctuated

  20. MEMOCODE 2012 Hardware/Software Codesign Contest: DNA Sequence Aligner Stephen A. Edwards

    E-print Network

    MEMOCODE 2012 Hardware/Software Codesign Contest: DNA Sequence Aligner Stephen A. Edwards@cs.columbia.edu Abstract--The MEMOCODE design contest for 2012 is exact substring matching: a simplified form of the DNA-Wheeler/hash hybrid running on a 12-core Intel system was second. Keywords-DNA sequence alignment; string matching

  1. NEOS: Optimization on the Internet Joseph Czyzyk y Jonathan H. Owen z Stephen J. Wright y

    E-print Network

    Wright, Steve

    NEOS: Optimization on the Internet Joseph Czyzyk y Jonathan H. Owen z Stephen J. Wright y June 30 and Northwestern University launched the NEOS project in late 1994 (NEOS=``Network­Enabled Optimization System to expand our vision for NEOS as the project pro­ gressed. We saw that interactive case studies to demon

  2. The Compleat Teacher-Scholar: An Interview with Stephen F. Davis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskist, William

    2009-01-01

    Stephen F. Davis is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Emporia State University. He served as the 2002-2003 Knapp Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at the University of San Diego. Currently, he is Distinguished Guest Professor at Morningside College and Visiting Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Texas Wesleyan University. Since…

  3. College of Public Health Dean of the College of Public Health is Stephen W.

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    . Scott Prince is Chair, Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health. Richard Kryscio is Chair239C College of Public Health Dean of the College of Public Health is Stephen W. Wyatt. Linda J, Biostatistics. Julia Costich is Chair, Health Services Management. Thomas T. Tucker is Chair, Epidemiology

  4. College of Public Health Dean of the College of Public Health is Stephen W.

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    Medicine and Environmental Health. Richard Kryscio is Chair, Biostatistics. Julia Costich is Chair, Health- tion/disease prevention programs, and in ini- tiatives for improving health care services. The College236 C College of Public Health Dean of the College of Public Health is Stephen W. Wyatt. Linda J

  5. A Combinatorial Noise Model for Quantum Computer Simulation Eric Chi, Stephen A. Lyon, Margaret Martonosi

    E-print Network

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Abstract Quantum computers (QCs) have many potential hardware implementations ranging from solid and have important appli- cations in defeating public-key cryptography. Quantum computing hardware is onlyA Combinatorial Noise Model for Quantum Computer Simulation Eric Chi, Stephen A. Lyon, Margaret

  6. Writing Centers and the Politics of Location: A Response to Terrance Riley and Stephen M. North.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ede, Lisa

    1996-01-01

    Critiques Terrance Riley's "The Uncompromising Future of Writing Centers" and Stephen M. North's "Revisiting 'The Idea of a Writing Center'"--two articles that upset assumptions about writing centers. Suggests that while the vision of these writers may strike some as harsh, readers should turn toward rather than away from the important questions…

  7. A BULK BLOWING SNOW MODEL STEPHEN J. DRY and M. K. YAU

    E-print Network

    Dery, Stephen

    A BULK BLOWING SNOW MODEL STEPHEN J. DÉRY and M. K. YAU Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic model that de- picts a column of sublimating, blowing snow. This bulk model predicts the mixing ratio of suspended snow by solving an equation that considers the diffusion, settling and sublimation of blowing snow

  8. Standards Panel: 1. Stephen Diamond, General Manager, Industry Standards Office and Global Standards Officer, EMC

    E-print Network

    NT 3.1, 4.0, 2000 and Windows 95 and 98 as well as Windows Communication Foundation, among others. HeStandards Panel: 1. Stephen Diamond, General Manager, Industry Standards Office and Global was President of the IEEE Computer Society. Steve is General Manager of the Industry Standards Office at EMC

  9. Interpretive Leadership FOR 573-501, Stephen F. Austin State University

    E-print Network

    Coble, Theresa G.

    St. Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, TX 75962-6109 Office Phone: 936.468.1354 Cell will facilitate student reflection, self-assessment, visioning, planning and skill development related 1.8 GHz or higher Memory 1 GB of RAM Modem Broadband/high-speed recommended Sound /Video Cards

  10. Role-Based Autonomous Multi-Robot Exploration Julian de Hoog, Stephen Cameron

    E-print Network

    Visser, Arnoud

    Role-Based Autonomous Multi-Robot Exploration Julian de Hoog, Stephen Cameron Computing Laboratory of finding a robust exploration strategy for a team of mobile robots that takes into account communication. A robot or team of robots exploring under such conditions must therefore employ an exploration strategy

  11. Porting the GROMACS Molecular Dynamics Code to the Cell Processor Stephen Olivier1

    E-print Network

    Prins, Jan

    Porting the GROMACS Molecular Dynamics Code to the Cell Processor Stephen Olivier1 , Jan Prins1 27709 USA {olivier, prins}@cs.unc.edu {jhderby, kenvu}@us.ibm.com Abstract The Cell processor offers and implementation are tuned to the Cell architec- ture. In this paper, we examine application characteristics which

  12. (Stephen Hawking), Sidney Sheldon "The sands of time"(Warner Books,1989)

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    and Roger Highfield, The Arrow of Time, Whallen,1990; 1995. 2. Stephen Hawking A brief history of time of time"(Warner Books,1989) `" ETA #12;(St. Augustin) ` ' `' (parameter) `' 365 temp->time - #12;`' : (Time is a concept that I understand that I don't understand) 1. Peter Coveney

  13. Contributions of Stephen J. Ball to the Research on Educational and Curriculum Policies in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainardes, Jefferson; Gandin, Luis Armando

    2013-01-01

    This article aims at showcasing the main contributions of Stephen J. Ball to educational research in Brazil, particularly to the study of educational and curriculum policies. We also highlight some of the limitations in the incorporation of Ball's ideas in Brazil as well as some of the challenges that these author's ideas pose to…

  14. Stephen C. Pratt Decentralized control of drone comb construction in honey bee colonies

    E-print Network

    Pratt, Stephen

    Stephen C. Pratt Decentralized control of drone comb construction in honey bee colonies Received with two types of comb distinguished by cell size: large cells for rearing males (drone comb) and small of drone comb in a nest is governed by negative feedback from drone comb already constructed. This feedback

  15. Mixed State Estimation for a Linear Gaussian Markov Model Argyrios Zymnis Stephen Boyd Dimitry Gorinevsky

    E-print Network

    Mixed State Estimation for a Linear Gaussian Markov Model Argyrios Zymnis Stephen Boyd Dimitry states, with the continuous state propagating linearly in the continuous and Boolean state variables, and an additive Gaussian process noise, and where each Boolean state component follows a simple Markov chain

  16. Two-state approximation for aggregate states of clusters R. Stephen Berry

    E-print Network

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Two-state approximation for aggregate states of clusters R. Stephen Berry Department of Chemistry The concepts of the phase and change of state for clusters are analyzed. The connection between a phase or state change and the thermodynamic parameters of a cluster is analyzed within the framework of a two-state

  17. Audio and User Directed Sound Synthesis Marc Cardle, Stephen Brooks, Peter Robinson

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Stephen

    , artists are faced with the daunting task of finding, recording or generating appropriate sound effectsAudio and User Directed Sound Synthesis Marc Cardle, Stephen Brooks, Peter Robinson Computer by the user in the form of large-scale properties of the sound texture. For instance, by specifying where

  18. Tom Glavich, Robert O. Green, Simon J. Hook, Betsy Middleton Francois Rogez, Stephen Ungar

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    Tom Glavich, Robert O. Green, Simon J. Hook, Betsy Middleton Francois Rogez, Stephen Ungar Presented by Robert O. Green February 11-12, 2009 NASA Headquarters #12;Visible ShortWave InfraRed (VSWIR. Green, S. Hook, E. Middleton, S. Ungar 31 member scientists Science oversights, Mission Dev. and Sci

  19. Modification of Lake Michigan Benthic Habitats by Zebra Mussels Primary Investigator: Stephen Lozano -NOAA GLERL

    E-print Network

    Modification of Lake Michigan Benthic Habitats by Zebra Mussels Primary Investigator: Stephen Overview Colonization by dreissenid mussels, Dreissena polymorpha (Zebra) and Dreissena bugensis (Quagga. Preliminary results suggest that zebra mussel populations on the lake bottom reflect sound in a unique way

  20. Program Chairs: Edmund Burke, Graham Kendall, Stephen Smith, and Kay Chen Tan

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Program Chairs: Edmund Burke, Graham Kendall, Stephen Smith, and Kay Chen Tan Technical Program artificial chromosomes for single machine scheduling problems" by Pei-Chann Chang, Shih-Shin Chen, Qiong-Chun Chen, Graham Kendall and Greet Vanden-Berghe 2007 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence

  1. The origin and early radiation of dinosaurs Stephen L. Brusatte a,b,

    E-print Network

    Benton, Michael

    The origin and early radiation of dinosaurs Stephen L. Brusatte a,b, , Sterling J. Nesbitt a online 4 May 2010 Keywords: dinosaurs diversification evolution Jurassic paleontology Triassic Dinosaurs of modern ecosystems. Although the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous has been

  2. Stephen Yue Lorne Trottier Chair in Aerospace Engineering Will Be Focal Point

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Stephen Yue Lorne Trottier Chair in Aerospace Engineering Will Be Focal Point For Aeronautics selected as the inaugural holder of the Lorne Trottier Chair in Aerospace Engineering. Professor Yue has." A Convergence of Talent The Lorne Trottier Chair in Aerospace Engineering is a gift from a generous alumnus

  3. A long state vector Kalman filter for speech enhancement Stephen So and Kuldip K. Paliwal

    E-print Network

    A long state vector Kalman filter for speech enhancement Stephen So and Kuldip K. Paliwal Signal for the enhancement of speech that has been corrupted by white and coloured noise. It has been reported in previ- ous filtering, speech enhancement, analysis- modification-synthesis 1. Introduction In the problem of speech

  4. Implosion hydrodynamics of fast ignition targetsa... R. B. Stephens,1,b

    E-print Network

    Implosion hydrodynamics of fast ignition targetsa... R. B. Stephens,1,b S. P. Hatchett,2 M. Tabak,2 March 2005; published online 2 May 2005 The fast ignition FI concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current base line FI target

  5. Tripping with Stephen Gaskin: An Exploration of a Hippy Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Gabriel Patrick

    2012-01-01

    For the last 40 years, Stephen Gaskin has been an adult educator on the fringe, working with tens of thousands of adults in the counterculture movement in pursuit of social change regarding marijuana legalization, women's rights, environmental justice issues and beyond. Gaskin has written 11 books about his experiences teaching and learning…

  6. The Cambridge Millites and the Early Economic Writings of Leslie Stephen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory C G Moore

    2006-01-01

    Leslie Stephen is now chiefly remembered as the founder of the Cambridge school of literary criticism; a champion of agnosticism during a period in which such beliefs drew condemnation; a pioneer of the art of mountaineering and the author of numerous mountaineering classics; the first editor of one of the great literary projects of the Victorian age, the Dictionary of

  7. The Design and Evaluation of a Sonically-Enhanced Tool Palette STEPHEN A. BREWSTER

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    The Design and Evaluation of a Sonically-Enhanced Tool Palette STEPHEN A. BREWSTER CATHERINE V to the default tool) or double-click for it to remain permanently selected. This method has the advantage ________________________________________________________________________ This paper describes an experiment to investigate the effectiveness of adding sound to tool palettes

  8. Design and Strategy in Organic Synthesis by Stephen Hanessian, Simon Giroux, and Bradley L.

    E-print Network

    Heller, Eric

    Design and Strategy in Organic Synthesis by Stephen Hanessian, Simon Giroux, and Bradley L. Merner at the molecular level to catalytic reactor design and includes several case studies illustrating the importance in detail. Protein-Protein Interactions in Drug Discovery edited by Alexander Dömling QP551.5.P758 2013

  9. Dellaporta DNA Extraction Citation: Stephen L. Dellaporta,Jonathan Wood , James B. Hicks. A plant DNA

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    1 Dellaporta DNA Extraction Citation: Stephen L. Dellaporta,Jonathan Wood , James B. Hicks. A plant DNA minipreparation: Version II. Plant Molecular Biology Reporter, 1983, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 19 supernatant and lightly dry DNA pellets by inverting the tubes on paper towels for 10 min. #12;4 12

  10. PHOTOMETRIC ACCURACY OF DECONVOLVED SIMULATED ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES Stephen R. McNeil

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    PHOTOMETRIC ACCURACY OF DECONVOLVED SIMULATED ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES Stephen R. McNeil Department ABSTRACT A study of the photometric accuracy of deconvolved astronomical images was undertaken by processing two simulated images with several well-known algorithms. The simulations consisted of an image

  11. Intrusion Activity Projection for Cyber Situational Shanchieh J. Yang1, Stephen Byers1,

    E-print Network

    Jay Yang, Shanchieh

    Intrusion Activity Projection for Cyber Situational Awareness Shanchieh J. Yang1, Stephen Byers1 in ensuring continuous and critical cyber operations. I. INTRODUCTION The pervasion of computer networks has amplified the importance of cyber security ranging from personal life to homeland security. Information

  12. Robust Cell Nuclei Segmentation Using Statistical Modelling Theodoros Mouroutis Stephen J. Roberts Anil A. Bharath

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    Robust Cell Nuclei Segmentation Using Statistical Modelling Theodoros Mouroutis Stephen J. Roberts segmenta­ tion method for the isolation of cell nuclei in such images. In the first stage the Compact Hough the nuclei of the cells contained in the image for further analysis. The nucleus is a very important

  13. AAAS 2012 Annual Meeting--Opening Ceremony Professor Stephen J. Toope, Co-Chair

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    significance of Columbus's discovery was that on a round earth, humanity is more interconnected than on a flat Ceremony Professor Stephen J. Toope, Co-Chair Page 2 of 8 Sciences and Humanities Research Council one. On a round earth, the two most distant points are closer than they are on a flat earth

  14. Gaze Step Distributions Reflect Fixations and Saccades: A Comment on Stephen and Mirman (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogartz, Richard S.; Staub, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In three experimental tasks Stephen and Mirman (2010) measured gaze steps, the distance in pixels between gaze positions on successive samples from an eyetracker. They argued that the distribution of gaze steps is best fit by the lognormal distribution, and based on this analysis they concluded that interactive cognitive processes underlie eye…

  15. Multi-product pricing for electric Shmuel S. Oren, Stephen A. Smith and Robert B. Wilson

    E-print Network

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    distinguish- ing characteristics are the conditions of delivery of the electric power service. Common productMulti-product pricing for electric power Shmuel S. Oren, Stephen A. Smith and Robert B. Wilson by a single supplier. Each product has a fixed marginal rate per unit, the demand for each product depends

  16. Global climate change and the scientific consensus Stephen Mulkey, PhD

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    1 Global climate change and the scientific consensus Stephen Mulkey, PhD Director of Research scientists. As scientists, our job is to present the data on climate change and to propose plausible recreate the Earth's climate in a laboratory bottle and change its composition to see what happens. Instead

  17. Stephen Schneider and the "Double Ethical Bind" of Climate Change Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russill, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Stephen Schneider's perspective on climate change communication is distinguished by its longevity, a keen anticipation of research findings, historical understanding, and grounding in first-person experience. In this article, the author elaborates Schneider's work in terms of its key claims, suggestive research directions, and lessons for…

  18. A Prism-based System for Multispectral Video Acquisition Stephen Lin

    E-print Network

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    A Prism-based System for Multispectral Video Acquisition Hao Du Xin Tong Xun Cao§ Stephen Lin In this paper, we propose a prism-based system for cap- turing multispectral videos. The system consists of a tri- angular prism, a monochrome camera, and an occlusion mask. Incoming light beams from the scene

  19. Featured Speaker: Dr. Stephen Wilson, Professor and Director of the Division of

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    will be tailored to the Pediatric Dentist. Four hours of CE will be given for the Infection Control course for NV pediatric dentists 9:00 am ­ Noon Sedation for the Pediatric Dentist presented by Dr. Stephen Dentist Accommodations: The beautiful Mediterranean-themed Suncoast Hotel & Casino, with its warm desert

  20. Wind Turbine Pitch Optimization Benjamin Biegel Morten Juelsgaard Matt Kraning Stephen Boyd Jakob Stoustrup

    E-print Network

    Wind Turbine Pitch Optimization Benjamin Biegel Morten Juelsgaard Matt Kraning Stephen Boyd Jakob Stoustrup Abstract-- We consider a static wind model for a three-bladed, horizontal-axis, pitch generate power but also create structural fatigue. We address the problem of find- ing blade pitch profiles

  1. TESSA, a system to aid communication with deaf people Stephen Cox, Michael

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    TESSA, a system to aid communication with deaf people Stephen Cox, Michael Lincoln and Judy Royal National Institute for Deaf People, 19­23 Featherstone Street, London EC1Y 8SL U.K. Mark Wells.K. ABSTRACT TESSA is an experimental system that aims to aid transactions between a deaf person and a clerk

  2. An interview with James T. Stephens and F. Dixon Brooke, Jr., EBSCO Industries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carol Pitts Diedrichs

    1998-01-01

    This interview was conducted at the EBSCO Industries offices in Birmingham, AL, on October 6, 1997. James T. Stephens, President and Chief Executive Officer, EBSCO Industries, and F. Dixon Brooke, Jr., Vice President and Division General Manager, EBSCO Subscription Services, candidly comment on issues such as the current state of the serials industry, electronic journals, customer service, and consortial licensing.

  3. Impacts of insect herbivores on rare plant populations Justin Ancheta, Stephen B. Heard

    E-print Network

    Heard, Stephen B.

    Review Impacts of insect herbivores on rare plant populations Justin Ancheta, Stephen B. Heard June 2011 Available online 20 July 2011 Keywords: Herbivory Insects Population size Vital rates Density-dependence Specialization a b s t r a c t Population-level impacts of insect herbivory on rare and endangered plants

  4. Portable Gage for Pressure Ulcer Detection Qi Wang, Linghua Kong, Stephen Sprigle and Vincent Hayward

    E-print Network

    Hayward, Vincent

    Portable Gage for Pressure Ulcer Detection Qi Wang, Linghua Kong, Stephen Sprigle and Vincent Hayward Abstract-- Pressure ulcers are widely considered to be a critical problem in rehabilitation since they result in severe discomfort and high healthcare cost. The prevention of pressure ulcers is a constant

  5. A Citizen's Guides to Democracy Inaction: Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's Comic Rhetorical Criticism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Don J. Waisanen

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the discourse of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, two of the most prominent political comedians in America. Kenneth Burke's theories of perspective by incongruity and the comic frame provide a general structure for surveying Stewart and Colbert's comic strategies on their nightly television shows, and their roles across various media events. Stewart and Colbert use three rhetorical

  6. Automated Landscape Painting in the Style of Bob Ross Alex Kalaidjian Craig S. Kaplan Stephen Mann

    E-print Network

    Waterloo, University of

    Automated Landscape Painting in the Style of Bob Ross Alex Kalaidjian · Craig S. Kaplan · Stephen is a notable exception. He left behind a complete and explicit record, in print and on video. His paintings cut Ross's painting technique down to the stroke level. It can gener- ate infinite variations of his

  7. FOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-print Network

    (energy penalty). Consequently, until alternative energy sources are developed or a practical meansFOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz For presentation of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide differs

  8. STEPHEN CRANE'S "THE O'RUDDY"--A PROBLEM IN AUTHORSHIP DISCRIMINATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'DONNELL, BERNARD

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANALYSIS WAS TO DISCOVER CERTAIN ASPECTS OF STYLE (BOTH LEXICAL AND GRAMMATICAL) WHICH COULD BE COUNTED AND WHICH WOULD, WHEN COMPARED, DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN THE WRITTEN PROSE OF TWO AUTHORS. THE SUBJECT SELECTED FOR ANALYSIS WAS "THE O'RUDDY," BEGUN BY STEPHEN CRANE AND COMPLETED BY ROBERT BARR. SINCE THERE WAS NO RECORD OF…

  9. Controlled, Scalable Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Culture STEPHEN M. DANG,a

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Controlled, Scalable Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Culture STEPHEN M. DANG,a SHARON GERECHT · Embryonic stem cells · Embryoid body · Scalable ABSTRACT Embryonic stem (ES) cells are of significantMed Press 1066-5099/2004/$12.00/0 INTRODUCTION Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells capable

  10. HOWARD W. BRAHAM, FLOYD E. DURHAM, GORDON H. JARRELL, and STEPHEN LEATHERWOOD

    E-print Network

    . On 3 May 1978, a bowhead whale taken at Barrow, Alaska, was identified by some Eskimos as an in- gutuk. The taking of this whale ex- ceeded by one the three-whale quota establ ished for Barrow by agreement between. Stephen Leatherwood is with the Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute, 1700 South Shores Road, San Diego, CA

  11. Fan-out: Measuring Human Control of Multiple Robots Dan R. Olsen Jr., Stephen Bart Wood

    E-print Network

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    Fan-out: Measuring Human Control of Multiple Robots Dan R. Olsen Jr., Stephen Bart Wood Brigham be operated is called the fan-out of a human-robot team. Robots that have high neglect tolerance and lower interaction time will achieve higher fan-out. We define an equation that relates fan-out to a robot's activity

  12. Friction in Mid-latitude Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown

    E-print Network

    Plant, Robert

    Friction in Mid-latitude Cyclones Ian Boutle Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown #12;Motivation · Many studies have shown the significance of friction in formation and dissipation of cyclones Dt = + � . F . Diabatic Term: · Surface heat fluxes · Latent heat fluxes Frictional Term

  13. Modeling of hydrophilic wafer bonding by molecular dynamics simulations David A. Litton and Stephen H. Garofalinia)

    E-print Network

    Garofalini, Stephen H.

    of glues or high pressures1­5 and an excellent review of wafer bonding is available.6 InterfacesModeling of hydrophilic wafer bonding by molecular dynamics simulations David A. Litton and Stephen for publication 31 December 2000 The role of moisture in hydrophilic wafer bonding was modeled using molecular

  14. Congruent population structure inferred from dispersal behaviour and intensive genetic surveys of the threatened Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma c??rulescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coulon, A.; Fitzpatrick, J.W.; Bowman, R.; Stith, B.M.; Makarewich, C.A.; Stenzler, L.M.; Lovette, I.J.

    2008-01-01

    The delimitation of populations, defined as groups of individuals linked by gene flow, is possible by the analysis of genetic markers and also by spatial models based on dispersal probabilities across a landscape. We combined these two complimentary methods to define the spatial pattern of genetic structure among remaining populations of the threatened Florida scrub-jay, a species for which dispersal ability is unusually well-characterized. The range-wide population was intensively censused in the 1990s, and a metapopulation model defined population boundaries based on predicted dispersal-mediated demographic connectivity. We subjected genotypes from more than 1000 individual jays screened at 20 microsatellite loci to two Bayesian clustering methods. We describe a consensus method for identifying common features across many replicated clustering runs. Ten genetically differentiated groups exist across the present-day range of the Florida scrub-jay. These groups are largely consistent with the dispersal-defined metapopulations, which assume very limited dispersal ability. Some genetic groups comprise more than one metapopulation, likely because these genetically similar metapopulations were sundered only recently by habitat alteration. The combined reconstructions of population structure based on genetics and dispersal-mediated demographic connectivity provide a robust depiction of the current genetic and demographic organization of this species, reflecting past and present levels of dispersal among occupied habitat patches. The differentiation of populations into 10 genetic groups adds urgency to management efforts aimed at preserving what remains of genetic variation in this dwindling species, by maintaining viable populations of all genetically differentiated and geographically isolated populations. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  15. HMGB in Mollusk Crassostrea ariakensis Gould: Structure, Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Function Characterization and Anti-Infection Role of Its Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Ye, Shigen; Luo, Ming; Zhu, Zewen; Wu, Xinzhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Crassostrea ariakensis Gould is a representative bivalve species and an economically important oyster in China, but suffers severe mortalities in recent years that are caused by rickettsia-like organism (RLO). Prevention and control of this disease is a priority for the development of oyster aquaculture. It has been proven that mammalian HMGB (high mobility group box) can be released extracellularly and acts as an important pro-inflammatory cytokine and late mediator of inflammatory reactions. In vertebrates, HMGB’s antibody (anti-HMGB) has been shown to confer significant protection against certain local and systemic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated the functions of Ca-HMGB (oyster HMGB) and anti-CaHMGB (Ca-HMGB’s antibody) in oyster RLO/LPS (RLO or LPS)-induced disease or inflammation. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequencing analysis revealed Ca-HMGB shares conserved structures with mammalians. Tissue-specific expression indicates that Ca-HMGB has higher relative expression in hemocytes. Significant continuous up-regulation of Ca-HMGB was detected when the hemocytes were stimulated with RLO/LPS. Recombinant Ca-HMGB protein significantly up-regulated the expression levels of some cytokines. Indirect immunofluorescence study revealed that Ca-HMGB localized both in the hemocyte nucleus and cytoplasm before RLO challenge, but mainly in the cytoplasm 12 h after challenge. Western blot analysis demonstrated Ca-HMGB was released extracellularly 4–12 h after RLO challenge. Anti-CaHMGB was added to the RLO/LPS-challenged hemocyte monolayer and real-time RT-PCR showed that administration of anti-CaHMGB dramatically reduced the rate of RLO/LPS-induced up-regulation of LITAF at 4–12 h after treatment. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that administration of anti-CaHMGB reduced RLO/LPS-induced hemocyte apoptosis and necrosis rates. Conclusions/Significance Ca-HMGB can be released extracellularly and its subcellular localization varies when stimulated with RLO. Ca-HMGB is involved in oyster immune reactions and functions as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Anti-CaHMGB can significantly suppress RLO/LPS-induced inflammatory responses and hemocyte necrosis and apoptosis, suggesting that Ca-HMGB is a potential target to prevent and control RLO/LPS-induced disease or inflammation. PMID:23209826

  16. The Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas to the AvalonThe Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas to the Avalon Dr. Stephen Bruneau, P.EngDr. Stephen Bruneau, P.Eng

    E-print Network

    Bruneau, Steve

    The Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas to the AvalonThe Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas October 26October 26thth 20052005 #12;The Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas to the AvalonThe Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas to the Avalon Dr. Stephen Bruneau, P.EngDr. Stephen Bruneau, P.Eng PRESENTATION

  17. PVM on Windows and NT Clusters Stephen L. Scott 1,+ , Markus Fischer 2 , and Al Geist 1

    E-print Network

    Scott, Stephen L.

    PVM on Windows and NT Clusters Stephen L. Scott 1,+ , Markus Fischer 2 , and Al Geist 1 1 Oak Ridge Ridge, TN 37831. scottsl1@ornl.gov, geist@msr.epm.ornl.gov 2 Paderborn Center for Parallel Computing

  18. UXO DISCRIMINATION USING TIME DOMAIN ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION Leonard R. Pasion, Stephen D. Billings, and Douglas W. Oldenburg

    E-print Network

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UXO DISCRIMINATION USING TIME DOMAIN ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION Leonard R. Pasion, Stephen D with a variety of geophysical sensing techniques. Time domain electromagnetic induction (TEM) surveys have been adequately reproduce the measured electromagnetic anomaly with minimal computational effort. The validity

  19. A first-generation microsatellite-based genetic linkage map of the Siberian jay (Perisoreus infaustus): insights into avian genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jaari, Sonja; Li, Meng-Hua; Merilä, Juha

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic resources for the majority of free-living vertebrates of ecological and evolutionary importance are scarce. Therefore, linkage maps with high-density genome coverage are needed for progress in genomics of wild species. The Siberian jay (Perisoreus infaustus; Corvidae) is a passerine bird which has been subject to lots of research in the areas of ecology and evolutionary biology. Knowledge of its genome structure and organization is required to advance our understanding of the genetic basis of ecologically important traits in this species, as well as to provide insights into avian genome evolution. Results We describe the first genetic linkage map of Siberian jay constructed using 117 microsatellites and a mapping pedigree of 349 animals representing five families from a natural population breeding in western Finland from the years 1975 to 2006. Markers were resolved into nine autosomal and a Z-chromosome-specific linkage group, 10 markers remaining unlinked. The best-position map with the most likely positions of all significantly linked loci had a total sex-average size of 862.8 cM, with an average interval distance of 9.69 cM. The female map covered 988.4 cM, whereas the male map covered only 774 cM. The Z-chromosome linkage group comprised six markers, three pseudoautosomal and three sex-specific loci, and spanned 10.6 cM in females and 48.9 cM in males. Eighty-one of the mapped loci could be ordered on a framework map with odds of >1000:1 covering a total size of 809.6 cM in females and 694.2 cM in males. Significant sex specific distortions towards reduced male recombination rates were revealed in the entire best-position map as well as within two autosomal linkage groups. Comparative mapping between Siberian jay and chicken anchored 22 homologous loci on 6 different linkage groups corresponding to chicken chromosomes Gga1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and Z. Quite a few cases of intra-chromosomal rearrangements within the autosomes and three cases of inter-chromosomal rearrangement between the Siberian jay autosomal linkage groups (LG1, LG2 and LG3) and the chicken sex chromosome GgaZ were observed, suggesting a conserved synteny, but changes in marker order, within autosomes during about 100 million years of avian evolution. Conclusion The constructed linkage map represents a valuable resource for intraspecific genomics of Siberian jay, as well as for avian comparative genomic studies. Apart from providing novel insights into sex-specific recombination rates and patterns, the described maps – from a previously genomically uncharacterized superfamily (Corvidae) of passerine birds – provide new insights into avian genome evolution. In combination with high-resolution data on quantitative trait variability from the study population, they also provide a foundation for QTL-mapping studies. PMID:19121221

  20. Interdecadal variation in seawater d13C and d18O recorded in fish otoliths Ryan W. Schloesser,a Jay R. Rooker,a,* Patrick Louchuoarn,b John D. Neilson,c and David H. Secord

    E-print Network

    Louchouarn, Patrick

    Interdecadal variation in seawater d13C and d18O recorded in fish otoliths Ryan W. Schloesser,a Jay R. Rooker,a,* Patrick Louchuoarn,b John D. Neilson,c and David H. Secord a Department of Marine water masses (Kerr et al. 2007; Rooker et al. 2008). Given the potential usefulness of otolith d13C

  1. Paleontology at the "high table"? Popularization and disciplinary status in recent paleontology.

    PubMed

    Sepkoski, David

    2014-03-01

    This paper examines the way in which paleontologists used "popular books" to call for a broader "expanded synthesis" of evolutionary biology. Beginning in the 1970s, a group of influential paleontologists, including Stephen Jay Gould, Niles Eldredge, David Raup, Steven Stanley, and others, aggressively promoted a new theoretical, evolutionary approach to the fossil record as an important revision of the existing synthetic view of Darwinism. This work had a transformative effect within the discipline of paleontology. However, by the 1980s, paleontologists began making their case to a wider audience, both within evolutionary biology, and to the general public. Many of their books-for example, Eldredge's provocatively-titled Unfinished Synthesis-explicitly argued that the received synthetic view of Darwinian evolution was incomplete, and that paleontological contributions such as punctuated equilibria, the hierarchical model of macroevolution, and the study of mass extinction dynamics offered a substantial corrective to evolutionary theory. This paper argues that books-far from being "mere popularizations" of scientific ideas-played an important role in disciplinary debates surrounding evolutionary theory during the 1980s, and in particular that paleontologists like Gould and Eldredge self-consciously adopted the book format because of the importance of that genre in the history of evolutionary biology. PMID:24346060

  2. Mediatized public crisis and civil society renewal: The racist murder of Stephen Lawrence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Cottle

    2005-01-01

    There have been many racist murders in Britain both before and since the killing of Stephen Lawrence, an 18-year-old black student, in April 1993. This particular murder, exceptionally, prompted widespread re-examination of questions of (in)justice, cultural identity and continuing racism in British society and it eventually initiated processes of institutional reflexivity including government policies targeting institutionalized racism within Britain’s most

  3. Perceptron Training for a WideCoverage LexicalizedGrammar Parser Stephen Clark

    E-print Network

    Curran, James R.

    Perceptron Training for a Wide­Coverage Lexicalized­Grammar Parser Stephen Clark Oxford University@it.usyd.edu.au Abstract This paper investigates perceptron training for a wide­coverage CCG parser and com­ pares the perceptron with a log­linear model. The CCG parser uses a phrase­structure pars­ ing model and dynamic

  4. Book review of: "Clinical aspects of electroporation" by Stephen T Kee, Julie Gehl, Edward W Lee

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review of the book: Clinical aspects of electroporation, by Stephen T. Kee, Julie Gehl, Edward W Lee, which is published by Springer Press. Basic information that should be helpful in deciding whether to read the book and whether to use it as a reference book is presented. This includes an introduction, a description of all the sections of the book, and a comparison with recently published books on the topic.

  5. Virginia Woolf and Leslie Stephen: a father's contribution to psychosis and genius.

    PubMed

    Bond, A H

    1986-10-01

    Leslie Stephen, the father of Virginia Woolf, was a cacophony of contradictions. From all accounts, he was a bully, a manipulator, and a blustering, pessimistic, emotionally dishonest man. Although he could be lovable, charming, whimsical, encouraging, and deeply devoted to his family, he subjugated the adult women in his household and at least one son to exploitation and abuse, demanding (and receiving from his wife and step-daughter) almost total abnegation of self. Julia Stephen, in contrast, was an optimistic, seemingly selfless person, who characteristically presented herself in an "up" mood to the world. Virginia incorporated both parental moods into her character structure, as have a number of the author's cyclothymic patients. Therefore, it is postulated that pessimism and habitual deflating affronts on the part of one parent, in combination with a compulsive "good mood" on the part of the second parent, are a particularly lethal combination of character traits, which in their offspring may contribute to the rapid mood shifting characteristic of manic depression. In contrast to Julie, Stephen was a presence who could not be side-stepped. This combination of sweet and monstrous attributes in her father's nature, and again in the contrasting temperaments of the parental couple, must have been impossible to integrate for the small Virginia, who already was desperately engaged in the struggle for selfhood. She could not complete her development on the oedipal level, although she loved her father dearly, because identification with her mother meant further threat to an identity already weakened at the separation-individuation phase of development. Virginia's solution was to identify with her father in his character, his sexual identity, and his profession. Stephen, who was particularly devoted to Virginia, whom he regarded as an extension of himself, encouraged this identification, and served as her teacher and mentor. In that sense, he truly was the captain of the ship in her voyage To the Lighthouse, master of the currents that swept her onward to the grand light of her genius. A four-fold comparison of Virginia Woolf and Leslie Stephen is made concerning their respective ages of weaning, success in navigating both the rapproachment phase of separation-individuation and the oedipal period, and the ages at which their mothers died. It appears that Virginia lost her mother at those four critical periods when Leslie did not.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3771329

  6. Oxidative cost of reproduction is sex specific and correlated with reproductive effort in a cooperatively breeding bird, the Florida scrub jay.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Rebecca S; Schoech, Stephan J

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction is energetically demanding, and how much an individual is able to invest in reproduction is often a function of its health state. An understanding of the relationship between oxidative balance and reproductive decisions, especially in free-living species, is still very limited. We evaluated the relationship between oxidative health and reproductive effort in a free-living population of the cooperatively breeding Florida scrub jay Aphelocoma coerulescens. Specifically, we assessed whether prebreeding oxidative damage levels predicted reproductive effort and subsequently whether postbreeding oxidative damage levels reflected reproductive effort. Prebreeding oxidative damage levels were negatively correlated with reproductive effort in males. In males, postbreeding levels of oxidative damage were significantly greater than prebreeding levels. Given that females exhibited no such patterns, our results suggest that in this species, males bear the brunt of the oxidative costs associated with reproduction. PMID:22902378

  7. Bluefield Blue Jays Internships

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    for an individual to manage the concessions for the 2013 baseball season. · Inventory of concession items · Kitchen and maintain vendor relationships · other duties as assigned by the General Manager JOB REQUIREMENTS the opportunity to work in many aspects such as and not limited to: ·Managing/ With the Stadium's concessions

  8. Curriculum Vit LAURENTOLIVIER JAY

    E-print Network

    Jay, Laurent O.

    of Applied Mathematics, Uni­ versity of Zaragoza, Spain. . Visiting Professor, July 2001 and January 2002 Environmental Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City. . Research and Teaching Assistant, October 1989­September in Mathematics in high schools, intermit­ tently during the period 1988­1994, Geneva, Switzerland. . Teaching

  9. Living with Kin in Lowland Horticultural Societies Author(s): Robert S. Walker, Stephen Beckerman, Mark V. Flinn, Michael Gurven, Chris R.

    E-print Network

    Gurven, Michael

    Living with Kin in Lowland Horticultural Societies Author(s): Robert S. Walker, Stephen Beckerman with Kin in Lowland Horticultural Societies Robert S. Walker, Stephen Beckerman, Mark V. Flinn, Michael-gatherer cultures has led to their characterization as primarily multilocal. Horticulturalists are associated

  10. Simulation of ultrathin lubricant films spreading over various carbon Stephen J. Vinay, David M. Phillips, Young Sil Lee, Charles M. Schroeder, Xiaoding Ma et al.

    E-print Network

    Schroeder, Charles

    Simulation of ultrathin lubricant films spreading over various carbon surfaces Stephen J. Vinay://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Simulation of ultrathin lubricant films spreading over various carbon surfaces Stephen J. Vinay surface composition and lubricant endgroup functionality, is described. Theoretical development based

  11. Geologic map of the Stephens City quadrangle, Clark, Frederick, and Warren Counties, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weary, D.J.; Orndorff, R.C.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Stephens City 1:24,000-scale quadrangle is one of several quadrangles in Frederick County, Virginia being mapped by geologists from the U.S. Geological Survey in Reston, VA with funding from the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program. This work is part of a project being lead by the U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Discipline, Virginia District, to investigate the geologic framework and groundwater resources of Frederick County as well as other areas in the northern Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and West Virginia.

  12. The genus Alphitobius Stephens (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Alphitobiini) in Africa and adjacent islands

    PubMed Central

    Schawaller, Wolfgang; Grimm, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Abstract All species of the genus Alphitobius Stephens, 1829 (Alphitobiini Reitter, 1917, subfamily Tenebrioninae Latreille, 1802) from Africa and adjacent islands are revised. New species: Alphitobius capitaneus sp. n. from Kenya. New synonyms: Cryptops ulomoides Solier, 1851, syn. n. of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1796); Alphitobius rufus Ardoin, 1976, syn. n. of Alphitobius hobohmi Koch, 1953); Peltoides (Micropeltoides) crypticoides Pic, 1916, syn. n. of Peltoides (Micropeltoides) opacus (Gerstaecker, 1871), comb. n. Homonym: Alphitobius ulomoides Koch, 1953 = Alphitobius arnoldi nom. n. New combinations from Alphitobius: Ulomoides basilewskyi (Ardoin, 1969), comb. n.; Peltoides (Micropeltoides) opacus (Gerstaecker, 1871), comb. n. Figures of all examined species are added and a species key is compiled. PMID:25009427

  13. Stephen Hawking Physics Colloquium Lectures (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Hawking

    These lectures by Stephen Hawking are divided into physics colloquium lectures (where at least undergraduate knowledge of physics is assumed), and public lectures. The public lectures include: The Beginning of Time, The Nature of Space and Time, Space and Time Warps, Does God Play Dice, and Life in the Universe. The physics colloquium lectures include: Inflation: An Open and Shut Case; Gravitational Entropy; Quantum Cosmology, M-theory and the Anthropic Principle; Rotation, Nut Charge, and Anti de Sitter Space; Stability of AdS and Phase Transitions; and The Future of Quantum Cosmology.

  14. A review of "The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon’s Thought." by Stephen A. McKnight

    E-print Network

    Matthews, Steven

    2006-01-01

    of major literary works in the period. As a result, I am certain it will come to shape our understanding of the complex relations between Reformation moral theory and soteriology. Stephen A. McKnight. The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon?s Thought.... Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2006. xi + 193 pp + 2 illus. $37.50. Review by STEVEN MATTHEWS, THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, DULUTH. The title of Stephen McKnight?s most recent book, The Religious Founda- tions of Francis Bacon?s Thought, may...

  15. Tree-ring responses to the 1978 earthquake at Stephens Pass, northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Paul R.; White, Lester O.

    1995-02-01

    The 1978 earthquake at Stephens Pass, northeastern California, dropped a series of grabens that average 4.5 m in width, extend up to 1 m in depth, and are found intermittently along a 2-km-long rupture zone. The formation of this graben series killed or otherwise affected many trees growing in or immediately adjacent to the rupture zone. Nine trees responded to the 1978 earthquake with anomalously narrow ring widths, beginning in 1979 and continuing for several years. One tree responded with anomalously wide latewood relative to total ring width. This example of tree-ring responses to a normal-fault earthquake complements other cases of tree-growth responses to earthquakes of thrust and strike-slip tectonic settings. The 1978 earthquake at Stephens Pass was unique in that it caused tree-ring responses even though it was only moderate (magnitude 4.6). This study serves as a specific calibration example for dendrochronologically studying prehistoric earthquakes, as well as eruptions, at the nearby Medicine Lake Highlands. Medicine Lake has been seismically and volcanically active during the past 1000 yr, and it supports a forest of several coniferous tree species that can be used for dendrochronologically studying geomorphological processes.

  16. Estuarine foraminiferal biofacies pattern compared to the brackish ichnofacies model: Port Stephens, southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder-Adams, Claudia J.; Boyd, Ron L.; Tran, Tanya

    2014-02-01

    Port Stephens, located in SE Australia, is a shallow estuary with an outer and inner basin separated by a narrow channel. Foraminiferal biofacies distribution reveals this complex physical environment. The flood-tide delta forms a transition between the wave-dominated open coast and the microtide-dominated estuary. Sand wave dynamics cause a shifting substrate, resulting in allochthonous assemblages of calcareous shelf species transported into the bay through a wide entrance. The muddy central basin is heavily bioturbated, and allows for an in-situ, mixed calcareous and agglutinated assemblage of a progressively more estuarine character. Burial of organic matter and increased bioturbation permits infaunal species to increase in abundance, but promotes calcium carbonate dissolution. The bayhead delta of the Karuah River is characterized by lithic-rich substrates that are associated with robust calcareous species. Tidal cycles, combined with low river-flux, provide nearly fully marine conditions far upstream into the Karuah River. Marginal regions, from sandy/muddy tidal flats to marsh, show distinct assemblages of opportunistic species that respond to tidal exposure, substrate variations, organic matter flux and salinities. Early diagenetic taphonomic loss, closely linked with bioturbation, needs to be considered in interpretations of microfossil assemblages. Foraminiferal biofacies analysis, in combination with the brackish-water ichnology model, is a powerful tool for recognizing Mesozoic marginal marine environments. Port Stephens, with its environmental complexity, offers a valuable modern analogue for estuarine deposits of the geological past.

  17. Branching Programs for Tree Evaluation Mark Braverman 1 , Stephen Cook 2 , Pierre McKenzie 3 , Rahul Santhanam 4 , and

    E-print Network

    Cook, Stephen A.

    Branching Programs for Tree Evaluation Mark Braverman 1 , Stephen Cook 2 , Pierre McKenzie 3 introduce a ``state sequence'' method that can match the size lower bounds on FT h d (k) obtained by the Neâ??ciporuk method and can yield slightly better (yet still subquadratic) bounds for some nonboolean functions. Both

  18. The Importance of Critical Reflection in College Teaching: Two Reviews of Stephen Brookfield's Book, Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Rosalyn M.; Hibbison, Eric P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Stephen Brookfield's book, Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher. Presents three categories of assumptions he believes teachers must make about their teaching: paradigmatic, prescriptive, and causal. States that Brookfield encourages engaging in critical conversation with peers in order to improve teaching methods. Provides strategies…

  19. Tumor Targeting by Surface-Modified Protein Microspheres Farah Jean-Jacques Toublan, Stephen Boppart, and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Tumor Targeting by Surface-Modified Protein Microspheres Farah Jean-Jacques Toublan, Stephen Received July 5, 2005; E-mail: ksuslick@uiuc.edu Core-shell protein microspheres are micron-sized, highly ultrasonic emulsification, particularly of serum albumin.1,2 Such microspheres have been used in multiple

  20. Yield Estimation in Vineyards by Visual Grape Detection Stephen Nuske, Supreeth Achar, Terry Bates, Srinivasa Narasimhan and Sanjiv Singh.

    E-print Network

    Treuille, Adrien

    Yield Estimation in Vineyards by Visual Grape Detection Stephen Nuske, Supreeth Achar, Terry Bates. We present an automated method that uses computer vision to identify and count grape berries meters) of two different grape varieties. We calibrate our berry count to yield and find that we can