Sample records for stevens-johnson syndrome complicating

  1. Phenytoin induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome exacerbated by cefepime

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Varsha A.; Doddapaneni, Sahiti; Thunga, Girish; Thiyagu, Rajakannan; Prabhu, M. Mukyaprana; Naha, Kushal

    2013-01-01

    Steven Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare drug induced mucocutaneous reaction. Here, we present an elaborate report of a 28-year-old female patient who developed Phenytoin induced SJS, which was exacerbated by cefepime. PMID:24250210

  2. Phenytoin induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome exacerbated by cefepime.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Varsha A; Doddapaneni, Sahiti; Thunga, Girish; Thiyagu, Rajakannan; Prabhu, M Mukyaprana; Naha, Kushal

    2013-10-01

    Steven Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare drug induced mucocutaneous reaction. Here, we present an elaborate report of a 28-year-old female patient who developed Phenytoin induced SJS, which was exacerbated by cefepime. PMID:24250210

  3. Medical genetics: A marker for Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Hung Chung; Shuen-Iu Hung; Hong-Shang Hong; Mo-Song Hsih; Li-Cheng Yang; Hsin-Chun Ho; Jer-Yuarn Wu; Yuan-Tsong Chen

    2004-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and the related disease toxic epidermal necrolysis are life-threatening reactions of the skin to particular types of medication. Here we show that there is a strong association in Han Chinese between a genetic marker, the human leukocyte antigen HLA-B*1502, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome induced by carbamazepine, a drug commonly prescribed for the treatment of seizures. It should be possible

  4. Syndrome de Stevens-Johnson à la griséofulvine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Disky; K. Zouhair; K. Khadir; H. Benchikhi

    2007-01-01

    Griseofulvin is an antifungal drug used for the treatment of dermatophytosis, especially tinea capitis in children. Griseofulvin is usually well tolerated but adverse events, including severe reactions, have been reported in patients treated with this drug. We report a case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a child treated with griseofulvin for tinea capitis. Moderate fever, purpuric lesions of the extremities, target

  5. The severe complication of Stevens–Johnson syndrome induced by long-term clozapine treatment in a male schizophrenia patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Kung; Chung, Weilun; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Tseng, Ping-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe adverse drug reaction that can result in disability and mortality. SJS is defined as having a widespread distribution throughout the whole body surface area with <10% extent of skin detachment and skin lesions. Some drugs, such as carbamazepine, have been reported to have a greater correlation to SJS. Although clozapine use has been mentioned as a risk factor for development of SJS, no report has clearly described the features of SJS as a reaction to clozapine use. Herein, we report the case of a patient presenting SJS after long-term clozapine treatment. Case report: Mr A was a 54-year-old male with a diagnosis of chronic schizophrenia. He was hospitalized in a mental institute and received clozapine 200 mg/day for 2 years, without discomfort or drug side effects. He developed acute-onset mouth edema, multiple oral and ocular ulcers, oral and ocular mucosa swelling, and multiple erythematous skin rashes over his entire body and extremities with hypertension and high fever. SJS was diagnosed after referral to a general hospital. Results The SJS subsided under supportive treatment. Conclusion Accumulated lymphocytes and macrophages in the epidermis and elevated TNF-? might cause an immune reaction and apoptosis and result in the clinical presentation of SJS. Clozapine is believed to modulate the immunologic reaction, and therefore might induce SJS through immunomodulation. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of SJS resulting from the use of drugs for which there are no reports of such a severe complication. PMID:25914536

  6. A marker for Stevens-Johnson syndrome …: ethnicity matters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Lonjou; L Thomas; N Borot; N Ledger; C de Toma; H LeLouet; E Graf; M Schumacher; A Hovnanian; M Mockenhaupt; J-C Roujeau

    2006-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare but severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, which can be caused by a certain number of specific drugs among which is carbamazepine, an antiepileptic agent. A very strong association of carbamazepine-induced SJS with HLA-B*1502 has recently been described in the Han Chinese population. Here in, we report preliminary results from a

  7. Aceclofenac induced Stevens-Johnson/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ameen, Kaderthambi Hajamohideen Nooru; Pinninti, Rakesh; Jami, Swathi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report a rare occurrence of Stevens-Johnson/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) overlap syndrome after the use of aceclofenac. A 38 year old healthy adult male presented with rapidly evolving rash over face and upper body with ulceration of buccal mucosa and breathlessness after taking aceclofenac tablet. Naranjo score for this adverse drug event was six, thereby making it a probable adverse drug reaction. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation and use of antihistamines and systemic steroids, patient's health rapidly worsened and died within six hours of presentation. Aceclofenac induced SJS/TEN overlap is an extremely rare clinical association previously reported only once in medical literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of such an association in the Indian population. We are presenting this case to highlight the serious adverse reactions possible from a routinely prescribed drug. PMID:23662031

  8. Bilateral conjunctival retention cysts in the aftermath of Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rajaraman, Revathi; Raghavan, Anita; Palanisamy, Manikandan

    2008-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the rare occurrence of bilateral conjunctival retention cysts in a child with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The case was managed conservatively as there were no functional or cosmetic problems. PMID:18158410

  9. Bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungchul; Ko, Young Bo; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Lim, Chae-Man

    2015-03-01

    We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A 59-year-old man presented with respiratory distress that gradually worsened over 3 months. He had been diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome 3 months before admission. He had no history of previous airway disease. On physical examination, expiratory breathing sounds were not audible, and a chest X-ray revealed a hyperinflated lung. A pulmonary function test indicated a severe obstructive pattern. Computed tomography scans of inspiratory and expiratory phases of respiration showed oligemia and air trapping, and both were more prominent on expiration view than on inspiration view. The pathogenesis of bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome is largely unknown. PMID:25684012

  10. Bronchiolitis Obliterans Associated with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyungchul; Ko, Young Bo; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A 59-year-old man presented with respiratory distress that gradually worsened over 3 months. He had been diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome 3 months before admission. He had no history of previous airway disease. On physical examination, expiratory breathing sounds were not audible, and a chest X-ray revealed a hyperinflated lung. A pulmonary function test indicated a severe obstructive pattern. Computed tomography scans of inspiratory and expiratory phases of respiration showed oligemia and air trapping, and both were more prominent on expiration view than on inspiration view. The pathogenesis of bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome is largely unknown. PMID:25684012

  11. Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a boy with nephrotic syndrome during prednisolone therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dae Sun Jo; Jun-Won Yang; Pyoung Han Hwang; Dae-Yeol Lee

    2003-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a mucocutaneous disease that can be lethal. It can occur in association with altered immunological conditions and the administration of various drugs, including corticosteroids. We report a case of SJS in a 14-year-old male with nephrotic syndrome, who was treated with oral prednisolone for 6 weeks. He presented symptoms of fever, skin lesions consisting of multiple vesiculopapular

  12. Investigation of Monnose-Binding Lectin gene Polymorphism in Patients with Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karkucak, Mutlu; Bülbül, Emel Ba?kan; Turan, Hakan; Yakut, Tahsin; Toka, Sevil; Sar?cao?lu, Hayriye

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Monnose-Binding lectin (MBL) appears to play an important role in the immune system. The genetic polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene can result in a reduction of serum levels, leading to a predisposition to recurrent infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of a polymorphism in codon 54 of the MBL2 gene on the susceptibility to Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome (EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome). Material and Methods: Our study included 64 patients who were clinically and/or histopathologically diagnosed with EM, SJS, and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome and 66 healthy control subjects who were genotyped for the MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism using the PCR-RFLP method. For all statistical analyses, the level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of the B allele was 18% in the EM, SJS and SJS/TEN patient groups and 13% in the control group. No significant differences in allele frequencies of any polymorphism were observed between the patient and control groups, although the B allele was more frequent in the patient groups (p=0.328). Conclusion: Our results provide no evidence of a relationship between MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism and the susceptibility to EM, SJS and SJS/ TEN overlap syndrome. However, these findings should be confirmed in studies with a larger sample size. PMID:25207021

  13. First case of mirtazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome from India

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Amit; Gurtoo, Anil; Gupta, Latika; Aggarwal, Gunjan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman, a known case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), was admitted with mucocutaneous ulceroerosive lesions with blisters and thrombocytopenia after taking antidepressant mirtazepine. Exacerbation of SLE and drug-induced eruption was diagnosed. Clinical and laboratory markers were suggestive of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. This is a rare adverse effect of the newer generation antidepressant mirtazepine. PMID:23112435

  14. A case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome possibly induced by amifostine during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zollo, Enrico; Cusano, Francesco; Argenone, Angela; Cusano, Carlo Ivan; Pelosi, Patrizia; Pironti, Teresa; Spacagna, Ettore; Viscusi, Alfonso; Lioce, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Skin reactions to amifostine are considered to be rare. Here we describe the case of a patient who developed a severe skin eruption (Stevens-Johnson syndrome) during radiotherapy probably due to amifostine. As in most of the patients described so far, the worst lesions were located in the skin areas previously treated with radiotherapy. PMID:18338505

  15. Vanishing bile duct and Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with ciprofloxacin treated with tacrolimus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gokhan Okan; Serpil Yaylaci; Onder Peker; Sabahattin Kaymakoglu; Murat Saruc

    2008-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a serious and potentially life-threatening disease. Vanishing bile duct syndrome (VBDS) is a rare cause of progressive cholestasis. Both syndromes are mostly related with drugs. We report a case of a patient with ciprofloxacin-induced SJS and acute onset of VBDS, and reviewed the related literature. It is the first case of ciprofloxacin-induced VBDS successfully treated with

  16. Evaluation of conjunctival bacterial flora in patients with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frizon, Luciana; Araújo, Marília Cavalcante; Andrade, Larissa; Yu, Maria Cecília Zorat; Wakamatsu, Tais Hitomi; Höfling-Lima, Ana Luisa; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the conjunctival bacterial flora present in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. METHODS: A prospective study of the conjunctival bacterial flora was performed in 41 eyes of 22 patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The information gathered included the patient's sex and age, the duration of disease, the cause of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and treatments. Scrapings of the inferior conjunctival fornix were performed in both eyes. Fourteen days before scraping, the patients were asked to interrupt all topical medication and start using 0.5% nonpreserved methylcellulose. The microbiological evaluation included microorganism identification and determination of antibiotic sensitivity. RESULTS: Of 22 patients (41 eyes), 14 (64%) were females, and eight (36%) were males. The mean age was 33.2 years, and the mean duration of disease was 15.6 years. Visual acuity ranged from light perception to 20/25 (1.57 logMar). The treatment received by most patients consisted of tear substitutes, topical antibiotics, and contact lenses. Bacterial identification was positive in 39 eyes (95%) and negative in two eyes (5%). Gram-positive cocci accounted for 55.5% of the microorganisms, whereas gram-positive bacilli and gram-negative bacilli accounted for 19% and 25.5%, respectively. Half of the patients (54%) had multiple bacterial species in their flora, and only one bacterial species was identified in the other half. Resistant bacteria were isolated from four eyes. The antibiotic sensitivity results for the Streptococcus group showed the lowest sensitivity and the highest microbial resistance identified. CONCLUSION: Patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome have a diverse conjunctival flora that includes many pathogenic species. PMID:24626941

  17. Stevens-Johnson syndrome following use of metronidazole in a dental patient

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Goutameswar; Shome, Koushik

    2014-01-01

    Metronidazole alone rarely causes Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). We present a case of an elderly male patient who, following metronidazole use, developed neurological symptoms followed by pain and blisters on both soles, erythema of face and neck, scrotal itching and erosion, and hemorrhagic encrustation around the lips and oral mucous membrane. Initial neurological symptoms followed by mucocutaneous manifestation of SJS following metronidazole use is probably a new presentation of this case. PMID:24550598

  18. Management of Dysphagia in Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola A. Clayton; Peter J. Kennedy

    2007-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare and potentially fatal skin disorder, precipitated by severe allergic drug reaction,\\u000a and is one of a spectrum of conditions, which includes Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). Mucosal involvement is common, resulting\\u000a in extreme pain on swallowing and poor oral intake. The aim of this study was to describe swallow function in TEN and SJS\\u000a and

  19. Combination of Steven-Johnson syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome following carbamazepine therapy: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhawna; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki; Gandhi, Pankaj; Dubey, Parul; Panagariya, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe, episodic, acute mucocutaneous reaction that is most often elicited by drugs and occasionally by infections. The drugs commonly implicated as the cause of SJS are anticonvulsants, sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Carbamazepine (CBZ) has been commonly implicated in SJS. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare, life-threatening but potentially treatable condition. Among the neuroleptics, haloperidol (parenteral) is implicated as a most common drug for NMS. Though rare, association of NMS with CBZ and association of NMS with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in a single patient after administration of neuroleptics has been reported in the literature before. However, a combination of NMS and SJS in a single patient after administration of CBZ has not been reported so far. We present a patient with seizure who developed SJS and NMS following administration of CBZ. PMID:23761563

  20. Reactivation of Cytomegalovirus in a Patient with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome-Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tagajdid, Mohamed Rida; Doblali, Taoufik; Elannaz, Hicham; Hammi, Salaheddine; Belfequih, Bouchra; Mrani, Saâd

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs. We describe the case of a 19 year old patient with SJS/TEN overlap syndrome, who developed severe interstitial pneumonia after she had received antiepileptic drugs. A cytomegalovirus infection was diagnosed by Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) detection on Bronchoalveolar lavage. Based on observations on biological data, temporal relationship, and clinical features, it could be inferred that the reactivation of cytomegalovirus with viral replication can predispose a person to TEN-SJS. We discuss here, in the light of the current literature, the probable association between drug-induced SJS-TEN and fulminant reactivation of cytomegalovirus. PMID:24031112

  1. A case of pediatric Steven-Johnson Syndrome associated with albuterol consumption.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Valentina; Lombardi, Niccolò; Lenti, Maria Carmela; Masi, Stefano; Trapani, Sandra; Pugi, Alessandra; Mugelli, Alessandro; Vannacci, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    We describe a case of Steven-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) associated with albuterol exposure in a 6-year-old male. A possible contributing role of albuterol in SJS occurrence in the present case is strongly suggested by the temporal relationship between the event and the initiation of drug therapy as well as by the positive rechallenge. To the best of our knowledge, albuterol had not been previously associated with SJS in medical literature. It can be therefore possible that physicians, pediatricians in particular, probably not aware of the possible risk of albuterol-induced SJS, might underestimate skin reactions in children taking the drug, thus underreporting this kind of severe adverse drug reaction. PMID:25981113

  2. [Severe drug-induced skin reactions. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis].

    PubMed

    Mockenhaupt, M

    2014-05-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are characterized by extensive blistering of the skin and mucosa; they are considered as one disease entity with varying severity. They are rare but potentially life-threatening and accompanied by high mortality. A clear clinical diagnosis is needed to direct specific therapy, but supportive therapy remains most important. In order to identify and withdraw the inducing drug, a very detailed and thorough medication history has to be obtained. Among the highly suspected (strongly associated) agents are allopurinol, antibacterial sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs of the oxicam type, various anti-epileptics and nevaripine. Together they account for more than half of the cases of SJS/TEN. Although a drug is not always the cause, it is considered very like in approximately 75% of cases. Infections have also to be considered as etiologic factors. PMID:24820799

  3. [Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in a hospital in Distrito Federal].

    PubMed

    Emerick, Mariane Ferreira Barbosa; Rodrigues, Mayra Martins Toledo; Pedrosa, Daniella Melo Arnaud Sampaio; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi; Gottems, Leila Bernarda Donato

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze demographic and clinical aspects of patients diagnosed with Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN), as well as identifying the actions of health professionals for the management of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR) in a public hospital in Distrito Federal, Brazil. A descriptive and retrospective research was held, with quantitative approach. Data collected from all the records of 22 patients admitted with diagnosed with SJS and TEN, from January 2005 to September 2012. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Of these cases, 9 were diagnosed with NET and 7, with SJS; there were more females (14); aged from 21 to 40 years (10); 21 were cured; the drugs more used were the antiepileptic ones (10). Fragility in clinical registers and in the actions to monitor the cases of ADR in this health service was observed. PMID:25590879

  4. A review of causes of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ferrandiz-Pulido, Carla; Garcia-Patos, Vicente

    2013-12-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare life-threatening conditions almost exclusively attributed to drugs. The incidence in children is lower than in adults and has a better outcome. Mycosplama pneumoniae infection may be involved in some cases of paediatric SJS. The main etiologic factors for both SSJ and TEN are sulphonamides and anticonvulsants, followed by penicillins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In rare instances, paracetamol is the only suspected drug. By contrast with adults, allopurinol, oxicams and nevirapine are not identified as causative agents in children, probably due to differences in drug prescriptions. The only aspects of treatment that have been proved to improve survival are the rapid withdrawal of the suspected offending drugs and an optimal supportive therapy with emphasis in nutritional support, accompanied by management of denuded skin areas. The use of specific therapies remains controversial. PMID:23873883

  5. Granulysin is a key mediator for disseminated keratinocyte death in Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Hung Chung; Shuen-Iu Hung; Jui-Yung Yang; Shih-Chi Su; Shien-Ping Huang; Chun-Yu Wei; See-Wen Chin; Chien-Chun Chiou; Sung-Chao Chu; Hsin-Chun Ho; Chih-Hsun Yang; Chi-Fang Lu; Jer-Yuarn Wu; You-Di Liao; Yuan-Tsong Chen

    2008-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening adverse drug reactions characterized by massive epidermal necrosis, in which the specific danger signals involved remain unclear. Here we show that blister cells from skin lesions of SJS-TEN primarily consist of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells, and both blister fluids and cells were cytotoxic. Gene expression

  6. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Associated with Drugs and Vaccines in Children: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Raucci, Umberto; Rossi, Rossella; Da Cas, Roberto; Rafaniello, Concita; Mores, Nadia; Bersani, Giulia; Reale, Antonino; Pirozzi, Nicola; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Traversa, Giuseppe; in Drug and Children, Italian Multicenter Study Group for Vaccine Safety

    2013-01-01

    Objective Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is one of the most severe muco-cutaneous diseases and its occurrence is often attributed to drug use. The aim of the present study is to quantify the risk of SJS in association with drug and vaccine use in children. Methods A multicenter surveillance of children hospitalized through the emergency departments for acute conditions of interest is currently ongoing in Italy. Cases with a diagnosis of SJS were retrieved from all admissions. Parents were interviewed on child’s use of drugs and vaccines preceding the onset of symptoms that led to the hospitalization. We compared the use of drugs and vaccines in cases with the corresponding use in a control group of children hospitalized for acute neurological conditions. Results Twenty-nine children with a diagnosis of SJS and 1,362 with neurological disorders were hospitalized between 1st November 1999 and 31st October 2012. Cases were more frequently exposed to drugs (79% vs 58% in the control group; adjusted OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0–6.1). Anticonvulsants presented the highest adjusted OR: 26.8 (95% CI 8.4–86.0). Significantly elevated risks were also estimated for antibiotics use (adjusted OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.5–7.2), corticosteroids (adjusted OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.8–9.9) and paracetamol (adjusted OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.5–6.9). No increased risk was estimated for vaccines (adjusted OR: 0.9; 95% CI 0.3–2.8). Discussion Our study provides additional evidence on the etiologic role of drugs and vaccines in the occurrence of SJS in children. PMID:23874553

  7. Amniotic Membrane Transplantation as a New Therapy for the Acute Ocular Manifestations of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Elizabeth; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Liang, Lingyi; Sheha, Hossam; Gregory, Darren G.; Tseng, Scheffer C.G.

    2010-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and its more severe variant, toxic epidermal necrolysis, have relatively low overall incidence; however, this disease presents with high morbidity and mortality. The majority of patients develop ocular inflammation and ulceration at the acute stage. Due to the hidden nature of these ocular lesions and the concentration of effort toward life-threatening issues, current acute management has not devised a strategy to preclude blinding cicatricial complications. This review summarizes recent literature data, showing how sight-threatening corneal complications can progressively develop from cicatricial pathologies of lid margin, tarsus, and fornix at the chronic stage. It illustrates how such pathologies can be prevented with the early intervention of cryopreserved amniotic membrane transplantation to suppress inflammation and promote epithelial healing at the acute stage. Significant dry eye problems and photophobia can also be avoided with this intervention. This new therapeutic strategy can avert the catastrophic ophthalmic sequelae of this rare but devastating disease. PMID:19699503

  8. Outbreak of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated With Mebendazole and Metronidazole Use Among Filipino Laborers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kow-Tong; Twu, Shiing-Jer; Chang, Hong-Jen; Lin, Ruey-Shiung

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study sought to identify the risk factors associated with an outbreak of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) among Filipino laborers in Taiwan. Methods. Forty-six SJS/TEN patients were matched to 92 controls according to month of arrival in Taiwan, sex, and age. Results. The odds ratio for development of SJS/TEN was 9.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.9, 23.9) among workers who had used both metronidazole and mebendazole sometime in the preceding 6 weeks. In addition, a gradient increase in the occurrence of SJS/TEN was found with an increasing level of exposure to metronidazole. Conclusions. This outbreak highlights the risk of SJS/TEN resulting from the use of both metronidazole and mebendazole and the need for control measures. PMID:12604501

  9. Independent strong association of HLA-A*02:06 and HLA-B*44:03 with cold medicine-related Stevens-Johnson syndrome with severe mucosal involvement.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Mayumi; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Sotozono, Chie; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Saito, Yoshiro; Sawai, Hiromi; Miyadera, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Emiko; Maekawa, Keiko; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nagato, Masaki; Aihara, Michiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Furuya, Hirokazu; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Ikezawa, Zenrou; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and its severe variant, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), are acute inflammatory vesiculobullous reactions of the skin and mucous membranes. Cold medicines including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and multi-ingredient cold medications are reported to be important inciting drugs. We used two sample sets of Japanese patients to investigate the association between HLA genotypes and cold medicine-related SJS/TEN (CM-SJS/TEN), including acetaminophen-related SJS/TEN (AR-SJS/TEN) with severe mucosal involvement such as severe ocular surface complications (SOC). HLA-A*02:06 was strongly associated with CM-SJS/TEN with SOC and AR-SJS/TEN with SOC. HLA-B*44:03 was also detected as an independent risk allele for CM-, including AR-SJS/TEN with SOC. Analyses using data obtained from CM-SJS/TEN patients without SOC and patients with CM-unrelated SJS/TEN with SOC suggested that these two susceptibility alleles are involved in the development of only CM-SJS/TEN with SOC patients. PMID:24781922

  10. ABC Transporters and the Proteasome Complex Are Implicated in Susceptibility to Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis across Multiple Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, Paola; Bansal, Mukesh; Lefebvre, Celine; Guarnieri, Paolo; Shen, Yufeng; Pe’er, Itsik; Califano, Andrea; Floratos, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) represent rare but serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Both are characterized by distinctive blistering lesions and significant mortality rates. While there is evidence for strong drug-specific genetic predisposition related to HLA alleles, recent genome wide association studies (GWAS) on European and Asian populations have failed to identify genetic susceptibility alleles that are common across multiple drugs. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the low to moderate effect size of individual genetic risk factors. To test this hypothesis we developed Pointer, a new algorithm that assesses the aggregate effect of multiple low risk variants on a pathway using a gene set enrichment approach. A key advantage of our method is the capability to associate SNPs with genes by exploiting physical proximity as well as by using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that capture information about both cis- and trans-acting regulatory effects. We control for known bias-inducing aspects of enrichment based analyses, such as: 1) gene length, 2) gene set size, 3) presence of biologically related genes within the same linkage disequilibrium (LD) region, and, 4) genes shared among multiple gene sets. We applied this approach to publicly available SJS/TEN genome-wide genotype data and identified the ABC transporter and Proteasome pathways as potentially implicated in the genetic susceptibility of non-drug-specific SJS/TEN. We demonstrated that the innovative SNP-to-gene mapping phase of the method was essential in detecting the significant enrichment for those pathways. Analysis of an independent gene expression dataset provides supportive functional evidence for the involvement of Proteasome pathways in SJS/TEN cutaneous lesions. These results suggest that Pointer provides a useful framework for the integrative analysis of pharmacogenetic GWAS data, by increasing the power to detect aggregate effects of multiple low risk variants. The software is available for download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/pointergsa/. PMID:26110827

  11. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  12. Innovation Squared: Comparison of Models by Tony Wagner and Steven Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, Tony Wagner's model of innovation differs from Steven Johnson's. One explores the following: how might we develop a nation of innovators? The other offers seven patterns that mark environments for innovation. Drawing from triangulated data, both authors create regularities (not laws) that have new paradigm, scientific credibility.…

  13. Chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated central-line dressings and necrosis in complicated skin disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jennifer B; Divito, Sherrie J; Talbot, Simon G

    2014-12-01

    Although chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) disks have been shown to help reduce the incidence of central line-associated blood stream infections, their use can result in local skin necrosis. The effects of CHG disks on patients with complex skin pathology have not been studied. We report 6 cases of dermal necrosis associated with Biopatch (Ethicon Inc, Somerville, NJ) CHG disks in adults with complex skin pathology including those with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome, graft-versus-host disease, burns, and anasarca. All patients had a CHG disk placed at a central venous catheter insertion site. Age range was from 21 to 84 years. Discovery of the reaction ranged from 4 to 14 days after disk placement. Resultant skin erosions required 2 to 10 weeks to reepithelialize. Complicated skin disorder patients represent a rare subset of the critically ill who appear prone to CHG disk necrosis. Continuous contact of CHG under occlusive dressings is speculated to predispose Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome, graft-versus-host disease, and burn patients to local chemical injury secondary to loss of the epithelial tissue barrier, decreased cohesion of the epidermal-dermal junction, and increased tissue permeability. In these patients, the risk of placing the CHG disk may present more risk than using alternative antimicrobial dressings. PMID:25035049

  14. Nocardia farcinica complicating Cogan's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merinopoulos, Dimos; Khan, Haroon; Ginwalla, Sara; Lane, Suzanne; Watts, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon bacterial gram-positive infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes in the genus Nocardia. Nocardiosis is typically regarded as an opportunistic infection with approximately two-thirds of infected patients being immunocompromised. In this case report we describe a 45-year-old female who presented with a right thigh abscess. She had been taking high-dose prednisolone and ciclosporin for Cogan's syndrome. She presented with erythema and severe pain over her right thigh. Ultrasound showed a collection and Nocardia farcinica was isolated. This case report stresses the importance of considering atypical infections in immunocompromised patients, even with minor symptoms, to avoid delay in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25988020

  15. Metabolic Complications of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy L. Setji; Ann J. Brown

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 4–7% of reproductive-aged women and is associated with serious metabolic complications\\u000a including type 2 diabetes. Forty percent of affected women have impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes by the age of\\u000a forty. Evaluation of women with PCOS includes metabolic risk assessment and counseling on the prevention of diabetes through\\u000a lifestyle therapies such as diet,

  16. Tapia's syndrome — a rare complication following cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nalladaru, Zubin; Wessels, Andre; DuPreez, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. It includes the extracranial involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the hypoglossal nerve and results in ipsilateral paralysis of the vocal cord and the tongue. It is usually a complication related to anaesthesia and positioning of the head of the patient during surgery. We describe this rare complication which occurred at our institute. A 49-year old man developed Tapia's syndrome after an uneventful coronary artery bypass surgery. He complained of dysphonia, hoarseness of voice and an inability to swallow soon after extubation. The syndrome resolved completely over the following weeks with no neurological deficit. PMID:22108947

  17. Tapia's syndrome--a rare complication following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nalladaru, Zubin; Wessels, Andre; DuPreez, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. It includes the extracranial involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the hypoglossal nerve and results in ipsilateral paralysis of the vocal cord and the tongue. It is usually a complication related to anaesthesia and positioning of the head of the patient during surgery. We describe this rare complication which occurred at our institute. A 49-year old man developed Tapia's syndrome after an uneventful coronary artery bypass surgery. He complained of dysphonia, hoarseness of voice and an inability to swallow soon after extubation. The syndrome resolved completely over the following weeks with no neurological deficit. PMID:22108947

  18. [Syndrome forms of complicated oligophrenia (Rubinstein-Taybi and Noonan syndromes)].

    PubMed

    Mastiukova, E M; Moskovkina, A G

    1989-01-01

    The article presents the results of clinicogenetic studies of two syndromal forms of complicated oligophrenia featuring the intellectual underdevelopment combined with apraxic cortical dysarthria, hypogenitalism and multiple dysontogenies. Psychopathological structure of these syndromal forms of complicated oligophrenia are given. This is of major importance for diagnostic, medical and psycho-pedagogical correction. The questions of genetic heterogeneity of the syndromes are discussed. PMID:2728752

  19. Gastrointestinal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter H. Beighton; J. Lamont Murdoch; Theodore Votteler

    1969-01-01

    The gastrointestinal abnormalities encountered in 125 patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been described. Spontaneous perforation of the intestine and massive gastrointestinal haemorrhage are uncommon but potentially lethal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Less dangerous abnormalities, such `as external hernia, hiatus hernia, eventration of the diaphragm, intestinal diverticula, and rectal prolapse were all encountered in patients in the series. Abdominal

  20. Grisel's Syndrome: A Rare Complication following Adenotonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bucak, Abdulkadir; Ulu, Sahin; Aycicek, Abdullah; Kacar, Emre; Miman, Murat Cem

    2014-01-01

    Grisel's syndrome is a nontraumatic atlantoaxial subluxation which is usually secondary of an infection or an inflammation at the head and neck region. It can be observed after surgery of head and neck region. Etiopathogenesis has not been clearly described yet, but increased looseness of paraspinal ligament is thought to be responsible. Patients typically present with painful torticollis. Diagnosis of Grisel's syndrome is largely based on suspicion of the patient who has recently underwent surgery or history of infection in head and neck region. Physical examination and imaging techniques assist in diagnosis. Therefore, clinicians should be aware of acute nontraumatic torticollis after recently applied the head and neck surgery or undergone upper respiratory tract infection. In this paper, a case of an eight-year-old male patient who had Grisel's syndrome after adenotonsillectomy is discussed with review of the literature. PMID:24782937

  1. Limy Bile Syndrome Complicated with Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Barut, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Limy bile is a relatively rare condition, in which a radiopaque material is visible in the gallbladder on plain radiography or computerized tomography. Cases of complicated hyperparathyroidism are extremely rare. We report a patient with right upper quadrant and epigastric pain and extremity weakness in whom abdominal tomography showed limy bile in the gallbladder and laboratory values showed high levels of serum calcium and parathormone. PMID:25821626

  2. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome complicated by unilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Parren, Lizelotte J M T; Bauer, Boris; Hamm, Henning; Frank, Jorge

    2008-11-01

    Brooke-Spiegler syndrome is an autosomal dominant tumor predisposition disorder. The disease is characterized by the occurrence of multiple skin appendage tumors, including cylindroma, trichoepithelioma, and spiradenoma. In some patients, tumors cover the entire head circumference, thereby causing disfigurement and other complications. Here, we report on a man with multiple cylindroma that were distributed in a turban tumor-like fashion. One of these neoplasms arose in the meatus externus of the right ear leading to unilateral hearing loss, a complication that has been documented only on few occasions in this disease. PMID:18986490

  3. Atypical Frey syndrome as a complication of Obwegeser osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Güerrissi, J; Stoyanoff, J

    1998-11-01

    A patient with Frey syndrome on the left cheek area as a complication of an Obwegeser osteotomy is reported. Flushing, sweating of skin, and hypoesthesia of buccal mucosae were present 6 months after surgery. An injury to the auriculotemporal nerve during desperiostization of the posterior border of the mandibular ramus is believed to be the principal cause. The physiopathologic mechanism is thought to occur in relation to aberrant regeneration of the postganglionic secretomotor parasympathetic nerve fibers carried in this nerve. These regenerated fibers erroneously reach the sweat glands of the cheek skin through anastomosis with the buccal nerve and temporofacial ramus of the facial nerve. Direct injury of the buccal nerve may be another cause, because of its close anatomic course with the external pterygoid muscle and the mandibular ramus. An extensive literature review revealed no cases of this syndrome as a complication of Obwegeser osteotomy. PMID:10029768

  4. Acute organophosphorus poisoning complicated by acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pankaj, Madhu; Krishna, Kavita

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of 30 year old alcoholic male admitted with vomiting, drowsiness, limb weakness and fasciculations after alleged history of consumption of 30 ml of chlorpyriphos insecticide. He had low serum cholinesterase levels. With standard treatment for organophosphorus poisoning (OPP), he improved gradually until day 5, when he developed neck and limb weakness and respiratory distress. This intermediate syndrome was treated with oximes, atropine and artificial ventilation. During treatment, his ECG showed fresh changes of ST elevation. High CPK & CPK-MB levels, septal hypokinesia on 2D echo suggested acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography was postponed due to his bedridden and obtunded status. The patient finally recovered fully by day 15 and was discharged. Acute coronary syndrome is a rare occurrence in OP poisoning. The present case thus emphasises the need for careful electrocardiographic and enzymatic monitoring of all patients of organophosphorus poisoning to prevent potential cardiac complication which can prove fatal. PMID:25672037

  5. Grisel's syndrome: a rare complication following traditional uvulectomy

    PubMed Central

    Elyajouri, Abdelhakim; Assermouh, Abdellah; Abilkacem, Rachid; Agadr, Aomar; Mahraoui, Chafiq

    2015-01-01

    A case is reported of an eight-month-old female patient who had traditional uvulectomy for sore throat complicated by Grisel's syndrome. She was admitted into the hospital one week after uvulectomy with Torticolis. Grisel's syndrome is a nontraumatic atlantoaxial subluxation, usually secondary of an infection or an inflammation at the head and neck area, or after surgery in the same area. Patients typically suffer from painful torticollis. Diagnosis of Grisel's syndrome is largely based on suspicion of the patient who has recently undergone surgery or has a history of an infection in head and neck area. Physical examination and imaging techniques assist in diagnosis. Thus, clinicians should be aware of acute nontraumatic torticollis if patient had a recent surgery in the head or neck area or undergone an upper respiratory tract infection. In this paper, a case of an eight-month-old female patient who had Grisel's syndrome after uvulectomy is discussed. This case is reported to highlight this neurogical threatening complication following traditional uvulectomy as well as highlighting the unnecessary morbidity and mortality associated with this persisting mode of treatment in Africa. PMID:26090020

  6. Cholesterol emboli syndrome--a rare complication of cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Ayaz Hussain; Hanif, Bashir; Hasan, Khursheed; Malik, Faiza

    2010-06-01

    We are reporting the case of a 57 years old male, hypertensive, diabetic, dyslipidaemic who presented with exertional angina. He had a coronary artery bypass surgery, one year ago. He underwent left heart catheterization with graft study which showed critical native triple vessel disease with patent arterial graft to left anterior descending and occluded venous grafts to obtuse marginal and right coronary artery. The procedure was complicated by catheter induced dissection of the ascending aorta. Three days later he developed cholesterol emboli syndrome, that was treated symptomatically. PMID:20527652

  7. Hyperperfusion syndrome after MCA embolectomy – a rare complication?

    PubMed Central

    Backhaus, Roland; Boy, Sandra; Fuchs, Kornelius; Ulrich, Bogdahn; Schuierer, Gerhard; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 78 Final Diagnosis: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endovascular embolectomy Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (cHS) is a well known but rare complication after carotid endarterectomy, carotid angioplasty with stenting, and stenting of intracranial arterial stenosis. The clinical presentation may vary from acute onset of focal oedema (stroke-like presentation) and intracerbral hemorrhage to delayed (>24h hours after the procedure) presentation with seizures, focal motor weakness, or late intracerebral hemorrhage. The incidence of cHS after carotid endarterectomy ranges from 0–3% and defined as an increase of the ipsilateral cerebral blood flow up to 40% over baseline in ultrasound. Case Report: We present a case of a 78-year-old woman with an acute ischemic stroke due to left side middle cerebral artery territory with right sided hemiparesis and aphasia (NIHSS 16). After systemic thrombolysis embolectomy using a retractable stent (Solitaire® device) was performed and resulted in complete and successful recanalization of MCA including its branches about 210 minutes after symptom onset but, partial dislocation of thrombotic material into the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Conclusions: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome should be considered in patients with clinical deterioration after successful recanalisation and the early diagnosis and treatment may be important for neurological outcome after endovascular embolectomy PMID:24340127

  8. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozbay, Isa; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1?mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic.

  9. Guillain-Barré syndrome following snake bite: An unusual complication

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Taly, A. B.; Gupta, Anupam; Moin, Aumir; Murali, T.

    2010-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with a nonhealing wound on the left ankle for the last 5 weeks, a tingling sensation in both hands for 20 days, and weakness in all four limbs for 10 days. He had been bitten by a snake while working in a sugarcane field 6 weeks earlier and had received tetanus toxoid and anti–snake venom on the day of the bite. He had clinical, biochemical, and electrophysiological features of Guillain-Barré syndrome, with motor and sensory neuropathy—primarily suggestive of demyelination with secondary axonal degeneration. Recognition of this unusual complication following snake bite or use of anti–snake venom / tetanus toxoid has considerable epidemiological, therapeutic, and prognostic significance. PMID:20436752

  10. Meconium aspiration syndrome complicated by massive intravascular thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sergi, C; Stein, K M; Beedgen, B; Zilow, E; Linderkamp, O; Otto, H F

    1998-06-01

    Fetal aspiration of meconium in amniotic fluid during fetal distress by newborn infants can induce the meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), a form of neonatal respiratory distress. Should this event occur, admission to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and vigorous airway management and monitoring are required. We present a term gestation resulting in MAS complicated by a massive intravascular thrombosis. Despite airway management considered appropriate, the infant developed respiratory distress a few hours after birth and died 5 days later. Postmortem examination showed a diffuse alveolar damage of the lungs with alveoli filled with meconium and amniotic epithelial cells as well as disseminated thrombi in the pulmonary vascular tree, portal system, suprahepatic veins, and peripheral arterial vascular tree. PMID:9722058

  11. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: complications and solutions concerning anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Barrett A; Occhipinti, Kaitlin E; Baluch, Amir; Kaye, Alan D

    2006-10-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an inherited disorder that results in dysfunctional collagen bundles. These dysfunctional collagen bundles are most noticeable in tissues rich with collagen fibers--skin, vessels, GI, and ligaments. Until gene therapy advancements can correct the underlying gene mutations causing faulty collagen, the mainstay of treatment is prevention of traumatic injury. The success of anesthetic management in patients with EDS requires and understanding of the role of collagen in the various tissues of the body. Collagen-rich tissue fragility, skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, hematoma formation and cardiovascular disease are just some of the complications that need to be accounted for before every anesthetic procedure involving EDS patients. Anesthesiologists should be keenly that any physical manipulation of EDS patients incurs risks of trauma. PMID:17263273

  12. [Psychiatric and psychological complications in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ga?ecki, Piotr; Florkowski, Antoni; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Pietras, Tadeusz; Szemraj, Janusz; Talarowska, Monika

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated, that symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) affect 2 to 4% of the middle-aged population and their prevalence increases with age (over 50% people aged 65 and older suffer from OSAS). Among risk factors of OSAS we can distinguish: the male sex, race, overweight and obesity, thyroid hypofunction, age and alcohol abuse. Obstructive sleep apnea results in the absence (apnea) or reduction (hypopnea) of airflow lasting at least 10 s despite normal respiratory exertion. The apnea and hypopnea result in decreased oxygen saturation levels in the blood (hypoxemia). A number of consequences of OSAS can appear including: disruption of the sleep cycle, fragmentation of the sleep cycle, sleepiness, fatigue, headaches, cognitive impairments, irritability and mood disturbance, the higher risk of accidents at work and car accidents, the decrease of the quality of life and the higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. Besides various psychiatric and psychological complications presented in this review can occur in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:21190150

  13. A complication of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis with Mirizzi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-Y; Cao, X-D; Chen, J-J; Luo, Y-Q; Wang, X-C

    2015-05-01

    A patient had right upper quadrant pain with sclera was transferred from emergency room to the hospital, she was proposed to have acute cholecystitis, gallstones, obstructive jaundice, and a four-year history of gallbladder stones. The NMR results showed that the gallbladder was significantly enlarged and the gallbladder wall was thickening irregularly. The liver morphology was not abnormal except with extensive intrahepatic bile duct dilatation. The MRCP results demonstrated that the intrahepatic bile ducts were significant expanded. The ERCP results showed that duodenal stenosis and extra-hepatic bile duct stenosis. We placed a plastic stent of 8.5Fr and 12 cm in length in the hepatic duct, and after biliary plastic stent placement, jaundice was rapidly reduced and liver function was improved significantly. A surgery was performed and the final pathologic diagnosis is a complication of Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis with Mirizzi syndrome. After the surgery of cholecystectomy and a bile duct repair were performed, the patient was recovered well. Conclusively, if a patient was diagnosed as biliary stricture, a biliary metal stent should not be placed until pathological diagnosis of malignancy. PMID:26044215

  14. Thromboembolic complications in the nephrotic syndrome: Pathophysiology and clinical management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajni Singhal; K. Scott Brimble

    2006-01-01

    Patients with the nephrotic syndrome are at increased risk of developing venous and arterial thromboembolism, the most common of which is renal vein thrombosis. There are several unanswered or controversial issues relating to the nephrotic syndrome and thromboembolism, which include the mechanism of thromboembolism, and optimal diagnostic and anticoagulant management strategies. This review will discuss several of these issues: the

  15. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A complication of neuroleptics and cocaine abuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MaCaulay J. Akpaffiong; Pedro Ruiz

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and sixty psychiatric patients on Neuroleptics, with and without a history of substance abuse were daily monitored in order to establish the incidence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in these two groups. Four (5.1%) of the cocaine abusers and none of the non-cocaine abusers developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome when treated with neuroleptics. Thus we argue that psychiatric patients with

  16. Posterior Fossa Syndrome: Identifiable Risk Factors and Irreversible Complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah Doxey; Derek Bruce; Frederick Sklar; Dale Swift; Ken Shapiro

    1999-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism was first described by Rekate et al. in 1985 as a transient condition which occurs after posterior fossa operations in children. Posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) and cerebellar mutism are often used interchangeably in the literature. In our experience, we found cerebellar mutism to be a reversible component of a persistent neurologic syndrome. The cause and identifiable risk factors

  17. Extrapleural pneumonectomy complicated by acute superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

    PubMed

    DuBray, Bernard J; Gnerlich, Jennifer L; Doyle, Maria B Majella; Patterson, G Alexander

    2012-07-01

    We present a patient who developed an acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome following pneumonectomy. Although rarely described, a majority of cases develop insidiously from a gradual loss of retroperitoneal fat in the setting of malnourishment. A postoperative presentation is atypical, however procedures that narrow the aortomesenteric angle have been associated with the development of SMA syndrome. This case illustrates an important anatomic relationship that thoracic surgeons performing lung resection surgery should be aware of in order to avoid predisposing patients to SMA syndrome. PMID:22734999

  18. Sjögren's syndrome: diagnosis and management of oral complications.

    PubMed

    Lilly, J P; Fotos, P G

    1996-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome, a common autoimmune disease process, is characterized by destruction of exocrine (including the lacrimal and salivary) glands. Patients with this disorder may initially complain of a dry mouth or have rapid onset of new carious lesions. Here, a case of Sjogren's syndrome is presented that was initially diagnosed because of dental complaints, and long-term treatment of Sjogren's patients is discussed. PMID:9171038

  19. Hemoptysis Complicating Scimitar Syndrome: From Diagnosis to Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nedelcu, Cosmina; Carette, Marie-France [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Parrot, Antoine [Respiratory Intensive Care Unit, AP-HP, Tenon Hospital (France); Hammoudi, Nadjib [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Cardiology Department (France); Marsault, Claude; Khalil, Antoine, E-mail: antoine_khalil@yahoo.f [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Radiology Department (France)

    2008-07-15

    We report the case of a 24-year-old patient with known scimitar syndrome presenting with hemoptysis. Multidetector CT angiography showed the scimitar vein draining the right lung to the inferior vena cava associated with right lower lobe bronchopulmonary sequestration. The presence of hemoptysis associated with scimitar syndrome is likely secondary to an anomalous systemic arterial blood supply. We treated this patient successfully with transcatheter occlusion of the anomalous feeding arterial vessels.

  20. Hemoptysis complicating Scimitar Syndrome: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Nedelcu, Cosmina; Carette, Marie-France; Parrot, Antoine; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Marsault, Claude; Khalil, Antoine

    2008-07-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old patient with known scimitar syndrome presenting with hemoptysis. Multidetector CT angiography showed the scimitar vein draining the right lung to the inferior vena cava associated with right lower lobe bronchopulmonary sequestration. The presence of hemoptysis associated with scimitar syndrome is likely secondary to an anomalous systemic arterial blood supply. We treated this patient successfully with transcatheter occlusion of the anomalous feeding arterial vessels. PMID:17763899

  1. Management of ocular complications of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irfan Perente; Canan Asli Utine; Hanefi Cakir; Vedat Kaya; Ilknur Tugal Tutkun; Omer Faruk Yilmaz

    2009-01-01

    Background Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome (VKH) is a multisystem disorder, characterized by the T-cell-mediated autoimmune process directed\\u000a against melanocytic antigens in the ocular, nervous, auditory and integumentary systems. The ocular hallmarks of the disease\\u000a involve severe bilateral panuveitis associated with exudative retinal detachment. Case report We report a pediatric case of probable VKH Syndrome with isolated ocular findings, in which bilateral vitritis,

  2. Successful treatment of POEMS syndrome complicated by severe congestive heart failure with thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daichi; Kato, Aiko; Tabata, Sumie; Kitai, Takeshi; Takiuchi, Yoko; Kimura, Takaharu; Shimoji, Sonoko; Mori, Minako; Nagai, Yuya; Togami, Katsuhiro; Matsushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Maruoka, Hayato; Imai, Yukihiro; Beppu, Minako; Kawamoto, Michi; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was diagnosed with POEMS syndrome; however, we could not perform high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) because of rapidly progressive congestive heart failure. Thus, we treated the patient with thalidomide plus dexamethasone, which brought about a marked improvement of systolic dysfunction, POEMS syndrome-related symptoms and the serum concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor. Subsequently, we safely performed high-dose chemotherapy with auto-PBCST. This report strongly suggests that thalidomide is effective for POEMS syndrome, even if complicated by congestive heart failure which is considered to be related to POEMS syndrome. PMID:20190484

  3. Infective endocarditis from Enterococcus faecalis complicating colonoscopy in Heyde's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    d Giusti; Sgreccia, A; Carmenini, E; Morelli, S

    2004-01-01

    A case of infective endocarditis from Enterococcus faecalis after colonoscopy in a patient with aortic stenoinsufficiency and bleeding intestinal angiodysplasia (Heyde's syndrome) is reported. A 77 year old man with aortic stenoinsufficiency presented with enterorrhagia and underwent a colonoscopy, which showed normal findings. Fifteen days later he developed a moderate degree of fever. Blood cultures were positive for E faecalis. An echocardiogram showed aortic valve vegetations, and infective endocarditis was diagnosed and successfully treated by antibiotics. Some months later, intestinal bleeding recurred and intestinal resection was performed. Histopathology showed angiodysplasia. In patients with Heyde's syndrome antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered before colonoscopy. PMID:15467002

  4. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as complicated Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Monastiri, K; Selmi, H; Tabarki, B; Yacoub, M; Mahjoub, T; Essoussi, A S

    2002-02-01

    A child showing signs of Henoch-Schönlein purpura developed a right tibiofibular vascular thrombosis. Antiphospholipid antibody tests were positive for both lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. This suggests that an antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered in cases of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and antiphospholipid antibodies should be measured to determine whether prophylactic antithrombotic measures are needed to prevent thrombotic manifestations. PMID:11827910

  5. Peripheral gangrene complicating idiopathic and recessive hemolytic uremic syndromes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard S. Kaplan; Clotilde D. Garcia; Russell W. Chesney; William E. Segar; Katia Giugno; Roberto Chem

    2000-01-01

    Three patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) developed peripheral gangrene. Bilateral carotid artery thromboses occurred\\u000a in one of these patients after recovery from HUS. One patient had a long history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In the\\u000a second patient, a flu-like illness preceded the onset of HUS. The third was one of two sisters, with the HUS appearing more\\u000a than 1

  6. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis: a rare complication in a child with nephrotic syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Avinoam Pirogovsky; Meital Adi; Amit Dagan; Levana Sinai; Dalia Sthoeger; Naphtali Barzilai; Elvan Tabachnik

    2001-01-01

    .   A 2-year-old boy with new-onset nephrotic syndrome developed recurrent vomiting, apathy and papilloedema. Superior sagittal\\u000a sinus thrombosis was diagnosed on cranial CT and MRI. He gradually recovered after treatment with heparin, fresh frozen plasma\\u000a and warfarin with complete resolution of the thrombosis after 1 month. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis is an extremely\\u000a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome in children.

  7. Tumor Lysis Syndrome: An Unreported Complication of Intrathecal Ara-C.

    PubMed

    Simangan, Lenore R; Kline, Ronald M

    2014-06-17

    Intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy is an established method of preventing and treating CNS leukemia. Although this intervention is beneficial and necessary, understanding the potential adverse effects of IT chemotherapy is important so that these potential effects can be anticipated and prevented. Tumor lysis syndrome is a known complication of systemic chemotherapy and has also been reported as a rare complication after IT chemotherapy in patients with CNS disease. We report the first case of tumor lysis syndrome occurring in a patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia without CNS disease. The systemic effects of the IT chemotherapy were confirmed by the decreased size of the presenting mediastinal mass. PMID:24942026

  8. [Unusual complications of the Peutz-Jeghers-syndrome in two consecutive generations of the same family].

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Ch; Papaziogas, B; Atmatzidis, K; Kalaitzis, E; Pavlidis, T; Papaziogas, T

    2002-02-01

    The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease, characterized by the presence of hamartomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract and perioral mucocutaneous pigmentation. The incidence of surgical complications in these patients is relatively rare, and correlates with the size and location of the polyps. We report on two complications of the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome which occurred in two generations of the same family. There was a perforation and an invagination of the small intestine. Both cases were treated by resection of the small intestine. PMID:11894220

  9. Perioperative Complications of Adenotonsillectomy in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Sanders; Melinda A. King; Ronald B. Mitchell; James P. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the rate of complications experienced by children who undergo adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), the safety of a standard anesthetic protocol for these children, and preoperative predictors of complications. Sixty-one children with OSAS, confirmed by polysomnography, and 21 children with recurrent tonsillitis were anesthetized using a standard protocol before adenotonsillectomy (ages 2-16 yr, ASA 1-3). The

  10. [Spinal complications encountered in Larsen's syndrome. Apropos of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Bellon, J M; Filipe, G

    1987-01-01

    The authors report 3 cases of Larsen's syndrome in which the spine was involved. There was one instability between C1 and C2 and another between C2 and C3. These two cases were treated by posterior grafting. All three cases presented with a severe thoraco lumbar kypho-scoliosis which was treated conservatively, but one of the scolioses had to be grafted later. It is concluded that cervical instability may be missed and needs to be looked for. The kypho-scoliosis appeared to be particularly progressive. PMID:3562942

  11. [Hepatopulmonary syndrome: a complication of type 1 Gaucher disease].

    PubMed

    Bouguila, J; Rouatbi, H; Tej, A; Chabchoub, I; Trimech, B; El Ajmi, S; Essoussi, A S; Boughammoura, L

    2012-02-01

    Gaucher's disease is a not exceptional lysosomial disease in Tunisia. Type 1 is by far the most common one. Pulmonary involvement is considered to be rare in type 1 Gaucher's disease. Pulmonary hypertension, infiltration of the lungs with Gaucher cells, and severe hypoxemia due to intrapulmonary arterial-venous shunts, have been described in case reports and small case series. We reported the case of hepatopulmonary syndrome in a 14-year-old boy with type 1 Gaucher disease. The diagnosis of Gaucher disease was established, at 2 years age, by enzyme assay of leucocyte ?-glucosidase. The patient presented dyspnoea, digital clubbing and cyanosis of the lips. The arterial blood gas found severe hypoxaemia with PaO(2) at 56.9 mmHg. The diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome, in our patient, was confirmed by demonstration of the intrapulmonary shunting using contrast-enhanced echocardiography and the technetium-99m-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The patient was treated by symptomatic measure, long term oxygen therapy because the insufficiency of the enzyme replacement therapy. Screening for hypoxemia in children with liver disease should be considered. PMID:22305140

  12. Kawasaki shock syndrome complicating a recurrence of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Tissandier, Côme; Lang, Matthieu; Lusson, Jean René; Bœuf, Benoit; Merlin, Etienne; Dauphin, Claire

    2014-12-01

    We describe a case of recurrent Kawasaki disease (KD) in a non-Asian 6-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with typical KD without cardiac involvement at age 3 years. He was admitted to the PICU 3 years later for heart failure, hypotension, and deterioration of his general condition. Ultrasonography revealed left ventricular dysfunction with a 44% ejection fraction and grade I mitral valve failure without coronary artery involvement. Subsequent observation of hyperemic conjunctiva, bilateral cervical adenopathies with erythematous skin (normal neck ultrasound and computed axial tomography findings), peeling of the fingertips at day 8 of the illness, and occurrence of an inflammatory syndrome led to a diagnosis of incomplete recurrent KD with a clinical picture of Kawasaki shock syndrome (KSS). Clinical improvement was rapidly obtained after intravenous immunoglobulin and intravenous corticosteroid therapy (30 mg/kg per day for 3 subsequent days). Left ventricular function gradually improved, with ultrasound returning to normal after 3 months. Diagnosis was difficult to establish because of the recurrence of the disease and the incomplete clinical picture, with clinical features of KSS. Physicians need to be aware of these pitfalls in the management of patients with clinical signs of KD. PMID:25384485

  13. Paget-Schrotter syndrome and complications of management.

    PubMed

    Dep, A; Concannon, E; Mc Hugh, S M; Burke, P

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old man presented to the emergency department with an acutely swollen right upper limb having spent the previous day canoeing. Venography confirmed right subclavian venous thrombosis at middle one-third of right clavicle with no evidence of cervical rib or other structural abnormalities. Following heparinisation, catheter directed thrombolysis was performed which restored luminal flow. Postprocedure the patient developed spontaneous small-volume haemoperitoneum and acute renal failure. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for haemodialysis and supportive management. The patients' renal function improved and he was discharged well following his 28th day of admission. Paget-Schroetter syndrome or effort thrombosis involves subclavian venous thrombosis associated with strenuous activity of upper extremities. In these cases, catheter directed thrombolysis with first rib resection provides greater patency rate than anticoagulation therapy alone. Acute kidney injury following mechanical thrombolysis is rarely reported in the literature. PMID:23853011

  14. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  15. Paget-Schrotter syndrome and complications of management

    PubMed Central

    Dep, A; Concannon, E; Mc Hugh, S M; Burke, P

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old man presented to the emergency department with an acutely swollen right upper limb having spent the previous day canoeing. Venography confirmed right subclavian venous thrombosis at middle one-third of right clavicle with no evidence of cervical rib or other structural abnormalities. Following heparinisation, catheter directed thrombolysis was performed which restored luminal flow. Postprocedure the patient developed spontaneous small-volume haemoperitoneum and acute renal failure. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for haemodialysis and supportive management. The patients’ renal function improved and he was discharged well following his 28th day of admission. Paget-Schroetter syndrome or effort thrombosis involves subclavian venous thrombosis associated with strenuous activity of upper extremities. In these cases, catheter directed thrombolysis with first rib resection provides greater patency rate than anticoagulation therapy alone. Acute kidney injury following mechanical thrombolysis is rarely reported in the literature. PMID:23853011

  16. Use of an allograft patch in repair of hypoplastic left heart syndrome may complicate future transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven R. Meyer; Patricia M. Campbell; Jennifer M. Rutledge; Anne M. Halpin; Lois E. Hawkins; Jonathan R. T. Lakey; Ivan M. Rebeyka; David B. Ross

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Cryopreserved allograft tissue used in the Norwood procedure for infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) has the potential to cause marked immunologic sensitization which may complicate potential future heart transplantation, if required. The purpose of this study was to assess the anti-HLA antibody response to allograft patches used in the initial repair of HLHS. Methods: A prospective cohort

  17. Life-threatening complications of transient abnormal myelopoiesis in neonates with Down syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Dormann; Marcus Krüger; Roland Hentschel; Regina Rasenack; Brigitte Strahm; Udo Kontny; Charlotte Niemeyer

    2004-01-01

    Neonates with Down syndrome can present with a haematological disorder called transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM). While TAM is usually a self-limiting disease, patients with severe complications such as hydrops fetalis, cardiorespiratory failure and liver fibrosis have been described. Here, we present five consecutive neonates with trisomy 21 and TAM, four of whom were critically ill and were therefore treated with

  18. Osteomalacia complicating renal tubular acidosis in association with Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ati, Zohra; Fatma, Lilia Ben; Boulahya, Ghada; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Renal involvement in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is not uncommon and may precede other complaints. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal disease in SS and may lead to renal tubular acidosis (RTA), which in turn may cause osteomalacia. Nevertheless, osteomalacia rarely occurs as the first manifestation of a renal tubule disorder due to SS. We herewith describe a 43-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for weakness, lumbago and inability to walk. X-ray of the long bones showed extensive demineralization of the bones. Laboratory investigations revealed chronic kidney disease with serum creatinine of 2.3 mg/dL and creatinine clearance of 40 mL/min, hypokalemia (3.2 mmol/L), hypophosphatemia (0.4 mmol/L), hypocalcemia (2.14 mmol/L) and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis (chlorine: 114 mmol/L; alkaline reserve: 14 mmol/L). The serum alkaline phosphatase levels were elevated. The serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D were low and borderline low, respectively, and the parathyroid hormone level was 70 pg/L. Urinalysis showed inappropriate alkaline urine (urinary PH: 7), glycosuria with normal blood glucose, phosphaturia and uricosuria. These values indicated the presence of both distal and proximal RTA. Our patient reported dryness of the mouth and eyes and Schirmer's test showed xerophthalmia. An accessory salivary gland biopsy showed changes corresponding to stage IV of Chisholm and Masson score. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse and severe tubulo-interstitial nephritis with dense lymphoplasmocyte infiltrates. Sicca syndrome and renal interstitial infiltrates indicated SS as the underlying cause of the RTA and osteomalacia. The patient received alkalinization, vitamin D (Sterogyl ®), calcium supplements and steroids in an initial dose of 1 mg/kg/day, tapered to 10 mg daily. The prognosis was favorable and the serum creatinine level was 1.7 mg/dL, calcium was 2.2 mmol/L and serum phosphate was 0.9 mmol/L. PMID:25193912

  19. Cardiotoxicity and serotonin syndrome complicating a milnacipran overdose.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael; Truitt, Carrie A; O'Connor, Ayrn D

    2011-12-01

    Milnacipran is a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, recently approved for use in the USA for treatment of fibromyalgia. This case report describes a 59-year-old woman who ingested 3,000 mg of milnacipran in a suicide attempt. Following the ingestion, she became obtunded and developed autonomic instability. She required mechanical ventilation, treatment for hypertension, and then ultimately vasopressor support for refractory hypotension. In addition, she developed a transient, acute cardiac dysfunction with global hypokinesis and an ejection fraction of 30%. Resolution of the cardiac dysfunction was documented on repeat echocardiogram 2 days after the initial study. This was confirmed by cardiac catheterization performed 4 days after the acute ingestion in which coronary arteriogram was normal and left ventricular ejection fraction was 70%. Acute overdose was confirmed by quantification of plasma milnacipran concentration of 8,400 ng/mL obtained 5 h post-ingestion. To our knowledge, this represents the first case of cardiac toxicity complicating a milnacipran overdose in the medical literature. PMID:21735310

  20. The Link between Hypersensitivity Syndrome Reaction Development and Human Herpes Virus-6 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pritchett, Joshua C.; Nanau, Radu M.; Neuman, Manuela G.

    2012-01-01

    Background. There are challenges in the clinical diagnosis of drug-induced injury and in obtaining information on the reactivation of human herpes viruses (HHV) during idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. Objectives. (i) To develop a unified list of drugs incriminated in drug-induced hepatotoxicity and severe cutaneous reactions, in which drug hypersensitivity leads to HHV-6 reactivation and further complication of therapy and recovery and (ii) to supplement the already available data on reporting frequencies of liver- or skin-induced cases with knowledge of individual case reports, including HHV-6 reactivation and briefly introducing chromosomally integrated HHV-6. Data Sources and Extraction. Drugs identified as causes of (i) idiosyncratic reactions, (ii) drug-induced hypersensitivity, drug-induced hepatotoxicity, acute liver failure, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and (iii) human herpes virus reactivation in PubMed since 1997 have been collected and discussed. Results. Data presented in this paper show that HHV-6 reactivation is associated with more severe organ involvement and a prolonged course of disease. Conclusion. This analysis of HHV-6 reactivation associated with drug-induced severe cutaneous reactions and hepatotoxicity will aid in causality assessment and clinical diagnosis of possible life-threatening events and will provide a basis for further patient characterization and therapy. PMID:22666603

  1. Clinically defined chemotherapy-associated bowel syndrome predicts severe complications and death in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vehreschild, Maria J.G.T.; Meißner, Arne M.K.; Cornely, Oliver Andreas; Maschmeyer, Georg; Neumann, Silke; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Karthaus, Meinholf; Wattad, Mohammed; Staib, Peter; Hellmich, Martin; Christ, Hildegard; Vehreschild, Jörg Janne

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutropenic patients are at risk of abdominal complications and yet the incidence and impact of these complications on patients’ morbidity and mortality have not been sufficiently evaluated. We aimed to assess a clinical rule for early detection of abdominal complications leading to death or transfer to intensive care in patients with chemotherapy-associated neutropenia. Design and Methods This observational multicenter study was carried out in seven German hematology-oncology departments. For inclusion, neutropenia of at least 5 consecutive days was required. Risk factors for “transfer to intensive care” and “death” were assessed by backward-stepwise binary logistic regression analyses. Chemotherapy-associated bowel syndrome was defined as a combination of fever (T ?37.8 °C) and abdominal pain and/or lack of bowel movement for 72 hours or more. Five hundred and twenty-one neutropenic episodes were documented in 359 patients. Results The incidence of chemotherapy-associated bowel syndrome was 126/359 (35%) in first episodes of neutropenia. Transfer to intensive care occurred in 41/359 (11%) and death occurred in 17/359 (5%) first episodes. Chemotherapy-associated bowel syndrome and duration of neutropenia were identified as risk factors for transfer to intensive care (P<0.001; OR 4.753; 95% CI 2.297–9.833, and P=0.003; OR 1.061/d; 95% CI 1.021–1.103). Chemotherapy-associated bowel syndrome and mitoxantrone administration were identified as risk factors for death (P=0.005; OR 4.611; 95% CI 1.573–13.515 and P=0.026; OR 3.628; 95% CI 1.169–11.256). Conclusions The occurrence of chemotherapy-associated bowel syndrome has a significant impact on patients’ outcome. In future interventional clinical trials, this definition might be used as a selection criterion for early treatment of patients at risk of severe complications. PMID:21859736

  2. Nodding syndrome in Ugandan children—clinical features, brain imaging and complications: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Idro, Richard; Opoka, Robert Opika; Aanyu, Hellen T; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Piloya-Were, Theresa; Namusoke, Hanifa; Musoke, Sarah Bonita; Nalugya, Joyce; Bangirana, Paul; Mwaka, Amos Deogratius; White, Steven; Chong, Kling; Atai-Omoruto, Anne D; Mworozi, Edison; Nankunda, Jolly; Kiguli, Sarah; Aceng, Jane Ruth; Tumwine, James K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder of uncertain aetiology affecting children in Africa. There is no diagnostic test, and risk factors and symptoms that would allow early diagnosis are poorly documented. This study aimed to describe the clinical, electrophysiological and brain imaging (MRI) features and complications of nodding syndrome in Ugandan children. Design Case series. Participants 22 children with nodding syndrome brought to Mulago National Referral Hospital for assessment. Outcome measures Clinical features, physical and functional disabilities, EEG and brain MRI findings and a staging system with a progressive development of symptoms and complications. Results The median age of symptom onset was 6 (range 4–10) years and median duration of symptoms was 8.5 (range 2–11) years. 16 of 22 families reported multiple affected children. Physical manifestations and complications included stunting, wasting, lip changes and gross physical deformities. The bone age was delayed by 2 (range 1–6) years. There was peripheral muscle wasting and progressive generalised wasting. Four children had nodding as the only seizure type; 18 in addition had myoclonic, absence and/or generalised tonic–clonic seizures developing 1–3?years after the onset of illness. Psychiatric manifestations included wandering, aggression, depression and disordered perception. Cognitive assessment in three children demonstrated profound impairment. The EEG was abnormal in all, suggesting symptomatic generalised epilepsy in the majority. There were different degrees of cortical and cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI, but no hippocampal changes. Five stages with worsening physical, EEG and brain imaging features were identified: a prodrome, the development of head nodding and cognitive decline, other seizure types, multiple complications and severe disability. Conclusions Nodding syndrome is a neurological disorder that may be characterised as probably symptomatic generalised epilepsy. Clinical manifestations and complications develop in stages which might be useful in defining treatment and rehabilitation. Studies of risk factors, pathogenesis, management and outcome are urgently needed. PMID:23645924

  3. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Huge Cervicofacial Hemangioma Complicated by Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaki Komiyama; Hideki Nakajima; Shouhei Kitano; Hiroaki Sakamoto; Hiroko Kurimasa; Hajime Ozaki

    2000-01-01

    A 2-month-old girl with a huge cervicofacial hemangioma complicated by Kasabach-Merritt syndrome was presented. Two weeks corticosteroid treatment was ineffective, and deterioration of coagulation parameters and compromise of the airway and left vision due to huge hemangioma prompted use of endovascular treatment. Transfemoral arterial embolization using polyvinyl alcohol particles resulted in rapid clinical improvement. Endovascular treatment should be considered as

  5. Complications and surgical conversion after total aortic repair using endovascular repair in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Numata, Satoshi; Tsutsumi, Yasushi; Ohashi, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of a Marfan syndrome patient who developed a complicated clinical course after total aortic repair using a hybrid technique. After hybrid total aortic repair, this patient was required to undergo open thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic repair due to impending rupture of the aorta. Moreover, the abdominal aortic graft was rereplaced due to debranching graft occlusion of the coeliac artery and the left renal artery. PMID:25575789

  6. Nephrotic syndrome complicated with deep venous thrombosis in the upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Akira; Inoue, Makoto; Imai, Toshimi; Takeda, Shin-Ichi; Kondo, Mariko; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities is a rare but important clinical illness, which leads to severe complications such as pulmonary embolism. Unlike DVT in the lower extremities, which is mainly induced by a hypercoagulable state, DVT in the upper extremities is usually caused by mechanical obstruction or anatomical stenosis in the venous system. We herein report a case in which DVT developed in the left upper limb during treatment of nephrotic syndrome. This is the first case report of upper-extremity DVT in association with nephrotic syndrome in the literature. Our patient was a 56-year-old male with nephrotic syndrome due to idiopathic membranous nephropathy who was treated with 40 mg/day of prednisolone. During corticosteroid therapy, he developed a swelling of the left upper limb. Computed tomography revealed thrombi in the left internal jugular vein and the left subclavian vein without anatomical abnormalities in his venous system. Thus, he was diagnosed with DVT of the upper extremities. After the initiation of warfarin treatment and subsequent regression of nephrotic syndrome, the swelling disappeared and the thrombi significantly diminished. DVT should be considered when upper-extremity edema is observed in patients with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:25849667

  7. The hypertension of Cushing's syndrome: controversies in the pathophysiology and focus on cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Andrea M; Graziadio, Chiara; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Cozzolino, Alessia; Ambrogio, Alberto G; Colao, Annamaria; Corsello, Salvatore M; Pivonello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular complications, which are sustained by the common development of systemic arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome, which partially persist after the disease remission. Cardiovascular diseases and hypertension associated with endogenous hypercortisolism reveal underexplored peculiarities. The use of exogenous corticosteroids also impacts on hypertension and cardiovascular system, especially after prolonged treatment. The mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension differ, whether glucocorticoid excess is acute or chronic, and the source endogenous or exogenous, introducing inconsistencies among published studies. The pleiotropic effects of glucocorticoids and the overlap of the several regulatory mechanisms controlling blood pressure suggest that a rigorous comparison of in-vivo and in-vitro studies is necessary to draw reliable conclusions. This review, developed during the first 'Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome' workshop held in Capri in 2012, evaluates the most important peculiarities of hypertension associated with CS, with a particular focus on its pathophysiology. A critical appraisal of most significant animal and human studies is compared with a systematic review of the few available clinical trials. A special attention is dedicated to the description of the clinical features and cardiovascular damage secondary to glucocorticoid excess. On the basis of the consensus reached during the workshop, a pathophysiology-oriented therapeutic algorithm has been developed and it could serve as a first attempt to rationalize the treatment of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome. PMID:25415766

  8. Herrmann multiple synostosis syndrome with neurological complications caused by spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M J; Rowe, L; Petroff, V

    2000-11-13

    A young man was found to have multiple synostosis syndrome type I after presenting with a neck injury causing a cervical spinal cord contusion. Neurological symptoms and signs suggested spinal cord compression. Magnetic resonance (MR) and computerized tomography (CT) imaging of the spine showed spinal canal stenosis with cord compression at C3-C6, a deformed spinal canal flattened in the anteroposterior dimension, vertebral fusions and deformed lateral processes of the vertebrae. He had a long broad nose with hypoplasia of the alae nasi, conductive hearing loss requiring hearing aids, muscular build, stiff spine, prominent acromia, pectus excavatum, ischial prominences, short fifth fingers, fusion at the proximal interphalangeal joints of the fifth fingers with indistinct overlying creases, and toe syndactyly. Spinal cord stenosis is a serious complication of multiple synostosis syndrome, that should be kept in mind in considering the risk of neck or back injury associated with certain sports or other activities. In both the multiple synostosis syndrome and the less severe proximal symphalangism deafness syndrome, mutations have been detected in the human homologue of the noggin gene on chromosome 17q21-q22. PMID:11078560

  9. Organophosphate intermediate syndrome with neurological complications of extrapyramidal symptoms in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are ubiquitous in the world as domestic and industrial agricultural insecticides. Intentional poisoning as suicides attempts are clinical phenomena seen in emergency departments and clinics in agricultural areas. Intermediate syndrome with the neurological complication of extra pyramidal symptoms following acute OP ingestion may occur in pediatric and adult cases. While death is the most serious consequence of toxic OP doses, low levels of exposure and nonfatal doses may disrupt the neurobehavioral development of fetuses and children in addition to bring linked to testicular cancer and male and female infertility. These are disturbing. Chronic and acute toxicity from OPs are barriers to the health of our present and future generations. Symptoms and treatment of acute and chronic OP exposure are briefly referenced with inclusion of the intermediate syndrome. Suggestions for local and systemic reduction of the acute and long term consequences of OP ingestion are opined. PMID:25002781

  10. Otitis complicated by Jacod's syndrome with unusal facial nerve involvement: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abdulkadir, Kocer; Buket, Sanlisoy; Dilek, Agircan; Munevver, Okay; Ayse, Aralasmak

    2015-04-01

    Otitis media is a well-known condition and its infra-temporal and intracranial complications are extremely rare because of the widespread usage of antibiotic treatment. We report a case of 63-year-old female with complaints of right-sided facial pain and diplopia. She had a history of acute otitis media before 4 months of admission to our neurology unit. Neurological examination showed that total ophthalmoplegia with ptosis, mydriasis, decreased vision and loss of pupil reflex on the right side. In addition, there was involvement of 5th and 7th cranial nerves. Neurological and radiological follow-up examinations demonstrated Jacod's Syndrome with unusual facial nerve damage and infection in aetiology. Sinusitis is the most common aetiology, but there are a few cases reported Jacod's Syndrome originating from otitis media. PMID:25976583

  11. Life-Threatening Complication During Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Gland Metastasis: Takotsubo Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Buy, Xavier, E-mail: Xavier.buy@chru-strasbourg.f [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Non Vascular Interventional Radiology (France); Zickler, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.zickler@chru-strasbourg.f [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Anaesthesiology (France); Zupan, Michel, E-mail: Michel.zupan@chru-strasbourg.fr; Douchet, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: Marie.pierre-douchet@chru-strasbourg.f [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Cardiology (France); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@rad6.u-strasbg.f [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Non Vascular Interventional Radiology (France)

    2010-06-15

    A rare life-threatening complication during percutaneous cryoablation of an adrenal gland metastasis from a lung carcinoma is reported. The patient presented hypertensive crisis at the beginning of the thawing cycle, followed by electrocardiographic change which necessitated interruption of the procedure and his transfer to the intensive care unit with suspicion of heart infarct. There was a slight increase in cardiac enzyme levels, and ventricular angiography demonstrated transient hypokinesis-dyskinesis of the mid left ventricular segments without apical involvement, while the coronary arteries showed no significant stenosis on coronarography. These findings led to the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy left ventricular dysfunction syndrome. This is the first case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurring as a complication during percutaneous ablation of an adrenal gland tumor.

  12. Advances in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of Cushing's syndrome complications.

    PubMed

    Arnaldi, G; Mancini, T; Tirabassi, G; Trementino, L; Boscaro, M

    2012-04-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a clinical condition resulting from chronic exposure to glucocorticoid excess. As a consequence, hypercortisolism contributes significantly to the early development of systemic disorders by direct and/or indirect effects. Complications such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypercoagulability cause premature atherosclerosis and increase cardiovascular mortality. Impairment of the skeletal system is a relevant cause of morbidity and disability in these patients especially due to the high prevalence of vertebral fractures. In addition, muscle weakness, emotional lability, depression, and impairment of quality of life are very common. Clinical management of these patients is complex and should be particularly careful in identifying global cardiovascular risks and aim at controlling all complications. Although the primary goal in the prevention and treatment of complications is the correction of hypercortisolism, treatment does not completely eliminate these comorbidities. Given that cardiovascular risk and fracture risk can persist after cure, early detection of each morbidity could prevent the development of irreversible damage. In this review we present the various complications of CS and their pathogenetic mechanisms. We also suggest the clinical management of these patients based on our extensive clinical experience and on the available literature. PMID:22652826

  13. The post-PE syndrome: a new concept for chronic complications of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Klok, F A; van der Hulle, T; den Exter, P L; Lankeit, M; Huisman, M V; Konstantinides, S

    2014-11-01

    Long-term follow-up studies have consistently demonstrated that after an episode of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), half of patients report functional limitations and/or decreased quality of life up to many years after the acute event. Incomplete thrombus resolution occurs in one-fourth to one-third of patients. Further, pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular function remain abnormal despite adequate anticoagulant treatment in 10-30% of patients, and 0.5-4% is diagnosed with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) which represents the most severe long term complication of acute PE. From these numbers, it seems that CTEPH itself is the extreme manifestation of a much more common phenomenon of permanent changes in pulmonary artery flow, pulmonary gas exchange and/or cardiac function caused by the acute PE and associated with dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which in analogy to post-thrombotic syndrome after deep vein thrombosis could be referred to as the post-pulmonary embolism syndrome. The acknowledgement of this syndrome would both be relevant for daily clinical practice and also provide a concept that aids in further understanding of the pathophysiology of CTEPH. In this clinically oriented review, we discuss the established associations and hypotheses between the process of thrombus resolution or persistence, lasting hemodynamic changes following acute PE as well as the consequences of a PE diagnosis on long-term physical performance and quality of life. PMID:25168205

  14. Intracranial fixation pin migration: a complication of external Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis in Apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ming; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Xudong; Fang, Bing

    2010-09-01

    External distraction osteogenesis has long been used in treatment of congenital midface hypoplasia. Distraction osteogenesis is associated with lower relapse rate and less complications compared with standard Le Fort III osteotomy. General complications in using rigid external distraction include localized infection, loosening of pins, and pin displacement. A 24-year-old female patient with Apert syndrome who underwent Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis is reported. Standard Le Fort III osteotomy was performed, and external distractor was placed. After 7-day latency period, the distractor was activated at the rate of 1 mm/d and finished after 20 days. A mild localized infection was recognized at the eighth week of consolidation period, and debridement was carried out at the left side of pin fixation. Obvious displacement of distractor occurred 1 week later while the patient was sleeping, and emergency operation was performed to remove the distractor and depress the left temporal skull bone fracture after clinical evaluation. The patient was asymptomatic clinically, and the advancement of the midface was stable. Le Fort I osteotomy was performed 3 years later to obtain a normal occlusion, and the patient was satisfied with the final outcome. We concluded that an unwanted trauma might cause severe complications such as skull bone fracture secondary to related local infection, and close follow-up and management are necessary for those cases. PMID:20856048

  15. Abdominal compartment syndrome – the prevention and treatment of possible lethal complications following hip arthroscopy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome have been increasingly recognized as a hip arthroscopy complication over the past decade. In the absence of consensus definitions and treatment guidelines, the diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome remains variable from institution to institution. Case presentation We report the occurrence of the extravasation of fluid into the abdomen during arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement combined with resection of trochanteric bursa and our management of the condition in a 55-year old Caucasian woman. Conclusions We present an algorithm of treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome, as a hip arthroscopy complication, according to the consensus definitions and recommendations of the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome. In the algorithm options, we have included paracentesis and percutaneous catheter decompression as the main point of treatment. Our algorithm will have a broader clinical impact on orthopedic surgery, anesthesiology and emergency medicine. PMID:25394557

  16. [A Case of Corticobasal Syndrome Complicated with Hypopituitarism and Hashimoto's Disease].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Satoru; Kinbara, Yoshiyuki; Terada, Makoto; Komiya, Tadashi; Ishii, Kenji; Takao, Masaki; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Murayama, Shigeo

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of an individual with corticobasal syndrome (CBS), hypopituitarism due to a post-traumatic leptomeningeal cyst, and Hashimoto's disease. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of cognitive dysfunction and bradykinesia. Following a primary diagnosis of hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism, she was given hormone replacement therapy, and her clinical symptoms appeared to improve. However, some cognitive impairment and extrapyramidal symptoms remained. The results of careful neurological examinations, as well as magnetic resonance, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography images, suggested a diagnosis of CBS-CBD (corticobasal degeneration). Because parkinsonism and cognitive impairment can be caused by endocrinopathy, it was initially difficult to reach the complete diagnosis that included CBS. Thus, it is important to understand that complicated neurological presentations can be caused by several different disorders. (Received September 4, 2014; Accepted October 15, 2014; Published June 1, 2015). PMID:26062591

  17. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Coincidence of unusual complication?

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, S.A.; Williams, C.A.; Gray, B.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); and others

    1996-09-06

    We report on two patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The first, a 9-year-old girl, presented with microcephaly, characteristic face, congenital heart disease, and velopharyngeal insufficiency. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study showed deletion of D22S75 (N25), confirming the diagnosis of VCFS. At age 7, she developed joint pain, and polyarticular JRA was diagnosed. Awareness of this case led to the subsequent diagnosis of VCFS (also confirmed by FISH) in another, unrelated 12-year-old girl with characteristic face, hypernasal speech, and obesity. JRA was first diagnosed in this case at age 5 years, and she subsequently developed severe polyarticular disease. Neither patient had clinical or laboratory evidence of immunodeficiency. This observation represents the first report of the association of JRA with VCFS and raises the question of whether this is a coincidental association or a rare complication of this condition. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome Complicated with Pyocolpos: An Unusual Cause of Postabortal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepti; Janu, MK; Gaikwad, Ramesh; Usha, MG

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive mullerian anomalies give rise to a spectrum of clinical presentations and are uncommon in routine gynecologic practice. The patient usually becomes symptomatic in early reproductive years. Recurrent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, enlarging abdominopelvic mass, and abnormal vaginal discharge are the common presenting symptoms. We describe a rare case of a mullerian anomaly getting diagnosed 13 years after attaining menarche during the evaluation of postabortal sepsis. Patient presented 2 weeks following evacuation carried out for missed abortion, with acute abdominal pain, fever and foul smelling discharge per vaginum. The anomaly was identified as uterus didelphys with obstructed left hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis (Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome) complicated by pyocolpos. She was successfully managed by single-stage transvaginal septum resection under laparoscopic control.

  19. Adipose tissue mitochondrial dysfunction triggers a lipodystrophic syndrome with insulin resistance, hepatosteatosis, and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Vernochet, Cecile; Damilano, Federico; Mourier, Arnaud; Bezy, Olivier; Mori, Marcelo A; Smyth, Graham; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Kahn, C Ronald

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue occurs in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of lipodystrophy, but whether this dysfunction contributes to or is the result of these disorders is unknown. To investigate the physiological consequences of severe mitochondrial impairment in adipose tissue, we generated mice deficient in mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in adipocytes by using mice carrying adiponectin-Cre and TFAM floxed alleles. These adiponectin TFAM-knockout (adipo-TFAM-KO) mice had a 75-81% reduction in TFAM in the subcutaneous and intra-abdominal white adipose tissue (WAT) and interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT), causing decreased expression and enzymatic activity of proteins in complexes I, III, and IV of the electron transport chain (ETC). This mitochondrial dysfunction led to adipocyte death and inflammation in WAT and a whitening of BAT. As a result, adipo-TFAM-KO mice were resistant to weight gain, but exhibited insulin resistance on both normal chow and high-fat diets. These lipodystrophic mice also developed hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and cardiac dysfunction. Thus, isolated mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue can lead a syndrome of lipodystrophy with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular complications. PMID:25005176

  20. Successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome complicated by severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Sumie; Shimoji, Sonoko; Murase, Kimihiko; Takiuchi, Yoko; Inoue, Daichi; Kimura, Takaharu; Nagai, Yuya; Mori, Minako; Togami, Katsuhiro; Kurata, Masayuki; Ito, Kiminari; Hashimoto, Hisako; Matushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2009-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by the abnormal accumulation of alveolar surfactant protein in alveolar spaces. We report herein a rare case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS-RAEB) complicated by severe PAP, and successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for both disorders. An unrelated BMT was planned for a 48-year-old male with advanced MDS-RAEB. Just before the initiation of the conditioning regimen for unrelated BMT in March 2007, he developed dyspnea. A diagnosis of PAP was made based on findings of chest X-ray, CT scanning, and the fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. To improve his dyspnea and improve BMT safety, whole lung lavage (WLL) was performed twice, with the partial improvement of PAP. Unrelated allogeneic BMT was performed in September 2007. We had to perform a third WLL because of the worsening of PAP on day 26 after BMT. Despite many infectious complications after BMT, GVHD was relatively mild. PAP had almost disappeared 6 months after BMT. He was well with favorable hematopoiesis 20 months after the BMT without any specific treatment. There has been no report of an MDS patient with PAP in whom 3 WLL procedures were performed before and after allogeneic BMT. PMID:19693450

  1. Successful treatment with recombinant thrombomodulin for disseminated intravascular coagulation complicated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Tatsumi, Goichi; Kotani, Shin-Ichi; Arai, Yasuyuki; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kitano, Toshiyuki; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human thrombomodulin (rTM) improves the blood coagulation disorder characteristic of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) as well as, or even better than, other anti-DIC drugs. On post-marketing surveillance, its effectiveness has been recognized for hematologic disorders, sepsis and solid tumor subgroups. However, the effect on hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) complicated by DIC remains unclear. We treated three HPS patients with rTM in addition to chemotherapy for the underlying diseases including nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and refractory acute myeloid leukemia post cord blood transplantation. Although being refractory to medical management was suspected in our cases, clinical status rapidly came under control including not only amelioration of the blood coagulation disorder but also inflammatory reactions, such as serum ferritin and lactic acid dehydrogenase abnormalities, which represent HPS activity. These observations suggest that rTM might exert marked synergistic effects on HPS with DIC. Given the results obtained in these three cases, administration of rTM appears to offer a promising method of treating HPS complicated by DIC. PMID:25876785

  2. Characterization of vascular complications in experimental model of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; Dsokey, Nora; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important complication associated with metabolic syndrome (MS). Here we fully characterized vascular complications in a rat model of fructose-induced MS. MS was induced by adding fructose (10%) to drinking water to male Wistar rats of 6 weeks age. Blood pressure (BP) and isolated aorta responses phenylephrine (PE), KCl, acetylcholine (ACh), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were recorded after 6, 9, and 12 weeks of fructose administration. In addition, serum levels of glucose, insulin, uric acid, tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?), lipids, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and arginase activity were determined. Furthermore, aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, hemeoxygenase-1 expression, and collagen deposition were examined. Fructose administration resulted in a significant hyperinslinemia after 6 weeks which continued for 12 weeks. It was also associated with a significant increase in BP after 6 weeks which was stable for 12 weeks. Aorta isolated from MS animals showed exaggerated contractility to PE and KCl and impaired relaxation to ACh compared with control after 6 weeks which were clearer at 12 weeks of fructose administration. In addition, MS animals showed significant increases in serum levels of lipids, uric acid, AGEs, TNF?, and arginase enzyme activity after 12 weeks of fructose administration. Furthermore, aortae isolated from MS animals were characterized by increased ROS generation and collagen deposition. In conclusion, adding fructose (10%) to drinking water produces a model of MS with vascular complications after 12 weeks that are characterized by insulin resistance, hypertension, disturbed vascular reactivity and structure, hyperuricemia, dyslipidemia, and low-grade inflammation. PMID:25046175

  3. Severe cutaneous adverse reactions: emergency approach to non-burn epidermolytic syndromes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuel Florian Struck; Peter Hilbert; Maja Mockenhaupt; Beate Reichelt; Michael Steen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction  Although severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are\\u000a rare, they are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The current knowledge regarding background, differential diagnoses, critical care and implications for inter-hospital emergency\\u000a medical service (EMS) transport of these patients is discussed.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Conclusion  SCAR patients will substantially benefit from early interdisciplinary care and thorough consideration of

  4. Anterior mediastinal fibrosis with superior vena caval obstruction complicating the synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteomyelitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, T; Farrell, J; Veale, D; Fitzgerald, O

    1993-05-01

    A syndrome of predominantly palmo-plantar pustular psoriasis associated with anterior chest wall (sternoclavicular, manubriosternal) inflammation has previously been described. In this case, a further patient is reported where chest wall involvement is complicated by anterior mediastinal fibrosis and superior vena caval obstruction. PMID:8495263

  5. Toxic shock syndrome complicating influenza A in a child: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Tolan, R W

    1993-07-01

    Despite extensive literature on toxic shock syndrome, reports of its manifestations in children remain relatively uncommon. Similarly, toxic shock syndrome in association with influenza B or influenza-like illness has been reported in 12 patients, but it has been reported to occur following influenza A in only two patients to date. We report a third case of toxic shock syndrome in a child with influenza A and review the association between epidemic influenza and toxic shock syndrome ("the Thucydides syndrome"). PMID:8353244

  6. Compartment syndrome as a complication of ileofemoral deep venous thrombosis:a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Lamborn, David R; Schranz, Craig

    2014-02-01

    A 22-year-old morbidly obese, nonpregnant woman presented with left ileofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presenting as low back pain and bilateral, left greater than right, leg swelling and pain for 2 days. While on heparin, she developed compartment syndrome in her left leg and had evidence of dead muscle tissue at the time of fasciotomy. Three options exist for treatment of ileofemoral DVT: catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, and surgical thrombectomy. Catheter-directed thrombolysis alone or in conjunction with pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in patients with low risk of bleeding has shown significant lysis of occlusion in 79% of patients with ileofemoral DVT with relatively low complication rates. Surgical thrombectomy and fasciotomy have not proven to be as effective but are appropriate alternatives if CDT is not available. Standard anticoagulation alone is likely not a sufficient treatment for ileofemoral DVT. Other therapies including CDT, CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, or surgical thrombectomy to address lysis of the clot should be attempted first or in conjunction with anticoagulation for appropriate patients. Catheter-directed thrombolysis with or without pharmacomechanical thrombolysis is the preferred initial treatment. PMID:24091199

  7. Heterotopic ossification as an unusual complication after Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Su-Ra; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Choi, In-Sung; Han, Jae-Young; Lee, Sam-Gyu

    2008-03-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the abnormal development of bone within soft tissue. It is frequently encountered after traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, rather than lower motoneuron disease. It has been reported as a rare complication in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We present the case of a 31-year-old woman who suffered from pain and swelling with limitation of the passive range of motion on right hip joint, and who had been diagnosed with GBS about 1 year previously. She was wheelchair-bound and had incomplete tetraplegia with flaccidity. She was diagnosed as HO based on the radiologic imaging study. She did not reveal any encephalopathy-related symptoms or signs, and hypercalcemia, and/or related metabolic derangement during 1.5-year follow-up period. Owing to the paucity of other causative factors, we presumed that the long-time hypomobility, even though not accompanied by hypercalcemia, played a major role for the development of HO. Early active rehabilitative management was initiated. The outcome is not promising because of her long-standing paralyzed state; however, it was possible to prevent the aggravation of HO. PMID:18295638

  8. [Ultrasonic cavitation and ozonization in treatment of patients with pyo-necrotic complications of diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zubarev, P N; Risman, B V

    2011-01-01

    The main group consisted of 130 patients with pyo-necrotic complications of diabetic foot syndrome, in who after operations within the foot limits, there were ultrasonic cavitation and ozonization of the wound surface. The control group consisted of 90 patients who underwent operative treatment as well as a standard local treatment using the preparations with reference to the phase of the wound process. The use of low-frequency ultrasound allows in short-terms ablation of necrotized tissues within the limits of healthy tissues, decrease of microbial contamination of the wounds and preparing to closing. Ozonization of the wounds facilitates growth of the granulating tissues and prolongs the effect of decontamination of the wound surface. The application of physical methods in treatment of patients with pyo-necrotic complications of diabetic foot syndrome decreases the number of disabling operations. PMID:21506355

  9. Small cell gall bladder carcinoma complicated by syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) treated with mozavaptan

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Tetsuo; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Small cell gall bladder carcinoma (Scc-GB) is a very rare entity. Although some cases present with endocrine manifestations, paraneoplastic hyponatraemia has been reported in only one previous case. Recently, the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) receptor antagonist mozavaptan has become available. Herein we report a case with Scc-GB complicated with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) treated with mozavaptan. A 47-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for hyponatraemia. Physical examination revealed elevated serum ADH, a gall bladder mass. She was clinically diagnosed with Scc-GB with SIADH as a paraneoplastic syndrome. Mozavaptan was used for SIADH. Serum sodium was quickly normalised after mozavaptan treatment. Two months later, metastasis to the subcutis of the abdominal wall was observed. The metastatic nodule was resected, and small cell carcinoma (Scc) was identified pathologically. Mozavaptan was effective for improvement of hyponatraemia in this patient with Scc-GB complicated with SIADH. PMID:23761568

  10. Mucosal lesions may be a minor complication of SAPHO syndrome: a study of 11 Japanese patients with SAPHO syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroki Yabe; Hisaji Ohshima; Yoji Takano; Takahiro Koyanagi; Hiroshi Usui; Kensuke Ochi; Michiya Kihara; Yukio Horiuchi

    2010-01-01

    Since the term synovitis–acne–pustulosis–hyperostosis–osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome was proposed by Chamot et al. (Rev Rhum Mal\\u000a Osteoartic 54:187–196, 1987), clinical reviews concerning this syndrome have been mainly reported from Europe. We carried out a retrospective analysis\\u000a of 11 Japanese patients with SAPHO syndrome, and reviewed the clinical features of our series in comparison with those in\\u000a a European large case study.

  11. Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome complicated by IgA nephropathy and Graves’ disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome is a disorder characterized by a combination of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is defined by the presence of immunoglobulin A deposits in glomerular mesangial areas. In this report, we describe a rare case of tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy and Graves’ disease, which was successfully treated with corticosteroids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such a case has been documented since tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome was first described. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman presented with tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome accompanied by immunoglobulin A nephropathy and Graves’ disease. She had renal dysfunction, proteinuria, and hematuria. Two weeks after her admission, she developed anterior chamber uveitis. She received corticosteroids, resulting in significant clinical improvement. Conclusion Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome is a relatively uncommon cause of tubulointerstitial nephritis. Clinicians should recognize that tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome with immunoglobulin A nephropathy can occur in the presence of Graves’ disease. Additionally, this report may provide important clues in terms of the management of a concomitant case of these diseases. PMID:25216854

  12. Successful Treatment of Crush Syndrome Complicated with Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Using Hybrid Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qin Wei; Su Baihai; Fu Ping; Chen Xiaolei; Li Jing; Zhen Rong

    2009-01-01

    Background: The M8.1 ‘Wenchuan’ earthquake occurred on May 12th 2008 causing many injuries and casualties. We report a case with crush syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) successfully treated with hybrid continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Method: The patient is a 16-year-old female who was rescued from a collapsed building after 17 h. Emergency amputation was performed. Infections and

  13. The lupus syndrome induced by hydralazine: a common complication with low dose treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H A Cameron; L E Ramsay

    1984-01-01

    The true incidence of the lupus syndrome induced by hydralazine was determined in a longitudinal study of 281 patients consecutively starting hydralazine for hypertension over a 51 month period. Data on the duration of treatment and the maximum dose achieved were examined using life table analysis. After three years' treatment with hydralazine the incidence of the lupus syndrome was 6.7%

  14. Classic Bartter syndrome complicated with profound growth hormone deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Classic Bartter syndrome is a salt-wasting tubulopathy caused by mutations in the CLCNKB (chloride channel Kb) gene. Although growth hormone deficiency has been suggested as a cause for persistent growth failure in patients with classic Bartter syndrome, in our opinion the diagnoses of growth hormone deficiency has been unconvincing in some reports. Moreover, Gitelman syndrome seems to have been confused with Bartter syndrome in some cases in the literature. In the present work, we describe a new case with CLCNKB gene mutations and review the reported cases of classic Bartter syndrome associated with growth hormone deficiency. Case presentation Our patient was a Japanese boy diagnosed as having classic Bartter syndrome at eight months of age. The diagnosis of Bartter syndrome was confirmed by CLCNKB gene analysis, which revealed compound heterozygous mutations with deletion of exons 1 to 3 (derived from his mother) and ?L130 (derived from his father). His medical therapy consisted of potassium (K), sodium chloride, spironolactone, and anti-inflammatory agents; this regime was started at eight months of age. Our patient was very short (131.1cm, -4.9 standard deviation) at 14.3 years and showed profoundly impaired growth hormone responses to pharmacological stimulants: 0.15?g/L to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and 0.39?g/L to arginine. His growth response to growth hormone therapy was excellent. Conclusions The present case strengthens the association between classic Bartter syndrome and growth hormone deficiency. We propose that growth hormone status should be considered while treating children with classic Bartter syndrome. PMID:24377430

  15. Analysis of Families with Lynch Syndrome Complicated by Advanced Serrated Neoplasia: The Importance of Pathology Review and Pedigree Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael D; Buchanan, Daniel D; Walters, Rhiannon; Roberts, Aedan; Arnold, Sven; McKeone, Diane; Clendenning, Mark; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jillian; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Young, Graeme P; Macrae, Finlay; Drini, Musa; Woods, Michael O; Parry, Susan; Jass, Jeremy R; Young, Joanne P

    2009-01-01

    The identification of Lynch syndrome has been greatly assisted by the advent of tumour immunohistochemistry (IHC) for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, and by the recognition of the role of acquired somatic BRAF mutation in sporadic MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC). However, somatic BRAF mutation may also be present in the tumours in families with a predisposition to develop serrated polyps in the colorectum. In a subgroup of affected members in these families, CRCs emerge which demonstrate clear evidence of MMR deficiency with absent MLH1 staining and high-level microsatellite instability (MSI). This may result in these families being erroneously classified as Lynch syndrome or, conversely, an individual is considered “sporadic” due to the presence of a somatic BRAF mutation in a tumour. In this report, we describe two Lynch syndrome families who demonstrated several such inconsistencies. In one family, IHC deficiency of both MSH2 and MLH1 was demonstrated in tumours from different affected family members, presenting a confusing diagnostic picture. In the second family, MLH1 loss was observed in the lesions of both MLH1 mutation carriers and those who showed normal MLH1 germline sequence. Both families had Lynch syndrome complicated by an independently segregating serrated neoplasia phenotype, suggesting that in families such as these, tumour and germline studies of several key members, rather than of a single proband, are indicated to clarify the spectrum of risk. PMID:19241144

  16. Cervical spinal cord stimulation treatment of deafferentation pain from brachial plexus avulsion injury complicated by complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang Chien, George C; Candido, Kenneth D; Saeed, Kashif; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2014-08-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion is a rare and debilitating condition frequently associated with severe, intractable neuropathic pain. Interventional treatment modalities include dorsal root entry zone lesioning, stellate ganglion blockade, and neuromodulation such as spinal cord stimulation. We present a case of a 42-year-old woman with a traumatic left upper extremity brachial plexus avulsion injury after a motor vehicle accident and treatment of deafferentation pain complicated by complex regional pain syndrome type II. Previous unsuccessful interventions included repeated stellate ganglion blocks, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and opioid medication. After a successful trial of cervical spinal cord stimulator lead placement, she went on to an uneventful permanent implantation procedure. Spinal cord stimulation is an effective treatment for deafferentation pain and complex regional pain syndrome type II secondary to brachial plexopathy refractory to pharmacotherapy and conventional interventional attempts to modulate pain. PMID:25611136

  17. A Case of Visceral Autonomic Neuropathy Complicated by Guillain-Barre Syndrome Accompanied with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome-like Disorder in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suk Jin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 8-year-old boy with visceral autonomic neuropathy complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome. In this pediatric patient, gastroparesis was the major symptom among the autonomic symptoms. Due to the gastroparesis, there was no progress with the oral diet, and nutrition was therefore supplied through a nasojejunal tube and gastrojejunal tube via Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). After tube feeding for 9 months, the patient's gastrointestinal symptoms improved and his oral ingestion increased. The pediatric patient was maintained well without gastrointestinal symptoms for 3 months after removal of the PEG, had repeated vomiting episodes which lead to the suspicion of cyclic vomiting syndrome. Then he started treatment with low-dose amitriptyline, which resulted in improvement. Currently, the patient has been maintained well for 6 months without recurrence, and his present growth status is normal. PMID:26157699

  18. Compartment syndrome due to massive leg hematoma after primary total hip arthroplasty: a previously unreported complication of fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Michael G; Lamont, Justin G

    2012-08-01

    Fondaparinux is an accepted form of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after hip arthroplasty. Cited advantages of its use include once-daily administration, standard dosage, and superiority as compared with enoxaparin. However, there have been several case reports of serious associated bleeding complications. We describe the case of a 77-year-old woman who developed a massive leg hematoma in the operative extremity nearly 3 weeks after a primary total hip arthroplasty while on fondaparinux. The patient developed a compartment syndrome requiring decompression of the hematoma, fasciotomy, and subsequent additional plastic surgery for split thickness skin grafting. PMID:22177799

  19. Embryonic natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis complicated by abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui-ming; Guo, Shao-qing; Liao, Xiu-min; Zhang, Li; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The study aimed to estimate the value of embryonal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (ENOTES) in treating severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated with abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). METHODS: The patients, who were randomized into an ENOTES group and an operative group, underwent ENOTES and laparotomy, respectively. The results and complications of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Enterocinesia was observed earlier in the ENOTES group than in the operative group. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score of patients in the ENOTES group was lower than that of the operative group on the 1st, 3rd and 5th post-operative day (P<0.05). The cure rate was 96.87% in the ENOTES group, which was statistically different from 78.12% in the operative group (P<0.05). There were significant differences in complications and mortality between the two groups (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Compared with surgical decompression, ENOTES associated with flexible endoscope therapy is an effective and minimal invasive procedure with less complications. PMID:25802562

  20. The superior mesenteric artery syndrome: an unusual complication in a patient with the Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Massa, G; Casaer, P; Marchal, G; Eggermont, E

    1989-01-01

    A 12 year old patient with the Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome and suffering from acute intestinal obstruction during treatment with benztropine is presented. An upright film of the abdomen and opacification of the duodenum showed an abrupt cut off just to the right of the third lumbar vertebra. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a reduced superior mesenteric-aortic angle and distance. Predisposing factors in this patient were supine position, extreme opisthotonos and duodenal hypotonia induced by benztropine. PMID:2486013

  1. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as complicated Henoch–Scho?nlein purpura

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Monastiri; H Selmi; B Tabarki; M Yacoub; T Mahjoub; A S Essoussi

    2002-01-01

    A child showing signs of Henoch–Scho?nlein purpura developed a right tibiofibular vascular thrombosis. Antiphospholipid antibody tests were positive for both lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. This suggests that an antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered in cases of Henoch–Scho?nlein purpura and antiphospholipid antibodies should be measured to determine whether prophylactic antithrombotic measures are needed to prevent thrombotic manifestations.

  2. [Who keeps watch over the watcher? Münchausen syndrome by proxy as a complication of tonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    García, F J; Serrano, R; Daniel, E; Pérez, D; Calvo, J

    2000-01-01

    Münchausen's syndrome by proxy is a form of child abuse which must be detected and treated as soon as possible. Within ours specialty there have been described few cases, but its frequency is higher to the described in the literature. We report a new case and check as well the cases of otorhinolaryngologic affectation of the disease. PMID:11075474

  3. Occam Paradox? A Variation of Tapia Syndrome and an Unreported Complication of Guidewire-Assisted Pedicle Screw Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Emohare, Osa; Peterson, Erik; Slinkard, Nathaniel; Janus, Seth; Morgan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Study Design?Case report. Clinical Question?The clinical aim is to report on a previously unknown association between guidewire-assisted pedicle screw insertion and neuropraxia of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and how this may overlap with the signs of Tapia syndrome; we also report our approach to the clinical management of this patient. Methods?A 17-year-old male patient with idiopathic scoliosis experienced Tapia syndrome after posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis at the level of T1–L1. After extubation, the patient had a hoarse voice and difficulty in swallowing. Imaging showed a breach in the cortex of the anterior body of T1 corresponding to the RLN on the right. Results?Otolaryngological examination noted right vocal fold immobility, decreased sensation of the endolarynx, and pooling of secretions on flexible laryngoscopy that indicated right-sided cranial nerve X injury and left-sided tongue deviation. Aspiration during a modified barium swallow prompted insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube before the patient was sent home. On postoperative day 20, a barium swallow demonstrated reduced aspiration, and the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms. The feeding tube was removed, and the patient resumed a normal diet 1?month later. Tapia syndrome, or persistent unilateral laryngeal and hypoglossal paralysis, is an uncommon neuropraxia, which has previously not been observed in association with a breached vertebral body at T1 along the course of the RLN. Conclusion?Tapia syndrome should be a differential diagnostic consideration whenever these symptoms persist postoperatively and spine surgeons should be aware of this as a potential complication of guidewires in spinal instrumentation. PMID:24436711

  4. Internal jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis (lemierre syndrome) as a complication of pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andrew P; Duggins, Maurice L; Neil, Tara

    2015-01-01

    Sore throat is a common presenting complaint in the outpatient setting. Most cases are nonbacterial in origin, but those that are bacterial are usually the result of group A ?-hemolytic streptococcus. Guidelines exist to help physicians decide whether to treat with an antibiotic. Lemierre syndrome is a dangerous potential sequela of pharyngitis that results in septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular (IJ) vein. A high index of suspicion is needed to consider this diagnosis in the workup of pharyngitis and should be aggressively treated once identified. Consideration should be given to completing blood cultures and neck imaging because of clinical suspicion. The case study discussed here illustrates the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of Lemierre syndrome. PMID:25957375

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by cytomegalovirus-induced hemophagocytic syndrome and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Seo, Ryutaro; Nagai, Yuya; Mori, Minako; Togami, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Haruyuki; Kurata, Masayuki; Matsushita, Akiko; Maeda, Akinori; Nagai, Kenichi; Kotani, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2008-02-01

    A 58-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) was referred and admitted to our hospital because of fever and pancytopenia. She had been taking small dose of prednisolone and azathiprine since 2003 with stable SLE and APS. Two weeks before the admission, she developed fever and common cold-like symptoms and was admitted to a hospital. Antibiotics were ineffective and thrombocytopenia manifested. Under a diagnosis of progressive SLE, bolus methylprednisolone was administrated. However, she became pancytopenic and was transferred to our hospital. A bone marrow aspirate showed the hemophagocytosis and chest CT scanning revealed interstitial pneumonia. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia test gave a positive result. A diagnosis of CMV-induced hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) and CMV pneumonia was made. Gancyclovir resolved the pancytopenia, pneumonia, and fever. There have been only 3 reported cases of CMV-related HPS in collagen disease. PMID:18311046

  6. Pulmonary function in coal workers with Caplan's syndrome and non-rheumatoid complicated pneumosoniosis.

    PubMed Central

    Constantinidis, K; Musk, A W; Jenkins, J P; Berry, G

    1978-01-01

    This retrospective study compares the pulmonary function of 24 coal workers with Caplan's syndrome with that of 36 subjects with non-rheumatoid progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). Allowing for differences in radiographical category, age, years worked underground, and smoking, obstruction to air flow as reflected in the one-second forced expiratory volume, the vital capacity, and the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity, was significantly less in subjects with Caplan's syndrome. No significant differences in transfer factor were found. These findings may be explained by the different pathological features of the two entities. Selection bias does not appear to be responsible for the differences observed between the groups, but studies designed to eliminate this would be desirable. PMID:746502

  7. Beneficial Role of Bitter Melon Supplementation in Obesity and Related Complications in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Subhan, Nusrat; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Jain, Preeti; Reza, Hasan Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome are becoming epidemic both in developed and developing countries in recent years. Complementary and alternative medicines have been used since ancient era for the treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Bitter melon is widely used as vegetables in daily food in Bangladesh and several other countries in Asia. The fruits extract of bitter melon showed strong antioxidant and hypoglycemic activities in experimental condition both in vivo and in vitro. Recent scientific evaluation of this plant extracts also showed potential therapeutic benefit in diabetes and obesity related metabolic dysfunction in experimental animals and clinical studies. These beneficial effects are mediated probably by inducing lipid and fat metabolizing gene expression and increasing the function of AMPK and PPARs, and so forth. This review will thus focus on the recent findings on beneficial effect of Momordica charantia extracts on metabolic syndrome and discuss its potential mechanism of actions. PMID:25650336

  8. Polyarteritis nodosa complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alp, Alper; Akdam, Hakan; Akar, Harun; Koseoglu, Kutsi; Ozkul, Ayca; Meteoglu, Ibrahim; Yenicerioglu, Yavuz

    2014-11-17

    Hypertension (HT) represents a major public health problem affecting many individuals worldwide. It is well known to be an important risk factor for the development of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. Classifying hypertension as ‘primary’ or ‘secondary’ depends on the underlying mechanism. In 5 to 10% of hypertensive patients, HT develops ‘secondary’ to a separate mechanism that has been encountered with increasing frequency in the tertiary refferral centers. The frequent causes of secondary hypertension include renal parenchymal disease, renal artery stenosis, primary hyperaldosteronism, phaeochromocytoma and Cushing's syndrome. Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) can involve any organ and in varying degrees. Here we present a young hypertensive patient diagnosed as PAN with the angiographic findings of multiple microaneurysms involving celiac, renal and superior mesenteric arteries and associated with a rarely seen neurological entity-PRES syndrome. PMID:25349926

  9. Ramsay-Hunt syndrome complicating osteonecrosis of edentulous maxilla and mandible: report of a rare case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samprati J. Badjate; K. M. Cariappa; S. R. Shenoi; Shweta Nakhate

    2009-01-01

    Review of literature revealed atleast 30 cases of post herpes zoster osteonecrosis of maxilla or mandible. To our knowledge\\u000a this is a first reported case of Ramsay-Hunt syndrome with post herpetic neuralgia and post herpes zoster osteonecrosis of\\u000a edentulous maxilla and mandible. We have briefly reviewed the pathophysiology and management of post herpes zoster osteonecrosis\\u000a and post herpetic neuralgia.

  10. Complications of endocapsular tension ring implantation in a child with Marfan’s syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas S Dietlein; Philipp C Jacobi; Walter Konen; Günter K Krieglstein

    2000-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy with Marfan’s syndrome had severe visual impairment after subluxation of the crystalline lens with bisection of the pupil. In the first eye, a capsular tension ring and an intraocular lens (IOL) were uneventfully placed in the capsular bag after phacoemulsification. During implantation of the endocapsular tension ring in the second eye, an inadvertent tear of the anterior

  11. Intracaval and intracardiac extension of invasive thymoma complicated by superior and inferior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Atsushi; Saji, Hisashi; Ikeda, Norihiko; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an aged male with invasive thymoma that extended into the right atrium and led to superior and inferior vena cava syndrome. The patient initially presented with edema of the face and bilateral lower extremities. Echocardiography revealed a mass within the right atrium. Imaging studies demonstrated an anterior mediastinal tumor that continuously occupied the bilateral brachiocephalic veins, superior vena cava, and right atrium. Pathological diagnosis of the tumor biopsy was highly suspicious of thymoma. Due to the high risk of wide spread of the tumor, treatments including resection of the tumor were impossible. Several days later he died, and an autopsy was performed. The tumor was type B2 thymoma invading bilateral brachiocephalic veins, superior vena cava and right atrium. Multiple tumor emboli within the pulmonary arteries were identified. Direct cause of death was deemed to be tumor strangulation at the tricuspid orifice. In addition to the superior vena cava syndrome, inferior vena cava syndrome including ectasia of the intrahepatic vessels was confirmed along with pericarditis. To our knowledge, this is the first English report of an autopsy case of intracardiac thymoma extension, and a detailed literature review of similar cases is also presented. PMID:23356226

  12. Excessive naked megakaryocyte nuclei in myelodysplastic syndrome mimicking idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a complicated pre- and post-transplantation course.

    PubMed

    Olcay, Lale; Tuncer, A Murat; Okur, Hamza; Erdemli, Esra; Uysal, Zumrut; Cetin, Mualla; Duru, Feride; Cetinkaya, Duygu Uckan

    2009-09-01

    A boy 3 years 7 months old with thrombocytopenia and history of intracranial hemorrhage who underwent bone marrow transplantation is presented. He was refractory to steroids, immunoglobulin G, vincristine, azathioprine, cyclosporine A, interleukin-11, chemotherapy, and splenectomy. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was excluded by light /electron microscopic and flow cytometric findings; the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia, a subgroup of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, was made. Naked megakaryocyte nuclei were 55.38 +/- 28.2% vs. 31.67 +/- 23.22% of all megakaryocytes in the patient and the control group of 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, respectively (p = .016). The posttransplatation course was complicated by delayed platelet engraftment, bronchiolitis obliterans associated with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved completely. PMID:19657988

  13. [Cardiopulmonary complication as a pitfall of the perioperative management of moyamoya syndrome with atherosclerosis: conflict to counteract with cerebral hyperperfusion].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Miki; Sato, Kenichi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-08-01

    A 42-year-old man with a history of hypertension and obesity presented with transient dysesthesia in his left upper and lower extremities and was found to have moyamoya syndrome associated with atherosclerosis. He underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis with pial synangiosis in the right hemisphere 1 month after the onset of symptoms. Prophylactic blood pressure lowering(<130 mmHg)as well as minocycline administration was introduced immediately after surgery to prevent symptomatic cerebral hyperperfusion, but he developed pulmonary edema due to congestive heart failure several hours after surgery. We subsequently allowed his systolic blood pressure to be under 140 mmHg, which dramatically improved his cardiopulmonary condition. The neurologic status of the patient was unremarkable, but (123)I-IMP-SPECT the day after surgery demonstrated an intense increase in the cerebral blood flow at the site of the anastomosis. Moreover, postoperative magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated the bypass as thick, high signal. Together, these results led us to the diagnosis of cerebral hyperperfusion. The patient did not demonstrate any neurological sign during the entire perioperative period, but CT scan performed 7 days after surgery revealed a delayed intra-cerebral hemorrhage in the right temporal lobe due to the cerebral hyperperfusion. We continued to mildly lower his blood pressure, and neither ischemic nor hemorrhagic events were subsequently observed; he was discharged without neurological deficit 2 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema are potential complications of the perioperative management of moyamoya syndrome with atherosclerotic background. Moreover, cardiopulmonary complications should be mentioned as a potential pitfall of the intensive perioperative management of moyamoya disease to counteract with cerebral hyperperfusion. PMID:25087762

  14. Spectrum of X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS), MASA syndrome, and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1): Clincal review with six additional families

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander-Stumpel, C.; Hoeweler, C. [Univ. of Limburg (Netherlands); Jones, M. [Children`s Hospital, Sandiego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-22

    X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS) (MIM{sup *}307000), MASA syndrome (MIM {sup *}303350), and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1) (MIM {sup *}3129000) are closely related. Soon after delineation, SPG1 was incorporated into the spectrum of MASA syndrome. HSAS and MASA syndrome show great clinical overlap; DNA linkage analysis places the loci at Xq28. In an increasing number of families with MASA syndrome or HSAS, mutations in L1CAM, a gene located at Xq28, have been reported. In order to further delineate the clinical spectrum, we studied 6 families with male patients presenting with MASA syndrome, HSAS, or a mixed phenotype. We summarized data from previous reports and compared them with our data. Clinical variability appears to be great, even within families. Problems in genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, the possible overlap with X-linked corpus callosum agenesis and FG syndrome, and the different forms of X-linked complicated spastic paraplegia are discussed. Since adducted thumbs and spastic paraplegia are found in 90% of the patients, the condition may be present in males with nonspecific mental retardation. We propose to abandon the designation MASA syndrome and use the term HSAS/MASA spectrum, incorporating SPG1. 79 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Lower Leg after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Silent but Dangerous Complication.

    PubMed

    Te Kolste, Henryk Jan; Balm, Ron; de Mol, Bas

    2015-06-01

    Background?Acute compartment syndrome (ACoS) is a serious, limb-threatening condition, but ACoS after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is rare. ACoS is diagnosed with the help of typical symptoms, but due to the use of analgesics in a postoperative setting, these symptoms may vary. Identifying risk factors for ACoS after CABG could reduce the risk of developing this complication. Methods?We describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of five cases of ACoS arising from CABG procedures at our institution during the last 5 years. We also review all cases found in literature about this complication. Discussion?Both systemic and local factors may contribute to ACoS of the lower leg. These factors include increased microvascular permeability caused by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the use of cardiac-assist devices causing arterial occlusion and reperfusion injury, diminished arterial blood flow in patients with peripheral vascular disease due to lithotomy position and the use of elastic bandages and local trauma and hematoma formation due to the harvesting of the greater saphenous vein (GSV). Conclusion?To prevent this serious complication, we advise to pay extra attention to the patients with a greater risk. Hemostasis after venectomy in CABG surgery is mandatory, especially in the endoscopic harvesting of the GSV. Elastic bandages should be applied after weaning from CPB. Elevated creatine phosphokinase values may indicate ACoS. When suspicion arises, intracompartmental pressure measurement is the preferred tool for early recognition and diagnosis. To prevent irreversible, extensive tissue damage and permanent disability fasciotomy must be performed immediately after the diagnosis is made. PMID:25602845

  16. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and heme oxygenase-1 interaction attenuates diabetes and metabolic syndrome complications

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Angela; Vanella, Luca; Bellner, Lars; Schwartzman, Michal L.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2011-01-01

    MSCs are considered to be the natural precursors to adipocyte development through the process of adipogenesis. A link has been established between decreased protective effects of EETs or HO-1 and their interaction in metabolic syndrome. Decreases in HO-1 or EET were associated with an increase in adipocyte stem cell differentiation and increased levels of inflammatory cytokines. EET agonist (AKR-I-27-28) inhibited MSC-derived adipocytes and decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines. We further describe the role of CYP-epoxygenase expression, HO expression, and circulating cytokine levels in an obese mouse, ob/ob?/? mouse model. Ex vivo measurements of EET expression within MSCs derived from ob/ob?/? showed decreased levels of EETs that were increased by HO induction. This review demonstrates that suppression of HO and EET systems exist in MSCs prior to the development of adipocyte dysfunction. Further, adipocyte dysfunction can be ameliorated by induction of HO-1 and CYP-epoxygenase, i.e. EET. PMID:22100745

  17. Acute venous thrombosis as complication and clue to diagnose a SAPHO syndrome case. A case report.

    PubMed

    Rosero, A; Ruano, R; Martin, M; Hidalgo, C; Garcia-Talavera, J

    2013-01-01

    This report concerns a male adult admitted for sternal and left arm pain, who was diagnosed and treated for acute deep venous thrombosis in the left subclavian and axillary veins. X-ray and a hybrid single photon emission tomography and computed tomography (SPECT-CT) scintigraphy scan revealed high intensity uptake in both sternoclavicular joints, which corresponded to hyperostosis, thereby suggesting a SAPHO syndrome. Upon reviewing the patient's medical history, we found dermatological pustulosis disease and an intermittent sternal chest pain untreated since 10 years ago. In the biochemical study we found erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation, hyperglobulinemia, and mild anaemia. Initial treatment included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with low response, which then changed to methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and prednisone. The patient's pain was controlled almost completely in 10 months. A control bone scan revealed a marked decrease in intensity of bone deposits according to clinical response. To our knowledge, there are only a few cases of SAPHO and thrombosis and none are followed up with a bone SPECT-CT scan. PMID:24149018

  18. Traumatic central cord syndrome in a 2-year-old child: minor trauma but major complication

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Neslihan; Ertan, Cem; Pepele, Mustafa S.; Sigirci, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic central cord syndrome (TCCS) is the most frequently encountered incomplete spinal cord injury, and it is a relatively rare situation in children younger than 15 years, but may have serious consequences. METHODS: We report the case of a 2-year-old female child with upper extremity weakness following a simple fall. All vitals and systemic examination findings were normal, except for 2/5 muscular strength in the upper extremities. While radiographic imaging showed no pathologic findings, MRI exposed spinal injury. The patient was treated conservatively with medication only. The medical treatment of the patient consisted of anti-edema treatment with methylprednisolone in the first 24 hours; 330 mg of methylprednisolone infused in the first hour, followed by 59 mg per hour during the next 23 hours. Along with pharmacological treatment, she received physiotherapy sessions during her 11-day hospitalization period. RESULTS: The child had full recovery within 6 months after conservative treatment. CONCLUSION: Neurological deficit without plain radiographic evidence in pediatric spinal trauma patients is a rare but significant incident. PMID:25215167

  19. [Early diagnosis and successful treatment of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome complicated by multiple organ failure].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daichi; Togami, Katsuhiro; Shimoike, Norihiro; Tamura, Ryo; Imai, Yukihiro; Kimura, Takaharu; Shimoji, Sonoko; Mori, Minako; Nagai, Yuya; Tabata, Sumie; Matsushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman was emergently admitted because of rapidly progressive unconsciousness, renal failure, hepatic dysfunction, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and high-grade fever in July, 2008. Based on clinical and laboratory findings, we made a tentative diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and immediately initiated the plasma exchange (PE). Despite the PE, she developed panperitonitis due to multiple intestinal perforation and massive splenic infarction within a week after the admission. Thrombosis of arterioles at perforated portion in the resected small and large intestines was histologically confirmed. Therefore, we made a definite diagnosis of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) based on the presence of antiphosphatidylserine-prothrombin complex antibodies (aPS/PT) throughout the course and lupus anticoagulant that was revealed positive on one occasion, and multiple thrombotic lesions. The underlying disease of CAPS appeared to be lupus erythematosus because of her clinical history and laboratory findings such as persistent leukopenia. Although it has been reported that CAPS causes systemic thrombosis at microvessels mostly within a week from the onset and the mortality rate in this disorder is as high as 50%, we successfully treated her in combination with high-dose corticosteroid, anticoagulation, concentrated human IgG, surgical procedures, and hemodialysis in addition to PE. Early diagnosis of CAPS and immediate start of PE may have contributed to the successful treatment. PMID:20190507

  20. D-Lactic Acidosis: An Underrecognized Complication of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kowlgi, N. Gurukripa; Chhabra, Lovely

    2015-01-01

    D-lactic acidosis or D-lactate encephalopathy is a rare condition that occurs primarily in individuals who have a history of short bowel syndrome. The unabsorbed carbohydrates act as a substrate for colonic bacteria to form D-lactic acid among other organic acids. The acidic pH generated as a result of D-lactate production further propagates production of D-lactic acid, hence giving rise to a vicious cycle. D-lactic acid accumulation in the blood can cause neurologic symptoms such as delirium, ataxia, and slurred speech. Diagnosis is made by a combination of clinical and laboratory data including special assays for D-lactate. Treatment includes correcting the acidosis and decreasing substrate for D-lactate such as carbohydrates in meals. In addition, antibiotics can be used to clear colonic flora. Although newer techniques for diagnosis and treatment are being developed, clinical diagnosis still holds paramount importance, as there can be many confounders in the diagnosis as will be discussed subsequently. PMID:25977687

  1. Life-Threatening Postpneumonectomy Syndrome Complicated with Right Aortic Arch after Left Pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with right aortic arch underwent left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy, followed by complete pneumonectomy, for refractory nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. Three months after the pneumonectomy, he developed acute respiratory distress. Computed tomography showed an excessive mediastinal shift with an extremely narrowed bronchus intermedius and right lower bronchus compressed between the right pulmonary artery and the right descending aorta. Soon after the nearly obstructed bronchus intermedius was observed by bronchoscopy, he began to exhibit frequent hypoxic attacks, perhaps due to mucosal edema. Emergent surgical repositioning of the mediastinum and decompression of the bronchus was indicated. After complete adhesiolysis of the left thoracic cavity was performed, to maintain the proper mediastinal position, considering the emergent setting, an open wound thoracostomy was created and piles of gauze were inserted, mildly compressing the heart and the mediastinum to the right side. Thoracoplasty was performed three months later, and he was eventually discharged without any dressings needed. Mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy should be avoided in elective cases because of its extremely high invasiveness. However, in the case of life-threatening postpneumonectomy syndrome in an emergent setting, mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy may be an option to save life, which every thoracic surgeon could attempt. PMID:26106501

  2. Beneficial effect of intravenous dexamethasone in children with mild to moderately severe acute chest syndrome complicating sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bernini, J C; Rogers, Z R; Sandler, E S; Reisch, J S; Quinn, C T; Buchanan, G R

    1998-11-01

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has historically been managed with oxygen, antibiotics, and blood transfusions. Recently high-dose corticosteroid therapy was shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization in children with SCD and vaso-occlusive crisis. Therefore, we chose to assess the use of glucocorticoids in ACS. We conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intravenous dexamethasone (0.3 mg/kg every 12 hours x 4 doses) in children with SCD hospitalized with mild to moderately severe ACS. Forty-three evaluable episodes of ACS occurred in 38 children (median age, 6.7 years). Twenty-two patients received dexamethasone and 21 patients received placebo. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic, clinical, or laboratory characteristics between the two groups. Mean hospital stay was shorter in the dexamethasone-treated group (47 hours v 80 hours; P = .005). Dexamethasone therapy prevented clinical deterioration and reduced the need for blood transfusions (P < .001 and = .013, respectively). Mean duration of oxygen and analgesic therapy, number of opioid doses, and the duration of fever was also significantly reduced in the dexamethasone-treated patients. Of seven patients readmitted within 72 hours after discharge (six after dexamethasone; P = .095), only one had respiratory complications (P = 1.00). No side effects clearly related to dexamethasone were observed. In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, gender and previous episodes of ACS were the only variables that appeared to predict response to dexamethasone, as measured by lengh of hospital stay. Intravenous dexamethasone has a beneficial effect in children with SCD hospitalized with mild to moderately severe acute chest syndrome. Further study of this therapeutic modality is indicated. PMID:9787142

  3. N-Glycomic Changes in Serum Proteins in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Correlate with Complications and with Metabolic Syndrome Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Boemi, Massimo; Olivieri, Fabiola; Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Spazzafumo, Liana; Borelli, Vincenzo; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Salvioli, Stefano; Garagnani, Paolo; Dewaele, Sylviane; Libert, Claude; Franceschi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycosylation, i.e the enzymatic addition of oligosaccharides (or glycans) to proteins and lipids, known as glycosylation, is one of the most common co-/posttranslational modifications of proteins. Many important biological roles of glycoproteins are modulated by N-linked oligosaccharides. As glucose levels can affect the pathways leading to glycosylation of proteins, we investigated whether metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), pathological conditions characterized by altered glucose levels, are associated with specific modifications in serum N-glycome. Methods We enrolled in the study 562 patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) (mean age 65.6±8.2 years) and 599 healthy control subjects (CTRs) (mean age, 58.5±12.4 years). N-glycome was evaluated in serum glycoproteins. Results We found significant changes in N-glycan composition in the sera of T2DM patients. In particular, ?(1,6)-linked arm monogalactosylated, core-fucosylated diantennary N-glycans (NG1(6)A2F) were significantly reduced in T2DM compared with CTR subjects. Importantly, they were equally reduced in diabetic patients with and without complications (P<0.001) compared with CTRs. Macro vascular-complications were found to be related with decreased levels of NG1(6)A2F. In addition, NG1(6)A2F and NG1(3)A2F, identifying, respectively, monogalactosylated N-glycans with ?(1,6)- and ?(1,3)-antennary galactosylation, resulted strongly correlated with most MS parameters. The plasmatic levels of these two glycans were lower in T2DM as compared to healthy controls, and even lower in patients with complications and MS, that is the extreme “unhealthy” phenotype (T2DM+ with MS). Conclusions Imbalance of glycosyltransferases, glycosidases and sugar nucleotide donor levels is able to cause the structural changes evidenced by our findings. Serum N-glycan profiles are thus sensitive to the presence of diabetes and MS. Serum N-glycan levels could therefore provide a non-invasive alternative marker for T2DM and MS. PMID:25793407

  4. Pregnancy Complications: HELLP Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... quick weight gain or your legs and face swell Have questions? Type your question here. Frequently Asked ... quick weight gain or your legs and face swell Have questions? Type your question here. Get the ...

  5. Identification of the SPG15 Gene, Encoding Spastizin, as a Frequent Cause of Complicated Autosomal-Recessive Spastic Paraplegia, Including Kjellin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hanein, Sylvain; Martin, Elodie; Boukhris, Amir; Byrne, Paula; Goizet, Cyril; Hamri, Abdelmadjid; Benomar, Ali; Lossos, Alexander; Denora, Paola; Fernandez, José; Elleuch, Nizar; Forlani, Sylvie; Durr, Alexandra; Feki, Imed; Hutchinson, Michael; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Mhiri, Chokri; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorders. Both “uncomplicated” and “complicated” forms have been described with various modes of inheritance. Sixteen loci for autosomal-recessive “complicated” HSP have been mapped. The SPG15 locus was first reported to account for a rare form of spastic paraplegia variably associated with mental impairment, pigmented maculopathy, dysarthria, cerebellar signs, and distal amyotrophy, sometimes designated as Kjellin syndrome. Here, we report the refinement of SPG15 to a 2.64 Mb genetic interval on chromosome 14q23.3-q24.2 and the identification of ZFYVE26, which encodes a zinc-finger protein with a FYVE domain that we named spastizin, as the cause of SPG15. Six different truncating mutations were found to segregate with the disease in eight families with a phenotype that included variable clinical features of Kjellin syndrome. ZFYVE26 mRNA was widely distributed in human tissues, as well as in rat embryos, suggesting a possible role of this gene during embryonic development. In the adult rodent brain, its expression profile closely resembled that of SPG11, another gene responsible for complicated HSP. In cultured cells, spastizin colocalized partially with markers of endoplasmic reticulum and endosomes, suggesting a role in intracellular trafficking. PMID:18394578

  6. Laparoscopic treatment of celiac axis compression syndrome (CACS) and hiatal hernia: Case report with bleeding complications and review?

    PubMed Central

    di Libero, Lorenzo; Varricchio, Antonio; Tartaglia, Ernesto; Iazzetta, Igino; Tartaglia, Alberto; Bernardo, Antonella; Bernardo, Rosanna; Triscino, Giovangiuseppe; Conte, Domenico Lo

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Median arcuate ligament (MAL) malposition is a rare cause of celiac axis compression syndrome (CACS) or Dunbar syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 26-year-old female presented with severe postprandial epigastric pain, weight loss, heartburn and regurgitation unresponsive to medical therapy. CT angiography and duplex ultrasound demonstrated the MAL crossing anterior to the celiac artery (CA). Reconstructions demonstrated CA compression, while the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was normal. The MAL was laparoscopically divided, releasing the celiac axis. A concomitant Nissen fundoplication was performed. At 3-months follow-up, the CT-scan demonstrated no evidence of CACS with complete symptom resolution. DISCUSSION Dunbar's syndrome can be treated with endovascular surgery, laparoscopic MAL division or vascular surgery.Six anatomical and morphologic variations of aortic and esophageal hiatus are described. The result of the analysis of these anatomical data leads to the conclusion that hiatus hernia, Dunbar's syndrome and GERD have a common etiopathogenesis and physiopathology. CONCLUSION Laparoscopic treatment is useful and feasible in centers with experience in majorlaparoscopic surgery with reduced invasiveness, better cosmetic effect and shorter postoperative course. PMID:23973901

  7. Beneficial Effect of Intravenous Dexamethasone in Children With Mild to Moderately Severe Acute Chest Syndrome Complicating Sickle Cell Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Carlos Bernini; Zora R. Rogers; Eric S. Sandler; Joan S. Reisch; Charles T. Quinn; George R. Buchanan

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has historically been managed with oxygen, antibiotics, and blood transfusions. Recently high-dose corti- costeroid therapy was shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization in children with SCD and vaso-occlusive crisis. Therefore, we chose to assess the use of glucocorti- coids in ACS. We conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial

  8. Concentrated ascites re-infusion therapy for pseudo-Meigs' syndrome complicated by massive ascites in large pedunculated uterine leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Yukie; Yanazume, Shintaro; Kamio, Masaki; Togami, Shinichi; Tasaki, Takashi; Douchi, Tsutomu

    2014-07-01

    Pseudo-Meigs' syndrome accompanied by massive ascites in uterine leiomyoma is rare. We encountered a rare case of a 37-year-old, nulliparous woman with a lower abdominal tumor and severe abdominal distention due to massive ascites. Serum cancer antigen 125 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were elevated to 1007.9?U/mL and 103?pg/mL, respectively. She was tentatively diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Emergency concentrated ascites re-infusion therapy was performed to improve dyspnea, abdominal pain, and her preoperative respiratory condition. Concentrated ascites re-infusion therapy eliminated dyspnea and abdominal discomfort without decreasing serum albumin levels. The patient underwent laparotomy, which revealed a fist-sized pedunculated uterine leiomyoma arising from the right uterine fundus. Myomectomy was performed. Pseudo-Meigs' syndrome mimics advanced ovarian cancer due to massive ascites and markedly elevated serum cancer antigen 125 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. Concentrated ascites re-infusion therapy was effective in improving the subjective symptoms of pseudo-Meigs' syndrome and the patient's preoperative condition. PMID:25056475

  9. Bleeding complications after arthroscopy in a JAK2V617F-positive patient with essential thrombocythemia and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS).

    PubMed

    Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Lewandowska, Maria; Wojtasi?ska, Ewelina; Wojtaszewska, Marzena Liliana; Walczak, Micha?; Bykowska, Ksenia; Komarnicki, Mieczys?aw

    2015-04-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is an acquired bleeding disorder with clinical and laboratory features similar to those of the inherited form of the disease. AVWS is reported in many disorders, most frequently in myeloproliferative neoplasms and in, among others, essential thrombocythemia (ET). Interestingly, ET is associated with both the thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications, which occur in 20 % and 5-30 % of patients, respectively. The present report concerns a 38-year-old man, suffering from ET, who presented with two episodes of post-arthroscopic joint bleeding after synovectomy required for the treatment of synovial hypertrophy and chronic left knee joint synovitis. We discuss the current diagnostic approaches, as well as the risk factors predisposing to bleeding and its management, in patients with essential thrombocythemia. PMID:25432436

  10. [Pregnancy complications with abnormal results of biochemical screening for Down syndrome in second trimester and normal fetal karyotype].

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, V; Chernev, T; Vragaleva, S; Sl?ncheva, B; Mikha?lova, E; Kremenski, I; Simeonov, E

    2002-01-01

    Pregnancy complications were studied in the following groups of pregnancies with structurally and chromosomally normal fetuses: 1) 216--with elevated free beta-hCG above 2 MoM and 134--above 2.5 MoM; 2) 37--with elevated alpha-fetoprotein [AFP] above 2 MoM; 3) 67 screen-positive patients below the age of 35. The following complications were compared in the studied and the control groups: preterm delivery and premature rupture of membranes [PROM], preeclampsia (in general and severe one), IUGR without preeclampsia, delivery of small for gestational age [SGA] and low birth weight [LBW] infants and perinatal fetal loss. Pregnancy outcome in cases with free beta-hCG above 2 MoM was not different from that in the control group. With 2.5 cut-off level the incidence of preeclampsia and of LBW infants was higher in the studied than in the control group. Elevated AFP above 2 MoM alone was associated with more frequent preeclampsia including severe one (in all the latter cases--IUGR present). In the screen-positive group the incidence of preeclampsia (in general and severe one with IUGR), SGA and LBW infants and perinatal mortality rate were significantly higher than in the control group. No difference was found between the studied and the control groups regarding subsequent development of IUGR without preeclampsia, preterm delivery and PROM. Abnormal second trimester serum screening test results (elevated free beta-hCG or AFP alone above 2.5 and 2 MoM respectively) in pregnancies with normal fetal karyotype indicate higher risk for subsequent development of preeclampsia. Screen-positive patients, being a heterogeneous group (including ones with elevated free bb-hCG alone and ones with elevated both free beta-hCG and AFP), are at increased risk for other pregnancy complications too. PMID:12577497

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) complicating influenza A/H1N1v infection--a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Witczak, Agnieszka; Prystupa, Andrzej; Kurys-Denis, Ewa; Borys, Micha?; Czuczwar, Miros?aw; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz; Michalak, Anna; Pietrzak, Aldona; Chodorowska, Gra?yna; Krupski, Witold; Mosiewicz, Jerzy; Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    ARDS is defined as an acute inflammatory syndrome characterized with bilateral parenchymal lung infiltrates on chest radiograph and PaO2/FiO2 ratio<200 resulting from causes other than acute left ventricular dysfunction. Inflammatory lung lesions may be induced by different disorders, with sepsis being the leading cause of ARDS. Other causes include infectious pneumonia, aspiration of gastric contents, drugs, severe trauma, fat embolism, surface burn, massive blood transfusion. Influenza A/H1N1 infection seems to be responsible for the development of extremely severe type of ARDS with poor response to routine treatment. Despite great progress in the management of ARDS with novel agents and sophisticated techniques, including antimicrobial drugs, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, prostaglandins, nitric oxide, prostacyclin, exogenous surfactant administration and activated protein C, supportive treatment based mostly on advanced mechanical ventilation in the intensive care units seems to be the most important for the prognosis. PMID:24364461

  12. Fulminant systemic capillary leak syndrome due to C1 inhibitor deficiency complicating acute dermatomyositis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dermatomyositis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by muscular and dermatologic symptoms with variable internal organ involvement. This is the first report on a patient with acute dermatomyositis and fulminant systemic capillary leak syndrome. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian woman with chronic dermatomyositis presented with clinical signs of severe hypovolemic shock and pronounced hemoconcentration (hematocrit, 69%). Her colloid osmotic pressure was 4.6mmHg. Following a bolus dose of prednisolone (500mg), fluid resuscitation was initiated. During volume loading, anasarca and acute respiratory distress rapidly developed. Echocardiography revealed an underfilled, hypokinetic, diastolic dysfunctional left ventricle with pericardial effusion but no signs of tamponade. Despite continued fluid resuscitation and high-dosed catecholamine therapy, the patient died from refractory shock 12 hours after intensive care unit admission. A laboratory analysis of her complement system suggested the presence of C1 inhibitor deficiency as the cause for systemic capillary leakage. The post-mortem examination revealed bilateral pleural, pericardial and peritoneal effusions as well as left ventricular hypertrophy with patchy myocardial fibrosis. Different patterns of endomysial/perimysial lymphocytic infiltrations adjacent to degenerated cardiomyocytes in her myocardium and necrotic muscle fibers in her right psoas major muscle were found in the histological examination. Conclusions This case report indicates that acute exacerbation of chronic dermatomyositis can result in a fulminant systemic capillary leak syndrome with intense hemoconcentration, hypovolemic shock and acute heart failure. In the presented patient, the cause for diffuse capillary leakage was most probably acquired angioedema, a condition that has been associated with both lymphoproliferative and autoimmunologic disorders. PMID:24467750

  13. Vaginoperineal Fistula as a Complication of Perianal Surgery in a Patient with Sjögren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Beksac, Kemal; Turgal, Mert; Aran, Omer; Beksac, M. Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Forty-seven-year-old woman with Sjögren's syndrome had been operated on because of transsphincteric perianal fistula secondary to perianal abscess. Vaginal wall injury occurred during the course of the operation and injured tissue was repaired primarily. Three months later, patient suffered from the recurrence of perianal fistula symptoms and fistulectomy was performed once again under antibiotic suppression. Several months later, perineal discharge continued, and, therefore, patient was admitted to the hospital for the third time and a fistulotomy was performed. Two months after the third operation, patient was admitted with leukorrhea and a perineovaginal fistula was detected. This time, not only her surgical problem but also her immune system disorder was considered in the preoperative workup. Then, patient was hospitalized for the fourth time and “fistulectomy/perineoplasty” was performed successfully. We believe that patients with autoimmune disorders with or without medical treatment may have healing problems during the course of surgical processes and therefore such medical problems must be taken into consideration by the surgeons. PMID:25295212

  14. Vaginoperineal Fistula as a Complication of Perianal Surgery in a Patient with Sjögren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Beksac, Kemal; Turgal, Mert; Basaran, Derman; Aran, Omer; Beksac, M Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Forty-seven-year-old woman with Sjögren's syndrome had been operated on because of transsphincteric perianal fistula secondary to perianal abscess. Vaginal wall injury occurred during the course of the operation and injured tissue was repaired primarily. Three months later, patient suffered from the recurrence of perianal fistula symptoms and fistulectomy was performed once again under antibiotic suppression. Several months later, perineal discharge continued, and, therefore, patient was admitted to the hospital for the third time and a fistulotomy was performed. Two months after the third operation, patient was admitted with leukorrhea and a perineovaginal fistula was detected. This time, not only her surgical problem but also her immune system disorder was considered in the preoperative workup. Then, patient was hospitalized for the fourth time and "fistulectomy/perineoplasty" was performed successfully. We believe that patients with autoimmune disorders with or without medical treatment may have healing problems during the course of surgical processes and therefore such medical problems must be taken into consideration by the surgeons. PMID:25295212

  15. Guillain-Barré syndrome complicating pregnancy and correlation with maternal and fetal outcome in North Eastern India: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shri Ram; Sharma, Nalini; Masaraf, Hussain; Singh, Santa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is rare in pregnancy with an estimated incidence between 1.2 and 1.9 cases per 100,000 people annually, and it is generally accepted that it carries a high maternal risk. Most reports of GBS with pregnancy are case reports only. Aim: Purpose of this retrospective study was to find the correlation between pregnancy and GBS. Settings and Design: Records of patients admitted in neurology division were analyzed in a tertiary care teaching hospital in the northeastern Indian pregnant female population with GBS between 15-49 years during the period of 2009-2013. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the records of 47 patients with pregnancy and GBS, evaluated and treated in our institute from August 2009 to December 2013. This is retrospective observational study done in North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health and Medical Sciences (NEIGRIHMS), India. Result: Predominant form of GBS was acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). The weakness started from the lower limbs in majority of patients. Ten percent of women had bifacial weakness. Most of patients had good maternal and fetal outcome. Two patients received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Only two patient required ventilator supports and one patient had intrauterine death (IUD) and died due to respiratory failure. Conclusion: Our results indicate that risk of GBS increases in third trimester and first 2 weeks after delivery. Demyelinating variety of GBS was common in our population. GBS natural course during pregnancy is mild and showed quick recovery. Maternal and perinatal outcome was good. PMID:26019422

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a rare complication of primary Sjögren syndrome: report of 9 new cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Launay, David; Hachulla, Eric; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Jais, Xavier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2007-09-01

    Primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) is a fairly common autoimmune disease with glandular and extraglandular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement mainly corresponds to small airways and interstitial lung disease. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is rare: to our knowledge, only 32 cases have been reported in pSS patients to date. PAH is a disease of the small pulmonary arteries characterized by vascular proliferation and remodeling, resulting in a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, and, ultimately, right ventricular failure and death. We report 9 new cases of pSS-associated PAH with a complete assessment including clinical characteristics (of both PAH and pSS), hemodynamic parameters, medical management, and outcome. We also review the 19 fully documented PAH patients with pSS reported in the English-language literature, therefore analyzing a total of 28 cases (27 women; mean age at PAH diagnosis, 50 +/- 11 yr; range, 23-68 yr). Functional impairment at diagnosis was severe, with a New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class of III or IV in most cases. Seven of 15 (47%) patients for whom data were available had history or evidence of right heart failure at PAH diagnosis. Hemodynamic parameters were moderate to severe with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 44 +/- 11 mm Hg (range, 24-60 mm Hg) and a cardiac index of 2.91 +/- 0.72 Lmin(-1)m(-2) (range, 1.36-3.88 Lmin(-1)m(-2)). Standard PAH therapy (endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, or prostanoids) was initially effective in some patients but had short-term and long-term failures. Some patients were treated with first-line immunosuppressants alone leading to improvement in some, but second-line standard PAH therapy was added in all cases thereafter. The best treatment strategy remains to be defined. Estimated survival rates were low (73% and 66% at 1 and 3 years, respectively). Compared with pSS patients without PAH, patients with pSS-associated PAH had Raynaud phenomenon, cutaneous vasculitis, and interstitial lung disease significantly more frequently. They also more frequently had antinuclear, anti-Ro/SSA, and anti-RNP autoantibodies, as well as positive rheumatoid factor and hypergammaglobulinemia. These data suggest that systemic vasculopathy, B-cell activation, and autoimmunity could play a role in the pathophysiology of pSS-associated PAH. In conclusion, this report underlines the rarity and severity of PAH in pSS patients. The best therapeutic regimen remains to be defined but should include standard PAH therapy and/or immunosuppressants. PMID:17873760

  17. Renal complications in 6p duplication syndrome: microarray-based investigation of the candidate gene(s) for the development of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura-Furuhata, Megumi; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Amano, Yoshiro; Ehara, Takashi; Hamasaki, Yuko; Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Aikawa, Atsushi; Hamada, Riku; Ishikura, Kenji; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Noda, Shunsuke; Koike, Kenichi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Awazu, Midori; Miyake, Noriko; Kosho, Tomoki

    2015-03-01

    6p duplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder that frequently manifests renal complications, including proteinuria, hypoplastic kidney, and hydronephrosis. We report a girl with the syndrome, manifesting left hydronephrosis, proteinuria/hematuria, and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS) resulting in chronic end-stage renal failure, successfully treated with renal transplantation. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization showed the derivative chromosome 6 to have a 6.4-Mb duplication at 6p25.3-p25.1 with 32 protein-coding genes and a 220-Kb deletion at 6p25.3 with two genes of no possible relation to the renal pathology. Review of the literature shows that variation of renal complications in the syndrome is compatible with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). FSGS, observed in another patient with 6p duplication syndrome, could be a non-coincidental complication. FOXC1, located within the 6.4-Mb duplicated region at 6p25.3-p25.2, could be a candidate gene for CAKUT, but its single gene duplication effect would not be sufficient. FSGS would be a primary defect associated with duplicated gene(s) albeit no candidate could be proposed, or might occur in association with CAKUT. PMID:25691411

  18. Otalgia and eschar in the external auditory canal in scrub typhus complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus, a mite-transmitted zoonosis caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, is an endemic disease in Taiwan and may be potentially fatal if diagnosis is delayed. Case presentations We encountered a 23-year-old previously healthy Taiwanese male soldier presenting with the right ear pain after training in the jungle and an eleven-day history of intermittent high fever up to 39°C. Amoxicillin/clavulanate was prescribed for otitis media at a local clinic. Skin rash over whole body and abdominal cramping pain with watery diarrhea appeared on the sixth day of fever. He was referred due to progressive dyspnea and cough for 4 days prior to admission in our institution. On physical examination, there were cardiopulmonary distress, icteric sclera, an eschar in the right external auditory canal and bilateral basal rales. Laboratory evaluation revealed thrombocytopenia, elevation of liver function and acute renal failure. Chest x-ray revealed bilateral diffuse infiltration. Doxycycline was prescribed for scrub typhus with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure. Fever subsided dramatically the next day and he was discharged on day 7 with oral tetracycline for 7 days. Conclusion Scrub typhus should be considered in acutely febrile patients with multiple organ involvement, particularly if there is an eschar or a history of environmental exposure in endemic areas. Rapid and accurate diagnosis, timely administration of antibiotics and intensive supportive care are necessary to decrease mortality of serious complications of scrub typhus. PMID:21450057

  19. Possible familial case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome complicated with lung cancer: A possible link between these two disease entities.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Chinatsu; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Torii, Ryo; Kawanami, Yukiko; Kawanami, Toshinori; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Ryo; Takenaka, Masaru; Yamada, Sohusuke; Kasai, Takahiko; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese woman was introduced to our hospital for an examination of multiple pulmonary cystic lesions and a pulmonary nodule in the left lower lobe. She had a smoking history of 25 pack-years, and her two younger brothers had suffered from pneumothorax; one of them additionally had lung cancer with pulmonary multiple cystic lesions. A surgical biopsy specimen obtained from her left lower lobe revealed adenocarcinoma surrounded by a single epithelial layer that was covered with collagen fibers. The pathological features were compatible with the findings of the cystic lesions in the patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS). A diagnosis of BHDS was eventually made according to the detection of a folliculin gene mutation. This is the first report of a possible familial case of BHDS complicated with primary lung cancer. We herein reviewed the previously reported cases of BHDS with lung cancer and other tumors and discussed a potential mechanism of tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis in the lung in the patients with BHDS. PMID:26028485

  20. Evaluation of the structural quality of bone in a case of progressive osteoporosis complicating a Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Cosmi, F; Mazzoleni, G

    2014-01-01

    Densitometry is considered to be the gold standard in bone quality assessment. However, since its introduction, the medical community has been aware that mineral density is only one of the factors that influence the bone risk of fracture, which also depends on the bone's trabecular arrangement and, in particular, on the trabecular architecture's load bearing capabilities. At the University of Trieste, in recent years, a test has been developed that simulates the application of compressive loads on trabecular architecture's reconstructions extracted from digital radiographs. In this work, the test is described, and the results obtained by applying the appraisal in a particular case of severe osteoporosis of the hand, complicating a Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type II, are presented. The test was able to quantify the pathological alterations of bone micro-architecture by means of a Structural Index (SI), which was absolutely significant and relevant to the clinical situation. Important research and clinical opportunities of application of the test include accurate evaluation of osteoporotic bone diseases, careful clinical follow-up and monitoring of responses to therapeutic approaches, and, prospectively, reliable quantification of biological damage (forensic field). PMID:24200752

  1. Metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cho, L W

    2011-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of different risk factors that collectively increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The syndrome itself is associated with various metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, obstructive sleep apnoea, male hypogonadism and polycystic ovary syndrome. This review aims to discuss recent developments related to the syndrome, including the associated metabolic complications and goals for therapeutic strategies. PMID:22173246

  2. [Complications of liposuction].

    PubMed

    Sattler, G; Eichner, S

    2013-03-01

    Liposuction is the most frequent aesthetic procedure worldwide for adipose tissue reduction and treatment of lipedema. It is being employed with increasing frequency. In 2010, in the USA more than 200.000 liposuctions were performed. Apart from aesthetic indications, liposuction also is suitable for treatment of benign adipose tissue diseases. This intervention is not a simple procedure but requires extensive knowledge and experience to prevent irreversible medical or aesthetic complications. Severe complications including necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, hemorrhage, perforation of inner organs und pulmonary embolism - some even with lethal outcome - occasionally have been reported. These complications were mostly due to inadequate hygiene measures, inappropriate patient selection, use of excessive local anesthesia during mega-liposuction (tumescent technique) and inadequate post-operative surveillance. The complication rate usually reflects a lack of medical experience as well as technical inadequacies. PMID:23494094

  3. Neurologic complications following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Kwon, Charles; Klein, Melanie; Corder, Julie; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2014-06-01

    We reviewed neurologic complications after renal transplantation in children over a 20-year period. Neurologic complications were classified as early (within 3 months) and delayed (beyond 3 months). Of 115 children, 10 (8.7%) had complications. Early complications were found in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 4 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to immunosuppressant toxicity, sepsis/presumed meningitis, and indeterminate) and headaches in 1. One patient with seizures received levetiracetam for 6 months and 1 with headaches received amitriptyline prophylaxis. Late complications were noted in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 3 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy), headaches in 2, and tremors in 1. Two patients with seizures were treated with anti-epilepsy medications; 1 with migraine received cyproheptadine prophylaxis. Neurologic complications develop in children after renal transplantation. Seizures due to posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome were the commonest complication. Early detection and appropriate management of these complications is important. PMID:23752071

  4. [Hemangioma: complications].

    PubMed

    Casanova, D; Norat, F; Bardot, J; Magalon, G

    2006-01-01

    Hemangioma (HMG) is a benign tumour of the child generally evolving to spontaneous regression. Sometimes this evolution can become complicated in a more or less serious way according to its localization or of its importance. If local complications are, in the most of cases, without gravity, complications of a general nature like thrombopenia or cardiac failure may compromise the vital prognosis. There are in addition serious forms where, according to its localization or its importance, the HMG can compromise the aesthetic, or functional even vital outcome. PMID:16997443

  5. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the thymus complicated by Cushing's syndrome. Report of a 58-year-old woman with a 3-year history of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hekimgil, M; Hamulu, F; Cagirici, U; Karabulut, B; Ozgen, A G; Soydan, S; Yilmaz, C

    2001-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a history of Cushing's syndrome for three years presented with a mediastinal mass and received the diagnosis of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the thymus invading the pericardium. On immunohistochemical study, the neoplastic cells reacted with antibodies against cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin, synaptophysin, and ACTH. Clinicopathologic findings of this rare case of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome are discussed with a literature review. PMID:11261817

  6. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    Home > Pregnancy > You're pregnant: Now what? Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en español ) Pregnancy complications Health problems before pregnancy Pregnancy related problems Infections during pregnancy When to call the doctor ...

  7. Complicated grief in late life

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a syndrome that affects 10% to 20% of grievers regardless of age, although proportionally more will face the death of loved ones in late life, CG is characterized by preoccupying and disabling symptoms that can persist for decades such as an inability to accept the death, intense yearning or avoidance, frequent reveries, deep sadness, crying, somatic distress, social withdrawal, and suicidal ideation. This syndrome is distinct from major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but CG maybe comorbid with each. This communication will focus on the impact of CG in late life (over age 60) and will include a case vignette for illustrating complicated grief therapy. PMID:22754292

  8. Chylous Ascites in a Patient with HIV/AIDS: A Late Complication of Mycobacterium avium Complex-Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Imam H.; Khan, Rumana; Shah, Saira; Syed, Amer K.; Lintz, David

    2014-01-01

    Chylous ascites is very rare in HIV/AIDS and its association with Mycobacterium avium complex-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (MAC-IRIS) has been rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a young African-American male who developed chylous ascites as a late sequela to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome while on treatment for MAC. Antiretroviral drug-naive patients who start HAART in close proximity to the diagnosis of an opportunistic infection and have a rapid decline in HIV RNA level should be monitored for development of IRIS. Although the long term prognosis is poor, early diagnosis and treatment help to improve quality of life. PMID:25478257

  9. Chiropractic management of a US Army veteran with low back pain and piriformis syndrome complicated by an anatomical anomaly of the piriformis muscle: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Cynthia; Bakkum, Barclay W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present the case of a patient with an anatomical anomaly of the piriformis muscle who had a piriformis syndrome and was managed with chiropractic care. Case Report A 32-year-old male patient presented to a chiropractic clinic with a chief complaint of low back pain that radiated into his right buttock, right posterior thigh, and right posterior calf. The complaint began 5 years prior as a result of injuries during Airborne School in the US Army resulting in a 60% disability rating from the Veterans Administration. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mildly decreased intradiscal T2 signal with shallow central subligamentous disk displacement and low-grade facet arthropathy at L5/S1, a hypolordotic lumbar curvature, and accessory superior bundles of the right piriformis muscle without morphologic magnetic resonance imaging evidence of piriformis syndrome. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic treatment included lumbar and sacral spinal manipulation with soft tissue massage to associated musculature and home exercise recommendations. Variations from routine care included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretches, electric muscle stimulation, acupressure point stimulation, Sacro Occipital Technique pelvic blocking, CranioSacral therapy, and an ergonomic evaluation. Conclusion A patient with a piriformis anomaly with symptoms of low back pain and piriformis syndrome responded positively to conservative chiropractic care, although the underlying cause of the piriformis syndrome remained. PMID:22942838

  10. Aspergillus osteomyelitis of the lumbar spine complicated with orbital apex syndrome: A potential role of the Batson's plexus in disease propagation

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Jose F.; Seriburi, Vimon; Tenner, Michael; El Khoury, Marc Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of orbital apex syndrome following epidural steroid injections of the lumbar spine in an immunocompetent individual with osteomyelitis and discitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. We suspect that the craniospinal venous system, also known as the Batson's plexus, was the main route for steroid-facilitated disease propagation from the spine to intracranial structures. PMID:24371725

  11. generalization complicated

    E-print Network

    Hinton, Geoffrey E.

    on big datasets . If we have a big data set that needs a complicated model, the full Bayesian framework generalization. Is preprocessing cheating? . Its cheating if we use a carefully designed set of task­ specific. One set is sufficient. . For planes in 3­D, h=4 even though 4 co­planar points cannot be shattered

  12. Two autopsy cases of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) in Japan: a pathognomonic histological feature and unique complication of SFTS.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Tsubasa; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Suzuki, Tadaki; Goto, Yuko; Higashi, Michiyo; Yokoyama, Seiya; Tabuchi, Tomohisa; Futatsuki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Hideki; Saijo, Masayuki; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Arima, Naomichi; Yonezawa, Suguru

    2014-11-01

    We report two autopsy cases of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) with a high fatality rate in aged Japanese patients. Both cases were caused by a tick-bite. The pathognomonic histological feature was necrotizing lymphadenitis of systemic lymphoid tissue with SFTS viruses and SFTSV-RNA copies. Marked fungal infections were also observed in the lungs of both patients. Since cellular immune function may be suppressed in SFTS patients, physicians should be aware of possible fungal infections. PMID:25329676

  13. Two autopsy cases of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) in Japan: A pathognomonic histological feature and unique complication of SFTS

    PubMed Central

    Hiraki, Tsubasa; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Suzuki, Tadaki; Goto, Yuko; Higashi, Michiyo; Yokoyama, Seiya; Tabuchi, Tomohisa; Futatsuki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Hideki; Saijo, Masayuki; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Arima, Naomichi; Yonezawa, Suguru

    2014-01-01

    We report two autopsy cases of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) with a high fatality rate in aged Japanese patients. Both cases were caused by a tick-bite. The pathognomonic histological feature was necrotizing lymphadenitis of systemic lymphoid tissue with SFTS viruses and SFTSV-RNA copies. Marked fungal infections were also observed in the lungs of both patients. Since cellular immune function may be suppressed in SFTS patients, physicians should be aware of possible fungal infections. PMID:25329676

  14. Cardiac glycoside overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be vague, particularly in the elderly. Eyes, ears, nose, and throat: Blurred vision Halos around objects (yellow, green, white) * Skin: Allergic reaction (See also: Stevens-Johnson syndrome ) Hives Rash Gastrointestinal: Diarrhea Loss of appetite* Nausea ...

  15. Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria Following Alemtuzumab Immunosuppressive Therapy for Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Complicated by Recurrent Life-Threatening Thrombosis Despite Anticoagulation: Successful Intervention with Eculizumab and Fondaparinux

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kit L.; Brody, Judith; Warshall, Craig E.; Sloand, Elaine M.; Allen, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is not fully understood. We report a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome who developed symptomatic PNH following treatment with alemtuzumab. A small PNH clone, identified prior to alemtuzumab, expanded resulting in hemolytic anemia and recurrent CNS thromboses despite anticoagulation. Remission was achieved with eculizumab and fondaparinux therapy. Alemtuzumab has been associated with the development of glycosylphosphotidylinositol negative cells, but its clinical significance has been unclear. Our case emphasizes its potential clinical importance. Future studies are necessary to expand our understanding of this rare disease entity and improve its management. PMID:19836075

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Proteus syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... proposed for the condition is segmental overgrowth, lipomatosis, arteriovenous malformations, and epidermal nevus (SOLAMEN) syndrome; another is type 2 segmental Cowden syndrome. However, some scientific articles still refer to PTEN -related Proteus ... complication ; connective tissue ; diagnosis ; ...

  17. A case of tension pneumothorax during hyperbaric oxygen therapy in an earthquake survivor with crush injury complicated by ARDS (adult respiratory distress syndrome).

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Tolga; Battal, Bilal; Kara, Kemal; Metin, Suleyman; Demirbas, Seref; Yildiz, Senol; Uzun, Gunalp

    2015-01-01

    Pneumothorax (PTX) is rarely reported in patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy. Patients with air-trapping lesions in the lungs and those with a history of spontaneous PTX, lung disease, mechanical ventilation or chest trauma are at an increased risk for PTX during HBO2 therapy. A 28-year-old male earthquake survivor was referred to our center for multiple wounds 21 days after being rescued from the debris. He had been intubated and put on mechanical ventilation for three days because of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). At initial presentation, he was conscious, well-oriented and hemodynamically stable. The initial six HBO2 treatments were uneventful. On the seventh HBO2 treatment, the patient lost consciousness and developed cardiopulmonary arrest near the end of decompression. The HBO2 specialist accompanying the patient inside the chamber immediately initiated CPR. A diagnosis of tension PTX was made. After the patient was removed from the chamber, a chest tube was inserted, which improved the symptoms. Although rare, tension PTX can occur during HBO2 therapy. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial for saving a patient's life. Increased vigilance is required during treatment of patients with risk factors for PTX. PMID:26094299

  18. False aneurysm of the interosseous artery and anterior interosseous syndrome - an unusual complication of penetrating injury of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. Objectives This case highlights the potential vascular and neurological hazards of minimal penetrating injury of the proximal forearm and emphasizes the phenomenon of delayed presentation of vascular injuries following seemingly obscure penetrating wounds. Case Report We report a case of a 22-year-old male admitted for a minimal penetrating trauma of the proximal forearm that, some days later, developed an anterior interosseous syndrome. A Duplex study performed immediately after the trauma was normal. Further radiologic investigations i.e. a computer-tomographic-angiography (CTA) revealed a false aneurysm of the proximal portion of the interosseous artery (IA). Endovascular management was proposed but a spontaneous rupture dictated surgical revision with simple excision. Complete neurological recovery was documented at 4 months postoperatively. Conclusions/Summary After every penetrating injury of the proximal forearm we propose routinely a detailed neurological and vascular status and a CTA if Duplex evaluation is negative. PMID:20034382

  19. Immediate and one-year outcome of patients presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome complicated by stroke: Findings from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is a potential complication of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence, risk factors predisposing to stroke, in-hospital and 1-year mortality among patients presenting with ACS in the Middle East. Methods For a period of 9?months in 2008 to 2009, 7,930 consecutive ACS patients were enrolled from 65 hospitals in 6 Middle East countries. Results The prevalence of in-hospital stroke following ACS was 0.70%. Most cases were ST segment elevation MI-related (STEMI) and ischemic stroke in nature. Patients with in-hospital stroke were 5?years older than patients without stroke and were more likely to have hypertension (66% vs. 47.6%, P?=?0.001). There were no differences between the two groups in regards to gender, other cardiovascular risk factors, or prior cardiovascular disease. Patients with stroke were more likely to present with atypical symptoms, advanced Killip class and less likely to be treated with evidence-based therapies. Independent predictors of stroke were hypertension, advanced killip class, ACS type –STEMI and cardiogenic shock. Stroke was associated with increased risk of in-hospital (39.3% vs. 4.3%) and one-year mortality (52% vs. 12.3%). Conclusion There is low incidence of in-hospital stroke in Middle-Eastern patients presenting with ACS but with very high in-hospital and one-year mortality rates. Stroke patients were less likely to be appropriately treated with evidence-based therapy. Future work should be focused on reducing the risk and improving the outcome of this devastating complication. PMID:22894647

  20. Hepatorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bataller, R; Ginès, P; Guevara, M; Arroyo, V

    1997-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome is a common complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and ascites characterized not only by renal failure but also by marked alterations in systemic hemodynamics and vasoactive systems. Renal failure is due to a marked hypoperfusion of the kidney secondary to renal vasoconstriction. The pathogenesis of hepatorenal syndrome is not completely known but it is thought to be the extreme manifestation of the underfilling of the arterial circulation secondary to an arterial vasodilation, located mainly in the splanchnic circulation. Recently, a new definition and diagnostic criteria of hepatorenal syndrome have been proposed, which has stimulated research in this field. Prognosis of patients with hepatorenal syndrome is very poor. Liver transplantation is the only effective treatment but it is not applicable in all patients due to short survival. New therapies developed during the last few years, such as the use of systemic vasoconstrictors or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts appear promising, but their usefulness should be evaluated in prospective investigations. PMID:9308128

  1. Managing complications I: leaks, strictures, emptying, reflux, chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Esophagectomy can be used to treat several esophageal diseases; it is most commonly used for treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophagectomy is a major procedure that may result in various complications. This article reviews only the important complications resulting from esophageal resection, which are anastomotic complications after esophageal reconstruction (leakage and stricture), delayed emptying or dumping syndrome, reflux, and chylothorax. PMID:24876942

  2. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Marfan Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome can affect many parts of ... many complications, some of which are life threatening. Marfan Traits Marfan syndrome often affects the long bones ...

  3. Streptococcal Toxic Shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Vidya; Sankaranarayan, Shuba; Sivaraman, Rajakumar Padur; Prabaharan, Krithika

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcal Toxic Shock syndrome (STSS) is a serious complication caused by exotoxins of Group A Streptococcus (GAS). It presents with fulminant shock and rash, is rapidly progressive with Multi-Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and requires aggressive therapy with fluids, antibiotics and source control. PMID:24297338

  4. Pregnancy Complications: Chlamydia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the community. Home > Pregnancy > Pregnancy Complications > Chlamydia Pregnancy complications Pregnancy complications may need special medical care. ... younger than 25. Can chlamydia cause problems during pregnancy? Yes. If you get it before or during ...

  5. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akku?, Selami; U?urlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  6. Circular box C D RNAs in Pyrococcus furiosus Natalia G. Starostina*, Sarah Marshburn*, L. Steven Johnson

    E-print Network

    Eddy, Sean

    Circular box C D RNAs in Pyrococcus furiosus Natalia G. Starostina*, Sarah Marshburn*, L. Steven, and approved August 24, 2004 (received for review May 18, 2004) Box C D RNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that function in RNA modification in eukaryotes and archaea. Here, we report that box C D RNAs exist in the rare

  7. Ocular Findings of Beals Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sugie Takaesu-Miyagi; Hiroshi Sakai; Tadashi Shiroma; Kazuhisa Hayakawa; Yusei Funakoshi; Shoichi Sawaguchi

    2004-01-01

    Background In this report of two Okinawan patients with Beals syndrome and accompanying ocular complications, the symptoms of Beals syndrome and Marfan syndrome are compared. The etiology of these two syndromes is considered in relation to fibrillin. Cases Case 1 was a 5-year-old boy who showed blue sclera and bilateral enlargement of optic disc cupping. Case 2 was a 24-year-old

  8. Complications of Diabetes and Their Implications for Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents information on the complications of both Type I and Type II diabetes and the implications for the rehabilitation of persons with diabetes and visual impairment. Topics covered include retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic hand syndrome, neuropathy of the autonomic nervous…

  9. [Renal biopsy: procedures, contraindications, complications].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Carmen; Nochy, Dominique; Bariety, Jean

    2009-07-01

    Renal biopsy plays a central role in the investigational approach of the nephrologist. The technique has significantly improved over the past two decades as a result of the introduction of ultrasonography and automated-gun biopsy devices. Percutaneous renal biopsy has become a relatively safe procedure with life-threatening complications occurring in less than 0.1% of biopsies in recent reports. However, percutaneous kidney biopsy is not without risk. Overt complications occurring in up to 13% of the cases, and 6 to 7% of complications were considered major, needing for an intervention such as transfusion of blood product or invasive procedure (radiographic or surgical). Major complications were apparent in more than 90% of patients by 24 hours. In situations in which the potential benefit of obtaining renal histology outweighs the risks of the procedure, transjugular kidney biopsy or surgical biopsy offers an attractive alternative. At present, we have no definite predictive indicators of postbiopsy bleeding complication, with the exception of age, gender, advanced renal insufficiency and the baseline partial thromboplastin time. Bleeding time is not significantly predictive and has been reported to have substantial limitations as a screening test. The use of the PFA-100 may replace the bleeding time and is now considered as a more valuable screening test for prebiopsy identification and management of patients with impaired haemostasis. Four groups of patients benefit from the findings of renal biopsy: those with a nephrotic syndrome, those with a renal disease in a context of systemic disorder, those with acute renal failure and those with a renal transplant. Some patients with non-nephrotic proteinuria, hematuria and chronic renal failure may also benefit from the procedure. PMID:19345174

  10. Complications of Tumor Ablation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence Cheung; Tito Livraghi; Luigi Solbiati; Gerald D. Dodd; Eric vanSonnenberg

    Percutaneous and surgical ablation procedures are flourishing, in large part because of the relative paucity and the acceptability\\u000a of complications. However, serious and fatal complications have occurred, albeit rarely, with ablation. This chapter identifies\\u000a those complications, describes their underlying cause, and, when possible, discusses strategies to avoid them.

  11. Gestational vascular complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnon Samueloff

    2003-01-01

    Severe pregnancy complications, primarily severe pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) occur in about 1–5% of gestations. This rate is even higher in special medical situations. These pregnancy complications have been shown to increase maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality considerably. Severe pregnancy complications have also been shown to be associated with deficient uteroplacental

  12. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection and management of clinical complications such as scoliosis and febrile seizures. An adequate psychological and educational program with speech therapy and motor stimulation plays an important role in the global development of the patients. Final body height is difficult to predict but growth tends to normalize after puberty. PMID:17825104

  13. Musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disease in children.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Skinner, Joline

    2008-02-01

    A wide variety of neuromuscular diseases affect children, including central nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and spinal cord injury; motor neuron disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy; peripheral nerve disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; neuromuscular junction disorders such as congenital myasthenia gravis; and muscle fiber disorders such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Although the origins and clinical syndromes vary significantly, outcomes related to musculoskeletal complications are often shared. The most frequently encountered musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disorders in children are scoliosis, bony rotational deformities, and hip dysplasia. Management is often challenging to those who work with children who have neuromuscular disorders. PMID:18194756

  14. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... applies to a condition known as metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome Is an Early Warning Sign Metabolic syndrome isn' ... 2 diabetes down the road. What Exactly Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is a collection of problems that ...

  15. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Boards & Staff Annual Report & Financials Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of ...

  16. [Complications of body piercing].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, L; Madrid, C; Odman-Jaques, M; Yersin, B; Carnon, P N

    2014-03-19

    The trend of body piercing has grown in popularity in the past decade within the general population and especially among young adults. Complications of body piercing include local inflammation and infections, but severe complications are also possible and largely underestimated. People are usually not aware of the risks before making a piercing, and their medical history, medication and comorbidities are largely neglected by the people who realise the piercing. This article presents a review of the complications that a primary care physician may observe, for a patient who wishes to make a piercing, or presents complications due to the implementation of such a device. PMID:24734366

  17. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kidney dialysis or transplantation may be required. Drug toxicity This is occasionally responsible for kidney complications, although toxicity issues generally resolve when the drug in question ...

  18. Complications in periorbital surgery.

    PubMed

    Terella, Adam M; Wang, Tom D; Kim, Michael M

    2013-02-01

    Comprehensive rejuvenation of the periorbital region commonly involves management of the brow, as well as the upper and lower eyelids. Browlifting, upper and lower blepharoplasty, fat transfer, and neuromodulators are frequently utilized with excellent results. However, surgery in this region can be fraught with potential complications ranging from a poor cosmetic outcome to orbital hematoma and vision loss. Although avoidance of complications is preferred, it is incumbent on the surgeon to have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these complications. The authors examine the more common complications of periorbital surgery. PMID:23426754

  19. [Neurologic Complications in HPV Vaccination].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    A relatively high incidence of chronic limb pain, frequently complicated by violent, tremulous involuntary movements, has been noted in Japanese girls following human papillomavirus vaccination. The average incubation period after the first dose of the vaccine was 5.47 ± 5.00 months. Frequent manifestations included headaches, general fatigue, coldness of the feet, limb pain, and weakness. The skin temperature of the girls with limb symptoms was slightly lower in the fingers and moderately lower in the toes. Digital plethysmograms revealed a reduced peak of the waves, especially in the toes. Limb symptoms of the affected girls were compatible with the diagnostic criteria for complex regional pain syndrome. The Schellong test identified a significant number of patients with orthostatic hypotension and a few with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Electron-microscopic examinations of the intradermal nerves showed an abnormal pathology in the unmyelinated fibers in two of the three girls examined. The symptoms observed in this study can be explained by abnormal peripheral sympathetic responses. The most common previous diagnosis in the patients was psychosomatic disease. Recently, delayed manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in the post-vaccinated girls has attracted attention. The symptoms include memory loss and difficulty in reading textbooks and/or calculation. PMID:26160812

  20. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes: A review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as Gorlin Syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B are sometimes referred to as HPS. HPS is characterized by the development of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract as well as several extra-intestinal findings such as dermatological and dysmorphic features or extra-intestinal cancer. The syndromes are rare and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. The diagnosis of HPS has traditionally been based on clinical criteria, but can sometimes be difficult as the severity of symptoms range considerably from only a few symptoms to very severe cases - even within the same family. De novo cases are also frequent. However, because of the discovery of several associated germline-mutations as well as the rapid development in genetics it is now possible to use genetic testing more often in the diagnostic process. Management of the syndromes is different for each syndrome as extra-intestinal symptoms and types of cancers differs. Clinical awareness and early diagnosis of HPS is important, as affected patients and at-risk family members should be offered genetic counselling and surveillance. Surveillance in children with HPS might prevent or detect intestinal or extra-intestinal complications, whereas in adulthood surveillance is recommended due to an increased risk of cancer e.g. intestinal cancer or breast cancer. PMID:25022750

  1. Complications of rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Harsha, Brian C

    2009-02-01

    Rhinoplasty presents a unique set of challenges for the cosmetic surgeon. Complications may arise from inadequate diagnosis, errors in surgical technique, or variations in the patient's anatomy or healing response. Complications as a result of overly aggressive surgery may also have functional consequences and be harder to correct. PMID:19185797

  2. Anastomotic Complications after Esophagectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lerut; W. Coosemans; G. Decker; P. De Leyn; P. Nafteux; D. Van Raemdonck

    2002-01-01

    Anastomotic complications after esophagectomy continue to be a burden jeopardizing the quality of life and of swallowing. However, incidence, mortality and morbidity of anastomotic complications have substantially decreased in recent years. It seems that this is not so much related to the use of a particular conduit, approach or route for reconstruction, but rather related to refinement in anastomotic techniques

  3. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  4. Complications of endoscopic neurosurgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Teo; Salim Rahman; Frederick A. Boop; Bruce Cherny

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendoscopy is rapidly becoming an essential part of the neurosurgeon's repertoire. Currently, very few studies have identified the complications of this new technique, yet many have warned of the steep learning curve associated with its practice. We have reviewed the last 173 neuroendoscopic procedures performed by one surgeon and identified two distinct groups of complications: those that have clinically significant

  5. Complications of body sculpture: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Luiz S; Mauad, Raul

    2006-01-01

    In many countries, lipoplasty is the most frequently performed aesthetic procedure. It has been promoted as a safe, easy-to-learn, outpatient procedure. Although plastic surgeons have developed safety measures to perform the technique, there are serious risks, including death at a rate of 1/5000 procedures. Life-threatening complications include pulmonary embolism, hemorrhage, perforation, infection, lidocaine toxicity, epinephrine toxicity, third space fluid shifts, and fat embolism syndrome. Aesthetic complications include undercorrection (insufficient fat removal), overcorrection (excess fat removal), irregular fat removal with palpable and visible irregularities, edema, hematoma, seroma, local infection, cutaneous slough, hyperpigmentation, vasculopathies, and permanent color changes in the skin. In this article we present methods to prevent and, when possible, treat these complications. PMID:16427969

  6. Streptococcus acidominimus infection in a child causing Gradenigo syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Finkelstein; N. Marcus; R. Mosseri; Z. Bar-Sever; B. Z. Garty

    2003-01-01

    Gradenigo syndrome is a rare presentation of acute petrositis. The clinical triad of Gradenigo syndrome consists of acute suppurative otitis media, severe unilateral headache and abducens nerve palsy. We report the first case of Gradenigo syndrome caused by Streptococcus acidominimus, a Gram-positive coccus of the Streptococcus viridans group, which rarely causes deep-seated infection in humans. Conclusion: Gradenigo syndrome may complicate

  7. Sjögren syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Xerostomia-Sjögren syndrome; Keratoconjunctivitis sicca - Sjögren; Sicca syndrome ... in children. Primary Sjögren syndrome is defined as dry eyes and dry mouth without another autoimmune disorder. Secondary ...

  8. Amniocentesis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Anandakumar, C; Wong, Y C; Annapoorna, V; Arulkumaran, S; Chia, D; Bongso, A; Ratnam, S S

    1992-05-01

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate whether the performance of an experienced operator had any significant influence in reducing the incidence of complications in amniocentesis; 1,459 women had amniocentesis performed under ultrasound guidance; 1,324 were performed by experienced operators and 135 cases by less experienced operators. Complications like fetal loss, blood-stained amniotic fluid, culture failure, multiple needle puncture, leaking liquor, fetal trauma and error in results were compared in the 2 groups. This study demonstrated that amniocentesis performed by an experienced operator decreased the various complications associated with amniocentesis. PMID:1520214

  9. Complications following hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications. PMID:25444470

  10. Meconium aspiration syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Yizhen Lim; S. Arulkumaran

    2008-01-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a rare condition affecting infants who inhale or aspirate meconium-stained liquor during or after labour. It is a serious disease with complications of neonatal respiratory distress, and can lead to the death of infants if it is not detected early or is left untreated.Hypoxia, hypercarbia and chorioamnionitis predispose infants to this condition, and often they

  11. Troyer syndrome revisited

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christos Proukakis; Harold Cross; Heema Patel; Michael A. Patton; Alan Valentine; Andrew H. Crosby

    2004-01-01

    Troyer syndrome, originally described in 1967 in an Old Order Amish population, is a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and slowly progressive. The cardinal features are spastic paraparesis, pseudobulbar palsy and distal amyotrophy, together with mild developmental delay and subtle skeletal abnormalities. We report a detailed evaluation of 21 cases of Troyer

  12. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Complications Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Symptoms Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  13. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... complete loss of smell (anosmia) may occur with sinusitis. Causes of decreased and/or loss of sense ... improvement. Mucocele A mucocele is a complication of sinusitis caused by obstruction of drainage of mucous from ...

  14. Complications of TMJ surgery.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David; Puig, Leann

    2015-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery can be divided into 3 types of surgery: Arthroscopy, arthroplasty, and total joint replacement. The complications associated with these procedures increase with complexity. They all include injury to adjacent structures, infections, and bleeding problems. PMID:25483447

  15. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  16. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD) are generally classified as either local ... is chronic (of long duration) LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF ULCERATIVE COLITIS PERFORATION (RUPTURE) OF THE BOWEL Intestinal perforation occurs ...

  17. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español ( ... Action Coalition's website (www.vaccineinformation.org). Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus ... Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  18. Complications of Otitis Media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Metin Önerci

    \\u000a The complications of acute or chronic middle ear diseases still carry a very high mortality rate if not treated properly,\\u000a although the incidence of complications has been decreasing significantly after the introduction of antibiotics. The infection\\u000a may spread to neighboring structures either by bone erosion or preformed pathways. Facial nerve paralysis due to chronic otitis\\u000a media with cholesteatoma requires urgent

  19. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    What Is Tourette Syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a condition that affects a person's central nervous system and causes tics. Tics are ... few months or a year. Continue Who Gets Tourette Syndrome? Tourette syndrome can affect people of all ...

  20. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Tourette Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Tourette Syndrome Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Tourette Syndrome? Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder ...

  1. Fanconi syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome ...

  2. 79 FR 27977 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-05-15

    ...history of other endocrine and metabolic diseases) V18.8 (Family...history of other endocrine and metabolic diseases) V18.8 (Family...Distress weight (adjusted by Syndrome, Neonate. percent...damage, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and psychiatric...

  3. Hepatopulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Fan, Daiming

    2015-07-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a pulmonary complication observed in patients with chronic liver disease and/or portal hypertension, attributable to an intrapulmonary vascular dilatation that may induce severe hypoxemia. Microvascular dilation and angiogenesis in the lung have been identified as pathologic features that drive gas exchange abnormalities in experimental HPS. Pulse oximetry is a useful screening test for HPS, which can guide subsequent use of arterial blood gases. Contrast-enhanced echocardiography, perfusion lung scanning, and pulmonary arteriography are three currently used diagnostic imaging modalities that identify the presence of intrapulmonary vascular abnormalities. The presence of HPS increases mortality and impairs quality of life, but is reversible with liver transplantation. No medical therapy is established as effective for HPS. At the present time, liver transplantation is the only available treatment for HPS. PMID:25732713

  4. [Marfan syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jondeau, Guillaume; Delorme, Gabriel; Guiti, Chabnam

    2002-05-15

    Marfan syndrome is a genetic illness, generally linked to an anomaly in fibrillin type 1, which is transmitted in an autosomally dominant fashion. Its diagnosis is sometimes difficult and should always be evoked in the face of a non-atheromatous aneurysm of the ascending aorta, lead to family screening in the search for aneurysms in any relatives, and an ophthalmological and rheumatological examination in the search for extracardiac signs. The diagnosis made, the dilatation of the aorta can be limited by proscribing violent sports and prescribing beta-blockers. The diameter of the ascending aorta should be measured with an annual ultrasound in order to propose a surgical replacement of the ascending aorta, before a complication (above all aortic dissection) arises. PMID:12107930

  5. Complications of body piercing.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Donna I

    2005-11-15

    The trend of body piercing at sites other than the earlobe has grown in popularity in the past decade. The tongue, lips, nose, eyebrows, nipples, navel, and genitals may be pierced. Complications of body piercing include local and systemic infections, poor cosmesis, and foreign body rejection. Swelling and tooth fracture are common problems after tongue piercing. Minor infections, allergic contact dermatitis, keloid formation, and traumatic tearing may occur after piercing of the earlobe. "High" ear piercing through the ear cartilage is associated with more serious infections and disfigurement. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are advised for treatment of auricular perichondritis because of their antipseudomonal activity. Many complications from piercing are body-site-specific or related to the piercing technique used. Navel, nipple, and genital piercings often have prolonged healing times. Family physicians should be prepared to address complications of body piercing and provide accurate information to patients. PMID:16342832

  6. Complications in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, H; Nahrstedt, U; Hollmann, S; Rückert, K

    1995-01-01

    Over the last few years, laparoscopic surgery has gained widespread acceptance in surgical practice. The indications range has expanded extraordinarily in that time. Some of the practiced procedures are already considered the gold standard, while others are still on the way there. The fascinating technique and results notwithstanding, a number of risks, mistakes, and complications are possible in both the initial and the advanced states. We present our experience from 2118 laparoscopic operations performed between February 1991 to March 1995, focusing on the intraoperative complications (Tables 1, 2). PMID:21400429

  7. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise. PMID:25833626

  8. [Nephrotic syndrome in a female patient with Rapunzel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Umbetalina, N S; Turgunov, E M; Turgunova, L G; Baesheva, T A; Bacheva, I V

    2014-01-01

    The Rapunzel syndrome is a rare complication of gastric trichobezoar, which may be long insidious. Systemic hair eating gradually leads to bezoar growth, gastritis, gastric mucosal ulcerations, and evacuatory disorders. The Rapunzel syndrome may cause acute and chronic bowel obstruction, peritonitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and allergic manifestations. Neither proteinuria nor nephrotic syndrome is depicted in any of the 38 Rapunzel syndrome cases described in the literature. The authors present the first case of gastric trichobezoar extending to the small bowel (its total length was 118 cm), which gave rise to chronic recurrent partial bowel obstruction, causing intoxication nephrotic syndrome in a 20-year-old women with trichotillomania. The nephrotic syndrome became a reason for her admission to a nephrology department and had specific features: it was unaccompanied by hypercholesterolemia, it rapidly regressed and completely disappeared after surgical removal of the trichobezoar weighing 1980 g. PMID:25804045

  9. Mycoplasmal Upper Respiratory Infection Presenting as Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mana; Agrawal, Abhinav; Parikh, Manan; Banayat, Rikka; Thomas, Maria Joana; Guo, Tianhua; Lee, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma is a virulent organism that is known to primarily infect the respiratory tract; however, affection of the skin, nervous system, kidneys, heart and bloodstream has been observed in various forms, which include Stevens Johnson syndrome, erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis, encephalitis, renal failure, conduction system abnormalities and hemolytic anemia. Small vessel vasculitis is a lesser-known complication of mycoplasma pneumonia infection. We report a case of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract infection with striking cutaneous lesions as the presenting symptom. Mycoplasmal infection was confirmed by serology testing, skin biopsy was suggestive of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. This case brings forth an uncommon manifestation of mycoplasmal infection with extra-pulmonary affection, namely small vessel vasculitis. PMID:25874067

  10. Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Ahmed, Wamda

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, seizures, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, postpartum angiopathy, cerebral sinus thrombosis, amniotic fluid emboli, choriocarcinoma, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are rare but can be devastating. These conditions can present a challenge to physicians because pregnancy is a unique physiologic state, most therapeutic options available in the intensive care unit were not studied in pregnant patients, and in many situations, physicians need to deliver care to both the mother and the fetus, simultaneously. Timely recognition and management of critical neurologic complications of pregnancy/puerperum can be life saving for both the mother and fetus. PMID:25123793

  11. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  12. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... materials (aspiration pneumonia) Breathing difficulty, possibly leading to death (10-20% of cases are fatal) Â Top of Page Related Page Symptoms/Complications for Clinicians Related Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination File Formats Help: How do I ...

  13. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  14. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  15. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotou?ová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  16. Heterotopic ossification as a complication of toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles J. Gibson; Kanakadurga R. Poduri

    1997-01-01

    The development of heterotopic ossification (HO) as a complication of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) has not been previously reported. TEN, also known as Lyell's syndrome, is a rare but serious skin disorder that typically occurs after the administration of drugs, especially sulfonamides, barbiturates, phenytoin, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. TEN is characterized by the development of large fluid-filled bullae with separation

  17. CT of pregnancy-related complications.

    PubMed

    Menias, Christine O; Elsayes, Khaled M; Peterson, Christine M; Huete, Alvaro; Gratz, Brett I; Bhalla, Sanjeev

    2007-03-01

    During pregnancy, the risk of radiation exposure to the fetus is increased so that more than the usual benefit is necessary to justify computed tomography (CT; or other radiation exposure) than in non-pregnant patients. In the setting of a life-threatening illness, CT may be indicated to assess for potentially fatal complications such as hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. After delivery, patients rarely develop serious problems requiring radiologic evaluation. When indicated, however, CT may be invaluable in making the diagnosis or determining the severity of peri- and post-partum complications, including uterine perforation, hemorrhage, endometritis, thrombophlebitis, and abscess formation. At times, CT may be the first to uncover conditions, such as post-partum cardiomyopathy, and heart failure, which are usually diagnosed by other modalities but may explain the symptoms for which the study was ordered. In some centers, CT pulmonary angiography represents the standard of care to diagnose pulmonary thromboembolism. In this article, we illustrate the spectrum of peri-partum and post-partum complications on CT to familiarize the radiologist with the CT features of these potentially life-threatening pregnancy-related complications. PMID:17216173

  18. Diabetologia . Author manuscript LDL from obese patients with the metabolic syndrome show increased

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Diabetologia . Author manuscript Page /1 12 LDL from obese patients with the metabolic syndrome was aimed at assessing oxidative stress in LDL from obese patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) compared ; metabolism ; Male ; Metabolic Syndrome X ; complications ; Middle Aged ; Obesity ; blood ; complications

  19. [Complications of hypospadias repairs].

    PubMed

    Soave, A; Riechardt, S; Engel, O; Rink, M; Fisch, M

    2014-07-01

    Hypospadias is the most common congenital abnormality of the lower urinary tract affecting one of 300 male newborns. More than 300 different surgical hypospadias repair techniques have been described. Currently, tubularized incised plate and meatal advancement and glansplasty integrated repair are the preferred techniques for distal hypospadias, whereas two-staged procedures are most frequently used in proximal forms. Success rates are high in the hands of dedicated surgeons, although studies on long-term results are sparse. The most frequent complications of hypospadias repairs include urethrocutaneous fistulas, meatal stenosis, and urethral strictures. Urological follow-up into puberty is warranted, as well as further studies with standardized reporting of long-term results and complications. PMID:25023236

  20. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  1. [Complications of rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Grevers, G; Klemens, A

    2002-10-31

    Rhinogenous complications may manifest in the region of the orbits, bone or soft parts of the wall of the frontal sinus, or endocranially. With regard to orbital complications, a differentiation is made between edema, periostitis, subperiosteal abscess and phlegmon--depending on severity and extent. A possible sequela of frontal sinusitis may be osteomyelitis. If the frontal bone is involved, there is a danger that the infection may spread to the endocranium via medullary spaces and blood vessels. The diagnostic basis for deciding appropriate treatment is CT or MRI. While orbital edema and periostitis usually respond to conservative treatment, subperiosteal abscess, orbital phlegmon and abscess of the brain require immediate operative treatment under antibiotic cover. The treatment of choice for osteomyelitis of the frontal bone is the liberal removal of affected bone, also under antibiotic cover. PMID:12494596

  2. Jacobsen syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe and require heart surgery in the neonatal period. Newborns with Jacobsen syndrome may have difficulties in feeding and tube feeding may be necessary. Special attention should be devoted due to hematological problems. About 20% of children die during the first two years of life, most commonly related to complications from congenital heart disease, and less commonly from bleeding. For patients who survive the neonatal period and infancy, the life expectancy remains unknown. PMID:19267933

  3. Neurologic Complications of Sarcoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Santosh Kesari; Lara J. Kunschner

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that rarely involve the nervous system. Neurologic effects of sarcoma are more\\u000a often due to tumors outside of the central nervous system. However, as long-term survival rates in childhood sarcoma improves,\\u000a reports of late neurologic complications have increased. With recent advances in treating local sarcomas with targeted molecular\\u000a therapies, the incidence of late

  4. Complications of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Settipane, R A

    1999-01-01

    With unfortunate high frequency, clinicians consider allergic rhinitis to be more of a nuisance than an illness. When in fact, allergic rhinitis is not only a very common disease process, affecting up to a cumulative frequency of 42% of the U.S. population by age 40, but can lead to significant short-term and long-term medical complications. Poorly controlled symptoms of allergic rhinitis may contribute to sleep loss, secondary daytime fatigue, learning impairment, decreased overall cognitive functioning, decreased long-term productivity and decreased quality of life. Additionally, poorly controlled allergic rhinitis may also contribute to the development of other related disease processes including acute and chronic sinusitis, recurrence of nasal polyps, otitis media/otitis media with effusion, hearing impairment, abnormal craniofacial development, sleep apnea and related complications, aggravation of underlying asthma, and increased propensity to develop asthma. Treatment of allergic rhinitis with sedating antihistamine therapy may result in negative neuropsychiatric effects that contribute to some of these complications. Sedating antihistamines may also be dangerous to use in certain other settings such as driving or operating potentially dangerous machinery. In contrast nonsedating antihistamines have been demonstrated to result in improved performance in allergic rhinitis. PMID:10476318

  5. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  6. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  7. Surgical complications of ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, B

    1991-01-01

    Over the past 25 years (1963-1988), a total of 311 children under 12 years of age were admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Service of the San Vicente de Paúl University Hospital, Medellín, Colombia, with complications resulting from infection with Entamoeba histolytica or Ascaris lumbricoides. In this group, the abdominal complications produced by ascariasis numbered 145, and included intestinal obstruction (n = 107), perforation of the appendix (n = 10), and migration of the parasite to the biliary tree or to the peritoneal cavity (n = 28). Evaluation of the living conditions of a significant subgroup of our patients confirms that intestinal parasitism is an endemic condition prevailing in nations that exhibit deep social and economic imbalance, where large sectors of the population remain deprived of the basic services of education, health, housing, and recreation. Massive infestation in children may give rise to grave complications that demand expert surgical care. Third World surgeons practicing in general hospitals that take care of patients of low economic capacity are usually familiar with the diagnosis and management of this pathology; surgeons who practice in the industrialized nations will only occasionally face such problems. The greater mobility of today's societies and the rather massive migrations that take place in current times have resulted in an increasing incidence of these entities in the hospital populations of the large urban centers of these nations. It is for the surgeons practicing in such centers that the information presented herein may be of greater value. PMID:2031358

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... first described the condition in 1885. What Is Tourette Syndrome? Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder ... is still being studied. Back Continue Dealing With Tourette Syndrome Many people don't understand what TS ...

  9. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  10. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Down Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome describes a set of cognitive and ...

  11. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Usher syndrome. The best treatment involves early identification so that educational programs can begin as soon ... syndrome. Other areas of study include the early identification of children with Usher syndrome, treatment strategies such ...

  12. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic (met-ah-BOL-ik) syndrome is the ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  13. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic syndrome is a name for a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the chance ... Metabolic syndrome is becoming very common in the United States. Doctors are not sure whether the syndrome is ...

  14. Vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominique P Germain; Yessica Herrera-Guzman

    2004-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, also known as Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type IV, is a life-threatening inherited disorder of connective tissue, resulting from mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Vascular EDS causes severe fragility of connective tissues with arterial and gastrointestinal rupture, and complications of surgical and radiological interventions. As for many rare orphan diseases, delay in diagnosis is

  15. Gradenigo syndrome caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pey-Yu; Wu, Chen-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Yi-Tsen; Lin, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Gradenigo syndrome is a rare but devastating complication of otitis media that involves the petrous apex. Clinically, it is characterized by the triad of suppurative otitis media, deep facial pain, and abducens palsy. Most of the Gradenigo syndrome cases that have been reported in the literature were caused by pyogenic bacteria. In this report, we describe the clinical courses of 4 adults with Gradenigo syndrome who were encountered consecutively at a tertiary referral hospital between 2008 and 2012. Mycobacterium abscessus was confirmed in all 4 cases by culturing the pathological tissues obtained during surgical debridement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report documenting infections of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in Gradenigo syndrome. An NTM infection must be considered in chronic otomastoiditis complicated by Gradenigo syndrome. The definite treatment of Gradenigo syndrome with an NTM infection requires adequate surgical debridement combined with antibiotic treatment for at least 4-6 months. PMID:25247278

  16. Miliary tuberculosis and adult respiratory distress syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Roglan Piqueras; L. Marruecos; A. Artigas; C. Rodriguez

    1987-01-01

    Although, miliary tuberculosis is an unusual cause of severe acute respiratory failure, we describe nine patients with miliary tuberculosis who developed adult respiratory distress syndrome. This complication occurred in seven patients despite treatment with antituberculous drugs. In two patients who developed the syndrome, miliary tuberculosis was diagnosed only at postmortem. The presence of pulmonary hypertension in all cases and disseminated

  17. Late development of Nicolau syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alyne Mendonça Marques; Ton, Angelo; Loureiro, Thaisa Faustini; Agrizzi, Brunella Lemos

    2011-01-01

    Nicolau syndrome also known as Embolia cutis medicamentosa and Livedoid dermatitis is a rare complication characterized by tissue necrosis that occurs after injection of medicines. We describe a case of late development of Nicolau syndrome following intra-articular infiltration with corticosteroid. PMID:21437542

  18. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominique P Germain

    2007-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria) in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of

  19. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, J. L.; Palacios-Araus, L.; Echevarría, S.; Herrán, A.; Campo, J. F.; Riancho, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus are predisposed to many infectious and noninfectious complications and often receive a variety of drugs. Furthermore, they seem to have a particular susceptibility to idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. It is therefore surprising that only a few cases of the neuroleptic malignant syndrome have been described in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose the neuroleptic malignant syndrome in these patients, as its usual manifestations, including fever and altered consciousness, are frequently attributed to an underlying infection. PMID:9497946

  20. Overlap Syndromes: An Emerging Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Pooja; Malhotra, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Overlap syndrome in hepatology is emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, which is further complicated by the present gaps in the information regarding the immunopathogenesis of these diseases. The present review represents a concise review of literature on overlap syndromes with emphasis on prevalence, etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of true overlap syndromes. PMID:25434314

  1. Sturge-Weber syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eulalia Baselga

    2004-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a sporadic neurocutaneous disease characterized by facial port-wine stain, ocular abnormalities (glaucoma and choroidal hemangioma) and leptomeningeal angioma. Although the precise pathogenesis is unknown, available data regarding genetics, embryogenesis, and pathologic features are briefly reviewed. Clinical features vary from mild incomplete forms to full-blown disease with facial stain, seizures, and glaucoma. Frequencies of associated complications are reviewed.

  2. Nasal tip complications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Richard E

    2012-06-01

    As cosmetic nasal surgery becomes increasingly more popular worldwide, postoperative nasal tip deformities have also become far more prevalent. Owing to the cosmetic prominence of the nose and to the functional importance of the nasal airway, postsurgical nasal tip deformities often result in debilitating emotional and physiological consequences. However, contemporary principles of cosmetic and functional nasal surgery, when applied expertly, will typically prevent such complications and will simultaneously permit a natural, attractive, and well-functioning nose. This article explores the mechanisms leading to common iatrogenic deformities of the nasal tip and provides alternative techniques for the safe and effective modification of nasal tip contour. PMID:22723230

  3. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178

  4. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-04-18

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178

  5. Complications in periocular rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Mack, William P

    2010-08-01

    Thorough preoperative evaluation with meticulous surgical planning to achieve facial aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface is imperative to avoid or decrease potential functional and/or cosmetic complications in cosmetic periocular surgery. Before performing surgery, the physician should be aware of the patient's history of dry eyes, previous facial trauma, previous injection of Botox Cosmetic, history of previous laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and past facial surgery. A full evaluation should be performed on the upper eyelid/brow region to assess for the presence of brow ptosis, brow/eyelid asymmetry, dermatochalasis/pseudodermatochalasis, eyelid ptosis, and deep superior sulcus. On the lower eyelid/cheek examination, special attention should be directed to the diagnosis of underlying negative vector, dry eyes, prominent eyes, lower lid retraction, ectropion, lateral canthal dystopia, lower eyelid laxity, scleral show, and lagophthalmos, with a rejuvenation goal that focuses on obtaining a youthful fullness through repositioning and reinforcing efforts to avoid the negative effects of hollowness. Intraoperative and postoperative medical and surgical management of cosmetic periocular surgery complications focus on decreasing the risk of postoperative ptosis, lagophthalmos, lid retraction, and lid asymmetry, with special attention to limiting the risk of visual loss secondary to orbital hemorrhage. PMID:20659676

  6. [Complications and peculiarities of anesthesia in abdominal delivery].

    PubMed

    Balich, E Ia

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the reasons responsible for complications of anesthesia in abdominal delivery has shown that such complications are most frequent before fetus extraction. They are: poorly corrected hypo- or hypertension and tachycardia; damages of major vessels, pleura and lungs upon central vein puncture; severe hypoxia in difficult or abortive intubations with mouth, larynx, pharynx, trachea and esophagus injuries; regurgitation and development of aspiration pneumonia (Mendelson syndrome); toxic and allergic reactions to psychopharmacological, narcotic and local anesthetic agents; signs of laryngobronchiolospasm; complications during suture of the uterus and abdominal cavity when main anesthesia is performed (hypotonic bleeding with the onset of ARDS, hemodynamic disturbances due to microembolism of the pulmonary artery branches upon active contractions of the uterus caused by uterotonics, side effects of myorelaxants); complications in the early postoperative period (prolonged apnea, the onset of acute cardiopulmonary and hepatic failure). PMID:7943866

  7. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you know? One in five Americans has the metabolic syndrome. WhO is At risk fOr the metAbOlic syndrOme? The syndrome runs in families and is more ... High blood pressure Most people who have the metabolic syndrome feel healthy and may not have any signs ...

  8. Complications associated with equine arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Laurie R; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2008-12-01

    Arthroscopic complications are infrequent but when they occur can cause significant morbidity in the equine patient. This article reviews intraoperative and postoperative complications along with ways to avoid them. Additionally, therapeutic methods of managing these complications also are discussed. PMID:19203702

  9. Les complications des hémangiomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Casanova; F. Norat; J. Bardot; G. Magalon

    2006-01-01

    Hemangioma (HMG) is a benign tumour of the child generally evolving to spontaneous regression. Sometimes this evolution can become complicated in a more or less serious way according to its localization or of its importance. If local complications are, in the most of cases, without gravity, complications of a general nature like thrombopenia or cardiac failure may compromise the vital

  10. Postoperative pulmonary complications updating.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Carreira, S; le Saché, F; Raux, M

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major contributor to the overall risk of surgery. PPCs affect the length of hospital stay and are associated with a higher in-hospital mortality. PPCs are even the leading cause of death either in cardiothoracic surgery but also in non-cardiothoracic surgery. Thus, reliable PPCs risk stratification tools are the key issue of clinical decision making in the perioperative period. When the risk is clearly identified related to the patient according the ARISCAT score and/or the type of surgery (mainly thoracic and abdominal), low-cost preemptive interventions improve outcomes and new strategies can be developed to prevent this risk. The EuSOS, PERISCOPE and IMPROVE studies demonstrated this care optimization by risk identification first, then risk stratification and new care (multifaceted) strategies implementation allowing a decrease in PPCs mortality by optimizing the clinical path of the patient and the care resources. PMID:25168300

  11. [Diabetic macrovascular complications].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2015-03-01

    Reactive derivatives from non-enzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions, as well as lipids and nucleic acids exposed to reducing sugars, form a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called "advanced glycation end products(AGEs)". The formation and accumulation of AGEs have been known to progress at an accelerated rate under diabetes. There is accumulating evidence that AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) interaction elicits oxidative stress generation and subsequently evokes inflammatory and thrombogenic reactions, thereby being involved in vascular complications in diabetes. We, along with others, have recently found that pigment epithelium-derived factor(PEDF), a glycoprotein that belongs to the superfamily of serine protease inhibitors, has neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties both in cell culture and animal models. In this review, we discuss the role of AGE-RAGE axis in diabetic macroangiopathy and its therapeutic intervention by PEDF. PMID:25812377

  12. Moyamoya syndrome associated with Alagille syndrome: outcome after surgical revascularization.

    PubMed

    Baird, Lissa C; Smith, Edward R; Ichord, Rebecca; Piccoli, David A; Bernard, Timothy J; Spinner, Nancy B; Scott, R Michael; Kamath, Binita M

    2015-02-01

    Vasculopathy is well-described in Alagille syndrome (ALGS); however, few data exist regarding neurosurgical interventions. We report 5 children with ALGS with moyamoya who underwent revascularization surgery. Postsurgical complications included 1 stroke and 1 death from thalamic hemorrhage. Global function improved in survivors. Revascularization is reasonably safe in patients with ALGS and may improve neurologic outcomes. PMID:25465847

  13. Polycystic ovary syndrome: a dermatologic approach.

    PubMed

    Moura, Heloisa Helena Gonçalves de; Costa, Dailana Louvain Marinho; Bagatin, Ediléia; Sodré, Celso Tavares; Manela-Azulay, Mônica

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (POS) is one of the most common endocrine abnormalities affecting women of reproductive age. It is a cause of significant social embarrassment and emotional distress. The pathogenesis of the disease is not yet fully understood, but it is thought to be a complex multigenic disorder, including abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, steroidogenesis, and insulin resistance. The main diagnostic findings of the syndrome are: hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation and polycystic ovarian morphology seen on ultrasound. Hyperandrogenism is generally manifested as hirsutism, acne, seborrhea, androgenic alopecia and, in severe cases, signs of virilization. Treatment may improve the clinical manifestations of excess androgen production, normalize menses and ameliorate metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular complications. This article reviews the diagnosis, clinical manifestations, metabolic complications, and treatment of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and the consequent early treatment may prevent metabolic complications and emotional distress that negatively impact the patients' quality of life. PMID:21437531

  14. Meconium aspiration syndrome: historical aspects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A A Fanaroff

    2008-01-01

    The meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a common problem that continues to concern perinatologists and neonatologists. MAS is defined as respiratory distress in an infant born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) whose symptoms cannot be otherwise explained. This disorder may be life threatening, complicated by respiratory failure, pulmonary air leaks and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Approaches to the prevention of MAS

  15. The Internal-Candidate Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Dennis M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author explains the complications involved when an internal candidate is included in an open search for a leadership position in an academic institution. Internal-candidate syndrome is a dilemma faced by institutions when they have to choose between an internal candidate and an external one. There are two reasons why…

  16. Ureteral Cannulation as a Complication of Urethral Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary catheterization is a common procedure, particularly among patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spinal cord injury. Urethral catheterization is associated with the well-recognized complications of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and limited genitourinary trauma. Unintentional ureteral cannulation represents a rare complication of urethral catheterization and has been previously described in only eight cases within the literature. We describe two cases of aberrant ureteral cannulation involving two patients with quadriplegia. These cases along with prior reports identify the spastic, insensate bladder and altered pelvic sensorium found in upper motor neuron syndromes as major risk factors for ureteral cannulation with a urinary catheter. PMID:25405021

  17. Mind the Sump! – Diagnostic Challenge of a Rare Complication of Choledochoduodenostomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeuge, Ulf; Fehr, Martin; Meyenberger, Christa; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2014-01-01

    Sump syndrome is a rare long-term complication of side-to-side choledochoduodenostomy (CDD), a common surgical procedure in patients with biliary tract disease in the era before endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Frequently only pneumobilia, serving as sign for functioning biliary-enteric anastomosis, is reminiscent of the former surgery. We present the case of an 81-year-old patient with sump syndrome who presented with clinical signs of ascending cholangitis, decades after the initial CDD procedure. Finally the detailed medical history that was taken very thoroughly in combination with the presence of pneumobilia led to the suspicion of sump syndrome. Sump syndrome was diagnosed by ERCP, and after endoscopic debris extraction and antibiotic treatment the patient recovered quickly. In the ERCP era little is known about CDD and its long-term complications, especially by young colleagues and trainees. Therefore this report provides an excellent opportunity to refresh the knowledge and raise awareness for this syndrome. PMID:25520606

  18. Moyamoya Syndrome: A Window of Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phi, Ji Hoon; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya-like vasculopathy develops in association with various systemic diseases and conditions, which is termed moyamoya syndrome. Relatively common diseases and conditions are related to moyamoya syndrome, including neurofibromatosis type 1, Down syndrome, thyroid disease, and cranial irradiation. Moyamoya syndrome shares phenotypical characteristics with idiopathic moyamoya disease. However, they differ in other details, including clinical presentations, natural history, and treatment considerations. The study of moyamoya syndrome can provide clinicians and researchers with valuable knowledge and insight. Although it is infrequently encountered in clinical practice, moyamoya-like vasculopathy can severely complicate outcomes for patients with various underlying diseases when the clinician fails to expect or diagnose moyamoya syndrome development. Furthermore, moyamoya syndrome could be used as a doorway to more enigmatic moyamoya disease in research. More comprehensive survey and investigation are required to uncover the secrets of all the moyamoya-like phenomena. PMID:26180607

  19. BCG vaccination in SCID patients: complications, risks and vaccination policies

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Beatriz E; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Joshi, Gyan; Rezaei, Nima; Carvalho, Beatriz Costa; Allwood, Zoe; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Reda, Shereen M; Gennery, Andrew; Thon, Vojtech; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Al-Herz, Waleed; Porras, Oscar; Shcherbina, Anna; Szaflarska, Anna; Kiliç, ?ebnem; Franco, Jose L; Raccio, Andrea C Gómez; Roxo-Jr, Persio; Esteves, Isabel; Galal, Nermeen; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Al-Tamemi, Salem; Yildiran, Alisan; Orellana, Julio C; Yamada, Masafumi; Morio, Tomohiro; Liberatore, Diana; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Lau, Yu-Lung; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Torres-Lozano, Carlos; Mazzucchelli, Juliana TL; Vilela, Maria MS; Tavares, Fabiola S; Cunha, Luciana; Pinto, Jorge A; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara E; Hernandez-Nieto, Leticia; Elfeky, Reem A; Ariga, Tadashi; Toshio, Heike; Dogu, Figen; Cipe, Funda; Formankova, Renata; Nuñez-Nuñez, M Enriqueta; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Marques, Jose Gonçalo; Pereira, María I; Listello, Viviana; Slatter, Mary A; Nademi, Zohreh; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Davies, Graham; Neven, Bénédicte; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2014-01-01

    Background SCID is a syndrome characterized by profound T cell deficiency. BCG vaccine is contraindicated in SCID patients. Because most countries encourage BCG vaccination at birth, a high percent of SCID patients are vaccinated before their immune defect is detected. Objectives To describe the complications and risks associated with BCG vaccination in SCID patients. Methods An extensive standardized questionnaire evaluating complications, therapeutics, and outcome regarding BCG in patients diagnosed with SCID was widely distributed. Summary statistics and association analysis was performed. Results Data on 349 BCG vaccinated SCID patients from 28 centers in 17 countries was analyzed. Fifty-one percent of the patients developed BCG complications, 34% disseminated and 17% localized (a 33,000 and 400 fold increase, respectively, over the general population). Patients receiving early vaccination (? 1 month) showed an increased prevalence of complications (p=0.006) and death due to BCG complications (p<0.0001). The odds of experiencing complications among patients with T cells ? 250/uL at diagnosis was 2.1 times higher (95% CI, 1.4-3.4; p = 0.001) than among those with T cells > 250/uL. BCG complications were reported in 2/78 patients who received anti-mycobacterial therapy while asymptomatic and no deaths due to BCG complications occurred in this group. In contrast 46 BCG-associated deaths were reported among 160 patients treated with anti-mycobacterial therapy for a symptomatic BCG infection (p<0.0001). Conclusions BCG vaccine has a very high rate of complications in SCID patients, which increase morbidity and mortality rates. Until safer and more efficient anti-tuberculosis vaccines become available, delay in BCG vaccination should be considered to protect highly vulnerable populations from preventable complications. PMID:24679470

  20. Concurrent Horner's and Harlequin syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, A; Herd, M K; Roszkowski, N; Downie, I P

    2015-06-01

    Horner's syndrome and Harlequin syndrome are both caused by disruptions to the sympathetic supply to the face. They have a varied aetiology, including intraneural dysfunction, extra- or intraneural compression, and idiopathic as well as iatrogenic causes. Horner's syndrome can occur as a rare complication of thyroid surgery and the Harlequin sign has only been documented as a complication of cervical surgery in a handful of paediatric patients. We present a patient who developed both conditions subsequent to excision of a papillary carcinoma with a neck dissection. We illustrate the anatomical basis for this presentation and highlight the need for its appreciation. This is of particular interest as it impacts on several specialities operating in the cervical and thoracic fields. PMID:25662430

  1. [Nicolau syndrome after intramuscular injection].

    PubMed

    Bellot, B; Bonnet, C; Retornaz, K; Panuel, M; Garnier, J-M; Dubus, J-C; Jurquet, A-L

    2014-04-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare, potentially severe complication that may occur after any drug injection, particularly after intramuscular injection. It is characterized by the acute onset of cutaneous and soft-tissue aseptic necrosis. Here, we report the case of a 14-year-old boy diagnosed with Nicolau syndrome on the right lower limb, after a benzathine-penicillin intramuscular injection for suspected rheumatic fever. The short-term progression was marked by uncomplicated rhabdomyolysis and the constitution of homolateral testicular torsion. The cutaneous-muscular disorders evolved favorably under symptomatic treatment. We discuss this insufficiently known complication of intramuscular injection, which may motivate reduced use of this route of drug administration in children and strict adherence to the procedure. Furthermore, it is important to note that Nicolau syndrome may evolve to homolateral testicular torsion, as, to the best of our knowledge, is reported for the first time in this case. PMID:24630542

  2. Postoperative surgical complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, M; Fernández, R; Fieira, E; González, D; Delgado, M; Méndez, L; Borro, J M

    2015-01-01

    This is a review article on the main postoperative complications after lung transplantation: airways complications, vascular complications, pleural complications, surgical wound complications, and abdominal complications. Incidence data, severity, and major management regimens are reported. Postoperative complications after lung transplantation result in a significantly increased morbidity and mortality, with early diagnosis and therapy being extremely important. PMID:25854134

  3. Neuromuscular complications of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Osias, Jules; Manno, Edward

    2014-10-01

    Neuromuscular sequelae are common in the critically ill. Critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy are neuromuscular complications of sepsis or iatrogenic complications of treatments required in intensive care. This article discusses the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of these disorders based on a literature review. This review found that glycemic control, early mobilization, and judicious use of steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents are the primary approaches to reduce the incidence and severity of neuromuscular complications in affected patients. PMID:25257741

  4. [Neurological complication of influenza infections].

    PubMed

    Brydak, Lidia B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present neurological complications of influenza infections. Infections caused by influenza viruses can be very serious and may lead even to death resulted from the post-infectious complications. The most often occurring complications are pneumonia, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, myocarditis and otitis media. The other group is neurological post-influenza complications, including dementia, epileptic disorders, cerebrovascular disease, febrile convulsions, toxic encephalopathy, encephalitis, meningitis, subarachnoid hemorrhages, lethargic encephalitis, psychosis or increase in the number of cases of Parkinson's disease. The first way of prevention of influenza is vaccination that results in healthy, social and economic benefits. PMID:12194226

  5. Learning about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What are the symptoms ... syndrome Additional Resources for Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome is a chromosomal condition related to ...

  6. Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Popescu, M; Strambu, V; Sandu, AM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of laparoscopic treatment in abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Methods: We report a retrospective study including 17 patients with abdominal complications secondary to VP shunt for hydrocephalus, laparoscopically treated in our department, between 2000 and 2007. Results: Patients' age ranged from 1 to 72 years old (mean age 25.8 years old). Male: female ratio was 1.4. Abdominal complications encountered were: shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration 47.05% (8/17), infections 23.52% (4/17) such as abscesses and peritonitis, pseudocysts 11.76% (2/17), CSF ascites 5.88% (1/17), inguinal hernia 5.88% (1/17), and shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube 5.88% (1/17). Free–disease interval varies from 1 day to 21 years, depending on the type of complication, short in peritoneal irritation syndrome and abscesses (days) and long in ascites, pseudocysts(months– years). Laparoscopic treatment was: extraction of the foreign body in shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration, evacuation, debridement, lavage and drainage for pseudocysts, abscess and peritonitis, shortening of the tube in shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube a nd hernioraphy. One diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in a peritoneal irritation syndrome, which found only CSF ascites. There were no conversions to open surgery. The overall mortality was of 5.88% and postoperative morbidity was of 11.76%. In 7 patients operated for abscesses, peritonitis, pseudocysts, and CSF ascites the shunting system was converted in to a ventriculocardiac shunt. Conclusions: Abdominal complication following VP shunt can be successfully performed laparoscopically. Abdominal surgery required, in selected cases, the repositioning of the distal catheter, frequently as a ventriculocardiac shunt. There are abdominal complications with no indication of surgery, like peritoneal irritation syndrome and CSF ascites. Free– disease interval varies from days (peritoneal irritation syndrome, abscesses) to month–years (pseudocyst, ascites), according to type of complication. PMID:20108757

  7. Premenstrual syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Brown I, O'Brien PMS, Marjoribanks I, Wyatt K. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for premenstrual syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;2:CD001396. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and ...

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics ... words, spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. ...

  9. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is Rett Syndrome? Rett syndrome is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that affects females almost exclusively. The child ... antiepileptic drugs may be used to control seizures. Occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and hydrotherapy may prolong mobility. Some children ...

  10. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  11. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    47 X-X-Y syndrome ... have two XX chromosomes. Boys normally have an X and a Y chromosome. Klinefelter syndrome is when ... boy is born with at least one extra X chromosome. Usually, this occurs due to one extra ...

  12. Asperger Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have certain genetic or chromosomal conditions, such as fragile X syndrome  or tuberous sclerosis . 11-14 When taken ... and autistic behavior in children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome. Am J Ment Retard. 2008; 113(1): 44- ...

  13. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mild to no mental deficiency Both forms: Carpal tunnel syndrome Coarse features of the face Deafness (gets ... Airway obstruction Carpal tunnel syndrome Hearing loss that gets worse over time Loss of ability to complete daily living activities Joint stiffness that ...

  14. Goodpasture syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Goodpasture syndrome is a rare disease that can involve quickly worsening kidney failure and lung disease. Some ... Goodpasture syndrome is an autoimmune disorder . It occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy ...

  15. Joubert Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sponsored a symposium on Joubert syndrome in 2002. Research priorities for the disorder were outlined at this meeting. NIH Patient Recruitment for Joubert Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  16. Sotos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Juneja, A; Sultan, A

    2011-12-01

    Sotos syndrome is a well-defined childhood overgrowth syndrome characterized by pre- and postnatal overgrowth, developmental delay, advanced bone age, and a typical facial gestalt including macrodolichocephaly with frontal bossing, frontoparietal sparseness of hair, apparent hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, and facial flushing. This report presents a case of Sotos syndrome in a 5½-year-old child. PMID:22169837

  17. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia/Triphalangeal thumb syndrome ... Jones KL, ed. Aase syndrome. In: Smith's Recognizable Patterns Of Human Malformation. 6th ed. Saunders. 2005. Clinton C, Gazda HT. Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. 2009 Jun 25 [Updated 2013 Jul ...

  18. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  19. Down syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called Trisomy 21. ...

  20. Sjögren’s syndrome associated with antiphospholipid syndrome and fetal myocardial echogenicity: case report

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbe, Annamaria; Grasso, Roberta; Foti, Grazia; Interdonato, Maria Lieta; Mancuso, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction Sjögren’s syndrome is a rare systemic autoimmune disorder associated with pregnancy (0.3–0.6%). The typical occurrence of anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB autoantibodies in the maternal serum can modify the perinatal outcome: neonatal lupus and congenital heart block are the most common fetal complications. Case we report a case of pregnancy complicated by a secondary form of SS associated with antiphospholipid syndrome and fetal myocardial echogenicity. Conclusion in conclusion, increased attention must be paid to pregnancies associated with autoimmune disorders, since careful ultrasonographic and clinical monitoring and preventive treatment with corticosteroids could minimize severe and common fetal complications. PMID:23991277

  1. Female circumcision and obstetric complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Larsen; F. E. Okonofua

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether complications at delivery are associated with female circumcision. Method: One thousand eight hundred and fifty-one women seeking family planning or antenatal care in three south-west Nigerian hospitals were interviewed and had a medical exam. The prevalence of complications at delivery for uncircumcised women and circumcised women with type 1 (partial or total removal of the clitoris)

  2. Intracranial complications of acute mastoiditis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia Go; Joseph M Bernstein; Andrew L de Jong; Marcelle Sulek; Ellen M Friedman

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Oral antibiotic use may have changed the incidence and microbiology of otitic intracranial complications. We reviewed cases of acute mastoiditis to document: (1) incidence of intracranial complications; (2) risk factors; and (3) identify pathologic organisms. Methods: A retrospective study of children at a tertiary care children's hospital with acute mastoiditis from July, 1986 through June, 1998. Results: 118 children

  3. Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bereavement The grief process Major depression and complicated grief Coping with loss Helping someone who is grieving Grief ... References Previous Topic The grief process Next Topic Coping with loss Major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, ...

  4. Septoplasty complications: avoidance and management.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Jason D; Kaplan, Seth E; Bleier, Benjamin S; Goldstein, Stephen A

    2009-06-01

    Nasal obstruction from a deviated septum is one of the more frequent complaints bringing patients into an otolaryngology office. Despite the significant number of septoplasties performed each year, complications after this procedure are relatively uncommon. Most complications result from inadequate surgical planning or poor technique and often can be prevented. Surgeons should discuss these risks with patients before surgery as part of the informed consent process. This article reviews how complications of septoplasty can occur, compromising the functional and aesthetic aspects of a patient's life, and how attention to detail can reduce the risk for these complications. The septoplasty surgeon must be aware of all the possible complications that may arise so as to convey the benefits and risks of surgery effectively to prospective patients. PMID:19486742

  5. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from 2-14 days. Related Links Coronavirus SARS File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  6. Growing Teratoma Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scavuzzo, Anna; Santana Ríos, Zael Arturo; Noverón, Nancy Reynoso; Jimenez Ríos, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Growing teratoma syndrome (GTS) is a rare clinical entity, which presents with enlarging teratomas masses of the retroperitoneum or other locations, occurring during or after systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of nonseminomatous germ cell of the testis (NSGCT), with normalised tumour markers. Awareness of this syndrome is necessary in order to prevent unnecessary chemotherapy and allow optimal management. Prognosis is excellent after the excision of these tumors, but surgery has to be as complete as possible. Surgical resection of bulky GTS lesions is technically challenging; intraoperative complications may occur; that is, why the treatment must not be delayed. Our experience in the surgical management of these lesions is reviewed in the following work. PMID:25197607

  7. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, David L; Berger, Miles; Mathew, Joseph P; Graffagnino, Carmelo; Milano, Carmelo A; Newman, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    As increasing numbers of elderly people undergo cardiac surgery, neurologists are frequently called upon to assess patients with neurological complications from the procedure. Some complications mandate acute intervention, whereas others need longer term observation and management. A large amount of published literature exists about these complications and guidance on best practice is constantly changing. Similarly, despite technological advances in surgical intervention and modifications in surgical technique to make cardiac procedures safer, these advances often create new avenues for neurological injury. Accordingly, rapid and precise neurological assessment and therapeutic intervention rests on a solid understanding of the evidence base and procedural variables. PMID:24703207

  8. Polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Anindita; Chen, Zijian; Patel, Ronak; Poretsky, Leonid

    2014-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a heterogeneous and chronic condition, today affects about 5% of women of reproductive age. PCOS is strongly associated with states of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Risk factors include genetics, metabolic profiles, and the in utero environment. Long-term consequences of PCOS include metabolic complications such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Dysregulation of insulin action is closely linked to the pathogenesis of PCOS. However, whether insulin resistance is the causative factor in the development of PCOS remains to be ascertained. Moreover, the mechanism by which insulin resistance may lead to reproductive dysfunction requires further elucidation. PMID:24582095

  9. [Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Laakso, Elina; Pekkola, Johanna; Soinne, Lauri; Putaala, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is increasingly recognized. The condition is characterized by multifocal vasoconstriction lesions in cerebral arteries. Headache is the central symptom, with an acute onset and paroxysmal occurrence. Some of the patients develop intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic disturbance of the cerebral circulation, hypertensive encephalopathy (PRES) or epileptic seizures as complications. The disease is most common in middle-aged women. Most patients have an underlying predisposing factor, most commonly vasoactive medications, drugs or puerperium. There is no evidence-based practice. PMID:25558591

  10. Empty nose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Suh, Jeffrey D; Wang, Marilene B

    2015-01-01

    Empty nose syndrome (ENS) is a rare, late complication of turbinate surgery. The most common clinical symptoms are paradoxical nasal obstruction, nasal dryness and crusting, and a persistent feeling of dyspnea. Little is known about the pathogenesis of ENS, though it is speculated that anatomical changes leading to alterations in local environment, disruption of mucosal cooling, and disruption of neurosensory mechanisms are strongly implicated. The diagnosis is clinical, though often difficult to make due to the poor correlation between subjective and objective findings. Medical therapies include mucosal humidification, irrigations, and emollients. Surgical therapy should be reserved for refractory cases and may involve turbinate reconstruction, most commonly using implantable biomaterials. Ultimately, prevention of this feared complication through turbinate-sparing techniques is essential. PMID:25430954

  11. Hyponatremia, Hypophosphatemia, and Hypouricemia in a Girl With Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuki Yamazawa; Kazuki Kodo; Jun Maeda; Sayu Omori; Mariko Hida; Tetsuya Mori; Midori Awazu

    Macrophage activation syndrome, a life-threatening complication of rheumatic disorders, is accompanied by the overproduction of cytokines. We describe a girl with macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic-onset juvenile arthritis who developed hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia associated with a high level of serum tumor necrosis factor . Renal proximal tubule dysfunction was considered to be the cause, which may be attributable to

  12. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  13. The acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Modrykamien, Ariel M; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  14. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH), also support research on Lyme disease. NIH Patient Recruitment for Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  15. Biliary Complications of Pancreatic Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Adarsh; Sachdev, Ajay; Negi, Sanjay

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic necrosis has the potential to cause avariety of locoregional complications (1). This isbecause of the propensity of the necrotic tissue tospread far beyond the confines of the pancreas. Theproximity of the biliary tract to the pancreas makesit particularly vulnerable to damage by the inflammatory process, and though likely, there are only isolated case reports of involvement of the biliarytract through the necrotic process (2-5). This papershares our experience in managing six patients withbiliary complications of pancreatic necrosis. PMID:12754382

  16. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  17. Progress in research on Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin J; Jankovic, Joseph; Hershey, Tamara; McNaught, Kevin St P; Mink, Jonathan W; Walkup, John

    2014-10-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable neuropsychiatric disorder commonly complicated by obsessions and compulsions, but defined by frequent unwanted movements (motor tics) and vocalizations (phonic tics) that develop in childhood or adolescence. In recent years, research on TS has progressed rapidly on several fronts. Inspired by the Fifth International Scientific Symposium on Tourette Syndrome, the articles in this special issue review advances in the phenomenology, epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and treatment of TS. PMID:25436182

  18. Learning about Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... terms used on this page. Learning About Velocardiofacial Syndrome What is velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS)? What are the ... Syndrome Additional Resources for VCFS What is velocardiofacial syndrome? Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is a genetic condition that ...

  19. [Capgras' syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ben-Zion, I Z; Levine, K; Shiber, A

    1997-09-01

    We present 3 cases of Capgras' syndrome-a delusional disorder in which the patient believes that 1 (or more) of his acquaintances has been replaced by an imposter who appears as a double. 2 were schizophrenics and 1 had depression with psychotic features. This syndrome is rare in our practice, but we do not know if this is due to lack of awareness of the condition, or to the possibility that it is a culture-related syndrome. We suggest that although the syndrome has lost some of it's significance, it is still worth making the diagnosis because of the medical and psychological implications this condition carries. PMID:9461686

  20. Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Inocêncio, G; Braga, A; Lima, T; Buchner, G

    2013-01-01

    Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome is a very rare systemic fibrovascular dysplasia. Rupture of angiomas can cause haemorrhages, which sometimes can be severe with difficult bleeding control. The main manifestation is recurrent epistaxis. Treatment of this disorder is symptomatic. During pregnancy, there may be an increased risk of complications. We describe a case of a pregnant woman with Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Besides frequent epistaxis and microcytic hypochromic anaemia that resolved with oral iron treatment, she had a normal pregnancy, vaginal delivery and puerperium without complications. PMID:23814092

  1. Nicolau syndrome after intramuscular benzathine penicillin injection.

    PubMed

    Noaparast, Morteza; Mirsharifi, Rasoul; Elyasinia, Fezzeh; Parsaei, Reza; Kondori, Hessam; Farifteh, Sara

    2014-11-01

    A 3-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency department with right lower limb pain, edema, and livedoid discoloration that occurred immediately after intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin. The patient was diagnosed with Nicolau syndrome, a rare complication of intramuscular injection presumed to be related to the inadvertent intravascular injection. It was first reported following intramuscular injection of bismuth salt, but it can occur as a complication of various other drugs. Fasciotomy was carried out due to the resultant compartment syndrome and medical therapy with heparin, corticosteroid, and pentoxifyllin was initiated. PMID:25429182

  2. Nicolau Syndrome after Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Noaparast, Morteza; Mirsharifi, Rasoul; Elyasinia, Fezzeh; Parsaei, Reza; Kondori, Hessam; Farifteh, Sara

    2014-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency department with right lower limb pain, edema, and livedoid discoloration that occurred immediately after intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin. The patient was diagnosed with Nicolau syndrome, a rare complication of intramuscular injection presumed to be related to the inadvertent intravascular injection. It was first reported following intramuscular injection of bismuth salt, but it can occur as a complication of various other drugs. Fasciotomy was carried out due to the resultant compartment syndrome and medical therapy with heparin, corticosteroid, and pentoxifyllin was initiated. PMID:25429182

  3. Down Syndrome What causes Down syndrome?

    E-print Network

    Palmeri, Thomas

    04/13 Down Syndrome What causes Down syndrome? Individuals with Down syndrome usually have an extra chromosome 21. Down syndrome occurs in about 1 in every 700 to 1,000 births. The chance of giving birth to a baby with Down syndrome increases if the mother is over 35 years old. Down syndrome affects both males

  4. Spectrum of complicated migraine in children: A common profile in aid to clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; Fields, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    Complicated migraine encompasses several individual clinical syndromes of migraine. Such a syndrome in children frequently presents with various neurological symptoms in the Emergency Department. An acute presentation in the absence of headache presents a diagnostic challenge. A delay in diagnosis and treatment may have medicolegal implication. To date, there are no reports of a common clinical profile proposed in making a clinical diagnosis for the complicated migraine. In this clinical review, we propose and describe: (1) A common clinical profile in aid to clinical diagnosis for spectrum of complicated migraine; (2) How it can be used in differentiating complicated migraine from migraine without aura, migraine with aura, and seizure; (3) We discuss the status of complicated migraine in the International Headache Society classification 2013; and (4) In addition, a common treatment strategy for the spectrum of migraine has been described. To diagnose complicated migraine clinically, it is imperative to adhere with the proposed profile. This will optimize the use of investigation and will also avoid a legal implication of delay in their management. The proposed common clinical profile is incongruent with the International Headache Society 2013. Future classification should minimize the dissociation from clinically encountered syndromes and coin a single word to address collectively this subtype of migraine with an acute presentation of a common clinical profile. PMID:25664241

  5. Periprocedural Bleeding Complications of Brain AVM Embolization with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L.; Jiang, C.; He, H.; Li, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The advent of Onyx has provided a new method for neurointerventional therapists to treat brain AVMs. Although some retrospective studies have reported complications for AVM embolization with Onyx, periprocedural bleeding complications with Onyx embolization have not yet been described in detail. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the factors of Onyx-related bleeding complications and to find a way to avoid and manage these complications. From January 2003, patients with AVMs recruited in our institution started to be treated by Onyx embolization. From January 2007 to July 2009, 143 consecutive interventions were performed in 126 patients using flow-independent microcatheters and Onyx as embolic agents. Seven patients encountered bleeding complications (5.4% per patients and 4.7% per procedures) during or after the endovascular procedures. Among them, five bleeding episodes occurred during procedures, the other two after procedures. Details of the seven patients' clinical presentations, imaging presentations, speculative reasons and management of these complications were recorded. Follow-up data, including postoperative course, clinical symptoms and duration of follow-up were documented. The five active bleedings discovered in procedures were managed in time, and the patients recovered without any new neurological symptoms compared with preoperation. However, of the two bleeding episodes that occurred after interventional procedures, one was detected half an hour later: the patient was remained comatose two months later after resection of right occipital hematoma; the other who encountered intraventricular and midbrain hemorrhage was treated conservatively and suffered Parinaud syndrome and hemianesthesia. Conclusion: Periprocedural bleeding of AVMs embolization is considered a severe and devastating complication. The clinical course and prognosis of bleeding mostly depends on prompt detection and management. Interventional embolization is an effective method to manage bleeding during procedures, and the detection of risk factors and imaging signs of bleeding is extremely important. PMID:20377979

  6. Antiphospholipid syndrome; its implication in cardiovascular diseases: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ioanna Koniari; Stavros N Siminelakis; Nikolaos G Baikoussis; Georgios Papadopoulos; John Goudevenos; Efstratios Apostolakis

    2010-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) is a rare syndrome mainly characterized by several hyper-coagulable complications and therefore, implicated in the operated cardiac surgery patient. APLS comprises clinical features such as arterial or venous thromboses, valve disease, coronary artery disease, intracardiac thrombus formation, pulmonary hypertension and dilated cardiomyopathy. The most commonly affected valve is the mitral, followed by the aortic and tricuspid valve.

  7. Continuous positive airway pressure and conventional mechanical ventilation in the treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J P Goldsmith

    2008-01-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a complex syndrome that ranges in severity from mild respiratory distress to severe respiratory failure, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and sometimes death. Understanding of the syndrome's complicated pathophysiology will help determine the appropriate treatment strategy, including the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) and other therapies. Approximately 30

  8. J Clin Endocrinol Metab . Author manuscript Metabolic syndrome, its components, and mortality in the elderly

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J Clin Endocrinol Metab . Author manuscript Page /1 7 Metabolic syndrome, its components and Objective The metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been shown to predict mortality in the middle-aged, but less ; Female ; Health Behavior ; Health Status ; Humans ; Male ; Metabolic Syndrome X ; blood ; complications

  9. Serotonin syndrome and drug combinations: focus on MAOI and RIMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Hilton; H. Maradit; H. J. Möller

    1997-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening complication of psychopharmacological drug therapy. The syndrome is produced\\u000a most often by the concurrent use of two or more drugs that increase brainstem serotonin activity and is often unrecognized\\u000a because of the varied and nonspecific nature of its symptomatology. Serotonin syndrome is characterized by alterations in\\u000a cognition, behavior, autonomic nervous system function and neuromuscular

  10. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Is It? Klinefelter syndrome can cause problems with learning and sexual development in guys. It's a genetic condition (meaning a person is born with it). Klinefelter syndrome only affects males. It happens because of a difference deep inside the body's cells, in microscopic centers called ...

  11. HELLP Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have your baby. HELLP stands for Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzyme levels and a Low Platelet count. These are problems that can occur in women who have this syndrome. Women who have HELLP syndrome may have bleeding problems, liver problems and blood pressure problems that can hurt ...

  12. Stonefish envenomation with acute carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ling, Samuel K K; Cheng, S C; Yen, C H

    2009-12-01

    Stonefish envenomation is a common marine sting. Although stonefish injuries are commonly sustained during maritime activities, this local delicacy can also be considered a regional occupational hazard for chefs. The availability and consumption of stonefish in local restaurants has increased the risk of acute carpal tunnel syndrome after a stonefish injury. This case report describes acute carpal tunnel syndrome following stonefish envenomation. An excellent recovery was achieved after surgical decompression of the carpal tunnel syndrome. Standard management of stonefish injuries should therefore take into account the possibility that this orthopaedic emergency may complicate the injury. PMID:19966353

  13. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  14. [Complications after cosmetic iris implantation].

    PubMed

    Jonsson, N J; Sahlmüller, M C; Ruokonen, P C; Torun, N; Rieck, P

    2011-05-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old patient with ocular complications associated with the implantation of cosmetic iris implants. Implantation of silicone iris implants for the purpose of changing iris colour has been performed since 2004. Diaphragms are implanted in the anterior chamber. Up to now only little information exists about side effects of this method. In the literature severe ocular complications shortly after cosmetic iris implantation are reported in single cases. In our case 5 months after surgery optic nerve damage caused by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) was diagnosed. Nuclear opacity of both lenses and a decreased number of corneal endothelial cells were observed at the first visit. Because of recurrent IOP elevation despite maximum antiglaucoma therapy, explantation of the iris implants was required. Damage to the trabecular meshwork, opacity of the lenses as well as the reduced number of endothelial cells are permanent and will probably lead to further complications like corneal decompensation and progressing glaucoma. PMID:21344246

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Noonan syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... use for Noonan syndrome? familial Turner syndrome Female Pseudo-Turner Syndrome Male Turner Syndrome Noonan-Ehmke syndrome pseudo-Ullrich-Turner syndrome Turner-like syndrome Turner's phenotype, ...

  16. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes – often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and discusses why some caregivers may struggle with the death of their loved one. Finally, it offers practical suggestions for what professionals can do to help caregivers both before and after the death has occurred. PMID:20463850

  17. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes - often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and discusses why some caregivers may struggle with the death of their loved one. Finally, it offers practical suggestions for what professionals can do to help caregivers both before and after the death has occurred. PMID:20463850

  18. T-cell lymphoma with POEMS syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, FANGWEN; LI, ZHENHUA; MA, JIN-AN; QIU, ZHENHUA; TANG, YI-FANG; ZHENG, JIAO-YUN

    2015-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a unique subtype of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused by an underlying plasma cell disorder (PCD). The occurrence of AITL with POEMS syndrome has rarely been reported in the literature. The current study presents the case of a 53-year-old male who presented with a rapidly proliferative lymph node on the left neck, which was identified as an AITL on biopsy. The patient also exhibited the complications of polyneuropathy, M-proteinemia, hepatosplenomegaly, left ventricular hypertrophy, endocrinopathy and skin changes, and was therefore diagnosed with POEMS syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report a case of AITL with POEMS syndrome. The findings in this case suggest that the aberrant clones of B cells can also be caused by AITL. PMID:25663904

  19. Brown's syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K W

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To better understand the various etiologies of Brown's syndrome, define specific clinical characteristics of Brown's syndrome, describe the natural history of Brown's syndrome, and evaluate the longterm outcome of a novel surgical procedure: the silicone tendon expander. Also, to utilize a computer model to simulate the pattern of strabismus seen clinically with Brown's syndrome and manipulate the model to show potential surgical outcomes of the silicone tendon expander. METHODS: Charts were reviewed on patients with the diagnosis of Brown's syndrome seen at a children's hospital ophthalmology clinic from 1982 to 1997, or seen in the author's private practice. Objective fundus torsion was assessed in up gaze, down gaze, and primary position in 7 Brown's syndrome patients and in 4 patients with primary superior oblique overaction. A fax survey was taken of members of the American Association of Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS) listed in the 1997-1998 directory regarding their results using the silicone tendon expander procedure for the treatment of Brown's syndrome. A computer model of Brown's syndrome was created using the Orbit 1.8 program by simulating a shortened superior oblique tendon or by changing stretch sensitivity to create an inelastic muscle. RESULTS: A total of 96 patients were studied: 85 with Brown's syndrome (38 with congenital and 47 with acquired disease), 6 with masquerade syndromes, 1 with Brown's syndrome operated on elsewhere, and 4 with primary superior oblique overaction in the torsion study. Three original clinical observations were made: 1. Significant limitation of elevation in abduction occurs in 70% of Brown's syndrome cases surgically verified as caused by a tight superior oblique tendon. Contralateral pseudo-inferior oblique overaction is associated with limited elevation in abduction. 2. Traumatic Brown's syndrome cases have larger hypotropias than nontraumatic cases (P < .001). There was no significant hypotropia in primary position in 56 (76%) of 74 congenital and nontraumatic acquired cases despite severe limitation of elevation. 3. Of 7 patients with Brown's syndrome, 6 had no significant fundus torsion in primary position, but had significant (+2 to +3) intorsion in up gaze. Spontaneous resolution occurred in approximately 16% of acquired nontraumatic Brown's syndrome patients. The silicone tendon expander was used on 15 patients, 13 (87%) were corrected with 1 surgery and 14 (93%) with 2 surgeries. The only failure was a Brown's syndrome not caused by superior oblique pathology. Five of the silicone tendon expander patients had at least 5 years follow-up (range, 5 to 11 years). Four (80%) of the 5 patients had an excellent outcome with 1 surgery, final results graded between 9 and 10 (on a scale of 1-10, 10 is best). The fifth patient had a consecutive superior oblique paresis and a good outcome after a recession of the ipsilateral inferior oblique muscle. The AAPOS survey had a mean outcome score of 7.3, with 65% between 8 and 10. There were 9 (6%) complications reported: 4 related to scarring and 5 extrusions of the implant. Three of the 5 extrusions were reported from the same surgeon. The computer model of an inelastic superior oblique muscle-tendon complex best simulated the motility pattern of Brown's syndrome with severe limitation of elevation in adduction, mild limitation of elevation in abduction, minimal hypotropia in primary position, no superior oblique overaction, and intorsion in up gaze. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of mild to moderate limitation of elevation in abduction is common, and its presence does not eliminate the diagnosis of Brown's syndrome. The majority of Brown's syndrome patients have a pattern of strabismus consistent with an inelastic superior oblique muscle-tendon complex that does not extend, but can contract normally; not the presence of a short tendon. The presence of inelastic or tethered superior oblique muscle-tendon can be diagnosed without forced duction testing by observing the pattern of strabismus including torsion. Because of

  20. [Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma complicated with endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Nanno, Satoru; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Kuwamura, Yukinobu; Ishimura, Eiji; Sakabe, Manami; Inaba, Akiko; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Terada, Yoshiki; Nakane, Takahiko; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hino, Masayuki

    2013-07-01

    A 30-year-old female developed fever and multiple lymphadenopathy in September 2011. Her symptoms improved with antibiotic treatment. However, she again presented with fever and multiple lymphadenopathy in December 2011. In addition, she suffered from nephrotic syndrome with severe edema. She was therefore hospitalized to undergo detailed examinations. Renal biopsy revealed endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis. Since her renal function deteriorated rapidly, she was given steroid pulse therapy with methylprednisolone, followed by maintenance therapy with prednisolone. After treatment, her renal function improved but multiple lymphadenopathy persisted. Biopsy of a left axillary lymph node was then performed and revealed angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL). She received CHOP therapy but showed no response. Therefore, she was given ESHAP therapy. A partial response was achieved and the nephrotic syndrome also resolved completely. We report this extremely rare case of renal dysfunction due to endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis complicated by AITL. PMID:23912350

  1. Acute compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco; Spoliti, Marco; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is one of the few true emergencies in orthopedics and traumatology. It is a painful condition caused by the increase interstitial pressure (intracompart-mental pressure – ICP) within a closed osteofascial compartment which impair local circulation. It occurs most often in the legs, but it can affects also the arms, hands, feet, and buttocks. It usually develops after a severe injury such as fractures or crush injury, but it can also occurs after a relatively minor injury and it may be iatrogenic. Uncommon causes of ACS have been also described, that suggest surgeons to pay great attention to this serious complication. Diagnosing ACS is difficult in clinical practice, even among expert surgeons. Currently, the diagnosis is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated ICP measures. ICP higher than 30 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure is significant of compartment syndrome. Once diagnosis is made, fasciotomy to release the affected compartment should be performed as early as possible because delayed decompression would lead to irreversible ischemic damage to muscles and peripheral nerves. Conclusion: acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency. There is still little consensus among authors about diagnosis and treatment of these serious condition, in particular about the ICP at which fasciotomy is absolutely indicated and the timing of wound closure. New investigations are needed in order to improve diagnosis and treatment of ACS. PMID:25878982

  2. Acute Mirizzi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mirizzi syndrome is a rare complication of cholecystolithiasis characterized by jaundice due to compression of the common hepatic duct. The diagnosis may not be immediately apparent, and management is controversial with open surgery still recommended by some authors. Method: A case is detailed herein of a 67-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain, fever, and jaundice. A dilated bile duct was found on ultrasound, but the gallbladder could not be seen. The diagnosis of Mirizzi syndrome was made at ERCP, and a stent was placed through the papilla. Laparoscopic retrograde (fundus first) cholecystectomy was carried out utilizing a laparoscopic liver retractor. Results: In this particular case, it was not possible at ERCP to get a guidewire and stent past the obstruction. A stent was left through the papilla, below the obstruction and this allowed primary duct closure during surgery. Conclusion: Acute Mirizzi syndrome should be suspected when a patient presents with acute cholecystitis and jaundice with dilated intrahepatic ducts on ultrasound. ERCP is useful to confirm the diagnosis and allows stenting to alleviate the jaundice and facilitate the subsequent operation. Laparoscopic ultrasound is useful to locate the impacted stone and to partially replicate the touch of the surgeon's hand, which is not available in laparoscopic surgery. PMID:19366554

  3. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  4. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-12-15

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  5. [Pancytopenia and pulmonary tuberculosis. Significance of a hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    François, B; Clavel, M; Trimoreau, F; Desachy, A; Slaouti, P; Gastinne, H

    1998-10-01

    Haemophagocytic syndromes or syndromes involving macrophage activation are rare complications of tuberculosis, whether they be pulmonary or polyvisceral. They are characterised by an anomalous increase in the phagocytic power of macrophages with phagocytosis of the formed elements of blood. The clinical biological picture associates a change in the general physical state accompanied by organomegaly, hyperferritinaemia and pancytopenia. Their occurrence is a poor prognostic factor and few treatment seem to check this mechanism. The authors report a rare case of marked macrophage activation syndrome complicating pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient who was HIV negative without an underlying blood disturbance and a favourable outcome. PMID:9834997

  6. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathrin Boerner; Richard Schulz

    2009-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes - often referred to as ‘complicated grief’. The article starts with a brief summary of

  7. Constraints complicate centrifugal compressor depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B. (Hoover and Keith Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Colbert, F.L. (Paragon Engineering Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-05-10

    Blowdown of a centrifugal compressor is complicated by process constraints that might require slowing the depressurization rate and by mechanical constraints for which a faster rate might be preferred. The paper describes design constraints such as gas leaks; thrust-bearing overload; system constraints; flare extinguishing; heat levels; and pressure drop.

  8. Caesarean section: techniques and complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Simm; Darly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    One-fifth of deliveries in England and Wales are undertaken by caesarean section. The procedure has changed very little over the years, although evidence-based refinements have resulted in reduced morbidity; research continues in adapting techniques to improve safety further. Preoperative preparation involving anaesthetists and radiologists if complications are anticipated has contributed to improved outcome. Good surgical training is paramount, particularly because

  9. Surgical complications of amyloid disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, D. P.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Bouch, D. C.; Wood, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The case of a man with primary systemic amyloidosis without myelomatosis and long-term survival is described. The patient has had major surgical complications from large amyloid deposits in the colon, dorsal spine and peritoneal cavity. The patient remains well 14 years after diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3684836

  10. Fetal complications of obstetric cholestasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD REID; K J Ivey; R H Rencoret; B Storey

    1976-01-01

    Among 56 pregnancies complicated by obstetric cholestasis five intrauterine deaths and one neonatal death occurred between 33 and 39 weeks, and a further six infants required urgent delivery for intrapartum asphyxia. Eighteen spontaneous premature deliveries occurred. Five mothers required specific treatment for unexplained postpartum haemorrhage. Cholestasis of pregnancy is therefore not a condition benign to the fetus, and it may

  11. Cutaneous vasculitis complicating coeliac disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Meyers; S Dikman; H Spiera; N Schultz; H D Janowitz

    1981-01-01

    A 38 year old female, with chronic uncontrolled coeliac disease, presented with the rare complication of cutaneous leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Detailed study failed to identify any cause for the vasculitis, other than the underlying coeliac disease. Haematuria and proteinuria with mesangial nephritis were also demonstrated on renal biopsy with electron microscopic study. It is speculated that exogenous or endogenous antigens permeated

  12. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  13. Infiltrative lung diseases: Complications of novel antineoplastic agents in patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Vahid, Bobbak; Marik, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Infiltrative lung disease is a well-known complication of antineoplastic agents in patients with hematological malignancies. Novel agents are constantly being added to available treatments. The present review discusses different pulmonary syndromes, pathogenesis and management of these novel agents. PMID:18551203

  14. Goldenhar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; Passi, Sidhi

    2013-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area. PMID:23852257

  15. Oral Complications in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients: The Role of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Haverman, T. M.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Rademacher, W. M. H.; Vokurka, S.; Epstein, J. B.; Huisman, C.; Hazenberg, M. D.; de Soet, J. J.; de Lange, J.; Rozema, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used as a potentially curative treatment for patients with various hematological malignancies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and congenital immune deficiencies. The prevalence of oral complications in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients remains high, despite advances in transplant medicine and in supportive care. Frequently encountered oral complications include mucositis, infections, oral dryness, taste changes, and graft versus host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Oral complications are associated with substantial morbidity and in some cases with increased mortality and may significantly affect quality of life, even many years after HSCT. Inflammatory processes are key in the pathobiology of most oral complications in HSCT recipients. This review article will discuss frequently encountered oral complications associated with HSCT focusing on the inflammatory pathways and inflammatory mediators involved in their pathogenesis. PMID:24817792

  16. Unusual exocrine complication of pancreatitis in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Akihiko; Komaki, Hirofumi; Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Itagaki, Yusuke; Matsuzaki, Koji; Nakura, Michiaki; Nishino, Ichizo; Goto, Yu-ichi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    No association between mitochondrial disease and pancreatitis has yet been established, although diabetes mellitus and diseases caused by exocrine insufficiency, such as Pearson syndrome, are the commonest pancreatic complications of mitochondrial diseases. Here, we report 2 cases of mitochondrial disease complicated by pancreatitis as an unusual pancreatic exocrine manifestation. One patient was a 10-year-old girl with mild retardation of psychomotor development who had experienced recurrent pancreatitis since the age of 4years. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) due to m.8344A>G mutation was diagnosed when the patient was 10years old. The other patient was a 28-year-old woman who was diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) due to m.3243A>G mutation at 10years of age. She had experienced regular recurrent vomiting since the age of 16 and suffered an episode of critical pancreatitis at 23years. In both cases, no possible etiological, morphological, or genetic factors for pancreatitis were identified, including anomalous pancreaticobiliary duct. A combination therapy of the standard treatment for chronic pancreatitis and supportive therapy for mitochondrial energy production may be beneficial to prevent the recurrence of acute pancreatitis complicating mitochondrial diseases. The pathophysiological mechanism of pancreatitis in mitochondrial disease has not been adequately established; however, our observations suggest that pancreatitis should be included in the list of pancreatic complications of mitochondrial disease. PMID:23182449

  17. Maternal serum soluble HLA-G in complicated pregnancies.

    PubMed

    B?y?k, Ismail

    2014-03-01

    Preeclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), oligohydramnios, abortus, preterm birth and premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) are significant complications of pregnancy. Insufficient trophoblastic invasion plays an important role in the pathophysiology of pregnancy complications. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-gestation (HLA-G)1/G5 is a molecule associated with trophoblast invasion. When pregnancy complications are predicted early, strategies to prevent these complications can be implemented. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between first trimester maternal serum soluble HLA-G1/G5 levels and high-risk pregnancies. A total of 232 pregnant women were followed prospectively. Maternal blood samples were collected for determination of soluble HLA-G1/G5 levels at 11-14 weeks, during which routine serum free beta human chorionic gonadotropin (?hCG) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) level determinations in addition to nuchal translucency (NT) measurements for Down's syndrome screening were done during 20-22 weeks gestation. The subjects were classified into normal pregnancy, preeclampsia, oligohydramnios, IUGR, preterm birth and PROM groups. First trimester maternal serum soluble HLA-G1/G5 levels were not significantly different between the groups. First trimester soluble HLA-G1/G5 did not predict high-risk pregnancies. Studies with larger number of cases are need to confirm our findings. PMID:23795671

  18. Spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Oreskovi?, Slavko; Jezek, Davor

    2013-06-01

    Spontaneous forms of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (sOHSS) are nearly always reported between 8 and 14 weeks of pregnancy and also with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) producing pituitary adenoma. The syndrome has been previously reported in rare instances of increased production of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) such as multiple pregnancies, hydatiforme mole, polycystic ovary disease and elevated concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in hypothyreoidism. High levels of these hormones are able to stimulate by natural promiscuous activation the wild-type FSHr, resulting in sporadic presentations of the syndrome. Since 2003, only six different activating FSHr gene mutations have been reported in cases of familial or habitual sOHSS. In addition to five mutations which have been found in the transmembrane helices (Asp567Asn, Asp567Gly, Thr449Ile, Thr449Ala, Ile545Thr), the first germline mutation (c.383C > A, p. Ser 128 Tyr) in the extracelullar domain was identified. All five mutants were abnormally activated by TSH and normal levels of hCG while displaying constitutive activity. In contrast to these mutations, the p.Ser128Tyr mutant displayed an increase in sensitivity only toward hCG. Accordingly, the mutated FSHrs, may be hyperstimulated by the pregnancy-derived hCG or TSH, inducing the occurrence of the syndrome. In the differential diagnosis, malignancy, pregnancy luteoma and hyperreactio luteinalis would have to be excluded. In almost all of the cases the disease regresses spontaneously and could be managed expectantly or conservatively, but with termination of pregnancy or surgery in cases of complications. PMID:23941020

  19. Down's Syndrome in Fiji and Tonga.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, John

    1979-01-01

    The article reports results of a survey of 42 Down's syndrome individuals in Fiji and Tonga. Considered are physical characteristics including complications, chromosome analysis (in most cases), and, in Fiji only, an examination of the social consequences for the family. (Author/SBH)

  20. Meconium Staining and Meconium Aspiration Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean C. Blackwell; Carlos A. Carreno; Sonia S. Hassan; Julie Moldenhauer; Honor M. Wolfe; Stanley M. Berry; Michael Kruger; Yoram Sorokin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the incidence of pregnancies complicated by meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) or meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) differs with seasonal changes. Methods: An established perinatal database was used to identify all term (?37 weeks) singleton gestations resulting in a live birth from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999. Patients were divided into groups based on the season

  1. Syndrome de l'artère mésentérique supérieure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Loeb; G. Loubert; R. Morsly; J. M. Gabillet; J. Pasteyer

    1999-01-01

    The superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare complication of spine surgery. A series of four patients who experienced a SMAS after surgery for either post-traumatic quadriplegia, paraplegia or scoliosis is reported. SMAS is a condition in which the third portion of the duodenum is squeezed between the superior mesenteric artery anteriorly, and the aorta and vertebral column posteriorly.

  2. Cardiorenal syndrome in decompensated heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W H Wilson Tang; Wilfried Mullens

    2009-01-01

    Worsening renal function during treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) often complicates the treatment course of heart failure. Furthermore, the development of worsening renal function is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes. Sometimes referred to as ‘cardiorenal syndrome,’ the definition varies widely, and the overall understanding of pathogenesis is limited. This is probably owing to the lack

  3. Pierre-Robin syndrome: a case report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreea Chiriac; Anja Dawson; Martin Krapp; Roland Axt-Fliedner

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a fetus diagnosed with micro-retrognathism at routine ultrasound examination in the 22nd week of gestation.\\u000a The diagnosis of Pierre-Robin syndrome was made postnatally. The possible differential diagnoses and the main complications\\u000a of retrognathism are reviewed.

  4. Progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome after aortic aneurysm repair: a case series.

    PubMed

    Nandipati, Sirisha; Rucker, Janet C; Frucht, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints. PMID:24386607

  5. Bartter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to reabsorb sodium. Persons affected by Bartter syndrome lose too much sodium through the urine. This causes a rise in the level of the hormone aldosterone, and makes the kidneys remove too much potassium from the body. This ...

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Loeys-Dietz is more likely to cause fatal aortic aneurysms, and treatment for the two is different. A ... shown that the blood pressure medication losartan prevents aortic aneurysms in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Studies ...

  7. Aicardi syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and 5 months. The condition causes jerking (infantile spasms), a type of childhood seizure. Aicardi syndrome may ... missing Female sex Seizures (typically beginning as infantile spasms) Sores on the retina (retinal lesions) or optic ...

  8. Sjögren's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... effects of saliva, you may develop more dental decay (cavities) and mouth infections. Sjögren’s syndrome can also ... mouth makes you extremely prone to progressive dental decay (cavities). Water. Take sips of water or another ...

  9. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmenal disorder that affects girls almost exclusively. It is characterized by normal early ... occur, although breathing usually improves during sleep. Some girls also display autistic-like symptoms such as loss ...

  10. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The most common symptoms ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  11. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or problems with their heart, stomach or eyes. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ... a baby who has Down syndrome will be. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ...

  12. Alagille Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bile ducts in the liver. Bile that cannot flow through the deformed ducts builds up in the ... syndrome involves five distinct findings, including reduced bile flow, congenital heart disease, bone defects, a thickening of ...

  13. Ohtahara Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have primarily tonic seizures, but may also experience partial seizures, and rarely, myoclonic seizures. Ohtahara syndrome is ... a characteristic pattern of high voltage spike wave discharge followed by little activity. This pattern is known ...

  14. Sotos Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... threatening disorder and patients may have a normal life expectancy. The initial abnormalities of Sotos syndrome usually resolve as the growth rate becomes normal after the first few years of life. Developmental delays may improve in the school-age ...

  15. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surgery. Some people may also choose to have surgery for cosmetic reasons. Anyone with heart problems associated with Marfan syndrome (especially anyone who's had heart surgery) should always take antibiotics before going to the ...

  16. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Menkes syndrome is an inborn error of metabolism in which cells in the body can absorb copper, but are unable to release it. ... Houwen RHJ. Disorders in the Transport of Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Selenium, and Zinc. In: Saudubray J- ...

  17. Hurler Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body how to work properly. In Hurler syndrome, the body has a defective gene and cannot make an important enzyme. Enzymes are proteins inside cells that break down larger building block chemicals into smaller ones. When ...

  18. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Special help, such as physical therapy and speech therapy , can give kids a boost with their walking and talking skills. Continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? About 1 out of every 800 babies born ...

  19. Aortoduodenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takagi, H; Watanabe, T; Umemoto, T

    2015-10-01

    Duodenal obstruction caused by abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), i.e. "aortoduodenal syndrome," first described by Osler in 1905 is a rare clinical entity, with only several dozens of cases reported in the literature. In the present paper, we systematically searched literature and reviewed them. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from January 1981 to April 2014 using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). Eighteen papers reported 21 cases with aortoduodenal syndrome. Mean age of patients was 74.5±8.4 years, 71.4% of patients were men, and mean AAA diameter was 7.2±2.1 cm. We also discussed confusion between aortoduodenal syndrome and "superior mesenteric artery syndrome" associated with AAA. PMID:25216355

  20. Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and destroy the glands that produce tears and saliva. Sjögren's syndrome is also associated with rheumatic disorders ... increasing knowledge and understanding of the disorder, improving diagnostic techniques, testing interventions, and finding ways to treat, ...

  1. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... typically caused by antibodies that bind to potassium channels on the motor nerve. Issacs' syndrome is only ... neurological conditions that can be caused by potassium channel antibodies. Is there any treatment? Anticonvulsants, including phenytoin ...

  2. Hyperventilation syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard E. Brashear

    1983-01-01

    The hyperventilation syndrome, primary alveolar hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis accompanied by various signs and\\u000a symptoms, occurs in about 6–11% of the general patient population. The causes of hyperventilation are: 1) organic and physiologic\\u000a and, 2) psychogenic (emotional\\/habit). Hyperventilation syndrome excludes hyperventilation that is compensatory or caused\\u000a by organic or physiologic factors. Acute or chronic anxiety is usually considered the predominant

  3. Epidemiology of Diabetes and Diabetes Complications in the Elderly: An Emerging Public Health Burden

    PubMed Central

    Corriere, Mark; Rooparinesingh, Nira; Kalyani, Rita Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes in the elderly is a growing public health burden. Persons with diabetes are living longer and are vulnerable to the traditional microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes but also at increased risk for geriatric syndromes. Peripheral vascular disease, heart disease and stroke all have a high prevalence among older adults with diabetes. Traditional microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy also frequently occur. Unique to this older population is the effect of diabetes on functional status. Older adults with diabetes are also more likely to experience geriatric syndromes such as falls, dementia, depression and incontinence. Further studies are needed to better characterize those elderly individuals who may be at the highest risk of adverse complications from diabetes. PMID:24018732

  4. Complications of acute otitis media in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimmo Leskinen

    2005-01-01

    The clinical picture and the treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and its complications have changed during the past decades.\\u000a The availability of antibiotics has decreased the incidence of complications of AOM significantly. The treatment of complications\\u000a of AOM is conservative in most cases. Mastoidectomy is needed when abscess-forming mastoiditis or intracranial complications\\u000a develop. Although intratemporal and intracranial complications of

  5. Alagille syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac malformations (most frequently peripheral pulmonary stenosis), ophthalmological abnormalities (typically of the anterior chamber with posterior embryotoxon being the most common), skeletal anomalies (most commonly butterfly vertebrae), and characteristic facial appearance. Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but expressivity is highly variable. Sibs and parents of probands are often found to have mild expression of the presumptive disease gene, with abnormalities of only one or two systems. The frequency of new mutations appears relatively high, estimated at between 15 and 50%. The disease gene has been mapped to chromosome 20 band p12 based on multiple patients described with cytogenetic or molecular rearrangements of this region. However, the frequency of detectable deletions of 20p12 is low (less than 7%). Progress has been made in the molecular definition of an Alagille syndrome critical region within the short arm of chromosome 20. We will review the clinical, genetic, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in this syndrome. Images PMID:9039994

  6. Avoiding complications in patellofemoral surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ryan K; Magnussen, Robert A; Flanigan, David C

    2013-06-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of patellofemoral disorders can challenge even the experienced orthopedic surgeon. Differential diagnosis is broad and multiple anatomic abnormalities must be taken into account in order to manage care. The majority of patients with patellofemoral disorders can be treated successfully nonoperatively. When nonoperative management fails, and in the carefully selected patient, a variety of surgical options exist based on the anatomic pathology involved, but each brings its own potential for complication. We discuss several of the surgical treatment options that are available to the orthopedic surgeon for the treatment of patellofemoral disorders, including lateral retinacular release, medial soft-tissue reconstructive procedures, and bony procedures (including trochleoplasty and tibial tubercle osteotomy. We describe potential complications of each procedure and what the orthopedic surgeon can do to avoid them. PMID:23649160

  7. Complications of splenic tissue reimplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Tzoracoleftherakis, E.; Alivizatos, V.; Kalfarentzos, F.; Androulakis, J.

    1991-01-01

    Splenic tissue reimplantation employing the omental implantation technique was applied in 23 patients undergoing splenectomy for traumatic or iatrogenic splenic injury. Four complications were encountered after autotransplantation (17.4%). Two of these consisted of small bowel obstruction due to postoperative adhesions and were successfully managed by lysis of the adhesions. The other two complications were aseptic necrosis of the splenic transplants and were treated with ablation of the autolysed transplants. A case of abnormal splenic tissue reimplantation in a male patient with unsuspected myelofibrosis is also discussed. He underwent an emergency laparotomy for rupture of a subcapsular splenic haematoma. It is concluded that splenic tissue implantation in the greater omentum is associated with important early morbidity and this should be taken into account whenever application of the method is considered. Images Figure 1 PMID:2018325

  8. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Tics and Tourette Syndrome Overview What is Tourette syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a type of tic disorder. Children who have Tourette syndrome will repeat both movements ...

  9. What Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How many people get myelodysplastic syndromes? What are myelodysplastic syndromes? Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are conditions that occur when ... of blood vessels caused by cuts or bruises. Myelodysplastic syndromes In MDS, some of the cells in the ...

  10. Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... syndromes (MDS) Email this page Print this page Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of diseases that affect ... other types are severe and life-threatening. Tweet Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) Symptoms of MDS How transplant can treat ...

  11. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Is ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  12. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is a condition in which extra genetic material causes delays ... rises to about 1 in 100. Continue How Down Syndrome Affects Kids Kids with Down syndrome tend to ...

  13. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... important to know the difference. What is carpal tunnel syndrome? Carpal tunnel syndrome is possibly the most ... permanent nerve and muscle damage. What causes carpal tunnel syndrome? Carpal tunnel syndrome may occur in patients ...

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Carpal tunnel syndrome is a painful condition ...

  15. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Job syndrome; Hyper IgE syndrome ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome, after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was tested by an affliction with draining skin sores and pustules . People with this ...

  16. Complications of Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexei Wedmid; Michael A. Palese

    \\u000a “Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy is a unique surgical procedure due to the fact that the surgeon is operating on a healthy\\u000a individual in order to benefit another patient he or she is unlikely managing, with a potential for complications ensuing\\u000a in both the donor and the recipient patients. Overall surgical technique, anatomic considerations, and perioperative management\\u000a remain important for minimizing the

  17. Eczema herpeticum complicating Parthenium dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Ajith C; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev

    2005-06-01

    Parthenium dermatitis is one of the most common causes of airborne contact dermatitis in India. Eczema herpeticum has been reported in association with various eczematous conditions, including Parthenium dermatitis. We report a case of eczema herpeticum in association with Parthenium dermatitis. Because Parthenium dermatitis is a common condition in this region, one should be aware of this complication so that appropriate treatment is not delayed. PMID:16036117

  18. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  19. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živkovi?, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  20. Pain syndrome with stress fractures in transplanted patients treated with calcineurin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gohh, Reginald; Evangelista, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bone disease remains a major cause of morbidity after renal transplantation. Post-transplant osseous complications include osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, both historically associated with glucocorticoids, and a newer syndrome of bone pain associated with calcineurin inhibitors. Calcineurin inhibitor-induced pain syndrome (CIPS) is a reversible etiology of lower extremity bone pain and bone marrow edema reported in patients receiving cyclosporine or tacrolimus after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. While the syndrome’s pathophysiology is unclear, bone insufficiency and epiphyseal impaction may play a role. We review the literature on this increasingly important post-transplant entity and describe a case illustrating the syndrome’s key features.

  1. Retrospective review of 707 cases of spinal cord stimulation: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    Mekhail, Nagy A; Mathews, Manu; Nageeb, Fady; Guirguis, Maged; Mekhail, Mark N; Cheng, Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate patient selection and minimizing complications are critical for successful spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy in managing intractable pain. We thus reviewed electronic medical records of 707 consecutive cases of patients who received SCS therapy in the Cleveland Clinic from 2000 to 2005 with an emphasis on indications and complications. SCS was used to treat complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) (345 cases), failed back surgery syndrome (235 cases), peripheral vascular disease (20 cases), visceral pain in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (37 cases), and peripheral neuropathy (70 cases). CRPS and failed back surgery syndrome accounted for 82% of the cases. The implant-to-trial ratio was 75% on average, with the highest for CRPS type 2 (83%) and the lowest for peripheral vascular diseases (65%). The only documented complication associated with SCS trials was lead migration in 5 of 707 patients (0.7%). There were no permanent neurological deficits or deaths as a result of SCS implant or its complications. Hardware-related complications were common (38%) and included lead migration (22.6%), lead connection failure (9.5%), and lead breakage (6%). Revisions or replacements were required in these cases. Biologically related complications included pain at the generator site (12%) and clinical infection (4.5%; 2.5% with positive culture). The rates of infection varied among the different diagnoses with the highest in failed back surgery syndrome (6.3%). Patients with diabetes had an infection rate of 9%, over the 4% in non-diabetics. Infections were managed successfully with explantation and antibiotic therapy without permanent sequela. PMID:21371254

  2. Implantable defibrillators in long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dohadwala, Mustafa; Link, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Sudden death is often the first manifestation in inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. Patients with long QT syndrome who have an episode of syncope while on beta-blockade should be offered an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). In Brugada syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, ICDs are often the most effective treatment of primary and secondary prevention of cardiac arrest. Risk stratification is crucial in identifying those at greatest risk to provide lifesaving therapy with an ICD while avoiding complications in those unlikely to receive benefit. PMID:24793806

  3. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  4. Sjögren's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who have another rheumatologic disease, most often systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis . Most of the complications ... patients, even in those without rheumatoid arthritis or lupus . Rashes on the arms and legs related to ...

  5. [POEMS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rose, C; Mahieu, M; Hachulla, E; Facon, T; Hatron, P Y; Bauters, F; Devulder, B

    1997-07-01

    POEMS syndrome is an acronym defined by Bardwick (Polyneuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, Monoclonal component and Skin changes). Other various clinical and biological features are reported: edema, cachexia, microangiopathic glomerulopathy, most rarely pulmonary hypertension, cutaneous necrosis. Thrombocytosis or polycythemia may be a prominent feature. POEMS syndrome is sometimes associated with lymphoproliferative disorder. Castelman-like disease is frequently observed as pathologic findings on lymph nodes. Distinction between POEMS syndrome and osteosclerotic myeloma is delicate. The rate of the monoclonal protein is modest-always less than 30 g/L-and is almost of the lambda light chain class. In contrast to multiple myeloma this syndrome is rarely associated with hypercalcemia, skeletal fracture, renal involvement and increasing of M component during evolution. Bone marrow plasmocytosis is usually less than 15% and the kinetic phenotype and genetic characteristics of the plasma cell remain those found in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The pathophysiology of this syndrome remains largely unknown but overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines are reported, especially TNF alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 beta. Some clinical manifestations seem to be cytokine related. Polyneuropathy and cachexia are the main cause of death. A part corticosteroid and cure of solitary bone lesion, treatment is disappointing and survival is 60% at five years. PMID:9255373

  6. Charcot foot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoate, W J

    2015-06-01

    Charcot foot syndrome is an uncommon complication of diabetes but is potentially devastating in its consequences. Outcome is made worse by widespread professional ignorance leading to delayed diagnosis, but it is also hampered by lack of understanding of its causes and lack of treatments with proven effectiveness, other than offloading. There remains a desperate need for studies into its causes as well as comparative audit and trials designed to determine the best treatment for this difficult condition. Such work can probably only be effectively carried out through the establishment of multicentre networks. Nevertheless, improved understanding in recent years of the likely role of inflammatory pathways has raised awareness of the multiple ways in which the effects of neuropathy may be manifest in the development of the Charcot foot. This awareness is also leading to the realization that similar processes may conceivably contribute to the refractoriness of other foot diseases in diabetes, including both chronic unhealing ulcers and osteomyelitis. PMID:25818542

  7. Fatal fat embolism syndrome in a case of isolated L1 vertebral fracture-dislocation.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Koun; Fushimi, Kazunari; Ikeda, Tsuneko; Fukuta, Masashi

    2013-11-01

    Although fat embolism syndrome is a well-known complication of fractures of the long bones or pelvis, fat embolism syndrome occurring subsequent to fracture of the lumbar spine is rare. We report a fatal case of fat embolism syndrome characterized by fat and bone marrow embolism that occurred 36 h after an isolated fracture-dislocation of the L1 vertebra. A postmortem examination was performed and pathological finding demonstrated fat and bone marrow tissue which were disseminated in the bilateral pulmonary arteries. We need to be aware of the possibility of fat embolism syndrome as a complication of spinal fractures, including isolated vertebral body fractures. PMID:23412313

  8. Risks of complication following thyroidectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark R. Burge; Tanja-Maria Zeise; Michael W. Johnsen; Martin J. Conway; Clifford R. Qualls

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because hypoparathyroidism is a serious complication of thyroidectomy, we attempted to elucidate factors determining the\\u000a risk of this postoperative outcome.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Four tertiary care hospitals in Albuquerque, New Mexico.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PATIENTS: A retrospective study of 142 patients who underwent total or subtotal thyroidectomy between 1988 and 1995.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Permanent hypoparathyroidism was defined as hypocalcemic symptoms plus a

  9. Vaccinia necrosum complicating immunoblastic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Turkel, S B; Overturf, G D

    1977-07-01

    A 59-year-old man is presented who had immunoblastic lymphadenopathy which evolved over a three-year period into immunoblastic sarcoma. His course was complicated by vaccinia necrosum, which necessitated prolonged therapy with Marboran and vaccinia-immune globulin. The persistence of virus was documented at autopsy by positive viral culture and ultra-structural examination. This case illustrates the potential hazards of administration of live viral vaccines to an immune compromised host presumed to be in remission and suggests that the continued activity of viral infection may signal the unsuspected persistence of underlying disease. PMID:880554

  10. Automatic Monitoring Of Complicated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of computer programs developed for expert computer system performing complicated, tedious, and repetitive portions of analysis of telemetry data from spacecraft. Provides nonstop, accurate surveillance of incoming data, also frees operators to concentrate their expertise on unexpected abnormal operating conditions. When unable to explain discrepancies with certainty resulting from data out of synchronization or other falso-alarm conditions, triggers alarm devices to request assistance from designated individuals. Concept useful in such terrestrial systems as production lines, power-distribution networks, chemical processes, large airplanes, and other assemblies of interdependent equipment.

  11. Pulmonary complications of inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shelly A; Glassberg, Marilyn K; Ascherman, Dana P

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary complications cause significant morbidity and mortality in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Advances in biomarker discovery have facilitated clinical phenotyping, allowing investigators to better define at-risk patient subsets and to potentially gauge disease activity. This serologic characterization has complemented more traditional assessment tools. Pharmacologic management continues to rely on the use of corticosteroids, often in combination with additional immunosuppressive agents. The rarity of myositis-associated interstitial lung disease and lack of controlled trials have limited analyses of treatment efficacy, mandating the development of standardized outcome measures and improvement of data sharing between disciplines. PMID:25836641

  12. [Cardiovascular complications of alpha interferon].

    PubMed

    Le Corguillé, Monika; Pochmalicki, Gilbert; Eugène, Claude

    2007-12-01

    Interferon-alpha is a biological response modifier with antiviral and tumoral effect that is used in the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis. Cardiovascular complications occurred in clinical trials of interferon. The most common presentations of cardio toxicity were cardiac arrhythmia, dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial extrasystole and symptoms of ischemic heart disease, including myocardial infarction and other effects less common and dangerous: low-level conduction impairment or reversible hypertension. The physiopathology of this cardiotoxicity remains unknown, but rigorous cardiological monitoring of all patients receiving this treatment seems necessary. PMID:18176361

  13. Crush syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Dario

    2005-01-01

    The assessment, management, and treatment of the entrapped victim are critical skills needed to ensure a successful outcome. Individuals have been trapped in the "rubble" for even short periods of time only to succumb to predictable consequences of muscle compression injury. The clinician should be prepared to address issues of crush syndrome (including compartment syndrome) proactively and aggressively. The history of this disease is clear and well documented both in the military literature and in the earthquake rescue reviews. The key to management is managing and predicting clinical conditions before they present themselves. The potential exists in the urban environment (with the potential of building collapses) to have patients with crush syndrome that far exceed local medical capabilities should be part of modern disaster planning. This article reviews the various body systems and presents management and assessment strategies for the clinician. PMID:15640677

  14. [Kallmann syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mokosch, A; Bernecker, C; Willenberg, H S; Neumann, N J

    2011-10-01

    The Kallmann syndrome is a very rare congenital association of gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and hyposmia or anosmia. Clinically it is characterized by low serum concentrations of testosterone and inadequate low levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone as well as incomplete sexual maturation, lack of secondary sexual features (facial and body hair growth, deepening of the voice), micropenis and sometimes even cryptorchidism. The reduced or absent sense of smell is typical for the Kallmann syndrome and distinguishes this syndrome from other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Additional findings may include synkinesia, hearing loss, unilateral renal aplasia, brachy- or syndactyly, agenesis of corpus callosum, cleft palate and dental agenesis. A 19-year-old man presented to our male infertility clinic with delayed sexual maturation, eunuchoid habitus, micropenis, cryptorchidism, erectile dysfunction and absence of ejaculation, anemia and osteoporosis as well as low serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone in combination with hyposmia. PMID:21918848

  15. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  16. Proteomics and syndrome of Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chuan-Li; Qv, Xiao-Ying; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Syndrome of Chinese medicine is an understanding of the regularity of disease occurrence and development and its performance of symptoms. Syndrome is the key to recognize diseases and the foundation to treat them. However, because of the complexity of the concept and the limitation of present investigations, the research of syndrome is hard to go further. Proteomics has been received extensive attention in the area of medical diagnosis and drug development. In the holistic and systemic context, proteomics have a convergence with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, which could overcome the one-sidedness and singleness of TCM and avoid the complication and tedious processes. Chinese medicine has a wealth of experience and proteomics has a substantial research potential, the integration of the two aspects will bring a great enhancement of our knowledge of disease. PMID:20874721

  17. Predictive Factors of Neurological Complications and One-Month Mortality after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Katherine A.; DiNorcia, Joseph; Sher, Linda; Velani, Shamsha A.; Akhtar, Shahrzad; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Sanossian, Nerses

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neurological complications are common after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We aimed to characterize the risk factors associated with neurological complications and mortality among patients who underwent OLT in the post-model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) era. Methods: In a retrospective review, we evaluated 227 consecutive patients at the Keck Hospital of the University of Southern California before and after OLT to define the type and frequency of and risk factors for neurological complications and mortality. Results: Neurological complications were common (n?=?98), with encephalopathy being most frequent (56.8%), followed by tremor (26.5%), hallucinations (11.2%), and seizure (8.2%). Factors associated with neurological complications after OLT included preoperative dialysis, hepatorenal syndrome, renal insufficiency, intra-operative dialysis, preoperative encephalopathy, preoperative mechanical ventilation, and infection. Preoperative infection was an independent predictor of neurological complications (OR 2.83, 1.47–5.44). One-month mortality was 8.8% and was independently associated with urgent re-transplant, preoperative intubation, and intra-operative arrhythmia. Conclusion: Neurological complications are common in patients undergoing OLT in the post-MELD era, with encephalopathy being most frequent. An improved understanding of the risk factors related to both neurological complications and one-month mortality post-transplantation can better guide perioperative care and help improve outcomes among OLT patients. PMID:25566180

  18. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  19. Serotonin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bodner, R A; Lynch, T; Lewis, L; Kahn, D

    1995-02-01

    We describe a patient treated with trazodone, isocarboxazid, and methylphenidate hydrochloride who developed confusion, agitation, poor concentration, rigidity, myoclonus, involuntary movements, orthostatic hypotension, and hyperreflexia. CK was normal, and the syndrome resolved spontaneously over 12 hours. The serotonin syndrome occurs following the use of serotomimetic agents (serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants, tryptophan, 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine, dextromethorphan, meperidine, S-adenosylmethionine) alone or in combination with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. It is characterized by various combinations of myoclonus, rigidity, hyperreflexia, shivering, confusion, agitation, restlessness, coma, autonomic instability, low-grade fever, nausea, diarrhea, diaphoresis, flushing, and rarely, rhabdomyolysis and death. PMID:7854515

  20. Neurological complications of Schistosoma infection.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2008-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Currently more than 200 million people worldwide are affected. Neuroschistosomiasis constitutes a severe presentation of the disease. Neurological symptoms result from the inflammatory response of the host to egg deposition in the brain and spinal cord. Neurological complications of cerebral schistosomiasis include delirium, loss of consciousness, seizures, dysphasia, visual field impairment, focal motor deficits and ataxia. Cerebral and cerebellar tumour-like neuroschistosomiasis can present with increased intracranial pressure, headache, nausea and vomiting, and seizures. Myelopathy (acute transverse myelitis and subacute myeloradiculopathy) is the most common neurological complication of Schistosoma mansoni infection. Schistosomal myelopathy tends to occur early after infection and is more likely to be symptomatic than cerebral schistosomiasis. The conus medullaris and cauda equina are the most common sites of involvement. Severe schistosomal myelopathy can provoke a complete flaccid paraplegia with areflexia, sphincter dysfunction and sensory disturbances. Schistosomicidal drugs, steroids and surgery are the currently available treatments for neuroschistosomiasis. Rehabilitation and multidisciplinary team care are needed in severely disabled patients. PMID:17905371

  1. Complications of herpes zoster in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trung N; Ray, G Thomas; Horberg, Michael A; Yawn, Barbara P; Castillo, Adrienne L; Saddier, Patricia; Habel, Laurel A

    2014-07-01

    Cancer patients tend to have a higher incidence of herpes zoster (HZ), but little is known about their risk of HZ complications. We conducted a retrospective study of 424 newly diagnosed hematologic (HM, n = 140) and solid tumor malignancy (STM, n = 284) patients who developed HZ between January 2001 and December 2006 to measure the frequency and identify risk factors of HZ complications. Patients were adult members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. HZ diagnosis and complications were confirmed by medical chart review. HM patients with HZ tended to have more HZ complications than STM patients (34% vs 23%, p = 0.02), largely due to more frequent non-pain complications. On multivariate analysis, older age and being male were associated with a higher risk of HZ complications in HM patients; more advanced cancer stage was associated with HZ complications in STM patients. HZ complications are frequent and can present extra disease burden in cancer patients who develop HZ. PMID:24796470

  2. Spinal cord dysfunction complicating meningococcal meningitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Khan; I. Altafullah; M. Ishaq

    1990-01-01

    A 29 year old male developed paraplegia during the acute phase of meningococcal meningitis. Possible mechanisms for this unusual complication are discussed and the literature regarding spinal cord complications of pyogenic meningitis is reviewed.

  3. Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... previous page Related Topics Diabetes Related Documents PDF Living with Diabetes Download PDF Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Managing Complications ...

  4. Gastric necrosis: A late complication of nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Javier; Georgiev, Tihomir; González-Sánchez, Juan Antonio; López-Ruiz, Elena; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-09-27

    Gastric necrosis is a rare condition because of the rich blood supply and the extensive submucosal vascular network of the stomach. "Gas-bloat" syndrome is a well known Nissen fundoplication postoperative complication. It may cause severe gastric dilatation, but very rarely an ischemic compromise of the organ. Other factors, such as gastric outlet obstruction, may concur to cause an intraluminal pressure enough to blockade venous return and ultimately arterial blood supply and oxygen deliver, leading to ischaemia. We report a case of a 63-year-old women, who presented a total gastric necrosis following laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and a pyloric phytobezoar which was the trigger event. No preexisting gastric motility disorders were present by the time of surgery, as demonstrated in the preoperative barium swallow, thus a poor mastication (patient needed no dentures) of a high fiber meal (cabbage) may have been predisposing factors for the development of a bezoar in an otherwise healthy women at the onset of old age. A total gastrectomy with esophagojejunostomy was performed and patient was discharged home after a 7-d hospital stay with no immediate complications. We also discuss some technical aspects of the procedure that might be important to reduce the incidence of this complication. PMID:25276288

  5. Gastric necrosis: A late complication of nissen fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Javier; Georgiev, Tihomir; González-Sánchez, Juan Antonio; López-Ruiz, Elena; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Gastric necrosis is a rare condition because of the rich blood supply and the extensive submucosal vascular network of the stomach. “Gas-bloat” syndrome is a well known Nissen fundoplication postoperative complication. It may cause severe gastric dilatation, but very rarely an ischemic compromise of the organ. Other factors, such as gastric outlet obstruction, may concur to cause an intraluminal pressure enough to blockade venous return and ultimately arterial blood supply and oxygen deliver, leading to ischaemia. We report a case of a 63-year-old women, who presented a total gastric necrosis following laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and a pyloric phytobezoar which was the trigger event. No preexisting gastric motility disorders were present by the time of surgery, as demonstrated in the preoperative barium swallow, thus a poor mastication (patient needed no dentures) of a high fiber meal (cabbage) may have been predisposing factors for the development of a bezoar in an otherwise healthy women at the onset of old age. A total gastrectomy with esophagojejunostomy was performed and patient was discharged home after a 7-d hospital stay with no immediate complications. We also discuss some technical aspects of the procedure that might be important to reduce the incidence of this complication. PMID:25276288

  6. Uterine Artery Doppler Flow and Uteroplacental Vascular Pathology in Normal Pregnancies and Pregnancies Complicated by Pre-eclampsia and Small for Gestational Age Fetuses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. Aardema; H. Oosterhof; A. Timmer; I. van Rooy; J. G. Aarnoudse

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the association between uterine artery Doppler flow patterns and uteroplacental vascular pathology in normal and complicated pregnancies in view of the recently described concept of heterogeneous causes of hypertensive pregnancy complications. Forty-three women whose pregnancies were complicated by pre-eclampsia, the HELLP (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelets) syndrome and\\/or small for gestational age (SGA)

  7. Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walling, Anne D; Dickson, Gretchen

    2013-02-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome consists of a group of neuropathic conditions characterized by progressive weakness and diminished or absent myotatic reflexes. The estimated annual incidence in the United States is 1.65 to 1.79 per 100,000 persons. Guillain-Barré syndrome is believed to result from an aberrant immune response that attacks nerve tissue. This response may be triggered by surgery, immunizations, or infections. The most common form of the disease, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, presents as progressive motor weakness, usually beginning in the legs and advancing proximally. Symptoms typically peak within four weeks, then plateau before resolving. More than one-half of patients experience severe pain, and about two-thirds have autonomic symptoms, such as cardiac arrhythmias, blood pressure instability, or urinary retention. Advancing symptoms may compromise respiration and vital functions. Diagnosis is based on clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid testing, and nerve conduction studies. Cerebrospinal fluid testing shows increased protein levels but a normal white blood cell count. Nerve conduction studies show a slowing, or possible blockage, of conduction. Patients should be hospitalized for multidisciplinary supportive care and disease-modifying therapy. Supportive therapy includes controlling pain with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, carbamazepine, or gabapentin; monitoring for respiratory and autonomic complications; and preventing venous thrombosis, skin breakdown, and deconditioning. Plasma exchange therapy has been shown to improve short-term and long-term outcomes, and intravenous immune globulin has been shown to hasten recovery in adults and children. Other therapies, including corticosteroids, have not demonstrated benefit. About 3 percent of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome die. Neurologic problems persist in up to 20 percent of patients with the disease, and one-half of these patients are severely disabled. PMID:23418763

  8. Epigenetic phenomena linked to diabetic complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luciano Pirola; Aneta Balcerczyk; Jun Okabe; Assam El-Osta

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) and the complications associated with this condition are an urgent public health problem, as the incidence of diabetes mellitus is steadily increasing. Environmental factors, such as diet and exposure to hyperglycemia, contribute to the etiology of diabetes mellitus and its associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. These vascular complications are the main cause of

  9. Paraneoplastic Pemphigus in a Burn Intensive Care Unit: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hayanga, Awori J; Lee, Timothy M; Pannucci, Christopher John; Knipp, Brian S; Olsen, Stephen H; Wang, Stewart C; Napolitano, Lena M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Paraneoplastic pemphigus is a rare cause of acute diffuse blistering in the adult patient. It commonly presents with subepidermal blistering, epidermal necrosis, and symptoms of mucosal irritation, such as conjunctivitis and vaginal ulceration. Because of its rarity, it is frequently misdiagnosed as Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Here, we will describe clinical and histologic manifestations of paraneoplastic pemphigus. Methods This case report describes a 45 year old female with paraneoplastic pemphigus who was admitted to and treated in a burn intensive care unit. Results Although initially diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome, the patient had progression of desquamation when potentially offending medications were discontinued. Diffuse adenopathy was noted on examination and biopsy confirmed a low grade lymphoma. Conclusions Paraneoplastic pemphigus is a rare but important cause of acute diffuse blistering in adults. This disorder should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with diffuse blistering. PMID:20683196

  10. How to diagnose a lipodystrophy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie; Douillard, Claire; Defrance, Frédérique; Dieudonne, Lucile; Mouton, Fanny; Lemaire, Christine; Bertrand-Escouflaire, Nicole; Bourdelle-Hego, Marie-Françoise; Devemy, Fabrice; Evrard, Anne; Gheerbrand, Dominique; Girardot, Caroline; Gumuche, Sophie; Hober, Christine; Topolinski, Hélène; Lamblin, Blandine; Mycinski, Bénédicte; Ryndak, Amélie; Karrouz, Wassila; Duvivier, Etienne; Merlen, Emilie; Cortet, Christine; Weill, Jacques; Lacroix, Dominique; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of adipose tissue diseases ranges from obesity to lipodystrophy, and is accompanied by insulin resistance syndrome, which promotes the occurrence of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular complications. Lipodystrophy refers to a group of rare diseases characterized by the generalized or partial absence of adipose tissue, and occurs with or without hypertrophy of adipose tissue in other sites. They are classified as being familial or acquired, and generalized or partial. The genetically determined partial forms usually occur as Dunnigan syndrome, which is a type of laminopathy that can also manifest as muscle, cardiac, neuropathic or progeroid involvement. Gene mutations encoding for PPAR-gamma, Akt2, CIDEC, perilipin and the ZMPSTE 24 enzyme are much more rare. The genetically determined generalized forms are also very rare and are linked to mutations of seipin AGPAT2, FBN1, which is accompanied by Marfan syndrome, or of BANF1, which is characterized by a progeroid syndrome without insulin resistance and with early bone complications. Glycosylation disorders are sometimes involved. Some genetically determined forms have recently been found to be due to autoinflammatory syndromes linked to a proteasome anomaly (PSMB8). They result in a lipodystrophy syndrome that occurs secondarily with fever, dermatosis and panniculitis. Then there are forms that are considered to be acquired. They may be iatrogenic (protease inhibitors in HIV patients, glucocorticosteroids, insulin, graft-versus-host disease, etc.), related to an immune system disease (sequelae of dermatopolymyositis, autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes, particularly associated with type 1 diabetes, Barraquer-Simons and Lawrence syndromes), which are promoted by anomalies of the complement system. Finally, lipomatosis is currently classified as a painful form (adiposis dolorosa or Dercum's disease) or benign symmetric multiple form, also known as Launois-Bensaude syndrome or Madelung's disease, which are sometimes related to mitochondrial DNA mutations, but are usually promoted by alcohol. In addition to the medical management of metabolic syndrome and the sometimes surgical treatment of lipodystrophy, recombinant leptin provides hope for genetically determined lipodystrophy syndromes, whereas modifications in antiretroviral treatment and tesamorelin, a GHRH analog, is effective in the metabolic syndrome of HIV patients. Other therapeutic options will undoubtedly be developed, dependent on pathophysiological advances, which today tend to classify genetically determined lipodystrophy as being related to laminopathy or to lipid droplet disorders. PMID:22748602

  11. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that determine whether you have blue eyes or brown or whether you look like your mom or your dad. But sometimes genes can pass on some not-so-great things, too, like certain illnesses and diseases. In most cases, the gene change for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children ...

  12. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florence E Roufosse; Michel Goldman; Elie Cogan

    2007-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES) constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders, defined as persistent and marked blood eosinophilia (> 1.5 × 109\\/L for more than six consecutive months) associated with evidence of eosinophil-induced organ damage, where other causes of hypereosinophilia such as allergic, parasitic, and malignant disorders have been excluded. Prevalence is unknown. HES occur most frequently in young to

  13. Aicardi Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... seen in boys born with an extra "X" chromosome. (Females have two X chromosomes, while males normally have an X and a Y chromosome.) The precise gene or genetic mechanism causing Aicardi syndrome is ... callosum ) that links the two halves of the brain (2) infantile spasms (a ...

  14. Exfoliation Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Ritch; Ursula Schlötzer-Schrehardt

    2001-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disease in which abnormal fibrillar extracellular material is produced and accumulates in many ocular tissues. Its ocular manifestations involve all of the structures of the anterior segment, as well as conjunctiva and orbital structures. Glaucoma occurs more commonly in eyes with XFS than in those without it; in fact, XFS has recently been recognized

  15. Wells syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Manish; Rai, Tulika; Pandey, Shyam S.

    2012-01-01

    Wells syndrome or eosinophilic cellulitis is characterized clinically by an acute dermatitis resembling cellulitis and histopathologically by dermal eosinophilic infiltration. Various morphological presentations have been described. We report a 32-year-old female with recurrent, erythematous plaques on left forearm of 8 months duration, associated with mild itching that resolved leaving mild hyperpigmentation. PMID:23189251

  16. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  17. Rud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pavani, K; Reddy, B S N; Singh, B Amar

    2014-04-01

    Rud's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by congenital ichthyosis, epilepsy, dwarfism, sexual infantilism, polyneuritis, and macrocytic anemia. We report here an interesting case of this disorder in an 18-year-old girl for its rarity and academic interest. PMID:24860755

  18. Rud's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pavani, K.; Reddy, B. S. N.; Singh, B. Amar

    2014-01-01

    Rud's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by congenital ichthyosis, epilepsy, dwarfism, sexual infantilism, polyneuritis, and macrocytic anemia. We report here an interesting case of this disorder in an 18-year-old girl for its rarity and academic interest. PMID:24860755

  19. Placental pathology in fetal bartter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Linda M; Parkash, Vinita

    2002-01-01

    Bartter syndrome, which presents clinically with polyuria, urinary potassium loss, hypokalemia, hypercalciuria, and alkalosis, is an autosomal recessive disorder with mutations in genes encoding the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter, the chloride channel CLC-NKB, and the potassium channel ROMK. Prenatal diagnosis of Bartter syndrome is now possible; however, there are no reports of the placental pathology associated with fetal Bartter syndrome. We present the placental pathologic findings in two siblings with fetal Bartter syndrome. Both pregnancies were complicated by polyhydramnios and preterm delivery. The first pregnancy delivered at 30 weeks, and Bartter syndrome was diagnosed in the perinatal period. The subsequent pregnancy required periodic therapeutic amniocentesis secondary to massive polyhydramnios and delivered at 32 weeks gestation. The suspicion of fetal Bartter syndrome was very high in this second pregnancy, and the infant was confirmed to have Bartter syndrome subsequently. Both placentas were large for gestational age, weighing greater than the 95th percentile. Microscopic examination showed extensive subtrophoblastic basement membrane mineralization (special stains positive for iron and calcium) in the chorionic villi. This striking finding was present in both placentas. Subtrophoblastic mineralization has been described in the literature in placentas of fetuses with abnormalities including anencephaly, trisomy 21, and other congenital abnormalities; however, it has also been described in normal pregnancies. Mechanisms of calcification in the placenta are not well understood, but these striking cases suggest that defects in fetal renal excretion of ions can lead to dystrophic calcification within the placenta, particularly in a subtrophoblastic pattern. PMID:11815871

  20. Hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Medina-Santillán, Roberto; López-Velázquez, Jorge A; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is growing around the world at an alarming rate. Obesity involves a plethora of molecules that predispose individuals to an inflammatory state and various metabolic complications. Dysregulation of nutrient metabolism is a key step during the progression of chronic liver disease that induces an inflammatory state, cellular damage, and impaired hepatic insulin signaling, which leads to insulin resistance. Insulin resistance arises from multiple defects in the liver, adipose tissues, and muscle signaling, which leads to a failure to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, thereby enhancing fat accumulation in the hepatocytes via increased lipolysis and increased hepatic synthesis of triglycerides. This metabolic condition also increases the frequency of other comorbidities such as liver and biliary diseases. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic expression of metabolic syndrome, which comprises a spectrum of clinical and histological events ranging from simple and benign fatty liver to steatohepatitis, which is characterized by the abnormal activation of pathways leading to an aggressive inflammatory condition. This pathological state may progress to more severe damage known as cirrhosis, which endangers the anatomy and function of liver tissue. In addition, a small group of patients with end-stage liver disease may develop hepatocellular carcinoma and finally death. By contrast, cholesterol gallstone disease is a common metabolic disease, and is considered to be the main biliary indicator of metabolic syndrome. This review provides a detailed summary of the hepatic manifestations associated with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23471889

  1. Early Postoperative Complications after Heart Transplantation in Adult Recipients: Asan Medical Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, Jae Joong; Kim, Joon Bum; Choo, Suk Jung; Yun, Tae-Jin; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart transplantation has become a widely accepted surgical option for end-stage heart failure in Korea since its first success in 1992. We reviewed early postoperative complications and mortality in 239 patients who underwent heart transplantation using bicaval technique in Asan Medical Center. Methods Between January 1999 and December 2011, a total of 247 patients aged over 17 received heart transplantation using bicaval technique in Asan Medical Center. After excluding four patients with concomitant kidney transplantation and four with heart-lung transplantation, 239 patients were enrolled in this study. We evaluated their early postoperative complications and mortality. Postoperative complications included primary graft failure, cerebrovascular accident, mediastinal bleeding, renal failure, low cardiac output syndrome requiring intra-aortic balloon pump or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation insertion, pericardial effusion, and inguinal lymphocele. Follow-up was 100% complete with a mean follow-up duration of 58.4±43.6 months. Results Early death occurred in three patients (1.3%). The most common complications were pericardial effusion (61.5%) followed by arrhythmia (41.8%) and mediastinal bleeding (8.4%). Among the patients complicated with pericardial effusion, only 13 (5.4%) required window operation. The incidence of other significant complications was less than 5%: stroke (1.3%), low cardiac output syndrome (2.5%), renal failure requiring renal replacement (3.8%), sternal wound infection (2.0%), and inguinal lymphocele (4.6%). Most of complications did not result in the extended length of hospital stay except mediastinal bleeding (p=0.034). Conclusion Heart transplantation is a widely accepted option of surgical treatment for end-stage heart failure with good early outcomes and relatively low catastrophic complications. PMID:24368968

  2. Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters

    MedlinePLUS

    Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters Updated:Jul 24,2014 Metabolic syndrome may be diagnosed when a patient has a cluster of ... Diabetes High Blood Pressure My Life Check Heart360® Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  3. Exercise-induced anterior tibial compartment compression syndrome in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, R. C.; Chadwick, C. J.; Bagnall, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Exercise-induced anterior tibial compartment compression syndrome occurs predominantly in young males. The authors report a case in a 79-year-old female as a complication of rehabilitation. PMID:7301708

  4. Disseminated vaccinia false alarm.

    PubMed

    Peev, Milan; Weber, Steven G; Daum, Robert S; Garcia-Houchinss, Sylvia; Marcinak, John

    2003-10-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old girl who presented in December 2002 with fever and a vesicular rash. Initially she was diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The differential diagnosis was expanded, however, when an exposure to a person who was believed to be vaccinated recently against smallpox was revealed. We describe the sequence of events that ensued and the workup for a possible case of disseminated virus. PMID:14579813

  5. Side effects of benoxaprofen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Diffey; Colin Hindson; F Lawlor

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of adverse dermatological reactions to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent benoxaprofen. Photosensitivity was seen in several patients, confined to wavelengths less than 340 nm. Other cutaneous side effects were erythema multiforme, the Stevens-Johnson syndrome, milia, and onycholysis. One case of pancytopenia and toxic epidermal necrolysis was reported. patients were not rechallenged with the drug, but these reactions

  6. Syndrome in question. MAGIC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ana Cláudia Mendes do; Gaspardo, Daniela Barros Cortez; Cortez, Tatiana Mimura; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a male 40-year-old patient with established diagnosis of Behçet's disease which had evolved to recurrent bilateral auricular polychondritis crises. MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) is rare and groups together patients with this clinical picture without necessarily fulfilling the clinical criteria for Behçet's disease or relapsing polychondritis, demonstrating an independent disorder. PMID:24626673

  7. Nicolau syndrome after intramuscular injection: 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Kwun; Kim, Tae-Heon; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2012-05-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection consisting of ischemic necrosis of skin, soft tissue, and muscular tissue that arises locoregionally. The characteristic pattern is pain around the injection site, developing into erythema, a livedoid dermatitis patch, and necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and muscle tissue. Three patients were injected with drugs (diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, meperidine) for pain relief. Three patients complained of pain, and a skin lesion was observed, after which necrosis developed on their buttocks. Each patient underwent debridement and coverage. The wound healed uneventfully. We report three cases of Nicolau syndrome in the buttocks following diclofenac intramuscular injection. PMID:22783535

  8. Nicolau Syndrome after Intramuscular Injection: 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Heon; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection consisting of ischemic necrosis of skin, soft tissue, and muscular tissue that arises locoregionally. The characteristic pattern is pain around the injection site, developing into erythema, a livedoid dermatitis patch, and necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and muscle tissue. Three patients were injected with drugs (diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, meperidine) for pain relief. Three patients complained of pain, and a skin lesion was observed, after which necrosis developed on their buttocks. Each patient underwent debridement and coverage. The wound healed uneventfully. We report three cases of Nicolau syndrome in the buttocks following diclofenac intramuscular injection. PMID:22783535

  9. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  10. The Advanced Glycation Endproduct, Pentosidine, in the Carpal Ligament in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Hemodialysis: Comparison with Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaaki Takahashi; Hironobu Hoshino; Kazuhiro Kushida; Hideyuki Murata; Satoshi Baba; Tetsuo Inoue

    1998-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a major complication that occurs in the musculoskeletal system in patients on long-term hemodialysis (HD). Pentosidine is an advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) and there is evidence that shows AGEs contribute to the pathogenesis of the complications in patients undergoing HD. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pentosidine accumulates in the carpal

  11. Acute Diaphragmatic Rupture in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Levine; Jonathan Adler

    2011-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare connective tissue disorder, usually characterized by the triad of hypermobility of the joints, hyperextensibility of the skin, and tissue fragility. Numerous gastrointestinal complications have been reported with this syndrome. However, spontaneous diaphragmatic rupture remains a very rare complication. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with EDS who presented to the Emergency Department

  12. Two cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens after uneventful cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Leonard; Trattler, William; Boxer Wachler, Brian S

    2008-11-01

    We report 2 cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens AT50SE and AT52SE intraocular lenses (Eyeonics, Inc.) after uneventful cataract surgery. Both patients had subsequent neodymium:YAG laser capsulotomy treatment that remedied the complication. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens AT50SE and AT52SE, a unique complication with this type of hinged accommodating intraocular lens. PMID:19006749

  13. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  14. Overtraining Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreher, Jeffrey B.; Schwartz, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Fatigue and underperformance are common in athletes. Understanding overtraining syndrome (OTS) is helpful in the evaluation, management, and education of athletes. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles in English were searched with OVID (1948-2011) and PubMed using the following keywords: overtraining syndrome, overtraining, overreaching, unexplained underperformance, staleness, pathophysiology, management, treatment, evaluation. Bibliographies were reviewed for additional resources. Results: OTS appears to be a maladapted response to excessive exercise without adequate rest, resulting in perturbations of multiple body systems (neurologic, endocrinologic, immunologic) coupled with mood changes. Many hypotheses of OTS pathogenesis are reviewed, and a clinical approach to athletes with possible OTS (including history, testing, and prevention) is presented. Conclusions: OTS remains a clinical diagnosis with arbitrary definitions per the European College of Sports Science’s position statement. History and, in most situations, limited serologies are helpful. However, much remains to be learned given that most past research has been on athletes with overreaching rather than OTS. PMID:23016079

  15. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help their child cope with the condition. About Tourette Syndrome Tourette syndrome (TS) is named for French ... people with TS. Back Continue Diagnosing and Treating Tourette Syndrome Pediatricians and family doctors may refer a ...

  16. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. - www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke - www. ...

  17. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  18. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  19. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry? . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  20. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Syndrome PDF Version Size: 62 KB Audio Version Time: 11:11 Size: 10.5 MB November 2014 What Is Marfan Syndrome? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Marfan syndrome is ...

  1. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Another condition that is associated with PCOS is metabolic syndrome . This syndrome contributes to both diabetes and heart ... the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Metabolic Syndrome: Combination of factors that contribute to both diabetes ...

  2. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ... chemicals in the body fail to interact properly), metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that put ...

  3. Fragile X Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Was Just Figuring Out CGG Repeats! Donate | Print Fragile X Syndrome Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic condition ... health concerns associated with the condition. Features of Fragile X Syndrome in Males Read our Story The majority of ...

  4. Fragile X Syndrome Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Fragile X Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Fragile X syndrome? Fragile X syndrome is a genetic disorder that ...

  5. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... key nerve in the wrist. What is carpal tunnel syndrome? Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median ... or traumatized. What are the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome? Symptoms usually start gradually, with frequent burning, ...

  6. Prognosis of patients treated for Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aulinas, Anna; Valassi, Elena; Webb, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS), due to an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, adrenal tumors, or ectopic ACTH secretion, causes hypercortisolism. CS is associated with major morbidity, especially metabolic and cardiovascular complications, osteoporosis, psychiatric changes, and cognitive impairment. Despite biochemical "cure" of hypercortisolism and clinical improvement after effective treatment, these complications are only partially reversible. Exacerbation of prior autoimmune diseases is also seen. All of these lead to quality of life impairment and increased mortality. This review addresses the main comorbidities and long-term consequences of CS despite clinical and biochemical "cure". PMID:23831107

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can occur during the treatment of several diseases and in several interventional procedures as a complication. It is a difficult situation to handle and special care should be applied to the patients. Mechanical ventilation is used for these patients and several parameters are changed constantly until compliance is achieved. However, a complication that is observed during the application of positive airway pressure is pneumothorax. In our current work we will present definition and causes of pneumothorax in the setting of intensive care unit (ICU). We will identify differences and similarities of this situation and present treatment options. PMID:25337400

  8. Kallmann syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Dodé; Jean-Pierre Hardelin; J-P Hardelin

    2009-01-01

    The Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) with anosmia. This is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. KAL1, encoding the extracellular glycoprotein anosmin-1, is responsible for the X chromosome-linked recessive form of the disease. Mutations in FGFR1 or FGF8, encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and fibroblast growth factor-8, respectively, underlie an autosomal dominant form with incomplete penetrance. Finally, mutations

  9. Hepatorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turban, Sharon; Thuluvath, Paul J; Atta, Mohamed G

    2007-08-14

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review. PMID:17696221

  10. Startle syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Truong, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    Startle refers to a sudden involuntary movement of the body in response to a surprising and unexpected stimulus. It is a fast twitch of facial and body muscles evoked by a sudden and intense tactile, visual, or acoustic stimulus. While startle can be considered to be a protective function against injury, startle syndromes are abnormal responses to startling events, consisting of three heterogeneous groups of disorders. The first is hyperekplexia, characterized by brisk and generalized startle in response to trivial stimulation. The major form of hereditary hyperekplexia has a genetic basis, frequently due to mutations in the ?1 subunit of the glycine receptor (GLRA1) on chromosome 5q. In the second group, normal startle induces complex but stereotyped motor and/or behavioral abnormalities lasting several seconds, termed as startle epilepsy. It usually occurs in the setting of severe brain damage, particularly perinatal hypoxia. The third group is characterized by nonhabituating hyperstartling, provoked by loud noises, sudden commands, or gestures. The intensity of startle response tends to increase with frequency of stimulation, which often leads to injury. Interestingly, its occurrence is restricted to certain social or ethnic groups in different parts of the world, such as jumping Frenchmen of Maine among Franco-Canadian lumberjack communities, and Latah in Southeast Asia. So far, no neurological abnormalities have been reported in association with these neuropsychiatric startle syndromes. In this chapter, the authors discuss the clinical presentation, physiology, and the neuronal basis of the normal human startle as well as different groups of abnormal startle syndromes. The aim is to provide an overview of hyperstartling with some diagnostic hints and the distinguishing features among these syndromes. PMID:21496599

  11. Antisynthetase syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agathe Imbert-Masseau; Mohamed Hamidou; Christian Agard; Jean-Yves Grolleau; Pascal Chérin

    2003-01-01

    Seven autoantibodies directed against synthetases have been identified to date, the best known being anti-Jo1. Synthetases play a vital role in protein synthesis by catalyzing the acetylation of transfer RNAs (tRNAs). The most common form of antisynthetase syndrome is characterized by anti-Jo1 production, interstitial lung disease (ILD), inflammatory muscle disease, and, in many cases, fever, polyarthritis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and thick

  12. Masquerade Syndromes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shouvik Saha; Elizabeth M. Graham

    The term “masquerade syndrome” was first used in 1967 to describe a case of conjunctival carcinoma that presented as chronic\\u000a conjunctivitis [1]. Since then, the term has been applied to range of disorders that may present as intraocular inflammation.\\u000a The disorders may be malignant or nonmalignant, but they share the common characteristic that intraocular inflammation is\\u000a not due to an

  13. Maffucci Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leida B. Rozeman; Yvonne M. Schrage; Judith V. M. G. Bovée; Pancras C. W. Hogendoorn

    Maffucci syndrome is characterized by the presence of multiple enchondromas, referred to as enchondromatosis, combined with\\u000a multiple haemangiomas and\\/or lymphangiomas, as described by (1881). Both lesions tend to have an unilateral predominance (Albregts and Rapini 1995). Enchondromas are benign cartilaginous neoplasms and occur mainly in the tubular bones of hands and feet. Their presence\\u000a in long bones can result in

  14. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dudova, Iva; Kocourkova, Jana; Koutek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome. PMID:26170676

  15. Human genetics of adiponectin in the metabolic syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei-Shiung Yang; Lee-Ming Chuang

    2006-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipose-derived plasma protein, has been well established to be an important biomarker for metabolic syndrome\\u000a and its complications after exhausted studies in humans. Animal and cell culture experiments also support most claims from\\u000a human observations of its roles in the metabolic syndrome. Reproducible results of human genetic studies of diverse ethnic\\u000a origin and by different investigators may provide

  16. Learning about Fragile X Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... genetic terms used on this page. Learning About Fragile X Syndrome What is fragile X syndrome? What are the ... Additional Resources for Fragile X Syndrome What is fragile X syndrome? Fragile X syndrome is the most common form ...

  17. Ophthalmological complications of the hypertriglyceridaemias.

    PubMed

    Winder, A F; Dodson, P M; Galton, D J

    1980-04-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia is an inappropriate elevation in plasma of chylomicrons, very low density lipoprotein, or both, functioning in the transport of exogenous and endogenous neutral fat respectively (lewis, 1976; Miller, 1979). The elevation may be due to rare genetically-determined defects or to a specific imbalance between triglyceride production and utilization, either secondary to or accentuated by other metabolic disturbances such as obesity or diabetes mellitus. Various surveys indicate that some degree of hypertriglyceridaemia affects more than 10 per cent of the adult population, with a male preponderance and a reduced expression during childhood (Lewis, 1976). Ophthalmological complications of hypertriglyceridaemia include eruptive and other forms of xanthomata including xanthelasmata, corneal arcus, lipaemia retinalis, effects on retinal blood flow, and lipid emboli affecting vision. The clinical features overlap those of hypercholesterolaemia and these features may lead to initial presentation and diagnosis of either disorder. Recognition of the underlying disorder is important since with treatment the incidence of major cardiovascular and other problems such as pancreatitis may be reduced, and with familial disorders other affected members may then be sought. PMID:6943819

  18. [The pathogenesis of postvaccinal complications].

    PubMed

    Huber, H C

    1981-03-19

    Paraspecific reactions to vaccines are -- induction of autoimmune mechanisms, -- immunosuppression, -- induction of inflammation (i.e. "reactogenicity"). These undesirable side effects of vaccination are important factors in pathogenesis of postvaccinal complications. Using the model of experimental vaccinia virus infection the paraspecific reactions could be demonstrated in several animal species. Cell mediated hypersensitivity to brain tissue antigen and basic encephalitogenic protein occurred following vaccinia infection in guinea pigs. In infected rabbits humoral anti-brain antibodies could be detected. The immune response to sheep erythrocytes in mice was tested by determining the number of plaque forming cells in the spleen after specific immunization. Vaccinia virus injected prior to or simultaneously with immunization strongly reduced the number of plaque forming cells in the spleen. The reactogenicity of bacterial and viral vaccines could be determined by means of a simple hemolytic plaque assay in mice. This assay represents the degree of enzymatic lysosomal activity of macrophages. The methods described might be useful to test the innocuity and tolerance of new vaccines. PMID:6112195

  19. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  20. Nutcracker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gulleroglu, Kaan; Gulleroglu, Basak; Baskin, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The nutcracker phenomenon [left renal vein (LRV) entrapment syndrome] refers to compression of the LRV most commonly between abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Term of nutcracker syndrome (NCS) is used for patients with clinical symptoms associated with nutcracker anatomy. LRV entrapment divided into 2 types: anterior and posterior. Posterior and right-sided NCSs are rare conditions. The symptoms vary from asymptomatic hematuria to severe pelvic congestion. Symptoms include hematuria, orthostatic proteinuria, flank pain, abdominal pain, varicocele, dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, fatigue and orthostatic intolerance. Existence of the clinical features constitutes a basis for the diagnosis. Several imaging methods such as Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography and retrograde venography are used to diagnose NCS. The management of NCS depends upon the clinical presentation and the severity of the LRV hypertension. The treatment options are ranged from surveillance to nephrectomy. Treatment decision should be based on the severity of symptoms and their expected reversibility with regard to patient’s age and the stage of the syndrome. PMID:25374822

  1. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Various types of PNS, singly or in multiples, may be associated with either benign or malignant tumors and may involve almost every organ system, directly or indirectly. These disorders can precede the discovery of the tumor by weeks, months, or even years, and many are good diagnostic and prognostic indicators. The true incidence of PNS in animal cancer patients is unknown, although approximately 75% of all human cancer patients, at some time during the tumor-bearing part of their lives, suffer from one or more of these disorders. Recognition of PNS is valuable because the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor, because they may allow assessment of premalignant states, because they may aid in the search for metastases, because they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy, and because they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformations and oncogene expression. Recognition of these syndromes is relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of many problems in veterinary cancer medicine. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Heterotaxy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heterotaxy is defined as an abnormality where the internal thoraco-abdominal organs demonstrate abnormal arrangement across the left-right axis of the body. This broad term includes patients with a wide variety of very complex cardiac lesions. Patients with heterotaxy can be stratified into the subsets of asplenia syndrome and polysplenia syndrome, or the subsets of heterotaxy with isomerism of the right atrial appendages and heterotaxy with isomerism of the left atrial appendages. Treatment of patients with isomerism is determined by the nature and severity of the associated cardiac and extracardiac lesions. Most cardiac operations for patients with isomerism are palliative in nature, since normal anatomy is rarely achieved and mortality rates remain high for patients with heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with left isomerism in general have less severe cardiac malformations than those with right isomerism and, hence, more chance of biventricular repair. For almost all patients with right isomerism, and for many with left isomerism, biventricular repair will not be feasible, and all palliative protocols are then staging procedures prior to a Fontan-type repair. Recent advances in medical management, and improvements in surgical techniques have resulted in improved survival for these patients, and the surgical outcomes are comparable to those with Fontan circulation irrespective of the presence or absence of heterotaxy. PMID:21731561

  3. Outcomes with the Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis at Instituto de Microcirugía Ocular IMO

    PubMed Central

    Güell, Jose L.; Arcos, Edilio; Gris, Oscar; Aristizabal, Diego; Pacheco, Miguel; Sanchez, Claudia L.; Manero, Felicidad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report the outcomes on the Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis at our institution. Design Retrospective analysis case series. Participants We analyzed 54 eyes of 53 patients who previously underwent Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis surgery at our institution from July 2006 to March 2011. Methods Preoperative and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. Main outcome measures Visual acuity and keratoprosthesis stability. Results Common preoperative diagnoses were penetrating keratoplasty failure in 49 eyes (90.7%), chronic keratitis in 2 eyes (3.7%), ocular cicatricial pemphigoid in 1 eye (1.85%), Stevens Johnson syndrome in 1 eye (1.85%) and corneal vascularization in 1 eye (1.85%). Additionally, 40 eyes (74%) had preoperative glaucoma, and an Ahmed valve was implanted in 55% of them. Preoperative BCVA ranged from 20/200 to light perception. At an average follow-up of 20.15 months ± 12.7 (range, 1–56), postoperative vision improved to ?20/200 in 18 eyes (33.3%) and ?20/50 in 4 eyes (7.4%). The graft retention was 96%. Conclusions The Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis is a valid option for high-risk patients. The design improvements in the Boston keratoprosthesis, as well as the daily implementation of the therapeutic methods, have notably diminished occurrence of the most serious complications, such as corneal necrosis and endophthalmitis. As such, glaucoma and its subsequent complications now stand as the most prevalent prognostic factor in the long term. PMID:23960937

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  5. Spontaneous fatal intracranial hemorrhage in a child with Evans syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Antonio; Piastra, Marco; Casadei Pistilli, Anna Maria; Serretti, Sara; Beate, Werner; Chiaretti, Antonio; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    Evans syndrome is a chronic and recurrent disease often resistant to multiagent therapy. Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening complication in children with Evans syndrome. The authors report the fatal course of a child with chronic thrombocytopenia who presented a spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage. The case indicates that this potentially fatal event may occur even in children with a moderate grade of chronic thrombocytopenia. Early recognition and aggressive management is required for an adequate management of this rare complication. PMID:12775539

  6. Proper Patient Positioning and Complication Prevention in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bonnaig, Nicolas; Dailey, Steven; Archdeacon, Michael

    2014-07-01

    ? The consequences of improper intraoperative positioning can be profound: it not only may cause substantial morbidity but also may be a major area of litigation, particularly when peripheral nerve injury occurs.? The ulnar nerve is most likely to be injured secondary to improper positioning. The elbow should be flexed ?90° and the forearm placed in a neutral or slightly supinated position intraoperatively to minimize pressure in the cubital tunnel.? Pressure-related complications, such as pressure ulcers and alopecia, are best avoided by the use of adequate padding. Cushions on the operating-room table and armrest should be emphasized under osseous prominences.? Positioning the head in a non-neutral alignment or arm abduction of ?90° may result in injury to the brachial plexus.? The hemilithotomy position increases intracompartmental pressure in the leg on the uninjured side. The risk of well-leg compartment syndrome can be minimized by avoiding this position if possible. PMID:24990979

  7. Pneumothorax as a complication of lung volume recruitment.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Erik J A; Jans, Maurice; Gaytant, Michael A; Bach, John R; Kampelmacher, Mike J

    2013-01-01

    Lung volume recruitment involves deep inflation techniques to achieve maximum insufflation capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness, in order to increase peak cough flow, thus helping to maintain airway patency and improve ventilation. One of these techniques is air stacking, in which a manual resuscitator is used in order to inflate the lungs. Although intrathoracic pressures can rise considerably, there have been no reports of respiratory complications due to air stacking. However, reaching maximum insufflation capacity is not recommended in patients with known structural abnormalities of the lungs or chronic obstructive airway disease. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who had poliomyelitis as a child, developed torsion scoliosis and post-polio syndrome, and had periodic but infrequent asthma attacks. After performing air stacking for 3 years, the patient suddenly developed a pneumothorax, indicating that this technique should be used with caution or not at all in patients with a known pulmonary pathology. PMID:23857693

  8. Anxiety sensitivity in bereaved adults with and without complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Robinaugh, Donald J; McNally, Richard J; LeBlanc, Nicole J; Pentel, Kimberly Z; Schwarz, Noah R; Shah, Riva M; Nadal-Vicens, Mireya F; Moore, Cynthia W; Marques, Luana; Bui, Eric; Simon, Naomi M

    2014-08-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a bereavement-specific syndrome chiefly characterized by symptoms of persistent separation distress. Physiological reactivity to reminders of the loss and repeated acute pangs or waves of severe anxiety and psychological pain are prominent features of CG. Fear of this grief-related physiological arousal may contribute to CG by increasing the distress associated with grief reactions and increasing the likelihood of maladaptive coping strategies and grief-related avoidance. Here, we examined anxiety sensitivity (AS; i.e., the fear of anxiety-related sensations) in two studies of bereaved adults with and without CG. In both studies, bereaved adults with CG exhibited elevated AS relative to those without CG. In study 2, AS was positively associated with CG symptom severity among those with CG. These findings are consistent with the possibility that AS contributes to the development or maintenance of CG symptoms. PMID:25075646

  9. Clinical and immunological features of systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by Jaccoud's arthropathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michio Takeishi; Akio Mimori; Teruhiko Suzuki

    2001-01-01

    This work was undertaken to evaluate clinical and immunological features in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)\\u000a complicated by Jaccoud's arthropathy. Patients diagnosed with SLE between 1985 and 1999, and who met the criteria of Villiaumey\\u000a et al., were checked for Jaccoud's arthropathy. Clinical features were retrospectively analysed for patients with both diseases.\\u000a Sjögren's syndrome and human leukocyte antigens (HLA)

  10. Ruptured semimembranosus bursa--an unusual complication following sports injury of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen-Ranberg, F; Hejgaard, N

    1986-01-01

    An exceptional complication of a slight sports injury of the knee with rupture of the semimembranosus bursa in a 29-year-old male football player is reported. The diagnosis was verified by immediate arthrography, consequently the possibility of thrombophlebitis could be ruled out. Anticoagulation is dangerous and contraindicated in rupture of the semimembranosus bursa due to the risk of developing compartment syndrome. Simple bed-rest for a week gave complete relief of pain. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3697597

  11. Ruptured semimembranosus bursa--an unusual complication following sports injury of the knee.

    PubMed

    Andersen-Ranberg, F; Hejgaard, N

    1986-03-01

    An exceptional complication of a slight sports injury of the knee with rupture of the semimembranosus bursa in a 29-year-old male football player is reported. The diagnosis was verified by immediate arthrography, consequently the possibility of thrombophlebitis could be ruled out. Anticoagulation is dangerous and contraindicated in rupture of the semimembranosus bursa due to the risk of developing compartment syndrome. Simple bed-rest for a week gave complete relief of pain. PMID:3697597

  12. Patellofemoral complications after posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: A comparison of 2 different implant designs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Anderson; David L. Becker; Travis Kieckbusch

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective review of 2 consecutive series of posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) to evaluate patellofemoral complications, in particular, significant patellofemoral crepitance or patellar clunk syndrome. Twenty posterior-stabilized Axiom PSK (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN) TKAs (group 1) were compared with 20 posterior cruciateNsacrificed Advance medial pivot (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN) TKAs (group 2). The average age

  13. Extravascular complications following abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Low, G; Jaremko, J L; Lomas, D J

    2015-08-01

    A variety of transplants have been performed in the abdomen including liver, kidney, pancreas and islet, bowel, and multivisceral transplants. Imaging plays an important role in graft surveillance particularly to exclude post-transplant complications. When complications occur, therapeutic image-guided interventions are invaluable as these may be graft-saving and even life-saving. Vascular complications following transplantation have been extensively reported in recent reviews. The focus of this review is to discuss post-transplant complications that are primarily extravascular in location. This includes biliary, urological, intestinal, malignancy, infections, and miscellaneous complications. Familiarity with the imaging appearances of these complications is helpful for radiologists as accurate diagnosis and expedient treatment has an impact on graft and patient survival. PMID:25979853

  14. Kousseff syndrome: A fifth case?

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, R.A. [Foundation for Blood Research, Portland, ME (United States); Hamilton, W.; Pinette, M. [Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Kousseff originally described three siblings with an open sacral myelomeningocele, conotruncal cardiac malformations, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, retrognathia, a short neck with a low posterior hairline, and renal agenesis as a new autosomal recessive condition. Open neural tube lesions and complex conotruncal cardiac defects are relatively common malformations, both as isolated defects and individually as components of syndromes, but they have been found together only rarely, as part of chromosomal syndromes or following maternal exposures. Toriello et al. reported a fourth case and suggested the eponym Kousseff syndrome for myelomeningcocele, conotruncal defects and minor facial abnormalies. We report a fifth probable case. This male infant was born by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 38 weeks gestation to a 23-year-old G{sub 2}P{sub 1001} mother. Pregnancy was complicated by an elevated alpha-fetoprotein at 16 weeks gestation, followed by an ultrasound diagnosis of an open disease. After birth, physical examination also revealed dysmorphic facies, with a bulbous nose and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, bilateral 5th finger clinodactyly and hypotonia. Echocardiogram demonstrated complex conotruncal malformations. The patient underwent closure of the myelomeningocele but died at one month of age. Chromosomal analysis was normal (46,XY). Because conotruncal heart defects have been associated with deletions on chromosome 22, FISH analysis using a probe for the DiGeorge syndrome on the long arm of chromosome 22 was performed. It indicated no detectable deletion within this critical region on 22q11. Nonetheless there remains the possibility of a gene (or genes) located on 22q that could produce findings of this rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome when disrupted. Therefore, further investigation on this chromosome is warranted.

  15. Complications of arthroscopic surgery of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, A. V.; Bardakos, N. V.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years hip arthroscopic surgery has evolved into one of the most rapidly expanding fields in orthopaedic surgery. Complications are largely transient and incidences between 0.5% and 6.4% have been reported. However, major complications can and do occur. This article analyses the reported complications and makes recommendations based on the literature review and personal experience on how to minimise them. PMID:23610683

  16. Complications associated with transobturator sling procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Hamilton Boyles; Renee Edwards; William Gregory; Amanda Clark

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to determine the complications associated with trans-obturator slings as reported to a national database.\\u000a We required “MAUDE”, a database that collects reports of complications associated with medical devices and which is maintained\\u000a by the Food and Drug Administration. We searched for complications associated with three different, commercially available\\u000a trans-obturator slings. We then tabulated the results by type

  17. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Grechi; Bruna, Cammarata; Benedetta, Mariani; Stefania, Di Candia; Giuseppe, Chiumello

    2012-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex multisystem genetic disorder that shows great variability, with changing clinical features during a patient's life. The syndrome is due to the loss of expression of several genes encoded on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 (15q11.2–q13). The complex phenotype is most probably caused by a hypothalamic dysfunction that is responsible for hormonal dysfunctions and for absence of the sense of satiety. For this reason a Prader-Willi (PW) child develops hyperphagia during the initial stage of infancy that can lead to obesity and its complications. During infancy many PW child display a range of behavioural problems that become more noticeable in adolescence and adulthood and interfere mostly with quality of life. Early diagnosis of PWS is important for effective long-term management, and a precocious multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to improve quality of life, prevent complications, and prolong life expectancy. PMID:23133744

  18. Inpatient Management of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in the developed world. Guillain-Barré syndrome typically presents with ascending paralysis and is usually severe enough to warrant hospital admission for management. In the United States alone, GBS results in more than 6000 hospitalizations each year. Although GBS patients were historically cared for at tertiary referral centers, changing treatment practices have broadened the number of neurologists who care for the disease. This article provides a review of key issues in the inpatient management of GBS. A survey of the evidence base for treatment with plasma exchange or intravenous immunoglobulins is presented. Although either of these treatments can limit the severity of GBS, patients are still at risk for a broad range of complications, including respiratory failure, autonomic dysfunction, thromboembolic disease, pain, and psychiatric disorders. Awareness of these complications, their detection and management, may help limit the morbidity of GBS. PMID:23983841

  19. Childhood tuberculosis presenting with haemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verma, Tarun; Aggarwal, Sameer

    2012-09-01

    Haemophagocytic syndrome is a life threatening complication of systemic infection resulting from an exaggerated immune response to a triggering agent. Prompt recognition and treatment of this disorder can abrogate otherwise high fatality associated with this disorder. A 2 year old girl presented with acute enteritis, developed prolonged fever and organomegaly complicated by multi-organ failure. She fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis including bone marrow evidence of haemophagocytosis. In addition she had serological evidence of tubercular infection as well as a positive family history of tuberculosis. She responded rapidly to immunosuppressive therapy and anti-tubercular therapy. Our case illustrates the association of haemophagocytic syndrome with tuberculosis as well as the favourable response obtained with prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23997456

  20. Light and scan electron microscopic analysis of cyclops syndrome: etiopathogenic hypothesis and technical solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Delcogliano; S. Franzese; A. Branca; M. Magi; C. Fabbriciani

    1996-01-01

    The loss of range of motion after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common and most challenging complications of this kind of surgery. Recently, an intercondylar notch fibrous proliferation, called cyclops syndrome because of its arthroscopic appearance, has been identified as one of the specific causes of loss of extension. The incidence of cyclops syndrome is