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  1. Chronic Ocular Complications of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: The Role of Systemic Immunomodulatory Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victoria S; Chodosh, James; Papaliodis, George N

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare, but potentially blinding diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes. Although the cutaneous manifestations tend to be self-limited and resolve without sequelae, the chronic ocular complications associated with SJS/TEN can persist despite local therapy. Poor understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and lack of a standardized clinical approach have resulted in a paucity of data in regards to suitable treatment options. Inflammatory cellular infiltration and elevated levels of ocular surface cytokines in the conjunctival specimens of affected patients give credence to an underlying immunogenic etiology. Furthermore, the presence of ongoing ocular surface inflammation and progressive conjunctival fibrosis in the absence of exogenous aggravating factors suggest a possible role for systemic immunomodulatory therapy (IMT). We review in detail the proposed immunogenesis underlying chronic ocular SJS/TEN and the possible utility of systemic IMT. PMID:26959145

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis On this page: Description ... Glossary definitions Reviewed July 2015 What is Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis? Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic ...

  3. [Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bellakhal, S; Ben Kaab, B; Teyeb, Z; Souissi, A; Derbel, F; Douggui, M-H

    2015-09-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are life-threatening dermatological conditions. Their most common cause is medication. However, in a small proportion of patients these dermatological conditions could be the first presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We now describe a 34-year-old patient who presented with manifestations of Stevens-Johnson as a first feature of systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus reveled by Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been infrequently reviewed in the previous literature. This diagnosis should be considered when cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur without clear drug causality. PMID:26088436

  4. Co-amoxiclav-induced Stevens Johnson syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Neila; Hanen, Zayani; Slim, Raoudha; Boussofara, Lobna; Najet, Ghariani; Bouraoui, Kamel; Ben Salem, Chaker

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome is an uncommon life threatening disease generally induced by drugs. Antibiotics, mainly sulphonamides, are the most involved drugs in Stevens-Johnson syndrome in children. Co-amoxiclav is a well tolerated antibiotic. It has never been reported to cause, lonely this syndrome in children. Herein, we report a co-amoxiclav-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome occurring in an 18-month-old child. The diagnosis of SJS is often challenging in children and other possible diseases should be ruled out. The etiology of this syndrome is not yet fully understood. It is thought to be mediated by an immunologic mechanism. Management involves early identification, withdrawal of the culprit drug and rapid initiation of supportive therapies. PMID:23560121

  5. Co-amoxiclav-induced Stevens Johnson Syndrome in a child

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Neila; Hanen, Zayani; Slim, Raoudha; Boussofara, Lobna; Najet, Ghariani; Bouraoui, Kamel; Salem, Chaker Ben

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is an uncommon life threatening disease generally induced by drugs. Antibiotics, mainly sulphonamides, are the most involved drugs in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome in children. Co-amoxiclav is a well tolerated antibiotic. It has never been reported to cause, lonely this syndrome in children. Herein, we report a co-amoxiclav-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome occurring in an 18-month-old child. The diagnosis of SJS is often challenging in children and other possible diseases should be ruled out. The etiology of this syndrome is not yet fully understood. It is thought to be mediated by an immunologic mechanism. Management involves early identification, withdrawal of the culprit drug and rapid initiation of supportive therapies. PMID:23560121

  6. [Bullous systemic lupus mimicking a Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Claudia L; Echeverri, Andrés F; González, Martha L; Tobón, Gabriel; Serrano, Carlos D

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases represent a diagnostic challenge due to the wide spectrum of pathologies that share similar clinical features. This paper reports the case of a woman admitted with a supposed diagnosis of a Stevens-Johnson syndrome, in which the history, the profile of autoimmunity and interdisciplinary approach were of vital importance to clarify the clinical picture. PMID:26556668

  7. Spontaneous complete regression of hypothalamic pilocytic astrocytoma after partial resection in a child, complicated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Samadian, Mohammad; Bakhtevari, Mehrdad Hosseinzadeh; Haddadian, Karim; Alavi, Hossein Afshin; Rezaei, Omidvar

    2016-04-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common pediatric central nervous system glial neoplasm and the most common pediatric cerebellar tumor. The spontaneous regression that occurs after partial/subtotal resection is multifactorial, depending on multiple factors, as for the case of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of the host to the implanted tumor. A 7-year-old boy was referred to a neurosurgery clinic with headache. Further imaging workup revealed hypothalamic PA. Partial resection of the lesions was performed with right-side pterional approach. The patient developed a severe panmucositis [Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)] and respiratory failure plus conjunctivitis, due to phenytoin allergy. During the patient's 6-month follow-up, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a residual tumor, and about 9 months later (at 15 months postoperatively), the MRI showed total regression of the tumor. Clinically, symptomatic PA may undergo spontaneous regression after partial resection. We report a well-documented case of spontaneous regression hypothalamic PA after partial resection that complicated with SJS. Immune system reaction in SJS may have a role in tumor behavior and spontaneous regression. Multiple studies confirmed spontaneous regression in PA after partial/subtotal resection. This phenomenon occurs due to humoral and cell-mediated host immune responses to the implanted tumor. The immune system reaction in SJS may have a role in tumor behavior and spontaneous regression. PMID:26662551

  8. Stevens-Johnson syndrome after treatment with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, S; Darby, A; Mead, G; Lister, A

    2002-12-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric mouse/human anti-CD20 antibody licensed for the treatment of low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and has recently also been shown to have a role in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We report a case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome after treatment with rituximab, which occurred in a 36-year-old man with relapsed follicular lymphoma. The patient developed mucositis and fevers after the first two injections, followed by a florid maculopapular rash with severe orogenital ulceration after the third infusion. Over several weeks his symptoms progressed with severe cutaneous, orogenital and conjunctival ulceration, leading to visual problems and malnutrition. No improvement occurred with steroids and immunosuppressant therapy. A review of the literature reveals this to be the first reported case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with rituximab therapy. PMID:12453865

  9. The severe complication of Stevens–Johnson syndrome induced by long-term clozapine treatment in a male schizophrenia patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Kung; Chung, Weilun; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Tseng, Ping-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe adverse drug reaction that can result in disability and mortality. SJS is defined as having a widespread distribution throughout the whole body surface area with <10% extent of skin detachment and skin lesions. Some drugs, such as carbamazepine, have been reported to have a greater correlation to SJS. Although clozapine use has been mentioned as a risk factor for development of SJS, no report has clearly described the features of SJS as a reaction to clozapine use. Herein, we report the case of a patient presenting SJS after long-term clozapine treatment. Case report: Mr A was a 54-year-old male with a diagnosis of chronic schizophrenia. He was hospitalized in a mental institute and received clozapine 200 mg/day for 2 years, without discomfort or drug side effects. He developed acute-onset mouth edema, multiple oral and ocular ulcers, oral and ocular mucosa swelling, and multiple erythematous skin rashes over his entire body and extremities with hypertension and high fever. SJS was diagnosed after referral to a general hospital. Results The SJS subsided under supportive treatment. Conclusion Accumulated lymphocytes and macrophages in the epidermis and elevated TNF-? might cause an immune reaction and apoptosis and result in the clinical presentation of SJS. Clozapine is believed to modulate the immunologic reaction, and therefore might induce SJS through immunomodulation. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of SJS resulting from the use of drugs for which there are no reports of such a severe complication. PMID:25914536

  10. Paracetamol-induced Stevens Johnson syndrome and cholestatic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Slim, Raoudha; Fathallah, Neila; Aounallah, Amina; Ksiaa, Mehdi; Sriha, Badreddine; Nouira, Rafiaa; Ben Salem, Chaker

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an uncommon life-threatening skin disease, generally induced by drugs. Extracutaneous manifestations of the syndrome can occur, and may involve the conjunctiva, buccal mucosa, gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. Cholestatic hepatitis has been rarely described in SJS. A 29-year-old woman was admitted with generalized cutaneous eruption. A self-medication with paracetamol had been started three days earlier. Clinical signs and skin biopsy were consistent with SJS. Five days later, the patient developed jaundice. Serial liver function tests showed rising transaminases, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transferase. Liver biopsy was performed and was consistent with the diagnosis of drug-induced cholestatic hepatitis. Adequate supportive care was provided to the patient. Skin lesions disappeared within two weeks. Jaundice disappeared progressively, and liver tests returned to normal. Herein, we report the first case of SJS associated with cholestatic hepatitis after ingestion of therapeutic doses of paracetamol. PMID:25158788

  11. Stevens-Johnson syndrome: report on a case with a strange complaint of allergy to bus.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Iraj; Khaledi, Mojdeh; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-09-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome is an uncommon inflammatory skin disorder in which immune mechanisms, cytotoxic reactions, and delayed hypersensitivity seem to be involved. Herein, an unusual case with strange complaint of"bus allergy" is presented, suffering from severe generalized itching and skin lesions, followed by ulcers in his mouth and genitalia. The diagnosis of Stevens-Johnson syndrome was made and appropriate treatment was advised. However, detailed medical history revealed a completely different cause of his allergic reactions, as he had occasionally used dimenhydrinate because of motion sickness in his history. Therefore, adverse drug reaction to dimenhydrinate was considered as the main underlying cause of the disease. In conclusion, thorough medical history should be taken to make a definitive diagnosis and identify the underlying disease, since accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment can prevent further complications. PMID:24558775

  12. Aceclofenac induced Stevens-Johnson/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ameen, Kaderthambi Hajamohideen Nooru; Pinninti, Rakesh; Jami, Swathi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report a rare occurrence of Stevens-Johnson/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) overlap syndrome after the use of aceclofenac. A 38 year old healthy adult male presented with rapidly evolving rash over face and upper body with ulceration of buccal mucosa and breathlessness after taking aceclofenac tablet. Naranjo score for this adverse drug event was six, thereby making it a probable adverse drug reaction. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation and use of antihistamines and systemic steroids, patient's health rapidly worsened and died within six hours of presentation. Aceclofenac induced SJS/TEN overlap is an extremely rare clinical association previously reported only once in medical literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of such an association in the Indian population. We are presenting this case to highlight the serious adverse reactions possible from a routinely prescribed drug. PMID:23662031

  13. Paracetamol induced Steven-Johnson syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Rajan; Sagari, Shitalkumar; Durgavanshi, Astha; Kanwar, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    In the contemporary era, use of drugs is the dominant paradigm of health care. The most quotidian drug used for fever and pain is paracetamol. Although adverse reactions to paracetamol in India are rare, at times they can cause life-threatening situations. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is one such potentially lethal adverse drug reaction. The most reported cases of analgesic-induced SJS were due to oxicams or propionic acid derivatives. There are very few detailed reports of SJS due to the use of paracetamol. We report a case of SJS, which occurred due to the use of paracetamol. The clinical features of this condition and multidisciplinary management of the patient are described in brief. PMID:26604588

  14. The ophthalmologic management of acute Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Darren G

    2008-04-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and its more severe variant, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), cause significant ocular surface damage. The majority of affected patients develop conjunctival inflammation during the acute phase of the disease. If intense, this inflammation yields permanent destruction of the normal mucosal tissue of the ocular surface and eyelids. Loss of the normal glandular structures leads to severe dry eye problems and vision loss. Medical treatments do little to arrest these problems, and repairing the damage after the acute phase is difficult, if not impossible. Recently, the application of cryopreserved amniotic membrane to the ocular surface during the acute phase of the disease has shown great promise in limiting the destructive inflammation and its long-term sequelae. A rationale for this treatment and a detailed description of the application procedure are provided, along with practical guidelines for the managing surgeon. PMID:18418506

  15. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dodiuk-Gad, Roni P; Chung, Wen-Hung; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Shear, Neil H

    2015-12-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening mucocutaneous reactions, predominantly drug induced. The mortality rates for SJS and TEN are as high as 30 %, and short- and long-term morbidities are very common. SJS/TEN is one of the few dermatological diseases that constitute a true medical emergency. Early recognition and prompt and appropriate management can be lifesaving. In recent years, our understanding of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of SJS/TEN has improved. Nevertheless, in 2015, there are still no internationally accepted management guidelines. This review summarizes up-to-date insights on SJS/TEN and describes a protocol for assessment and treatment. We hope these suggested guidelines serve as a practical clinical tool in the management of SJS/TEN. The classic manifestation of SJS/TEN consists of initial "flu-like" symptoms (malaise, fever, anorexia) in the prodromal phase, followed by cutaneous and mucous membrane (ocular, oral, and genital) inflammation and pain, and other systemic involvement. Symptoms usually begin 4-28 days after the onset of drug intake. Treatment is multidisciplinary and includes identification and withdrawal of the culprit drug, transfer to a specialist unit, supportive care, medical treatment, communication, and provision of appropriate information and emotional support. PMID:26481651

  16. Bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungchul; Ko, Young Bo; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Lim, Chae-Man

    2015-03-01

    We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A 59-year-old man presented with respiratory distress that gradually worsened over 3 months. He had been diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome 3 months before admission. He had no history of previous airway disease. On physical examination, expiratory breathing sounds were not audible, and a chest X-ray revealed a hyperinflated lung. A pulmonary function test indicated a severe obstructive pattern. Computed tomography scans of inspiratory and expiratory phases of respiration showed oligemia and air trapping, and both were more prominent on expiration view than on inspiration view. The pathogenesis of bronchiolitis obliterans associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome is largely unknown. PMID:25684012

  17. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome triggered by chemical hair relaxer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes a 41-year-old Afro-Caribbean lady presenting with a constellation of pyrexia, conjunctivitis, arthralgia, sterile dysuria, apthous ulceration, labial crusting and widespread erythema multiforme. A diagnosis of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome was made. She had taken no medications recently (the most common precipitant of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome) and a full screen for the common and atypical bacterial and viral triggers was negative. The identified trigger was the use of a chemical hair relaxant treatment a few days previously. With supportive measures and a course of oral prednisolone, the patient quickly improved and made a full recovery. This case highlights the importance of considering occupational and recreational precipitants of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. PMID:19918477

  18. Stevens-Johnson syndrome induced by sorafenib for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Fujita, Tetsuo; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Mii, Sumiyuki; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    Sorafenib is an orally administered active multikinase inhibitor for metastatic renal cell carcinoma that is now considered a standard agent. Skin toxicity, such as hand-foot skin reaction, is one of the frequent adverse effects of sorafenib. On the other hand, sorafenib-induced erythema multiforme is very rare, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis induced by sorafenib have not been reported. We report the first case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome caused by sorafenib for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:23969404

  19. Trans-ethnic study confirmed independent associations of HLA-A*02:06 and HLA-B*44:03 with cold medicine-related Stevens-Johnson syndrome with severe ocular surface complications.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Mayumi; Kannabiran, Chitra; Wakamatsu, Tais Hitomi; Kim, Mee Kum; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Joo, Choun-Ki; Sangwan, Virender; Rathi, Varsha; Basu, Sayan; Shamaila, Almas; Lee, Hyo Seok; Yoon, Sangchul; Sotozono, Chie; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and its severe variant, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), are acute inflammatory vesiculobullous reactions of the skin and mucous membranes. Cold medicines including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multi-ingredient cold medications are reported to be important inciting drugs. Recently, we reported that cold medicine related SJS/TEN (CM-SJS/TEN) with severe mucosal involvement including severe ocular surface complications (SOC) is associated with HLA-A*02:06 and HLA-B*44:03 in the Japanese. In this study, to determine whether HLA-B*44:03 is a common risk factor for CM-SJS/TEN with SOC in different ethnic groups we used samples from Indian, Brazilian, and Korean patients with CM-SJS/TEN with SOC, and investigated the association between CM-SJS/TEN with SOC and HLA-B*44:03 and/or HLA-A*02:06. We found that HLA-B*44:03 was significantly associated with CM-SJS/TEN with SOC in the Indian and Brazilian but not the Korean population, and that HLA-A*02:06 might be weakly associated in the Korean- but not the Indian and Brazilian population. PMID:25099678

  20. Fatal Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis induced by allopurinol-rituximab-bendamustine therapy.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Michael J; Heck, Jessica N

    2015-10-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap is an acute hypersensitivity reaction that compromises the integrity of mucous membranes and cutaneous tissue. While the pathophysiology of this syndrome has not been fully elucidated, it is commonly associated with the medication use and carries a significant mortality risk of approximately 30%. No commonalities among causative medications have been identified, and determining the offending agent can be challenging. This case report describes fatal Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap in a patient after receiving his first cycle of allopurinol, rituximab, and bendamustine treatment for non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. An analysis of FDA Medwatch adverse reaction case reports involving allopurinol, rituximab, and bendamustine is also presented. PMID:25005569

  1. Evaluation of conjunctival bacterial flora in patients with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frizon, Luciana; Araújo, Marília Cavalcante; Andrade, Larissa; Yu, Maria Cecília Zorat; Wakamatsu, Tais Hitomi; Höfling-Lima, Ana Luisa; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the conjunctival bacterial flora present in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. METHODS: A prospective study of the conjunctival bacterial flora was performed in 41 eyes of 22 patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The information gathered included the patient's sex and age, the duration of disease, the cause of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and treatments. Scrapings of the inferior conjunctival fornix were performed in both eyes. Fourteen days before scraping, the patients were asked to interrupt all topical medication and start using 0.5% nonpreserved methylcellulose. The microbiological evaluation included microorganism identification and determination of antibiotic sensitivity. RESULTS: Of 22 patients (41 eyes), 14 (64%) were females, and eight (36%) were males. The mean age was 33.2 years, and the mean duration of disease was 15.6 years. Visual acuity ranged from light perception to 20/25 (1.57 logMar). The treatment received by most patients consisted of tear substitutes, topical antibiotics, and contact lenses. Bacterial identification was positive in 39 eyes (95%) and negative in two eyes (5%). Gram-positive cocci accounted for 55.5% of the microorganisms, whereas gram-positive bacilli and gram-negative bacilli accounted for 19% and 25.5%, respectively. Half of the patients (54%) had multiple bacterial species in their flora, and only one bacterial species was identified in the other half. Resistant bacteria were isolated from four eyes. The antibiotic sensitivity results for the Streptococcus group showed the lowest sensitivity and the highest microbial resistance identified. CONCLUSION: Patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome have a diverse conjunctival flora that includes many pathogenic species. PMID:24626941

  2. Steven's Johnson syndrome with toxic epidermal necrolysis due to thalidomide in a case of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Das, Anupam; Sil, Amrita; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2014-01-01

    Thalidomide developed in 1954 for morning sickness had proven to be a teratogen and hence was withdrawn from market. Resurgence of thalidomide began as an immunomodulator when it was shown to be effective in the management of multiple myeloma and many conditions like erythema nodosum leprosum, graft versus host disease, recurrent aphthous ulcers etc. We report a case of Stevens Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis developing in an elderly male who was prescribed thalidomide after being diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:25298592

  3. Stevens-Johnson syndrome following use of metronidazole in a dental patient

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Goutameswar; Shome, Koushik

    2014-01-01

    Metronidazole alone rarely causes Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). We present a case of an elderly male patient who, following metronidazole use, developed neurological symptoms followed by pain and blisters on both soles, erythema of face and neck, scrotal itching and erosion, and hemorrhagic encrustation around the lips and oral mucous membrane. Initial neurological symptoms followed by mucocutaneous manifestation of SJS following metronidazole use is probably a new presentation of this case. PMID:24550598

  4. Stevens-Johnson syndrome following use of metronidazole in a dental patient.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Goutameswar; Shome, Koushik

    2014-01-01

    Metronidazole alone rarely causes Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). We present a case of an elderly male patient who, following metronidazole use, developed neurological symptoms followed by pain and blisters on both soles, erythema of face and neck, scrotal itching and erosion, and hemorrhagic encrustation around the lips and oral mucous membrane. Initial neurological symptoms followed by mucocutaneous manifestation of SJS following metronidazole use is probably a new presentation of this case. PMID:24550598

  5. Combination of Steven-Johnson syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome following carbamazepine therapy: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhawna; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki; Gandhi, Pankaj; Dubey, Parul; Panagariya, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe, episodic, acute mucocutaneous reaction that is most often elicited by drugs and occasionally by infections. The drugs commonly implicated as the cause of SJS are anticonvulsants, sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Carbamazepine (CBZ) has been commonly implicated in SJS. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare, life-threatening but potentially treatable condition. Among the neuroleptics, haloperidol (parenteral) is implicated as a most common drug for NMS. Though rare, association of NMS with CBZ and association of NMS with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in a single patient after administration of neuroleptics has been reported in the literature before. However, a combination of NMS and SJS in a single patient after administration of CBZ has not been reported so far. We present a patient with seizure who developed SJS and NMS following administration of CBZ. PMID:23761563

  6. A Novel Technique for Amniotic Membrane Transplantation in Patients with Acute Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kelly N; Thanos, Aristomenis; Chodosh, James; Shah, Ankoor S; Mantagos, Iason S

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreserved amniotic membrane (AM) transplantation is an emerging technique that is becoming the gold standard for the management of acute Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and its more severe variant, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). We describe a novel surgical technique utilizing a single, large sheet of AM (5 x 10 cm) and a custom-made forniceal ring, which facilitates AM placement. Our technique is easy to use and minimizes suturing and manipulation of ocular tissues, resulting in decreased operative time. This technique may be applied in the management of multiple ocular surface disease processes, including chemical or thermal burns, severe ocular graft versus host disease (GVHD), and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:26387869

  7. Erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin

    SciTech Connect

    Delattre, J.Y.; Safai, B.; Posner, J.B.

    1988-02-01

    In 15 months we encountered eight patients with intracranial tumors who developed erythema multiforme (EM) or erythema multiforme bullosa (Stevens-Johnson syndrome). All occurred shortly after use of phenytoin (DPH) and brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The clinical picture differed from the classic form of EM in that the erythema began on the scalp and spread to the extremities, progressing in three cases to extensive bullous formation. There were no cases of EM among patients who received either DPH or radiotherapy alone. The combination of DPH, WBRT, and tapering of steroids seems to predispose to EM. The pathogenesis of the disorder is probably immunologic. In the absence of seizures, anticonvulsants should not be given routinely to patients with brain tumors. When anticonvulsants are necessary in patients scheduled for WBRT, DPH may not be the drug of choice.

  8. [Stevens-Johnson syndrome induced by regorafenib in a patient with progressive recurrent rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Mihara, Yutaro; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Nakama, Takekuni; Nakayama, Goichi; Kamei, Hideki; Ishibashi, Nobuya; Uchida, Shinji; Akagi, Yoshito; Ogata, Yutaka

    2015-02-01

    A 55-year-old man with rectal carcinoma underwent lower anterior resection. Eight years after surgery, multiple metastases were detected in the liver, lung, and abdominal lymph nodes. The metastatic cancers were resistant to standard chemotherapy. Thus, regorafenib was administered to the patient. The patient presented symptoms of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) nine days after regorafenib administration, and hence, treatment was terminated. To treat SJS, he received oral and topical steroid therapies. SJS is an important adverse event that hinders the continuation of regorafenib treatment. Thus, it is necessary to continually check the patient's skin condition carefully, especially at early stages of treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of SJS arising during the course of regorafenib treatment. PMID:25743146

  9. [News in severe clinical adverse drug reactions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN)].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cabriales, Sylvia Aide; Gómez-Flores, Minerva; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are life-threatening conditions associated with significant morbidity and mortality. They are considered to be part of a spectrum of cutaneous drug reactions, differing only by their extent of skin detachment due to keratinocyte apoptosis. Drugs are assumed as the main cause of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in most cases. The pathophysiology is incompletely understood; however, current pathogenic models involve Fas ligand, granulysin, and cytokines. Diagnosis relies mainly on clinical signs together with the histological analysis, and treatment requires early cessation of the causative drug and supportive care. Of these conditions, herein we will review the advances in clinical, pathogenesis, and management. PMID:26581536

  10. Ibuprofen induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome - toxic epidermal necrolysis in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Angadi, Siddheshwar S; Karn, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that any drug can be an impending cause of hypersensitivity reactions, Ibuprofen, an over-the-counter drug used extensively as an analgesic and antipyretic in Asia, is considered to be relatively safe. But herein we report a rare extremely 'rapid onset' occurrence of a severe case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in a 22-year-old male, induced by 3 doses of 400 mg of Ibuprofen taken at 8-hour interval for eye pain, probably the first case report of rapid onset of TEN by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in Nepal. SJS and TEN are idiosyncratic, delayed hypersensitivity inflammatory adverse drug reactions that are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions which predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes and are linked with high morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, removal of ibuprofen and its metabolites with plasma exchange and treatment with antibiotics and intravenous corticosteroids along with supportive therapy improved the course of the disorder. This rare case report addresses the fact that severe hypersensitivity reactions can occur with Ibuprofen, which can be potentially dangerous and life threatening. It is thus important for the clinicians to be alert to such severe hypersensitivity reactions even with drugs which are deemed to be probably safe. PMID:26844223

  11. Data Mining FAERS to Analyze Molecular Targets of Drugs Highly Associated with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Keith K; Abernethy, Darrell; Jackson, David

    2015-06-01

    Drug features that are associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) have not been fully characterized. A molecular target analysis of the drugs associated with SJS in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) may contribute to mechanistic insights into SJS pathophysiology. The publicly available version of FAERS was analyzed to identify disproportionality among the molecular targets, metabolizing enzymes, and transporters for drugs associated with SJS. The FAERS in-house version was also analyzed for an internal comparison of the drugs most highly associated with SJS. Cyclooxygenases 1 and 2, carbonic anhydrase 2, and sodium channel 2 alpha were identified as disproportionately associated with SJS. Cytochrome P450 (CYPs) 3A4 and 2C9 are disproportionately represented as metabolizing enzymes of the drugs associated with SJS adverse event reports. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1), organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), and PEPT2 were also identified and are highly associated with the transport of these drugs. A detailed review of the molecular targets identifies important roles for these targets in immune response. The association with CYP metabolizing enzymes suggests that reactive metabolites and oxidative stress may have a contributory role. Drug transporters may enhance intracellular tissue concentrations and also have vital physiologic roles that impact keratinocyte proliferation and survival. Data mining FAERS may be used to hypothesize mechanisms for adverse drug events by identifying molecular targets that are highly associated with drug-induced adverse events. The information gained may contribute to systems biology disease models. PMID:25876064

  12. Ibuprofen induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome - toxic epidermal necrolysis in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Angadi, Siddheshwar S

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that any drug can be an impending cause of hypersensitivity reactions, Ibuprofen, an over-the-counter drug used extensively as an analgesic and antipyretic in Asia, is considered to be relatively safe. But herein we report a rare extremely 'rapid onset' occurrence of a severe case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in a 22-year-old male, induced by 3 doses of 400 mg of Ibuprofen taken at 8-hour interval for eye pain, probably the first case report of rapid onset of TEN by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in Nepal. SJS and TEN are idiosyncratic, delayed hypersensitivity inflammatory adverse drug reactions that are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions which predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes and are linked with high morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, removal of ibuprofen and its metabolites with plasma exchange and treatment with antibiotics and intravenous corticosteroids along with supportive therapy improved the course of the disorder. This rare case report addresses the fact that severe hypersensitivity reactions can occur with Ibuprofen, which can be potentially dangerous and life threatening. It is thus important for the clinicians to be alert to such severe hypersensitivity reactions even with drugs which are deemed to be probably safe. PMID:26844223

  13. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis - A Comprehensive Review and Guide to Therapy. I. Systemic Disease.

    PubMed

    Kohanim, Sahar; Palioura, Sotiria; Saeed, Hajirah N; Akpek, Esen K; Amescua, Guillermo; Basu, Sayan; Blomquist, Preston H; Bouchard, Charles S; Dart, John K; Gai, Xiaowu; Gomes, José A P; Gregory, Darren G; Iyer, Geetha; Jacobs, Deborah S; Johnson, Anthony J; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Mantagos, Iason S; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Perez, Victor L; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Sangwan, Virender S; Sippel, Kimberly C; Sotozono, Chie; Srinivasan, Bhaskar; Tan, Donald T H; Tandon, Radhika; Tseng, Scheffer C G; Ueta, Mayumi; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The intent of this review is to comprehensively appraise the state of the art with regard to Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), with particular attention to the ocular surface complications and their management. SJS and TEN represent two ends of a spectrum of immune-mediated, dermatobullous disease, characterized in the acute phase by a febrile illness followed by skin and mucous membrane necrosis and detachment. The widespread keratinocyte death seen in SJS/TEN is rapid and irreversible, and even with early and aggressive intervention, morbidity is severe and mortality not uncommon. We have divided this review into two parts. Part I summarizes the epidemiology and immunopathogenesis of SJS/TEN and discusses systemic therapy and its possible benefits. We hope this review will help the ophthalmologist better understand the mechanisms of disease in SJS/TEN and enhance their care of patients with this complex and often debilitating disease. Part II (April 2016 issue) will focus on ophthalmic manifestations. PMID:26549248

  14. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Associated with Drugs and Vaccines in Children: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Raucci, Umberto; Rossi, Rossella; Da Cas, Roberto; Rafaniello, Concita; Mores, Nadia; Bersani, Giulia; Reale, Antonino; Pirozzi, Nicola; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Traversa, Giuseppe; in Drug and Children, Italian Multicenter Study Group for Vaccine Safety

    2013-01-01

    Objective Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is one of the most severe muco-cutaneous diseases and its occurrence is often attributed to drug use. The aim of the present study is to quantify the risk of SJS in association with drug and vaccine use in children. Methods A multicenter surveillance of children hospitalized through the emergency departments for acute conditions of interest is currently ongoing in Italy. Cases with a diagnosis of SJS were retrieved from all admissions. Parents were interviewed on child’s use of drugs and vaccines preceding the onset of symptoms that led to the hospitalization. We compared the use of drugs and vaccines in cases with the corresponding use in a control group of children hospitalized for acute neurological conditions. Results Twenty-nine children with a diagnosis of SJS and 1,362 with neurological disorders were hospitalized between 1st November 1999 and 31st October 2012. Cases were more frequently exposed to drugs (79% vs 58% in the control group; adjusted OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0–6.1). Anticonvulsants presented the highest adjusted OR: 26.8 (95% CI 8.4–86.0). Significantly elevated risks were also estimated for antibiotics use (adjusted OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.5–7.2), corticosteroids (adjusted OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.8–9.9) and paracetamol (adjusted OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.5–6.9). No increased risk was estimated for vaccines (adjusted OR: 0.9; 95% CI 0.3–2.8). Discussion Our study provides additional evidence on the etiologic role of drugs and vaccines in the occurrence of SJS in children. PMID:23874553

  15. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcome of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis

    PubMed Central

    CHANTAPHAKUL, HIROSHI; SANON, THANOMSAK; KLAEWSONGKRAM, JETTANONG

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are erythematous skin lesions with blister formation accompanied by mucosal involvement. These conditions are considered to be life-threatening illnesses. Understanding the clinical presentation, risk factors, treatment options and results will be advantageous for physicians in the management of patients in the future. The aim of the present study was to review and analyze the clinical manifestations, drug implications, treatment and outcome of patients with SJS and/or TEN who had been hospitalized in a tertiary care center. All hospitalized patients with SJS and/or TEN during a 5-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical severity was graded according to the score of toxic epidermal necrolysis (SCORTEN) scale. Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, possible precipitating factors, management and outcome data were collected for analysis. A total of 43 patients (mean age, 49.5 years) were hospitalized and classified into the SJS group (55.8%), SJS/TEN overlap group (20.9%) and TEN group (23.3%). The majority of the patients (90.7%) had mucocutaneous eruptions associated with oral drug administration. Allopurinol, anticonvulsants and antibiotics were the most common causative agents for the mucocutaneous eruption. Twenty-eight patients (65.1%) were treated with corticosteroids. The mortality rate was 6.9%. Comparison between the survival group and the non-survival group revealed that patient age >70 years (P=0.014) and body surface area involvement >20% (P<0.01) were the significant factors associated with mortality. The use of systemic steroids was higher in the survival group in comparison with the non-survival group (65.1 vs. 0%, respectively; P=0.014). The mucocutaneous eruptions in SJS and TEN are mostly caused by medication. With early recognition and treatment, the mortality rate in this study was lower than that in previous reports. Patient age and the area of mucocutaneous involvement were significant factors associated with mortality. PMID:26622347

  16. Fuchs' syndrome (Stevens-Johnson syndrome without skin involvement) in an adult male--a case report and general characteristics of the sporadically diagnosed disease.

    PubMed

    Šternberský, Jan; Tichý, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fuchs' syndrome (Stevens-Johnson syndrome without skin involvement) is a sporadically diagnosed disease. Most authors consider it to be a pure mucosal variant of Stevens-Johnson syndrome; however, some consider the syndrome a separate entity. The complete absence of cutaneous symptoms may be the reason that not all cases of Fuchs' syndrome are diagnosed and properly classified. The authors describe a case of a 22-year-old patient suffering only from mucosal symptoms, diagnosed as Fuchs' syndrome from the context of the tests performed. A Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection triggered the disease onset. Mycoplasma infection, as a trigger factor of Fuchs' syndrome in adults, has so far been described in only a few isolated cases worldwide. PMID:25580788

  17. The Amnion Doughnut: A Novel Method for Sutureless Fixation of Amniotic Membrane to the Bulbar and Palpebral Conjunctiva in Acute Ocular-Involving Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pruet, Christopher M.; Queen, Joanna H.; Kim, Gene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel surgical method for sutureless placement of amniotic membrane on the bulbar and palpebral conjunctiva in the setting of ocular-involving acute Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Methods Six days into an acute Stevens-Johnson episode, a 27-year-old male developed early symblepharon, despite aggressive lubrication and topical steroid therapy. He underwent symblepharon lysis and placement of an amniotic membrane wrapped around a symblepharon ring. Results The patient maintained 20/20 vision in each eye with no recurrent symblepharon formation except for the temporal canthus (which was not covered with amniotic membrane). Conclusion Amniotic-membrane-wrapped symblepharon rings provide a sutureless way to fixate amniotic membrane to the bulbar and palpebral conjunctiva with very good anatomic and functional outcomes in an acute Stevens-Johnson patient. Future research could be directed towards development of a symblepharon ring able to better protect the far temporal conjunctiva. PMID:25222004

  18. Carbamazepine, HLA-B*1502 and risk of Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: US FDA recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, P Brent; McLeod, Howard L

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the USA FDA has made a labeling change to the drug information contained in carbamazepine. Owing to recent data implicating the HLA allele B*1502 as a marker for carbamazepine-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Han Chinese, the FDA recommends genotyping all Asians for the allele. This allele is seen in high frequency in many Asian populations other than Han Chinese, but there are few data on whether the allele is a marker for this severe outcome in anyone other than Han Chinese. In fact, the association has not been found in Caucasian patients. We review the data that prompted this recommendation, list data for other ethnic groups, both Asian and non-Asian, and briefly discuss the implication of this recommendation for clinical practice. PMID:18855540

  19. Stevens Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Maternal and Foetal Outcomes in Twenty-Two Consecutive Pregnant HIV Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Lauren; Todd, Gail; Muloiwa, Rudzani; Matjila, Mushi; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) form a spectrum of a rare and life-threatening cutaneous drug reaction. SJS/TEN in pregnancy poses largely unknown risk factors and outcomes for both the mother and foetus compared to the general population. Methods We conducted a study of consecutive pregnant women admitted to single tertiary referral centre in South Africa with SJS/TEN over a 3 year period. They were all managed by the same medical team using the same protocols. We evaluated their underlying illnesses, offending drugs and the course of pregnancy and outcomes to determine factors influencing maternal and foetal outcomes. Results We identified twenty-two women who developed SJS/TEN while pregnant, all of them HIV-infected. Their median age was 29 years. The majority 16/22 (73%) had SJS, the milder variant of the disease affecting < 10% body surface area. Nevirapine was the offending drug in 21/22 (95%) cases. All 22 of the mothers survived with 3/22 (14%) developing postpartum sepsis. Pregnancy outcomes were known in 18/22 women and 9/18 (50%) babies were delivered by caesarean section. There were 2 foetal deaths at 21 and 31 weeks respectively and both were associated with post-partum sepsis. Postnatal complications occurred in 5 cases, 3 involving the respiratory system and the other two being low birth weight deliveries. Eight placentae and one foetus were sent for histology and none showed macroscopic or microscopic features of SJS/TEN. On follow-up, only 12/20 children were tested for HIV at 6 weeks post-delivery and none of them were HIV-infected. All had received prophylactic ARVs including nevirapine. Conclusions TEN, the severe form of the disease, was associated with poorer foetal outcomes. SJS/TEN-associated mortality is not increased in HIV-infected pregnant women. Maternal SJS/TEN does not seem to commonly manifest in the foetus. PMID:26267659

  20. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN): could retinoids play a causative role?

    PubMed

    Mawson, Anthony R; Eriator, Ike; Karre, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are overlapping manifestations on a spectrum of acute drug-induced conditions associated with severe blistering, skin peeling, and multi-organ damage. TEN is an eruption resembling severe scalding, with ≥30% skin detachment. SJS is a mild form of TEN, characterized histologically by epidermal keratinocyte apoptosis with dermo-epidermal separation and extensive small blisters with <10% body surface skin detachment. The syndrome can be induced by numerous medications and typically occurs 1-4 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Granulysin is found in the lesions of patients with SJS/TEN and plays a significant pathogenic role in the condition, but the overall mechanisms linking medications, granulysin, and disease manifestations remain obscure. This paper reviews evidence suggesting that the different medications implicated in SJS/TEN have the common property of interacting and synergizing with endogenous retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners), in many instances causing the latter to accumulate in and damage the liver, the main storage organ for vitamin A. It is hypothesized that liver damage leads to the spillage of toxic retinoid compounds into the circulation, resulting in an endogenous form of hypervitaminosis A and cytotoxicity with widespread apoptosis, mediated by granulysin and recognized as SJS/TEN. Subject to testing, the model suggests that symptom worsening could be arrested at onset by lowering the concentration of circulating retinoids and/or granulysin via phlebotomy or plasmapheresis or by pharmacological measures to limit their expression. PMID:25579087

  1. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN): Could Retinoids Play a Causative Role?

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, Anthony R.; Eriator, Ike; Karre, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are overlapping manifestations on a spectrum of acute drug-induced conditions associated with severe blistering, skin peeling, and multi-organ damage. TEN is an eruption resembling severe scalding, with ≥30% skin detachment. SJS is a mild form of TEN, characterized histologically by epidermal keratinocyte apoptosis with dermo-epidermal separation and extensive small blisters with <10% body surface skin detachment. The syndrome can be induced by numerous medications and typically occurs 1–4 weeks after the initiation of therapy. Granulysin is found in the lesions of patients with SJS/TEN and plays a significant pathogenic role in the condition, but the overall mechanisms linking medications, granulysin, and disease manifestations remain obscure. This paper reviews evidence suggesting that the different medications implicated in SJS/TEN have the common property of interacting and synergizing with endogenous retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners), in many instances causing the latter to accumulate in and damage the liver, the main storage organ for vitamin A. It is hypothesized that liver damage leads to the spillage of toxic retinoid compounds into the circulation, resulting in an endogenous form of hypervitaminosis A and cytotoxicity with widespread apoptosis, mediated by granulysin and recognized as SJS/TEN. Subject to testing, the model suggests that symptom worsening could be arrested at onset by lowering the concentration of circulating retinoids and/or granulysin via phlebotomy or plasmapheresis or by pharmacological measures to limit their expression. PMID:25579087

  2. Stevens Johnson Syndrome-Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Secondary to Interaction Between Methotrexate and Etoricoxib: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, HV; Mounika, Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease affecting about 1% of people, with the highest incidence between 40 and 70 years. Methotrexate is an anti-folate analogue that has good efficacy and safety in the treatment of RA. Methotrexate (MTX) and non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs are often concomitantly administered in clinical practice for the treatment of RA. In this case report, a 57-year-old female was treated with oral methotrexate 7.5 mg per week for a diagnosed case of RA. Since her pain persisted after completing six weeks of treatment with methotrexate, oral etoricoxib 60 mg once daily was added to the treatment regimen. Six weeks later, the patient complained of oral ulcerations and blisters on all fours limbs and trunk. The patient was re-evaluated and was diagnosed with Stevens-Johnson syndrome-Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS-TEN) overlap. This case highlights the possible pharmacokinetic interaction between methotrexate and etoricoxib that has a significant clinical implication. PMID:26417551

  3. Boston type 1 based keratoprosthesis (Auro Kpro) and its modification (LVP Kpro) in chronic Stevens Johnson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sayan; Sureka, Shraddha; Shukla, Rashmi; Sangwan, Virender

    2014-01-01

    Two young women with completely dry and keratinised eyes post-Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) underwent unilateral oral mucous membrane grafts (MMGs) in preparation for modified osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis (MOOKP) implantation. In both cases, the mucosal graft was deemed to be too tight to accommodate the MOOKP implant. Instead of proceeding with MOOKP, the first patient underwent Auro Kpro (Boston type 1-based keratoprosthesis) implantation under the MMG, while the second patient underwent implantation of a modification of Auro Kpro with a longer optical stem (LVP Kpro) exposed through the MMG. Both patients maintained a visual acuity of 20/20, N6 at 15 months post-implantation. The first patient needed repeated mucosal trimming because of mucosal overgrowth; while in the second patient, mucosal overgrowth did not occur. This report highlights the innovative and successful use of Boston type 1-based keratoprosthesis (Auro Kpro) and its modification (LVP Kpro) in completely dry and keratinised post-SJS eyes. PMID:24663249

  4. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia from 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Suwarsa, Oki; Dharmadji, Hartati Purbo; Sutedja, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) with high mortality and have a significant public health impact because of high mortality and morbidity. Objective To describe data the epidemiological features, etiology, and treatment of retrospectively reviewed data of all patients with SJS and TEN. Methods Retrospective study was conducted in patients with SJS and TEN treated from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia. Results A total of 57 patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-nine cases of SJS (21 males and 18 females), 7 cases of SJS overlapping TEN (4 males and 3 females), and 11 cases of TEN (5 males and 6 females) were reported. All cases of SJS and TEN were caused by drugs, such as paracetamol (16.56%), carbamazepine (7%), amoxicillin (5.73%), ibuprofen (4.46%), rifampicin (3.18%), and trihexyphenidyl (3.18%). All cases were treated systemically with corticosteroid alone (100%). Seven from 57 patients (12,28%) died; 5 cases developed sepsis and 2 cases developed respiratory failure. The mortality rate was 7.69% in SJS, 0% in SJS/TEN overlap, and 36.36% in TEN. Conclusion The role of systemic corticosteroids in SJS and TEN are still controversial, but with a prompt and earlier treatment reduces mortality and improves outcomes of SJS and TEN patients. PMID:26844219

  5. Carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome treated with IV steroids and IVIG.

    PubMed

    Straussberg, R; Harel, L; Ben-Amitai, D; Cohen, D; Amir, J

    2000-03-01

    A 17-year-old female is presented who developed antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity syndrome after treatment with carbamazepine. The initial diagnoses were idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and toxic shock syndrome. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and intravenous steroids. After a severe climax on days 2-4 she recovered completely and was discharged on the eighth day of hospitalization. Although we do not have direct proof, we believe that these treatment modalities, especially the IVIG, shortened and ameliorated the clinical course of the disease. PMID:10734256

  6. In Silico Risk Assessment of HLA-A*02:06-Associated Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Caused by Cold Medicine Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Isogai, Hideto; Miyadera, Hiroko; Ueta, Mayumi; Sotozono, Chie; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe drug hypersensitivities with high mortality. Typical over-the-counter drugs of cold medicines are suggested to be causative. As multiple ingredients are generally contained in cold medicines, it is of particular interest to investigate which ingredients are responsible for SJS/TEN. However, experimental examination of causal relationships between SJS/TEN and a particular drug molecule is not straightforward. Significant association between HLA-A*02:06 and SJS/TEN with severe ocular surface complications has been observed in the Japanese. In the present study, we have undertaken in silico docking simulations between various ingredients contained in cold medicines available in Japan and the HLA-A*02:06 molecule. We use the composite risk index (CRI) that is the absolute value of the binding affinity multiplied by the daily dose to assess the potential risk of the adverse reactions. The drugs which have been recognized as causative drugs of SJS/TEN in Japan have revealed relatively high CRI, and the association between SJS/TEN and HLA-A*02:06 has been qualitatively verified. The results have also shown that some drugs whose links to SJS/TEN have not been clinically recognized in Japan show the high CRI and suggested that attention should be paid to their adverse drug reactions. PMID:24285954

  7. Role of Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress in Pathophysiology of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and Stevens Johnson Syndrome—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Dincy; Amirtharaj, G Jayakumar; Mathew, Teena; Pulimood, Susanne; Ramachandran, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative and nitrosative stress caused by drug metabolism may be a trigger for keratinocyte apoptosis in the epidermis seen in toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS). Aims: To estimate oxidative damage in the serum and to examine the role of nitric oxide in mediating epidermal damage in patients with TEN and SJS. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted among TEN and SJS patients and controls in a tertiary care center between January 2006 and February 2010. Patients with a maculopapular drug rash without detachment of skin constituted the control group 1 (drug exposed). Patients without a drug rash constituted the control group 2 (drug unexposed). The serum values of protein carbonyls, malondialdehyde, conjugated diene and nitrates were measured. Two-group comparison with the non-parametric Mann–Whitney U test was used. Significance of differences if any was established using Pearson's Chi-square test. Results: Ten patients in the SJS-TEN group (study group), 8 patients in control group 1 and 7 patients in control group 2 were included. More than one drug was implicated in 4/10 patients in group 1 and 3/8 patients in group 2. SCORTEN of 0, 1 and 3 at admission were seen in 2, 6 and 2 patients, respectively. The serum values of protein carbonyls, malondialdehyde, conjugated diene and nitrates were not significantly increased in the study group when compared to the controls. Conclusions: There was no elevation of oxidative stress markers in patients with TEN and SJS as compared to the control population. PMID:26538686

  8. Carbamazepine-Induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Sparing the Skin Previously Affected by Herpes Zoster Infection in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Reverse Isotopic Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Tenea, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The reverse isotopic response is a rarely encountered phenomenon. The spared lesions are various and mainly inflammatory in nature, with herpes zoster infection being the most common. A novel case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome triggered by carbamazepine sparing the skin area previously affected by herpes zoster infection in a 39-year-old Indian female with systemic lupus erythematosus is documented. Several features as well as possible pathomechanisms that bear discussion have emerged from this case documentation. These may be related to the virus immunity, the underlying autoimmune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus) and/or drug metabolism. PMID:21076686

  9. Outbreak of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated With Mebendazole and Metronidazole Use Among Filipino Laborers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kow-Tong; Twu, Shiing-Jer; Chang, Hong-Jen; Lin, Ruey-Shiung

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study sought to identify the risk factors associated with an outbreak of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) among Filipino laborers in Taiwan. Methods. Forty-six SJS/TEN patients were matched to 92 controls according to month of arrival in Taiwan, sex, and age. Results. The odds ratio for development of SJS/TEN was 9.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.9, 23.9) among workers who had used both metronidazole and mebendazole sometime in the preceding 6 weeks. In addition, a gradient increase in the occurrence of SJS/TEN was found with an increasing level of exposure to metronidazole. Conclusions. This outbreak highlights the risk of SJS/TEN resulting from the use of both metronidazole and mebendazole and the need for control measures. PMID:12604501

  10. Skin rash in the intensive care unit: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, or a rare manifestation of a hidden cutaneous malignancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    AL-SAFFAR, FARAH; IBRAHIM, SAIF; PATEL, PUJAN; JACOB, RAFIK; PALACIO, CARLOS; CURY, JAMES

    2016-01-01

    Skin rashes are infrequently encountered in the intensive care units, either as a result or as a cause of admission. The entities of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) form a spectrum of desquamating skin diseases that have multiple etiologies, the most common being drug-related reactions; very rarely, the cause may be cutaneous malignancies. We herein present a unique case of a 54-year-old male patient with psoriasis treated with methotrexate, who presented with a cellulitis-like clinical picture, then developed a severe progressive systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and progressed clinically to SJS, then TEN even after discontinuing the antibiotics and methotrexate. A skin biopsy demonstrated an aggressive and rapidly-progressing T-cell lymphoma. The present case highlights the necessity of skin biopsy when encountering SJS and TEN in the ICU in order to identify potentially treatable/controllable causes. Although it appeared reasonable to correlate TEN solely to medications, the skin biopsies clearly demonstrated an aggressive T-cell skin lymphoma. In a patient with a better general condition it may have been helpful to treat this malignancy. TEN is a life-threatening condition and skin biopsy is the cornerstone of diagnosis, despite the presence of multiple risk factors and the typical physical findings of a drug-induced reaction.

  11. Severe delayed skin reactions related to drugs in the paediatric age group: A review of the subject by way of three cases (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and DRESS).

    PubMed

    Belver, M T; Michavila, A; Bobolea, I; Feito, M; Bellón, T; Quirce, S

    2016-01-01

    Severe delayed drug-induced skin reactions in children are not common but potentially serious. This article describes aspects concerning the etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of these processes; it presents three paediatric cases, namely STS (Steven Johnson Syndrome), TEN (toxic epidermal necrolysis), probably related to amoxicillin/clavulanate and ibuprofen and DRESS (a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) secondary to phenytoin; and in relation to them, the diagnosis and the treatment of these processes are discussed and reviewed. The AGEP (acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis) is also reviewed. The aetiological diagnosis of severe non-immediate reactions is difficult, and the value of current allergological testing is not well defined in these cases. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the empirical risk of drugs to trigger SJS/TEN or DRESS, and the in vivo and in vitro testing of the suspect drug. Skin biopsy confirms that the clinical diagnosis and delayed hypersensitivity tests, especially the patch test and the lymphoblastic transformation test (LTT), may be important to confirm the aetiological diagnosis, in our cases emphasising the latter. These diseases can be life threatening (especially DRESS and TEN) and/or have a high rate of major complications or sequelae (SJS/TEN). The three cases described progressed well without sequelae. All were treated with corticosteroids, which is the most currently accepted treatment although the effect has not been clearly demonstrated. PMID:26089185

  12. Independent strong association of HLA-A*02:06 and HLA-B*44:03 with cold medicine-related Stevens-Johnson syndrome with severe mucosal involvement.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Mayumi; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Sotozono, Chie; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Saito, Yoshiro; Sawai, Hiromi; Miyadera, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Emiko; Maekawa, Keiko; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nagato, Masaki; Aihara, Michiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Furuya, Hirokazu; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Ikezawa, Zenrou; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and its severe variant, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), are acute inflammatory vesiculobullous reactions of the skin and mucous membranes. Cold medicines including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and multi-ingredient cold medications are reported to be important inciting drugs. We used two sample sets of Japanese patients to investigate the association between HLA genotypes and cold medicine-related SJS/TEN (CM-SJS/TEN), including acetaminophen-related SJS/TEN (AR-SJS/TEN) with severe mucosal involvement such as severe ocular surface complications (SOC). HLA-A*02:06 was strongly associated with CM-SJS/TEN with SOC and AR-SJS/TEN with SOC. HLA-B*44:03 was also detected as an independent risk allele for CM-, including AR-SJS/TEN with SOC. Analyses using data obtained from CM-SJS/TEN patients without SOC and patients with CM-unrelated SJS/TEN with SOC suggested that these two susceptibility alleles are involved in the development of only CM-SJS/TEN with SOC patients. PMID:24781922

  13. HLA-B*59:01: a marker for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by methazolamide in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Xuan, J; Chen, J; Zhong, H; Luo, H; Zhou, P; Sun, X; He, L; Chen, S; Cao, Z; Luo, X; Xing, Q

    2016-02-01

    Methazolamide is an intraocular pressure-lowering drug that is used in the treatment of glaucoma and other ophthalmologic abnormalities. The use of methazolamide has been shown to cause Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in patients of Asian ancestry. Methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN is associated with the presence of HLA-B59 serotype/HLA-B*59:01 in Korean and Japanese populations. To better understand the genetic risk factors for these adverse reactions in the Han Chinese population, we characterized the HLA class I genotypes of eight Chinese patients with methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN from 2008 to 2014. The frequency of HLA-B*59:01 was 87.5% (7/8) in the case patients, which was significantly different from 0% (0/30) in the methazolamide-tolerant patients (odds ratio (OR)=305.0; P=6.3 × 10(-7)) and 0.35% (1/283) in healthy subjects from the human major histocompatibility complex database (OR=1974.0; P=2.0 × 10(-12)). HLA-C*01:02, which is closely linked to HLA-B*59:01, had a weaker but notable association with methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN compared with the tolerant controls (OR=12.1; P=0.016) and general population (OR=15.5; P=2.0 × 10(-3)). The distribution of the HLA-B*59:01-C*01:02 haplotype was also significantly different in cases and controls. This study demonstrated a strong association between HLA-B*59:01 and methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN in the Han Chinese population for the first time. Pretherapy screening for HLA-B*59:01 would be useful to reduce the risk of methazolamide-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:25918017

  14. The epidemiology of ophthalmologic disease associated with erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis among hospitalized children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Jacqueline F.; Watson, R. Scott; Hartman, Mary E.; Linde-Zwirble, Walter T.; Ferris, Laura K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the epidemiology and resource use of US children hospitalized with ophthalmologic disease secondary to erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (EM/SJS/TEN) Methods We studied children ages 5–19 hospitalized in 2005 in 11 states, encompassing 38% of the US pediatric population. Using ICD-9-CM codes, we identified admissions with EM/SJS/TEN as well as presence of concurrent ophthalmologic disease, analyzed patient and hospitalization characteristics, and generated age- and sex-adjusted national estimates. Results We identified 460 admissions with EM/SJS/TEN, corresponding to 1,229 US hospitalizations in 2005. Among children with EM/SJS/TEN, 60 (13.0%) had ophthalmologic disease, primarily (90.0%) disorders of the conjunctiva. Children with the highest proportions of ophthalmologic disease included those with mycoplasma pneumonia (26.7%), herpes simplex virus (15.6%), upper respiratory infection (13.9%), and lower respiratory infection (13.7%). Compared to EM/SJS/TEN patients without ophthalmologic disease, those with ophthalmologic disease were more likely to receive ICU care (28.3% vs. 17.0%, p=.035) and to be admitted to a children’s hospital (63.3% vs. 48.8%, p=.035). Ophthalmologic disease was also associated with significantly higher median length of stay (6.0 [3, 9] days vs. 3.0 [2, 6] days, p<.001) and median hospital cost ($7,868 [$3,539, $17,440] vs. $2,969 [$1,603, $8,656], p<.001). Conclusions Among children with EM/SJS/TEN, ophthalmologic disease was most common in those with concurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae and herpes simplex virus infections. Ophthalmologic disease was associated with considerably higher inpatient resource use in this population. Children with EM/SJS/TEN should be screened and treated early for ophthalmologic disease to prevent morbidity and minimize long-term costs. PMID:23679157

  15. ABC Transporters and the Proteasome Complex Are Implicated in Susceptibility to Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis across Multiple Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, Paola; Bansal, Mukesh; Lefebvre, Celine; Guarnieri, Paolo; Shen, Yufeng; Pe’er, Itsik; Califano, Andrea; Floratos, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) represent rare but serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Both are characterized by distinctive blistering lesions and significant mortality rates. While there is evidence for strong drug-specific genetic predisposition related to HLA alleles, recent genome wide association studies (GWAS) on European and Asian populations have failed to identify genetic susceptibility alleles that are common across multiple drugs. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the low to moderate effect size of individual genetic risk factors. To test this hypothesis we developed Pointer, a new algorithm that assesses the aggregate effect of multiple low risk variants on a pathway using a gene set enrichment approach. A key advantage of our method is the capability to associate SNPs with genes by exploiting physical proximity as well as by using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that capture information about both cis- and trans-acting regulatory effects. We control for known bias-inducing aspects of enrichment based analyses, such as: 1) gene length, 2) gene set size, 3) presence of biologically related genes within the same linkage disequilibrium (LD) region, and, 4) genes shared among multiple gene sets. We applied this approach to publicly available SJS/TEN genome-wide genotype data and identified the ABC transporter and Proteasome pathways as potentially implicated in the genetic susceptibility of non-drug-specific SJS/TEN. We demonstrated that the innovative SNP-to-gene mapping phase of the method was essential in detecting the significant enrichment for those pathways. Analysis of an independent gene expression dataset provides supportive functional evidence for the involvement of Proteasome pathways in SJS/TEN cutaneous lesions. These results suggest that Pointer provides a useful framework for the integrative analysis of pharmacogenetic GWAS data, by increasing the power to detect aggregate effects of multiple low risk variants. The software is available for download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/pointergsa/. PMID:26110827

  16. Antecedent Drug Exposure Aetiology and Management Protocols in Steven-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, A Hospital Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Samina; Hassan, Iffat

    2016-01-01

    Aim The study sought to identify the magnitude and characteristic of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR’s) like Steven–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN). Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted by the Department of Pharmacology in association with Department of Dermatology in SMHS hospital. The study was carried out from June 2013-June 2015 on hospitalized cases of cutaneous adverse drug reaction reporting in hospital. The SCAR’s were reported in a structured questionnaire based on adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting form provided by the Central Drug Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) Ministry of Health and Family welfare, Government of India. The SCAR’s were analysed for their characteristics, causality, severity and prognosis. Causality assessment was done by using a validated ADR probability scale of Naranjo as well as WHO Uppsala Monitoring Center (WHO-UMC) system for standardized case causality assessment. The management protocol were analysed for their clinical outcome through a proper follow up period. Results A total of 52 hospitalized cases of cutaneous adverse drug reactions were reported during the study period. We identified a total of 15 cases (28%) of SCAR’s involving 9(17%) of SJS and 6 (12%) of TEN. SJS was seen in 2(22%) males and 7(78%) females. TEN was seen in all females (100%) and in no male. Drugs implicated in causing these life threatening reactions were identified as anticonvulsant agents like carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT) and Lamotrigine (LTG), oxicam NSAID, Sulfasalazine and levofloxacin. Despite higher reported mortality rates in SJS and TEN all patients survived with 2 patients surviving TEN suffered from long term opthalmological sequelae of the disease. Conclusion Present study suggest that drug induced cutaneous eruptions are common ranging from common nuisance rashes to rare life threatening diseases like SJS and TEN, SJS/TEN typically occur 1-3 weeks after initiation of therapy. Aromatic AED’s, LTG, oxicam NSAID’s, sulfasalazine and levofloxacin have a tremendous potential to trigger SCARS’s. To ensure safe use of pharmaceutical agents and better treatment outcomes post marketing voluntary reporting of severe rare and unusual reactions remains inevitable. PMID:26894082

  17. Innovation Squared: Comparison of Models by Tony Wagner and Steven Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, Tony Wagner's model of innovation differs from Steven Johnson's. One explores the following: how might we develop a nation of innovators? The other offers seven patterns that mark environments for innovation. Drawing from triangulated data, both authors create regularities (not laws) that have new paradigm, scientific credibility.…

  18. Complications of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2011-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of a family of genes called the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. The HLA complex helps the ... immune system ; infection ; inflammation ; inherited ; kidney ; kidney stones ; leukocyte ; mucous ; pharmacogenetics ; pharmacogenomics ; photophobia ; pigmentation ; pneumonia ; population ; risk ...

  20. Rare extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Kiran; Enright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons syndrome (SJS) is a rare extra-pulmonary complication of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. We present the case of a 26-year-old man with fever, cough, extensive oral mucosal ulceration and a widespread truncal rash. He was diagnosed with M. pneumoniae-induced SJS. He responded well to antibiotics and steroids initially, but went on to develop pseudomembranous conjunctivitis requiring bilateral amniotic membrane grafting.SJS is most commonly drug-induced, however, M. pneumoniae is the commonest infectious cause and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. It is also important to get specialist care involved early to minimise the long-term effects of any complications. PMID:26837942

  1. Complications of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhu, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder in the peripheral nervous system with a wide spectrum of complications. A good understanding of the complications of GBS assists clinicians to recognize and manage the complications properly thereby reducing the mortality and morbidity of GBS patients. Herein, we systemically review the literature on complications of GBS, including short-term complications and long-term complications. We summarize the frequency, severity, clinical manifestations, managements and possible mechanisms of different kinds of complications, and point out the flaws of current studies as well as demonstrate the further investigations needed. PMID:26642351

  2. [Pregnancy complicated by HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Belowska, Anna; Ulman-W?odarz, Izabela; Galbierz-Kwiatkowska, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    HELLP syndrome belongs to the group of pathological disorders associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension and may accompany preeclampsia. The basic criteria for establishing the diagnosis are as follows: H--for hemolysis, EL--for elevated liver enzymes and LP--for low platelets. In this report the authors present the case of a 32 years old primipara admitted to the Obstetrics Clinic complaining of epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting. Medical history revealed previously diagnosed and treated reflux disease. In the 39th week of gestation epigastric pain manifested again, blood pressure was high (150/100) and on the basis of laboratory parameters HELLP syndrome was diagnosed (GPT 319 U/L, GOT 204 U/L, platelet 80 x 10(9)/L, antithrombin III 63.9%, D-dimer (+++)). With this case report, authors wished to point out the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of this rare, but having high percentage of perinatal mortality syndrome. PMID:15884197

  3. Nocardia farcinica complicating Cogan's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merinopoulos, Dimos; Khan, Haroon; Ginwalla, Sara; Lane, Suzanne; Watts, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon bacterial gram-positive infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes in the genus Nocardia. Nocardiosis is typically regarded as an opportunistic infection with approximately two-thirds of infected patients being immunocompromised. In this case report we describe a 45-year-old female who presented with a right thigh abscess. She had been taking high-dose prednisolone and ciclosporin for Cogan's syndrome. She presented with erythema and severe pain over her right thigh. Ultrasound showed a collection and Nocardia farcinica was isolated. This case report stresses the importance of considering atypical infections in immunocompromised patients, even with minor symptoms, to avoid delay in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25988020

  4. Hypothalamic pituitary complications in Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naoko; Ihara, Kenji; Tsutsumi, Yasushi; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-06-01

    Kabuki syndrome is characterized by distinctive facial features, multiple anomalies and mental retardation. In this syndrome, structural CNS abnormalities are commonly observed, but congenital abnormalities in the pituitary gland or hypothalamus have rarely been reported. We searched the published medical literature on the complications in hypothalamic pituitary axis in this syndrome. As a result, only nine patients with Kabuki syndrome had been reported to have complications in hypothalamic pituitary axis in previous papers. Among the nine reported patients and one presented case in this report, GH deficiency was the most frequent complication and found in six patients. Precocious puberty and central diabetes insipidus (DI) was identified in two cases, respectively, and ACTH deficiency was found in one. One case had combination of GH deficiency and central DI. Three of the 10 patients demonstrated abnormal pituitary findings in MRI study. Two of the six patients with GH deficiency were accompanied with premature thelarche. This review highlights that patients with Kabuki syndrome could present various clinical manifestations due to abnormalities in hypothalamic pituitary axis. PMID:22434255

  5. Use of Cross-linked Donor Corneas as Carriers for the Boston Keratoprosthesis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-20

    Chemical Injuries; Unspecified Complication of Corneal Transplant; Autoimmune Diseases; Ocular Cicatricial Pemphigoid; Stevens Johnson Syndrome; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Other Autoimmune Diseases

  6. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  7. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis complicated by Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Kato, Masataka; Chou, Ami; Komori, Akiko; Abe, Yuriko; Matsumura, Masaharu; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Shori

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old girl with Down syndrome (DS) diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH). Although acute pneumonia complicated by hemolytic anemia was suspected, IPH was finally diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Treatment with prednisolone achieved good clinical response. An association between IPH and DS was not able to be identified, but immunological issues in DS may contribute to the onset of IPH. Recurrent and intractable respiratory symptoms with marked infiltrative shadows in the bilateral lungs and complicated by severe anemia in patients with DS should suggest IPH. PMID:26508184

  8. Teeth syndrome: diagnosis, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Boussen, Monia; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Teeth syndrome or fight bite is a specific entity in hand surgery that is little known. It includes infectious complications of the hand following a fist against the teeth. Neglected or misdiagnosed this injury frequently leads to serious complications that could compromise the function of the hand. A retrospective study was performed on 20 patients treated for teeth syndrome at our department, during a period of 12 years (January 2003 to April 2015). All young adults with a mean age of 28 years and a significant male predominance. The dominant side was involved in 15 patients. Lesions were divided into 4 cases of simple dorsal wounds facing the MP joint, 8 cases of dorsal hand cellulitis, and 8 cases of arthritis and osteoarthritis of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the long fingers. The index was the most affected finger. Treatment consisted in debridement of necrotic tissues, stabilization with external fixation for arthritis, skin reconstruction was performed secondarily. Result was assessed as good in 60% of cases. Clenched fist injuries to the mouth (teeth syndrome or fight bite) are known as being the worst human bites. Usually treated as minor injuries, without realizing a breach of the joint capsule, a lesion of the extensor tendon, or a contamination by oral flora. Any patient with a wound near the joint of the hand and was involved in a fight, need an appropriate evaluation and a specialized treatment to avoid serious complications. PMID:26834924

  9. Sleep apnea syndrome and its complications.

    PubMed

    Jurkovicová, Ingrid; Celec, Peter

    2004-05-01

    In this article we summarize the available information regarding the epidemiology, the pathophysiology as well as the risk factors and complications of the sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Central, obstructive and mixed forms of SAS are known, however, the obstructive form is (resulting from the actual high prevalence of obesity) definitely the most frequent. Latest years of experimental and clinical research have pointed towards the clinical importance of this sleep related breathing disorder. High prevalence in the population and especially the cardiovascular complications (e. g. systemic and pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis, arrhythmias) have contributed to the recent increase in knowledge about SAS. Nevertheless, there are numerous unsolved problems and unanswered questions in the pathophysiology of SAS. Future studies should, thus, provide us with more information and shed light on regarding the hidden mysteries of SAS. PMID:15359982

  10. Pregnancy complications of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tincani, A; Balestrieri, G; Danieli, E; Faden, D; Lojacono, A; Acaia, B; Trespidi, L; Ventura, D; Meroni, P L

    2003-02-01

    Starting from their first description, antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) were associated with repeated miscarriages and fetal losses. Other complications of pregnancy like preterm birth,with pre-eclampsia or severe placental insufficiency were also frequently reported and are included in the current classification criteria of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The titre, the isotype of the antibodies or their antigen specificity may be important in the risk level determination. Some of the difference in the reported results can be explained by the poor standardization achieved in aPL testing or by the not univocal classification of pregnancy complications. The pathogenesis of pregnancy failures is linked to the thrombophilic effect of aPL but also to different mechanisms including a direct effect of antibodies on the throphoblast differentiation and invasion. The study of experimental animal models provided sound evidence of the pathogenic role of aPL both in lupus prone and naive mice. The definition of APS as a condition linked to high obstetric risk and the application of an effective therapy have completely changed the prognosis of pregnancy in these patients. In fact, despite the high number of complications and preterm delivery, today a successful outcome can be achieved in the large majority of the cases. PMID:12765468

  11. Pregnancy complications in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Katulski, Krzysztof; Czyzyk, Adam; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Genazzani, Andrea R; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2015-02-01

    Infertility is a widely disputed problem affecting patients suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). As a serious dysfunction, it frequently occurs in PCOS patients. It is, therefore, important to devote more attention to pregnancy in PCOS sufferers. According to various data, the risk of miscarriage in PCOS women is three times higher than the risk of miscarriage in healthy women. Unfortunately, the risk of most frequent pregnancy pathologies is also higher for PCOS patients, as gestational diabetes (GD), pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia, and small for gestational age (SGA) children. Impaired glucose tolerance and GD in pregnant PCOS patients occur more frequently than in healthy women. A quadruple increase in the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension linked to arterial wall stiffness has also been observed in PCOS patients. The risk of pre-eclampsia, the most severe of all complications, is also four times higher in those suffering from PCOS. Pre-eclampsia is also more frequent in patients presenting additional risk factors accompanying PCOS, such as obesity or GD. At that point, it should be mentioned that PCOS patients are under 2.5 higher risk of giving birth to SGA children than healthy women. It appears that SGA can be linked to insulin resistance and insulin-dependent growth dysfunction. Therefore, PCOS pregnant women are patients of special obstetrical care. PMID:25356655

  12. Tapia's syndrome — a rare complication following cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nalladaru, Zubin; Wessels, Andre; DuPreez, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. It includes the extracranial involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the hypoglossal nerve and results in ipsilateral paralysis of the vocal cord and the tongue. It is usually a complication related to anaesthesia and positioning of the head of the patient during surgery. We describe this rare complication which occurred at our institute. A 49-year old man developed Tapia's syndrome after an uneventful coronary artery bypass surgery. He complained of dysphonia, hoarseness of voice and an inability to swallow soon after extubation. The syndrome resolved completely over the following weeks with no neurological deficit. PMID:22108947

  13. Congenital corneal staphyloma as a complication of Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryuma; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Uchida, Keiko; Sato, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Yoshihashi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takao; Tsubota, Kazuo; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2012-08-01

    Kabuki syndrome has long been clinically defined based mainly on its characteristic eye features. The recent discovery of MLL2 as a causative gene of Kabuki syndrome has enabled the extreme end of the phenotype to be explored. We herein report on two patients with striking visible congenital staphyloma at birth. A diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome was subsequently made in both patients based on a constellation of characteristic eye features, cardiac abnormalities and severe developmental delay, and finally by the confirmation of MLL2 mutations. In conclusion, congenital corneal staphyloma is a complication of Kabuki syndrome with MLL2 mutations. PMID:22786791

  14. Rothmund-Thomson syndrome complicated by osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Green, J S; Rickett, A B

    1998-01-01

    We describe the radiological features of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, a rare condition of autosomal recessive inheritance, which is commonly associated with a generalised skeletal dysplasia. The condition has an increased incidence of malignancy, which occasionally manifests in the musculoskeletal system. PMID:9426273

  15. Nutcracker Syndrome Complicated by Left Renal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Faouzi; Hmida, Wissem; Jaidane, Mehdi; Mama, Nadia; Mosbah, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Isolated renal vein thrombosis is a rare entity. We present a patient whose complaint of flank pain led to the diagnosis of a renal vein thrombosis. In this case, abdominal computed tomography angiography was helpful in diagnosing the nutcracker syndrome complicated by the renal vein thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started and three weeks later, CTA showed complete disappearance of the renal vein thrombosis. To treat the Nutcracker syndrome, we proposed left renal vein transposition that the patient consented to. PMID:24349817

  16. Fahr Syndrome Unknown Complication: Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tuglu, Devrim; Yuvanç, Ercan; Bal, Fatih; Türkel, Yakup; Da?, Ersel; Y?lmaz, Erdal; Batislam, Ertan

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient's medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome. PMID:25140274

  17. TRALI Syndrome Complicated by Retroperitoneal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay A.; Zeltsman, David

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underdiagnosed and underreported syndrome which by itself is the third leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The incidence of TRALI is reported to be 1 in 2000 to 5000 transfusions. When combined with uncontrollable bleeding, survival is unachievable. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, who underwent open heart surgery as an infant to correct his congenital heart disease in association with right pulmonary artery atresia. He presented with hemoptysis secondary to aspergilloma and required a pneumonectomy of the nonfunctional right lung. During pneumolysis, significant bleeding occurred from the superior vena cava. The patient required a blood transfusion and was placed on cardiopulmonary bypass to control the bleeding. Simultaneous occurrence of severe pulmonary edema and retroperitoneal bleeding were noted. Approximately 8 L of frothy edema fluid were drained from the only functional left lung starting ~15 minutes after the transfusion and lasting for several hours until the end of the case. It most likely represented TRALI syndrome. Increasing abdominal girth and poor volume return to the pump were consistent with and pathognomonic for retroperitoneal bleeding. Though primary surgical bleeding in the chest was controlled successfully and a pneumonectomy performed without further difficulty, we were unable to separate the patient from cardiopulmonary bypass due to the inability to oxygenate. As a result, we could not reverse the anti-coagulation which potentially exacerbated the retroperitoneal bleeding. After multiple unsuccessful attempts the patient succumbed. This ill-fated case demonstrates the quandary of obtaining vascular access for emergency cardiopulmonary bypass while in the right thoracotomy position. It may be beneficial to have both the femoral artery and vein cannulated before positioning a patient in a lateral decubitus position. In addition, early direct access to the right atrium may obviate a need for femoral venous cannulation. Also, adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may be indicated if faced with such a severe pulmonary edema without ongoing hemorrhage. PMID:22942633

  18. Gastrointestinal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, Peter H.; Murdoch, J. Lamont; Votteler, Theodore

    1969-01-01

    The gastrointestinal abnormalities encountered in 125 patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been described. Spontaneous perforation of the intestine and massive gastrointestinal haemorrhage are uncommon but potentially lethal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Less dangerous abnormalities, such `as external hernia, hiatus hernia, eventration of the diaphragm, intestinal diverticula, and rectal prolapse were all encountered in patients in the series. Abdominal surgery in affected patients may be made difficult by fragility of tissues and a bleeding tendency. In the postoperative period, tearing out of sutures and wound dehiscence may occur. PMID:5308459

  19. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome complicating staged corrective surgery for scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chee-Huan; Tzeng, Shiau-Tzu; Chen, Chiang-Sang; Chen, Po-Quang

    2007-02-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a rare complication following correction of scoliosis with either nonoperative or operative methods. If the patient diagnosed with this syndrome is not managed timely and adequately, mortality may result. We report two cases of SMAS complicating staged corrective surgery for scoliosis using modern segmental derotation instrumentation system. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical presentations, laboratory findings, radiologic features, and management of the syndrome. The first patient had the syndrome after two-staged scoliosis surgery with halo traction between two stages, and the second patient after three-staged scoliosis surgery with halo traction between the first and second surgeries. The first patient responded well to conservative treatment. However, the second patient failed to respond to conservative treatment and needed a gastrojejunostomy operation to bypass the duodenal obstruction. Clinicians treating post scoliosis surgery patients should always have a high index of suspicion for this potential life-threatening condition. Early diagnosis will enable a multidisciplinary team approach to be initiated early to provide optimal care for the patient. Nutritional and fluid supplementation is mandatory during conservative treatment. The duration for trial of conservative treatment should not exceed 1 week. PMID:17493895

  20. Grisel's syndrome: a rare complication following traditional uvulectomy

    PubMed Central

    Elyajouri, Abdelhakim; Assermouh, Abdellah; Abilkacem, Rachid; Agadr, Aomar; Mahraoui, Chafiq

    2015-01-01

    A case is reported of an eight-month-old female patient who had traditional uvulectomy for sore throat complicated by Grisel's syndrome. She was admitted into the hospital one week after uvulectomy with Torticolis. Grisel's syndrome is a nontraumatic atlantoaxial subluxation, usually secondary of an infection or an inflammation at the head and neck area, or after surgery in the same area. Patients typically suffer from painful torticollis. Diagnosis of Grisel's syndrome is largely based on suspicion of the patient who has recently undergone surgery or has a history of an infection in head and neck area. Physical examination and imaging techniques assist in diagnosis. Thus, clinicians should be aware of acute nontraumatic torticollis if patient had a recent surgery in the head or neck area or undergone an upper respiratory tract infection. In this paper, a case of an eight-month-old female patient who had Grisel's syndrome after uvulectomy is discussed. This case is reported to highlight this neurogical threatening complication following traditional uvulectomy as well as highlighting the unnecessary morbidity and mortality associated with this persisting mode of treatment in Africa. PMID:26090020

  1. [Rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: Horner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Abe, Yusuke; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Kondo, Akihide; Nonaka, Senshu; Ito, Masanori

    2008-10-01

    Horner syndrome due to injury to the cervical sympathetic trunk (CST) is a very rare complication of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). We have not mentioned the possibility of Horner syndrome as a postoperative complication in patients before surgery. We present a patient with Horner syndrome after ACDF and discuss the anatomical background of the CST and the causes and preventative measures against postoperative Homer syndrome. A 48-year-old man presented with disturbance of fine movement and reduction of grasping power in the right hand. MRI revealed osteophytes and a prolapsed disc compressing the spinal cord at C5-6 and C6-7. Two-level ACDF with inclusion of titan cages was performed via a right-sided exposure. Anisocoria (right > left) and right blepharoptosis were observed immediately after surgery. Postoperatively, disturbance of fine movement was resolved. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score improved from 12 to 16. Horner syndrome disappeared at 6 months after surgery. The CST runs 10-15 mm lateral to the medial edge of the longus colli muscle (LCM) and exists in the loose fascia and approaches most medially at C6. During the decompressive procedure under microscopic viewing, the right blade of a retractor was found to come out of the medial edge of the LCM on the level of C6. It is postulated that the blade injured the right CST. Knowledge of the anatomical relation between the CST and the LCM is very important to avoid Horner syndrome in ACDF. The tip of a retractor blade must be placed between the medial edge of the LCM and the vertebral body. PMID:18975569

  2. [Nephrotic Syndrome in Adult Patients--Etiology and Complications].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Harald; Fehr, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The nephrotic syndrome (NS) in adult patients is a rare entity. It is characterized by a tetrad consisting of edema, proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hypercholesterolemia. NS can be caused by intrinsic glomerular disorders or secondary damage to the glomerulus triggered by systemic diseases, infections or drugs. The responsibility of the primary care physician is to distinguish NS from other edematous disorders. Patients should be referred to a nephrologist for further diagnosis and treatment. NS is associated with various complications. Affected individuals are prone to infections and may suffer from thrombophilia, acute renal failure and Vitamin D deficiency. Immunosuppressive therapy of the underlying disorder may cause late onset complications such as skin cancer or urothelial carcinoma. Aside from causative therapy adequate management of these complications is crucial for the treatment of patients suffering from NS. PMID:26934010

  3. Persistent ductus arteriosus complicating the respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R W; Pickering, D

    1977-01-01

    Persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA) complicated the clinical course in 45 (15%) of 299 babies with the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) presenting over a 3-year period. The incidence of PDA complicating RDS rose with decreasing birthweight and was highest in babies with severe RDS as judged by the use of assisted ventilation. In babies with a birthweight of less than 1500 g, PDA occurred as a complication of RDS in 25% of cases. In babies who recieved intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) for management of RDS, the incidence of PDA was 35%. Overall mortality for babies with RDS was 17%; when PDA occurred as a complication mortality was 31%. In survivors, spontaneous closure of the PDA occurred in all except one infant. The development of signs of PDA in 19 babies either necessitated a renewal of IPPV or prevented "weaning" from IPPV or from continuous positive airways pressure. 9 (47%) of these babies died, 8 of them after the first week of life. The frequency of PDA complicating RDS and the relatively high mortality in this conservatively-treated group of babies is emphasized. The incidence reported here is likely to increase with the increased survival of very low birthweight infants with severe RDS. The high incidence of late deaths in babies who develop signs of PDA associated with an inability to wean from assisted ventilation suggests that early surgical ligation of the PDA in these babies should be considered. The results of a conservative approach to management of these infants are presented. PMID:324406

  4. Myhre syndrome: Clinical features and restrictive cardiopulmonary complications.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lois J; Grange, Dorothy K; Delaney, Jeffrey W; Yetman, Anji T; Hammel, James M; Sanmann, Jennifer N; Perry, Deborah A; Schaefer, G Bradley; Olney, Ann Haskins

    2015-12-01

    Myhre syndrome, a connective tissue disorder characterized by deafness, restricted joint movement, compact body habitus, and distinctive craniofacial and skeletal features, is caused by heterozygous mutations in SMAD4. Cardiac manifestations reported to date have included patent ductus arteriosus, septal defects, aortic coarctation and pericarditis. We present five previously unreported patients with Myhre syndrome. Despite varied clinical phenotypes all had significant cardiac and/or pulmonary pathology and abnormal wound healing. Included herein is the first report of cardiac transplantation in patients with Myhre syndrome. A progressive and markedly abnormal fibroproliferative response to surgical intervention is a newly delineated complication that occurred in all patients and contributes to our understanding of the natural history of this disorder. We recommend routine cardiopulmonary surveillance for patients with Myhre syndrome. Surgical intervention should be approached with extreme caution and with as little invasion as possible as the propensity to develop fibrosis/scar tissue is dramatic and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26420300

  5. Locus coeruleus syndrome as a complication of tectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kronenburg, Annick; Spliet, Wim G; Broekman, Marike; Robe, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent a resection of a tectal pilocytic astrocytoma complicated by a sequence of fluctuating consciousness, psychosis with complex hallucinations and lasting sleeping disturbances in which she vividly acts out her dreams. Based on the clinical and anatomical evidence of this case, we propose the term locus coeruleus syndrome to describe this association of iatrogenic symptoms. Along with those of the locus coeruleus, lesions of the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventral tegmentum, substantia nigra pars compacta, the superior colliculus and other peduncular lesions (such as peduncular hallucinosis) are involved in the regulation of sleep-wake/arousal, behaviour, sleeping disorders and rapid eye movement atonia. However, iatrogenic lesion of the locus coeruleus could explain the complications on all levels in our patient. PMID:25903199

  6. Economy class syndrome: still a recurrent complication of long journeys.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Bertamini, Francesca; Michieletto, Elisa; Ori, Carlo

    2007-04-01

    Economy class syndrome is a rare but still unavoidable complication of long haul flights, particularly in patients who carry various intrinsic risk factors. The tendency to affect even asymptomatic young people and the greater risk to fragment and propagate to the pulmonary circulation are the main characteristics of deep vein thrombosis of long-flight travelers. We report the clinical history of eight patients admitted to intensive care unit for confirmed or highly suspected economy class syndrome. Seven of them developed the syndrome within 72 h from a long return flight, one suffered from pulmonary embolism after a 12-h car trip. Two out of eight patients died, one because of extremely severe hemodynamic impairment, the other as a consequence of multiple organ failure caused by a concomitant myocardial infarction. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism represent one of the main medical problems of air travel and cause almost 20% of deaths in people with no medical history. Although economy class syndrome occurs mostly in elderly, even the healthy young population can be affected and, in fact, three out of eight patients of our series were under 50 years of age. All our patients but one carried a well recognized risk factor for deep vein thrombosis. Clinical symptoms of deep vein thrombosis can sometimes be aspecific and confusing, so that a certain proportion of post-travel deep vein thrombosis, evolving favorably and not giving rise to pulmonary embolism, might effectively remain undiagnosed. Economy class syndrome is still quite difficult to deal with and controversial in terms of preventive strategies. PMID:17496687

  7. Buried bumper syndrome: A complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Cyrany, Jiri; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kopacova, Marcela; Bures, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used method of nutrition delivery for patients with long-term insufficiency of oral intake. The PEG complication rate varies from 0.4% to 22.5% of cases, with minor complications being three times more frequent. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is a severe complication of this method, in which the internal fixation device migrates alongside the tract of the stoma outside the stomach. Excessive compression of tissue between the external and internal fixation device of the gastrostomy tube is considered the main etiological factor leading to BBS. Incidence of BBS is estimated at around 1% (0.3%-2.4%). Inability to insert, loss of patency and leakage around the PEG tube are considered to be a typical symptomatic triad. Gastroscopy is indicated in all cases in which BBS is suspected. The depth of disc migration in relation to the lamina muscularis propria of the stomach is critical for further therapy and can be estimated by endoscopic or transabdominal ultrasound. BBS can be complicated by gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation, peritonitis, intra-abdominal and abdominal wall abscesses, or phlegmon, and these complications can lead to fatal outcomes. The most important preventive measure is adequate positioning of the external bolster. A conservative approach should be applied only in patients with high operative risk and dismal prognosis. Choice of the method of release is based on the type of the PEG set and depth of disc migration. A disc retained inside the stomach and completely covered by the overgrowing tissue can be released using some type of endoscopic dissection technique (needle knife, argon plasma coagulation, or papillotome through the cannula). Proper patient selection and dissection of the overgrowing tissue are the major determinants for successful endoscopic therapy. A disc localized out of the stomach (lamina muscularis propria) should be treated by a surgeon. PMID:26811611

  8. Buried bumper syndrome: A complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Cyrany, Jiri; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kopacova, Marcela; Bures, Jan

    2016-01-14

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used method of nutrition delivery for patients with long-term insufficiency of oral intake. The PEG complication rate varies from 0.4% to 22.5% of cases, with minor complications being three times more frequent. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is a severe complication of this method, in which the internal fixation device migrates alongside the tract of the stoma outside the stomach. Excessive compression of tissue between the external and internal fixation device of the gastrostomy tube is considered the main etiological factor leading to BBS. Incidence of BBS is estimated at around 1% (0.3%-2.4%). Inability to insert, loss of patency and leakage around the PEG tube are considered to be a typical symptomatic triad. Gastroscopy is indicated in all cases in which BBS is suspected. The depth of disc migration in relation to the lamina muscularis propria of the stomach is critical for further therapy and can be estimated by endoscopic or transabdominal ultrasound. BBS can be complicated by gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation, peritonitis, intra-abdominal and abdominal wall abscesses, or phlegmon, and these complications can lead to fatal outcomes. The most important preventive measure is adequate positioning of the external bolster. A conservative approach should be applied only in patients with high operative risk and dismal prognosis. Choice of the method of release is based on the type of the PEG set and depth of disc migration. A disc retained inside the stomach and completely covered by the overgrowing tissue can be released using some type of endoscopic dissection technique (needle knife, argon plasma coagulation, or papillotome through the cannula). Proper patient selection and dissection of the overgrowing tissue are the major determinants for successful endoscopic therapy. A disc localized out of the stomach (lamina muscularis propria) should be treated by a surgeon. PMID:26811611

  9. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Akhrass, Fadi Al; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Sartawi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications. PMID:26793462

  10. Acquired hemophilia complicated by cardiorenal syndrome type 3

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rakesh; Dash, Sananta Kumar; Chawla, Rajesh; Kansal, Sudha; Agrawal, Devender Kumar; Dua, Harsh

    2013-01-01

    Development of autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) leads to a rare condition defined as acquired hemophilia (AH). If not diagnosed and treated early, AH may be associated with high mortality and morbidity. A 65-year-old woman presented with history of macrohematuria, acute renal failure, cardiogenic shock, and acute respiratory failure. Blood investigation revealed azotemia, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), coagulation FVIII level of <1%, and presence of FVIII inhibitor. Echocardiography showed global hypokinesia and ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral hydroureteronephrosis. The final diagnosis was acquired hemophilia A, complicated by acute obstructive renal failure and cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 3. Patient was managed with mechanical ventilation, heparin-free hemodialysis, negative fluid balance, recombinant activated factor VII, and prednisolone. Hematuria was relieved, renal function improved, and cardiac function showed improvement on repeat echocardiography. Patient was discharged on prednisolone with subsequent follow ups. PMID:24501492

  11. Acquired hemophilia complicated by cardiorenal syndrome type 3.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Dash, Sananta Kumar; Chawla, Rajesh; Kansal, Sudha; Agrawal, Devender Kumar; Dua, Harsh

    2013-11-01

    Development of autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) leads to a rare condition defined as acquired hemophilia (AH). If not diagnosed and treated early, AH may be associated with high mortality and morbidity. A 65-year-old woman presented with history of macrohematuria, acute renal failure, cardiogenic shock, and acute respiratory failure. Blood investigation revealed azotemia, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), coagulation FVIII level of <1%, and presence of FVIII inhibitor. Echocardiography showed global hypokinesia and ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral hydroureteronephrosis. The final diagnosis was acquired hemophilia A, complicated by acute obstructive renal failure and cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 3. Patient was managed with mechanical ventilation, heparin-free hemodialysis, negative fluid balance, recombinant activated factor VII, and prednisolone. Hematuria was relieved, renal function improved, and cardiac function showed improvement on repeat echocardiography. Patient was discharged on prednisolone with subsequent follow ups. PMID:24501492

  12. Cocket syndrome: thrombotic-septic disease post-appendicectomy complication.

    PubMed

    Luque Mialdea, R; Diez, R; Casanova, A; Guglieri, C; Cerda, J; Diez Delgado, J; Concejo, J; Delgado, J; Aguilar, F

    1995-02-01

    The incidence of complications following treatment of acute appendicitis in childhood is lower than 5%, while thromboembolic disease at that age is exceptional. The case of a 13-year-old male who was operated on in our pediatric surgery department for acute gangrenous appendicitis is presented. His condition improved until the sixth day after the operation when he suffered thrombosis in both the left iliac vein and the inferior cava. Ultrasonography, plethysmography and computer tomography (CT) studies were carried out and a diagnosis of venous thrombosis was made with an underlying congenital vascular malformation where the iliac vein was compressed by the overlying iliac artery; known as the Cocket syndrome. The etiology diagnosis and treatment of this rare disease in childhood is reviewed. PMID:7756239

  13. Polycystic ovary (Stein-Leventhal) syndrome: etiology, complications, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Karri Lynn; Schmidt, Margaret C

    2004-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) occurs in approximately 3% to 5% of the female population and may be the leading cause of infertility in those of reproductive age. PCOS presents clinically with a variety of signs and symptoms; the most common being menstrual irregularities, hyperandrogenism, infertility, and obesity. The true pathophysiology has not been clearly elucidated; however, there is growing agreement that gonadotropin dynamic dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, and insulin resistance are key features. The diagnosing of PCOS involves radiologic and laboratory studies. Radiologic studies typically include pelvic ultrasound; laboratory data should be obtained regarding pertinent gonadotropins and other hormone levels. PCOS is not a benign condition. It may lead to complications involving glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The goals of treatment should focus on restoring menstrual regularity, decreasing androgen excesses, and decreasing insulin resistance. PMID:15314890

  14. Complications of bariatric surgery: dumping syndrome, reflux and vitamin deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jan; Deloose, Eveline

    2014-08-01

    Bariatric surgical procedure are increasingly and successfully applied in the treatment of morbid obesity. Nevertheless, these procedures are not devoid of potential long-term complications. Dumping syndrome may occur after procedures involving at least partial gastric resection or bypass, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy. Diagnosis is based on clinical alertness and glucose tolerance testing. Treatment may involve dietary measures, acarbose and somatostatin analogues, or surgical reintervention for refractory cases. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be aggravated by vertical banded gastroplasty and sleeve gastrectomy procedures, but pre-existing GERD may improve after RYGB and with adjustable gastric banding. Nutrient deficiencies constitute the most important long-term complications of bariatric interventions, as they may lead to haematological, metabolic and especially neurological disorders which are not always reversible. Malabsorptive procedures, poor postoperative nutrient intake, recurrent vomiting and poor compliance with vitamin supplement intake and regular follow-up are important risk factors. Preoperative nutritional assessment and rigourous postoperative follow-up plan with administration of multi-vitamin supplements and assessment of serum levels is recommended in all patients. PMID:25194187

  15. Microcirculation Approach in HELLP Syndrome Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Massive Hepatic Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento, Stephanno Gomes Pereira; Santana, Eduardo Feliz Martins; Campanharo, Felipe Favorette; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    HELLP syndrome is a complication of severe forms of preeclampsia and occurs mainly in the third trimester of pregnancy. In extreme cases, it may evolve unfavorably and substantially increase maternal mortality. We present the case of an 18-year-old pregnant woman who was admitted to our emergency service in her 31st week, presenting with headache, visual disturbances, and epigastralgia, with progression to a severe condition of HELLP syndrome followed by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and hepatic infarction. We highlight the approach taken towards this patient and the case management, in which, in addition to the imaging examinations routinely available, we also used the sidestream dark field (SDF) technique to evaluate the systemic microcirculation. PMID:25485160

  16. Complications and challenges associated with polycystic ovary syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; Falbo, Angela; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) represents the most common endocrine dysfunction in fertile women and it is considered a heterogeneous and multifaceted disorder, with multiple reproductive and metabolic phenotypes which differently affect the early- and long-term syndrome’s risks. Women with PCOS present an adverse reproductive profile, including a high risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus. Patients with PCOS present not only a higher prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type-2 diabetes mellitus, but also of nonclassic cardiovascular risk factors, including mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Moreover, at the moment, clinical data on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women with PCOS are controversial. Finally, women with PCOS show an increased risk of endometrial cancer compared to non-PCOS healthy women, particularly during premenopausal period. Currently, we are unable to clarify if the increased PCOS early- and long-term risks are totally due to PCOS per se or mostly due to obesity, in particular visceral obesity, that characterized the majority of PCOS patients. In any case, the main endocrine and gynecological scientific societies agree to consider women with PCOS at increased risk of obstetric, cardiometabolic, oncology, and psychological complications throughout life, and it is recommended that these women be accurately assessed with periodic follow-up. PMID:26261426

  17. Harlequin syndrome as a complication of epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Boling, Bryan; Key, Christopher; Wainscott, Justin; Rebel, Annette

    2014-06-01

    Harlequin syndrome is a rare neurological condition that results in unilateral facial flushing and sweating. Although the syndrome is generally a benign condition with complete resolution if appropriate treatment is initiated, unilateral facial flushing can be a sign of several serious conditions and should be thoroughly investigated. Sudden onset of facial flushing related to harlequin syndrome developed in a patient who had bilateral lung transplant with postoperative epidural anesthesia for pain control. Differential diagnosis includes neurovascular disease (acute stroke), malignant neoplasm of brain or lung, Horner syndrome, idiopathic hyperhidrosis, and Frey syndrome. Harlequin syndrome is often easily treated by discontinuing the anesthetic or adjusting placement of the epidural catheter. PMID:24882829

  18. Genetic Abnormality May Explain Health Complications of Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Health News on: Down Syndrome Genes and Gene Therapy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Down Syndrome Genes and Gene Therapy About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  19. Oxidative stress and cardiovascular complications in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hyderali, Barkath Nisha; Mala, Kanchana

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine condition which is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular complications. It is elevated to a metabolic disorder with significant long term health ramification due to the high prevalence of insulin resistance (IR), impaired glucose tolerance, type 2 diabetes (T2D), dyslipidemia and numerous cardiovascular risk factors in PCOS women. This article concentrates on the recent developments in the regulation of oxidative stress (OS) in PCOS and on the association between PCOS and CVD outcomes. The prognostic events that define the severity of PCOS and involvement of cardiovascular risk in PCOS include endothelial dysfunction (ED) and impaired cardiac structure. Fact is that, in PCOS women, the circulating biomarkers of OS are in abnormal levels that are independent of overweight, which depicts the participation of OS in the pathophysiology of this common derangement. In addition, hyperglycemia (HG) per se, promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in PCOS. When the destructive ROS outbalances the concentration of physiological antioxidants, OS occurs. The resultant OS, directly stimulates hyperandrogenism and causes extensive cellular injury, DNA damage and/or cell apoptosis. To further the burden, the total serum antioxidant level in PCOS women is compromised, which diminishes the body's defense against an oxidative milieu. Thus, it is evident that OS regulates several cellular mechanisms in PCOS. Improving our understanding about the regulation of OS, critical role of ROS and protein biomarkers in PCOS should lead to novel therapeutic strategies in addressing PCOS-induced CVD. Besides, it is possible that the beneficial effects of dietary or therapeutic antioxidants have significant clinical relevance in PCOS. PMID:26066290

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis in a child: a rare complication of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deliba?, Ali; Bek, Kenan; Bülbül, Mehmet; Demircin, Gülay; Baysun, Sahika; Oner, Ay?e

    2005-01-01

    In nephrotic syndrome there is an increased tendency for bacterial infections due to immunological changes secondary to proteinuria, treatment (including steroids), and other as yet unknown causes. However, necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon complication of the disease and has rarely been reported in nephrotic children. We report a 14-month-old boy with nephrotic syndrome who developed sepsis and NF as a complication. He was treated successfully with intensive medical and surgical treatment. PMID:15549409

  1. Sick sinus syndrome as a complication of mediastinal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjola-Sintonen, S.; Toetterman, K.J.K.; Kupari, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 33-year-old man who had received mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease 12 years earlier developed a symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The sick sinus syndrome and a finding of an occult constrictive pericarditis were considered to be due to the previous mediastinal irradiation. A ventricular pacemaker was chosen because mediastinal radiotherapy also increases the risk of developing atrioventricular conduction defects.

  2. Hemoptysis Complicating Scimitar Syndrome: From Diagnosis to Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nedelcu, Cosmina; Carette, Marie-France; Parrot, Antoine; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Marsault, Claude; Khalil, Antoine

    2008-07-15

    We report the case of a 24-year-old patient with known scimitar syndrome presenting with hemoptysis. Multidetector CT angiography showed the scimitar vein draining the right lung to the inferior vena cava associated with right lower lobe bronchopulmonary sequestration. The presence of hemoptysis associated with scimitar syndrome is likely secondary to an anomalous systemic arterial blood supply. We treated this patient successfully with transcatheter occlusion of the anomalous feeding arterial vessels.

  3. Lethal Complications of the Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, P.

    1968-01-01

    Death from arterial bleeding or gastrointestinal perforation has previously been reported in more than 15 patients with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. On a basis of 100 personally examined patients and a review of published accounts, these events seem particularly likely to occur in two distinct and recognizable forms (the gravis and the ecchymotic forms) of the syndrome. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 1 PMID:5673215

  4. Sjögren's syndrome: diagnosis and management of oral complications.

    PubMed

    Lilly, J P; Fotos, P G

    1996-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome, a common autoimmune disease process, is characterized by destruction of exocrine (including the lacrimal and salivary) glands. Patients with this disorder may initially complain of a dry mouth or have rapid onset of new carious lesions. Here, a case of Sjogren's syndrome is presented that was initially diagnosed because of dental complaints, and long-term treatment of Sjogren's patients is discussed. PMID:9171038

  5. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following bariatric surgery: A rare but important complication

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bernadette; Heath, Dugal

    2015-01-01

    Gluteal Compartment Syndrome is a rare condition caused by excessive pressure within the gluteal compartments which leads to a number of potentially serious sequelae including rhabdomyolysis, nerve damage, renal failure and death. As bariatric patients are heavy and during prolonged bariatric procedures lie in one position for extended periods of time, they are especially susceptible to developing this complication. It is therefore essential that bariatric surgeons are aware of this complication and how to minimise the chances of it occurring and how to diagnose it. We describe a case of Gluteal Compartment Syndrome in a patient following a gastric bypass and review the aetiology, pathophysiology, treatment and prevention of this complication. PMID:25750728

  6. Pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome and its lipid complications

    PubMed Central

    Binesh Marvasti, T.; Adeli, Kh.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity epidemic has been spread all over the world in the past few decades and has caused a major public health concern due to its increasing global prevalence. Obese individuals are at higher risks of developing dyslipidemic characteristics resulting in increased triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol content and reduced HDL-cholesterol levels. This disorder has profound implications as afflicted individuals have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of development of hypertension, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Today, this phenotype is designated as metabolic syndrome. According to the criteria set by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), for a patient to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, the person must have central obesity plus any two of the following conditions: raised TG, reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised blood pressure, and increased fasting plasma glucose. Current National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) guidelines for the treatment of patients with the metabolic syndrome encourage therapies that lower LDL cholesterol and TG and raise HDL-cholesterol. Primary intervention often involves treatment with statins to improve the lipid profiles of these patients. However, recent studies suggest the potential of newly identified drugs including thiazolidinediones, GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors that seem to be promising in reducing the level of progression of metabolic syndrome related disorders. This review discusses the current pharmacological treatments of the metabolic syndrome with the above mentioned drugs. PMID:22615610

  7. Two vascular complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brearley, S; Fowler, J; Hamer, J D

    1993-03-01

    Patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV have thin walled, friable arteries and veins and are prone to spontaneous arterial rupture. We present a patient who suffered severe damage to the common femoral vein during surgery for varicose veins and who subsequently suffered a spontaneous rupture of the right external carotid artery, treated by ligation and oversewing. Intraarterial radiology and surgery in such patients are hazardous and should be avoided if possible. Where operation is essential, the simplest available procedure should be performed. Patients should be counselled to inform every doctor they consult that they have the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:8462713

  8. Cerebral and ocular congenital toxoplasmosis complicated by West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eballe, André Omgbwa; Ellong, Augustin; Zoua, Marie Evodie Akono; Bella, Lucienne Assumpta; Ngeufack, Séraphin; Kouam, Jeanne Mayouego; Melong, Justin

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of a child who presented cerebral and ocular congenital toxoplasmosis associated with West syndrome. He was seen and followed-up in the in patients pediatric and ophthalmologic units at the Gyneco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital of Yaoundé in Cameroon between July 2008 and February 2010. PMID:20714363

  9. Compartment syndrome: a complication of use of the MAST suit.

    PubMed

    Teeny, S M; Wiss, D A

    1987-01-01

    A case of compartment syndrome following the use of a MAST suit is reported. The most significant factor in its development is prolonged application combined with severe hemodynamic compromise. Amputation was performed or death occurred in 50% of reported cases. Compartment pressure monitoring should be done in patients who require a MAST suit for more than 4 h. PMID:3333388

  10. Hyper Ig E syndrome (Job syndrome, HIES) – radiological images of pulmonary complications on the basis of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Jo?czyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Szczawi?ska-Pop?onyk, Aleksandra; Warzywoda, Ma?gorzata; Br?borowicz, Anna; Pawlak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Hyperimmunoglobulinemia E syndrome (hyper-IgE syndrome, Job syndrome, HIES) is a complex immune deficiency with multiorgan clinical manifestations and diverse genetic background. The clinical triad of symptoms observed in approximately 75% of patients with HIES includes: recurrent abscesses of staphylococcal etiology, recurrent respiratory infections and elevated immunoglobulin E in serum. Case Report: The paper discusses three cases of female patients presenting typical pulmonary complications of the hyper-Ig E syndrome. In the first case, the development of aspergilloma in a postinflamatory cyst was observed, in the other one, pneumonia with pleural effusion, and as a consequence of inflammatory infiltrations – fibrotic changes, giving rise to lobectomy, while in the last of these cases, the course of lung disease was complicated by formation of staphylococcal abscess. In one of the girls, bronchiectasis appeared at follow-up. Conclusions: Complications of pulmonary infections are the most common causes of death in hyper-Ig E syndrome. Late diagnosis significantly worsens the respiratory function and reduces the chance for normal development of a child. Introduction of comprehensive treatment, including prophylaxis, decreases the recurrences. Therefore, the important role is attributed to the radiologist in the multidisciplinary care of patients with this syndrome. PMID:22844313

  11. Ruptured Baker's cyst with compartment syndrome: an extremely unusual complication

    PubMed Central

    Hamlet, Mark; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Mahale, Avinash; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of pain with acute tense swelling of his left leg. Initially he was treated empirically with antibiotics for cellulitis while the possibility of deep vein thrombosis was ruled out. His symptoms gradually worsened with progressive distal neurological deficit and increasing pain. Further investigations suggested that he had a ruptured Baker's cyst in the calf with development of compartment syndrome. PMID:23264161

  12. Ruptured Baker's cyst with compartment syndrome: an extremely unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Mark; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Mahale, Avinash; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of pain with acute tense swelling of his left leg. Initially he was treated empirically with antibiotics for cellulitis while the possibility of deep vein thrombosis was ruled out. His symptoms gradually worsened with progressive distal neurological deficit and increasing pain. Further investigations suggested that he had a ruptured Baker's cyst in the calf with development of compartment syndrome. PMID:23264161

  13. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Kidney Complicated by a Wunderlich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manescu, Mihai Razvan; Sahyoun, Achraf; Froment, Nicolas; Crisan, Nicolae; Girot, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The Wunderlich syndrome found after the rupture of primitive renal Ewing's sarcoma is not a situation that we find often in everyday practice. The clinical findings are not specific, which is why the differential diagnosis must be made with a multitude of benign and malignant renal masses until the correct diagnosis can be made by the pathologist. The CT and MRI images are not characteristic. One treatment option is the multidisciplinary approach; however, the prognosis remains poor for patients with metastatic disease. PMID:25922782

  14. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: an indolent rash with a serious cardiac complication.

    PubMed

    Merika, E E; Lefroy, D; Milojkovic, D; Wakelin, S H

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disorder, characterized by prominent blood or tissue eosinophilia with ensuing tissue damage, which is diagnosed after exclusion of underlying diseases known to cause HES. Sustained eosinophilia is associated with cardiac disease, including endomyocardial thrombosis and fibrosis, leading to restrictive cardiomyopathy, valvular dysfunction and increased thrombotic tendency. Aneurysmal coronary artery disease (CAD) occurring in the absence of stenotic atherosclerotic plaques is extremely rare. We present a case of idiopathic HES in a 30-year-old woman with asymptomatic multianeurysmal CAD and a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, and discuss a brief review of the literature and management strategies. PMID:26213289

  15. Erythema multiforme

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyell's syndrome; Stevens-Johnson syndrome; Erythema multiforme minor; Erythema multiforme major ... more severe. It is also known as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. This form is usually caused by reactions ...

  16. Compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis and risk of acute renal failure as complications of the lithotomy position.

    PubMed

    Bocca, Gianlorenzo; van Moorselaar, Jeroen A; Feitz, Wout F J; van der Staak, Frans H J M; Monnens, Leo A H

    2002-01-01

    Compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis and the risk of acute renal failure are potential complications of the lithotomy position. A six-year-old girl is described who developed a compartment syndrome with rhabdomyolysis after prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. This complication occurred three times over ten years in our hospital. Rhabdomyolysis may induce acute renal failure. The pathogenesis of rhabdomyolysis--induced renal failure has not yet been elucidated. However, forced diuresis by intravenous administration of mannitol and furosemide can prevent acute renal failure. PMID:12018636

  17. [Unusual complications of the Peutz-Jeghers-syndrome in two consecutive generations of the same family].

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Ch; Papaziogas, B; Atmatzidis, K; Kalaitzis, E; Pavlidis, T; Papaziogas, T

    2002-02-01

    The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease, characterized by the presence of hamartomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract and perioral mucocutaneous pigmentation. The incidence of surgical complications in these patients is relatively rare, and correlates with the size and location of the polyps. We report on two complications of the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome which occurred in two generations of the same family. There was a perforation and an invagination of the small intestine. Both cases were treated by resection of the small intestine. PMID:11894220

  18. Premature Birth with Complicated Perinatal Course Delaying Diagnosis of Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ciana, G.; Fertz, M. C.; Pecile, V.; Demarini, S.

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome in the newborn is essentially characterized by marked hypotonia, feeding difficulties, hypogonadism, and possible characteristic facial features. However, diagnosis at this age may be particularly difficult, and dysmorphic features may be subtle or absent. Prematurity can furthermore delay clinical features recognition and typical complications due to preterm birth may contribute to divert the diagnosis. We describe a preterm baby with a complicated perinatal course later diagnosed as PWS. PMID:22606524

  19. Sweet's syndrome complicating ulcerative colitis: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Lopes Caçola, Rute; Soares, Marta; Cardoso, Carla; Furtado, António

    2016-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome (SS) is a neutrophilic dermatosis disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by acute fever, neutrophilia, painful erythematous papules, nodules and plaques, and an infiltrate consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils in the upper dermis. Classical SS is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of in?ammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (UC). There is a predilection for women, and for patients with colonic disease and active IBD. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with a flare of moderate severity UC treated with mesalazine who presented with a 5-day history of acute fever, painful papules and plaques on forearms and legs, episcleritis and cervical pain. Skin biopsies showed papillary dermis inflammatory cell infiltration composed mainly of neutrophils, without evidence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis or panniculitis, compatible with SS. The patient had an excellent response to systemic corticosteroids. Symptoms promptly improved and skin lesions resolved after 7?weeks. PMID:26791120

  20. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  1. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  2. Paget-Schrotter syndrome and complications of management

    PubMed Central

    Dep, A; Concannon, E; Mc Hugh, S M; Burke, P

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old man presented to the emergency department with an acutely swollen right upper limb having spent the previous day canoeing. Venography confirmed right subclavian venous thrombosis at middle one-third of right clavicle with no evidence of cervical rib or other structural abnormalities. Following heparinisation, catheter directed thrombolysis was performed which restored luminal flow. Postprocedure the patient developed spontaneous small-volume haemoperitoneum and acute renal failure. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for haemodialysis and supportive management. The patients’ renal function improved and he was discharged well following his 28th day of admission. Paget-Schroetter syndrome or effort thrombosis involves subclavian venous thrombosis associated with strenuous activity of upper extremities. In these cases, catheter directed thrombolysis with first rib resection provides greater patency rate than anticoagulation therapy alone. Acute kidney injury following mechanical thrombolysis is rarely reported in the literature. PMID:23853011

  3. Donohue syndrome: a new case with a new complication.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Rasha; Alassaf, Abeer; Al-Qudah, Abdelkarim A

    2015-07-01

    Donohue syndrome (DS) is a very rare autosomal recessive disease affecting less than one in a million live births. It represents the most severe form of insulin resistance due to mutations involving the insulin receptor gene. DS is characterized by pre- and postnatal growth retardation with failure to thrive, lipoatrophy, muscle wasting, acanthosis nigricans, hypertrichosis, and dysmorphic features. Glucose homeostasis is affected with hyperinsulinemia, fasting hypoglycemia, and postprandial hyperglycemia. We report a Jordanian patient with genetically proven DS who had the classical physical features, progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cholestasis, and hyperglycemia, followed by hypoglycemia. In addition, the patient developed polyuria and uremia despite normal creatinine levels, hypernatremia, and hypertension. To our knowledge, these metabolic derangements were not previously reported in patients with DS. PMID:25741786

  4. Peripheral gangrene complicating idiopathic and recessive hemolytic uremic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, B S; Garcia, C D; Chesney, R W; Segar, W E; Giugno, K; Chem, R

    2000-09-01

    Three patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) developed peripheral gangrene. Bilateral carotid artery thromboses occurred in one of these patients after recovery from HUS. One patient had a long history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In the second patient, a flu-like illness preceded the onset of HUS. The third was one of two sisters, with the HUS appearing more than 1 year apart. None had evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation or infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The patient with rheumatoid arthritis had renal cortical necrosis but recovered moderate renal function after treatment with dialysis and plasmapheresis for 6 months. The child with a genetic form of HUS died of renal failure and had massive cortical necrosis and vascular thrombosis at autopsy. This is the first report of peripheral gangrene in children with idiopathic HUS and autosomal recessive HUS. PMID:10975312

  5. Antiphospholipids Syndrome Complicated by a Systemic Capillary Leak-Like Syndrome Treated With Steroids and Intravenous Immunoglobulins: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Prete, Marcella; Urso, Livio; Fatone, Maria Celeste; Pinto, Vincenzo; Perosa, Federico

    2016-02-01

    This report describes the onset of systemic capillary leak (SCL)-like syndrome in a 30-year-old woman with antiphospholipids syndrome (APS) during puerperium.Twelve hours after a cesarean section, she presented a sudden fever and abdominal pains followed by dyspnea, severe edema of the limbs and pelvis.Computer tomography shows congestion of interstitial pulmonary parenchyma, pericardial and pleural effusion, edema of intestinal wall and of perivisceral adipose tissue, and periportal lymphedema. Laboratory tests showed neutrophilic leukocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, and an increase of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Because fever and raised inflammation parameters are not observed in idiopathic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS; Clarkson disease), a diagnosis of SCL-like syndrome was made.Albumin solution, high-dose methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) infusion were administered with a rapid improvement of her clinical condition.The prompt treatment with steroids and IVIG likely prevented the life-threatening shock syndrome that can occur in SCLS, with acute hypotensive attacks, and severe limbs edema requiring fasciotomy.All clinical and laboratory findings supported autoinflammation as the underlying pathogenic mechanism of the syndrome. The data indicate that SCL-like syndrome can be considered a novel clinical syndrome, which can complicate APS. PMID:26844485

  6. Premonitory Urges in Adults With Complicated and Uncomplicated Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Clare M; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-03-01

    Most patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) report experiencing subjective bodily sensations termed premonitory urges, before they have a tic. This study investigated relationships between premonitory urges and tic severity, depression, anxiety, obsessions, compulsions, and attention problems. We also explored possible differences between patients with and without comorbid conditions. Finally, we explored whether premonitory urges impacted on perceived quality of life (QoL). One hundred adult outpatients (70 males; mean age 32 years) were recruited from a specialist TS clinic. Fifty percent exhibited comorbid diagnoses, the most common of which were obsessive-compulsive disorder (23%), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (15%), anxiety (6%), and depression (5%). For the entire sample, premonitory urges were significantly related to clinical symptoms, especially obsessive-compulsive symptoms and anxiety, and were significantly negatively related to QoL scores. Premonitory urges had a strong negative correlation with QoL in patients with "pure" TS (no comorbidities), while this relationship was weaker for patients with comorbid conditions, who reported stronger or more frequent premonitory urges in association with greater anxiety. These findings may imply that slightly different psychological factors drive self-reported premonitory urge ratings in patients with and without comorbidities and that the perceived influence of distressing premonitory urges on wellbeing is less important in the context of comorbid symptomatology. As premonitory urges are related to QoL, they should be taken into account during evaluation of treatment efficacy, especially in cases with "pure" TS. PMID:24042069

  7. Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Hydatid Cyst of the Liver Managed by Venoplasty and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Sarawagi, Radha Keshava, Shyamkumar N. Surendrababu, Narayanam R. S.; Zachariah, Uday G. Eapen, Eapen C.

    2011-02-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal hypertension is an uncommon complication of hydatid cyst of the liver. Previous reports describe cyst excision or portosystemic shunt surgery for such patients. Here we present a case of hydatid cyst of the liver with BCS that was treated successfully with hepatic venoplasty and transjugular stent placement.

  8. Thigh compartment syndrome complicated by sciatic nerve palsy, rhabdomyolysis, and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Alobaidi, Ahmad; Backdash, Mohamad Munir; El-Menyar, Ayman

    2016-02-01

    We reported a rare case of thigh compartment syndrome (TCS) complicated by sciatic nerve palsy, rhabdomyolysis, and acute renal failure in an alcoholic patient. Intensive care measures and immediate posteromedial decompressive fasciotomy were performed. These timely interventions resulted in improvement of the nerve injury and restoration of the kidney function. PMID:26862401

  9. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel P; Philippo, Sean M; Prasad, Paritosh

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective. PMID:26744664

  10. Lemierre syndrome caused by acute isolated sphenoid sinusitis and its intracranial complications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang-Chul; Lee, Sung-Su; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Lee, Joon-Kyoo

    2010-02-01

    Classically, Lemierre syndrome is a rare clinical entity in which acute oropharyngeal infection causes septic internal jugular vein thrombosis and leads to septic lesions to distant organs, such as the lung. Lemierre syndrome also presents with odontogenic infections, mastoiditis, parotitis, and sinusitis. We report the first case of Lemierre syndrome following acute isolated sphenoid sinusitis that was complicated with cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and bilateral infectious aneurysms of the intracavernous internal carotid artery. Treatment with endoscopic sphenoidotomy, culture-directed antibiotics, heparinization, and endovascular GDC coiling were performed and the patient recovered without major neurologic morbidity. Immediate and intensive treatment with careful evaluation to localize the primary infectious focus of the head and neck, including the paranasal sinus, improves the prognosis of patients with rhinogenic Lemierre syndrome. PMID:19410401

  11. [Mauriac syndrome--a rare complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Schmetz, Anne V N; Dekker-Maas, Mariëlle H; den Breejen, Marianne P; Sas, Theo C J

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus has improved dramatically over the last few decades. The maintenance of acceptable metabolic control, nevertheless, remains challenging because the success of treatment is so dependent on patient compliance. Children with type 1 diabetes and poor metabolic control are at risk of developing Mauriac syndrome, a condition characterised by hepatomegaly, growth retardation and cushingoid features. A similar complication may occur in type-1 or type-2 adult diabetics; namely, glycogenic hepatopathy. We describe two children, a 12-year-old girl and a 16-year-old boy, who presented with classic symptoms of Mauriac syndrome. After metabolic control was achieved, reduction of hepatomegaly and the disappearance of cushingoid features were observed, proving the reversibility of the syndrome. Awareness that this syndrome still exists despite improved insulin therapy is crucial for earlier recognition and treatment. PMID:22805790

  12. Nodding syndrome in Ugandan children—clinical features, brain imaging and complications: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Idro, Richard; Opoka, Robert Opika; Aanyu, Hellen T; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Piloya-Were, Theresa; Namusoke, Hanifa; Musoke, Sarah Bonita; Nalugya, Joyce; Bangirana, Paul; Mwaka, Amos Deogratius; White, Steven; Chong, Kling; Atai-Omoruto, Anne D; Mworozi, Edison; Nankunda, Jolly; Kiguli, Sarah; Aceng, Jane Ruth; Tumwine, James K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder of uncertain aetiology affecting children in Africa. There is no diagnostic test, and risk factors and symptoms that would allow early diagnosis are poorly documented. This study aimed to describe the clinical, electrophysiological and brain imaging (MRI) features and complications of nodding syndrome in Ugandan children. Design Case series. Participants 22 children with nodding syndrome brought to Mulago National Referral Hospital for assessment. Outcome measures Clinical features, physical and functional disabilities, EEG and brain MRI findings and a staging system with a progressive development of symptoms and complications. Results The median age of symptom onset was 6 (range 4–10) years and median duration of symptoms was 8.5 (range 2–11) years. 16 of 22 families reported multiple affected children. Physical manifestations and complications included stunting, wasting, lip changes and gross physical deformities. The bone age was delayed by 2 (range 1–6) years. There was peripheral muscle wasting and progressive generalised wasting. Four children had nodding as the only seizure type; 18 in addition had myoclonic, absence and/or generalised tonic–clonic seizures developing 1–3?years after the onset of illness. Psychiatric manifestations included wandering, aggression, depression and disordered perception. Cognitive assessment in three children demonstrated profound impairment. The EEG was abnormal in all, suggesting symptomatic generalised epilepsy in the majority. There were different degrees of cortical and cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI, but no hippocampal changes. Five stages with worsening physical, EEG and brain imaging features were identified: a prodrome, the development of head nodding and cognitive decline, other seizure types, multiple complications and severe disability. Conclusions Nodding syndrome is a neurological disorder that may be characterised as probably symptomatic generalised epilepsy. Clinical manifestations and complications develop in stages which might be useful in defining treatment and rehabilitation. Studies of risk factors, pathogenesis, management and outcome are urgently needed. PMID:23645924

  13. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity. PMID:22852104

  14. Compartment syndrome of the thigh complicating surgical treatment of ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. R.; Garfin, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with ipsilateral femur and ankle fractures. The patient was treated with interlocking nail of his femur fracture, followed by open reduction and internal fixation of his ankle fracture under tourniquet control. Postoperatively, the patient developed compartment syndrome of his thigh with elevated pressures, requiring decompressive fasciotomies. This case illustrates the possible complication of treating a femur fracture with intramedullary nailing and then immediately applying a tourniquet to treat an ipsilateral extremity fracture. Because of the complication with this patient, we feel the procedure should be staged, or a tourniquet should be avoided if possible.

  15. [A Fatal Case of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Azuma, Taichi; Yasukawa, Masaki; Shinomiya, Hiroto

    2015-09-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a recently identified emerging viral infectious disease in China that is caused by a novel phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae, SFTS virus, with an average case fatality rate of 12-30%. A cytokine storm with abnormally expressed cytokine profiles is associated with the disease severity. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an aggressive and lifethreatening syndrome associated with excessive immune activation. We report herein on a fatal case of SFTS complicated by HLH. Consecutive plasma exchange and immunomodulatory therapy was ineffective in our case. The pathognomonic histological feature was necrotizing lymphadenitis with massive hemophagocytosis of systemic lymphoid tissues with SFTS viruses and SFTS-RNA copies. No specific treatment of SFTS is available, and an effective treatment strategy for patients with rapidly progressing SFTS has not been established. Appropriate immunomodulatory therapy is necessary for SFTS patients complicated by HLH. PMID:26630792

  16. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  17. Iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome: A Potential Complication Following Anterior Interbody Lumbar Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Glenn S.; Castro, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Baastrup's Syndrome is a condition that occurs when there is abnormal contact between two adjacent spinous processes resulting in back pain. An alteration in lumbar spinal alignment and/or adjacent segment compensatory motion is thought to be potential causative factors. The objective of this study was to present a case series of what appears to be iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome as a mid-to-late term complication following anterior lumbar interbody surgery. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients undergoing anterior lumbar surgery for either fusion or disc replacement to determine the prevalence of Baastrup's Syndrome. Results Over a 12-year period, 855 patients who had undergone an anterior approach for lumbar spine surgery were identified. Of them 8 patients with evidence of Baastrup's Syndrome were found; this demonstrated a prevalence of 0.9%. Diagnostic injection was a helpful clinical tool in confirming the diagnosis of iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome. The partial removal of the impinging spinous processes resulted in excellent clinical relief. Conclusions Iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome may be an iatrogenic result of anterior lumbar surgery in small group of patients. Spinous process excision is a suggested treatment option. Further studies are necessary to explore the above phenomenon. This study is a Level 3 retrospective case series. PMID:26767158

  18. A Rare Case of Neonatal Complicated Appendicitis in a Child with Patau's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Valentina; Bartoli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal appendicitis is a rare condition with high mortality rate. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific, imaging modalities are not always diagnostic, and preoperative diagnosis is difficult with subsequent delay and complications. Its pathophysiology may be different from appendicitis in older children and comorbidities can be found. We report a case of a female neonate with Patau's syndrome, intestinal malrotation, and Fallot tetralogy in whom perforated appendix, probably occurring during fetal period due to vascular insufficiency, was found at laparotomy. PMID:25276460

  19. [Cerebral vasospasms with hemodynamic infarctions as a complication of HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Harscher, S; Witte, O W; Möller, U; Bloos, G; Pfleiderer, S O R; Terborg, C

    2003-12-01

    Sinal thrombosis, intracerebral bleeding, cerebral edema, and cerebral vasospasm are typical neurological complications in pre- and eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme, and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome is a rare, severe complication of pre-eclampsia. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with HELLP syndrome. After a cesarean section, generalized epileptic seizure occurred and intubation was necessary due to sustained unconsciousness. Despite magnesium therapy, bilateral hemodynamic ischemic infarctions and narrowing of the circle of Willis were visible on MRI, and vasospasm of all large basal cerebral arteries was confirmed by cerebral angiography and transcranial Doppler sonography. During the following 2 weeks, the cerebral vasospasm resolved with application of high-dose methyl prednisolone and nimodipine. After extubation, the patient initially suffered from mild psychosyndrome and ataxia but recovered completely after 3 months. The HELLP syndrome may be complicated by cerebral vasospasm with subsequent hemodynamic strokes. Combined treatment with magnesium, corticosteroids, and nimodipine can be recommended. In our case, this regimen led to resolution of the cerebral vasospasm and complete clinical recovery. PMID:14647914

  20. Infliximab/Plasmapheresis in Vanishing Bile Duct Syndrome Secondary to Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    PubMed Central

    White, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Vanishing bile duct syndrome (VBDS) is a rare disorder characterized by loss of interlobular bile ducts and progressive worsening cholestasis. The acute presentation of this disease is typically associated with a drug hypersensitivity and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). The mainstay of treatment has been ursodeoxycholic acid with mixed results from immunosuppressive regimens. Anti–tumor necrosis factor-? and plasmapheresis have been speculated to be of potential benefit. It is hoped that early identification and intervention in VBDS secondary to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN with continued reporting will lead to better regimens and outcomes. Our case report details the first reported use of infliximab and plasmapheresis, in addition to steroids, in a patient with VBDS secondary to TEN, as well as a literature review that supports a mechanism for why these modalities could be effective treatments. Unfortunately, our patient died, and the use of these therapies had an unclear benefit on his liver and skin disease. We hope that additional work can be published to confirm or refute their utility in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:25246624

  1. Complications in 54 frontofacial distraction procedures in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jesse A; Paliga, James Thomas; Taylor, Jesse A; Bartlett, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis manifest midfacial hypoplasia often treated by midfacial advancement. Benefits of midfacial advancement by distraction osteogenesis have been well studied; little is known about the perioperative morbidity of these procedures, specifically relating to device selection. This study compares the perioperative complications between semiburied- and halo-type distraction osteogenesis of the midface. A retrospective review was performed on all patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent midface distraction with semiburied- or halo-type external distractors. Demographic information and operative/postoperative course were reviewed. Complications were categorized as hardware-related, infectious, and either as major (requiring additional intervention) or minor (requiring medication only). Chi-squared and Fisher exact test were used to compare variables.From 1999 to 2012, a total of 54 patients underwent midface distraction osteogenesis, including 23 patients with Apert syndrome, 19 patients with Crouzon syndrome, 10 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, and 2 patients with other craniofacial syndromes. Thirty-three patients underwent a total of 34 subcranial Le Fort III distraction procedures and 21 underwent 21 monobloc distraction procedures. The mean age during surgery was 8.0 (range, 4.0-17.7) years, whereas the mean time between distractor placement and removal was 102.9 days. Thirty procedures were performed with external halo-type distractors (18 Le Fort III and 12 monobloc distractions), whereas 25 were performed with buried midface distractors (16 Le Fort III and 9 monobloc distractions). There were no significant differences in diagnoses or interventions between the distraction devices. Of the 19 distractor-related complications, there were a total of 10 (18.2%) in the halo group including 5 (9.1%) requiring separate operative intervention as well as 9 (16.4%) in the buried distractor group including 6 (10.1%) requiring separate operative intervention. Major infections were more common in the buried distractor group (n = 8) compared with the halo distractor group (n = 3) (P = 0.048). There were 4 (7.3%) patients in the halo group who had malposition or transcranial pin migration related to postoperative positioning or falls and required operative repositioning. Frontofacial distraction is an important technique in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. Higher rates of halo displacement requiring surgery are offset with lower rates of infections compared with buried distractors. PMID:25569391

  2. Adipose tissue mitochondrial dysfunction triggers a lipodystrophic syndrome with insulin resistance, hepatosteatosis, and cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Vernochet, Cecile; Damilano, Federico; Mourier, Arnaud; Bezy, Olivier; Mori, Marcelo A.; Smyth, Graham; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue occurs in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of lipodystrophy, but whether this dysfunction contributes to or is the result of these disorders is unknown. To investigate the physiological consequences of severe mitochondrial impairment in adipose tissue, we generated mice deficient in mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in adipocytes by using mice carrying adiponectin-Cre and TFAM floxed alleles. These adiponectin TFAM-knockout (adipo-TFAM-KO) mice had a 75–81% reduction in TFAM in the subcutaneous and intra-abdominal white adipose tissue (WAT) and interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT), causing decreased expression and enzymatic activity of proteins in complexes I, III, and IV of the electron transport chain (ETC). This mitochondrial dysfunction led to adipocyte death and inflammation in WAT and a whitening of BAT. As a result, adipo-TFAM-KO mice were resistant to weight gain, but exhibited insulin resistance on both normal chow and high-fat diets. These lipodystrophic mice also developed hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and cardiac dysfunction. Thus, isolated mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue can lead a syndrome of lipodystrophy with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular complications.—Vernochet, C., Damilano, F., Mourier, A., Bezy, O., Mori, M. A., Smyth, G., Rosenzweig, A., Larsson, N.-G., Kahn, C. R. Adipose tissue mitochondrial dysfunction triggers a lipodystrophic syndrome with insulin resistance, hepatosteatosis, and cardiovascular complications. PMID:25005176

  3. Prevalence of ocular pseudoexfoliation syndrome and associated complications in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saleh, Sulaiman A.; Al-Dabbagh, Najwa M.; Al-Shamrani, Saad M.; Khan, Nusrat M.; Arfin, Misbahul; Tariq, Mohammad; Al-Faleh, Hafez M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX), and associated ophthalmic complications among Saudi patients. Methods: The prevalence of PEX and associated ocular co-morbidities were determined among the Saudi patients visiting the Primary Care Clinic of Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January 2009 and January 2010. A total of 1967 patients were examined biomicoscopically by ophthalmologists to determine the presence of PEX and associated ocular complications. Results: Sixty-nine of the 1967 examined patients (3.5%) showed the presence of PEX with no significant gender difference. There was an age dependent increase in the prevalence of PEX after the age of 50 years. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome was associated with higher intraocular pressure, cataract, and poor vision. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of PEX in male and female Saudi patients. Conclusion: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is an age-related disorder, and its prevalence increases with age. Further larger population based studies are warranted to assess the prevalence of PEX and associated risk factors. PMID:25630014

  4. Hemophagocytic Syndrome, an Uncommon Complication of Microscopic Polyangitis: A Case Report From Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Cisse, Mouhamadou Moustapha; Abdoul Karim Omar, Daher; Nzambaza, Jean De Dieu; Ba, Sidy; Ndao, Awa Cheikh; Sall, Abibatou; Dial, Cherif Mouhamed; Faye, Maria; Ka, El Hadji Fary; Faye, Moustapha; Lemrabott, Ahmed Tall; Niang, Abdou; Diouf, Boucar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We reported a case of hemophagocytic syndrome complicating microscopic polyangitis presented by crescentic glomerulonephritis. Case Presentation: A 22-year-old female patient originated from Dakar, Senegal presented with nephrotic syndrome and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. On physical examination, we noticed hyperchromic diffuse punctilious purpura skin lesions predominant on the trunk, the neck and the upper thigh. Immunology investigations revealed strongly positive anti SSA/Ro and anti-SSB. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies had positive results with a peri-nuclear type fluorescence, specific to myeloperoxidase. In optic microscopy, renal biopsy showed a crescentic glomerulonephritis with circumferential cellular and fibrous proliferation affecting 85% of glomeruli. The diagnosis of microscopic polyangitis with renal and skin involvement was retained. The patient received methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide 700 mg/m2 every 15 days for the first 3 pulses and every 21 days thereafter. After the 5th month, she developed obnubilation, fever and central pancytopenia. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, which showed medullary invasion by macrophages with signs of hemophagocytosis. Diagnosis of hemophagocytic syndrome complicating a microscopic polyangitis was retained and methylprednisolone pulses started. The patient was under hemodialysis after follow-up of about 9 months with stable clinical state. Conclusions: The occurrence of SAM in pauci-autoimmune vasculitis is rarely described, particularly in Africa. Our case is an illustration of the reality of this association. PMID:26866006

  5. Floating-Harbor syndrome complicated by tethered cord: a new association and potential contribution from growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Esko; Wickremesekera, Agadha; Dixon, Joanne

    2005-07-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome is a rare syndrome with short stature, severely delayed bone age, typical facies and delay in expressive speech. Structural malformations are uncommon, and tethered cord or other forms of spinal dysraphism have not previously been reported. We report on a case of Floating-Harbor syndrome, complicated by tethered cord and discuss the possibility that growth hormone therapy may contribute to the development of symptoms of this malformation. PMID:15889416

  6. Otitis complicated by Jacod's syndrome with unusal facial nerve involvement: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abdulkadir, Kocer; Buket, Sanlisoy; Dilek, Agircan; Munevver, Okay; Ayse, Aralasmak

    2015-04-01

    Otitis media is a well-known condition and its infra-temporal and intracranial complications are extremely rare because of the widespread usage of antibiotic treatment. We report a case of 63-year-old female with complaints of right-sided facial pain and diplopia. She had a history of acute otitis media before 4 months of admission to our neurology unit. Neurological examination showed that total ophthalmoplegia with ptosis, mydriasis, decreased vision and loss of pupil reflex on the right side. In addition, there was involvement of 5th and 7th cranial nerves. Neurological and radiological follow-up examinations demonstrated Jacod's Syndrome with unusual facial nerve damage and infection in aetiology. Sinusitis is the most common aetiology, but there are a few cases reported Jacod's Syndrome originating from otitis media. PMID:25976583

  7. Treatment of GERD Complications (Barrett’s, Peptic Stricture) and Extraesophageal Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ajay; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Apart from typical reflux symptoms and esophagitis, the clinical presentation of GERD can be dominated by mucosal complications of reflux (Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, Peptic structure) or by extra-esophageal syndromes, most notably asthma, laryngitis, or chronic cough. Managing these entities is much less straightforward than with esophagitis. With respect to adenocarcinoma, metaplasia and dysplasia are recognized precursors, but the potential of these lesions to evolve to cancer has not been shown to lessen as a result of treatment, medical or surgical. Consequently, management focuses on strategies to identify and eliminate high grade dysplasia and intramucosal cancer, lesions that are potentially curable by endoscopic ablation or surgical resection. With respect to the extra-esophageal GERD syndromes, these are increasingly recognized as multifactorial conditions with reflux as an exacerbating factor. Treatment trials have been generally disappointing and the clinical challenge remains in accurately identifying afflicted patients who might benefit from more intensive medical or surgical reflux treatment. PMID:21126707

  8. Air leak syndrome after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A rare and fatal complication

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Bulent; Roach, Emir Charles; Koklu, Seyfettin; Aydin, Onur; Unlu, Ozan; Kilic, Yusuf Alper

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic procedure for various pancreatic and biliary problems. In spite of the well-established safety of the procedure, there is still a risk of complications such as pancreatitis, cholangitis, bleeding and perforation. Air leak syndrome has rarely been reported in association with ERCP and the optimal management of this serious condition can be difficult to establish. Our group successfully managed a case of air leak syndrome following ERCP which was caused by a 3cm Stapfer type I perforation in the posterolateral aspect of the second part of the duodenum and was repaired surgically. Hereby, we describe the presentation and subsequent therapeutic approach. PMID:25914490

  9. Pulmonary Complications of Azanucleoside Therapy in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Manuel; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Mims, Martha; Rahman, Effie; Rivero, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Our primary aim was to identify potential risk factors and clinical outcome of azanucleoside induced pulmonary complications in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML). We present an 89-year-old female with MDS derived AML who developed fatigability, hypoxemia, and bilateral lung infiltrates indicating interstitial lung disease after 11 cycles of azanucleoside. In addition, we describe a cohort of six MDS patients with fever, cough, dyspnea, and pulmonary infiltrates at early time point during azanucleoside treatment. Early and late onset of pulmonary manifestations suggest different pathogenic mechanisms. Brief azanucleoside discontinuation and steroids led to rapid improvement in symptoms. PMID:26798526

  10. Rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla complicated by combination syndrome with an implant overdenture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Piermatti, Jack

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of the edentulous jaws with complete dentures is determined individually and often is unpredictable. Implant-assisted overdentures are a significant improvement over conventional complete dentures in terms of patient comfort and function. Combination syndrome refers to a dramatic exaggeration of maxillary alveolar resorption leading to a more complicated rehabilitation. This article reviews how the edentulous maxilla can be rehabilitated with an implant-assisted overdenture. A case report is presented which utilizes a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufactured milled titanium connecting bar to retain a chrome-cobalt based, precision attachment, palateless prosthesis. PMID:23928443

  11. Bilateral Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms Complicated by Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Lynch, Donald; Jahanayar, Jama; Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer; Boyd, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Giant coronary aneurysms are rare. We present a 25-year-old woman with a known history of non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic bilateral coronary aneurysms. She was transferred to our facility with acute coronary syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock. Angiography demonstrated giant bilateral coronary aneurysms and complete occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting is the preferred approach for addressing giant coronary aneurysms. Intervention on the aneurysm varies in the literature. Aggressive revascularization is recommended in the non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic aneurysm patient, and ligation should be performed in patients with thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:27000621

  12. Life-Threatening Complication During Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Gland Metastasis: Takotsubo Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia Buy, Xavier; Zickler, Pierre; Zupan, Michel Douchet, Marie-Pierre; Gangi, Afshin

    2010-06-15

    A rare life-threatening complication during percutaneous cryoablation of an adrenal gland metastasis from a lung carcinoma is reported. The patient presented hypertensive crisis at the beginning of the thawing cycle, followed by electrocardiographic change which necessitated interruption of the procedure and his transfer to the intensive care unit with suspicion of heart infarct. There was a slight increase in cardiac enzyme levels, and ventricular angiography demonstrated transient hypokinesis-dyskinesis of the mid left ventricular segments without apical involvement, while the coronary arteries showed no significant stenosis on coronarography. These findings led to the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy left ventricular dysfunction syndrome. This is the first case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurring as a complication during percutaneous ablation of an adrenal gland tumor.

  13. Bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in a patient with alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Young Cho, Jae; Lee, Jae-Won; Jung Cho, Eun; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung; Yong Cho, Won; Kyu Kim, Hyoung

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare clinical entity that can be complicated by rhabdomyolysis or acute kidney injury (AKI). We report the a case of a 30-year-old woman without any comorbid diseases who was diagnosed with bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome complicated by rhabdomyolysis and dialysis-requiring AKI, which was caused by prolonged immobilization under the influence of alcohol. Although the patient’s renal function recovered fully after 5 sessions of hemodialysis, sciatic neuropathy caused by gluteal compartment syndrome led to permanent foot drop.

  14. Boerhaave syndrome as a complication of colonoscopy preparation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Colonoscopy is one of the most frequently performed elective and invasive diagnostic interventions. For every colonoscopy, complete colon preparation is mandatory to provide the best possible endoluminal visibility; for example, the patient has to drink a great volume of a non-resorbable solution to flush out all feces. Despite the known possible nauseating side effects of colonoscopy preparation and despite the knowledge that excessive vomiting can cause rupture of the distal esophagus (Boerhaave syndrome), which is a rare but severe complication with high morbidity and mortality, it is not yet a standard procedure to provide a patient with an anti-emetic medication during a colon preparation process. This is the first report of Boerhaave syndrome induced by colonoscopy preparation, and this case strongly suggests that the prospect of being at risk of a severe complication connected with an elective colonoscopy justifies a non-invasive, inexpensive yet effective precaution such as an anti-emetic co-medication during the colonoscopy preparation process. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian woman was scheduled to undergo elective colonoscopy. For the colonoscopy preparation at home she received commercially available bags containing soluble polyethylene glycol powder. No anti-emetic medication was prescribed. After drinking the prepared solution she had to vomit excessively and experienced a sudden and intense pain in her back. An immediate computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a rupture of the distal esophagus (Boerhaave syndrome). After initial conservative treatment by endoluminal sponge vacuum therapy, she was taken to the operating theatre and the longitudinal esophageal rupture was closed by direct suture and gastric fundoplication (Nissen procedure). She recovered completely and was discharged three weeks after the initial event. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of Boerhaave syndrome as a complication of excessive vomiting caused by colonoscopy preparation. The case suggests that patients who are prepared for a colonoscopy by drinking large volumes of fluid should routinely receive an anti-emetic medication during the preparation process, especially when they have a tendency to nausea and vomiting. PMID:22054124

  15. The hypertension of Cushing's syndrome: controversies in the pathophysiology and focus on cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Isidori, Andrea M.; Graziadio, Chiara; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Cozzolino, Alessia; Ambrogio, Alberto G.; Colao, Annamaria; Corsello, Salvatore M.; Pivonello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with increased mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular complications, which are sustained by the common development of systemic arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome, which partially persist after the disease remission. Cardiovascular diseases and hypertension associated with endogenous hypercortisolism reveal underexplored peculiarities. The use of exogenous corticosteroids also impacts on hypertension and cardiovascular system, especially after prolonged treatment. The mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension differ, whether glucocorticoid excess is acute or chronic, and the source endogenous or exogenous, introducing inconsistencies among published studies. The pleiotropic effects of glucocorticoids and the overlap of the several regulatory mechanisms controlling blood pressure suggest that a rigorous comparison of in-vivo and in-vitro studies is necessary to draw reliable conclusions. This review, developed during the first ‘Altogether to Beat Cushing's syndrome’ workshop held in Capri in 2012, evaluates the most important peculiarities of hypertension associated with CS, with a particular focus on its pathophysiology. A critical appraisal of most significant animal and human studies is compared with a systematic review of the few available clinical trials. A special attention is dedicated to the description of the clinical features and cardiovascular damage secondary to glucocorticoid excess. On the basis of the consensus reached during the workshop, a pathophysiology-oriented therapeutic algorithm has been developed and it could serve as a first attempt to rationalize the treatment of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome. PMID:25415766

  16. Severe Asherman's syndrome complicated with placenta increta conceived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection following hysteroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, S; Yahata, T; Nishikawa, N; Arinami, Y; Maruhashi, T; Takakuwa, K; Tanaka, K

    2012-01-01

    Although severe Asherman's syndrome is a disease that may cause infertility, pregnancy and childbirth are possible by performing hysteroscopic surgery. However, the obstetrical outcome is not always satisfactory. We report a case where severe Asherman's syndrome occurred following a cesarean section. Hysteroscopic surgery was performed due to secondary infertility, and pregnancy was achieved through a subsequent intracytoplasmic sperm injection. At 23 weeks of gestation, the patient was hospitalized due to the threat of premature labor, and a cesarean section was performed at 29 weeks of gestation after pregnancy-induced hypertension occurred. It was determined to be abnormal adherent placentation such as placenta increta through intraoperative findings, and a cesarean hysterectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis of the uterus was placenta increta. Due to the risk of complications from placenta increta in pregnancies following hysteroscopic surgery in patients with severe Asherman's syndrome, it is important to realize the high risk involved in such cases during the pregnancy course, and careful perinatal management should be required. PMID:23444767

  17. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge. PMID:25971272

  18. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating an acute chest syndrome: potential benefit of early combination of exchange transfusion and prone positioning].

    PubMed

    Dusacre, J-A; Pons, B; Piednoir, P; Soubirou, J-F; Thiery, G

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of an 8-year-old sickle cell anemia child admitted for acute respiratory failure complicating acute chest syndrome. Because of threatening respiratory failure, tracheal intubation was performed immediately after ICU admission. The patient met the criteria for ARDS with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 94mmHg. An exchange transfusion was performed immediately after admission. HbS fraction failed from 69 % to 30 %. Fluid resuscitation with crystalloids and continuous norepinephrine infusion was needed because of arterial hypotension. Due to persistent severe hypoxemia with PaO2/FiO2 ratio below 100, the patient was placed in prone positioning 16hours after admission, for a total duration of 14hours. A second 12-hour session of prone positioning was performed 41h after admission and PaO2/FiO2 ratio reached 300mmHg after. Treatment also included transfusion of two red-cell pack on day 1 and 2 after admission in order to maintain hemoglobin level above 8g/dL, and a daily folic acid supplementation. The control of hyperthermia was achieved by a systematic parenteral administration of paracetamol. Cefotaxime and erythromycine were continued until day 7 despite the negative results of all bacteriological samples. The outcome was favorable from day 3 and the patient met the criteria for extubation on day 5. A first attempt of extubation was performed on day 5, but re-intubation was required because of laryngeal edema. Steroids were given for 48h and the patient was successfully extubated on day 7. She was discharged from the ICU on day 8, and from the hospital on day 12. We discuss the various treatments available for the management of acute chest syndrome and their actual relevance in acute respiratory distress syndrome in the absence of strong evidence-based guidelines in pediatric ARDS. PMID:25458459

  19. Abdominal compartment syndrome – the prevention and treatment of possible lethal complications following hip arthroscopy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome have been increasingly recognized as a hip arthroscopy complication over the past decade. In the absence of consensus definitions and treatment guidelines, the diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome remains variable from institution to institution. Case presentation We report the occurrence of the extravasation of fluid into the abdomen during arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement combined with resection of trochanteric bursa and our management of the condition in a 55-year old Caucasian woman. Conclusions We present an algorithm of treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome, as a hip arthroscopy complication, according to the consensus definitions and recommendations of the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome. In the algorithm options, we have included paracentesis and percutaneous catheter decompression as the main point of treatment. Our algorithm will have a broader clinical impact on orthopedic surgery, anesthesiology and emergency medicine. PMID:25394557

  20. [A Case of Corticobasal Syndrome Complicated with Hypopituitarism and Hashimoto's Disease].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Satoru; Kinbara, Yoshiyuki; Terada, Makoto; Komiya, Tadashi; Ishii, Kenji; Takao, Masaki; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Murayama, Shigeo

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of an individual with corticobasal syndrome (CBS), hypopituitarism due to a post-traumatic leptomeningeal cyst, and Hashimoto's disease. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of cognitive dysfunction and bradykinesia. Following a primary diagnosis of hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism, she was given hormone replacement therapy, and her clinical symptoms appeared to improve. However, some cognitive impairment and extrapyramidal symptoms remained. The results of careful neurological examinations, as well as magnetic resonance, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography images, suggested a diagnosis of CBS-CBD (corticobasal degeneration). Because parkinsonism and cognitive impairment can be caused by endocrinopathy, it was initially difficult to reach the complete diagnosis that included CBS. Thus, it is important to understand that complicated neurological presentations can be caused by several different disorders. PMID:26062591

  1. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Coincidence of unusual complication?

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, S.A.; Williams, C.A.; Gray, B.A.

    1996-09-06

    We report on two patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The first, a 9-year-old girl, presented with microcephaly, characteristic face, congenital heart disease, and velopharyngeal insufficiency. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study showed deletion of D22S75 (N25), confirming the diagnosis of VCFS. At age 7, she developed joint pain, and polyarticular JRA was diagnosed. Awareness of this case led to the subsequent diagnosis of VCFS (also confirmed by FISH) in another, unrelated 12-year-old girl with characteristic face, hypernasal speech, and obesity. JRA was first diagnosed in this case at age 5 years, and she subsequently developed severe polyarticular disease. Neither patient had clinical or laboratory evidence of immunodeficiency. This observation represents the first report of the association of JRA with VCFS and raises the question of whether this is a coincidental association or a rare complication of this condition. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Complication of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia in an elderly patient with Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waseda, Koichi; Hagiya, Hideharu; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kosuke; Tsuzuki, Takao; Hasegawa, Kou; Nada, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eri; Murakami, Kazutoshi; Kondo, Eisei; Otsuka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old Japanese male with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) developed a low-grade fever and productive cough which were refractory to antibiotic therapy. Based on the high level of eosinophils observed in his bronchial alveolar lavage, he was diagnosed with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) and successfully treated by oral prednisolone. Interstitial lung diseases associated with pSS (pSS-ILDs) usually present as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia or usual interstitial pneumonia; therefore, the present case is extremely unique in that the patient's condition was complicated with CEP. A diagnosis of advanced gallbladder cancer was made in the patient's clinical course, suggesting the advisability of a whole-body workup in cases of pSS, especially in elderly patients. PMID:25899635

  3. Fatal nephrotic syndrome complicating allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dov, Iddo Z; Pizov, Galina; Ben-Chetrit, Eldad; Rubinger, Dvora; Or, Reuven

    2009-09-01

    Disturbed kidney function is a common occurrence after bone-marrow transplantation. Sepsis, nephrotoxic medications, thrombotic microangiopathy and injury related to haemodynamic alterations are frequently accountable. Recently, attention has been given to immune-mediated glomerular damage, related to graft-versus-host disease. Herein we describe the fatal course of a nephrotic syndrome complicating allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a young woman with long-standing paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. A post-mortem kidney biopsy revealed amyloidosis of the AA type. Physicians should be aware of the possibility that infections and inflammation accompanying the post-transplantation period may rarely promote the development of systemic amyloidosis or exacerbate silent pre-existing disease. PMID:19506045

  4. A case of metastatic testicular cancer complicated by pulmonary hemorrhage due to choriocarcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Shuya; Kawai, Koji; Fukuhara, Yoshiharu; Joraku, Akira; Miyanaga, Naoto; Shimazui, Toru; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2010-12-01

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of metastatic testicular cancer. Computerized tomography revealed multiple lung, liver, and retroperitoneal lymph node metastases. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple brain metastases. Induction chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin was started the day after a high orchiectomy. The pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was yolk sac carcinoma. The serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was markedly increased to 630,000 mIU/ml, which suggested the presence of a choriocarcinoma element at metastatic sites. The patient subsequently suffered respiratory failure due to pulmonary hemorrhage. Intensive supportive care prevented a fatal outcome. Physicians who treat advanced testicular tumors should be aware of the potential complication of acute pulmonary hemorrhage, called choriocarcinoma syndrome, in cases with a high hCG level, which indicates a rapidly progressive and high-volume choriocarcinoma. PMID:20544252

  5. Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome and its associated complications in Iranian women: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Anahita; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Khodaee, Zahra; Akbari, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age and is the most common cause of infertility due to anovulation. There is no single criterion for the diagnosis of this syndrome. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of PCOS and its associated complications in Iranian women using meta-analysis method. Materials and Methods: Prevalence of PCOS was investigated from the SID, Goggle scholar, PubMed, Magiran, Irandoc, and Iranmedex, and weighting of each study was calculated according to sample size and prevalence of the binomial distribution. Data were analyzed using a random-effects model meta-analysis (Random effects model) and the software R and Stata Version 11.2. Results: 30 studies conducted between the years 2006 to 2011 were entered into meta-analysis. The total sample size was 19, 226 women aged between 10-45 years. The prevalence of PCOS based on National institute of child health and human disease of the U.S was, 6.8% (95 % CI: 4.11–8.5), based on Rotterdam was 19.5% (95 % CI: 2.24-8.14), and based on ultrasound was 4.41% (95% CI: 5.68-4.14). Also, the prevalence of hirsutism was estimated to be 13%, acne 26%, androgenic alopecia 9%, menstrual disorders 28%, overweight 21%, obesity 19%, and infertility 8%. Conclusion: The prevalence of PCOS in Iran is not high. However, given the risk of complications such as heart disease - cardiovascular and infertility, prevention of PCOS is important; we suggest that health officials must submit plans for the community in this respect. PMID:26644787

  6. Unambiguous molecular detections with multiple genetic approach for the complicated chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Huang, Cheng-Hung; Cheong, Mei-Leng; Hung, Kun-Long; Lin, Lung-Huang; Yu, Yeong-Seng; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Huei-Chen; Chen, Chan-Wei; Huang, Chi-Jung

    2009-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) causes a developmental disorder during the embryonic stage, usually because of hemizygous deletions. The clinical pictures of patients with 22q11DS vary because of polymorphisms: on average, approximately 93% of affected individuals have a de novo deletion of 22q11, and the rest have inherited the same deletion from a parent. Methods using multiple genetic markers are thus important for the accurate detection of these microdeletions. Methods We studied 12 babies suspected to carry 22q11DS and 18 age-matched healthy controls from unrelated Taiwanese families. We determined genomic variance using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Results Changes in genomic copy number were significantly associated with clinical manifestations for the classical criteria of 22q11DS using MPLA and qPCR (p < 0.01). An identical deletion was shown in three affected infants by MLPA. These reduced DNA dosages were also obtained partially using array-CGH and confirmed by qPCR but with some differences in deletion size. Conclusion Both MLPA and qPCR could produce a clearly defined range of deleted genomic DNA, whereas there must be a deleted genome that is not distinguishable using MLPA. These data demonstrate that such multiple genetic approaches are necessary for the unambiguous molecular detection of these types of complicated genomic syndromes. PMID:19243607

  7. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome: a unique complication following carboplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Pansuria, Heer P; Farooqi, Bilal; Goyal, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is an uncommon condition, attributable to vascular compression of the third part of the duodenum between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta. It can present in patients due to mechanical compression or severe weight loss. We present a unique case of SMAS in a patient undergoing carboplatin-based chemotherapy for mesothelioma. An 81-year-old male with mesothelioma was treated with carboplatin-based chemotherapy. He subsequently suffered a progressive, unintentional 18 kg weight loss and presented acutely with intense epigastric pain, severe nausea, and vomiting. Diagnosis was confirmed by abdominal computed tomography and esophagogram with upper gastrointestinal series, which revealed gastric and duodenal distention and a narrow angle between the superior mesenteric artery and aorta, causing compression of the duodenum. Prompt recognition of this syndrome allowed us to treat our patient successfully and avoid the risks of operative interventions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of SMAS in patients receiving carboplatin. Furthermore, this case of SMAS was unique in that it was due to weight loss as compared with mechanical obstruction. Our experience illustrates the importance of considering SMAS in chemotherapy patients, especially those with substantial weight loss. A high index of suspicion for this potential complication coupled with appropriate radiographic studies are necessary for early diagnosis and can prevent severe consequences. PMID:25733933

  8. A case of Clostridium difficile infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Gweon, Tae-Geun; Yeo, Chang Dong; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Hyunho; Lee, Hye Won; Lim, Taeseok; Ham, Hyoju; Oh, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yeongbok; Byeon, Jaeho; Park, Sung Soo

    2014-09-21

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life-threatening disorder caused mainly by pneumonia. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common nosocomial diarrheal disease. Disruption of normal intestinal flora by antibiotics is the main risk factor for CDI. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for serious medical conditions can make it difficult to treat CDI complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective treatment in patients with refractory CDI. Here we report on a patient with refractory CDI and acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by pneumonia who was treated with fecal microbiota transplantation. PMID:25253977

  9. [Successful treatment with recombinant thrombomodulin for disseminated intravascular coagulation complicated with hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Tatsumi, Goichi; Kotani, Shin-Ichi; Arai, Yasuyuki; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kitano, Toshiyuki; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant human thrombomodulin (rTM) improves the blood coagulation disorder characteristic of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) as well as, or even better than, other anti-DIC drugs. On post-marketing surveillance, its effectiveness has been recognized for hematologic disorders, sepsis and solid tumor subgroups. However, the effect on hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) complicated by DIC remains unclear. We treated three HPS patients with rTM in addition to chemotherapy for the underlying diseases including nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and refractory acute myeloid leukemia post cord blood transplantation. Although being refractory to medical management was suspected in our cases, clinical status rapidly came under control including not only amelioration of the blood coagulation disorder but also inflammatory reactions, such as serum ferritin and lactic acid dehydrogenase abnormalities, which represent HPS activity. These observations suggest that rTM might exert marked synergistic effects on HPS with DIC. Given the results obtained in these three cases, administration of rTM appears to offer a promising method of treating HPS complicated by DIC. PMID:25876785

  10. Clinical and epidemiological peculiarities of hemorrhagic colitis complicated by hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pachkoria, E; Vashakidze, E; Megrelishvili, T; Tevzadze, L

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the research: identification of etiological structure of acute diarrheas and hemorrhagic colitis in Georgia, manifestation of clinical peculiarities and predictors of hemorrhagic colitis complicated by HUS ( Hemolytic-Uremic syndrome). In 2011-2013 we studied 274 hospitalized patients at the Center of Infectious Diseases, AIDS and Clinical Immunology (160 hemorrhagic colitis and 114 non-bloody diarrhea). Causative agents of hemorrhagic colitis (160 patients) were determined in 110 (69%) cases; etiology of the non-bloody diarrhea (114 patients) was established in 46 (40%) cases. Enteronterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strains are major causes of hemorrhagic colitis. For the confirmation of STEC infection by the bacteriological investigation some significant additional methods were used: serologic examination of feces on shiga- toxin molecular markers by ImmunoCard STAT and PCR methods. Thus, these above mentioned investigations contribute to diagnosis STEC infection at the early stage of the disease. Based on our findings we were able to reveal predictors of complications of hemorrhagic colitis by HUS. They include: Delayed hospitalization, rural residents, premorbid background, onset of the disease with low-grade fever accompanied with abdominal cramps, manifestation of bloody diarrhea on the 2-3-rd days of the disease, frequent bowl movement (>20 times a day), development of oliguria and edema on the following days, leucocytosis in hemogram, elevation of LDH, creatinine and urea, hypoalbuminemia and development of ascites. PMID:25341242

  11. [Prevention and treatment of the complications of polycystic ovarian syndrome--the significance of evidence-based, interdisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-12-13

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The complex feature of the syndrome requires an interdisciplinary approach to treatment, where cooperation of paediatrician, internist, gynaecologist, endocrinologist, dermatologist, psychologist and oncologist is essential. The prevention and the treatment should be based on the best available evidence. This should include physical examination, laboratory tests for hormones, serum insulin, glucose, lipids, in addition patient's preferences should be considered, too. To maximise health gain of polycystic ovarian syndrome, adequate, effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular complications of the syndrome, and discusses the relevant evidence published in the literature. PMID:26639643

  12. Mycobacterium kansasii septicaemia in an AIDS patient complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Hamid; Layne, Trevor; Sensakovic, John W; Boghossian, Jack

    2014-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious complication of sepsis. Only a few cases of non-tuberculous mycobacteria complicated by ARDS have been discussed in the literature to date. Mycobacterium kansasii is the most pathogenic non-tuberculous mycobacterium affecting the lung. In the late stages of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), it may also present as disseminated disease. The clinical course is usually chronic, and the time to clinical diagnosis can sometimes be long, requiring a careful and meticulous search for the pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of disseminated M. kansasii infection complicated by ARDS and acute liver failure in a patient with end-stage AIDS. PMID:23970643

  13. Moderate wine consumption in the prevention of metabolic syndrome and its related medical complications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Wang, Yu; Lam, Karen S L; Xu, Aimin

    2008-06-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) encompasses a constellation of cardio-metabolic abnormalities associated with a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the top killer in the ageing population. Recent studies have demonstrated multiple beneficial effects of moderate wine consumption in the protection against development of the MetS and its related medical complications. The association of moderate wine consumption with lower incidence of the MetS and atherosclerotic heart disease has been repeatedly documented in numerous epidemiological studies on diverse ethnic groups. In addition to the favorable effects of moderate ethanol intake on lipid profiles, polyphenols enriched in red wine possess multiple benefits on the MetS beyond alcohol through their anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, vascular-protective and insulin-sensitizing properties. Notable among these red wine polypheolic compounds is resveratrol, a phytoalexin that has recently attracted great attention due to its role in mimicking calorie restriction. This compound can act as a potent activator of the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases sirtuins to expand the life span and to prevent the deleterious effects of excess intake on insulin resistance and metabolic derangement. In addition, resveratrol exerts its multiple protective effects against the MetS through stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase and promoting mitochondria biogenesis. In this review, we highlight the recent epidemiological and experimental evidences supporting the protective effects of moderate wine intake against the MetS and its associated cardio-metabolic complications, and discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the multiple beneficial actions of red wine polyphenols with the focus on resveratrol. PMID:18537695

  14. Pregnancy complications and glucose intolerance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Mari; Masuyama, Hisashi; Hayata, Kei; Kamada, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2015-11-28

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder characterized by insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism. The interaction of these factors might result in increased risks of miscarriage and pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). To examine the pregnancy risks in women with PCOS, we compared obstetrical outcomes between patients with and without PCOS. We also studied the differences in maternal characteristics, glucose intolerance and pregnancy complications between PCOS patients with and without GDM, with and without obesity, and between successful pregnancies and miscarriages. We observed a high incidence of GDM and prevalence of GDM diagnosis in the first trimester in PCOS. Patients with GDM had higher body mass index (BMI) and lower homeostasis model assessment of ?-cell function (HOMA-?) at preconception than those without GDM. Obese pregnant women with PCOS demonstrated a high incidence of GDM with severe insulin resistance, including high fasting insulin, HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and HOMA-? at preconception compared with normal-weight patients. BMI was significantly correlated with HOMA-IR or HOMA-?, and both indices were lower in PCOS patients with than without GDM for the same BMI. There were no significant differences in maternal characteristics (excluding maternal age) between PCOS patients with successful pregnancy and PCOS patients with miscarriages. Our data suggest that pregnant women with PCOS have an increased risk of GDM, especially if they have obesity and/or poorer insulin secretion. Measure of ?-cell function, such as HOMA-?, at preconception might be a useful predictor of the risk of GDM in pregnant PCOS patients. PMID:26370557

  15. Investigation of an outbreak of bloody diarrhea complicated with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chokoshvili, Otar; Lomashvili, Khatuna; Malakmadze, Naile; Geleishvil, Marika; Brant, Jonas; Imnadze, Paata; Chitadze, Nazibrola; Tevzadze, Lia; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Tevdoradze, Tea; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Talkington, Deborah; Mody, Rajal K; Strockbine, Nancy; Gerber, Russell A; Maes, Edmond; Rush, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    In July-August 2009, eight patients with bloody diarrhea complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) were admitted to hospitals in Tbilisi, Georgia. We started active surveillance in two regions for bloody diarrhea and post-diarrheal HUS. Of 25 case-patients who developed HUS, including the initial 8 cases, half were ?15 years old, 67% were female and seven (28%) died. No common exposures were identified. Among 20 HUS case-patients tested, Shiga toxin was detected in the stools of 2 patients (one with elevated serum IgG titers to several Escherichia coli serogroups, including O111 and O104). Among 56 persons with only bloody diarrhea, we isolated Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O104:H4 from 2 and Shigella from 10; 2 had serologic evidence of E. coli O26 infection. These cases may indicate a previously unrecognized burden of HUS in Georgia. We recommend national reporting of HUS and improving STEC detection capacity. PMID:25455642

  16. Warfarin-induced venous limb ischemia/gangrene complicating cancer: a novel and clinically distinct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Cook, Richard J; Sarode, Ravi; Sloane, Debi A; Crowther, Mark A

    2015-07-23

    Venous limb gangrene (VLG) can occur in cancer patients, but the clinical picture and pathogenesis remain uncertain. We identified 10 patients with metastatic cancer (7 pathologically proven) who developed severe venous limb ischemia (phlegmasia/VLG) after initiating treatment of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT); in 8 patients, cancer was not known or suspected at presentation. The patients exhibited a novel, clinically distinct syndrome: warfarin-associated supratherapeutic international normalized ratio (INR; median, 6.5) at onset of limb ischemia, rising platelet count during heparin anticoagulation, and platelet fall after stopping heparin. Despite supratherapeutic INRs, patient plasma contained markedly elevated thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex levels (indicating uncontrolled thrombin generation) and protein C (PC) depletion; this profile resembles the greatly elevated TAT/PC activity ratios reported in patients with warfarin-associated VLG complicating heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Analyses of vitamin K-dependent factors in 6 cancer patients with available serial plasma samples showed that variations in the INR corresponded most closely with changes in factor VII, with a highly collinear relationship between VII and PC. We conclude that venous limb ischemia/gangrene is explained in some cancer patients by profoundly disturbed procoagulant-anticoagulant balance, whereby warfarin fails to block cancer-associated hypercoagulability while nonetheless contributing to severe PC depletion, manifest as a characteristic supratherapeutic INR caused by parallel severe factor VII depletion. PMID:25979950

  17. Heterotopic ossification as an unusual complication after Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Su-Ra; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Choi, In-Sung; Han, Jae-Young; Lee, Sam-Gyu

    2008-03-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the abnormal development of bone within soft tissue. It is frequently encountered after traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, rather than lower motoneuron disease. It has been reported as a rare complication in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We present the case of a 31-year-old woman who suffered from pain and swelling with limitation of the passive range of motion on right hip joint, and who had been diagnosed with GBS about 1 year previously. She was wheelchair-bound and had incomplete tetraplegia with flaccidity. She was diagnosed as HO based on the radiologic imaging study. She did not reveal any encephalopathy-related symptoms or signs, and hypercalcemia, and/or related metabolic derangement during 1.5-year follow-up period. Owing to the paucity of other causative factors, we presumed that the long-time hypomobility, even though not accompanied by hypercalcemia, played a major role for the development of HO. Early active rehabilitative management was initiated. The outcome is not promising because of her long-standing paralyzed state; however, it was possible to prevent the aggravation of HO. PMID:18295638

  18. A possible role of polycystic ovary syndrome for pregnancy complications in women with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Clara; Caldarola, Giacomo; Corbeddu, Marialuisa; Moro, Francesca; Tropea, Anna; Moretta, Gaia; Apa, Rosanna

    2014-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, relapsing immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID) of the skin. IMIDs are multifactorial diseases characterized by common molecular pathways leading to a systemic inflammation. Patients with an IMID are also at higher risk of developing co-morbidities, such as adverse pregnancy outcomes, than the general population. A higher rate of pregnancy complications have been seen in inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The data for psoriasis are inconsistent but it appears that women with moderate-to-severe psoriasis may also have an increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. The cause of this association is unknown, although it may be related to elevated proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-?, the high prevalence of comorbidities and other unhealthy behaviours, or the high prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In a recent study, PCOS prevalence in a psoriatic cohort (n?=?51) was higher than in non-psoriatic women (n?=?102) (47% versus 11%), and women with PCOS and psoriasis had a greater probability of insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia, and dyslipidaemia as well as a more severe skin condition, than those with psoriasis alone. Further studies are necessary to clarify the impact of psoriasis on pregnancy and in particular if these effects are mediated by concomitant PCOS. PMID:25381981

  19. Os peroneum friction syndrome complicated by sesamoid fatigue fracture: a new radiological diagnosis? Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Waseem A; Lewis, Steve; Cullen, Nicholas; Connell, David A

    2009-02-01

    Injuries to the peroneal tendons are relatively common worldwide but tendon rupture without significant trauma is uncommon. Ankle mechanics can be seriously affected by disruption of one or both of the peroneal tendons although complete rupture can also remain asymptomatic. Accessory ossicles are sesamoid bones and are common findings in routine radiology of the foot and ankle. Although in the vast majority these "os" are normal variants of anatomy, they can lead to painful syndromes and suffer fractures and even undergo degenerative changes in response to overuse and trauma. Although similar syndromes have been discussed in the surgical literature, there is a lack of literature describing the use of modern imaging in the accurate diagnosis and its subsequent assistance towards appropriate management of os peroneum friction syndrome complicated by sesamoid fatigue syndrome. This article presents the plain film, sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in a case of os peroneum friction syndrome complicated by a sesamoid fatigue fracture as well as reviewing the pertinent literature. PMID:18810434

  20. Clinical correlates of complicated grief among individuals with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Stefano; Gesi, Camilla; Abelli, Marianna; Cardini, Alessandra; Lari, Lisa; Felice, Francesca; Di Stefano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Gianfranco; Bovenzi, Francesco; Bertoli, Daniele; Borelli, Lucia; Michi, Paola; Oligeri, Claudia; Balbarini, Alberto; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed at exploring bereavement and complicated grief (CG) symptoms among subjects without a history of coronary heart disease (CHD) at the time of a first acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to evaluate the relationship of CG symptoms and ACS. Method Overall, 149 subjects with ACS (namely, acute myocardial infarct with or without ST-segment elevation or unstable angina), with no previous history of CHD, admitted to three cardiac intensive care units were included and evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for Complicated Grief (SCI-CG), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36). Results Of the total sample of 149 subjects with ACS, 118 (79.2%) met criteria for DSM-5 persistent complex bereavement disorder. Among these, subjects who lost a partner, child, or sibling were older (P=0.008), less likely to be working (P=0.032), and more likely to be suffering from hypertension (P=0.021), returned higher scores on the SCI-CG (P=0.001) and developed the index ACS more frequently between 12 and 48 months after the death than those who lost a parent or another relative (P≤0.0001). The occurrence of ACS 12–48 months (P=0.019) after the loss was positively correlated with SCI-CG scores. An inverse relationship with SCI-CG scores was observed for patients who experienced ACS more than 48 months after the loss (P=0.005). The SCI-CG scores significantly predicted lower scores on the “general health” domain of MOS-SF-36 (P=0.030), as well as lower scores on “emotional well-being” domain (P=0.010). Conclusion A great proportion of subjects with ACS report the loss of a loved one. Among these, the loss of a close relative and the severity of CG symptoms are associated with poorer health status. Our data corroborate previous data indicating a strong relationship between CG symptoms and severe cardiac problems. PMID:26504390

  1. Prenatal management and perinatal outcome in giant placental chorioangioma complicated with hydrops fetalis, fetal anemia and maternal mirror syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Giant placental chorioangiomas have been associated with a number of severe fetal complications and high perinatal mortality. Case presentation We report a case of giant chorioangioma with fetal hydrops, additionally complicated by severe anemia, mild cardiomegaly with hyperdinamic heart circulation and maternal mirror syndrome. Intrauterine blood transfusion and amniodrainage was performed at 29 weeks. Worsening of the fetal and maternal condition prompted us to proceed with delivery at 29 + 5 weeks. The newborn died 3 hours later due to pulmonary hypoplasia and hemodynamic failure. Maternal course was favourable, mirror syndrome resolved in the second day and the patient was discharged four days following delivery. Conclusions In the case described here, fetal condition got worse despite of the anemia correction and amniodrainage. Our outcome raises the issue whether additional intrauterine clinical intervention, as intersticial laser, should have been performed to stop further deterioration of the fetal condition when progressive severe hydrops develops. PMID:22840187

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome After Renal Transplant: A Simple Solution for a Complicated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Haughey, David; Narsipur, Sriram S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by an acute neurologic dysfunction coupled with characteristic findings on brain imaging. PRES occurs in the setting of hypertensive emergencies, eclampsia and as a neurotoxic effect of immunosuppressive agents. While overwhelmingly reversible without residual deficits when promptly recognized, vague symptomatology may delay the diagnosis of PRES. Results/Summary A 50-year-old man who had undergone a recent kidney transplant was admitted to our clinic due to multiple episodes of seizure. He had no prior history of seizures or alcoholism. His transplantation had been without complication; he was discharged and given prednisone, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, acyclovir, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, atenolol and enalapril. On the day of presentation, he experienced a severe headache, blurred vision and tonic-clonic seizure-like activity. His neurologic examination was limited by sedation, although no focal deficits were evident. Laboratory studies were unremarkable. A lumbar puncture revealed normal opening pressure, negative Gram stain, benign CSF analysis and India ink preparation. An MRI of the brain revealed bilateral enhancing parietal-occipital lesions, seen prominently on FLAIR sequence. Tacrolimus and all other medications were continued. The patient remained afebrile and normotensive and was extubated on the second hospital day. The patient reported no neurologic symptoms and was discharged on the third hospital day after a full recovery. Conclusions While the outcome of PRES is typically benign, a delay in diagnosis may lead to permanent neurologic deficits, and misdiagnosis can be lethal. The cornerstone of treatment is removal of the offending agent or treatment of the underlying etiology. A clinical picture of headache, visual abnormalities, altered mentation and seizures is sufficient to prompt an empiric discontinuation of agents known to cause PRES. Calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus are known to cause PRES, and in our patient, discontinuation led to a complete clinical resolution. PMID:25849670

  3. Germline and somatic genetic variations of TNFAIP3 in lymphoma complicating primary Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nocturne, Gaetane; Boudaoud, Saida; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Viengchareun, Say; Lazure, Thierry; Nititham, Joanne; Taylor, Kimberly E; Ma, Averil; Busato, Florence; Melki, Judith; Lessard, Christopher J; Sivils, Kathy L; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Hachulla, Eric; Gottenberg, Jacques Eric; Lombès, Marc; Tost, Jorg; Criswell, Lindsey A; Mariette, Xavier

    2013-12-12

    Several autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), are associated with an increased risk for lymphoma. Polymorphisms of TNFAIP3, which encodes the A20 protein that plays a key role in controlling nuclear factor ?B activation, have been associated with several autoimmune diseases. Somatic mutations of TNFAIP3 have been observed in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma subtype frequently associated with pSS. We studied germline and somatic abnormalities of TNFAIP3 in 574 patients with pSS, including 25 with lymphoma. Nineteen additional patients with pSS and lymphoma were available for exome sequence analysis. Functional abnormalities of A20 were assessed by gene reporter assays. The rs2230926 exonic variant was associated with an increased risk for pSS complicated by lymphoma (odds ratio, 3.36 [95% confidence interval, 1.34-8.42], and odds ratio, 3.26 [95% confidence interval, 1.31-8.12], vs controls and pSS patients without lymphoma, respectively; P = .011). Twelve (60%) of the 20 patients with paired germline and lymphoma TNFAIP3 sequence data had functional abnormalities of A20: 6 in germline DNA, 5 in lymphoma DNA, and 1 in both. The frequency was even higher (77%) among pSS patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Some of these variants showed impaired control of nuclear factor ?B activation. These results support a key role for germline and somatic variations of A20 in the transformation between autoimmunity and lymphoma. PMID:24159176

  4. Steal syndrome complicating upper extremity hemoaccess procedures: incidence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Dion; Louridas, George; Guzman, Randolph; Tanner, John; Weighell, Wendy; Spelay, Jodi; Chateau, Dan

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Steal syndrome is a potentially grave complication of upper extremity hemoaccess (HA) in patients with renal failure. To determine the incidence and risk factors for steal in these patients at the St. Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, a tertiary care centre for vascular surgery and dialysis, we reviewed data from patients requiring hemodialysis between September 1986 and July 2000. Patients and methods We excluded all venous catheter and lower extremity procedures. There remained 325 upper extremity procedures in 217 patients. Data were collected from the patients' charts or by interview. First by univariate analysis and then by multivariate analysis for independent risk factors, we studied the effect on the development of steal of age, sex, race diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease or cerebrovascular disease, smoking, proximal procedures based on the brachial artery, distal procedures based on the radial artery, the use of prosthetic graft material and the creation of autologous fistulas. Results The incidence of steal was 6.2%. The significant independent risk factors were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] 5.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39–18.08, p = 0.01) and Aboriginal race (OR 3.59, 95% CI 1.07–12.04, p = 0.04). An increasing risk for each year of advancing age at the time of procedure was suggested but was not significant (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.00–1.09 p = 0.07). Conclusions Patients who are diabetic or Aboriginal are at increased risk for steal with upper extremity HA procedures. This knowledge can guide discussion of dialysis options and informed consent. If upper extremity HA procedures are undertaken in patients at risk, they should be closely monitored and early intervention applied if necessary. PMID:14680346

  5. Drug Hypersensitivity: Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Mallal, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include syndromes such as drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). An important advance has been the discovery of associations between HLA alleles and many of these syndromes including abacavir hypersensitivity reaction, allopurinol DRESS/DIHS and SJS/TEN and SJS/TEN associated with aromatic amine anticonvulsants. These HLA associations have created the promise for prevention through screening and have additionally shed further light on the immunopathogenesis of SCARs. The roll-out of HLA-B*5701 into routine clinical practice as a genetic screening test to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity provides a translational roadmap for other drugs. Numerous hurdles exist in the widespread translation of several other drugs such as carbamazepine where the positive predictive value of HLA-B*1502 is low and the negative predictive value of HLA-B*1502 for SJS/TEN may not be 100% in all ethnic groups. International collaborative consortia have been formed with the goal of developing phenotype standardization and undertaking HLA and genome-wide analyses in diverse populations with these syndromes. PMID:21354501

  6. The life-threatening complications of dermatologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Orion, Edith; Matz, Hagit; Wolf, Ronni

    2005-01-01

    Dermatologists use a variety of systemic drugs, some of which can cause severe adverse reactions and even fatalities. Ivermectin, a well-tolerated drug, can cause severe neurological side effects, whereas metronidazole, in high cumulative doses, has been associated with convulsions and rarely with hepatotoxicity. Dapsone is associated with frequent hematologic side effects, such as methemoglobinemia, hemolysis, and anemia. Although hepatotoxicity is rare and usually mild and reversible with the new antifungal agents, severe cutaneous reactions (such as toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and anaphylaxis) have been reported. Even a relatively safe drug such as acyclovir has been reported to be the cause of renal failure and neurotoxicity. Retinoids can cause not so benign "benign" intracranial hypertension. Methotrexate can cause not only liver toxicity, but also myelosuppression and pancytopenia, which may be acute and life threatening. Nephrotoxicity is a well-recognized side effect of cyclosporine, whereas thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality, is less well known. Dermatologists should be familiar with these and other severe adverse reactions of the most popular and most used systemic medications of our trade. PMID:15802212

  7. Classic Bartter syndrome complicated with profound growth hormone deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Classic Bartter syndrome is a salt-wasting tubulopathy caused by mutations in the CLCNKB (chloride channel Kb) gene. Although growth hormone deficiency has been suggested as a cause for persistent growth failure in patients with classic Bartter syndrome, in our opinion the diagnoses of growth hormone deficiency has been unconvincing in some reports. Moreover, Gitelman syndrome seems to have been confused with Bartter syndrome in some cases in the literature. In the present work, we describe a new case with CLCNKB gene mutations and review the reported cases of classic Bartter syndrome associated with growth hormone deficiency. Case presentation Our patient was a Japanese boy diagnosed as having classic Bartter syndrome at eight months of age. The diagnosis of Bartter syndrome was confirmed by CLCNKB gene analysis, which revealed compound heterozygous mutations with deletion of exons 1 to 3 (derived from his mother) and ?L130 (derived from his father). His medical therapy consisted of potassium (K), sodium chloride, spironolactone, and anti-inflammatory agents; this regime was started at eight months of age. Our patient was very short (131.1cm, -4.9 standard deviation) at 14.3 years and showed profoundly impaired growth hormone responses to pharmacological stimulants: 0.15?g/L to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and 0.39?g/L to arginine. His growth response to growth hormone therapy was excellent. Conclusions The present case strengthens the association between classic Bartter syndrome and growth hormone deficiency. We propose that growth hormone status should be considered while treating children with classic Bartter syndrome. PMID:24377430

  8. Bloom syndrome complicated by colonic cancer in a young Tunisian woman.

    PubMed

    Benjazia, Elhem; Turki, Hajer; Atig, Amira; Khalifa, Mabrouk; Letaief, Amel; Bahri, Fethi; Braham, Ahlem

    2011-10-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by chromosomal instability leading to a high risk of cancer at an early age. The diagnosis should be considered in patients with short stature, photosensitivity, variable degrees of immunodeficiency, and hypogonadism. We report a 19-year-old woman, with history of dysmorphic features and recurrent infections. The diagnosis of bloom syndrome was made and confirmed cytogenetically at the age of 14 years. She developed a colon cancer revealed by venous thrombosis and anemia. She died after 15 days of the cancer diagnosis. This is the first registrated case of confirmed Bloom syndrome in Tunisian population. PMID:21778134

  9. Long survival of a patient with Marshall-Smith syndrome without respiratory complications.

    PubMed Central

    Sperli, D; Concolino, D; Barbato, C; Strisciuglio, P; Andria, G

    1993-01-01

    The Marshall-Smith syndrome is characterised by overgrowth, accelerated skeletal maturation, and dysmorphic facial features, often associated with mental retardation of variable degree. Most of the reported patients died in the first three years of life mainly because of respiratory problems. We describe a 5 year old patient with this rare syndrome, who has optic atrophy and agenesis of the corpus callosum, but has no respiratory problems so far. This observation underlines the clinical variability of the Marshall-Smith syndrome and indicates that life expectancy may be prolonged. Images PMID:8230168

  10. Tetrabenazine-induced oculogyric crisis - a rare complication in the treatment of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janik, Piotr; Figura, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Tetrabenazine is used in the treatment of chorea, tardive dyskinesia, tics, and dystonia. It rarely causes acute eyeball dystonia and the description of this complication in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is limited. We provide a description of an acute oculogyric crisis caused by tetrabenazine in a patient with severe tics. The patient had never developed acute dystonic reactions, although he was previously exposed to numerous dopamine receptor-blocking agents. After 8 days of therapy with tetrabenazine at a dose of 62.5 mg daily, the patient developed involuntary movement of the eyeballs. Withdrawal of tetrabenazine caused resolution of all symptoms after a week. The purpose of this description is to draw attention to the potential of tetrabenazine to induce acute oculogyric crisis as well as the difficulty of differentiating drug-induced dystonia from dystonic tics in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:26955276

  11. Tetrabenazine-induced oculogyric crisis – a rare complication in the treatment of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Janik, Piotr; Figura, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Tetrabenazine is used in the treatment of chorea, tardive dyskinesia, tics, and dystonia. It rarely causes acute eyeball dystonia and the description of this complication in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is limited. We provide a description of an acute oculogyric crisis caused by tetrabenazine in a patient with severe tics. The patient had never developed acute dystonic reactions, although he was previously exposed to numerous dopamine receptor-blocking agents. After 8 days of therapy with tetrabenazine at a dose of 62.5 mg daily, the patient developed involuntary movement of the eyeballs. Withdrawal of tetrabenazine caused resolution of all symptoms after a week. The purpose of this description is to draw attention to the potential of tetrabenazine to induce acute oculogyric crisis as well as the difficulty of differentiating drug-induced dystonia from dystonic tics in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:26955276

  12. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome as a complication of Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 1996, Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate was introduced and has been shown to be safe and highly effective. Case presentation We report a case of a rare complication that resulted in intra-abdominal compartment syndrome with prolonged intubation and intensive care, involving an 74-year-old male after holmium laser enucleation of prostate, with a massive irrigant fluid leakage into the retroperitoneal space. The elevated abdominal pressure was reduced by forced diuresis. The tracheal tube was removed 18 hours after the patient’s transfer to the ICU. The patient was discharged to home one week after the operation. Conclusion In rare cases when no obvious ruptures of the prostate capsule or the bladder occur during laser enucleation of prostate, knowledge regarding possible emersion of massive amounts of irrigant fluid into the retroperitoneal space leading to intra-abdominal compartment syndrome aids in the diagnosis and subsequent successful therapy of intra-abdominal hypertension. PMID:24910537

  13. Syndrome of iron pill inhalation in four patients with accidental tablet aspiration: Severe airway complications are described

    PubMed Central

    Caterino, U.; Battistoni, P.; Batzella, S.; Iacono, R. Dello; Lucantoni, G.; Galluccio, G.

    2015-01-01

    Iron pill inhalation represents a uncommon cause of syntomatic endobronchial foreign bodies. Unlike foreign body, the direct contact of iron tablet onto the bronchial mucosa results in severe bronchial damage in addition to obstruction and local irritation. Four patients with Iron Pill Inhalation Syndrome are described. All but one patient developed irreversible bronchial stenosis as late post inflammatory complication. Bronchoscopic features and clinical evolution are described in order to reduce the risk of severe side-effects in patients highly suspected for iron pill aspiration. PMID:26236596

  14. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, an unusual complication of heroin intoxication: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Gang; Luo, Qiancheng; Guo, Enwei; Yao, Yulan; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Bingyu; Li, Longxuan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) has rarely been described in patients with heroin intoxication. Here, we report a rare case of MODS involving six organs, due to heroin intoxication. The patient was a 32-year-old Chinese man with severe heroin intoxication complicated by acute pulmonary edema and respiratory insufficiency, shock, myocardial damage and cardiac insufficiency, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal insufficiency, acute liver injury and hepatic insufficiency, toxic leukoencephalopathy, and hypoglycemia. He managed to survive and was discharged after 10 weeks of intensive care. The possible pathogenesis and therapeutic measures of MODS induced by heroin intoxication and some suggestions for preventing and treating severe complications of heroin intoxication, based on clinical evidence and the pertinent literature, are discussed in this report. PMID:26617935

  15. A Case of Visceral Autonomic Neuropathy Complicated by Guillain-Barre Syndrome Accompanied with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome-like Disorder in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suk Jin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 8-year-old boy with visceral autonomic neuropathy complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome. In this pediatric patient, gastroparesis was the major symptom among the autonomic symptoms. Due to the gastroparesis, there was no progress with the oral diet, and nutrition was therefore supplied through a nasojejunal tube and gastrojejunal tube via Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). After tube feeding for 9 months, the patient's gastrointestinal symptoms improved and his oral ingestion increased. The pediatric patient was maintained well without gastrointestinal symptoms for 3 months after removal of the PEG, had repeated vomiting episodes which lead to the suspicion of cyclic vomiting syndrome. Then he started treatment with low-dose amitriptyline, which resulted in improvement. Currently, the patient has been maintained well for 6 months without recurrence, and his present growth status is normal. PMID:26157699

  16. A case of novel swine influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia complicated with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asai, Nobuhiro; Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Matsunuma, Ryo; Iwama, Kanichi; Otsuka, Yoshihito; Kawamura, Yasutaka; Motojima, Shinji; Kaneko, Norihiro

    2012-10-01

    Influenza related to complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis have sporadically been reported. However, influenza A (H1N1)-virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS) has rarely been reported. A 39-year old woman complained of high fever and was referred to us. Chest infiltrations in both lungs and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for novel swine origin influenza A (H1N1) in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) specimen was confirmed and she was diagnosed with influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia. Pancytopenia was found, and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) was diagnosed by bone marrow aspiration. Following intravenous administration of antiflu drug and combination therapy of steroid pulse and erythromycin IV, the patient’s respiratory dysfunction and lab data gradually improved and she was discharged on day 21. Whereas secondary HPS related to viral infections such as Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and human herpesvirus type 6 are commonly seen, H1N1 pneumonia complicated with secondary VAHS is rare. PMID:22286408

  17. Le syndrome d'ogilvie post césarienne: une complication mystérieuse: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Amourak, Sarah; Tayae, Mariam; Jayi, Sofia; Alaoui, Fatimazahra Fdili; Bouguern, Hakima; Chaara, Hikmat; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome d'ogilvie ou appeler encore Pseudo-occlusion colique aiguë (acute colonic pseudo-obstruction), décrit par Sir William Ogilvie en 1948 et correspond à une dilatation aiguë du colon antérieurement sain, survenant en l'absence d'obstruction mécanique avec un diamètre cæcal > 9 cm, La symptomatologie correspond à celle d'une occlusion intestinale basse, d'installation rapide et l'imagerie fait d'ASP et de TDM abdominale permet de mettre en évidence la distension cæcale dont la mesure de son diamètre permet de prédire le risque de perforation. A travers notre cas et une revue de la littérature nous invitons les obstétriciens à ne pas méconnaitre ce syndrome car seul un diagnostic précoce permet de réduire le risque de perforation cæcale PMID:25932081

  18. Sticky platelet syndrome: an important cause of life-threatening thrombotic complications.

    PubMed

    Kubisz, Peter; Stanciakova, Lucia; Stasko, Jan; Dobrotova, Miroslava; Skerenova, Maria; Ivankova, Jela; Holly, Pavol

    2016-01-01

    Sticky platelet syndrome (SPS) is a prothrombotic thrombocytopathy with familial occurrence, characterized by hyperaggregability of platelets in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), epinephrine (EPI) or both. The syndrome has been identified in approximately 21% of unexplained arterial thrombotic episodes, regarded to be the most common thrombophilia in arterial thrombosis and 13.2% of unexplained venous thromboembolism (VTE). The relatively young age at the first manifestation, relation to fertility and pregnancy, seriousness of the symptoms, easy and effective management of the disorder indicate to the necessity to take it into account in the differential diagnosis of the underlying cause of the thrombotic event. As the various localizations of the thrombosis in SPS have been reported, its management often requires a multidisciplinary approach. This review deals with the clinical aspects of thrombophilia, its etiopathogenesis, diagnosis as well as novel advances in the treatment and outlines the challenges for the further research. PMID:26567442

  19. Beneficial role of bitter melon supplementation in obesity and related complications in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Ashraful; Uddin, Riaz; Subhan, Nusrat; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Jain, Preeti; Reza, Hasan Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome are becoming epidemic both in developed and developing countries in recent years. Complementary and alternative medicines have been used since ancient era for the treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Bitter melon is widely used as vegetables in daily food in Bangladesh and several other countries in Asia. The fruits extract of bitter melon showed strong antioxidant and hypoglycemic activities in experimental condition both in vivo and in vitro. Recent scientific evaluation of this plant extracts also showed potential therapeutic benefit in diabetes and obesity related metabolic dysfunction in experimental animals and clinical studies. These beneficial effects are mediated probably by inducing lipid and fat metabolizing gene expression and increasing the function of AMPK and PPARs, and so forth. This review will thus focus on the recent findings on beneficial effect of Momordica charantia extracts on metabolic syndrome and discuss its potential mechanism of actions. PMID:25650336

  20. Beneficial Role of Bitter Melon Supplementation in Obesity and Related Complications in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Subhan, Nusrat; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Jain, Preeti; Reza, Hasan Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome are becoming epidemic both in developed and developing countries in recent years. Complementary and alternative medicines have been used since ancient era for the treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Bitter melon is widely used as vegetables in daily food in Bangladesh and several other countries in Asia. The fruits extract of bitter melon showed strong antioxidant and hypoglycemic activities in experimental condition both in vivo and in vitro. Recent scientific evaluation of this plant extracts also showed potential therapeutic benefit in diabetes and obesity related metabolic dysfunction in experimental animals and clinical studies. These beneficial effects are mediated probably by inducing lipid and fat metabolizing gene expression and increasing the function of AMPK and PPARs, and so forth. This review will thus focus on the recent findings on beneficial effect of Momordica charantia extracts on metabolic syndrome and discuss its potential mechanism of actions. PMID:25650336

  1. Occam Paradox? A Variation of Tapia Syndrome and an Unreported Complication of Guidewire-Assisted Pedicle Screw Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Emohare, Osa; Peterson, Erik; Slinkard, Nathaniel; Janus, Seth; Morgan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Study Design?Case report. Clinical Question?The clinical aim is to report on a previously unknown association between guidewire-assisted pedicle screw insertion and neuropraxia of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and how this may overlap with the signs of Tapia syndrome; we also report our approach to the clinical management of this patient. Methods?A 17-year-old male patient with idiopathic scoliosis experienced Tapia syndrome after posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis at the level of T1–L1. After extubation, the patient had a hoarse voice and difficulty in swallowing. Imaging showed a breach in the cortex of the anterior body of T1 corresponding to the RLN on the right. Results?Otolaryngological examination noted right vocal fold immobility, decreased sensation of the endolarynx, and pooling of secretions on flexible laryngoscopy that indicated right-sided cranial nerve X injury and left-sided tongue deviation. Aspiration during a modified barium swallow prompted insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube before the patient was sent home. On postoperative day 20, a barium swallow demonstrated reduced aspiration, and the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms. The feeding tube was removed, and the patient resumed a normal diet 1?month later. Tapia syndrome, or persistent unilateral laryngeal and hypoglossal paralysis, is an uncommon neuropraxia, which has previously not been observed in association with a breached vertebral body at T1 along the course of the RLN. Conclusion?Tapia syndrome should be a differential diagnostic consideration whenever these symptoms persist postoperatively and spine surgeons should be aware of this as a potential complication of guidewires in spinal instrumentation. PMID:24436711

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome: a complication of arteriovenous fistula in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Trivedi, H. L.; Smith, E. K.

    1975-01-01

    Symptoms of compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel developed in two patients in whom an arteriovenous fistula was created to alleviate chronic renal failure through hemodialysis. Anatomic changes in the wrist area due to the fistula are probably important in the development of this syndrome, and pre-existing uremic peripheral polyneuropathy may also be important in the early development of local symptoms of nerve damage. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1201544

  3. Zika virus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome--case report, French Polynesia, December 2013.

    PubMed

    Oehler, E; Watrin, L; Larre, P; Leparc-Goffart, I; Lastere, S; Valour, F; Baudouin, L; Mallet, Hp; Musso, D; Ghawche, F

    2014-01-01

    Zika fever, considered as an emerging disease of arboviral origin, because of its expanding geographic area, is known as a benign infection usually presenting as an influenza-like illness with cutaneous rash. So far, Zika virus infection has never led to hospitalisation. We describe the first case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) occurring immediately after a Zika virus infection, during the current Zika and type 1 and 3 dengue fever co-epidemics in French Polynesia. PMID:24626205

  4. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) complicating the ‘legal high’ mephedrone

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Taha Adam; Doherty, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a 19-year-old woman who developed convulsions preceded by nasal ingestion of a cocaine mimic named ‘the bubble’ or mephedrone, obtained legally from a ‘headshop’ in Dublin. Characteristic posterior white matter oedema on brain imaging after the seizure suggested a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). While PRES has been rarely associated with cocaine ingestion, this is the first report of an association with mephedrone. PMID:22689272

  5. [Nebido in the treatment of hypogonadism syndrome and its complications in men].

    PubMed

    Dedov, I I; Kurbatov, D G; Rozhivanov, R V; Lepetukhin, A E; Dubski?, S A; Goncharov, N P

    2011-01-01

    The article presents original experience with use of undecanoate (nebido, BayerHealthcare Pharmaceuticals, Germany) in androgenic testosteron replacement therapy in males with hypogonadism. Prospective studies of nebido efficacy were made in males with vein-occlusive erectile dysfunction (n = 20), chronic pelvic pain syndrome (n = 77), metabolic syndrome (n = 170). Retrospective studies assessed efficacy of nebido monotherapy in patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism (n = 34), hematological and urological safety of the drug (n = 40). Laboratory monitoring was performed in all the studies according to ISSAM recommendations. The patients were not included in contraindications to androgenic therapy. Nebido treatment significantly improved libido and erectile function, efficacy of phosphodiesterase of type 5 inhibiors used in moderate and severe erectile dysfunction. Depressive, asthenic, pain symptoms declined in males with chronic pelvic pain. Body fat reduced in metabolic syndrome with alleviation of its other components. Insignificant rise of hemoglobin level and packed cell volume was observed in some patients while a PSA level increase was clinically significant in 10% patients who had initial PSA > 2.5 ng/ml and acromegalia. Also, nebido depressed production of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. Thus, nebido is highly effective in sexual dysfunction and other somatic disorders caused by hypogonadism. Nebido does not induce severe side effects, but clinically significant rise of PSA level requires treatment discontinuation and more careful urological examination. In view of nebido ability to suppress spermatogenesis, the drug should not be used in reproductively active men. PMID:22448484

  6. Stewart-Treves syndrome as a rare complication of a hereditary lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Dürr, H R; Pellengahr, C; Nerlich, A; Baur, A; Maier, M; Jansson, V

    2004-02-01

    Lymphangiosarcoma (LAS) may occur as a rare complication of primary lymphedema. A case of LAS in hereditary lymphedema of the lower extremity in a 36-year old female is reported. Despite of chemotherapy, local hyperthermia and later amputation of the extremity the patient died of progressive disease due to pulmonary metastasis. In respect to this case, the different therapeutic concepts, as reported in the literature, and their results are presented and discussed. PMID:15061047

  7. Vitamin D deficiency rickets as a late complication of the short gut syndrome during infancy.

    PubMed

    Touloukian, R J; Gertner, J M

    1981-06-01

    Four infants with less than 35 cm of jejunum and ileum remaining following neonatal operations and after being weaned from long-term total parenteral nutrition onto an "elemental" formula, developed the syndrome of vitamin D deficiency rickets at 9-15 mo of age. The diagnosis of rickets was confirmed by biochemical and radiographic findings. Serum 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25 OHD) values were significantly lower than normal and oral 25 OHD absorption studies indicated severe vitamin D malabsorption. This report emphasizes the importance of prospective assessment of all neonates having distal ileal resection to detect the early stages of vitamin D deficiency rickets. PMID:6973020

  8. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder complicated with Sjogren syndrome successfully treated with tocilizumab: A case report.

    PubMed

    Komai, Toshihiko; Shoda, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Sakurai, Keiichi; Shibuya, Mihoko; Kubo, Kanae; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-03-01

    A 38-year-old woman with relapsing longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis and Sjogren's syndrome (SS) was admitted with lower extremity muscle weakness. Studies showed high serum titer of anti-aquaporin4 antibody and gadolinium-enhanced-MRI T1-weighted lesions within thoracic cord. Clinical findings suggested neuromyelitis optica-spectrum disorder (NMO-SD). High-dose corticosteroids, plasma exchange and cyclophosphamide were not effective. After starting tocilizumab, her neurological findings gradually improved. This report describes the first evidence to show tocilizumab could be effective for NMO-SD with SS. PMID:24313919

  9. [A tamponade complicating an acute eosinophilic pericarditis due to a myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Moreuil, C; Lieber, A; Marjanovic, Z; Bobbio, A; Alavi, Z; Blacher, J; Marie, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac involvement in eosinophilia is potentially fatal and requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment. We report here the case of a 71-year-old female patient with eosinophilia>10,000/mm(3) for 2 months due to a myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic syndrome, with a rapidly progressive exertional dyspnea explained by an important circumferential eosinophilic pericarditis. Due to a rapid evolution to a tamponade, an emergent surgical drainage was performed. Subsequent medical treatment combined high-dose corticosteroids (1mg/kg/day) with hydroxyurea and imatinib. The outcome was favourable with regression of the effusion, of the volume overload symptoms and decrease in eosinophilia. PMID:25704728

  10. Late postpartum eclampsia complicated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihong; Wang, Yacong; Shi, Liang; Cao, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare but serious clinical-neuroradiological entity characterized by headache, vomiting, visual disturbances, altered mental status, seizures, and unconsciousness associated with the characteristic imaging findings including sub-cortical vasogenic edema at the bilateral parietal and occipital lobes. We describe a case of 28-year-old PRES patient secondary to delayed maternal postpartum eclampsia. This patient was not initially diagnosed with pre-eclampsia and PRES. The diagnosis was established after magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment this patient’s PRES resolved. Early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to reverse PRES. A literature review for PRES is provided in this report. PMID:26807372

  11. Macular pigmentation complicating irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts in Laugier-Hunziker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhoyrul, B; Paulus, J

    2016-04-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a rare acquired disorder characterized by macu-lar pigmentation of the lips and oral mucosa, with frequent longitudinal melanonychia. Involvement of other areas, such as the genitalia and fingers, has rarely been described. LHS is a benign condition with no known systemic manifestations. We report the case of a woman who developed melanotic macules on her fingers and elbow 16 years after the onset of pigmentation of her lips. This unusual feature of LHS in our patient was associated with irritant contact dermatitis and viral warts. Only two cases of an association with an inflammatory dermatosis have been reported previously in the literature. PMID:26508289

  12. Twin pregnancy with HELLP syndrome complicated with acute renal failure for emergency cesarean section: An unusual case and its anesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Ghodki, Poonam S.; Singh, Noopur D.; Patil, Kalyani N.

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure is not common in pregnancy. However, the incidence rises when pregnancy is complicated with Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelets (HELLP) syndrome, which itself is a rare occurrence. We had an unusual case of HELLP syndrome in twin pregnancy with deranged renal profile for emergency cesarean section. We report the case, its anesthetic management for emergency cesarean section, and perioperative supportive treatment for acute renal failure. PMID:25885844

  13. [Anesthetic Management of a Patient Complicated with Marfan Syndrome and Suffering from Stanford Type A Aortic Dissection during Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Uozaki, Nako; Mizuno, Kaori; Shiraishi, Yoshito; Doi, Matsuyuki; Sato, Shigehito

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of a 36-year-old woman at 34 weeks of gestation complicated with Marfan syndrome who underwent Bentall type aortic replacement surgery due to Stanford type A aortic dissection after undergoing caesarean section. Since this patient exhibited severe hypotension before coming to the operating room, it was very difficult to determine whether the cardiac surgery or caesarean section should be performed first. In this case, the caesarean section was performed first, followed by Bentall's surgery. Although intra-aortic balloon pumping and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support were required after weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass, she was discharged on post-operative day (POD) 40 and the baby was discharged on POD 60, without signs of cerebral palsy. Unfortunately, this patient died on POD 57, due to heart failure. We discuss how to determine the priority of surgeries for patients who require emergency surgery for cardiovascular disease during pregnancy. PMID:26419107

  14. Excessive naked megakaryocyte nuclei in myelodysplastic syndrome mimicking idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a complicated pre- and post-transplantation course.

    PubMed

    Olcay, Lale; Tuncer, A Murat; Okur, Hamza; Erdemli, Esra; Uysal, Zumrut; Cetin, Mualla; Duru, Feride; Cetinkaya, Duygu Uckan

    2009-09-01

    A boy 3 years 7 months old with thrombocytopenia and history of intracranial hemorrhage who underwent bone marrow transplantation is presented. He was refractory to steroids, immunoglobulin G, vincristine, azathioprine, cyclosporine A, interleukin-11, chemotherapy, and splenectomy. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was excluded by light /electron microscopic and flow cytometric findings; the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia, a subgroup of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, was made. Naked megakaryocyte nuclei were 55.38 +/- 28.2% vs. 31.67 +/- 23.22% of all megakaryocytes in the patient and the control group of 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, respectively (p = .016). The posttransplatation course was complicated by delayed platelet engraftment, bronchiolitis obliterans associated with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved completely. PMID:19657988

  15. Compound heterozygous GFM2 mutations with Leigh syndrome complicated by arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Ohba, Chihiro; Watanabe, Toshihide; Minagawa, Kimio; Shimura, Masaru; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial translation apparatus can impair energy production in affected tissues and organs. Most components of this apparatus are encoded by nuclear genes, including GFM2, which encodes a mitochondrial ribosome recycling factor. A few patients with mutations in some of these genes have been reported to date. Here, we present two female siblings with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, optic atrophy and severe mental retardation. The younger sister had a progressive cerebellar atrophy and bilateral neuropathological findings in the brainstem. Although her cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of lactate and pyruvate were not increased, brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a lactate peak. Additionally, her CSF lactate/pyruvate and serum beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratios were high, and levels of oxidative phosphorylation in skin fibroblasts were reduced. We therefore diagnosed Leigh syndrome. Genomic investigation confirmed the presence of compound heterozygous GFM2 mutations (c.206+4A>G and c.2029-1G>A) in both siblings, causing aberrant splicing with premature stop codons (p.Gly50Glufs*4 and p.Ala677Leufs*2, respectively). These findings suggest that GFM2 mutations could be causative of a phenotype of Leigh syndrome with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. PMID:26016410

  16. A case with neonatal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia: It is a characteristic complication of Sotos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshie; Takagi, Masaki; Yoshihashi, Hiroshi; Miura, Masaru; Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Miyake, Yoshishige; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-05-01

    Sotos syndrome (SoS, OMIM #117550) is an overgrowth syndrome. Deletions or intragenic mutations of the NSD1 , which is located at chromosome 5q35, are responsible for more than 75% of SoS. Conventionally, neonatal hypoglycemia was reported briefly as one of the infrequent symptoms of SoS. However, Matsuo et al. published a report describing five patients with SoS who presented with transient hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HIH) in the neonatal period. We report on an additional patient of SoS, who presented transient HIH in the neonatal period. All of this patient and previous patients have microdeletions at the 5q35 chromosome. Therefore, we examined the following three in considering the possibility that other factor than NSD1 caused HIH. 1) This patient had no mutation of four currently known HIH related genes, ABCC8, KCNJ11, GLUD1, and GCK. 2) He had no further deletion than commonly observed region encompassing NSD1 by comparative genomic hybridization to DNA microarrays. 3) He had no mutation in the 5q35 region in the non-deleted chromosome using exsome sequence analysis. In conclusion, our patient supported that HIH could be one of the characteristic symptoms of SoS in the neonatal period, and could be useful for early diagnosis. PMID:25712828

  17. The Metabolic Syndrome and Microvascular Complications in a Murine Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hur, Junguk; Dauch, Jacqueline R; Hinder, Lucy M; Hayes, John M; Backus, Carey; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-09-01

    To define the components of the metabolic syndrome that contribute to diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we treated the BKS db/db mouse, an established murine model of T2DM and the metabolic syndrome, with the thiazolidinedione class drug pioglitazone. Pioglitazone treatment of BKS db/db mice produced a significant weight gain, restored glycemic control, and normalized measures of serum oxidative stress and triglycerides but had no effect on LDLs or total cholesterol. Moreover, although pioglitazone treatment normalized renal function, it had no effect on measures of large myelinated nerve fibers, specifically sural or sciatic nerve conduction velocities, but significantly improved measures of small unmyelinated nerve fiber architecture and function. Analyses of gene expression arrays of large myelinated sciatic nerves from pioglitazone-treated animals revealed an unanticipated increase in genes related to adipogenesis, adipokine signaling, and lipoprotein signaling, which likely contributed to the blunted therapeutic response. Similar analyses of dorsal root ganglion neurons revealed a salutary effect of pioglitazone on pathways related to defense and cytokine production. These data suggest differential susceptibility of small and large nerve fibers to specific metabolic impairments associated with T2DM and provide the basis for discussion of new treatment paradigms for individuals with T2DM and DPN. PMID:25979075

  18. [Cardiopulmonary complication as a pitfall of the perioperative management of moyamoya syndrome with atherosclerosis: conflict to counteract with cerebral hyperperfusion].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Miki; Sato, Kenichi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-08-01

    A 42-year-old man with a history of hypertension and obesity presented with transient dysesthesia in his left upper and lower extremities and was found to have moyamoya syndrome associated with atherosclerosis. He underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis with pial synangiosis in the right hemisphere 1 month after the onset of symptoms. Prophylactic blood pressure lowering(<130 mmHg)as well as minocycline administration was introduced immediately after surgery to prevent symptomatic cerebral hyperperfusion, but he developed pulmonary edema due to congestive heart failure several hours after surgery. We subsequently allowed his systolic blood pressure to be under 140 mmHg, which dramatically improved his cardiopulmonary condition. The neurologic status of the patient was unremarkable, but (123)I-IMP-SPECT the day after surgery demonstrated an intense increase in the cerebral blood flow at the site of the anastomosis. Moreover, postoperative magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated the bypass as thick, high signal. Together, these results led us to the diagnosis of cerebral hyperperfusion. The patient did not demonstrate any neurological sign during the entire perioperative period, but CT scan performed 7 days after surgery revealed a delayed intra-cerebral hemorrhage in the right temporal lobe due to the cerebral hyperperfusion. We continued to mildly lower his blood pressure, and neither ischemic nor hemorrhagic events were subsequently observed; he was discharged without neurological deficit 2 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema are potential complications of the perioperative management of moyamoya syndrome with atherosclerotic background. Moreover, cardiopulmonary complications should be mentioned as a potential pitfall of the intensive perioperative management of moyamoya disease to counteract with cerebral hyperperfusion. PMID:25087762

  19. DRESS syndrome as a complication of treatment of hepatitis C virus-associated post-inflammatory liver cirrhosis with peginterferon α2a and ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Pazgan-Simon, Monika; Simon, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Various skin and systemic symptoms may develop as a complication of treatment with different medications and medicinal substances. One of them is a relatively rare drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, referred to as DRESS syndrome. The morphology of skin lesions and the patient's general health can differ; the management involves withdrawal of drugs suspected of triggering DRESS syndrome, and administration of local and systemic glucocorticosteroids. In this paper we present a case of a patient with HCV associated chronic hepatitis, treated with peginterferon α2a (PEG-IFN-α2a) and ribavirin, who developed skin lesions and systemic symptoms typical of DRESS syndrome. PMID:25610356

  20. Clival osteomyelitis and hypoglossal nerve palsy--rare complications of Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    He, Jingzhou; Lam, Jonathan Chun Leuk; Adlan, Tarig

    2015-01-01

    An increasingly reported entity, Lemierre's syndrome classically presents with a recent oropharyngeal infection, internal jugular vein thrombosis and the presence of anaerobic organisms such as Fusobacterium necrophorum. The authors report a normally fit and well 17-year-old boy who presented with severe sepsis following a 5-day history of a sore throat, myalgia and neck stiffness requiring intensive care admission. Blood cultures grew F. necrophorum and radiological investigations demonstrated left internal jugular vein, cavernous sinus and sigmoid sinus thrombus, left vertebral artery dissection and thrombus within the left internal carotid artery. Imaging also revealed two areas of acute ischaemia in the brain, consistent with septic emboli, skull base (clival) osteomyelitis and an extensive epidural abscess. The patient improved on meropenem and metronidazole and was warfarinised for his cavernous sinus thrombosis. He has an on-going left-sided hypoglossal (XIIth) nerve palsy. PMID:26323975

  1. Spectrum of X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS), MASA syndrome, and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1): Clincal review with six additional families

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander-Stumpel, C.; Hoeweler, C.; Jones, M.

    1995-05-22

    X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS) (MIM{sup *}307000), MASA syndrome (MIM {sup *}303350), and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1) (MIM {sup *}3129000) are closely related. Soon after delineation, SPG1 was incorporated into the spectrum of MASA syndrome. HSAS and MASA syndrome show great clinical overlap; DNA linkage analysis places the loci at Xq28. In an increasing number of families with MASA syndrome or HSAS, mutations in L1CAM, a gene located at Xq28, have been reported. In order to further delineate the clinical spectrum, we studied 6 families with male patients presenting with MASA syndrome, HSAS, or a mixed phenotype. We summarized data from previous reports and compared them with our data. Clinical variability appears to be great, even within families. Problems in genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, the possible overlap with X-linked corpus callosum agenesis and FG syndrome, and the different forms of X-linked complicated spastic paraplegia are discussed. Since adducted thumbs and spastic paraplegia are found in 90% of the patients, the condition may be present in males with nonspecific mental retardation. We propose to abandon the designation MASA syndrome and use the term HSAS/MASA spectrum, incorporating SPG1. 79 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Classification of and risk factors for hematologic complications in a French national cohort of 102 patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Donadieu, Jean; Fenneteau, Odile; Beaupain, Blandine; Beaufils, Sandrine; Bellanger, Florence; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Lambilliotte, Anne; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Bertrand, Yves; Mialou, Valérie; Perot, Christine; Michel, Gérard; Fouyssac, Fanny; Paillard, Catherine; Gandemer, Virginie; Boutard, Patrick; Schmitz, Jacques; Morali, Alain; Leblanc, Thierry; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome often develop hematologic complications. No risk factors for these complications have so far been identified. The aim of this study was to classify the hematologic complications occurring in patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and to investigate the risk factors for these complications. Design and Methods One hundred and two patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, with a median follow-up of 11.6 years, were studied. Major hematologic complications were considered in the case of definitive severe cytopenia (i.e. anemia <7 g/dL or thrombocytopenia <20×109/L), classified as malignant (myelodysplasia/leukemia) according to the 2008 World Health Organization classification or as non-malignant. Results Severe cytopenia was observed in 21 patients and classified as malignant severe cytopenia (n=9), non-malignant severe cytopenia (n=9) and malignant severe cytopenia preceded by non-malignant severe cytopenia (n=3). The 20-year cumulative risk of severe cytopenia was 24.3% (95% confidence interval: 15.3%–38.5%). Young age at first symptoms (<3 months) and low hematologic parameters both at diagnosis of the disease and during the follow-up were associated with severe hematologic complications (P<0.001). Fifteen novel SBDS mutations were identified. Genotype analysis showed no discernible prognostic value. Conclusions Patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome with very early symptoms or cytopenia at diagnosis (even mild anemia or thrombocytopenia) should be considered at a high risk of severe hematologic complications, malignant or non-malignant. Transient severe cytopenia or an indolent cytogenetic clone had no deleterious value. PMID:22491737

  3. Budd-Chiari syndrome, a rare complication of multicentric Castleman disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SONG, KUI; LI, MIN

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old female presented to The First Affiliated Hospital of Jishou University (Jishou, Hunan) with a fever of unknown origin and progressive abdominal distension. Physical examination revealed generalized lymphadenopathy, multiple non-tender cutaneous nodules, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and abdominal edema. An axillary lymph node biopsy indicated hyaline vascular type Castleman disease, and color Doppler and computed tomography scans suggested Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Based on the abdominal distension and impairments of the liver and kidneys, an inferior vena cavography and balloon dilatation were performed, confirming the diagnosis of BCS and leading to symptomatic improvement. The patient commenced a combination chemotherapy regimen of cyclophosphamide (0.4 g; days 1–3), vindesine (4 mg; day 1) and prednisolone (100 mg; days 1–5), with no melioration of symptoms. Theprubicin was added to suppress the aggravation of the disease on day six of the chemotherapy cycle. The patient exhibited symptomatic remission for one week, however, she subsequently succumbed to intracranial hemorrhage and infections of the lung and intestine due to long-term myelosuppression following chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of BCS in a patient with multicentric Castleman disease without human immunodeficiency virus infection. PMID:26137030

  4. Clinical features and pregnancy outcome in antiphospholipid syndrome patients with history of severe pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yuko; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Koushi; Hisano, Michi; Arata, Naoko; Oku, Kenji; Watanabe, Noriyoshi; Sago, Haruhiko; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Murashima, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Objective. To clarify the clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) profile in patients with obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods. Clinical records of 13 pregnant patients (15 pregnancies) with obstetrical APS were reviewed over 10 years. Patients who met the Sapporo Criteria fully were studied, whereas those with only early pregnancy loss were excluded. In addition to classical aPL: lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibody (aCL), and anti-?2-glycoprotein I (a?2GPI); phosphatidylserine-dependent anti-prothrombin antibody (aPS/PT) and kininogen-dependent anti-phosphatidylethanolamine antibody (aPE) were also examined in each case. Results. Cases were divided into two groups according to patient response to standard treatment: good and poor outcome groups. All cases with poor outcome presented LA, with IgG a?2GPI and IgG aPS/PT were also frequently observed. IgG aPE did not correlate with pregnancy outcome. Conclusion. aPL profile may predict pregnancy outcome in patients with this subset of obstetric APS. PMID:25146551

  5. D-Lactic Acidosis: An Underrecognized Complication of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kowlgi, N. Gurukripa; Chhabra, Lovely

    2015-01-01

    D-lactic acidosis or D-lactate encephalopathy is a rare condition that occurs primarily in individuals who have a history of short bowel syndrome. The unabsorbed carbohydrates act as a substrate for colonic bacteria to form D-lactic acid among other organic acids. The acidic pH generated as a result of D-lactate production further propagates production of D-lactic acid, hence giving rise to a vicious cycle. D-lactic acid accumulation in the blood can cause neurologic symptoms such as delirium, ataxia, and slurred speech. Diagnosis is made by a combination of clinical and laboratory data including special assays for D-lactate. Treatment includes correcting the acidosis and decreasing substrate for D-lactate such as carbohydrates in meals. In addition, antibiotics can be used to clear colonic flora. Although newer techniques for diagnosis and treatment are being developed, clinical diagnosis still holds paramount importance, as there can be many confounders in the diagnosis as will be discussed subsequently. PMID:25977687

  6. Sjogren's syndrome complicated with IgA nephropathy and leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Chang; Chen, Chen-Yin; Lin, Wei-Tung; Lee, Wei-Jen; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS) with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis and IgA nephropathy. The accurate diagnosis of SS was established based on objective signs and symptoms of ocular and oral dryness, a characteristic appearance of a biopsy sample from a minor salivary gland, and the presence of anti-SS-A autoantibody. A second autoimmune disorder was not present, so the diagnosis of primary SS was established. A histologic finding of skin biopsy of purpuric lesion was typical for leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Renal biopsy was performed for nephrotic range proteinuria. The pathologic finding of renal biopsy was IgA glomerulonephritis with crescent formation. The patient was treated with small doses of glucocorticoids and maintenance hemodialysis. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is one of the most characteristic extraglandular manifestations of SS. However, IgA nephropathy associated with SS and leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a rare finding. SS patients with glomerulonephritis present a more diverse outcome, even requiring hemodialysis. Therefore, renal biopsy is warranted in SS with glomerulonephritis and systemic vasculitis. PMID:18704825

  7. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome complicating massive hemorrhage from an unusual presentation of ruptured ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Robert B; Aziz, Rafeeqa; Bhutto, Abdulrazaque; Seliem, Salah I

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) is characterized by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), elevation and splinting of the diaphragm, high pleural pressure, and poor venous return to the heart, producing low cardiac output and shock which, in turn, results in poor venous return across the capillaries to set in a vicious cycle. Unless the Intra-abdominal pressure is reduced quickly by urgent surgical or medical interventions, death is inevitable. We report a case of ACS resulting from an unrecognized slow but massive intra-abdominal bleeding caused by a ruptured ectopic pregnancy (REP) in an Arab woman. Due to the unusual nature of the presentation of the REP, the diagnosis proved elusive for over a week until the patient succumbed to hypovolemic shock after losing about 4.2 l inside the peritoneal space. The fruitless effort at aggressive fluid resuscitation was at operation found not due to hypovolemia per se but due to IAH causing ACS. The lessons learned from this case emphasize the need for awareness about atypical presentations of REP and the need for quick intervention to terminate the vicious cycle of ACS. PMID:21912014

  8. Appendiceal tie syndrome: A very rare complication of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Awale, Laligen; Joshi, Brikh Raj; Rajbanshi, Saroj; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2015-04-27

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency that we encounter. Adynamic Intestinal obstruction due to appendicitis or its complication may be seen time and often. Mechanical obstruction because of appendicitis is uncommon and even rarer for a closed loop obstruction to occur. Although it was described as early as 1901, very few cases have been reported. We report the case of a 20 years male who presented with generalized colicky pain abdomen, abdominal distension, vomiting and obstipation for three to four days. Vital signs were stable. His abdomen was distended and peritonitic, especially in the right iliac fossa. Rest of the physical examination was unremarkable. Blood tests were normal except for leucocytosis with neutrophilia. An abdominal X-ray finding was indicating a small bowel obstruction. A midline laparotomy was performed. On intraoperative examination, distended loops of small bowel from the jejunum to the distal ileum was observed, and a constricting ring around the terminal ileum created by a phlegmonous appendicitis with its tip adherent to the root of mesentery was found, obstructing an edematous loop of small bowel without signs of ischemia. As the bowel was viable simple appendectomy was done. Postoperatively, he had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 3 d. PMID:25914785

  9. Bacterial sinusitis and its frightening complications: subdural empyema and Lemierre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, German Alcoba; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of a previously healthy 14-year-old female with an initial history of tooth pain and swelling of the left maxillary evolved to a progressive headache and altered neurological findings characterized by auditory hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and aggressiveness. She was brought to the emergency department after 21 days of the initial symptoms. An initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed frontal subdural empyema with bone erosion. The symptoms continued to evolve to brain herniation 24 hours after admission. A second CT scan showed a left internal jugular vein thrombosis. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died on the second day after admission. The autopsy findings depicted rarefaction of the cranial bone at the left side of the frontal sinus, and overt meningitis. The severe infection was further complicated by thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein up to the superior vena cava with septic embolization to the lungs, pneumonia, and sepsis. This case report highlights the degree of severity that a trivial infection can reach. The unusual presentation of the sinusitis may have wrongly guided the approach of this unfortunate case. PMID:26894042

  10. Appendiceal tie syndrome: A very rare complication of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Awale, Laligen; Joshi, Brikh Raj; Rajbanshi, Saroj; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency that we encounter. Adynamic Intestinal obstruction due to appendicitis or its complication may be seen time and often. Mechanical obstruction because of appendicitis is uncommon and even rarer for a closed loop obstruction to occur. Although it was described as early as 1901, very few cases have been reported. We report the case of a 20 years male who presented with generalized colicky pain abdomen, abdominal distension, vomiting and obstipation for three to four days. Vital signs were stable. His abdomen was distended and peritonitic, especially in the right iliac fossa. Rest of the physical examination was unremarkable. Blood tests were normal except for leucocytosis with neutrophilia. An abdominal X-ray finding was indicating a small bowel obstruction. A midline laparotomy was performed. On intraoperative examination, distended loops of small bowel from the jejunum to the distal ileum was observed, and a constricting ring around the terminal ileum created by a phlegmonous appendicitis with its tip adherent to the root of mesentery was found, obstructing an edematous loop of small bowel without signs of ischemia. As the bowel was viable simple appendectomy was done. Postoperatively, he had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 3 d. PMID:25914785

  11. [Perioperative management of an obese patient complicated with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) undergoing awake craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Komayama, Noriaki; Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Both obesity (BMI over 30) and SAS are risks for Supper airway maintenance. We report an obese patient (BMI 33.5) with SAS who underwent awake craniotomy. Weight reduction was instructed 1 month before the operation, and the patient lost enough weight to use intraoperative MRI. Under general anesthesia, surgical pads containing 2% lidocaine with adrenaline were inserted into the nasal cavities. The patient's airway S was secured by i-gel® until dura was opened. A nasal airway was then inserted to confirm the upper airway patency and anesthetics were terminated The patient regained consciousness and started respiration. The i-gel® was removed. The nasal airway was changed to an RAE tracheal tube ; the tube was fixed above the vocal cords under bronchofiberscopic observation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via RAE tube was started. Neither coughing nor epistaxis was observed.The RAE tube prevented glossoptosis and did not disturb speech mapping. Emergent endotracheal intubation was easily managed because the tube was close to the glottis. The RAE tube was removed and nasal CP AP was applied overnight Carefully prepared CP AP support via nasal RAE tube was practical in keeping upper airway patency for an obese patient complicated with SAS undergoing awake craniotomy. PMID:25693340

  12. Serious air leak syndrome complicating high-flow nasal cannula therapy: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Satyanarayan; Prodhan, Parthak

    2013-03-01

    Despite the absence of clinical safety data, heated, humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) therapy is increasingly being used as an alternative to positive-pressure ventilation in pediatrics. This use of HHFNC is "off label" because the US Food and Drug Administration's approval for these devices was only for air humidification and not as a modality to provide positive distending pressure. For the first time we describe 3 cases who developed serious air leaks related to HHFNC therapy. The first child was a previously healthy 2-month-old male infant with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis who developed a right pneumothorax on day 5 of his illness at 8 liters per minute (lpm). He subsequently required intubation and ventilation for 14 days. The second case involved an otherwise healthy 16-year-old boy with cerebral palsy who developed pneumomediastinum and died of its complications. He was receiving 20 lpm HHFNC therapy when he developed pneumomediastinum. The third case involved a 22-month-old, previously healthy boy who developed subdural hematoma secondary to abuse. He developed a right pneumothorax while receiving HHFNC at a flow of 6 lpm, requiring chest tube placement. These cases emphasize the need for extreme caution while using HHFNC for the off-label indication of providing positive distending pressure in children, especially at flows higher than the patient's minute ventilation. A more detailed study to specifically look at the serious adverse events related to HHFNC is urgently needed. PMID:23382446

  13. Medical complications of bariatric surgery: focus on malabsorption and dumping syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F

    2012-01-01

    Gastroenterologists increasingly see patients with symptoms after bariatric surgery. A number of gastrointestinal or extra-gastrointestinal symptoms should raise the suspicion of malabsorption or dumping syndrome. Little is known about long-term consequences of disordered intestinal anatomy and physiology resulting from bariatric surgical procedures. The latency phase of clinical problems is unknown, but may potentially be long, and postoperative courses over many decades have to be considered regarding the consequences of surgical alterations of gastrointestinal structure and function. Long-term nutritional requirements in patients with bariatric procedures are incompletely understood. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of long-limb Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) because it has become the most common bariatric procedure in many parts of the world. Although several potential mechanisms for nutritional deficiencies after RYGB like deficiency of dietary intake, lack of gastric secretions, exclusion of proximal duodenum and jejunum, or asynergia between food bolus and biliopancreatic secretions have been postulated, it was only very recently that in-depth studies have been carried out to measure the extent to which the long-limb RYGB causes malabsorption. In order to improve care for these patients, specialists who are trained in understanding pathophysiological changes in digestion and absorption after bariatric surgery and who recognize and treat clinical symptoms and nutritional deficits after bariatric surgery are needed. In addition, clinical researchers should take advantage of the experimental setups provided by standardized surgical procedures, and scientific societies should design courses and scientific meetings which combine the expertise in gastroenterology, surgery and nutrition. PMID:22722436

  14. Evolution of iron overload in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: iron chelation therapy and organ complications.

    PubMed

    Remacha, Ángel F; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Villegas, Ana; Durán, María Soledad; Hermosín, Lourdes; de Paz, Raquel; Garcia, Marta; Diez Campelo, Maria; Sanz, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the evolution of iron overload, assessed by serum ferritin (SF), in transfusion-dependent lower risk patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as to describe the occurrence of organ complications, and to analyze its relationship with iron chelation therapy. This observational retrospective study was conducted from March 2010 to March 2011 in 47 Spanish hospitals. A total of 263 patients with lower risk MDS (International Prognostic Scoring System [IPSS] low/intermediate-1 risk or Spanish Prognostic Index [SPI] 0-1 risk), transfusion-dependent, and who had received ?10 packed red blood cells (PRBC) were included. At MDS diagnosis, patients received a mean of 2.8?±?3.9 PRBC/month, and 8.7% of patients showed SF ?1000 ?g/L. Over the course of the disease, patients received a mean of 83.4?±?83.3 PRBC, and 36.1% of patients presented SF ?2500 ?g/L. Cardiac, hepatic, endocrine, or arthropathy complications appeared/worsened in 20.2, 11.4, 9.9, and 3.8% of patients, respectively. According to investigator, iron overload was a main cause of hepatic (70.0%) and endocrine (26.9%) complications. A total of 96 (36.5%) patients received iron chelation therapy for ?6 months, being deferasirox the most frequent first chelation treatment (71.9%). Chelation-treated patients showed longer overall survival (p?

  15. N-Glycomic Changes in Serum Proteins in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Correlate with Complications and with Metabolic Syndrome Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Boemi, Massimo; Olivieri, Fabiola; Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Spazzafumo, Liana; Borelli, Vincenzo; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Salvioli, Stefano; Garagnani, Paolo; Dewaele, Sylviane; Libert, Claude; Franceschi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycosylation, i.e the enzymatic addition of oligosaccharides (or glycans) to proteins and lipids, known as glycosylation, is one of the most common co-/posttranslational modifications of proteins. Many important biological roles of glycoproteins are modulated by N-linked oligosaccharides. As glucose levels can affect the pathways leading to glycosylation of proteins, we investigated whether metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), pathological conditions characterized by altered glucose levels, are associated with specific modifications in serum N-glycome. Methods We enrolled in the study 562 patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) (mean age 65.6±8.2 years) and 599 healthy control subjects (CTRs) (mean age, 58.5±12.4 years). N-glycome was evaluated in serum glycoproteins. Results We found significant changes in N-glycan composition in the sera of T2DM patients. In particular, ?(1,6)-linked arm monogalactosylated, core-fucosylated diantennary N-glycans (NG1(6)A2F) were significantly reduced in T2DM compared with CTR subjects. Importantly, they were equally reduced in diabetic patients with and without complications (P<0.001) compared with CTRs. Macro vascular-complications were found to be related with decreased levels of NG1(6)A2F. In addition, NG1(6)A2F and NG1(3)A2F, identifying, respectively, monogalactosylated N-glycans with ?(1,6)- and ?(1,3)-antennary galactosylation, resulted strongly correlated with most MS parameters. The plasmatic levels of these two glycans were lower in T2DM as compared to healthy controls, and even lower in patients with complications and MS, that is the extreme “unhealthy” phenotype (T2DM+ with MS). Conclusions Imbalance of glycosyltransferases, glycosidases and sugar nucleotide donor levels is able to cause the structural changes evidenced by our findings. Serum N-glycan profiles are thus sensitive to the presence of diabetes and MS. Serum N-glycan levels could therefore provide a non-invasive alternative marker for T2DM and MS. PMID:25793407

  16. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). Methods A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of experts was first asked to evaluate 115 profiles of patients with MAS, which included the values of laboratory tests at the pre-MAS visit and at MAS onset, and the change in values between the two time points. The experts were asked to choose the 5 laboratory tests in which change was most important for the diagnosis of MAS and to rank the 5 selected tests in order of importance. The relevance of change in laboratory parameters was further discussed and ranked by the same experts at a consensus conference. Results Platelet count was the most frequently selected test, followed by ferritin level, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), white cell count, neutrophil count, and fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Ferritin was most frequently assigned the highest score. At the end of the process, platelet count, ferritin level and AST were the laboratory tests in which the experts found change over time to be most important. Conclusions We identified the laboratory tests in which change over time is most valuable for the early diagnosis of MAS in sJIA. The dynamics of laboratory values during the course of MAS should be further scrutinised in a prospective study in order to establish the optimal cut-off values for their variation. PMID:26848401

  17. Pregnancy Complications: HELLP Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is a test that uses X-rays and computers to take pictures of your body. Many women are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they have HELLP. ... is a test that uses X-rays and computers to take pictures of your body. Many women are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they have HELLP. ...

  18. Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome complicated with multiple cerebral infarction: a rare case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Yao, Fang; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Cui, Quan-Cai

    2015-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare hematological disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy and skin changes. Castleman disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that can be present in POEMS patients, which can be defined as Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome. Herein, we described a 24-year-old male patient diagnosed with this syndrome and also suffered from multiple cerebral infarctions. This patient showed no evidence of monoclonal gammopathy and failed to have electromyography examined. The final diagnosis was established with the help of the axillary lymph node biopsy. As a rare case of POEMS syndrome without evidence fulfilling the major mandatory diagnostic criteria and with cerebrovascular involvement, its characteristics was discussed with a brief literature review in order to facilitate further understanding of the POEMS syndrome. PMID:26722578

  19. Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome complicated with multiple cerebral infarction: a rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hang; Yao, Fang; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Cui, Quan-Cai

    2015-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare hematological disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy and skin changes. Castleman disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that can be present in POEMS patients, which can be defined as Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome. Herein, we described a 24-year-old male patient diagnosed with this syndrome and also suffered from multiple cerebral infarctions. This patient showed no evidence of monoclonal gammopathy and failed to have electromyography examined. The final diagnosis was established with the help of the axillary lymph node biopsy. As a rare case of POEMS syndrome without evidence fulfilling the major mandatory diagnostic criteria and with cerebrovascular involvement, its characteristics was discussed with a brief literature review in order to facilitate further understanding of the POEMS syndrome. PMID:26722578

  20. Successful treatment of an essential thrombocythemia patient complicated by Sweet's syndrome with combination of chemotherapy and lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Jomen, Wataru; Abe, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Tamaki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nagashima, Kazuo; Matsuno, Teppei; Sato, Masanori; Kato, Junji

    2014-04-01

    A 79-year-old man had been followed up since July 2003 based on a diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia (ET). The patient visited our hospital after developing a high fever and rash in August 2010, and Sweet's syndrome was diagnosed based on skin biopsy results. The bone marrow aspirate showed features like those of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN, unclassifiable). Administration of metenolone and azacitidine was initiated in March and May 2011, respectively, but the rash associated with Sweet's syndrome showed exacerbation. Ranimustine was therefore administered starting in July 2011 to control the blood cell count, but the rash associated with Sweet's syndrome persisted. Combination therapy with lenalidomide was initiated in September 2012, and resulted in control of the blood cell count and marked improvement of Sweet's syndrome. PMID:24850455

  1. La para-osteo-arthropathie neurogene dans le syndrome de guillain barre: complication rare (à propos d'un cas et revue de la littérature)

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Hatim; El Idrissi, Mohamed; Shimi, Mohamed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Les para-ostéo-arthropathies neurogènes sont des complications classiques des affections neurologiques centrales, surtout dans les contextes traumatiques. Elles surviennent principalement au voisinage des grosses articulations. Leur physiopathologie exacte reste inconnue malgré de très nombreux travaux et cas rapportés. Il semble que leur survenue au décours d'affections neurologiques périphériques soit exceptionnelle. Nous présentons le cas d'une para-ostéo-arthropathie de hanche bilatérale compliquant un syndrome de Guillain-Barré. PMID:26161168

  2. Severe Intimal Thickening of Interlobular Arteries Revealed by a Renal Biopsy in an Adult with Prader-Willi Syndrome Complicated by IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takayasu; Ishikawa, Eiji; Fujimoto, Mika; Murata, Tomohiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Renal complications are rare in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We herein experienced a 31-year-old woman with PWS, in whom a renal biopsy showed IgA nephropathy and severe intimal thickening of the interlobular arteries. The patient was admitted to our hospital due to proteinuria and microscopic hematuria after an upper respiratory infection. The occurrence of cardiovascular events has been reported as a cause of death in obese PWS patients. Because chronic kidney disease is generally a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, early detection checkups are essential in obese PWS patients to monitor the possible development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26781016

  3. Guillain-Barré syndrome as first presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare manifestation complicated by IVIg-induced splenic infarct.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Richard M; Chen, Ioana; Somal, Navjot

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman presented with progressively worsening neurological symptoms of 1?week duration. Physical examination revealed absent reflexes of the lower extremities and proximal muscle weakness, bilaterally. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis and electrophysiological studies were consistent with the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and the patient was started on intravenous immunoglobulin infusion. Along with positive neurological findings, rheumatological work up revealed elevated antinuclear antibody titres, positive double-stranded DNA and anti-Smith antibodies. These results, in conjunction with positive clinical findings, confirmed an underlying diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient's hospital course was complicated by an episode of severe left upper quadrant abdominal pain, fever, tachycardia and elevated inflammatory markers. CT scan of the abdomen revealed a splenic infarct following completion of IVIg infusion, making this a contributor to thrombus formation in the setting of an already thrombophilic state, and a rare complication of an approved method of treatment. PMID:26607185

  4. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF72 gene. Our findings seem to support the hypothesis that the hexanucleotide expansions of C9ORF72 gene with intermediate repetitions between 20 and 29 repetitions could be associated with typical PD with psychosis or dementia and atypical parkinsonisms with dementia (non-classical atypical parkinsonism with dementia FTD-like) or without dementia (non-classical atypical parkinsonism upper MND-like), although the causal relationship is still unclear. In these latter patients, parkinsonism, more or less levodopa responsive, constituted the symptomatological central core at onset. PMID:26275564

  5. Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome caused by posterior chamber intraocular lens--a rare complication in pediatric cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Tan, Chau-Yi; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Jou, Jieh-Ren

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of postoperative uveitis-glaucome-hyphema (UGH) syndrome following pediatric cataract surgery due to posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL). Slit-lamp examination revealed the optic of PC-IOL migrated into anterior chamber. The PC-IOL explantation was performed and ocular inflammation subsided. PMID:19230361

  6. Large offspring or large placenta syndrome? Morphometric analysis of late gestation bovine placentomes from somatic nuclear transfer pregnancies complicated by hydrallantois.

    PubMed

    Constant, F; Guillomot, M; Heyman, Y; Vignon, X; Laigre, P; Servely, J L; Renard, J P; Chavatte-Palmer, P

    2006-07-01

    Somatic nuclear transfer (NT) in cattle is often complicated by fetal oversize (i.e., large offspring syndrome), hydrallantois, and placentomegaly in late gestation. The aims of this work were to obtain data on the placentome structure in NT-recipient cows with hydrallantois (NTH) and to relate these with fetal and placental weights to better understand the abnormalities observed in NTH pregnancies during the third trimester. Pregnant cows were slaughtered between Gestation Days 180 and 280. The fetuses were weighed, and the placentomes were numbered and weighed. Placentomes were examined by histologic and stereological techniques. Macroscopic data showed that placental overgrowth preceded fetal overgrowth, and the ratio of the fetal to the total placentome weight in the NTH group was lower than that in controls after Gestation Day 220. This suggests that placental overgrowth is due to placental default rather than due to fetal overgrowth, as shown also by stereological analysis showing primary deregulation of the growth of cotyledonary tissues. Observed alterations, such as thinning of the maternal epithelium within placentomes and increased trophoblastic surface, could be secondary adaptations. Thus, placental growth deregulations would be due to modifications of the expression of placental factors. Various examples of placental deficiency were observed, suggesting that some fetal abnormalities observed in NTH calves, such as enlarged heart, enlarged umbilical cord, and abdominal ascites, are consequences of placental dysfunction. Therefore, the condition described by the term "large offspring syndrome" might better be described by "large placenta syndrome," because this syndrome affects an average of 50% of late-gestation NT pregnancies. No conclusion can be drawn from this work on apparently normal pregnancies. PMID:16571872

  7. Occurrence of Guillain-Barré syndrome as an immune mediated complication after thrombolysis with streptokinase for acute anterior wall myocardial infarction: a caution to be vigilant

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Basant; Agrawal, Navin; Patra, Soumya; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) constitutes a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated peripheral neuropathic disorders that can be triggered by a variety of antecedent events. Clinical symptoms are thought to result from streptokinase antibody-mediated damage to the local blood–nerve barrier. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction who developed GBS as a manifestation of autoimmune hypersensitivity reaction to the drug 17?days after thrombolytic therapy with streptokinase. The patient was treated with a 5-day course of intravenous ? globulin and his symptoms improved and there was no residual deficit. The case forms a reminder of the autoimmune complications of non-fibrin specific agents that can sometimes be catastrophic and require persistent and vigilant in-hospital and immediate postdischarge follow-up and immediate management. PMID:24099761

  8. Efficacy of intravenous cyclosporine in a case of cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis complicated by haemophagocytic syndrome after visceral leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Merelli, M; Quartuccio, L; Bassetti, M; Pecori, D; Gandolfo, S; Avellini, C; De Vita, S

    2015-01-01

    Cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis (CHP) is a rare panniculitis characterized by systemic features, due to histiocytic infiltration along with haemophagocytosis, which may also appear in bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a group of autoinflammatory disorders, which include macrophage activation syndrome, sometimes observed in the course of systemic autoimmune diseases, such as juvenile chronic polyarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus or vasculitis, and infection-associated haemophagocytic syndrome; if not promptly recognised and treated, HLH can be fatal. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a systemic disease caused by different forms of Leishmania spp., an intracellular protozoa. VL is endemic in tropical countries such as in the Middle East and the Mediterranean. The typical clinical and laboratory features are fever, hepato-splenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinaemia and pancytopenia. The features of VL may mimic some haematologic diseases. We report a case of cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis and HLH, triggered by a previous visceral leishmania infection. Cyclosporine was quickly effective in this case, after failure of high-dose glucocorticoids, anakinra and etoposide. PMID:26575530

  9. Le syndrome des loges du bras: une complication inhabituelle de l'intoxication au monoxyde de carbone

    PubMed Central

    Chkoura, Khalid; Kechna, Hicham; Loutid, Jaouad; Ouzad, Omar; Cherradi, Toufiq; Hachimi, Moulay Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Le monoxyde de carbone (CO) surnommé “Silent killer” par les Anglo-Saxons représente la première cause de mortalité par intoxication accidentelle ou volontaire en Europe comme aux États-Unis. Au Maroc, le centre anti poison a collecté entre 1991 et 2008, 12976 cas d'intoxication au monoxyde de carbone dont 98,7% étaient accidentelles. Cette intoxication est très exceptionnellement compliquée d'un syndrome de loge qui peut contribuer à une aggravation certaine du pronostic fonctionnel et vital quand il est ignoré ou dominé par d'autres symptômes en particulier neurologiques. Nous rapportons le cas d'un gardien de nuit qui a présenté un syndrome de loge particulier par sa localisation (bras) au cours d'une intoxication au CO qui a évolué favorablement. PMID:26301009

  10. Atypical Parathyroid Adenoma Complicated with Protracted Hungry Bone Syndrome after Surgery: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-León, Óscar Alfredo; Gómez-Sámano, Miguel Ángel; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma; López-Flores A La Torre, Manuel Alejandro; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hungry Bone Syndrome refers to the severe and prolonged hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia, following parathyroidectomy in patients with hyperparathyroidism. We present the case of an eighteen-year-old woman with a four-year history of hyporexia, polydipsia, weight loss, growth retardation, and poor academic performance. The diagnostic work-up demonstrated primary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcemia of 13.36 mg/dL, a PTH level of 2551 pg/mL, bone brown tumors, and microcalcifications within pancreas and kidneys. Neck ultrasonography revealed a parathyroid adenoma of 33 × 14 × 14 mm, also identified on 99Tc-sestamibi scan. Bone densitometry showed decreased Z-Score values (total lumbar Z-Score of −4.2). A right hemithyroidectomy and right lower parathyroidectomy were performed. Pathological examination showed an atypical parathyroid adenoma, of 3.8 g of weight and 2.8 cm in diameter. After surgery she developed hypocalcemia with tetany and QTc interval prolongation. The patient required 3 months of oral and intravenous calcium supplementation due to Hungry Bone Syndrome (HBS). After 42 months, she is still under oral calcium. Usually HBS lasts less than 12 months. Therefore we propose the term “Protracted HBS” in patients with particularly long recovery of 1 year. We present a literature review of the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HBS. PMID:26640724

  11. Acute Liver Failure in an Adult, a Rare Complication of Alagille Syndrome: Case Report and Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Frongillo, F; Bianco, G; Silvestrini, N; Lirosi, M C; Sanchez, A M; Nure, E; Gaspari, R; Avolio, A W; Sganga, G; Agnes, S

    2015-09-01

    Alagille syndrome (AS) is an autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder affecting the liver, heart, eyes, skeleton, and face. The manifestations are predominantly pediatric. Diagnosis is based on findings of a paucity of bile ducts on liver biopsy combined with ?3 of 5 major clinical criteria. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the only option for treating patients who developed liver failure, portal hypertension, severe itching, and xanthomatosis. It is difficult to establish clear criteria for OLT; indications are controversial because of the wide variety of clinical symptoms and the multisystem involvement. Generally, AS-associated liver disease is never an acute illness. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with AS who underwent urgent OLT for acute liver failure. At 24 months posttransplant, the patient is in good clinical condition and with normal hepatic and renal function. PMID:26361673

  12. The prevalence of restless legs syndrome in Edirne and its districts concomitant comorbid conditions and secondary complications.

    PubMed

    Güler, Sibel; Caylan, Ay?e; Nesrin Turan, F; Da?deviren, Nezih; Çelik, Yahya

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of restless legs syndrome in Edirne and its districts, located in Western Thrace, which is the most western part of Turkey. In this study, 4003 individuals who could communicate and agreed to participate in the study were evaluated. To obtain the data from the applicants in 30 Family Health Centres in Edirne and its districts, a face-to-face questionnaire that consisted of 54 questions was prepared by the researchers. The questionnaire included general information, questions to evaluate potential concomitant comorbid conditions and questions regarding the symptomatology used in restless legs syndrome (RLS) diagnosis, as well as questions to evaluate insomnia and tension-type headache secondary to insomnia according to the ICD-II Criteria (International Classification of Sleep Disorders-II Criteria). Of 4003 individuals, 282 were diagnosed with RLS according to the questionnaire results from Edirne and its districts, and the prevalence of RLS was 7%. Approximately, 47.9% of the patients with RLS were male, and 52.1% were female, which was not significantly different (p > 0.05). Anaemia was identified in 41.1 % of the cases and control group was detected in 19.4 %, which was significantly different (p < 0.001). Secondary insomnia was identified in 64.2% of the cases with RLS and was not detected in 35.8%, which was significantly different (p < 0.001). RLS prevalence studies will increase the awareness of the community and provide early diagnosis and treatment, as well as serve as a basis to reduce morbidity and improve the quality of life. PMID:25990102

  13. Fulminant systemic capillary leak syndrome due to C1 inhibitor deficiency complicating acute dermatomyositis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dermatomyositis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by muscular and dermatologic symptoms with variable internal organ involvement. This is the first report on a patient with acute dermatomyositis and fulminant systemic capillary leak syndrome. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian woman with chronic dermatomyositis presented with clinical signs of severe hypovolemic shock and pronounced hemoconcentration (hematocrit, 69%). Her colloid osmotic pressure was 4.6mmHg. Following a bolus dose of prednisolone (500mg), fluid resuscitation was initiated. During volume loading, anasarca and acute respiratory distress rapidly developed. Echocardiography revealed an underfilled, hypokinetic, diastolic dysfunctional left ventricle with pericardial effusion but no signs of tamponade. Despite continued fluid resuscitation and high-dosed catecholamine therapy, the patient died from refractory shock 12 hours after intensive care unit admission. A laboratory analysis of her complement system suggested the presence of C1 inhibitor deficiency as the cause for systemic capillary leakage. The post-mortem examination revealed bilateral pleural, pericardial and peritoneal effusions as well as left ventricular hypertrophy with patchy myocardial fibrosis. Different patterns of endomysial/perimysial lymphocytic infiltrations adjacent to degenerated cardiomyocytes in her myocardium and necrotic muscle fibers in her right psoas major muscle were found in the histological examination. Conclusions This case report indicates that acute exacerbation of chronic dermatomyositis can result in a fulminant systemic capillary leak syndrome with intense hemoconcentration, hypovolemic shock and acute heart failure. In the presented patient, the cause for diffuse capillary leakage was most probably acquired angioedema, a condition that has been associated with both lymphoproliferative and autoimmunologic disorders. PMID:24467750

  14. Serum Concentrations of Interleukin-6, Procalcitonin, and C-Reactive Protein: Discrimination of Septical Complications and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome after Pediatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Neunhoeffer, Felix; Plinke, Swantje; Renk, Hanna; Hofbeck, Michael; Fuchs, Jörg; Kumpf, Matthias; Zundel, Sabine; Seitz, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Background Early differentiation between sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is useful for therapeutic management in neonates and infants after surgery. Objective To compare the early (first 2 days) diagnostic value of interleukin-6 (IL-6), procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) after surgery in the differentiation of subsequent SIRS and septic complications. Methods IL-6, PCT, and CRP were measured 0, 24, and 48 hours after surgery in neonates and infants with clinical suspicion of postoperative sepsis. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for SIRS/septic complications were calculated. Results A total of 31 out of 205 neonates and infants showed clinical signs for postoperative sepsis and underwent sepsis work-up. Nine patients developed septic complications, sixteen patients met criteria for SIRS, and six patients showed an uneventful postoperative course during the first five postoperative days. IL-6, PCT, and CRP levels increased in all subgroups after surgery and were significantly higher in the sepsis group (p < 0.05). IL-6 peaked immediately, CRP at 24 to 48 hours, and PCT at 24 hours after surgery. Sensitivity and specificity (area under the curve) for IL-6 (cutoff 673 ng/dL) were 94.4 and 75% (86.2%), for CRP (cutoff 1.48 mg/dL) 76.2 and 75.0% (88.1%), and for PCT (cutoff 16.1 mg/L) 66.7 and 57.1% (65.6%). Conclusion IL-6 appears to be an early marker for severe bacterial infections with high sensitivity. IL-6 and CRP were the most reliable markers for the discrimination between SIRS and sepsis within the postoperative period. PMID:25643248

  15. Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease Combined with IgA Nephropathy Complicated with Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome: An Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ya-ting; Liao, Jin-lan; Liang, Wei; Xiong, Zu-ying

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 24 Final Diagnosis: Crescentic glomerulonephritis (type I) with IgA nephropathy Symptoms: Headache • gross hematuria • nocturia • seizures Medication: Cyclophosphamide Clinical Procedure: Dignosis to treatment Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (anti-GBM disease) is an autoimmune glomerulonephritis disease that is characterized by IgG linear deposition along the non-collagen domain of α3 chains of type IV collagen on the GBM. Although anti-GBM disease accompanied with IgA linear deposition along GBMs was discussed previously in some papers, anti-GBM disease combined with IgA granular deposition in the mesangial area, especially complicated with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), was rarely reported. RPLS is usually caused by hypertensive encephalopathy, renal decompensation, fluid retention, and adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Case Report: A male patient with the chief complaints of headache, gross hematuria, and nocturia was referred to our hospital. Based on renal biopsy, the diagnosis was finally confirmed as anti-GBM disease combined with IgA nephropathy and, the patient received comprehensive treatment, including cyclophosphamide (CTX), which led to symptom improvement. Two days after the third impulse CTX was given, he suddenly experienced headache and dizziness, which eventually developed into a tonic-clonic seizure. RPLS was identified by cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with reversible neuroimaging. After diazepam and antihypertension management, seizures were controlled. RPLS, a neurological complication, was found in anti-GBM disease with IgA nephropathy during our immunosuppressants therapy for the first time. Conclusions: It is worth paying more attention to patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), as they might be complicated with RPLS during intravenous administration of CTX and methylprednisolone. We suggest the neuroimaging be examined as soon as the seizure happens. PMID:26621456

  16. Vaginoperineal Fistula as a Complication of Perianal Surgery in a Patient with Sjögren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Beksac, Kemal; Turgal, Mert; Aran, Omer; Beksac, M. Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Forty-seven-year-old woman with Sjögren's syndrome had been operated on because of transsphincteric perianal fistula secondary to perianal abscess. Vaginal wall injury occurred during the course of the operation and injured tissue was repaired primarily. Three months later, patient suffered from the recurrence of perianal fistula symptoms and fistulectomy was performed once again under antibiotic suppression. Several months later, perineal discharge continued, and, therefore, patient was admitted to the hospital for the third time and a fistulotomy was performed. Two months after the third operation, patient was admitted with leukorrhea and a perineovaginal fistula was detected. This time, not only her surgical problem but also her immune system disorder was considered in the preoperative workup. Then, patient was hospitalized for the fourth time and “fistulectomy/perineoplasty” was performed successfully. We believe that patients with autoimmune disorders with or without medical treatment may have healing problems during the course of surgical processes and therefore such medical problems must be taken into consideration by the surgeons. PMID:25295212

  17. Transfusion-related Plasmodium ovale malaria complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a non-endemic country.

    PubMed

    Haydoura, Souha; Mazboudi, Ola; Charafeddine, Khalil; Bouakl, Imad; Baban, Tania A; Taher, Ali T; Kanj, Souha S

    2011-01-01

    46year old female presented with a one week history of high grade fever, chills, cough, and severe nausea. The patient had been admitted a month earlier with severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding from hemorrhoids necessitating transfusion of 7 units of packed red blood cells. Initial work-up was unremarkable. Because of persistent symptoms, the patient was admitted 2 days later. Malaria smear was positive. Due to the severity of her symptoms, she was managed as falciparum malaria and was started on intravenous quinine and oral doxycycline. On the second day of treatment the patient developed respiratory failure, requiring intubation and ventilatory support with new bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Antimalarial treatment was continued for a total of 7 days followed by primaquine for 14 days once the blood smear results revealed Plasmodium ovale infection. The patient remained intubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) for 16 days, and was later extubated successfully with a clear chest x-ray after a total of one month hospitalization. To our knowledge, this is the first case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to blood transfusion related P. ovale malaria infection in a non-endemic country. PMID:20971212

  18. Vaginoperineal Fistula as a Complication of Perianal Surgery in a Patient with Sjögren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Beksac, Kemal; Turgal, Mert; Basaran, Derman; Aran, Omer; Beksac, M Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Forty-seven-year-old woman with Sjögren's syndrome had been operated on because of transsphincteric perianal fistula secondary to perianal abscess. Vaginal wall injury occurred during the course of the operation and injured tissue was repaired primarily. Three months later, patient suffered from the recurrence of perianal fistula symptoms and fistulectomy was performed once again under antibiotic suppression. Several months later, perineal discharge continued, and, therefore, patient was admitted to the hospital for the third time and a fistulotomy was performed. Two months after the third operation, patient was admitted with leukorrhea and a perineovaginal fistula was detected. This time, not only her surgical problem but also her immune system disorder was considered in the preoperative workup. Then, patient was hospitalized for the fourth time and "fistulectomy/perineoplasty" was performed successfully. We believe that patients with autoimmune disorders with or without medical treatment may have healing problems during the course of surgical processes and therefore such medical problems must be taken into consideration by the surgeons. PMID:25295212

  19. Clinical Evaluation of High-Volume Hemofiltration with Hemoperfusion Followed by Intermittent Hemodialysis in the Treatment of Acute Wasp Stings Complicated by Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Si, Xiaoyun; Li, Jingjing; Bi, Xiaohong; Wu, Lan; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a rare complication of wasp stings. Currently, there is no standardized treatment for MODS secondary to multiple wasp stings, although blood purification techniques are often used. This study aimed to analyze our experiences of using intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) with or without high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) for treating acute wasp stings complicated by MODS. In this retrospective study, 36 patients with wasp stings complicated by MODS received either IHD combined with hemoperfusion, or HVHF (ultrafiltration flow rate, 70 mL/kg/h) combined with hemoperfusion for 5 days followed by IHD. Clinical symptoms, blood biochemical parameters, duration of mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive agents, duration of hospital stay and survival rate were recorded, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) scores estimated. Patients treated with HVHF followed by IHD appeared to exhibit a faster recovery than those receiving IHD alone, as evidenced by superior improvements in MOD (4.29±1.08 vs. 2.27±1.07) and APACHE II (7.09±2.62 vs. 4.20±1.69) scores (P < 0.05). Patients treated with HVHF had significantly lower myoglobin, creatine kinase-MB, lactate dehydrogenase, bilirubin and creatinine levels than patients treated with IHD alone. In addition, the durations of hospital stay (13.15±2.77 vs. 27.92±3.18 days), vasopressor use (1.76±0.24 vs. 3.43 ± 1.01 days), mechanical ventilation (3.02±1.63 vs. 5.94 ± 2.11 days) and oliguria (6.57±2.45 vs. 15.29 ± 3.51 days) were reduced, and renal function more often recovered (85.1% vs. 53.1%), in the HVHF group compared with the IHD group (P < 0.05). These results raise the possibility that HVHF plus IHD may be superior to IHD alone for the treatment of acute wasp stings complicated by MODS; additional prospective studies are merited to explore this further. PMID:26207371

  20. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Materials Publications Related Links World Health Organization (WHO) Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) Diphtheria and the Alaskan Iditarod Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Complications from ...

  1. Cardiac glycoside overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be vague, particularly in the elderly. Eyes, ears, nose, and throat: Blurred vision Halos around objects (yellow, green, white) * Skin: Allergic reaction (See also: Stevens-Johnson syndrome ) Hives Rash Gastrointestinal: Diarrhea Loss of appetite* Nausea ...

  2. Renal Complications and Their Prognosis in Korean Patients with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus from the Central MERS-CoV Designated Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection presented renal function impairment after the first MERS-CoV patient died of progressive respiratory and renal failure. Thus, MERS-CoV may include kidney tropism. However, reports about the natural courses of MERS-CoV infection in terms of renal complications are scarce. We examined 30 MERS-CoV patients admitted to National Medical Center, Korea. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urine dipstick tests, urinary protein quantitation (ACR or PCR), and other clinical parameters in all patients. Two consecutive results of more than trace (or 1+) of albumin and blood on dipstick test occurred in 18 (60%) (12 [40%]) and 22 (73.3%) (19 [63.3%]) patients, respectively. Fifteen (50.0%) patients showed a random urine ACR or PCR more than 100 mg/g Cr. Eight (26.7%) patients showed acute kidney injury (AKI), and the mean and median durations to the occurrence of AKI from symptom onset were 18 and 16 days, respectively. Old age was associated with a higher occurrence of AKI in the univariate analysis (HR [95% CI]: 1.069 [1.013-1.128], P = 0.016) and remained a significant predictor of the occurrence of AKI after adjustment for comorbidities and the application of a mechanical ventilator. Diabetes, AKI, and the application of a continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) were risk factors for mortality in the univariate analysis (HR [95% CI]: diabetes; 10.133 [1.692-60.697], AKI; 12.744 [1.418-114.565], CRRT; 10.254 [1.626-64.666], respectively). Here, we report renal complications and their prognosis in 30 Korean patients with MERS-CoV. PMID:26713056

  3. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  4. Renal complications in 6p duplication syndrome: microarray-based investigation of the candidate gene(s) for the development of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura-Furuhata, Megumi; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Amano, Yoshiro; Ehara, Takashi; Hamasaki, Yuko; Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Aikawa, Atsushi; Hamada, Riku; Ishikura, Kenji; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Noda, Shunsuke; Koike, Kenichi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Awazu, Midori; Miyake, Noriko; Kosho, Tomoki

    2015-03-01

    6p duplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder that frequently manifests renal complications, including proteinuria, hypoplastic kidney, and hydronephrosis. We report a girl with the syndrome, manifesting left hydronephrosis, proteinuria/hematuria, and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS) resulting in chronic end-stage renal failure, successfully treated with renal transplantation. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization showed the derivative chromosome 6 to have a 6.4-Mb duplication at 6p25.3-p25.1 with 32 protein-coding genes and a 220-Kb deletion at 6p25.3 with two genes of no possible relation to the renal pathology. Review of the literature shows that variation of renal complications in the syndrome is compatible with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). FSGS, observed in another patient with 6p duplication syndrome, could be a non-coincidental complication. FOXC1, located within the 6.4-Mb duplicated region at 6p25.3-p25.2, could be a candidate gene for CAKUT, but its single gene duplication effect would not be sufficient. FSGS would be a primary defect associated with duplicated gene(s) albeit no candidate could be proposed, or might occur in association with CAKUT. PMID:25691411

  5. Poison ivy: an underreported cause of erythema multiforme.

    PubMed

    Werchniak, Andrew E; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between herpes simplex virus (HSV) and erythema multiforme (EM) has been well described. Many authors contend that EM (excluding Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis) occurs almost exclusively as a response to HSV infection. During the past year, however, we have observed several cases of EM complicating severe Rhus allergic contact dermatitis. Although this association has been previously documented, the paucity of cases in the literature, along with our experience, suggests that this is an underreported phenomenon. We describe 4 of our cases. PMID:15577759

  6. Foot Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Complications > Foot Complications Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Foot Complications People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Even ordinary problems can get worse and ...

  7. Bing-Neel syndrome, a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: analysis of 44 cases and review of the literature. A study on behalf of the French Innovative Leukemia Organization (FILO).

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Laurence; Fitsiori, Aikaterini; Lemal, Richard; Dupuis, Jehan; Carpentier, Benjamin; Boudin, Laurys; Corby, Anne; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Gastaud, Lauris; Talbot, Alexis; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Mahe, Béatrice; Payet, Camille; Soussain, Carole; Bonnet, Charlotte; Vincent, Laure; Lissandre, Séverine; Herbrecht, Raoul; Kremer, Stéphane; Leblond, Véronique; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement by malignant cells is a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and this clinicopathological entity is referred to as the Bing-Neel syndrome. There is currently no consensus on the diagnostic criteria, therapeutic approaches and response evaluation for this syndrome. In this series, we retrospectively analyzed 44 French patients with Bing-Neel syndrome. Bing-Neel syndrome was the first manifestation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia in 36% of patients. When Waldenström macroglobulinemia was diagnosed prior to Bing-Neel syndrome, the median time interval between this diagnosis and the onset of Bing-Neel syndrome was 8.9 years. This study highlights the possibility of the occurrence of Bing-Neel syndrome without any other evidence of progression of Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The clinical presentation was heterogeneous without any specific signs or symptoms. Biologically, the median lymphocyte count in the cerebrospinal fluid was 31/mm3. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in 78% of the cases. The overall response rate after first-line treatment was 70%, and the overall survival rate after the diagnosis of Bing-Neel syndrome was 71% at 5 years. Altogether, these results suggest that Bing-Neel syndrome should be considered in the context of any unexplained neurological symptoms associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The diagnostic approach should be based on cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal axis. It still remains difficult to establish treatment recommendations or prognostic factors in the absence of large-scale, prospective, observational studies. PMID:26385211

  8. EMPACT syndrome: limited evidence despite a high-risk cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Chang, Maria; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2016-01-01

    Serious dermatologic adverse events such as erythema multiforme (EM) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) have been reported in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and cranial radiotherapy (RT). Given the frequency of AED-associated rashes and the infrequency of serious dermatologic adverse events after cranial RT, we sought to further assess the prevalence of cutaneous eruptions in patients receiving an AED before and after cranial RT. We reviewed medical records of patients taking AEDs while undergoing RT for a high-grade glioma and recorded demographic, disease, and treatment parameters, as well as the development of rashes. Rashes were found in 19 % of patients taking AEDs. Phenytoin was most commonly implicated (93 %) in rash formation compared with other AEDs (P < 0.0001), both before and during RT. Most rashes (76 %) occurred before starting RT (P < 0.0001). However, of those during RT, most were associated with phenytoin compared with other AEDs (P = 0.002). One case of SJS was noted in a patient receiving phenytoin prior to RT. While rashes were slightly less prevalent in patients receiving temozolomide compared with those not receiving temozolomide (3.4 vs 4.8 %), this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.65). Rashes are relatively common in patients receiving AEDs, with the highest incidence associated with phenytoin. However, the risk of serious dermatologic events is low. There did not appear to be an association between the receipt of cranial radiotherapy and the development of AED-associated rash with phenytoin or other AEDs. PMID:24792490

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Antiphospholipid syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body's own tissues and organs. Women with antiphospholipid syndrome are at increased risk of complications during pregnancy. These complications include pregnancy-induced high blood pressure ( ...

  10. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of— Preeclampsia. Early delivery. Cesarean birth . Having a big baby, which can complicate delivery. Having a baby ... health prevention with improved sources of maternal health data, and methods for measuring and studying the data. ...

  11. Improved burn center survival of patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis managed without corticosteroids.

    PubMed Central

    Halebian, P H; Corder, V J; Madden, M R; Finklestein, J L; Shires, G T

    1986-01-01

    Fifteen consecutive patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis or the Stevens-Johnson syndrome managed without corticosteroids after transfer to the burn center (group 2) are compared to a previous consecutive group of 15 who received high doses of these drugs (group 1). Group 2 had a 66% survival, which was a significant improvement compared to the 33% survival in group 1 (p = 0.057). In group 1, mortality was associated with loss of more than 50% of the body surface area skin. In group 2, mortality was related to advanced age and associated diseases. Age, extent of skin loss, progression of skin loss after burn center admission, incidence of abnormal liver function tests, and the incidence of septic complications were not significantly different in the two groups (p greater than 0.10). The incidence of detected esophageal slough was similar in both groups. Nonsteroid (group 2) management was associated with a decreased incidence of ulceration of gastrointestinal columnar epithelium, Candida sepsis, and an increased survival after septic complications. The combined experience of these 30 patients suggests that corticosteroids are contraindicated in the burn center management of toxic epidermal necrolysis and the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIG. 3. FIG. 4. PMID:3767483

  12. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  13. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  14. HLA-B*5801: utility and cost-effectiveness in the Asia-Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Siaw Ing

    2013-06-01

    Gout is a common condition which is mainly treated with the hypo-uricemic agent, allopurinol. Although allopurinol is generally a well-tolerated drug, there is a small risk of developing potentially fatal complications, such as allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome. Recent advances in pharmacogenomics have made possible the identification of genes which confer susceptibility to specific drugs. A recent multi-national case-control study has reported allopurinol as the most common drug associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Several studies have established a strong association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*5801 gene and development of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The allele frequency of HLA-B*5801 is highest in the South East Asian population.Since other hypo-uricemic agents are available, patients may wish to have HLA-B*5801 testing before being started on allopurinol. As the test for HLA-B*5801 is expensive, time-consuming and only available in selected laboratories, there is a need to evaluate the utility and cost-effectiveness of this test in our region. PMID:23981744

  15. Chylous Ascites in a Patient with HIV/AIDS: A Late Complication of Mycobacterium avium Complex-Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Imam H.; Khan, Rumana; Shah, Saira; Syed, Amer K.; Lintz, David

    2014-01-01

    Chylous ascites is very rare in HIV/AIDS and its association with Mycobacterium avium complex-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (MAC-IRIS) has been rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a young African-American male who developed chylous ascites as a late sequela to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome while on treatment for MAC. Antiretroviral drug-naive patients who start HAART in close proximity to the diagnosis of an opportunistic infection and have a rapid decline in HIV RNA level should be monitored for development of IRIS. Although the long term prognosis is poor, early diagnosis and treatment help to improve quality of life. PMID:25478257

  16. [Postpartum secondary cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with axial transtentorial and tonsillar herniation as a complication of intracranial hypotension syndrome after spinal anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kraayvanger, L; Berlit, P

    2014-12-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year-old postpartum female patient who suffered from a secondary cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to an intracranial hypotension syndrome with axial transtentorial and tonsillar herniation and the clinical signs of incarceration after spinal anaesthesia. PMID:25489758

  17. [Neurologic complications following liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Shibolet, Oren; Safadi, Rifaat; Ashur, Yaffa; Eid, Ahmed; Ilan, Yaron

    2002-01-01

    Neurologic complications are very common following liver transplantation and appear in 30%-90% of the patients. These complications represent a wide array of etiologies, often presenting complicated diagnostic options. The primary liver disease for which the patient underwent the transplantation can cause neurologic complications, or they can be a presentation of a metabolic or vascular derangement. The medications given to liver transplanted patients can cause neurologic complication either directly via drug side effects or indirectly via immune-suppression and secondary opportunistic infections of the nervous system. We present two cases of liver transplanted patients, one suffering from a complex neurologic syndrome attributed to her primary Wilsons disease and the second with recurrent encephalopathy following transplantation attributed to a porto-systemic shunt. We review the current literature on the subject. PMID:11851103

  18. Gitelman’s syndrome complicated by mild renal insufficiency and high anion gap acidosis; a rare presentation in a young female

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Jafry, Nazrul; Ahmed, Ejaz; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gitelman’s syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder that is characterized by episodic clinical manifestations and persistent biochemical abnormalities. The disorder manifests in adolescent or adult age and is characterized by transient episodes of muscle weakness and tetany. Its diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and skillful interpretation of laboratory investigations. Case Presentation: We herein present a case of a 20-year-old female patient who presented with generalized muscle weakness and mild renal insufficiency. Laboratory investigations revealed mild azotemia, high anion gap acidosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, and hypocalciuria. She recovered her renal functions and muscle power with appropriate management and is doing well seven months after her first presentation to our hospital. Conclusions: This case highlights the need to create high index of suspicion among the general practitioners about this syndrome and an early referral of such patients to nephrologists for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:25964887

  19. Comparing the effects of inorganic nitrate and allopurinol in renovascular complications of metabolic syndrome in rats: role of nitric oxide and uric acid

    PubMed Central

    Essawy, Soha S.; Elbaz, Amani A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The epidemic of metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide and correlates with elevation in serum uric acid and marked increase in total fructose intake. Fructose raises uric acid and the latter inhibits nitric oxide bioavailability. We hypothesized that fructose-induced hyperuricemia may have a pathogenic role in metabolic syndrome and treatment of hyperuricemia or increased nitric oxide may improve it. Material and methods Two experiments were performed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control diet or a high-fructose diet to induce metabolic syndrome. The latter received either sodium nitrate or allopurinol for 10 weeks starting with the 1st day of fructose to evaluate the preventive role of the drugs or after 4 weeks to evaluate their therapeutic role. Results A high-fructose diet was associated with significant (p < 0.05) hyperuricemia (5.9 ±0.5 mg/dl), hypertension (125.2 ±7.8 mm Hg), dyslipidemia and significant decrease in tissue nitrite (27.4 ±2.01 mmol/l). Insulin resistance, as manifested by HOMAIR (20.6 ±2.2) and QUICKI (0.23 ±0.01) indices, as well as adiposity index (12.9 ±1.1) was also significantly increased (p < 0.1). Sodium nitrate or allopurinol was able to reverse these features significantly (p < 0.05) in the preventive study better than the therapeutic study. Conclusions Fructose may have a major role in the epidemic of metabolic syndrome and obesity due to its ability to raise uric acid. Either sodium nitrate or allopurinol can prevent this pathological condition by different mechanisms of action. PMID:25097586

  20. The spectrum of "complicated spastic paraplegia, MASA syndrome and X-linked hydrocephalus". Contribution of DNA linkage analysis in genetic counseling of individual families.

    PubMed

    Schrander-Stumpel, C; Meyer, H; Merckx, D; Jones, M; Israel, J; Sommer, A; Stevens, C; Tinschert, S; Wilson, G; Willems, P

    1994-01-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus and the X-linked MASA syndrome (Mental retardation. Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia) both have a variable clinical spectrum with great overlap. Data from DNA linkage analysis placed the locus for both conditions at Xq28. On clinical and molecular grounds it has been hypothesized that both MASA syndrome and X-linked hydrocephalus are caused by a mutation in the same gene at Xq28. There is no significant clinical marker in the obligate female carriers and prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound is not reliable; DNA analysis can offer an improved genetic counseling for the families and more reliable prenatal diagnosis. In the gene encoding for Ll, a neural cell adhesion molecule and located at Xq28, several different mutations have been reported in X-linked hydrocephalus families and in a MASA family. We report data on DNA linkage analysis in 6 families with X-linked hydrocephalus/MASA syndrome. These data illustrate the importance of DNA linkage analysis in the individual family; they also show, however, the problem of studying small families. Genetic heterogeneity cannot be excluded. PMID:8031529

  1. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications. PMID:12760580

  2. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  3. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  4. Managing complications in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Paolo; Cordoba, Juan; Farges, Oliver; Valla, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. This life-threatening condition usually arises from complications of cirrhosis. While variceal bleeding is the most acute and probably best studied, several other complications of liver cirrhosis are more insidious in their onset but nevertheless more important for the long-term management and outcome of these patients. This review summarizes the topics discussed during the UEG-EASL Hepatology postgraduate course of the United European Gastroenterology Week 2013 and discusses emergency surgical conditions in cirrhotic patients, the management of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, coagulation disorders, and liver cancer. PMID:25653862

  5. Iatrogenic skin injury in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol E; Kroshinsky, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Iatrogenic skin injuries in hospitalized patients range from drug-related complications to those related to procedures. Common drug complications include drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), linear immunoglobulin (Ig) A bullous dermatosis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. Contact dermatitis can result from surgical preparations of chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine, medical adhesives, topical postsurgical ointments, most commonly neomycin and bacitracin, and internal prostheses, including coronary stents, pacemakers, and metal joints. Complications arising from procedures include thrombosis caused by placement of peripherally inserted central catheters, pyoderma gangrenosum from sites of dermal trauma, and anetoderma of prematurity from cutaneous monitoring devices in neonates. Calcinosis cutis and decubitus ulcers are also hospital problems. PMID:22014984

  6. Repair of Bochdalek hernia in an adult complicated by abdominal compartment syndrome, gastropleural fistula and pleural empyema: Report of a case?

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Hanyu, Ken; Suwa, Katsuhito; Ashizuka, Shuichi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bochdalek's diaphragmatic hernia (BDH) rarely developed symptomatic in adulthood but mostly required an operation. In adult BDH cases, long-term residing of the massive intraabdominal organs in the thoracic cavity passively causes loss of domain for abdominal organs (LOD). PRESENTATION OF CASE A 63-year-old man presented at our institution complaining of sudden left upper quadrant abdominal pain. Chest radiography showed a hyperdense lesion containing bowel gas in the left pleural space. Computed tomography revealed a dilated bowel above the diaphragm and intestinal obstruction suggestive of gangrenous changes. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of incarcerated BDH and an emergency laparotomy was performed. Operative findings revealed the hypoplastic lung, lack of hernia sac, and location of the diaphragmatic defect, which indicated that his hernia was true congenital. Organs were reduced into the abdominal cavity, and large defect of the diaphragm was repaired with combination of direct vascular closure and intraperitoneal onlay mesh reinforcement using with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. On the postoperative day 1, the patient fell into the shock and was diagnosed to have abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Conservative therapies were administered, but resulted in gastropleural fistula and pleural empyema, which required an emergency surgery. Mesh extraction and fistulectomy were performed. DISCUSSION A PubMed search for the case of ACS after repair of the adult BDH revealed only three cases, making this very rare condition. CONCLUSION In dealing with adult BDH, possible post-repair ACS should be considered. PMID:24441713

  7. Loss of p53 accelerates the complications of myelodysplastic syndrome in a NUP98-HOXD13–driven mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiming; Menendez, Silvia; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Bae, Narae; Aplan, Peter D.; Göhring, Gudrun; Deblasio, Tony R.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleoporin gene NUP98 is fused to several genes including HOXD13 in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic myeloid leukemia, blast crisis. Genetically engineered mice that express a NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) transgene (Tg) display the phenotypic features of MDS, including cytopenias, bone marrow dysplasia, and transformation to acute leukemia. Here we show that short-term treatment with the p53 inhibitor Pifithrin-α partially and transiently rescued the myeloid and lymphoid abnormalities found in NHD13+ Tg mice, with no improvement in the anemia, while the genetic deletion of 2 alleles of p53 rescued both the myeloid progenitor cell and long-term hematopoietic stem cell compartments. Nonetheless, loss of one or both alleles of p53 did not rescue the MDS phenotype, but instead exacerbated the MDS phenotype and accelerated the development of acute myeloid leukemia. Our studies suggest that while targeting p53 may transiently improve hematopoiesis in MDS, over the long-term, it has detrimental effects, raising caution about abrogating its function to treat the cytopenias that accompany this disease. PMID:22927245

  8. Dizygotic monochorionic twin pregnancy conceived following intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment and complicated by twin-twin transfusion syndrome and blood chimerism.

    PubMed

    Ekelund, C K; Skibsted, L; Søgaard, K; Main, K M; Dziegiel, M H; Schwartz, M; Moeller, N; Roos, L; Tabor, A

    2008-11-01

    We report a case of a dizygotic monochorionic twin pregnancy preceded by intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment including assisted hatching. On ultrasound examination at 25 weeks' gestation the twins, which had been assumed to be monochorionic, were found to be of different sexes. Karyotyping and zygocity determination were performed on amniotic fluid and showed the twins to be dizygotic with normal female and male karyotypes. There were clinical and sonographic signs of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), and Cesarean delivery was performed at 32 weeks' gestation. At birth the twins were phenotypically a normal male and a normal female. Histology of the placenta showed it to be monochorionic diamniotic. Blood chimerism was found postnatally as both infants had the karyotypes 46,XX[13]/46,XY[17]. Chimerism was not found in cells from a buccal swab at 6 months of age. This is one of only a few reported cases of dizygotic monochorionic twins. Nearly all of these cases have been conceived after assisted reproductive technology procedures. It is of clinical importance to be aware of this rare phenomenon in relation to TTTS, prenatal screening and parental counseling. PMID:18956441

  9. False aneurysm of the interosseous artery and anterior interosseous syndrome - an unusual complication of penetrating injury of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. Objectives This case highlights the potential vascular and neurological hazards of minimal penetrating injury of the proximal forearm and emphasizes the phenomenon of delayed presentation of vascular injuries following seemingly obscure penetrating wounds. Case Report We report a case of a 22-year-old male admitted for a minimal penetrating trauma of the proximal forearm that, some days later, developed an anterior interosseous syndrome. A Duplex study performed immediately after the trauma was normal. Further radiologic investigations i.e. a computer-tomographic-angiography (CTA) revealed a false aneurysm of the proximal portion of the interosseous artery (IA). Endovascular management was proposed but a spontaneous rupture dictated surgical revision with simple excision. Complete neurological recovery was documented at 4 months postoperatively. Conclusions/Summary After every penetrating injury of the proximal forearm we propose routinely a detailed neurological and vascular status and a CTA if Duplex evaluation is negative. PMID:20034382

  10. [HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vigil-De Gracia, Paulino

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are one of the most common complications of pregnancy, but one of the most serious expressions of this pathology is HELLP syndrome. The HELLP syndrome is characterized by the presence of hypertension disorder more a triad: microangiopathic hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. Patient with HELLP syndrome is associated with increased maternal risk complications such as: cerebral hemorrhage, retinal detachment, hematoma/ hepatic rupture, acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, placental abruption and therefore a maternal death. For all these reasons it is recommended to search for findings of HELLP syndrome in patients with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. The main clinical confusion of HELLP syndrome is acute fatty liver of pregnancy, however there are parameters that help correct identification. The presence of HELLP syndrome involves a rapid termination of pregnancy and the administration of corticosteroids does not improve maternal morbidity and mortality but may help raise the platelet count, thus decreasing the need for transfusion and shorten hospital stay. Much of the decline in maternal morbidity and mortality associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is in proper diagnosis and effective management of HELLP syndrome. PMID:26016316

  11. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosi?ska, Justyna; ?ukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  12. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  13. An unusual cause of rhabdomyolysis in emergency setting: challenges of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Mikhail; Yatsynovich, Yan; Lionte, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare phenomenon that may be challenging to recognize in an emergency setting. Drugs are one of the common causes. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is a commonly used antibiotic effective in the treatment of upper and lower respiratory tract infections as well as renal, urinary, and gastrointestinal tract infections. It has variable side effects, ranging from mild symptoms of fatigue and insomnia to a potentially life-threatening Steven-Johnson syndrome and renal failure. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of therapy with this drug and is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients or those with an allogenic stem cell transplant. In this article, we report a case of rhabdomyolysis in an immunocompetent patient who has undergone treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and a possible drug interaction with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with the latter acting as an aggravating factor of this complication. PMID:24997105

  14. Severe complications of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    The usual presentation of herpes zoster is as a self-limiting vesicular rash, often accompanied by post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), its most common complication. However, herpes zoster can give rise to other complications, many of which have unusual presentations and serious sequelae. The incidence and burden of many of these less common complications are poorly understood. Ocular complications of ophthalmic zoster are relatively frequent but, with early antiviral therapy, need not be sight-threatening. Delayed contralateral hemiparesis is a rare complication of ophthalmic zoster that may present as stroke, temporally remote from the zoster episode. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) involving the facial nerve; facial paralysis, ear pain and vesicles in the ear are diagnostic. Facial paralysis in the absence of vesicles may indicate zoster sine herpete, which can be mistaken for Bell's palsy. Herpetic facial palsies may respond to combination therapy with an antiviral plus steroid, but further research is needed to determine the benefit of such treatments. PMID:17939894

  15. Dengue-associated neuromuscular complications.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Kiran Preet

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is associated with many neurological dysfunctions. Up to 4% of dengue patients may develop neuromuscular complications. Muscle involvement can manifest with myalgias, myositis, rhabdomyolysis and hypokalemic paralysis. Diffuse myalgia is the most characteristic neurological symptom of dengue fever. Dengue-associated myositis can be of varying severity ranging from self-limiting muscle involvement to severe dengue myositis. Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis often has a rapidly evolving course; benign nature; excellent response to potassium; and, often leads to diagnostic confusion with other dengue-associated neuromuscular disorders. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe form of muscle involvement and may be life-threatening. Guillain-Barrι syndrome is another frequent neuromuscular dengue-associated complication. Dengue-associated Guillain-Barrι syndrome responds very well to intravenous immunoglobulins. Predominant spinal gray matter involvement has been reported in a patient presenting with areflexic paraparesis. Mononeuropathies often manifest with paralysis of the diaphragm due to phrenic nerve dysfunction. Brachial plexopathy, in the form of neuralgic amyotrophy, has been described much more frequently than lumbo-sacral plexopathy. Early recognition of these neuromuscular complications is needed for successful treatment and to prevent further disabilities. PMID:26238884

  16. Hematologic complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Danielle M

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This review discusses specifically the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations; however, care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist, and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets), or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy, and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  17. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  18. Comparative Analysis of Substrate-Free Cultured Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets from Cells of Subjects with and without Stevens—Johnson Syndrome for Use in Ocular Surface Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Shin, Eun Jung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Wee, Won Ryang; Jeon, Saewha; Kim, Mee Kum

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the regenerative potential of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells sheets (COMECs) from Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) subjects with those from non-SJS subjects. Methods Human oral mucosal epithelial cells from SJS and non-SJS subjects were cultured, and colony-forming efficiency (CFE), proliferative and migration potential, expression of cytokines/growth factors and stem cells were compared. COMECs from SJS and non-SJS subjects were transplanted into 12 limbal stem cell-deficient rabbits, and their regenerative potential was analyzed at 1 week after transplantation. Results CFE (p>0.05, student’s t test), cell proliferation potential (p>0.05, two-way ANOVA) and expression of the cytokeratins (K3, K4, K13, K19) in the oral mucosal epithelial cells from SJS subjects were similar to those of the cells from non-SJS subjects. The initial migratory potential of SJS cells was delayed compared to that of non-SJS cells (p <0.05, RM two-way ANOVA). The SJS cells expressed lower levels of EGF and higher levels of VEGF compared to that of non-SJS cells (p<0.05, one-way ANOVA). In vivo transplanted SJS-COMECs showed similar expression of K3, K4, and K13, proliferation markers (Ki-67; p>0.05, Mann-Whitney U test), and stem cell markers (p63; p>0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) compared to non-SJS COMECs. The initial epithelial defects in vivo were larger in the eyes treated with SJS-COMECs on day 3 (p<0.01, RM two-way ANOVA), but no differences were observed by day 7 between SJS- and non-SJS-COMECs. Conclusions These results suggest that, aside from differences in migratory potential, oral mucosal epithelial cells from SJS and non-SJS subjects are comparable in their regeneration potential in treating limbal stem cell deficiency. PMID:26808056

  19. 2016 Classification Criteria for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Complicating Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-03-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to classify 428 patient profiles as having or not having MAS, based on clinical and laboratory features at the time of disease onset. The 428 profiles comprised 161 patients with systemic JIA-associated MAS and 267 patients with a condition that could potentially be confused with MAS (active systemic JIA without evidence of MAS, or systemic infection). Next, the ability of candidate criteria to classify individual patients as having MAS or not having MAS was assessed by evaluating the agreement between the classification yielded using the criteria and the consensus classification of the experts. The final criteria were selected in a consensus conference. Experts achieved consensus on the classification of 391 of the 428 patient profiles (91.4%). A total of 982 candidate criteria were tested statistically. The 37 best-performing criteria and 8 criteria obtained from the literature were evaluated at the consensus conference. During the conference, 82% consensus among experts was reached on the final MAS classification criteria. In validation analyses, these criteria had a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 0.99. Agreement between the classification (MAS or not MAS) obtained using the criteria and the original diagnosis made by the treating physician was high (κ=0.76). We have developed a set of classification criteria for MAS complicating systemic JIA and provided preliminary evidence of its validity. Use of these criteria will potentially improve understanding of MAS in systemic JIA and enhance efforts to discover effective therapies, by ensuring appropriate patient enrollment in studies. PMID:26865703

  20. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  1. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  2. Complications Following Anorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, Hiroko; Poylin, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Anorectal surgery is well tolerated. Rates of minor complications are relatively high, but major postoperative complications are uncommon. Prompt identification of postoperative complications is necessary to avoid significant patient morbidity. The most common acute complications include bleeding, infection, and urinary retention. Pelvic sepsis, while may result in dramatic morbidity and even mortality, is relatively rare. The most feared long-term complications include fecal incontinence, anal stenosis, and chronic pelvic pain. PMID:26929747

  3. Pericardiectomy for Pleuropericardial Effusion Complicating Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Quarti, Andrea; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Soura, Elli; Pozzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Severe pericardial effusion is a rare complication of bacterial pneumonia and it usually disappears under medical treatment. Herein we report a case of a girl with a congenital immunodeficient syndrome and bacterial pneumonia, who developed recurrent and life-threatening pericardial effusion refractory to medical treatment. She was finally treated with pericardiectomy. PMID:20585369

  4. Mycoplasmal Upper Respiratory Infection Presenting as Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mana; Agrawal, Abhinav; Parikh, Manan; Banayat, Rikka; Thomas, Maria Joana; Guo, Tianhua; Lee, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma is a virulent organism that is known to primarily infect the respiratory tract; however, affection of the skin, nervous system, kidneys, heart and bloodstream has been observed in various forms, which include Stevens Johnson syndrome, erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis, encephalitis, renal failure, conduction system abnormalities and hemolytic anemia. Small vessel vasculitis is a lesser-known complication of mycoplasma pneumonia infection. We report a case of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract infection with striking cutaneous lesions as the presenting symptom. Mycoplasmal infection was confirmed by serology testing, skin biopsy was suggestive of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. This case brings forth an uncommon manifestation of mycoplasmal infection with extra-pulmonary affection, namely small vessel vasculitis. PMID:25874067

  5. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is called paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. Complications of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome can occur ... common cause of an arrhythmia known as paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is the most frequent ...

  7. Syndromic Scoliosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Neurofibromatosis (NF) Noonan Syndrome VATER/VACTERL Syndrome Angelman Syndrome Rett Prader Willi Osteogenesis Imperfecta Trisomy 21 (Down's Syndrome) Symptoms Highly variable based on underlying syndrome and ...

  8. [Definition and classification of the late complications after gastric resection].

    PubMed

    Milkov, G

    1980-01-01

    In literature reports dealing with assessment of the long-term results after gastric resection a great diversity exists in terms of clinical definition, denominations, and classification of the late post-resection complications. This gave sufficient reason to the author to carry out personal researches into 126 patients with expressed late complications subsequent to gastric resection with a view to elucidate the type aad incidence of these complications, their etiopathogenesis, clinical peculiarities, possibilities of diagnosis and differential diagnosis and treatment problems, and on the basis of the results obtained to work out a personal classification scheme of post-resection complications which would be utilized both in connection with the diagnosing and treatment of these complications, and in assessment of the long-term results of gastric resection. In the suggested classification are included pathological syndromes representing true post-resection complications and never recorded without resection of the stomach; they run a prolonged course, and exert a permanent effect on the clinical condition and working ability of the operated patients, they are characterized by a typical symptom constellation on the basis of which it is possible to diagnose and differentiate them, and are conditioned by a variety of pathogenetic mechanisms demanding different treatment policy. The pathogenetic and clinical characteristic of the syndromes included in the classification (e.g. dumping syndrome, afferent loop syndrome, digestive insufficiency syndrome, hypoglycemic syndrome, and ulcerous recurrences after gastric resection)are briefly outlined. PMID:7443670

  9. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome) and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes. Differential diagnoses include Huntington disease and other causes of progressive hyperkinetic movement disorders. There are no curative therapies for NA syndromes. Regular cardiologic studies and avoidance of transfusion complications are mandatory in McLeod syndrome. The hyperkinetic movement disorder may be treated as in Huntington disease. Other symptoms including psychiatric manifestations should be managed in a symptom-oriented manner. NA syndromes have a relentlessly progressive course usually over two to three decades. PMID:22027213

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... to help prevent problems like these. Can preexisting diabetes cause problems during pregnancy? Yes. If it’s not ...

  11. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Information Page Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of AIDS? AIDS is primarily an immune system disorder caused ...

  12. Pregnancy Complications: Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Genital herpes and pregnancy Genital herpes and pregnancy Now playing: E-mail to a ... the United States has genital herpes. Can genital herpes cause complications during pregnancy? Yes. Genital herpes can ...

  13. Complications of Diabetes and Their Implications for Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents information on the complications of both Type I and Type II diabetes and the implications for the rehabilitation of persons with diabetes and visual impairment. Topics covered include retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic hand syndrome, neuropathy of the autonomic nervous…

  14. Complications of Diabetes and Their Implications for Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents information on the complications of both Type I and Type II diabetes and the implications for the rehabilitation of persons with diabetes and visual impairment. Topics covered include retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic hand syndrome, neuropathy of the autonomic nervous…

  15. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  16. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  17. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article. PMID:26706652

  18. Risks and complications in rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoplasty is regarded to be associated with many risks as the expectations of patient and physician are not always corresponding. Besides of postoperative deformities many other risks and complications have to be considered. Reduction-rhinoplasty e.g. can cause breathing disturbances which are reported in 70% of all revision-rhinoplasty-patients. One has to be aware however that scars and loss of mucosal-sensation can also give the feeling of a “blocked nose”. The main risks of autogenous transplants are dislocation and resorption, while alloplasts can cause infection and extrusion. In this respect silicone implants can have a complication rate between 5-20%. Less complications are reported with other materials like Gore-Tex. Complications of skin and soft tissues can be atrophy, fibrosis, numbness, cysts originating from displaced mucosa or subcutaneous granulomas caused by ointment material. Postoperative swelling depends mainly on the osteotomy technique. Percutaneous osteotomies cause less trauma, but may result in visible scars. Infections are rare but sometimes life-threatening (toxic-shock-syndrome). The risk is higher, when sinus surgery and rhinoplasty are combined. Osteotomies can also cause injuries of the orbital region. Necrosis of eye-lids by infections and blindness by central artery occlusion are known. There are reports on various other risks like rhinoliquorrhea, brain damage, fistulas between sinus-cavernosus and carotid artery, aneurysms and thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. Discoloration of incisors are possible by damage of vessels and nerves. Rhinoplasty can also become a court-case in dissatisfied patients, a situation that may be called a “typical complication of rhinoplasty”. It can be avoided by proper patient selection and consideration of psychological disturbances. Postoperative deformities are considered as main risks of rhinoplasty, causing revision surgery in 5% to 15% of the cases. The analysis of postoperative deformities allowes the identification of specific risks. The most frequent postoperative deformity is the “pollybeak” when a deep naso-frontal angle, cartilaginous hump and reduced tip projection are present preoperatively. The pollybeak is the indication in about 50% of all revision rhinoplasties. Other frequent postoperative deformities are a pendant and wide nasal tip, retractions of the columella base or irregularities of the nasal dorsum. These deformities are very often combined and caused by a loss of septal support. This is why the stability of the caudal septum in septorhinoplasty is the key for a predictable result. Maintaining the position of the tip and the columella is one of the main issues to avoid typical postoperative deformities. The risks for rhinoplasty-complications can be reduced with increasing experience. A prerequisite is continuing education and an earnest distinction between complication and mistake. PMID:22073084

  19. Transoesophageal Echocardiography Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, S K; Singh, Pooja

    2009-01-01

    Summary The application of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been continuously increasing over past several decades. It is usually considered a very safe diagnostic and monitoring device. Though the complications are rare, but these complications must be known to the operators performing TEE. The goal of this article is to encapsulate the potential complications associated with TEE. The complications are primarily related to gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems along with some miscellaneous problems related to probe insertion, drugs and inexperience of the operator. Strategies for the prevention of these complications are also analyzed in order to avoid the risk. PMID:20640107

  20. Neurological complications in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Campise, Maria Rosaria

    2005-01-01

    Neurological complications are frequent in renal transplant recipients and may largely contribute to morbidity and mortality. The postransplant neurological complications may be categorized into five areas: 1) Immunosuppressive medications, 2) stroke, 3) peripheral neuropathies, 4) infection, and 5) malignancies. A number of complications are directly caused by the neurotoxicity of immunosuppressive agents. Calcineurin-inhibitors may cause mild symptoms, such as tremors and paresthesia, or severe symptoms, such as disabling pain syndrome and leukoencephalopathy. Severe neurological syndromes may also be caused by the monoclonal antibody OKT3. Stroke may occur in about 8% of renal transplant patients. It may be favored by hypertension, diabetes, and accelerated atherosclerosis which may be acquired during dialysis or after transplantation. Peripheral mononeuritis and polyneuritis may also occur. An acute femoral neuropathy may occur in about 2% of patients as a result of nerve compression after operation. Guillain-Barré syndrome may also develop, triggered in some cases by cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Campylobacter jejuni infection. Lymphomas are the most frequent brain tumors. They are usually associated to a Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection and are more frequent in patients who received an aggressive immunosuppressive therapy. Infection represents the most frequent neurological complication. Acute meningitis usually caused by Listeria monocytogenes, subacute and chronic meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, focal brain infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, Toxoplasma gondii or Nocardia asteroids, and progressive dementia caused by polyoma J virus or other viruses are the most frequent types of neurological infections. PMID:16299677

  1. Cirrhosis and its complications: Evidence based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad S; Fazili, Javid; Madhoun, Mohammad F

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis results from progressive fibrosis and is the final outcome of all chronic liver disease. It is among the ten leading causes of death in United States. Cirrhosis can result in portal hypertension and/or hepatic dysfunction. Both of these either alone or in combination can lead to many complications, including ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and coagulation disorders. Cirrhosis and its complications not only impair quality of life but also decrease survival. Managing patients with cirrhosis can be a challenge and requires an organized and systematic approach. Increasing physicians’ knowledge about prevention and treatment of these potential complications is important to improve patient outcomes. A literature search of the published data was performed to provide a comprehensive review regarding the management of cirrhosis and its complications. PMID:24833875

  2. Nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andolino, Tecile Prince; Reid-Adam, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    On the basis of observational studies, the most common cause of nephrotic syndrome in school-aged children is minimal change disease. On the basis of research evidence and consensus, corticosteroids are considered first-line therapy for treatment of nephrotic syndrome. On the basis of consensus, prednisone therapy should be initiated at doses of 60 mg/m2 per day (2 mg/kg per day) administered for 4 to 6 weeks, followed by 40 mg/m2 per dose (1.5 mg/kg) every other day for at least 6 to 8 weeks. On the basis of consensus and expert opinion, it is important to recognize and manage the complications that can arise in patients with nephrotic syndrome, such as dyslipidemia, infection, and thrombosis. On the basis of research evidence, consensus, and expert opinion, several alternative therapies have been observed to have variable efficacy in children with both corticosteroid-dependent and corticosteroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, although caution must be exercised in the administration of these corticosteroid-sparing medications secondary to toxic adverse effects. On the basis of observational studies, the course of nephrotic syndrome in most patients is that of relapse and remission. PMID:25733763

  3. Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common monogenetic disorder with high associated morbidity and mortality. The pulmonary complications of SCD are of particular importance, as acute chest syndrome and pulmonary hypertension have the highest associated mortality rates within this population. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of clinically significant pulmonary manifestations of SCD, including acute chest syndrome, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension in adult and pediatric patients. Clinicians should be vigilant in screening and treating such comorbidities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:22447965

  4. Imaging ACL reconstructions and their complications.

    PubMed

    Kulczycka, P; Larbi, A; Malghem, J; Thienpont, E; Vande Berg, B; Lecouvet, F

    2015-01-01

    Examination of ligament reconstructions, particularly of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), are common situations in everyday knee imaging practice. Knowledge of normal appearances, the expected changes over time and the potential complications of these plasties are essential. MRI is the imaging method of choice. This article illustrates the main complications specific to this procedure: suboptimal positioning of the femoral or tibial tunnels, impingement between the graft and bony contours, rupture (partial or complete) of the plasty due to friction or injury, arthrofibrosis and particularly the "Cyclops" syndrome, fragmentation or migration of the fixation materials and a granulomatous reaction to biomaterials. PMID:24910463

  5. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  6. Complications of Elbow Trauma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emilie V; Sarkissian, Eric J

    2015-11-01

    The elbow is a highly congruent trochoginglymoid joint allowing motion in both flexion-extension and pronosupination across 3 articulations. Therefore, treatment of fractures of the elbow can be technically challenging to manage, even after initial surgery. The posttraumatic elbow is prone to complications such as stiffness associated with heterotopic ossification, instability or subluxation (posterolateral rotatory instability and varus posteromedial instability patterns), and wound complications. This article discusses the pathoanatomy, prevention, and treatment of these complications. PMID:26498555

  7. Complications of diverticular disease: surgical laparoscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Anania, G; Vedana, L; Santini, M; Scagliarini, L; Giaccari, S; Resta, G; Cavallesco, G

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease is still debatable. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopic colon resection in patients with diverticulitis and with complications like colon-vescical fistula, peridiverticular abscess, perforation or stricture. All patients underwent laparoscopic colectomy within 8 years period. Main data recorded were age, sex, return of bowel function, operation time, duration of hospital stay, ASA score, body mass index (BMI), early and late complications. During the study period, 33 colon resections were performed for diverticulitis and complications of diverticulitis. We performed 5 associated procedures. We had 2 postoperative complications; 1 of these required a redo operation with laparotomy for anastomotic leak and 3 patients required conversion from laparoscopic to open colectomy. The most common reasons for conversion were related to the inflammatory process with a severe adhesion syndrome. Mean operative time was 229 minutes, and average postoperative hospital stay was 9,8 days. Laparoscopic surgery for complications of diverticular disease is safe, effective and feasible. Laparoscopic colectomy has replaced open resection as standard surgery for recurrent and complicated diverticulitis in our institution. PMID:24979103

  8. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. PMID:26600443

  9. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses.

  10. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  11. Complications in Post-Acute Care are Associated with Persistent Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Corrie P.; Ngo, Long H.; Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Delirium is highly prevalent and persistent in post-acute care (PAC). However, few risk factors have been identified for delirium persistence. Objectives To investigate whether complications in PAC are associated with delirium persistence 30 days after PAC admission. Design Observational cohort study Setting 8 Boston-area PAC facilities Participants 350 patients with delirium at PAC admission Measurements We interviewed participants at PAC admission and 30 days later. Delirium presence was determined using the Confusion Assessment Method. We performed medical record reviews to ascertain new cardiac, non-cardiac, and geriatric syndrome complications in PAC. We also determined complication status 30 days after admission or at PAC discharge, whichever came first. Results The participants (mean age 83.6 years, 66% women) experienced the following incidence of PAC complications: cardiac complications 7%, non-cardiac complications 21%, geriatric syndrome complications 39%. Delirium persisted in 56% of participants one month after PAC admission. Neither cardiac nor non-cardiac complications were associated with delirium persistence. Delirium persistence at one month was significantly greater in patients with more geriatric syndrome complications (no complication 51%, one complication 61%, ?2 complications 100%, adjusted p=0.048). There was also a trend toward greater delirium persistence in patients with unresolved geriatric syndrome complications (no complication 51%, resolved complication 61%, unresolved complication 68%, adjusted p=0.1). Conclusion Geriatric syndrome complications are common in patients admitted to post-acute care with delirium, and are associated with the persistence of delirium one month later. Proactively addressing risk factors for geriatric syndromes may improve outcomes of vulnerable patients in post-acute care. PMID:22646692

  12. Unusual septoplasty complication: Streptococcus viridans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, D W; Thompson, D H

    1998-10-01

    Infection is an infrequently reported complication following septoplasty and septorhinoplasty. Among the recognized but rare infections are toxic shock syndrome, spinal osteomyelitis, meningitis, septic cavernous sinus thrombosis and endocarditis. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose these infections early and thereby minimize morbidity and mortality. We present a case of endocarditis following septoplasty in a patient who had no identifiable preoperative risk factors but who experienced recurrent fever and chills postoperatively. PMID:9818534

  13. Management of Cardiopulmonary Complications of Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Prabha; Vashishtha, C.; Nasa, M.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced portal hypertension accompanying end-stage liver disease results in an altered milieu due to inadequate detoxification of blood from splanchnic circulation by the failing liver. The portosystemic shunts with hepatic dysfunction result in an increased absorption and impaired neutralisation of the gastrointestinal bacteria and endotoxins leads to altered homeostasis with multiorgan dysfunction. The important cardiopulmonary complications are cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension, and right-sided hydrothorax. PMID:21994850

  14. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  15. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample.

  16. Neuromuscular complications of statins.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung C

    2008-02-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methlglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are commonly prescribed for patients who have hyperlipidemia. Statins were first approved in 1987. Statin therapy is well documented to reduce serum low-density lipoprotein levels, incidence of cardiovascular events, and mortality. Although statin therapy is well tolerated, serious adverse affects have been reported, including neuromuscular and hepatic complications. Myopathy is particularly concerning because of the potential for rhabdomyolysis and death. Recently, peripheral neuropathy also has been identified as a possible complication. The incidence of neuromuscular complications is expected to increase with the increased number of people using statin therapy. Clinicians should be aware of the potential neuromuscular complications. This article reviews epidemiology, possible mechanisms, risk factors, and management of statin-associated neuromuscular complications. PMID:18194749

  17. Obstetric complications of twin pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Rao, Anita; Sairam, Shanthi; Shehata, Hassan

    2004-08-01

    Advances in assisted reproductive technology and increases in the proportion of maternities in older women have both contributed to the steep increase in the incidence of twin pregnancies since the 1980s. Maternal and perinatal complications are higher in twins than in singleton pregnancies. A significant proportion of perinatal mortality and morbidity among twins is due to the high incidence of preterm delivery and the added complication of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in monochorionic twins. Monochorionic twins also have a much higher rate of perinatal mortality than dichorionic twins, the greatest risk being before fetal viability (<24 weeks gestation). Early diagnosis of twins and their chorionicity, close fetal surveillance, particularly of monochorionic twins, and prompt therapeutic intervention in TTS are necessary to reduce perinatal mortality. Intrapartum management in the hospital setting with anaesthetic and neonatal facilities, as well as critical assessment of mode of delivery, have led to better outcomes. Ultrasonography is a valuable tool in the management of twin pregnancy. This chapter briefly summarises these topics, with a particular focus on recent literature. PMID:15279817

  18. Complications of chronic use of skin lightening cosmetics.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Olumide YM; Akinkugbe AO; Altraide D; Mohammed T; Ahamefule N; Ayanlowo S; Onyekonwu C; Essen N

    2008-04-01

    Skin lightening (bleaching) cosmetics and toiletries are widely used in most African countries. The active ingredients in these cosmetic products are hydroquinone, mercury and corticosteroids. Several additives (conconctions) are used to enhance the bleaching effect. Since these products are used for long duration, on a large body surface area, and under hot humid conditions, percutaneous absorption is enhanced. The complications of these products are very serious and are sometimes fatal. Some of these complications are exogenous ochronosis, impaired wound healing and wound dehiscence, the fish odor syndrome, nephropathy, steroid addiction syndrome, predisposition to infections, a broad spectrum of cutaneous and endocrinologic complications of corticosteroids, including suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In this era of easy travels and migration, African patients with these complications can present to physicians anywhere in the world. It is therefore critical for every practicing physician to be aware of these complications.

  19. [Hepatorenal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pillebout, Evangéline

    2014-02-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome is a severe complication of end-stage liver disease. The pathophysiological hallmark is severe renal vasoconstriction, resulting from peripheral and splanchnic vasodilation as well as activation of renal vasoconstrictor molecules, which induce the effective arterial volume reduction and the functional renal failure. The diagnosis of hepatorenal syndrome is currently based on the exclusion of other causes of renal failure (especially prerenal). Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is one of the triggering factors and should be sought in all patients with severe liver disease and acute renal failure. Quickly treating patients with parental antibiotics and albumin infusion significantly decreases the risk. The combined use of intravenous albumin, splanchnic and peripheral vasoconstrictor and/or renal replacement therapy sometimes enables a delay until liver transplantation (or combined liver-kidney in selected patients). Transplantation is in fact the only way to improve the long-term prognosis. PMID:24388293

  20. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events. PMID:26948356

  1. Imaging manifestations of a dreaded obstetric complication in the immediate postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Cannon, Walter

    2014-01-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet) syndrome is a dreaded complication that may develop during pregnancy or in the immediate postpartum period. Rarely this syndrome manifests itself with imaging findings. We report a case of HELLP syndrome in which the diagnosis was reaffirmed via imaging findings. PMID:24688204

  2. Early respiratory complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Carollo, Cristiana; Barbieri, Stefania; Pettenuzzo, Tommaso; Ori, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The poor clinical conditions associated with end-stage cirrhosis, pre-existing pulmonary abnormalities, and high comorbidity rates in patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores are all well-recognized factors that increase the risk of pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) surgery. Many intraoperative and postoperative events, such as fluid overload, massive transfusion of blood products, hemodynamic instability, unexpected coagulation abnormalities, renal dysfunction, and serious adverse effects of reperfusion syndrome, are other factors that predispose an individual to postoperative respiratory disorders. Despite advances in surgical techniques and anesthesiological management, the lung may still suffer throughout the perioperative period from various types of injury and ventilatory impairment, with different clinical outcomes. Pulmonary complications after OLT can be classified as infectious or non-infectious. Pleural effusion, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia may contribute considerably to early morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. It is of paramount importance to accurately identify lung disorders because infectious pulmonary complications warrant speedy and aggressive treatment to prevent diffuse lung injury and the risk of evolution into multisystem organ failure. This review discusses the most common perioperative factors that predispose an individual to postoperative pulmonary complications and these complications’ early clinical manifestations after OLT and influence on patient outcome. PMID:24409054

  3. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Browne, George W; Pitchumoni, CS

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids, chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines. PMID:17131469

  4. Management of gallstones and its related complications.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, P; Di Ciaula, A; de Bari, O; Garruti, G; Palmieri, V O; Wang, Dq-H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of gallstone patients remain asymptomatic; however, interest toward the gallstone disease is continuing because of the high worldwide prevalence and management costs and the development of gallstone symptoms and complications. For cholesterol gallstone disease, moreover, a strong link exists between this disease and highly prevalent metabolic disorders such as obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and the metabolic syndrome. Information on the natural history as well as the diagnostic, surgical (mainly laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and medical tools available to facilitate adequate management of cholelithiasis and its complications are, therefore, crucial to prevent the negative outcomes of gallstone disease. Moreover, some risk factors for gallstone disease are modifiable and some preventive strategies have become necessary to reduce the onset and the severity of complications. PMID:26560258

  5. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  6. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  7. Toxic megacolon complicating Escherichia coli O157 infection.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Deepa M; Vetrivel, Shanmu; McElroy, Jack; Pai, Pearl; Koerner, Roland J

    2006-04-01

    Toxic megacolon is a well known complication in inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The development of toxic megacolon as a complication of infectious colitis is rare. However it is recognised as a complication of enteric infections caused by Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella, Salmonella species, Cytomegalovirus and amoebae. We describe a case of necrotising haemorrhagic ileo-colitis in a previously fit and healthy young adult female caused by Escherichia coli O157 where toxic megacolon developed as a complication along with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). PMID:16126276

  8. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  9. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. PMID:26589696

  10. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... most commonly encountered kidney complications of IBD—particularly oxalate stones. Kidney stones are more common in Crohn's ... of fat malabsorption. Fat binds to calcium, leaving oxalate (a type of salt) free to be absorbed ...

  11. Management of medical complications.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Carolin I; Reding, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Medical comorbidities and complications are expected following stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. The neurorehabilitation physician's role is to manage these comorbidities, prevent complications, and serve as a medical and neurologic resource for the patient, family, and neurorehabilitation team. The most common comorbidities are similar to those found in the general population, namely hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Frequent complications encountered in the neurorehabilitation unit relate to medication side effects, medical comorbidities, and the direct effect of the neurologic injury. They include orthostatic hypotension; syncope or presyncope; cardiac arrhythmia; bowel and bladder dysfunction; seizures; pressure sores; dysphagia-related pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; venous thromboembolism; falls; and sexual dysfunction. This article discusses strategies for managing comorbidities and avoiding complications. PMID:22810865

  12. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  13. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Chickenpox (Varicella) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chickenpox Home About Chickenpox Overview Signs & Symptoms Complications Transmission ...

  14. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A ... applies to a condition known as metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome Is an Early Warning Sign Metabolic syndrome isn' ...

  15. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  16. Acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbous, Ibrahim A

    2002-09-01

    Acute chest syndrome is an acute pulmonary illness in patients with sickle cell disease. It is a common problem, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Many factors may cause this syndrome. Treatment is primarily supportive. Therapy includes hydration, analgesia, supplemental oxygen, antibiotics, blood transfusion and mechanical ventilation. Early detection and aggressive management may limit its severity and prevent its complications. This article reviews the current information for its definition, frequency, pathogenesis, clinical features, complications, investigations, management and prevention. Recent advances in management of acute and recurrent attacks will be discussed. PMID:12370708

  17. Lumbar spine surgery positioning complications: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Michael F; Zeer, Valerie; Alentado, Vincent J; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT There are a variety of surgical positions that provide optimal exposure of the dorsal lumbar spine. These include the prone, kneeling, knee-chest, knee-elbow, and lateral decubitus positions. All are positions that facilitate exposure of the spine. Each position, however, is associated with an array of unique complications that result from excessive pressure applied to the torso or extremities. The authors reviewed clinical studies reporting complications that arose from positioning of the patient during dorsal exposures of the lumbar spine. METHODS MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science database searches were performed to find clinical studies reporting complications associated with positioning during lumbar spine surgery. For articles meeting inclusion criteria, the following information was obtained: publication year, study design, sample size, age, operative time, type of surgery, surgical position, frame or table type, complications associated with positioning, time to first observed complication, long-term outcomes, and evidence-based recommendations for complication avoidance. RESULTS Of 3898 articles retrieved from MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science, 34 met inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies reported complications associated with use of the prone position, and 7 studies investigated complications after knee-chest positioning. Complications associated with the knee-elbow, lateral decubitus, and supine positions were each reported by a single study. Vision loss was the most commonly reported complication for both prone and knee-chest positioning. Several other complications were reported, including conjunctival swelling, Ischemic orbital compartment syndrome, nerve palsies, thromboembolic complications, pressure sores, lower extremity compartment syndrome, and shoulder dislocation, highlighting the assortment of possible complications following different surgical positions. For prone-position studies, there was a relationship between increased operation time and position complications. Only 3 prone-position studies reported complications following procedures of less than 120 minutes, 7 studies reported complications following mean operative times of 121-240 minutes, and 9 additional studies reported complications following mean operative times greater than 240 minutes. This relationship was not observed for knee-chest and other surgical positions. CONCLUSIONS This work presents a systematic review of positioning-related complications following prone, knee-chest, and other positions used for lumbar spine surgery. Numerous evidence-based recommendations for avoidance of these potentially severe complications associated with intraoperative positioning are discussed. This investigation may serve as a framework to educate the surgical team and decrease rates of intraoperative positioning complications. PMID:26424340

  18. Lowe syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Loi, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL) is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type) becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5)P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years. PMID:16722554

  19. Lowe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loi, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL) is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type) becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5)P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years. PMID:16722554

  20. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-22

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications. PMID:26891794

  1. A neuropsychiatric complication of oligomenorrhea according to iranian traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Maryam; Khodabandeh, Faezeh; Tansaz, Mojgan; Rouholamin, Safoura

    2014-07-01

    Oligomenorrhea, a prevalent disease with serious complications, has been declared in the Avicenna traditional medicine in detail. Avicenna in his famous book, Cannon of Medicine, presents a syndrome termed 'uterine strangulation', as a complication of menstrual bleeding cessation and lack of sexual satisfaction. We have explained this syndrome from both traditional and conventional medicine viewpoints to propose a new hypothesis for diagnosis and treatment of women with oligomenorrhea and systemic signs/symptoms admitting to clinics for further evaluation. This hypothesis definitely needs to be further assessed and confirmed by strong clinical trials. PMID:25114666

  2. A neuropsychiatric complication of oligomenorrhea according to iranian traditional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Maryam; Khodabandeh, Faezeh; Tansaz, Mojgan; Rouholamin, Safoura

    2014-01-01

    Oligomenorrhea, a prevalent disease with serious complications, has been declared in the Avicenna traditional medicine in detail. Avicenna in his famous book, Cannon of Medicine, presents a syndrome termed ‘uterine strangulation’, as a complication of menstrual bleeding cessation and lack of sexual satisfaction. We have explained this syndrome from both traditional and conventional medicine viewpoints to propose a new hypothesis for diagnosis and treatment of women with oligomenorrhea and systemic signs/symptoms admitting to clinics for further evaluation. This hypothesis definitely needs to be further assessed and confirmed by strong clinical trials. PMID:25114666

  3. Emerging and Underrecognized Complications of Illicit Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Wurcel, Alysse G; Merchant, Elisabeth A; Clark, Roger P; Stone, David R

    2015-12-15

    Illicit drug use can result in a wide range of medical complications. As the availability, synthesis, and popularity of illicit drugs evolve over time, new syndromes associated with their use may mimic infections. Some of these symptoms are anticipated drug effects, and others are complications of adulterants mixed with drugs or complications from the method of using drugs. Some illicit drugs are associated with rare infections, which are difficult to diagnosis with standard microbiological techniques. The goal of this review is to orient a wide range of clinicians-including general practitioners, emergency medicine providers, and infectious diseases specialists-to complications of illicit drug use that may be underrecognized. Improving awareness of infectious and noninfectious complications of illicit drug can expedite diagnosis and medical treatment of persons who use drugs and facilitate targeted harm reduction counseling to prevent future complications. PMID:26270683

  4. [Crush syndrome].

    PubMed

    Scapellato, S; Maria, S; Castorina, G; Sciuto, G

    2007-08-01

    Crush injuries and crush syndrome are common after natural (e.g. earthquake, land-slide, tornadoes, tsunami) or man-made catastrophes (e.g. wars, terrorist attacks), in fact the history of this disease is well reported both in earthquake rescue reviews and in military literature. However, there are instances due to conventional causes, such as building collapses, road traffic accident, accident at work or altered level of consciousness after stroke or drug overdose. These situations of ''big or small'' catastrophes can occur at any time and anywhere, for this reason every clinician should be prepared to address issues of crush syndrome quickly and aggressively. The treatment has to manage and to predict clinical conditions before they present themselves. In particular, acute renal failure is one of the few life-threatening complications that can be reversed. This article reviews the various evidences and summarizes the treatment strategies available. Fundamental targets in crush syndrome management are early aggressive hydration, urine alkalinization and, when possible, forced diuresis. Since electrolyte imbalance may be fatal due to arrhythmias secondary to hyperkalemia (especially associated with hypocalcemia), it's necessary to correct these abnormalities using insulin-glucose solution and/or potassium binders, and if nevertheless serum potassium levels remain high this serious disease will necessitate dialysis, which is often a vital procedure. PMID:17641588

  5. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  6. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. PMID:25808686

  7. Fatal complications of tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Stemmer, E A; Oliver, C; Carey, J P; Connolly, J E

    1976-03-01

    Thirty-six of 403 deaths after tracheotomy were direct complications of that procedure. Arterial hemorrhage caused three deaths, venous bleeding, seven. Airway obstruction resulted in six fatalities. Tracheoesophageal fistula caused five deaths. Eight deaths were due to infection and sepsis. Tension pneumothorax developed in one patient and the remaining six deaths were due to cardiopulmonary collapse. Many of the complications of tracheotomy can be avoided with accurate knowledge of anatomic variations, ideal operating conditions, proper technic, careful arterial and venous hemostasis, routine postoperative chest x-ray films, sterile suction technic, proper use of soft cuffed tracheotomy tubes, adequate humidification, and careful postoperative blood gas monitoring. PMID:769582

  8. Anesthetic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Amie; Yu, Albert; Kaminski, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia complications in the parturient can be divided into 2 categories: those related to airway manipulation and those related to neuraxial anesthesia. Physiologic changes of pregnancy can lead to challenging intubating conditions in a patient at risk of aspiration. Neuraxial techniques are used to provide analgesia for labor and anesthesia for surgical delivery. Therefore, complications associated with neuraxial techniques are often seen in this population. In the event of maternal cardiac arrest, modification to advanced cardiac life support algorithms must be made to accommodate the gravid uterus and to deliver the fetus if return of maternal circulation is not prompt. PMID:26600441

  9. Osteoporosis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Varacallo, Matthew A; Fox, Ed J

    2014-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current burden of osteoporosis and its complications in today's health care system. The impact of osteoporosis on patients' quality of life and direct financial consequences to the entire health care system are emphasized to highlight the need for increased knowledge and awareness of its complications if left untreated or treated incorrectly. Special attention is given to hip fracture and vertebral compression fracture, stressing the importance of diagnosing osteoporosis before fragility fractures occur. Models for improved care of fragility fractures during follow-up in the outpatient setting and the use of pharmacologic agents are discussed. PMID:24994054

  10. Orbital Complications of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Radovani, Pjerin; Vasili, Dritan; Xhelili, Mirela; Dervishi, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the modern antibiotherapies applied in the practice of otorhinolaryngology, the orbital complications of sinusitis are still considered a serious threat to essential functions of the eye, including loss of vision, and at worst, life threatening symptoms. Aims: The goal of this study is to consider and analyse patients who were treated for these complications in the last decade in our hospital, which is the only tertiary hospital in our country. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of cases. Methods: In our practice, cases treated in the hospital are rhinosinusitis cases where surgical intervention is necessary, or those with a suspicion of complications. Between the years 1999 and 2009 there were 177 cases, the clinical charts of which were reviewed. The cases that are omitted from this study are those involving soft tissues, bone, and intracranial complications. The diagnoses were determined based on anamnesis, anterior rhinoscopy, x-rays of the sinuses with the Water’s projection or where there was a suspicion of a complication, and CT scans with coronal and axial projections. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of cefalosporines, aminoglycosides and Proetz manoeuvre. When an improvement in the conditions did not occur within 24–48 hours, we intervened with a surgical procedure, preferably the Lynch-Patterson external frontoethmoidectomy. Results: In our study, we encountered 35 cases (19.8%) of orbital complications with an average age of 25 (range: 3–75); Palpebral inflammatory oedema (15), orbital cellulitis (10), subperiosteal abscess (6), orbital abscess (3), and cavernous sinus thrombosis (1 patient). The average time that patients remained in hospital was 4.6 days; for those with orbital complications this was 7 days. Conclusion: Orbital complications of sinusitis are considered to be severe pathologies. The appearance of oedema in the corner of the eye should be evaluated immediately and the means to exclude acute sinusitis should be taken under serious consideration. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are key to the reduction of these unwanted manifestations. PMID:25207092

  11. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  12. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šucha?, M; Hor?ák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kova?, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal endoscopic surgery (FEES). In case of superior subperiosteal abscess, combined endonasal and external approach (external orbitotomy) was needed. Combined therapy facilitated quick improvement of local and systematic symptoms. Average time of hospitalisation was 7 days. Early diagnosis and agresive combined therapy prevent loss of vision and life threatening complications. PMID:25640234

  13. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Lyme Disease - Neurological Complications Table ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial organism ...

  14. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  15. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  16. [Esophageal stenting complications].

    PubMed

    Smoliar, A N; Radchenko, Iu A; Nefedova, G A; Abakumov, M M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze esophageal stenting complications in case of cancer and benign diseases. It was investigated complications in 8 patients in terms from 7 days to 1 year after intervention. In 4 patients esophageal stenting was performed for constrictive esophageal cancer and compression with pulmonary cancer metastases into mediastinal lymphatic nodes. 2 patients had esophageal stenting for post-tracheostomy tracheo-esophageal fistula, 1 patient - for spontaneous esophageal rupture, 1 patient - for post-burn scar narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach. Severe patients' condition with tumor was determined by intensive esophageal bleeding in 2 cases, bilateral abscessed aspiration pneumonia, tumor bleeding, blood aspiration (1 case), posterior mediastinitis (1 case). Severe patients' condition with benign disease was associated with decompensated esophageal narrowing about proximal part of stent (1 case), increase of tracheo-esophageal fistula size complicated by aspiration pneumonia (1 case), stent migration into stomach with recurrence of esophago-mediastino-pleural fistula and pleural empyema (1 case), decompensated narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach (1 case). Patients with cancer died. And patients with benign diseases underwent multi-stage surgical treatment and recovered. Stenting is palliative method for patients with esophageal cancer. Patients after stenting should be under outpatient observation for early diagnosis of possible complications. Esophageal stenting in patients with benign diseases should be performed only by life-saving indications, in case of inability of other treatment and for the minimum necessary period. PMID:25589315

  17. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  18. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  19. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) ... www.vaccineinformation.org). Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: ...

  20. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and adults with pertussis needed care in the hospital. Pneumonia (lung infection) was diagnosed in 1 out of 50 (2%) of those patients. The most common complications in another study were: Weight loss in 1 out of 3 (33%) adults Loss of bladder control in 1 out of 3 (28%) adults Passing ...

  1. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  2. Neurologic complications of influenza.

    PubMed

    Shah, Snehal; Keil, Anthony; Gara, Kieren; Nagarajan, Lakshmi

    2014-09-01

    We report on a child with mild encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion (MERS) associated with influenza infection and present a case series of neurological complications associated with influenza infections in children who presented to a tertiary children's hospital in Australia over a period of one year. PMID:24072018

  3. Postthyroidectomy Horner's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Fort, José Manuel; Mazarro, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Oscar; Caubet, Enric; Romero, Giancarlo; Armengol, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Horner's syndrome (HSd) results from an injury along the cervical sympathetic chain, producing ipsilateral miosis, ptosis, enophthalmos, and facial anhydrosis. Although more commonly associated to malignant tumors affecting the preganglionar segment of the sympathetic chain (especially in the lung apex), HSd has been described as a rare complication of thyroid surgery. We herein report a case of HSd after completing total thyroidectomy. PMID:23118763

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Th M e etabolic Syndrome What is the metabolic syndrome? The term metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that increase ... high blood sugar). The exact cause of the metabolic syndrome is not known but genetic factors, too much ...

  5. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Hughes Syndrome Table of Contents ( ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Antiphospholipid Syndrome? Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused ...

  6. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Cushing's Syndrome Overview What is Cushing's syndrome? Cushing's syndrome occurs when your body is exposed to high levels ... they can cause problems with your eyesight. Diagnosis & Tests How is Cushing's syndrome diagnosed? Your doctor may ...

  7. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  8. Neurological complications of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier; Wichmann, Ole; Farrar, Jeremy; Gascón, Joaquim

    2013-09-01

    Dengue is the second most common mosquito-borne disease affecting human beings. In 2009, WHO endorsed new guidelines that, for the first time, consider neurological manifestations in the clinical case classification for severe dengue. Dengue can manifest with a wide range of neurological features, which have been noted--depending on the clinical setting--in 0·5-21% of patients with dengue admitted to hospital. Furthermore, dengue was identified in 4-47% of admissions with encephalitis-like illness in endemic areas. Neurological complications can be categorised into dengue encephalopathy (eg, caused by hepatic failure or metabolic disorders), encephalitis (caused by direct virus invasion), neuromuscular complications (eg, Guillain-Barré syndrome or transient muscle dysfunctions), and neuro-ophthalmic involvement. However, overlap of these categories is possible. In endemic countries and after travel to these regions, dengue should be considered in patients presenting with fever and acute neurological manifestations. PMID:23948177

  9. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  10. Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Ahmed, Wamda

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care complications of pregnancy and puerperum such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, seizures, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, postpartum angiopathy, cerebral sinus thrombosis, amniotic fluid emboli, choriocarcinoma, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are rare but can be devastating. These conditions can present a challenge to physicians because pregnancy is a unique physiologic state, most therapeutic options available in the intensive care unit were not studied in pregnant patients, and in many situations, physicians need to deliver care to both the mother and the fetus, simultaneously. Timely recognition and management of critical neurologic complications of pregnancy/puerperum can be life saving for both the mother and fetus. PMID:25123793

  11. [Complications of silicone oil tamponade].

    PubMed

    Baillif, S; Gastaud, P

    2014-03-01

    Silicone oil tamponade is used for the management of complicated retinal detachment. Patients should be closely monitored as many complications may occur with intraocular silicone oil. Short-term complications include temporarily increased intraocular pressure and anterior segment inflammation. Long-term complications include cataract, emulsification, ocular hyper- or hypotension, keratopathy and retinal redetachment associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy. PMID:24559527

  12. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  13. Complications of antiobesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ninh T; Wilson, Samuel E

    2007-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective long-term treatment for patients who suffer from morbid obesity, the incidence of which is increasing in North America. Laparoscopic gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric band placement are the two commonly performed bariatric procedures. This article discusses the indications for bariatric surgery and the early and late complications associated with these two procedures. Laparoscopic biliopancreatic diversion and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are also briefly discussed. PMID:17339851

  14. Early complications. Chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Vallières, E; Karmy-Jones, R; Wood, D E

    1999-08-01

    Postpneumonectomy chylothorax is a very common but serious complication. Drainage of the pneumonectomy space, metabolic and nutritional support with TPN, and absolute enteral rest may lead to control of the leak. Failure of these measures to obtain a rapid resolution of the chyle losses should be followed by early surgical intervention in most instances in an effort to alleviate the chronic metabolic, nutritional, and immunological consequences of prolonged chyle losses. PMID:10459431

  15. Surgical complications of ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, B

    1991-01-01

    Over the past 25 years (1963-1988), a total of 311 children under 12 years of age were admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Service of the San Vicente de Paúl University Hospital, Medellín, Colombia, with complications resulting from infection with Entamoeba histolytica or Ascaris lumbricoides. In this group, the abdominal complications produced by ascariasis numbered 145, and included intestinal obstruction (n = 107), perforation of the appendix (n = 10), and migration of the parasite to the biliary tree or to the peritoneal cavity (n = 28). Evaluation of the living conditions of a significant subgroup of our patients confirms that intestinal parasitism is an endemic condition prevailing in nations that exhibit deep social and economic imbalance, where large sectors of the population remain deprived of the basic services of education, health, housing, and recreation. Massive infestation in children may give rise to grave complications that demand expert surgical care. Third World surgeons practicing in general hospitals that take care of patients of low economic capacity are usually familiar with the diagnosis and management of this pathology; surgeons who practice in the industrialized nations will only occasionally face such problems. The greater mobility of today's societies and the rather massive migrations that take place in current times have resulted in an increasing incidence of these entities in the hospital populations of the large urban centers of these nations. It is for the surgeons practicing in such centers that the information presented herein may be of greater value. PMID:2031358

  16. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  17. Neurologic complications of cardiac tests and procedures.

    PubMed

    Sila, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Arterial or central venous vascular access is the cornerstone of invasive cardiac diagnosis, monitoring, and therapeutics. Although procedural safety has significantly improved with protocols perfected over decades of use, their prevalence renders even the uncommon neurologic complication clinically relevant. Serious peripheral nerve complications result from direct or indirect nerve injuries in the setting of a hematoma or compartment syndrome. Functional outcome is dependent upon prompt diagnosis and early treatment, so proceduralists should be aware of the relevant anatomy and early signs of nerve injury. Ischemic stroke is the most common central nervous system complication of diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization, and is presumed to be due to embolization of atherosclerotic plaque or thrombus dislodged during guiding catheter manipulation, platelet-fibrin thrombus that forms on the catheters, or air that appears during catheter flushing. Acute neurologic deterioration after thrombolysis for acute myocardial infarction should be presumed to be an intracranial hemorrhage until proven otherwise. The ideal angiography suite of the future is patientcentric and multipurpose, coordinating diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for multivascular disease, allowing for multispecialty collaboration, and, in the event of a neurologic complication of a cardiac procedure, facilitating the various treating physicians to converge efficiently upon the patient. PMID:24365287

  18. Hepatopulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Fan, Daiming

    2015-07-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a pulmonary complication observed in patients with chronic liver disease and/or portal hypertension, attributable to an intrapulmonary vascular dilatation that may induce severe hypoxemia. Microvascular dilation and angiogenesis in the lung have been identified as pathologic features that drive gas exchange abnormalities in experimental HPS. Pulse oximetry is a useful screening test for HPS, which can guide subsequent use of arterial blood gases. Contrast-enhanced echocardiography, perfusion lung scanning, and pulmonary arteriography are three currently used diagnostic imaging modalities that identify the presence of intrapulmonary vascular abnormalities. The presence of HPS increases mortality and impairs quality of life, but is reversible with liver transplantation. No medical therapy is established as effective for HPS. At the present time, liver transplantation is the only available treatment for HPS. PMID:25732713

  19. Basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thalakoti, Srikanth; Geller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) or Gorlin syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome sometimes known as the fifth phacomatosis, inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Gorlin syndrome is characterized by development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of falx cerebri, various developmental skeletal abnormalities such as bifid rib, hemi- or bifid vertebra and predisposition to the development of various tumors. BCNS is caused by a mutation in the PTCH1 gene localized to 9q22.3. Its estimated prevalence varies between 1/55600 and 1/256000 with an equal male to female ratio. The medulloblastoma variant seen in Gorlin syndrome patients is of the desmoplastic type, characteristically presenting during the first 3 years of life. Therefore, children with desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be carefully screened for other features of BCNS. Radiation therapy for desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be avoided in BCNS patients as it may induce development of invasive BCCs and other tumors in the skin area exposed to radiation. This syndrome is a multisystem disorder so involvement of multiple specialists with a multimodal approach to detect and treat various manifestations at early stages will reduce the long-term sequelae and severity of the condition. Life expectancy is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications and cosmetic scarring can be substantial. PMID:26564075

  20. Neurologic Complications of Commonly Used Drugs in the Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Elliot T; Hocker, Sara E

    2016-04-01

    This chapter reviews the neurologic complications of medications administered in the hospital setting, by class, introducing both common and less common side effects. Detail is devoted to the interaction between pain, analgesia, sedation, and their residual consequences. Antimicrobials are given in nearly every hospital setting, and we review their capacity to produce neurologic sequelae with special devotion to cefepime and the antiviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. The management of hemorrhagic stroke has become more complex with the introduction of novel oral anticoagulants, and we provide an update on what is known about reversal of the new oral anticoagulants. Both central and peripheral nervous system complications of immunosuppressants and chemotherapies are reviewed. Because diagnosis is generally based on clinical acumen, alone, neurotoxic syndromes resulting from psychotropic medications may be easily overlooked until severe dysautonomia develops. We include a practical approach to the diagnosis of serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. PMID:26905071

  1. Surgical Interventions for Late Complications of Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Sedat; Yabanoglu, Hakan; Aydogan, Cem; Parlakgumus, Alper; Yildirim, Sedat; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the most effective surgical treatment for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) complications after all other methods of salvage have failed. We evaluated 110 patients for 139 complications that occurred after the initial AVF placement and for whom surgical intervention was the last hope for retaining fistula access. Vascular steal syndrome and venous hypertension were the most common complications seen in our patients. The anastomoses of 17 of the vascular steal syndrome cases were narrowed either by stitches or by a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. The second most performed revision surgery was excision of the aneurysm and repair with primary suturing, followed by excision of the aneurysm and interposition grafting. Successful surgical outcomes were achieved in 111 of 139 procedures after revision surgery without constructing a new AVF. AVF salvage surgery is of paramount importance in order to increase the patency rate, which prolongs survival and increases the patient's quality of life. PMID:25058786

  2. The Nelson's syndrome... revisited.

    PubMed

    Assié, Guillaume; Bahurel, Hélène; Bertherat, Jérôme; Kujas, Michèle; Legmann, Paul; Bertagna, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Adrenalectomy is a radical therapeutic approach to control hypercortisolism in some patients with Cushing's disease. However it may be complicated by the Nelson's syndrome, defined by the association of a pituitary macroadenoma and high ACTH secretion after adrenalectomy. This definition has not changed since the end of the fifties. Today the Nelson's syndrome must be revisited with new to criteria using more sensitive diagnostic tools, especially the pituitary magnetic resonance imaging. In this paper we will review the pathophysiological aspects of corticotroph tumor growth, with reference to the impact of adrenalectomy. The main epidemiological data on the Nelson's syndrome will be presented. More importantly, we will propose a new pathophysiological and practical approach to this question which attempts to evaluate the Corticotroph Tumor Progression after adrenalectomy, rather than to diagnose the Nelson's syndrome. We will discuss the consequences for the management of Cushing's disease patients after adrenalectomy, and will also draw some perspectives. PMID:16132203

  3. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  4. [Infectious complications of lymphedema].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, L; Gironet, N

    2002-06-01

    Erysipelas and lymphangitis are frequent complications of lymphedemas (20 to 30%). The most important risk factor for erysipelas is lymphedema since this is a protein rich edema that contributes to the risk of infection. In case of lymphedema the treatment is the usual consensus treatment for erysipelas. A prophylactic treatment with penicillin is requested as soon as the first recurrence. This prophylactic treatment includes skin care, particularly treatment of injuries and intertrigos. Hyperplastic skin leads to maceration and then mycoses. Physiotherapy does not increase the risk for infection. Moreover an infection needs a complex decongestive physiotherapy which decreases risks of recurrence. PMID:12162204

  5. Neurologic complications of immunization.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F

    2004-06-01

    In the United States and many other developed countries, active immunization of children has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis, measles, rubella, tetanus, and other diseases, such as disease due to Haemophilus influenzae type b. Individual vaccines can produce systemic or neurologic reactions ranging from minor events, such as pain and erythema at the injection site, to major complications, such as seizures, shock, encephalopathy, or death. Immunization programs have also generated considerable controversy, as witnessed by recent concerns regarding the relationship between vaccines or their constituents and autism or multiple sclerosis. This review summarizes current information regarding vaccines, the diseases that they prevent, and the potential relationships between vaccines and neurologic disease. PMID:15446387

  6. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  7. Management of the patient with refeeding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lauts, Nada M

    2005-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a metabolic complication that can occur when nutrition is reintroduced for patients who are severely malnourished. This syndrome can occur with any form of nutrition (oral, enteral, or parenteral), and it is fatal if not recognized and treated properly. This article discusses the body's adaptation to starvation, the pathophysiology and risk factors of refeeding syndrome, and the pharmacologic treatment of complications that threaten the lives of patients who experience this disorder. Additionally, this article discusses standards of care to ensure the early recognition of patients at risk for refeeding syndrome and the nursing considerations that can be implemented to prevent it. PMID:16205500

  8. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection with Neurologic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yimenicio?lu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Bora Carman, Kursat; Cagr? Dinleyici, Ener

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection include encephalitis, optic neuritis, acute psychosis, stroke, cranial nerve palsies, aseptic meningitis and also it may be implicated in immune mediated neurological diseases such as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and transverse myelitis. Case Presentation: We present five cases with acute neurological diseases after M. pneumoniae infection. The clinical presentations were characterized by encephalitis in 2 patients, Gullain-Barre syndrome in 2 patients, transverse myelitis in 1 patient. M. pneumoniae infection was detected in serum by serological method. Only two patients had respiratory symptoms preceding M. pneumoniae infection. Brain MRI revealed hyperintensities on corpus striatum and mesencephalon in one patient with encephalitis, the other had front parietal coalescent periventricular white matter lesions on T2 images. The patient with transverse myelitis had cervical, dorsal and lumbar scattered hyperintense lesions on T2 images. Two patients were treated with high dose steroid, the other two patients received treatment with intravenous immune globuline. Conclusion: M. pneumoniae may reveal different neurologic complications with different radiologic findings. PMID:25793076

  9. Imaging Complications of Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Courtney Coursey; Mittal, Pardeep K; Ghonge, Nitin P; Bhargava, Puneet; Heller, Matthew T

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplant complications are categorized as those related to the transplant vasculature, collecting system, perinephric space, renal parenchyma, and miscellaneous complications including posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Many of these renal transplant complications are diagnosed with imaging. Medical complications including rejection, acute tubular necrosis, and drug toxicity also can impair renal function. These medical complications are typically indistinguishable at imaging, and biopsy may be performed to establish a diagnosis. Normal transplant anatomy, imaging techniques, and the appearances of renal transplant complications at ultrasound, computed tomography, and MR imaging are reviewed. PMID:26896222

  10. Complications of Lateral Epicondylar Release.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Michael Lucius

    2016-04-01

    Reported complication rates are low for lateral epicondylitis management, but the anatomic complexity of the elbow allows for possible catastrophic complication. This review documents complications associated with lateral epicondylar release: 67 studies reporting outcomes of lateral epicondylar release with open, percutaneous, or arthroscopic methods were reviewed and 6 case reports on specific complications associated with the procedure are included. Overall complication rate was 3.3%. For open procedures it was 4.3%, percutaneous procedures 1.9%, and arthroscopic procedures 1.1%. In higher-level studies directly comparing modalities, the complication rates were 1.3%, 0%, and 1.2%, respectively. PMID:26772953

  11. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  12. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  13. Complication with Intraosseous Access: Scandinavian Users’ Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Intraosseous access (IO) is indicated if vascular access cannot be quickly established during resuscitation. Complication rates are estimated to be low, based on small patient series, model or cadaver studies, and case reports. However, user experience with IO use in real-life emergency situations might differ from the results in the controlled environment of model studies and small patient series. We performed a survey of IO use in real-life emergency situations to assess users’ experiences of complications. Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to Scandinavian emergency physicians, anesthesiologists and pediatricians. Results: 1,802 clinical cases of IO use was reported by n=386 responders. Commonly reported complications with establishing IO access were patient discomfort/pain (7.1%), difficulties with penetration of periosteum with IO needle (10.3%), difficulties with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%), and bended/broken needle (4.0%). When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%), slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag) (8.8%), displacement after insertion (8.5%), and extravasation (3.7%). Compartment syndrome and osteomyelitis occurred in 0.6% and 0.4% of cases respectively. Conclusion: In users’ recollection of real-life IO use, perceived complications were more frequent than usually reported from model studies. The perceived difficulties with using IO could affect the willingness of medical staff to use IO. Therefore, user experience should be addressed both in education of how to use, and research and development of IOs. PMID:24106537

  14. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  15. Hair tourniquet syndrome: revisited.

    PubMed

    Hussin, P; Mawardi, M; Masran, M S; Ganaisan, P

    2015-01-01

    Hair tourniquet syndrome is a rare condition. It is an important emergency condition where urgent attention is needed. In this condition, body appendages are strangulated by hair that acts like a tourniquet. A strand or strands of hair act like a circumferential constriction band and subsequently strangulate the body appendages. Commonly affected sites include fingers, toes or even genitals. Failure to identify and release the acute constriction may result in amputation of affected body part. We report two cases of hair tourniquet syndrome of the thumb and toe that were successfully released without complications. PMID:26712259

  16. Toe tourniquet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Naglaa M; Khan, Ubaid U; Mirza, Shazia J; Al-Malki, Talal A

    2014-08-01

    Toe tourniquet syndrome refers to external, mechanical, circumferential constriction of the toes. We report a series of 4 infants with toe tourniquet syndrome from Saudi Arabia who presented during wintertime with very similar symptoms (approximately 48 hours of inconsolable crying and irritability), similar involved region (toes), and similar constricting agent (hairs). Immediate removal of the hair fibers was carried out in all patients, fortunately followed by fast healing with no signs of tissue necrosis. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of the condition were vital in attaining the good outcome and preventing ischemic complications.  PMID:25129188

  17. Hair tourniquet syndrome: revisited

    PubMed Central

    HUSSIN, P.; MAWARDI, M.; MASRAN, M.S.; GANAISAN, P.

    2015-01-01

    Hair tourniquet syndrome is a rare condition. It is an important emergency condition where urgent attention is needed. In this condition, body appendages are strangulated by hair that acts like a tourniquet. A strand or strands of hair act like a circumferential constriction band and subsequently strangulate the body appendages. Commonly affected sites include fingers, toes or even genitals. Failure to identify and release the acute constriction may result in amputation of affected body part. We report two cases of hair tourniquet syndrome of the thumb and toe that were successfully released without complications. PMID:26712259

  18. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Güngor Gündo?an, Tu?ba; Jacquemyn, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital vascular disorder, and only few cases have been described in pregnancy. We describe two cases, in one patient without complications, the other patient developed postpartum deep venous thrombosis. PMID:21209709

  19. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178

  20. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  1. Intravenous immunoglobulin in critically ill adults: When and what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Wang, J; McQuilten, Z K; Wood, E M; Aubron, C

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) use is growing dramatically internationally due to the increasing numbers of acute and chronic conditions that may benefit from IVIg. Patients with conditions that may benefit from IVIg might require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, supporting the need to review IVIg use in the critical care setting. The most common clinical indications for IVIg in adults that may require ICU admission and are commonly supported under clinical practice guidelines are Guillain-Barré syndrome, myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, inflammatory myopathies, and primary or secondary immunodeficiency diseases complicated by severe bacterial sepsis. Other emerging indications include necrotizing fasciitis, toxic epidermal necrolysis/Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic shock syndrome. The evidence for IVIg use in sepsis and septic shock remains controversial and insufficient to recommend its routine use. Intravenous immunoglobulin is expensive and also carries risks of adverse effects, including common and benign infusion-related reactions, as well as relatively rare and more serious problems, such as thromboembolic events, renal failure, and aseptic meningitis. In this article, we review the literature on conditions requiring ICU admission and IVIg, and we classify them as supported, emerging, or unsupported indications based on the available evidence and guidelines for clinical use of IVIg. PMID:25702845

  2. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  3. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic syndrome is a name for a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the chance ... Metabolic syndrome is becoming very common in the United States. Doctors are not sure whether the syndrome is ...

  4. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Down Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome describes a set of cognitive and ...

  5. Piriformis Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Piriformis Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Piriformis Syndrome? Piriformis syndrome is a rare neuromuscular disorder that ...

  6. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the limb girth and weight, and the prevention of infection. Intertrigo is caused by friction between skin surfaces, combined with moisture and warmth, resulting in infection. This infection, most commonly candidiasis, is best treated with topical antifungal agents; systemic antifungal therapy may be required in some patients. Excess load on the feet can result in morphological changes that require careful diagnosis; insoles may offer some symptom relief while control of obesity is achieved. Obesity-related dermatoses associated with hospitalization, such as pressure ulcers, diminished wound healing, dermatoses secondary to respiratory conditions, and incontinence, must all be carefully managed with an emphasis on prevention where possible. Recognition and control of the dermatological complications of obesity play an important role in diminishing the morbidity of obesity. PMID:12180897

  7. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Hande H; Rana, Naveed; Milani, Cannon; Darko, Angela; Al-Homsi, Samer A

    2012-01-01

    Recognition and management of gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has gained increasing importance as indications and techniques of transplantation have expanded in the last few years. The transplant recipient is at risk for several complications including conditioning chemotherapy related toxicities, infections, bleeding, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) as well as other long-term problems. The severity and the incidence of many complications have improved in the past several years as the intensity of conditioning regimens has diminished and better supportive care and GVHD prevention strategies have been implemented. Transplant clinicians, however, continue to be challenged with problems arising from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched and unrelated donor transplants, expanding transplant indications and age-limit. This review describes the most commonly seen transplant related complications, focusing on their pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and management. PMID:22563164

  8. COMPLICATIONS OF TATTOOING

    PubMed Central

    Lubeck, Glenn; Epstein, Ervin

    1952-01-01

    Pathologic consequence of tattooing is relatively rare, but in light of the great number of persons in military service, where tattooing seems to be popular, consideration of the complications seems worth while. Four unusual cases of patients with cutaneous lesions in tattoos are reported. One patient had Boeck's sarcoid, in which the cutaneous eruption was limited solely to the tattooed areas on the body and involved all the various colors of the tattoo. The cutaneous eruption was only a single manifestation of generalized sarcoidosis. Another patient had secondary syphilis with the cutaneous lesions involving multi-colored tattoos, including the red areas. These tattoos were applied in Hawaii, and presumably the red dye was not the usual cinnabar (mercuric sulfide). As a general rule, the cutaneous lesions of secondary syphilis do not involve the red areas because of the treponomicidal action of mercuric sulfide. In the third case the characteristic eruption of discoid lupus erythematosus was present. It began over the red areas of a tattoo on the patient's forearm. It has been stated that mercuric sulfide is a photo-sensitizing agent, and it is believed that this explains the localization of the eruption in this case. The fourth patient had eruption, caused by mercury sensitivity, in an area of tattoo. The eruption was noted soon after the tattooing was done, and it persisted for seven years. PMID:14905289

  9. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  10. Complications of pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, S J

    1991-09-01

    MSOF is a life-threatening complication of trauma. The body is a dynamic interrelated group of systems that work together efficiently. Changes in one system generally have a widespread impact, and soon the entire system is changed. In children with MSOF, the normal equilibrium that is maintained between organ systems does not exist. Generalized disruption of organ functions occur, and the body attempts to compensate and regain its homeostasis. This activity will often benefit certain organs and harm others. If the disruption continues and compensation fails, organ dysfunction occurs and general chaos reigns. Medical and nursing interventions are directed toward supporting individual organ systems before failure occurs. Attempts to provide this support for one system can cause adverse effects to occur in other systems. Although this is a potential result of medical and nursing interventions, often there is no other choice. It is essential that nurses be aware of the systemic consequences of these interventions and carefully evaluate them. Although overall mortality rates are high, children have a better chance for survival than adults. Expert nursing assessments, interventions, and evaluations are essential to maximize this outcome. More research in the area of MSOF in children is necessary, with specific attention to nursing management and the effect on patient outcome. PMID:1883588

  11. Gastrointestinal Complications and Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3–87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  12. Autoimmune haematological disorders in two Italian children with Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Paola; Lassandro, Giuseppe; Sangerardi, Maria; Faienza, Maria Felicia; Valente, Federica; Martire, Baldassarre

    2014-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (also called Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome) is a rare genetic disease described for the first time in Japan, characterised by anomalies in multiple organ systems and often associated with autoimmune disorders and impaired immune response. We herein report the clinical history, the therapeutic approach and the outcome of two children with Kabuki syndrome who developed autoimmune haematological disorders (haemolytic anaemia and immune thrombocytopenia). Factors regarding differential diagnosis and interventions in better management of this syndrome and its complications are discussed. This is the first report of Italian children with autoimmune haematological disorders complicating Kabuki syndrome. PMID:24460868

  13. Overlap Syndromes: An Emerging Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Pooja; Malhotra, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Overlap syndrome in hepatology is emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, which is further complicated by the present gaps in the information regarding the immunopathogenesis of these diseases. The present review represents a concise review of literature on overlap syndromes with emphasis on prevalence, etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of true overlap syndromes. PMID:25434314

  14. [Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1): peculiarities and complications].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, I

    1996-09-01

    The clinical, radiological and genetic peculiarities of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) or the von Recklinghausen disease are shown. The most common complications of this syndrome are presented. These are optic pathways gliomas and some other tumors of the nervous system and of any other location in the body; oseous alterations with skoliosis, pseudoarthrosis and facial dysplasias as the most important; aqueductal stenosis that frequently appears at the puberty or at adult life; an intellectual level lower than their brothers and sisters without NF1, and some less frequent complications such as endocrinological disorders and corpus callosum agenesis. PMID:8755343

  15. [Complicated abscesses of the lungs].

    PubMed

    Gukasian, E A; MuromskiÄ­, Iu A

    1985-07-01

    The work is based upon the treatment of 445 patients with complicated abscesses of the lungs for the period from 1963 to 1984. 158 operations were performed in 149 patients. General lethality in patients with complicated abscesses of the lungs was 11%. The operative treatment is thought to be absolutely indicated in patients with abscesses of the lungs complicated by hemorrhage and in patients with gangrenous abscesses of the lungs. PMID:4060481

  16. BCG vaccination in SCID patients: complications, risks and vaccination policies

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Beatriz E; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Joshi, Gyan; Rezaei, Nima; Carvalho, Beatriz Costa; Allwood, Zoe; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Reda, Shereen M; Gennery, Andrew; Thon, Vojtech; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Al-Herz, Waleed; Porras, Oscar; Shcherbina, Anna; Szaflarska, Anna; Kiliç, ?ebnem; Franco, Jose L; Raccio, Andrea C Gómez; Roxo-Jr, Persio; Esteves, Isabel; Galal, Nermeen; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Al-Tamemi, Salem; Yildiran, Alisan; Orellana, Julio C; Yamada, Masafumi; Morio, Tomohiro; Liberatore, Diana; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Lau, Yu-Lung; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Torres-Lozano, Carlos; Mazzucchelli, Juliana TL; Vilela, Maria MS; Tavares, Fabiola S; Cunha, Luciana; Pinto, Jorge A; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara E; Hernandez-Nieto, Leticia; Elfeky, Reem A; Ariga, Tadashi; Toshio, Heike; Dogu, Figen; Cipe, Funda; Formankova, Renata; Nuñez-Nuñez, M Enriqueta; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Marques, Jose Gonçalo; Pereira, María I; Listello, Viviana; Slatter, Mary A; Nademi, Zohreh; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Davies, Graham; Neven, Bénédicte; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2014-01-01

    Background SCID is a syndrome characterized by profound T cell deficiency. BCG vaccine is contraindicated in SCID patients. Because most countries encourage BCG vaccination at birth, a high percent of SCID patients are vaccinated before their immune defect is detected. Objectives To describe the complications and risks associated with BCG vaccination in SCID patients. Methods An extensive standardized questionnaire evaluating complications, therapeutics, and outcome regarding BCG in patients diagnosed with SCID was widely distributed. Summary statistics and association analysis was performed. Results Data on 349 BCG vaccinated SCID patients from 28 centers in 17 countries was analyzed. Fifty-one percent of the patients developed BCG complications, 34% disseminated and 17% localized (a 33,000 and 400 fold increase, respectively, over the general population). Patients receiving early vaccination (? 1 month) showed an increased prevalence of complications (p=0.006) and death due to BCG complications (p<0.0001). The odds of experiencing complications among patients with T cells ? 250/uL at diagnosis was 2.1 times higher (95% CI, 1.4-3.4; p = 0.001) than among those with T cells > 250/uL. BCG complications were reported in 2/78 patients who received anti-mycobacterial therapy while asymptomatic and no deaths due to BCG complications occurred in this group. In contrast 46 BCG-associated deaths were reported among 160 patients treated with anti-mycobacterial therapy for a symptomatic BCG infection (p<0.0001). Conclusions BCG vaccine has a very high rate of complications in SCID patients, which increase morbidity and mortality rates. Until safer and more efficient anti-tuberculosis vaccines become available, delay in BCG vaccination should be considered to protect highly vulnerable populations from preventable complications. PMID:24679470

  17. [Proteus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benichou, J J; Labrune, B; Formanek, A; Denoix, C; Oger, P

    1990-01-01

    Two new cases of Proteus syndrome are reported. This congenital syndrome, first described in 1983, comprises gigantism of extremities, body hemihypertrophy, pigmented nevi and multiple tumors (subcutaneous, lipomas, hamartomas). This syndrome belongs to the same group as Recklinghausen disease, Maffucci or Klippel-Trenaunay syndromes. The prognosis is not well known but mostly depends on functional and psychologic consequences of important deformations. PMID:2206106

  18. [Practical update of Tsaktubo syndrome].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Martínez-Losas, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Takotsubo syndrome, apical ballooning or «broken heart» syndrome, is a growing diagnostic entity which clinically mimics an acute coronary syndrome. Included into the stress cardiomyopathy group of cardiopathies, this condition is characterized by the absence of potentially responsible coronary lesions, while displaying a transient abnormal ventricular motion, usually affecting various coronary territories. It is generally observed in postmenopausal women and frequently seen in the presence of a stressful situation, both physical and emotional. With a prevalence of 1.2% among patients undergoing a cardiac catheterization with a suspected diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes, Takotsubo syndrome usually has a good prognosis. However, complications can occur in the acute phase, generally heart failure, which can even lead to death. In this review we discuss the latest available information on this disease and present it in a practical and useful way for the attending physician. PMID:26205669

  19. Cocaine-Induced Delayed Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Apical Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rafay; Arshed, Sabrina; Jehangir, Waqas; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    It is well demonstrated in the literature that cocaine use has been well linked to the formation of various forms of acute and chronic cardiovascular problems including but not limited to acute coronary syndromes. However, cocaine has been commonly associated with coronary vasospasms and less commonly with myocardial infarction and the formation of atrial thrombus. Through this case presentation, we illustrate the findings of a 35-year-old gentleman with history of cocaine use presenting with acute coronary syndrome and complicated by thrombus formation. Furthermore, through this report, we illustrate in a patient with no other risk factors and at a young age, how chronic cocaine use or even a history of usage may result in complications even weeks after its consumption. PMID:26668686

  20. Cocaine-Induced Delayed Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Apical Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rafay; Arshed, Sabrina; Jehangir, Waqas; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    It is well demonstrated in the literature that cocaine use has been well linked to the formation of various forms of acute and chronic cardiovascular problems including but not limited to acute coronary syndromes. However, cocaine has been commonly associated with coronary vasospasms and less commonly with myocardial infarction and the formation of atrial thrombus. Through this case presentation, we illustrate the findings of a 35-year-old gentleman with history of cocaine use presenting with acute coronary syndrome and complicated by thrombus formation. Furthermore, through this report, we illustrate in a patient with no other risk factors and at a young age, how chronic cocaine use or even a history of usage may result in complications even weeks after its consumption. PMID:26668686

  1. Endoscopic sphenoid sinus drainage in Lemierre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Golan, E; Wong, K; Alahmadi, H; Agid, R F; Morris, A; Sharkawy, A; Zadeh, G

    2014-02-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare condition arising from an invasive oropharyngeal infection, which leads to septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and multi-organ septic embolization. Intracranial complications are rare but serious, including subdural empyema, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and internal carotid artery aneurysms. We report a patient with Lemierre syndrome with multiple intracranial complications despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy. The patient eventually required transsphenoidal endoscopic drainage of the sphenoid sinus to help eradicate the infectious source. We postulate that in patients with Lemierre syndrome with evidence of infection in the paranasal sinuses, endoscopic sinus drainage can be an adjunct to antimicrobial therapy in achieving infection control. PMID:24060623

  2. 42 CFR 102.21 - Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine Injury Table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) vaccine in recipients (R); or (2) exposure to vaccinia in contacts (C). Please note that these time... Reaction R or C: 1-21 days. 2. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome R or C: 1-21 days. 3. Inadvertent Inoculation R or C: 1-21 days. 4. Generalized Vaccinia R or C: 1-21 days. 5. Eczema Vaccinatum R or C: 1-21 days....

  3. Complications of Distal Radius Fixation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis S; Weikert, Douglas R

    2016-04-01

    Complications following any form of distal radius fixation remain prevalent. With an armamentarium of fixation options available to practicing surgeons, familiarity with the risks of newer plate technology as it compares with other conventional methods is crucial to optimizing surgical outcome and managing patient expectations. This article presents an updated review on complications following various forms of distal radius fixation. PMID:26772950

  4. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  5. [Surgical complications in renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Boffo, V; Cortese, F; Baroni, B; Pisani, F; Utzeri, G; Casciani, C U

    1993-11-01

    Technical complications in kidney transplantation are unusual but with a high incidence of graft loss and mortality. The authors report their experience with 89 kidney transplants with an overall incidence of 16.8%. Only early and aggressive surgical procedures can resolve certain of the complications. PMID:8152568

  6. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... small foot problems can turn into serious complications. Diabetes-related Foot and Leg Problems Infections and ulcers (sores) that ... This is a common – and serious – complication of diabetes and can lead to a loss of your foot, your leg, or your life. Corns and calluses. ...

  7. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters. PMID:16363113

  8. Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Popescu, M; Strambu, V; Sandu, AM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of laparoscopic treatment in abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Methods: We report a retrospective study including 17 patients with abdominal complications secondary to VP shunt for hydrocephalus, laparoscopically treated in our department, between 2000 and 2007. Results: Patients' age ranged from 1 to 72 years old (mean age 25.8 years old). Male: female ratio was 1.4. Abdominal complications encountered were: shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration 47.05% (8/17), infections 23.52% (4/17) such as abscesses and peritonitis, pseudocysts 11.76% (2/17), CSF ascites 5.88% (1/17), inguinal hernia 5.88% (1/17), and shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube 5.88% (1/17). Free–disease interval varies from 1 day to 21 years, depending on the type of complication, short in peritoneal irritation syndrome and abscesses (days) and long in ascites, pseudocysts(months– years). Laparoscopic treatment was: extraction of the foreign body in shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration, evacuation, debridement, lavage and drainage for pseudocysts, abscess and peritonitis, shortening of the tube in shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube a nd hernioraphy. One diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in a peritoneal irritation syndrome, which found only CSF ascites. There were no conversions to open surgery. The overall mortality was of 5.88% and postoperative morbidity was of 11.76%. In 7 patients operated for abscesses, peritonitis, pseudocysts, and CSF ascites the shunting system was converted in to a ventriculocardiac shunt. Conclusions: Abdominal complication following VP shunt can be successfully performed laparoscopically. Abdominal surgery required, in selected cases, the repositioning of the distal catheter, frequently as a ventriculocardiac shunt. There are abdominal complications with no indication of surgery, like peritoneal irritation syndrome and CSF ascites. Free– disease interval varies from days (peritoneal irritation syndrome, abscesses) to month–years (pseudocyst, ascites), according to type of complication. PMID:20108757

  9. [Neurological complications during treatment of the tumor necrosis alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Piusi?ska-Macoch, Renata

    2013-05-01

    Medications with TNF-alpha inhibitors family are successfully applicable in rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and neurology. Still, the ongoing research on the safety assessment of their application, also due to neurological complications. The vast majority of these complications is associated with an increased risk of serious virus (Herpes simplex--JC) and bacterial (Listeria monocytogenes) neuroinfections. They can cause the occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy--PML with a severe clinical course and poor prognosis or herpes simplex encephalitis--HSE. Meta-analysis revealed a number of cases of PML and the HSE in the first 6 months of treatment with natalizumab, efalizumab, rituximab, abatacept and infliximab. Common complication occasionally turning on this biologics is chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy or Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Described are cases of central and peripheral demyelination typical of multiple sclerosis (MS). Are also reported cases of motor multifocal neuropathy with conduction block acute encephalithis with polyneuropathy or mononeuropathy in the form of anterior optic neuropathy Guillen-Barre' syndrome and its variant, Miller-Fisher syndrome have been confirmed as adverse events following treatment with infliximab. Also revealed several cases of myasthenia gravis after using etanercept. In the few cases of systemic lupus CNS involvement caused by treatment with TNF inhibitors, the mechanism of these disorders is still considered too vague. Due to the emerging reports on the number of neurological adverse events of TNF antagonists, significantly higher than those described in the literature, the safety of their use requires further monitoring and multicenter studies. PMID:23894783

  10. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  11. Stoma complications: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Wang, Yi-Zarn; Weintraub, Sharon L; Boyle, Michael; Hunt, John P

    2002-11-01

    Construction of a gastrointestinal stoma is a frequently performed surgical procedure. We sought to analyze a large cohort to document the frequency and types of ostomy complications and the risk factors associated with them. The charts of patients undergoing a procedure which resulted in ostomy during a 3-year period were reviewed. Demographics, indication, ostomy type/location, perioperative risk factors, and complications were recorded. Case-control methodology was used to determine crude odds ratios and multiple logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. An ostomy was constructed in 204 patients and records were available for 164. Forty-one patients (25.0%) had ostomy complications. Sixteen of these complications (39.0%) occurred within one month of the procedure. Complications included prolapse in nine (22%), necrosis in nine (22%), stenosis in seven (17%), irritation in seven (17%), infection in six (15%), bleeding in two (5%), and retraction in two (5%). Gender, cancer, trauma, diverticulitis, emergency surgery, ileostomy, and ostomy location/type were not associated with a stoma complication. Significant predictors of ostomy malfunction are presented as odds ratios (ORs) with 95 per cent confidence intervals (CIs) and include inflammatory bowel disease (OR = 4.49; 95% CI = 1.16-17.36) and obesity (OR = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.15-6.16). The care of an enterostomal nurse was found to prevent complications (OR = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.03-0.69). We conclude that ostomies have a high risk of complication, which is not related to stoma location or type. Obesity and inflammatory bowel disease predispose to complications. Enterostomal nursing may be instrumental in preventing complications. PMID:12455788

  12. [Management of acute complications in sickle cell disease ].

    PubMed

    Gellen-Dautremer, Justine; Brousse, Valentine; Arlet, Jean-Benoît

    2014-10-01

    Acute complications in sickle cell disease are a major and life-long cause for hospital referral. The most frequent events are painful acute vaso-occlusive crisis involving the limbs and back, and acute chest syndrome. Acute vaso-occlusive crisis is a therapeutic emergency because of the very high level of pain. Acute chest syndrome may be potentially fatal and must be adequately searched for and treated. Sickle cell patients are susceptible to pneumococcal infections notably, but any infection may favour vaso-occlusive crisis. Triggers of sickle cell vase occlusion must be tracked and corrected, if possible. Moderate crisis can be managed at home, but referral is necessary as soon as opiates are needed and/or if acute chest syndrome is suspected. Additional treatments besides opiates include co analgesics, oxygen, hydration, physiotherapy. Blood transfusion may be required but is not systematic. Acute spleen sequestration occurs in young children and requires immediate hospital referral for transfusion. PMID:25510139

  13. Neonatal case of novel KMT2D mutation in Kabuki syndrome with severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gohda, Yuji; Oka, Shohki; Matsunaga, Takamoto; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    A newborn Japanese girl with Kabuki syndrome had neonatal persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, which seemed to be a rare complication of Kabuki syndrome. On sequence analysis she was found to have a novel heterozygous KMT2D mutation. Diazoxide therapy was effective for the hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia should be considered when Kabuki syndrome patients have convulsion or other non-specific symptoms. Diazoxide may help to improve hypoglycemia in patients with Kabuki syndrome complicated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. PMID:25944076

  14. THE HEPATOPULMONARY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    NACIF, Lucas Souto; ANDRAUS, Wellington; PINHEIRO, Rafael Soares; DUCATTI, Liliana; HADDAD, Luciana BP; D'ALBUQUERQUE, Luiz Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The hepatopulmonary syndrome has been acknowledged as an important vascular complication in lungs developing systemic hypoxemia in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Is formed by arterial oxygenation abnormalities induced from intrapulmonary vascular dilatations with liver disease. It is present in 4-32% of patients with cirrhosis. It increases mortality in the setting of cirrhosis and may influence the frequency and severity. Initially the hypoxemia responds to low-flow supplemental oxygen, but over time, the need for oxygen supplementation is necessary. The liver transplantation is the only effective therapeutic option for its resolution. Aim To update clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of this entity. Method A literature review was performed on management of hepatopulmonary syndrome. The electronic search was held of the Medline-PubMed, in English crossing the headings "hepatopulmonary syndrome", "liver transplantation" and "surgery". The search was completed in September 2013. Results Hepatopulmonary syndrome is classically defined by a widened alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaPO2) on room air (>15 mmHg, or >20 mmHg in patients >64 years of age) with or without hypoxemia resulting from intrapulmonary vasodilatation in the presence of hepatic dysfunction or portal hypertension. Clinical manifestation, diagnosis, classification, treatments and outcomes are varied. Conclusion The severity of hepatopulmonary syndrome is an important survival predictor and determine the improvement, the time and risks for liver transplantation. The liver transplantation still remains the only effective therapeutic. PMID:25004294

  15. Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous disorder, after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, and impacts approximately 1 in 20000 live births. Sturge-Weber syndrome is not inherited, but rather occurs exclusively sporadically, in both males and females and in all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sturge-Weber syndrome presents at birth with a capillary malformation on the face (port-wine birthmark) with later diagnosis of abnormal vasculature in the eye and the brain which result in a range of complications. The underlying somatic mosaic mutation causing both Sturge-Weber syndrome and isolated port-wine birthmarks was recently discovered and is an activating mutation in GNAQ. When a newborn presents with a facial port-wine birthmark on the upper face, that child has a 15-50% risk of developing Sturge-Weber syndrome brain and/or eye involvement, depending on the extent of the birthmark, and close monitoring and appropriate screening is essential for early diagnosis and optimal treatment. Treatment options include laser therapy for lightening of the birthmark, eye drops and surgery for glaucoma management, and aggressive anticonvulsant treatment, low dose aspirin, and neurosurgery where necessary. Future possible treatments based upon new knowledge of the somatic mutation and downstream pathways are currently being considered and studied. PMID:26564078

  16. A Poorly Known Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Complication: Miyazaki Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Riccardo; Wierzbicki, Venceslao; Marrocco, Luigi; Pesce, Alessandro; Piccione, Emanuele

    2015-09-01

    We studied a poorly known form of cerebrospinal fluid hypotension characterized by cervical myelopathy, a considerable growth in volume of the venous plexus of the cervical spine, and absence of headache. This form was first described by Miyazaki. We reported a case brought to our attention, reviewed the literature, and formulated etiopathogenic theories that might explain all the various clinical aspects of this pathology. PMID:25913430

  17. Moyamoya Syndrome: A Window of Moyamoya Disease.

    PubMed

    Phi, Ji Hoon; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-06-01

    Moyamoya-like vasculopathy develops in association with various systemic diseases and conditions, which is termed moyamoya syndrome. Relatively common diseases and conditions are related to moyamoya syndrome, including neurofibromatosis type 1, Down syndrome, thyroid disease, and cranial irradiation. Moyamoya syndrome shares phenotypical characteristics with idiopathic moyamoya disease. However, they differ in other details, including clinical presentations, natural history, and treatment considerations. The study of moyamoya syndrome can provide clinicians and researchers with valuable knowledge and insight. Although it is infrequently encountered in clinical practice, moyamoya-like vasculopathy can severely complicate outcomes for patients with various underlying diseases when the clinician fails to expect or diagnose moyamoya syndrome development. Furthermore, moyamoya syndrome could be used as a doorway to more enigmatic moyamoya disease in research. More comprehensive survey and investigation are required to uncover the secrets of all the moyamoya-like phenomena. PMID:26180607

  18. Moyamoya Syndrome: A Window of Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phi, Ji Hoon; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya-like vasculopathy develops in association with various systemic diseases and conditions, which is termed moyamoya syndrome. Relatively common diseases and conditions are related to moyamoya syndrome, including neurofibromatosis type 1, Down syndrome, thyroid disease, and cranial irradiation. Moyamoya syndrome shares phenotypical characteristics with idiopathic moyamoya disease. However, they differ in other details, including clinical presentations, natural history, and treatment considerations. The study of moyamoya syndrome can provide clinicians and researchers with valuable knowledge and insight. Although it is infrequently encountered in clinical practice, moyamoya-like vasculopathy can severely complicate outcomes for patients with various underlying diseases when the clinician fails to expect or diagnose moyamoya syndrome development. Furthermore, moyamoya syndrome could be used as a doorway to more enigmatic moyamoya disease in research. More comprehensive survey and investigation are required to uncover the secrets of all the moyamoya-like phenomena. PMID:26180607

  19. [Infectious complications in patients after cardiac arrest undergoing therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Sýkora, R

    2011-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is currently recommended neuroprotective therapeutic measure for comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Hypothermia has been proven not only to affect the neurological outcomes but also the survival of patients after cardiac arrest. This communication summarizes the issue of early infectious complications in patients after cardiac arrest undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. Diagnosis of infectious events is complicated in patients after cardiac arrest not only by the physiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia but also by the consequences of reperfusion injury and development of postresuscitation disease associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Furthermore, there are discussed limited diagnostic options of infectious complications. The significance of the usual symptoms of infections is reduced, as well as the value of laboratory markers such as procalcitonin and C-reactive protein. Finally, the possibility of antibiotic treatment and eventual antibiotic prophylaxis during therapeutic hypothermia in patients after cardiac arrest outside hospitals is mentioned. PMID:21695930

  20. Neurologic complications of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Hocker, Sara E

    2014-01-01

    A new spectrum of neurologic complications has appeared with treatment of the organ transplant recipient. There are specific problems in liver recipients. Most pertinent is the management of acute fulminant hepatic failure and emerging brain edema that can only be definitively treated with acute liver transplantation. In some patients neurologic complications appear as a result of immunosuppressive drugs or due to infectious complications in immunocompromised patients. Neurologists seeing patients in a transplant unit should be prepared to see confused or obtunded critically ill patients with multiple medical problems, procedures, and polypharmacy. This chapter discusses the challenges of the transplant team and the consulting neurologist. PMID:24365417

  1. [Prevalence of ulcer disease complications].

    PubMed

    Za?tsev, O V; Tarasenko, S V; Kope?kin, A A; Kariukhin, I V; Larionova, A A

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of complications of a peptic ulcer is studied: bleedings, perforations and pylorodudenal stenoses. 1799 patients are included in research that were on hospitalisation in 1995-2009. A frequency of all the complications has declined. Middle age of patients with the complicated ulcer enlarged: in case of an ulcerative bleeding--at the expense of reduction of a share of male at the age of 36-60 years, in case of a perforated ulcer--because of appreciable reduction of a percentage of male at the age of 21-35 years. PMID:22629752

  2. [Unusual complication of noninvasive ventilation: The œsogastric pneumatosis associated with a subcutaneous emphysema].

    PubMed

    Bakkali, H; Aissa, I; Massou, S; Wartiti, L; Abouelalaa, K; Balkhi, H; Drissi Kamili, N

    2014-08-01

    The non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a technique of ventilator support to avoid endotracheal intubation and its potential complications. However, it has some complications that are usually harmless to type of erythema and/or cutaneous ulcerations, mouth or nose dryness, conjunctival irritation and rarely lesions of barotrauma, volotrauma or gastric insufflation with nausea and vomiting. We report the case of a patient who had an unusual complication of NIV: sub mucosa gastro-esophageal pneumatosis associated with subcutaneous emphysema occurring on the second day after one hepatectomy which was settled but complicated with a postoperative pulmonary aspiration syndrome. PMID:24646777

  3. Malignancy in Noonan syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Smpokou, P; Zand, D J; Rosenbaum, K N; Summar, M L

    2015-12-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and related disorders, such as NS with multiple lentigines (formerly called LEOPARD syndrome), cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, and Costello syndrome, constitute an important group of developmental malformation syndromes with variable clinical and molecular features. Their underlying pathophysiologic mechanism involves dysregulation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, an essential mediator of developmental and growth processes in the prenatal and postnatal setting. Malignant tumor development is an important complication encountered in other RASopathies, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, but the neoplastic risks and incidence of malignant tumors are less clearly defined in NS and related disorders of the Noonan spectrum. Malignant tumor development remains an important complication variably seen in the RASopathies and, thus, a clear understanding of the underlying risks is essential for appropriate clinical care in this patient population. This review discusses previously published reports of malignancies in individuals with RASopathies of the Noonan spectrum. PMID:25683281

  4. Scoliosis, superior mesenteric artery syndrome, and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is defined as a lateral curvature of the spine that can occur in any region of the spinal column. For curves that require surgical correction, spinal fusion is the surgical treatment, and superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a possible complication. Risk factors for superior mesenteric artery syndrome include a small aorta-superior mesenteric artery angle, spinal lengthening, and an asthenic habitus. Asthenic habitus may be due to natural build, peptic ulcer disease, or anorexia, especially among adolescent females. Research regarding adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and superior mesenteric artery syndrome is warranted to identify if some adolescents are more likely to develop superior mesenteric artery syndrome. The advanced practice nurse can identify which adolescents may develop superior mesenteric artery syndrome and provide safe care to avoid this complication. PMID:17273103

  5. Pneumococcal Disease Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... World Health Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis Symptoms and Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... drinking, low alertness, and vomiting. Pneumococcal bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low ...

  6. Complications in cochlear implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, DC; Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A

    2015-01-01

    For the last 6 years, cochlear implantation has become a standard practice in our department. The number of patients rose from 5 to 21/ year. Using multiple types of cochlear implants and indicating the surgery also to malformed inner ears led to the encounter of some complications. Objective: to present the surgical complications from our department. Material: all the patients admitted and operated in our clinic have been reviewed. Results: 9 complications (8,86%) have occurred: the impossibility of establishing a reliable cochleostomy (due to ossification), air in the cochlea through lack of sealing of the cochleostomy (exteriorization of the electrode array), cochlear implant postoperative migration from its bed, weak hearing discrimination due to “double electrodes” in the scala tympani, gusher. Conclusions: cochlear implanting needs to respect the technical steps of the surgery and the best technical/ tactical solution has to be found to whatever complications arise in complex or malformed cases! PMID:26351535

  7. Maternal complications in diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Gillian

    2011-02-01

    Pregnant women with diabetes have to manage both the effect of pregnancy on glucose control and its effect on pre-existing diabetic complications. Most women experience hypoglycaemia as a consequence of tightened glycaemic control and this impacts on daily living. Less commonly, diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious metabolic decompensation of diabetic control and a medical emergency, can cause foetal and maternal mortality. Microvascular complications of diabetes include retinopathy and nephropathy. Retinopathy can deteriorate during pregnancy; hence, regular routine examination is required and, if indicated, ophthalmological input. Diabetic nephropathy significantly increases the risk of obstetric complications and impacts on foetal outcomes. Pregnancy outcome is closely related to pre-pregnancy renal function. Diabetic pregnancy is contraindicated if the maternal complications of ischaemic heart disease or diabetic gastropathy are known to be present before pregnancy as there is a significant maternal mortality associated with both of these conditions. PMID:21130689

  8. Imaging Cardiovascular Manifestations of Genetic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Soham; Ashwath, Ravi; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital structural cardiovascular defects are commonly associated and found concurrently with many different types of genetic diseases and syndromes. Understanding these cardiovascular manifestations is essential for diagnosing these genetic syndromes without delay and provides prompt attention and repair of life-threatening defects without complications. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are increasingly used in the evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities, and it is imperative for radiologists to be cognizant of the syndromes associated with these abnormalities. In this article, we review the cardiovascular manifestations of the common genetic syndromes and illustrate the role of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of these abnormalities. PMID:26163737

  9. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Renal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Kyew; Park, Sung Kwang

    1987-01-01

    The coexistence of nephrotic syndrome and renal vein thrombosis has been of medical interest since Rayer’s description in 1840. Renal vein thrombosis has been underdiagnosed because of its variable clinical and radiological findings but it becomes a more frequently recognizable clinical entity since diagnosis can be easily established by modern angiographic techniques. Generally it has been believed that renal vein thrombosis may cause nephrotic syndrome. But recent articles strongly suggest that renal vein thrombosis is a complication of the nephrotic syndrome rather than a cause. We report three cases of nephrotic syndrome associated with renal vein thrombosis. PMID:3154812

  10. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Paraneoplastic Syndromes ... done? Research on paraneoplastic syndromes is aimed at enhancing scientific understanding and evaluating new therapeutic interventions. Researchers ...

  11. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... heads, jerky movements, protruding tongues, and bouts of laughter." Infants with Angelman syndrome appear normal at birth, ... develop techniques to diagnose, treat, prevent, and ultimately cure them. NIH Patient Recruitment for Angelman Syndrome Clinical ...

  12. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Like for Kids With Marfan Syndrome? en español Síndrome de Marfan Evan couldn't wait for school ... for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children from parents who have the disease. ...

  13. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... poor binocular vision (which can result in poor depth perception) and/or amblyopia. Are there different kinds of Brown syndrome? Brown syndrome can be classified according to severity. In mild cases there is a reduced ability to look up ...

  14. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  15. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental ...

  16. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  17. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits ... the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated. Last Modified February 13, 2007 National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  18. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the brain is very good at making up for a weak vestibular system, and most children and adults with Pendred syndrome don't have a problem ...

  19. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  20. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Rett Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental genetic disorder that ...

  1. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits. PMID:25825086

  2. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Goldenhar/Hemifacial Moebius syndrome Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Treacher Collins syndrome Other syndromes Wonder News & Events ... of the radial limb. Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Saethre-Chotzen Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a condition ...

  3. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  4. Piriformis Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the symptoms of piriformis syndrome? The most common symptom of piriformis syndrome is sciatica. This term describes pain, tingling or numbness that ... such as a car accident or a fall. ... something other than piriformis syndrome is causing your sciatica, he or she may order additional tests. Computerized ...

  5. Turcot Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of colorectal cancer , and an increased risk of brain cancer . The type of brain cancer generally depends on whether the Turcot syndrome ... Lynch syndrome or FAP. The two most common types of brain tumors in Turcot syndrome are: Glioblastoma . This type ...

  6. Rowell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ramesh Y; Varma, Chaitanya; Bhatt, Sonia; Balachandran, C

    2014-01-01

    Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:25506561

  7. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  8. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia/Triphalangeal thumb syndrome ... Jones KL, ed. Aase syndrome. In: Smith's Recognizable Patterns Of Human Malformation. 6th ed. Saunders. 2005. Clinton C, Gazda HT. Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. 2009 Jun 25 [Updated 2013 Jul ...

  9. Outcomes with the Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis at Instituto de Microcirugía Ocular IMO

    PubMed Central

    Güell, Jose L.; Arcos, Edilio; Gris, Oscar; Aristizabal, Diego; Pacheco, Miguel; Sanchez, Claudia L.; Manero, Felicidad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report the outcomes on the Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis at our institution. Design Retrospective analysis case series. Participants We analyzed 54 eyes of 53 patients who previously underwent Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis surgery at our institution from July 2006 to March 2011. Methods Preoperative and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. Main outcome measures Visual acuity and keratoprosthesis stability. Results Common preoperative diagnoses were penetrating keratoplasty failure in 49 eyes (90.7%), chronic keratitis in 2 eyes (3.7%), ocular cicatricial pemphigoid in 1 eye (1.85%), Stevens Johnson syndrome in 1 eye (1.85%) and corneal vascularization in 1 eye (1.85%). Additionally, 40 eyes (74%) had preoperative glaucoma, and an Ahmed valve was implanted in 55% of them. Preoperative BCVA ranged from 20/200 to light perception. At an average follow-up of 20.15 months ± 12.7 (range, 1–56), postoperative vision improved to ?20/200 in 18 eyes (33.3%) and ?20/50 in 4 eyes (7.4%). The graft retention was 96%. Conclusions The Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis is a valid option for high-risk patients. The design improvements in the Boston keratoprosthesis, as well as the daily implementation of the therapeutic methods, have notably diminished occurrence of the most serious complications, such as corneal necrosis and endophthalmitis. As such, glaucoma and its subsequent complications now stand as the most prevalent prognostic factor in the long term. PMID:23960937

  10. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Buggs, Colleen; Rosenfield, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a syndrome of variable combinations of menstrual irregularity, hirsutism or acne, and obesity. It can be diagnosed in adolescence and has early childhood antecedents. PCOS is the single most common endocrine cause of anovulatory infertility and a major risk factor for the metabolic syndrome and, in turn, development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in women. Thus, it appears that PCOS increases a woman’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Therefore, identifying girls at risk for PCOS and implementing treatment early in the development of PCOS may be an effective means of preventing some of the long-term complications associated with this syndrome. This article reviews the definition, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of PCOS. PMID:16085166

  11. [Myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Thol, F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) encompasses a heterogeneous group of diseases originating in hematopoietic stem cells and is characterized by inefficient hematopoiesis and dysplastic changes in the bone marrow. In peripheral blood patients show anemia (mostly macrocytic), frequently accompanied by neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Thus, clinically the patients suffer from fatigue (anemia), increased bleeding (thrombocytopenia) and infectious complications (neutropenia). Approximately one quarter of MDS patients develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the course of the disease, which is characterized by a 20?% or more increase of blasts in the bone marrow. The estimated overall survival as well as the risk for AML transformation can be calculated with the international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) as well as the revised IPSS score (IPSS-R). Novel sequencing methods (e.g. next generation sequencing) allow the detection of recurrent gene mutations in MDS patients. Genes of the splicing machinery as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation (e.g. ASXL1 and TET2) are most frequently mutated in MDS. Therapy is selected based on the patient risk profile (IPSS). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a curative approach for high risk patients (i.e. IPSS int-2 and higher) with a good performance status and a biological age below 70 years. Otherwise, high risk patients are treated with demethylating agents (e.g. decitabine and azacitidine). Low risk patients (IPSS low and int-1) mainly receive supportive therapy including iron chelation. An exceptional position is presented by MDS with an isolated 5q deletion as it can be treated with lenalidomide with good success. Enrolling patients in clinical trials is strongly recommended to improve the prospects of this disease. PMID:25700647

  12. Complications

    MedlinePLUS

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  13. Prevalence of peripheral nervous system complications after major heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Gavazzi, Armando; de Rino, Francesca; Boveri, Maria Claudia; Picozzi, Anna; Franceschi, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated 374 consecutive patients from May 2013 to April 2014 who underwent major cardiac surgery. Each patient had an interview and a neurological clinical examination during the rehabilitation period. Patients with possible peripheral nervous system (PNS) complications underwent further electrodiagnostic tests. Among 374 patients undergoing major heart surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting, valvular heart surgery, ascending aortic aneurysm repair) 23 (6.1 %) developed 34 new PNS complications. We found four brachial plexopathies; four carpal tunnel syndromes; five critical illness neuropathies; three worsening of pre-existing neuropathies; two involvement of X, one of IX and one of XII cranial nerves; three peroneal (at knee), one saphenous, two median (at Struthers ligament), six ulnar (at elbow) mononeuropathies; two meralgia parestheticas. Diabetes is a strong risk factor for PNS complications (p = 0.002); we could not find any other relationship of PNS complications with clinical conditions, demographic data (gender, age) or type of surgical intervention. The mononeuropathies of right arms can be related to ipsilateral vein cannulation; position of body and stretching from chest wall retraction may be the cause of mononeuropathies of left arms (more frequent); the use of saphenous vein and position of the limbs may be the cause of mononeuropathies of the legs; surgical and anesthetical procedures can injure cranial nerves; respiratory failure and infection during the first days after surgery can cause critical illness neuropathies. Careful preoperative assessment and intraoperative management may reduce the risk of long-term PNS complications after cardiac surgery. PMID:26439918

  14. [Pregnancy complicated by diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kinalski, Maciej; Sledziewski, Adam; Majkowicz-M?ynarczyk, Amelia; Ku?micki, Mariusz

    2004-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team work and recommendations of diabetologist and obstetrician is the condition of success of antenatal care and consequently perinatal outcome in pregnancy complicated by diabetes. Careful insight into the metabolic, haemodynamic and vascular disturbances is the basic of contemporary surveillance in diabetic pregnancy. The authors emphasise that a diabetic pregnant woman must not only pay attention to adequate nutrition and balanced exercise, but also be aware of and cope with characteristic, momentary swings in glycemia in order to overcome them by appropriate insulin therapy. Continuous supervision for several other complications associated with diabetic pregnancy, viz. hypertension, retinopathy, thyroid dysfunction, nephropathy and the threat of in utero foetal death is justified. Briefly, rigorous measures to sustain normoglycemia and normal blood pressure, examination of the retina, thyroid and renal functions as well as foetal status evaluation are paramount in appropriate management of major common diabetic complications in pregnancy. PMID:15858241

  15. Meningitis-Retention Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basoulis, Dimitrios; Mylona, Maria; Toskas, Pantelis; Tsilingiris, Dimitris; Fytili, Christina

    2015-09-01

    Meningitis-retention syndrome (MRS) is a clinical entity that has recently appeared in the literature. We present the case of a 22-year-old man with fever and headache who, in the course of his hospitalization with a diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, developed acute urinary retention. Fewer than 30 such cases have been described and in several of them, no clear associations with other disorders have been made. In some cases, direct association with viral infection has been proved, and in others, there are indications of an underlying demyelinating condition. To further complicate the issue, various conditions such as Elsberg syndrome and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, which not only have some similarities but also have some distinct differences, have been placed under the umbrella definition of MRS. In our review, we attempt to address these conditions and better define MRS by establishing diagnostic criteria based on what has thus far been described in the literature. PMID:26620904

  16. Meningitis-Retention Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basoulis, Dimitrios; Mylona, Maria; Toskas, Pantelis; Tsilingiris, Dimitris; Fytili, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis-retention syndrome (MRS) is a clinical entity that has recently appeared in the literature. We present the case of a 22-year-old man with fever and headache who, in the course of his hospitalization with a diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, developed acute urinary retention. Fewer than 30 such cases have been described and in several of them, no clear associations with other disorders have been made. In some cases, direct association with viral infection has been proved, and in others, there are indications of an underlying demyelinating condition. To further complicate the issue, various conditions such as Elsberg syndrome and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, which not only have some similarities but also have some distinct differences, have been placed under the umbrella definition of MRS. In our review, we attempt to address these conditions and better define MRS by establishing diagnostic criteria based on what has thus far been described in the literature. PMID:26620904

  17. The idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Alfaham, M A; Ferguson, S D; Sihra, B; Davies, J

    1987-01-01

    A 14 year old girl with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome is described. In addition to weight loss, anaemia, amenorrhoea, general lethargy, anorexia, mouth ulcers, blisters of hands and feet, and petechial skin rash, she had features of involvement of the cardiovascular system as the major complication. She responded well to treatment. After a comprehensive search of the published reports 18 cases of this syndrome were identified in children under 16 years. Fifteen of these children had involvement of the cardiovascular system as the major source of their morbidity and mortality. Summary of the clinical details and laboratory, biopsy, and necropsy findings of the involvement of the various organ systems of the 18 children is presented. PMID:3619478

  18. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  19. [Psychiatric complications of cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Karila, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, especially among young people. Cannabis use is extremely commonplace and frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders that raise questions about the etiology. The use of cannabis is an aggravating factor of all psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric complications are related to the age of onset, duration of exposure and individual risk factors of the individual (mental and social health). The panic attack is the most common complication. The link with psychosis is narrow that leads to increased prevention for vulnerable populations. Cannabis is also an indicator of increased depressive vulnerability and an aggravating factor for bipolar disorder. PMID:24579344

  20. Complications of Distal Biceps Repair.

    PubMed

    Garon, Mark Tyson; Greenberg, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Modern techniques to repair the distal biceps tendon include one-incision and 2-incision techniques that use transosseous sutures, suture anchors, interference screws, and/or cortical buttons to achieve a strong repair of the distal biceps brachii. Repair using these techniques has led to improved functional outcomes when compared with nonoperative treatment. Most complications consist of neuropraxic injuries to the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve, posterior interosseous nerve, stiffness and weakness with forearm rotation, heterotopic ossification, and wound infections. Although complications certainly affect outcomes, patients with distal biceps repairs report a high satisfaction rate after repair. PMID:26772952