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Sample records for stickler syndrome arthro-ophthalmopathy

  1. Stop codon in the procollagen II gene (COL2A1) in a family with the Stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy)

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.N.; Ala-Kokko, L.; Knowlton, R.G.; Jimenez, S.A.; Weaver, E.J.; Prockop, D.J. ); Maguire, J.I.; Tasman, W. )

    1991-08-01

    Linkage analysis with restriction fragment length polymorphisms for the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1) was carried out in a family with the Stickler syndrome, or arthro-ophthalmopathy, an autosomal dominant disorder that affects the eyes, ears, joints, and skeleton. The analysis demonstrated linkage of the disease and COL2A1 with a logarithm-of-odds score of 1.51 at zero recombination. A newly developed procedure for preparing cosmid clones was employed to isolate the allele for type II procollagen that was linked to the disease. Analysis of over 7000 nucleotides of the gene revealed a single base mutation that altered a CG dinucleotide and converted the codon CGA for arginine at amino acid position {alpha}1-732 to TGA, a stop codon. From previous work on procollagen biosynthesis, it is apparent that the truncated polypeptide synthesized from an allele with a stop codon at {alpha}1-732 cannot participate in the assembly of type II procollagen, and therefore that the mutation would decrease synthesis of type II procollagen. It was not apparent, however, why the mutation produced marked changes in the eye, which contains only small amounts of type II collagen, but relatively mild effects on the many cartilaginous structures of the body that are rich in the same protein.

  2. Marshall/Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baraitser, Michael

    1982-01-01

    A family originally reported as a variant of Marshall syndrome is re-examined. The clinical picture now encompasses both the Marshall and Stickler syndromes and it is suggested that the distinction between the two should be abandoned. Images PMID:7077624

  3. A{sup -2} {yields} G transition at the 3{prime} acceptor splice site of IVS17 characterizes the COL2A1 gene mutation in the original Stickler syndrome kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.J.; Ganguly, A.; Considine, E.

    1996-06-14

    Hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy, or {open_quotes}Stickler syndrome,{close_quotes} is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterized by a variety of ocular and skeletal anomalies which frequently lead to retinal detachment and precocious osteoarthritis. A variety of mutations in the COL2A1 gene have been identified in {open_quotes}Stickler{close_quotes} families; in most cases studied thus far, the consequence of mutation is the premature generation of a stop codon. We report here the characterization of a COL2A1 gene mutation in the original kindred described by Stickler et al. Conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) was used to screen for mutations in the entire COL2A1 gene in an affected member from the kindred. A prominent heteroduplex species was noted in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product from a region of the gene including exons 17 to 20. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA resulted in the identification of a base substitution at the A{sup -2} position of the 3{prime} splice acceptor site of IVS17. Sequencing of DNA from affected and unaffected family members confirmed that the mutation segregated with the disease phenotype. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of poly A+ RNA demonstrated that the mutant allele utilized a cryptic splice site in exon 18 of the gene, eliminating 16 bp at the start of exon 18. This frameshift eventually results in a premature termination codon. These findings are the first report of a splice site mutation in classical Stickler syndrome and they provide a satisfying historical context in which to view COL2A1 mutations in this dysplasia. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Analysis of four families with the Stickler syndrome by linkage studies. Identification of a new premature stop codon in the COL2A1 gene in a family

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaventure, J.; Lasselin, C.; Toutain, A.

    1994-09-01

    The Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy which associates progressive myopia with vitreal degeneration and retinal detachment. Cleft palate, cranio-facial abnormalities, deafness and osteoarthritis are often associated symptoms. Genetic heterogeneity of this autosomal dominant disease was consistent with its large clinical variability. Linkage studies have provided evidence for cosegregation of the disease with COL2A1, the gene coding for type II collagen, in about 50% of the families. Four additional families are reported here. Linkage analyses by using a VNTR located in the 3{prime} region of the gene were achieved. In three families, positive lod scores were obtained with a cumulative maximal value of 3.5 at a recombination fraction of 0. In one of these families, single strand conformation analysis of 25 exons disclosed a new mutation in exon 42. Codon for glutamic acid at position a1-803 was converted into a stop codon. The mutation was detected in DNA samples from all the affected members of the family but not in the unaffected. This result confirms that most of the Stickler syndromes linked to COL2A1 are due to premature stop codons. In a second family, an abnormal SSCP pattern of exon 34 was detected in all the affected individuals. The mutation is likely to correspond to a splicing defect in the acceptor site of intron 33. In one family the disease did not segregate with the COL2A1 locus. Further linkage studies with intragenic dimorphic sites in the COL10A1 gene and highly polymorphic markers close to the COL9A1 locus indicated that this disorder did not result from defects in these two genes.

  5. Stickler's syndrome: a study of 12 families.

    PubMed Central

    Spallone, A

    1987-01-01

    Stickler's syndrome is a congenital disease of connective tissue with considerable ocular and non-ocular lesions. This study reports 12 pedigrees (10 families and two isolated cases) and evaluates some peculiar ocular aspects not previously reported in the syndrome. Images PMID:3651362

  6. Genetics and Hearing Loss: A Review of Stickler Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Catherine Bearce

    1998-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant multisystem disease. The four most affected systems are craniofacial, skeletal, ocular, and auditory. The manifestations of Stickler syndrome vary considerably among affected individuals. Audiologists and speech-language pathologists should be familiar with the characteristics associated with Stickler…

  7. The clinical effectiveness and safety of prophylactic retinal interventions to reduce the risk of retinal detachment and subsequent vision loss in adults and children with Stickler syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, C; Papaioannou, D; Rees, A; Kaltenthaler, E

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Stickler syndrome, also known as hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy, is an inherited progressive disorder of the collagen connective tissues. Manifestations include short-sightedness, cataracts, retinal problems leading to retinal detachment and possible blindness. This is principally the case among individuals with type 1 Stickler Syndrome. It is the most commonly identified inherited cause of retinal detachment in childhood. However, there is no consensus regarding best practice and no current guidelines on prophylactic interventions for this population. OBJECTIVES The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and safety of primary prophylactic interventions for the prevention of retinal detachment in previously untreated eyes without retinal detachment in patients with Stickler syndrome. The primary outcome of interest was retinal detachment post prophylaxis. DATA SOURCES A systematic search was made of 11 databases of published and unpublished literature, which included MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and The Cochrane Library. There was no restriction by language or date. The references of all included studies were checked for further relevant citations and authors of studies with potentially relevant data were also contacted. REVIEW METHODS Two reviewers double-screened all titles and abstracts of the citations retrieved by the search to identify studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria. Both reviewers also independently extracted and quality assessed all included studies. A narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS The literature search identified 1444 unique citations, of which four studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The two principal studies were both retrospective cohort studies with control groups in populations with type 1 Stickler syndrome. One study evaluated 360° cryotherapy (n = 204) and the other focal or circumferential laser treatment (n = 22). Both studies reported a statistically significant difference in the rate of retinal detachment per eye between the groups receiving prophylaxis and the controls. However, both studies were subject to a high risk of bias. The results of the two supporting studies of Wagner-Stickler patients were either relatively inconsistent or unreliable. No study reported any major or long-term complications associated with the interventions. Despite the weaknesses of the evidence, the rate of retinal detachment in the intervention groups, especially the cryotherapy group, was lower than the rate either experienced in the study control groups or reported in other studies of untreated Stickler syndrome populations not exposed to prophylaxis. CONCLUSIONS Only 360° cryotherapy and focal and circumferential laser treatment have been evaluated for the type 1 Stickler syndrome population, and then only by a single retrospective, controlled, cohort study in each case. Both of these studies report a significant difference between intervention and control groups (principally no treatment) and no major or long-term side effects or complications. However, there is a high risk of bias within these two studies, so the relative effectiveness of either intervention is uncertain. FUTURE WORK A service priority is to determine reliably the prevalence of Stickler syndrome, i.e. how many individuals have type 1 or type 2 Stickler syndrome, and their risk of retinal detachment and subsequent blindness. A non-randomised, prospective cohort comparison study, in which eligible participants are treated, followed-up and analysed in one of three study arms, for no treatment, laser therapy or cryotherapy, would potentially offer further certainty in terms of the relative efficacy of both prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis and cryotherapy versus laser therapy than is possible with the currently available data. Alternatively, continued follow-up and analysis of existing study data, and data collection from relevant sample populations, are required to assess the long-term risks of blindness, retinal detachment and prophylaxis. FUNDING This study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme. PMID:21466760

  8. The Marshall and Stickler syndromes: objective rejection of lumping.

    PubMed Central

    Aymé, S; Preus, M

    1984-01-01

    To answer the question of whether nosological splitting of the Marshall and Stickler syndromes is justified at the phenotypic level, we surveyed published reports on the two syndromes and applied an objective method to determine this. A set of 18 patients with clinical description, photographs, and radiographs was used to tabulate a list of 53 signs. Cluster analysis using these signs showed that there are two groups of patients with different phenotypes. An index score based on the 20 most discriminating signs was applied to other reported patients and the authors' diagnosis confirmed. There is therefore no objective reason to consider that these two syndromes are not separate dominant disorders with variable expressivity. PMID:6694183

  9. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay.

  10. PCR assay confirms diagnosis in syndrome with variably expressed phenotype: mutation detection in Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, N N; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Dixon, P; Zackai, E H; Tasman, W S

    1996-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease with ocular (severe myopia, vitreal degeneration, and retinal detachment) and other systemic manifestations (hearing loss, cleft palate, epiphyseal dysplasia, and premature osteoarthritis). As with other dominantly inherited conditions, the clinical phenotype of Stickler syndrome varies considerably. To date, all mutations have been located in the type II procollagen (COL2A1) gene. Analysis of a C-->T mutation we had identified previously, in COL2A1 gene in exon 40, in a three generation pedigree showed the loss of a cleavage site for the TaqI restriction enzyme. We designed a rapid PCR based restriction enzyme assay to detect this mutation and used it to establish the diagnosis in a neonate from the same pedigree, presenting with the first occurrence of the Pierre-Robin sequence in the family and minimal ocular findings. These results underline the potential diagnostic value of many as yet undetected DNA mutations in families affected with Stickler syndrome, since the variability of the phenotype can impede accurate diagnosis, appropriate genetic counselling, and effective intervention and prophylactic treatment for affected people. Images PMID:8863161

  11. Stickler syndrome type 1 accompanied by membranous vitreous anomaly in two Japanese sisters.

    PubMed

    Suemori, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Shiraki, Ikumi; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of Stickler syndrome type 1 accompanied by a membranous vitreous anomaly in two Japanese sisters. A nine-year-old girl was referred to us for a rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment in her right eye. She had moderate myopia and a membranous vitreous anomaly in both eyes. She also had micrognathia and a saddle nose, leading to a diagnosis of Stickler syndrome type 1. The retinal detachment persisted even after scleral buckling surgery; however, the retina was reattached after 25-gauge microincision vitreous surgery 11 days later. Her seven-year-old sister had been diagnosed with Pierre Robin sequence due to micrognathia, cleft palate, and saddle nose. She was myopic by about -9.0 diopters with a membranous vitreous anomaly in both eyes and circumferential perivascular retinal degeneration in the right eye. Genetic analyses showed that both sisters and their mother carried the same mutation in the COL2A1 gene. The findings in these sisters indicate that retinal detachment is associated with Stickler syndrome type 1. Micro-incison vitreous surgery might be effective for rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment with high vitreous liquefaction. PMID:24164106

  12. Splicing Mutations of 54-bp Exons in the COL11A1 Gene Cause Marshall Syndrome, but Other Mutations Cause Overlapping Marshall/Stickler Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Annunen, Susanna; Körkkö, Jarmo; Czarny, Malwina; Warman, Matthew L.; Brunner, Han G.; Kääriäinen, Helena; Mulliken, John B.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Brooks, David G.; Cox, Gerald F.; Cruysberg, Johan R.; Curtis, Mary A.; Davenport, Sandra L. H.; Friedrich, Christopher A.; Kaitila, Ilkka; Krawczynski, Maciej Robert; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mukai, Shitzuo; Olsen, Björn R.; Shinno, Nancy; Somer, Mirja; Vikkula, Miikka; Zlotogora, Joel; Prockop, Darwin J.; Ala-Kokko, Leena

    1999-01-01

    Summary Stickler and Marshall syndromes are dominantly inherited chondrodysplasias characterized by midfacial hypoplasia, high myopia, and sensorineural-hearing deficit. Since the characteristics of these syndromes overlap, it has been argued whether they are distinct entities or different manifestations of a single syndrome. Several mutations causing Stickler syndrome have been found in the COL2A1 gene, and one mutation causing Stickler syndrome and one causing Marshall syndrome have been detected in the COL11A1 gene. We characterize here the genomic structure of the COL11A1 gene. Screening of patients with Stickler, Stickler-like, or Marshall syndrome pointed to 23 novel mutations. Genotypic-phenotypic comparison revealed an association between the Marshall syndrome phenotype and splicing mutations of 54-bp exons in the C-terminal region of the COL11A1 gene. Null-allele mutations in the COL2A1 gene led to a typical phenotype of Stickler syndrome. Some patients, however, presented with phenotypes of both Marshall and Stickler syndromes. PMID:10486316

  13. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachments associated to Stickler syndrome in a tertiary eye care center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Saeed T; Ghazi, Nicola G; Al-Rashaed, Saba

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical findings and outcomes of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in Stickler syndrome on affected and fellow eyes that underwent prophylactic retinopexy. Patients and methods Chart review of 70 eyes (62 patients). Incidence of RRD, postoperative visual acuity, and risk factors were evaluated. Results Twenty-two patients (35%) had RRD in the fellow eye, 37% of the eyes had cataract, 93% had macular detachment, 50% had proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and 41% had posterior vitreous detachment. Success rates were: 60% of patients after scleral buckling; 57.1% after pars plana vitrectomy; and 75% after combined scleral buckling and pars plana vitrectomy. Sixty-one (93.8%) of patients had successful surgery (including second surgery). Silicone oil tamponade was significantly associated with final anatomic outcome, with a protective odds ratio of 0.11 (P=0.027). Visual acuity improved in 54% of eyes and decreased in 5%. Statistically significant associations were present for eyes with final visual acuity ≥20/200, and total retinal detachment (P<0.001); preoperative cataract (P=0.023); and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (P<0.001). RRD developed in 16/44 eyes despite laser prophylaxis. Conclusion Prophylactic retinopexy was not beneficial for Stickler syndrome patients. Success of primary surgery for RRD remains low. The primary surgery should be vitrectomy combined with scleral buckling and silicone oil tamponade. PMID:26730175

  14. A novel COL11A1 missense mutation in siblings with non-ocular Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Atsumi; Morita, Kei-ichi; Naruto, Takuya; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kashimada, Kenichi; Enomoto, Keisuke; Morio, Tomohiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Stickler syndrome (STL) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by ocular, auditory, orofacial and skeletal abnormalities. We conducted targeted resequencing using a next-generation sequencer for molecular diagnosis of a 2-year-old girl who was clinically suspected of having STL with Pierre Robin sequence. We detected a novel heterozygous missense mutation, NM_001854.3:n.4838G>A [NM_001854.3 (COL11A1_v001):c.4520G>A], in COL11A1, resulting in a Gly to Asp substitution at position 1507 [NM_001854.3(COL11A1_i001)] within one of the collagen-like domains of the triple helical region. The same mutation was detected in her 4-year-old brother with cleft palate and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:27081569

  15. Linkage analysis in a family with Stickler syndrome leads to the exclusion of the COL2A1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Mottes, M.; Zolezzi, F.; Pignatti, P.F.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary arthro-ophtalmopathy (AO) or Stickler Syndrome (MIM No. 10830) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by vitro-retinal degeneration and other connective tissue disturbances. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene, coding for type II collagen chains, have been described in a few patients. The wide spectrum of clinical manifestations is presumably due to genetic heterogeneity, since only about 50% of the Stickler families so far studied show cosegregation of the disease with the COL2A1 locus. We have investigated a large pedigree (19 individuals of whom 9 are affected) in which severe myopia with vitro-retinal degeneration consegregated with joint laxity, recurrent inguinal hernias, and degenerative changes of the hip and the knee. The 3{prime} end COL2A1 VNTR polymorphism was utilized for linkage analysis. In order to get the maximum informativity, we have analyzed the allelic microheterogeneity of this VNTR, due to the repeat sequence variation, by means of a single strand polymorphism. Mendelian inheritance of the different single strands was observed as expected. Discordance of segregation between the disease and the COL2A1 locus was thus established inequivocally in this family.

  16. Two Likely Pathogenic Variants of COL2A1 in Unrelated Korean Patients With Ocular-Only Variants of Stickler Syndrome: The First Molecular Diagnosis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Je Moon; Jang, Mi Ae; Ki, Chang Seok; Kim, Sang Jin

    2016-03-01

    Stickler syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that affects the ocular, auditory, and musculoskeletal systems. Ocular-only variant of Stickler syndrome type 1 (OSTL1) is characterized by high risk of retinal detachment without systemic involvement and is caused by alternatively spliced exon 2 mutation of COL2A1. We report the cases of two Korean families with OSTL1 carrying likely pathogenic variants of COL2A1. All patients presented with membranous vitreous anomaly, peripheral retinal degeneration, and/or rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, but no systemic manifestations. By genetic analysis, two likely pathogenic non-exon 2 variants, c.2678dupC (p.Ala895Serfs*49) and c.3327+ 1G>C, were identified in COL2A1. Our results demonstrate that COL2A1 defects in OSTL1 are not confined to mutations in exon 2. Together with molecular data, ophthalmologists should consider genetic diagnosis of Stickler syndrome in patients with vitreous anomaly to prevent blindness from retinal detachment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genetically confirmed OSTL1 in Korea. PMID:26709265

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Stickler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... J, Czarny M, Warman ML, Brunner HG, Kääriäinen H, Mulliken JB, Tranebjaerg L, Brooks DG, Cox GF, Cruysberg JR, Curtis MA, Davenport SL, Friedrich CA, Kaitila I, Krawczynski MR, Latos-Bielenska A, ...

  18. Significant ophthalmoarthropathy associated with ectodermal dysplasia in a child with Marshall-Stickler overlap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ganger, Rudolf; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Background The Marshall-Stickler phenotype is an autosomal dominant trait comprising ocular abnormalities, sensorineural hearing loss, craniofacial anomalies, and anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. Case presentation A 5-year-old boy from non-consanguineous family in Austria was born with features of Pierre-Robin association (cleft palate, micrognathia, and glossoptosis). Radiological examination at birth revealed coronal clefts of the vertebrae, platyspondyly, and flaring of the metaphyses of the long bones (features suggestive of the Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome). Significant features of ectodermal dysplasia such as sparse hair, defective dentition, dysplastic nails, and deficient sweating associated with bouts of unexplained hyperthermia were present. These features not shared by Stickler syndrome, Wagner syndrome, or Weissenbacher – Zweymuller syndrome, all of which are conditions often confused with Marshall syndrome. Conclusion There is continuing debate over the clinical overlap and differential diagnosis of Marshall and Stickler syndromes. We compared similar disorders, such as Weissenbacher-Zweymuller, and Wagner syndromes, and conclude that our present patient manifests Marshall-Stickler overlap. Focussing on subtle facial and ectodermal features may detract from recognising the serious outcome of congenital vitreous/myopia anomaly. Retinal detachment with subsequent blindness is a major risk in our current patient. PMID:18950500

  19. Marshall-Stickler phenotype associated with von Willebrand disease

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M.R.; Baker, K.S.; Schaefer, G.B.

    1997-01-20

    We report on 6 individuals from three different kindreds with Marshall-Stickler (MS) phenotype, with characteristic orofacial abnormalities, arthropathy, deafness, and eye findings, all of whom were discovered to have a mild bleeding diathesis and coagulation-study findings consistent with mild von Willebrand disease (vWD). MS syndrome has been linked in some cases to the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) on chromosome 12q, and to the collagen XI gene (COL11A2) on chromosome 6. The von Willebrand factor (vWF) is encoded by a 180-Kb gene located on the short arm of chromosome 12. This is the first reported association of these two disorders. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains

  1. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  2. When flexibility is not necessarily a virtue: a review of hypermobility syndromes and chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Khubchandani, Raju; Cimaz, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint in children. Among the most common causes for this problem are different conditions associated with hypermobility. Pediatricians and allied professionals should be well aware of the characteristics of the different syndromes associated with hypermobility and facilitate early recognition and appropriate management. In this review we provide information on Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan Syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Stickler syndrome, and discuss their characteristics and clinical management. PMID:26444669

  3. Marshall syndrome associated with a splicing defect at the COL11A1 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, A J; Sprunger, L K; Sirko-Osadsa, D A; Tiller, G E; Meisler, M H; Warman, M L

    1998-01-01

    Marshall syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia that is phenotypically similar to the more common disorder Stickler syndrome. For a large kindred with Marshall syndrome, we demonstrate a splice-donor-site mutation in the COL11A1 gene that cosegregates with the phenotype. The G+1-->A transition causes in-frame skipping of a 54-bp exon and deletes amino acids 726-743 from the major triple-helical domain of the alpha1(XI) collagen polypeptide. The data support the hypothesis that the alpha1(XI) collagen polypeptide has an important role in skeletal morphogenesis that extends beyond its contribution to structural integrity of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Our results also demonstrate allelism of Marshall syndrome with the subset of Stickler syndrome families associated with COL11A1 mutations. PMID:9529347

  4. Marshall syndrome: further evidence of a distinct phenotypic entity and report of new findings.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, O; Imtiaz, F; Ramzan, K; Allam, R; Hemidan, A Al-; Faqeih, E; Abuharb, G; Balobaid, A; Sakati, N; Owain, M Al-

    2014-10-01

    Marshall syndrome and type II Stickler syndrome are caused by mutations in COL11A1, which codes for the proα1chain of collagen XI. Collagen XI is a minor fibrillar collagen co-expressed with collagen II in cartilage and the vitreous of the eye. Characteristic features of Marshall syndrome include midfacial hypoplasia, high myopia, and sensorineural-hearing deficit. Deletions, insertions, splice site, and missense mutations in COL11A1 have been identified in Stickler syndrome and Marshall syndrome patients. In this study, we describe the clinical presentations of seven patients with Marshall syndrome from three unrelated Saudi families, inherited as autosomal dominant (two families) and autosomal recessive (one family). Cardinal clinical features of Marshall syndrome are manifested in all patients. One patient had ectodermal abnormalities. Mutations (c.2702G > A in exon 34,IVS50 + 1G > A, and IVS50 + lG > C) were identified in COL11A1 in affected members. Interestingly, the first report of autosomal recessive Marshall syndrome was from Saudi Arabia caused by the same mutation (c.2702G > A, p.Gly901Glu) as in one of our families. This study depicts detailed phenotypic and genetic description of dominant and recessive forms of Marshall syndrome due to COL11A1 mutations. PMID:25073711

  5. Syndromic Scoliosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neurofibromatosis (NF) Noonan Syndrome VATER/VACTERL Syndrome Angelman Syndrome Rett Prader Willi Osteogenesis Imperfecta Trisomy 21 (Down's Syndrome) Symptoms Highly variable based on underlying syndrome and ...

  6. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Usher syndrome Table of Contents Overview Symptoms Cause Inheritance ... pigmentosa syndrome Dystrophia retinae pigmentosa-dysostosis syndrome Graefe-Usher syndrome Hallgren syndrome Usher's syndrome Related Diseases Usher ...

  7. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... as MPS I S. See also: MPS I H (Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) ... individuals with Scheie syndrome, and also Hurler and Hurler-Scheie syndromes. Early detection and treatment of spinal cord compression ...

  8. Novel mutations confirm that COL11A2 is responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB53

    PubMed Central

    Chakchouk, Imen; Grati, M’hamed; Bademci, Guney; Bensaid, Mariem; Ma, Qi; Chakroun, Amine; Foster, Joseph; Yan, Denise; Duman, Duygu; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Mittal, Rahul; Farooq, Amjad; Tekin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is a major public health issue. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The identification of the causal mutation is important for early diagnosis, clinical follow-up, and genetic counseling. HL due to mutations in COL11A2, encoding collagen type XI alpha-2, can be non-syndromic autosomal-dominant or autosomal-recessive, and also syndromic as in Otospondylomegaepiphyseal Dysplasia, Stickler syndrome type III, and Weissenbacher–Zweymuller syndrome. However, thus far only one mutation co-segregating with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in a single family has been reported. In this study, whole exome sequencing of two consanguineous families with ARNSHL from Tunisia and Turkey revealed two novel causative COL11A2 mutations, c.109G > T (p.Ala37Ser) and c.2662C > A (p.Pro888Thr). The variants identified co-segregated with deafness in both families. All homozygous individuals in those families had early onset profound hearing loss across all frequencies without syndromic findings. The variants are predicted to be damaging the protein function. The p.Pro888Thr mutation affects a -Gly-X–Y- triplet repeat motif. The novel p.Ala37Ser is the first missense mutation located in the NC4 domain of the COL11A2 protein. Structural model suggests that this mutation will likely obliterate, or at least partially compromise, the ability of NC4 domain to interact with its cognate ligands. In conclusion, we confirm that COL11A2 mutations cause ARNSHL and broaden the mutation spectrum that may shed new light on genotype–phenotype correlation for the associated phenotypes and clinical follow-up. PMID:25633957

  9. Novel mutations confirm that COL11A2 is responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB53.

    PubMed

    Chakchouk, Imen; Grati, M'hamed; Bademci, Guney; Bensaid, Mariem; Ma, Qi; Chakroun, Amine; Foster, Joseph; Yan, Denise; Duman, Duygu; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Mittal, Rahul; Farooq, Amjad; Tekin, Mustafa; Masmoudi, Saber; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is a major public health issue. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous.The identification of the causal mutation is important for early diagnosis, clinical follow-up, and genetic counseling. HL due to mutations in COL11A2, encoding collagen type XI alpha-2, can be non-syndromic autosomal-dominant or autosomal-recessive, and also syndromic as in Otospondylomegaepiphyseal Dysplasia, Stickler syndrome type III, and Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome. However, thus far only one mutation co-segregating with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in a single family has been reported. In this study, whole exome sequencing of two consanguineous families with ARNSHL from Tunisia and Turkey revealed two novel causative COL11A2 mutations, c.109G > T (p.Ala37Ser) and c.2662C > A (p.Pro888Thr). The variants identified co-segregated with deafness in both families. All homozygous individuals in those families had early onset profound hearing loss across all frequencies without syndromic findings. The variants are predicted to be damaging the protein function. The p.Pro888Thr mutation affects a -Gly-X-Y- triplet repeat motif. The novel p.Ala37Ser is the first missense mutation located in the NC4 domain of the COL11A2 protein. Structural model suggests that this mutation will likely obliterate, or at least partially compromise, the ability of NC4 domain to interact with its cognate ligands. In conclusion, we confirm that COL11A2 mutations cause ARNSHL and broaden the mutation spectrum that may shed new light on genotype-phenotype correlation for the associated phenotypes and clinical follow-up. PMID:25633957

  10. Auriculotemporal Syndrome (Frey Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Motz, Kevin M; Kim, Young J

    2016-04-01

    Frey syndrome is a common sequela of parotidectomy, and although it is not frequently manifested clinically, it can cause significant morbidity for those affected. Frey syndrome results from synkinetic autonomic reinnervation by transected postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fiber within the parotid gland to the overlying sweat glands of the skin. Many surgical techniques have been proposed to prevent the development of Frey syndrome. For those who develop clinical symptoms of Frey syndrome, objective testing can be performed with a Minor starch-iodine test. Some of the current methods to prevent and treat symptomatic Frey syndrome are reviewed. PMID:26902982

  11. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... as MPS III. See also: MPS I H (Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) ... unlike the cloudy corneas seen in persons with Hurler syndrome (MPS I H). Neurological testing will reveal signs ...

  12. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Rett Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Rett Syndrome? Rett syndrome is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that ...

  13. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Tourette Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Tourette Syndrome Print A A ... Act Around Someone Who Has It? What Is Tourette Syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a condition that affects a ...

  14. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Hughes Syndrome Table of Contents ( ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Antiphospholipid Syndrome? Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused ...

  15. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fine motor coordination, slurred speech, memory loss, vision problems, sleep disturbances, dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, stiff-person syndrome, encephalomyelitis, myasthenia ...

  16. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you have a malabsorption syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to remove ...

  17. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  18. [Proteus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benichou, J J; Labrune, B; Formanek, A; Denoix, C; Oger, P

    1990-01-01

    Two new cases of Proteus syndrome are reported. This congenital syndrome, first described in 1983, comprises gigantism of extremities, body hemihypertrophy, pigmented nevi and multiple tumors (subcutaneous, lipomas, hamartomas). This syndrome belongs to the same group as Recklinghausen disease, Maffucci or Klippel-Trenaunay syndromes. The prognosis is not well known but mostly depends on functional and psychologic consequences of important deformations. PMID:2206106

  19. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  20. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  1. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  2. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  3. [Gardner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Femiano, F; Cozzolino, S; Malzone, A

    1990-01-01

    The Gardner syndrome is characterized by polyposis coli and multiple hard and soft tissue tumors. This work show crucial dentist's role in the early diagnosis important for the highly malignant potential of this syndrome. PMID:2097961

  4. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  5. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  6. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Definition Common Signs Diagnostic Criteria (I have ... NIH to go with this criteria) Glossary Videos Proteus Syndrome is a condition which involves atypical growth ...

  7. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Rett Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental genetic disorder that ...

  8. Rett syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system that leads to developmental problems in children, especially in ... Rett syndrome occurs almost always in girls. It may be diagnosed as autism or cerebral palsy. Most Rett ...

  9. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  10. Serotonin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines that caused the syndrome In life-threatening cases, medicines that keep your muscles still (paralyze them) and ... Syndrome. Am J Psychiatry . 1991: 148:705. US Food and Drug Administration. FDA Public Health Advisory: Combined Use of ...

  11. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  12. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  13. Branchiootorenal Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rare Disease Day More Search for News on Rare Diseases Search Go Advanced News Search About GARD About ... GARD Home Diseases Branchiootorenal syndrome Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Branchiootorenal syndrome ...

  14. Zellweger Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cure disorders such as Zellweger syndrome. NIH Patient Recruitment for Zellweger Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 National Institute of Child Health and ...

  15. Learning about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What are the symptoms ... syndrome Additional Resources for Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome is a chromosomal condition related to ...

  16. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dysplasia Goldenhar/Hemifacial Moebius syndrome Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Treacher Collins syndrome Other syndromes Wonder News & ... absence of the radial limb. Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Saethre-Chotzen Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a ...

  17. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  18. Cushing Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... links Share this: Page Content What is Cushing’s syndrome? Cushing’s syndrome is a condition that occurs when the body’s ... medication or as a result of a tumor, Cushing’s syndrome can develop. Many factors influence whether this happens, ...

  19. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the

  20. Rowell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ramesh Y; Varma, Chaitanya; Bhatt, Sonia; Balachandran, C

    2014-01-01

    Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:25506561

  1. Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis. PMID:23723494

  2. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties. Adults with Klinefelter syndrome may also experience primary hypogonadism (decreased testosterone production), small testes, enlarged ...

  3. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  4. Alagille Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... person's discomfort. Scientists have not yet found a way to prevent Alagille syndrome. Caregivers and parents of children with Alagille syndrome should try to maximize their children's potential for growth through good eating, diet, and nutrition. [ Top ] Clinical Trials The National ...

  5. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are ... words, spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  6. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  7. Prostatitis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. Curtis

    1991-01-01

    The many prostatitis syndromes remain a frustrating enigma to family physicians as well as specialists. An understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of these syndromes and a rigorous diagnostic plan to properly classify the patients at first presentation are essential to a successful treatment outcome. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21229071

  8. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin, and loose jointed. Most people with Marfan syndrome have heart and blood vessel problems, such as a weakness in the aorta or heart valves that leak. They may also have problems with ... diagnose Marfan syndrome. Your doctor may use your medical history, family ...

  9. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It also helps control how your body grows and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects ... A mutation, or change, in the gene that controls how the body makes fibrillin causes Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin is a ...

  10. Postthrombotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the prevention and management of postthrombotic syndrome. Ann Pharmacother . 2009;43:1824–1835. Reproduced from Vazquez ... in the prevention and management of postthrombotic syndrome. Ann Pharmacother . 2009 ; 43 : 1824 –1835. OpenURL CrossRef Medline ↵ ...

  11. Alzheimer's Disease and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  12. Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  13. Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takashima, S

    1997-04-01

    Down syndrome, trisomy of chromosome 21, is well investigated because it is a genetic disease with characteristic mental retardation and precocious dementia of Alzheimer type. Maternal serum markers of human chorionic gonadotrophin unconjugated estriol and amyloid precursor protein, nuchal skinfold on ultrasound and new genetic probes are developed to allow better detection of Down syndrome. The overproduction of A beta 42 because of excessive genes is thought to be a leading factor for early onset of dementia in Down syndrome adults. Animal models and transgenic mice may be helpful in determining the specific gene and pathogenesis for mental retardation and precocious dementia. PMID:9146996

  14. LEOPARD Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Majumdar, Biswajit; Rudra, Olympia; Chakraborty, Sougat

    2015-10-01

    LEOPARD syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited or sporadic disorder of variable penetrance and expressivity. The acronym LEOPARD stands for its cardinal clinical features including Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and Deafness. We present herein a patient with LEOPARD syndrome and distinctive features. It was noteworthy that our patient presented with the concern of generalized lentiginosis and subsequent evaluation revealed that the patient had LEOPARD syndrome. In this report we would like to highlight the importance of detailed clinical examination and appropriate imaging in patients with multiple lentigines. PMID:26632807

  15. Hubris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair. PMID:18724614

  16. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, D C; List, A F

    1989-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic and ineffective hematopoiesis and a varying risk of transformation to acute leukemia. Although the natural history of these syndromes is variable, several factors appear to be of prognostic importance, including the French-American-British classification, the karyotype, in vitro colony formation, and others. The pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndrome is not known, but recent evidence suggests that alterations of cellular oncogenes may be a causative factor. There is no standard therapy for myelodysplasia, and thus novel approaches to patient management are warranted. PMID:2672599

  17. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is typically caused by antibodies that bind to potassium channels on the motor nerve. Issacs' syndrome is only ... several neurological conditions that can be caused by potassium channel antibodies. Is there any treatment? Anticonvulsants, including phenytoin ...

  18. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common symptoms of Cushing's syndrome include upper body obesity, severe fatigue and muscle weakness, high blood pressure, backache, elevated blood sugar, easy bruising, and bluish-red stretch marks on ...

  19. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  20. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  1. Ohtahara Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... The course of Ohtahara syndrome is severely progressive. Seizures become more frequent, accompanied by delays in physical and cognitive development. Some children will die in infancy; others will survive but ...

  2. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease. This is called an autosomal recessive trait. There are 2 forms of Morquio syndrome: Type A and Type B. People with Type A do not have a substance ( enzyme ) called galactosamine-6-sulfatase. People with Type ...

  3. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occupational therapy (to help with issues such as language skills, hand-eye coordination and social skills) may be helpful for your child. As with any child, children who have Down syndrome need regular medical care. Because children with Down ...

  4. Levator Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse Levator ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids, fissures, or abscesses). The physical examination is often ...

  5. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Gulgonen A, Ozer K. Compartment syndrome. In: Wolfe SE, Hotchkiss RN, Pederson WC, Kozin SH, eds. Green's Operative Hand Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingston; 2012:chap 57. Jobe ...

  6. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  7. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... shouts unexpectedly or blinks his eyes hard. These tics are symptoms of Luke's Tourette syndrome. But to ... looks like he's in pain or needs help. Tics are sudden, repetitive movements or sounds that some ...

  9. Troyer Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Troyer syndrome is one of more than 40 genetically-distinct neurological disorders known collectively as the hereditary ... the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated. Last Modified January 3, 2012 National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  10. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifestyle is a lifelong commitment. Successfully controlling metabolic syndrome requires long-term effort and teamwork with your health care providers. Rate This ... US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and ...

  11. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... others, too. Checking for metabolic syndrome mostly involves stuff your doctor would be doing anyway, like taking ... lungs. It can be hard to take this stuff seriously when your thirties and forties seem like ...

  12. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and enables the use of recently developed animal models such as transgenic mice which are deficient in ... about the September 2011 workshop on optimizing animal models in Rett syndrome preclinical research, visit http://www. ...

  13. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... expand treatment options. Scientists also are developing mouse models that have the same characteristics as the human types of Usher syndrome. Mouse models will make it easier to determine the function ...

  14. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  15. Sotos Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sotos Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  16. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Tourette Syndrome Fact Sheet ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  17. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  18. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  19. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stolinsky, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Neoplasms can produce a variety of remote effects on the host; these are referred to as paraneoplastic syndromes. The syndromes may affect any of the systems of the body, may precede or follow the diagnosis of the underlying neoplasm, and may or may not parallel the course of the neoplasm in severity. The diagnosis of and therapy for these syndromes can be challenging to a physician, but successful therapy may bring about worthwhile relief for the patient. In addition, the syndromes and the substances that cause them are sometimes useful in diagnosing and in following the course of certain neoplasms. Perhaps of greater importance, study of these remote effects of neoplasia may shed light on the nature of the neoplastic process itself. PMID:6990627

  20. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  1. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  2. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the development of effective drug therapies. NIH Patient Recruitment for Dravet Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Epilepsy Foundation 8301 Professional Place East, ...

  3. [Diogenes syndrome].

    PubMed

    Klosterkötter, J; Peters, U H

    1985-11-01

    Endogenous or physically conditioned psychoses are usually considered to be the underlying cause of signs of extreme self-neglect and social retreat if these occur suddenly in persons who had been socially successful up to that time. However, in recent years several independent researchers have found extreme sociocultural refusal attitudes even in patients not displaying any psychotic disturbances. This unexpected result led to a new syndrome concept which has since been accepted internationally under the designation "Diogenes syndrome". Hence, the Diogenes syndrome comprises shameless neglect of body and personal environment, associated with collectionism, social retreat and rejection of any well-meant help. It has been reported that this constellation of signs allegedly occurs with enhanced frequency in women over 60 years of age with self-isolation tendencies in their previous life history. The following article reviews the literature published so far on the Diogenes syndrome and presents two cases treated by the authors, as a suitable means to re-examine and to define the new syndrome concept more precisely. The following conclusions can be drawn from the cases already reported in the literature and the two cases newly presented here: The socioculturally complete rejection associated with the Diogenes syndrome is the final result of a personality-based abnormal emotional reaction development. Marked seclusion tendencies in the previous life history, as well as organic brain diseases, are relevant. Medical treatment can be successful mainly by means of behaviour therapy techniques. PMID:4077006

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome, ... Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome? Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a ...

  5. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen What is Usher Syndrome? What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized ...

  6. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Tics and Tourette Syndrome Overview What is Tourette syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a type of tic disorder. Children who have Tourette syndrome will repeat both movements and ...

  7. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children who have WAGR syndrome may have normal intelligence. Other symptoms of WAGR syndrome may also include: ... mild. Some individuals with WAGR syndrome have normal intelligence. Children with WAGR syndrome should be referred for ...

  8. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the tip Reifenstein syndrome (also known as Gilbert-Dreyfus syndrome or Lubs syndrome) Infertile male syndrome ... F, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al., eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, ...

  9. National Down Syndrome Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... ndss.org Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ... Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ...

  10. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meet Jessi Patient to Patient - John Connect on Twitter Tweets by @AlportSyndFndn Alport Syndrome Diagnosis Early and ... Alport Syndrome YouTube Alport Syndrome LinkedIn Alport Syndrome Twitter Alport Syndrome Flickr Alport Syndrome Instagram Follow @twitterapi ...

  11. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice. PMID:26897561

  12. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  13. [Kallmann syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mokosch, A; Bernecker, C; Willenberg, H S; Neumann, N J

    2011-10-01

    The Kallmann syndrome is a very rare congenital association of gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and hyposmia or anosmia. Clinically it is characterized by low serum concentrations of testosterone and inadequate low levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone as well as incomplete sexual maturation, lack of secondary sexual features (facial and body hair growth, deepening of the voice), micropenis and sometimes even cryptorchidism. The reduced or absent sense of smell is typical for the Kallmann syndrome and distinguishes this syndrome from other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Additional findings may include synkinesia, hearing loss, unilateral renal aplasia, brachy- or syndactyly, agenesis of corpus callosum, cleft palate and dental agenesis. A 19-year-old man presented to our male infertility clinic with delayed sexual maturation, eunuchoid habitus, micropenis, cryptorchidism, erectile dysfunction and absence of ejaculation, anemia and osteoporosis as well as low serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone in combination with hyposmia. PMID:21918848

  14. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  15. Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nivean, M; Utkarsha, P

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudoexfoliation (PXF) syndrome is a well-recognized clinical entity of considerable clinical significance. It is associated with poor mydriasis, cataracts with weak zonular support, secondary glaucoma and possibly with biochemical abnormalities, such as elevated homocysteine and systemic diseases involving the cardiovascular and central nervous system. There have also been some recent studies identifying mutations in genes which are associated with PXF. How to cite this article: Ariga M, Nivean M, Utkarsha P. Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome. J Current Glau Prac 2013;7(3): 118-120.

  16. Eagle syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro Costa; Mendanha, Mário; Frada, Tiago; Carvalho, Jorge; Silva, Alvaro; Amarante, José

    2014-01-01

    Eagle syndrome, also known as elongated styloid process, is a condition first described by Watt Eagle in 1937. It occurs when an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament causes recurrent throat pain or foreign body sensation, dysphagia, or facial pain. Additional symptoms may include neck or throat pain with radiation to the ipsilateral ear. It is usually hard to diagnose because the symptoms related to this condition can be confused with those attributed to a wide variety of facial neuralgias. In this article, a case of Eagle syndrome exhibiting unilateral symptoms with bilateral elongation of styloid process is reported. PMID:24406612

  17. Aicardi Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Aicardi Syndrome Foundation P.O. Box 3202 St. Charles, IL 60174 web@aicardisyndrome.org http://www.aicardisyndrome.org Tel: 800-374-8518 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  18. Joubert Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Joubert Syndrome Foundation & Related Cerebellar Disorders 1415 West Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45215 info@jsfrcd.org http://www.jsfrcd.org Tel: 614-864-1362 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  19. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-432-6435 Fax: 630-978-7408 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW Suite 1200 Washington, DC 20006 Info@thearc.org http://www.thearc.org Tel: 202-534-3700; 800-433-5255 Fax: 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, ...

  20. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.

  1. Alport Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... older the risk of kidney failure increases. All boys and girls with the autosomal recessive type of Alport Syndrome ... with this disease have the X-linked type. Boys with this type are severely ... in their lives. Girls with this type usually have milder symptoms than ...

  2. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  3. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Web version Metabolic Syndrome Overview What is insulin resistance? Your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows ... as insulin resistance. If you have insulin resistance, your body will ...

  5. [POEMS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Masson, C; Krespi, Y

    1994-04-01

    POEMS syndrome has been defined as an association of plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes. Although certain authors do not distinguish this syndrome from osteosclerosing myeloma, syndromes comparable to POEMS have been observed without bone lesions. Others have described the clinical features involved under the terms of Crow-Fukase's syndrome, PEP syndrome (pigmentation, oedema, plasma cell dyscrasia, or Takatsuki's syndrome. Seen in men twice as often as in women, usually between the ages of 40-50 years, all five clinical features are not always present or may be accompanied by other signs. The first sign of the peripheral polyneuropathy is usually sensorial impairment followed by distal then proximal motor deficit. The deficit is usually severe and 50% of the patients become unable to walk. Cranial nerves are rarely involved. Liver, spleen and lymph node enlargement are observed. The most frequent signs of an endocrinopathy are gynaecomastia, atrophy of the testicules, impotence and amenorrhoea. Testosterone levels are low and oestrogen levels are increased in men together with luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and prolactin. Hypothyroidism is frequent and diabetes mellitus is observed in 50% of the patients. Protein M is a monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG or IgA), almost always with a light lambda chain. Skin changes include hyperpigmentation, hypertrichosis, hyperhidrosis, thickening of the skin suggestive of sclerodermia and papillary angiomas. Other signs, especially peripheral oedema often occur early in the disease course and may precede the peripheral neuropathy. POEMS syndrome is often associated with a myeloma (up to 50% of the cases in certain series). Although immunoglobulin deposit on myelin sheaths, anti-endocrine antibodies and receptors of lambda chains have been proposed as playing a role, no mechanism of pathogenesis has been determined. The natural history of the disease leads to a severe polyneuropathy. The patients become totally bedridden and death results from complications of decubitus rather from the direct effect of the underlying dyscrasia. When bone lesions are minor, radiotherapy or surgery can improve the neuropathy and resection of a solitary plasmocytoma can lead to total remission. Chemotherapy or corticosteroids may improve the polyneuropathy in certain cases. Plasma exchange has not been successful. PMID:8072960

  6. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection and management of clinical complications such as scoliosis and febrile seizures. An adequate psychological and educational program with speech therapy and motor stimulation plays an important role in the global development of the patients. Final body height is difficult to predict but growth tends to normalize after puberty. PMID:17825104

  7. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  8. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal

  9. Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Jabr, Fadi I

    2011-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure. PMID:21403791

  10. Overtraining Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreher, Jeffrey B.; Schwartz, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Fatigue and underperformance are common in athletes. Understanding overtraining syndrome (OTS) is helpful in the evaluation, management, and education of athletes. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles in English were searched with OVID (1948-2011) and PubMed using the following keywords: overtraining syndrome, overtraining, overreaching, unexplained underperformance, staleness, pathophysiology, management, treatment, evaluation. Bibliographies were reviewed for additional resources. Results: OTS appears to be a maladapted response to excessive exercise without adequate rest, resulting in perturbations of multiple body systems (neurologic, endocrinologic, immunologic) coupled with mood changes. Many hypotheses of OTS pathogenesis are reviewed, and a clinical approach to athletes with possible OTS (including history, testing, and prevention) is presented. Conclusions: OTS remains a clinical diagnosis with arbitrary definitions per the European College of Sports Science’s position statement. History and, in most situations, limited serologies are helpful. However, much remains to be learned given that most past research has been on athletes with overreaching rather than OTS. PMID:23016079

  11. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  12. Dravet syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Incorpora, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    "Dravet syndrome" (DS) previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized), which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB). DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+). PMID:19737414

  13. [Kabuki syndrome].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Rikke Børthy; Lindholm, Pernille; Bonde, Christian T

    2010-05-01

    A clinical case of the rare Kabuki syndrome is described in a 2-year-old boy. At the time of birth he was diagnosed with cleft palate and from the age of six months he presented with unusual facial features and slow psychomotoric development. At the age of two he has no language and only minimal speech perception and is showing signs of growth retardation. PMID:20444412

  14. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. PMID:27012936

  15. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  16. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of

  17. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Vikas; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome-specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  18. Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Casey; Ogbogu, Princess

    2016-04-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome consists of a group of disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of eosinophils in the blood or peripheral tissues, independent of known secondary causes of eosinophilia such as parasitic infection. Clinical manifestations of the condition are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic eosinophilia to severe tissue damage and end-organ failure. This entity has been recognized for decades, with early studies identifying distinct groups of patients with differing symptoms, exam findings, laboratory abnormalities, and prognosis. In the past, these patients were treated with non-targeted immunosuppressive agents, often with limited efficacy. More recently, advances in the knowledge of eosinophil biology and molecular diagnostics have allowed for more specific delineation of the many disease subgroups that characterize hypereosinophilic syndrome. Identification of these groups has led to a personalized management approach to the condition, with improved diagnostic techniques as well as stratification of patients into more effective treatment groups. This review will discuss the evolution of the definition of hypereosinophilic syndrome, outline current disease classifications, provide a guide for evaluation and monitoring, and discuss current and future therapeutic modalities. PMID:26475367

  19. Heterotaxy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heterotaxy is defined as an abnormality where the internal thoraco-abdominal organs demonstrate abnormal arrangement across the left-right axis of the body. This broad term includes patients with a wide variety of very complex cardiac lesions. Patients with heterotaxy can be stratified into the subsets of asplenia syndrome and polysplenia syndrome, or the subsets of heterotaxy with isomerism of the right atrial appendages and heterotaxy with isomerism of the left atrial appendages. Treatment of patients with isomerism is determined by the nature and severity of the associated cardiac and extracardiac lesions. Most cardiac operations for patients with isomerism are palliative in nature, since normal anatomy is rarely achieved and mortality rates remain high for patients with heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with left isomerism in general have less severe cardiac malformations than those with right isomerism and, hence, more chance of biventricular repair. For almost all patients with right isomerism, and for many with left isomerism, biventricular repair will not be feasible, and all palliative protocols are then staging procedures prior to a Fontan-type repair. Recent advances in medical management, and improvements in surgical techniques have resulted in improved survival for these patients, and the surgical outcomes are comparable to those with Fontan circulation irrespective of the presence or absence of heterotaxy. PMID:21731561

  20. Hepatorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension. This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys, where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration, which ultimately results in uraemia. The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites. Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output. Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure, but refractory ascites, and its impact on prognosis is less negative. Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method, nevertheless, only a few patients can receive it. The most suitable “bridge treatments” or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response. Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS. PMID:23049205

  1. Acrodysostosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  2. Acrodysostosis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR–Gsα–cAMP–PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  3. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  4. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes problems with the skin, sinuses, lungs, bones, and teeth. ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome. It is named after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was ...

  5. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Restless Legs Syndrome Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is restless legs syndrome? Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder ...

  6. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome is spontaneous, meaning it happens randomly. Such random mutations are usually not inherited or passed from ... of Rett syndrome will be more severe. This random process allows most females with Rett syndrome to ...

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  8. Learning about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the mothers of infants with Down syndrome. Intelligence in individuals with Down syndrome ranges from low ... is not possible to tell the level of intelligence a baby with Down syndrome will have. All ...

  9. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  10. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research on Marfan syndrome Currently, NHGRI is not conducting research on Marfan syndrome. The National Institutes of Health is conducting a research study involving Marfan syndrome: Manifestations of Heritable Disorders ...

  11. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... life expectancy. Do children with Down syndrome have eye problems? Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased ... When should children with Down syndrome receive an eye exam? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ...

  12. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  13. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  14. Syndrome in question. MAGIC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ana Cláudia Mendes do; Gaspardo, Daniela Barros Cortez; Cortez, Tatiana Mimura; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a male 40-year-old patient with established diagnosis of Behçet's disease which had evolved to recurrent bilateral auricular polychondritis crises. MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) is rare and groups together patients with this clinical picture without necessarily fulfilling the clinical criteria for Behçet's disease or relapsing polychondritis, demonstrating an independent disorder. PMID:24626673

  15. Morvan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  16. [Alagille syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Mirta; Alvarez, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Alagille syndrome (AS) is a multisystemic disease autosomal dominant, with variable expression. The major clinical manifestations are: chronic cholestasis, congenital heart disease, posterior embryotoxon in the eye, characteristic facial phenotype, and butterfy vertebrae. AS is caused by mutations in JAGGED1 (more than 90%) and in NOTCH2. Differential diagnosis include: infections, genetic-metabolic diseases, biliary atresia, idiopathic cholestasis. Cholestasis, pruritus and xanthomas have been successfully treated with choleretic agents (ursodeoxycholic acid) and other medications (cholestyramine, rifampin, naltrexone). In certain cases, partial external biliary diversion has also proved successful. Liver transplantation is indicated in children with cirrhosis and liver failure. PMID:23224309

  17. Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Manu, Mohan K; Mohapatra, Aswini Kumar; Magazine, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with a significant smoking history presented with chronic expectorative cough and exertional shortness of breath with recent-onset hoarseness. Chest examination was essentially normal and cardiovascular examination was suggestive of aortic regurgitation. Ears, nose and throat evaluation showed left vocal cord palsy and CT scan revealed an aortic arch aneurysm. Ortner's syndrome refers to hoarseness due to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to a cardiovascular abnormality. Aortic aneurysms usually present with chest pain, back pain or epigastric pain, depending on the site of the aneurysm. An aortic arch aneurysm presenting as hoarseness is extremely rare. PMID:24618861

  18. Postmenopausal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Pronob K.; Agarwal, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is one of the most significant events in a woman's life and brings in a number of physiological changes that affect the life of a woman permanently. There have been a lot of speculations about the symptoms that appear before, during and after the onset of menopause. These symptoms constitute the postmenopausal syndrome; they are impairing to a great extent to the woman and management of these symptoms has become an important field of research lately. This chapter attempts to understand these symptoms, the underlying pathophysiology and the management options available. PMID:26330639

  19. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard

    2008-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is diagnosed when arterial or venous thrombosis or recurrent miscarriages occur in a person in whom laboratory tests for antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant and/or anti-beta 2-glycoprotein I) are positive. Despite the strong association between antiphospho-lipid antibodies and thrombosis, their pathogenic role in the development of thrombosis has not been fully elucidated. Novel mechanisms involving both the complement pathway and micro-particles have been described. The knowledge of these new pathogenic approaches might identify novel therapeutic targets and therefore may improve the management of these patients. PMID:19090981

  20. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Odenike, Olatoyosi; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The myelodysplastic syndromes are a diverse group of clonal stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and an increased propensity to evolve to acute myeloid leukemia. The molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, but recurring chromosomal abnormalities occur in ~50% of cases, and are the focus of much investigation. The availability of newer molecular techniques has allowed the identification of additional genetic aberrations, including mutations and epigenetic changes of prognostic and potential therapeutic importance. This review will focus on the key role of cytogenetic analysis in MDS in the context of the diagnosis, prognosis, and pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:22118747

  1. Brugada Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Marwan M; Hotait, Mostafa; Scheinman, Melvin

    2016-03-01

    Brugada syndrome might stay undetected in patients until surviving cardiac arrest. Despite the prominent advances in exploring the disease in the past 2 decades, many questions remain unanswered and the controversies continue. Despite all mutations identified to be associated with the disease, two-thirds of cases have a negative genetic test. Future studies should be more directed on modulating factors and their impact on patients' risk for sudden death to help physicians in risk stratifying their patients and optimally implementing an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to prevent sudden cardiac death. PMID:26920201

  2. Noonan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BHAMBHANI, VIKAS; MUENKE, MAXIMILIAN

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome–specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  3. Meckel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, R; Paavola, P

    1998-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal syndrome with a central nervous system malformation, usually occipital meningoencephalocele, bilaterally large multicystic kidneys with fibrotic changes of the liver, and polydactyly in most cases. Additional anomalies are frequent. A common characteristic of the parenchymal changes of many organs is a proliferation of the stromal connective tissue and increase and dilatation of the associated epithelial ducts. Autosomal recessive inheritance is well confirmed and the gene locus has been mapped to chromosome 17q21-24 by genome wide linkage study. The locus was later refined to within a less than 1 cM region (17q22), in which most of the Finnish MKS patients share a common chromosomal haplotype suggesting one major and relatively old mutation. However, in most of the non-Finnish MKS families studied, this linkage could not be confirmed. The linkage studies provide evidence that more than one locus is involved in bringing about the combination of CNS malformations, cystic kidneys, and polydactyly, maybe even in typical cases of MKS. Prenatal diagnosis of MKS by vaginal ultrasound scan is possible from 11-12 weeks of pregnancy, especially in families where there is a known risk. In those families where linkage to 17q22 is established, prenatal diagnosis by DNA analysis is possible. Images PMID:9643292

  4. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Polycystic Ovary Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Print A ... condition called polycystic ovary sydrome (PCOS) . What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome? Polycystic (pronounced: pol-ee-SISS-tik) ovary syndrome ...

  5. Post-Polio Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Post-Polio Syndrome ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Post-Polio Syndrome? Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a condition ...

  6. Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  7. Familial syndrome resembling Aarskog syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingzhi; Qi, Ming; Zhou, Huali; Yong, Jing; Qiu, Huiqing; Cong, Peikuan; Hong, Xutao; Li, Chengjiang; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Yu, Yunsong

    2010-08-01

    Aarskog(-Scott) syndrome (AAS) is characterized by short stature, and facial, limb, and genital anomalies. AAS can be an X-linked condition caused by mutations in the FGD1 gene, but there is evidence that an autosomal dominant or recessive form also exists. We report on a Chinese family in whom several members have manifestations of AAS, but differ in limb anomalies and show additional characteristics. FGD1 sequencing and linkage analysis excluded FGD1 as the cause in this family. A common known submicroscopic chromosome imbalance is less likely. Both autosomal dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance remain possible. PMID:20607856

  8. HAMARTOMATOUS POLYPOSIS SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Amanda; Jasperson, Kory; Kohlmann, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes are a diverse group of inherited conditions grouped together because they exhibit hamartomatous rather than epithelial polyp histology. Each syndrome exhibits characteristic polyp histology, gastrointestinal polyp distribution, gastrointestinal cancer risks, extra-intestinal benign findings and often extra-intestinal cancer risks. Identifying individuals at risk for these syndromes and accurately defining the precise diagnosis is necessary for planning surveillance and management in order to prevent the benign and malignant complications. Characteristic syndrome features including gastrointestinal findings, pathology, genetics, and management options for the three most common hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome, and juvenile polyposis will be presented in this review. PMID:19414148

  9. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. PMID:26280343

  10. [Stormorken's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stormorken, Helge

    2002-12-10

    In 1985, a new syndrome with the following characteristics was described: thrombopathia, thrombopenia, asplenia, miosis, headache, ichthyosis, dyslexia, muscle defect, and subsequently also hypocalcaemia. Skin and deep bleedings, leg spasms, disturbed dark vision and dyslexia are main worries. This paper describes these patients with a review of the investigations performed. Causes of the bleeding tendency are complex disturbances of the platelet membrane causing insufficient stability of the haemostatic plug, the nature of which is unresolved, but involves membrane scrambling. The muscle defect consists in tubular aggregates and high blood values of creatine kinase. A connection with the hypocalcaemia is possible, because increasing the ionic Ca with calcitriol significantly improves muscle function. Miosis is resistant to mydriatics and causes decreased dark vision, possibly also influencing dyslexia. The asplenia has little influence on immunocompetence, and the patients have survived 300 patient years without critical infections. The gene defect has not yet been unravelled. PMID:12569706

  11. Nodding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Scott F; Sejvar, James J; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A H; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B; Winkler, Andrea S; Mbonye, Anthony K

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5-15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case-control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  12. Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, E.E.J.; Pelc, K.; Dan, B.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a truncating mutation. We discuss the clinical aspects with special emphasis on the behavioral phenotype and we review current perspectives in clinical management alongside with perspectives in altering gene expression. PMID:22670134

  13. [Paraneoplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Erdmann, H

    1984-02-01

    Paraneoplasia has come to denote those tumor activities not caused within an organism directly by invasion, obstruction, or by the tumor burden itself. PSN research has yielded best results through the examination of those hormones produced by the tumor, esp. the pro-ACTH and its functionally active subgroups, furthermore the ADH, gonadotropins, HPL, STH, prolactine etc. Frequently very special features have been found to characterize this disease which have been published in detail. In addition to this, several differentiating PNS have been described without having been sufficiently defined, esp. those concerning the nervous system, the haematopoesia , the kidneys, the skin and the gastrointestinal system. In very rare cases there has been a mention or different characteristic syndromes that have come to be assigned to special kinds of tumors. PMID:6371641

  14. Nodding Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sejvar, James J.; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A.H.; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B.; Winkler, Andrea S.; Mbonye, Anthony K.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5–15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case–control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  15. Meigs' Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lichtblau, Steven

    1984-01-01

    A 52-year-old female physician was admitted to hospital because of severe dyspnea and massive pleural effusion. At first, it seemed she may have been suffering from heart failure with an associated malignant disease. The patient was seemingly unaware of her progressive illness. During her hospital stay, it became evident that she was denying the possibility of cancer because of her husband's death from adenocarcinoma of the esophagus three years earlier. The carcinoma was inoperable and he was treated with chemotherapy. The patient was very upset about her husband's untimely death, and his treatment convinced her that she did not want chemotherapy if she was found to have cancer. Fortunately, it was discovered that she had benign cystic teratoma of the ovary with ascites and hydrothorax (Meigs' syndrome). ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:21278951

  16. Hepatopulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Fan, Daiming

    2015-07-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a pulmonary complication observed in patients with chronic liver disease and/or portal hypertension, attributable to an intrapulmonary vascular dilatation that may induce severe hypoxemia. Microvascular dilation and angiogenesis in the lung have been identified as pathologic features that drive gas exchange abnormalities in experimental HPS. Pulse oximetry is a useful screening test for HPS, which can guide subsequent use of arterial blood gases. Contrast-enhanced echocardiography, perfusion lung scanning, and pulmonary arteriography are three currently used diagnostic imaging modalities that identify the presence of intrapulmonary vascular abnormalities. The presence of HPS increases mortality and impairs quality of life, but is reversible with liver transplantation. No medical therapy is established as effective for HPS. At the present time, liver transplantation is the only available treatment for HPS. PMID:25732713

  17. Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lisa; Lehman, Erik; Brown, Ashley D.; Ahmad, Syeda; Berlin, Cheston

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a 35-year single-center experience with pediatric tics and Tourette syndrome was conducted. 482 charts from 1972 to 2007 were reviewed. Follow-up surveys were mailed to last known address and 83 patients responded (17%). Response rate was affected by long interval from last visit; contact information was often incorrect as it was the address of the patient as a child. Males constituted 84%. Mean tic onset was 6.6 years. At first visit, 83% had multiple motor tics and >50% had comorbidities. 44% required only 1 visit and 90% less than 12 visits. Follow-up showed positive clinical and social outcomes in 73/83 survey responses. Of those indicating a poor outcome, mean educational level was lower and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities were significantly higher. Access to knowledgeable caregivers was a problem for adult patients. A shortage of specialists may in part be addressed by interested general pediatricians. PMID:25200367

  18. Parkinsonian Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The different parkinsonian conditions can be challenging to separate clinically. This review highlights the important clinical features that guide the diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Strategies for treatment and disease management are also discussed. Recent Findings Over the past decade there has been an increasing recognition of the broad clinical presentations of the neurodegenerative forms of parkinsonism. Nonmotor symptoms in these diseases, including psychiatric, cognitive, autonomic, and gastrointestinal dysfunction, appear to have a major impact on quality of life and disability. PSP and CBD are now considered pathologic diagnoses, with several different and varied clinical phenotypes, that overlap and share features with PDand frontotemporal dementia syndromes. PD is distinguished by its excellent response to dopaminergic medications that is maintained over many years, in contrast to the response seen in patients with MSA and PSP. New diagnostic criteria have been proposed for CBD. No new therapeutic interventions have emerged for PSP, MSA, or CBD. Infusional therapies and deep brain stimulation surgery are established therapies for advanced PD. Summary The “parkinsonian syndromes” encompass a number of nosologic entities that are grouped together on the basis of their shared clinical features but are separated on the basis of their different pathologies. Overall, the consideration of clinical signs, mode of disease onset, and nature of disease progression are all important to make a timely and definitive diagnosis. PMID:24092286

  19. [Liddle syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tamura, H; Sasaki, S

    1996-03-01

    In 1963 Liddle et al. described a disorder that simulated primary aldosteronism, characterized by severe hypertension and hypokalemia but with negligible secretion of aldosterone. They theoried that this was a disorder in which the renal tubules transport ions with such abnormal facility that the end result simulates that of a mineralcorticoid excess. Later, it was postulated that this disorder could be related to the abnormality of amiloride sensitive Na channel. The activity of amiloride-sensitive Na channels constitutes the rate limiting step for Na reabsorption in Na transporting epithelia. Recently, the primary sequence of the rat amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel (rENaC) was determined by functional expression cloning and shown to be composed of three homologous subunits: alpha, beta, and gamma. Its expression of all three subunits in Xenopus oocytes markedly increased the magnitude of these currents. Analysis of subjects with Liddle's syndrome demonstrates the mutation of carboxy-terminal domain in alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. The mutations are either premature termination, frameshift mutation, or missense mutations. PMID:8904241

  20. Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Termine, Cristiano

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of multiple motor and one or more vocal/phonic tics. TS is increasingly recognized as a common neuropsychiatric disorder usually diagnosed in early childhood and comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders occur in approximately 90% of patients, with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) being the most common ones. Moreover, a high prevalence of depression and personality disorders has been reported. Although the mainstream of tic management is represented by pharmacotherapy, different kinds of psychotherapy, along with neurosurgical interventions (especially deep brain stimulation, DBS) play a major role in the treatment of TS. The current diagnostic systems have dictated that TS is a unitary condition. However, recent studies have demonstrated that there may be more than one TS phenotype. In conclusion, it appears that TS probably should no longer be considered merely a motor disorder and, most importantly, that TS is no longer a unitary condition, as it was previously thought. PMID:22411257

  1. Down Syndrome Myths and Truths

    MedlinePlus

    ... ndss.org Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ... Printed Materials Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids You may also ...

  2. Shaken Baby Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby syndrome. NIH Patient Recruitment for Shaken Baby Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  3. Facts about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lip and Palate Craniosynostosis Down Syndrome Eye Defects Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders Gastroschisis Heart Defects Coarctation of ... and risk for trisomy 21 assessed by the origin of chromosome nondisjunction: a report from the Atlanta ...

  4. What is Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with the syndrome. 1 The degree of intellectual disability in people with Down syndrome varies but is ... Z Topics Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Early Learning Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDDs) All related topics NICHD News and Spotlights ...

  5. [Fragile X syndrome].

    PubMed

    Femiano, F; Cozzolino, S

    1990-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome include clinical features macroorchidism, ear large, prognathism, elongated facies, speech dysfunction, mental retardation and mitral valve prolapse. The interest for this syndrome is linked to the antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial secondary endocarditis and bacteremia. PMID:2151505

  6. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a disorder passed down through families (inherited) in which a person has mild jaundice throughout ... Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder. In order to inherit the condition, a child must get ...

  7. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  8. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ121 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) • What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin resistance? • ...

  9. Miller Fisher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is considered to be a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome. It is characterized by abnormal muscle coordination, ... muscles, and absence of the tendon reflexes. Like Guillain-Barré syndrome, symptoms may be preceded by a viral ...

  10. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  11. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (Ritter Disease). In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

  12. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome What is Klinefelter syndrome? What ... they are referred to a doctor to evaluate learning disabilities. The diagnosis may also be considered in ...

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be a lifelong condition. You may be suffering from cramping and loose stools, diarrhea, ... Ferri FF. Irritable bowel syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's ... . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 669-70. What I ...

  14. Schwartz–Jampel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Gayathri, N.; Shivaram, Sumanth

    2015-01-01

    Schwartz–Jampel syndrome is a very rare congenital myotonic syndrome with typical phenotypic and electrophysiological features. Diagnosis is made by awareness into the typical phenotypic characters. PMID:26167227

  15. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... present at birth. The syndrome often involves port wine stains, excess growth of bones and soft tissue, ... Symptoms of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome include: Many port wine stains or other blood vessel problems, including dark ...

  16. Marfan syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  17. Pierre Robin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Pierre Robin sequence; Pierre Robin complex; Pierre Robin anomaly ... The exact causes of Pierre Robin syndrome are unknown. It may be part of many genetic syndromes. The lower jaw develops slowly before birth, but may speed ...

  18. Down Syndrome: Education

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kit Financials Newsroom Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Education Education This section includes information about inclusion, elementary and ... and postsecondary options for students with Down syndrome. Education & Down Syndrome This section provides an overview and ...

  19. Thoracic outlet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... tingling of the fingers A weak grip The thoracic outlet is the area between the ribcage and collarbone. ... with the nerves cause almost all cases of thoracic outlet syndrome. ... the spine to the ribs. People with this syndrome often ...

  20. Sick sinus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chambers is a common cause of sick sinus syndrome. Coronary artery disease , high blood pressure, and aortic and ... pressure may be normal or low. Sick sinus syndrome may cause symptoms of heart failure to start or get worse. Sick sinus ...

  1. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy. Seizures usually begin before 4 years of age. ... broad program of basic and clinical research on epilepsy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. These studies are aimed ...

  2. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources » Health Care » Associated Conditions » ADHD & Down Syndrome ADHD & Down Syndrome Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, ... traits. Does That Mean That Your Child Has ADHD? It may, but more often it means that ...

  3. HAMARTOMATOUS POLYPOSIS SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Daniel; Howe, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Since the histological description of the hamartomatous polyp in 1957 by Horrilleno et al., several different syndromes have been described with the propensity to develop these polyps in the upper and lower GI tracts. These include Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes (Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes), which are autosomal-dominantly inherited, and Cronkhite-Canada syndrome, which is acquired. The clinical aspects, the molecular pathogenesis, the organ systems affected, the risks of cancer, and the management of these hamartomatous polyposis syndromes will be reviewed in this paper. Although the incidence of these syndromes is low, it is important for clinicians to recognize these disorders in order to prevent morbidity and mortality in these patients, and to perform presymptomatic testing in patients at risk. PMID:18672141

  4. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In children, Horner’s syndrome may be caused by neuroblastoma, a tumor arising in another part of the body. Although rare, the risk of neuroblastoma is significantly greater with acquired Horner’s syndrome than ...

  5. Cri du chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Cri du chat syndrome is a group of symptoms that result from missing a piece of chromosome number 5. ... Cri du chat syndrome is rare. It is caused by a missing piece of chromosome 5. Most cases are ...

  6. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common Questions Does Pancreatitis Cause FAPS and IBS? Hirschsprung's Disease Intestinal Psuedo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome Other ... Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  7. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  8. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves throughout the body. ... Riley-Day syndrome is passed down through families (inherited). A person must inherit a copy of the defective gene ...

  9. [Disseminated pigmented nevus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cabrera, H N; Savoia, J; Pietropaolo, N; Snchez, G

    1988-01-01

    Two patients carriers of a neuro-cutaneous syndrome showing scattered pigmentary nevus and neurologic disorders are exposed, who are added to three similar cases presented in a previous publication. Differences with other syndromes that show cafe-au-lait spots, like those of Recklinghausen and Albright, and also of other known publications, are remarked. Ultrastructural studies are contributed. The denomination of "disseminated pigmentary nevus syndrome" is proposed in comparison with the epidermal nevus syndrome. PMID:3050324

  10. Hypoventilation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Piper, Amanda J; Yee, Brendon J

    2014-10-01

    In patients with impaired inspiratory muscle function or altered respiratory system mechanics, an imbalance between load and capacity can arise. The ventilatory control system normally compensates for this by increasing drive to maintain adequate alveolar ventilation levels, thereby keeping arterial CO2 within its normal range. To reduce work of breathing, a pattern of reduced tidal volume and increased respiratory rate occurs. This pattern itself may eventually reduce effective ventilation by increasing dead space ventilation. However, the impact of sleep on breathing and its role in the development of diurnal respiratory failure is often overlooked in this process. Sleep not only reduces respiratory drive, but also diminishes chemoresponsiveness to hypoxia and hypercapnia creating an environment where significant alterations in oxygenation and CO2 can occur. Acute increases in CO2 load especially during rapid eye movement sleep can initiate the process of bicarbonate retention which further depresses ventilatory responsiveness to CO2. Treatment of hypoventilation needs to be directed toward factors underlying its development. Nocturnal noninvasive positive pressure therapy is the most widely used and reliable strategy currently available to manage hypoventilation syndromes. Although this may not consistently alter respiratory muscle strength or the mechanical properties of the respiratory system, it does appear to reset chemosensitivity by reducing bicarbonate, resulting in a more appropriate ventilatory response to CO2 during wakefulness. Not only is diurnal hypoventilation reduced with noninvasive ventilation, but quality of life, functional capacity and survival are also improved. However, close attention to how therapy is set up and used are key factors in achieving clinical benefits. PMID:25428856

  11. CONSTIPATION IN RETT SYNDROME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal problems occur frequently in girls with Rett syndrome. Constipation is a common problem in girls with Rett syndrome because of their neurological abnormalities. Research studies to better understand the abnormalities of large bowel function in our girls with Rett syndrome have not b...

  12. [Morning glory syndrome].

    PubMed

    López-Lizárraga, Erika Paulina; Bolaños-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Treviño-Alanís, M Guadalupe; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    In 1970, Kindier described the morning glory syndrome. This syndrome is a congenital abnormality of the optic nerve with unilateral presence and very low incidence. It is characterized by an enlarged optical disc, deep excavation, presence of traces of radial glia, and arrangement of retinal vascularization. This report describes the fundoscopic image in a patient with morning glory syndrome. PMID:21412399

  13. Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome Print A A A Text ... Child Getting Help for the Parent or Caregiver Munchausen by proxy syndrome (MBPS) is a relatively rare ...

  14. Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    MedlinePlus

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a mental illness and a form of child abuse . The caretaker of ... No one is sure what causes Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Sometimes, the person was abused as a child or has Munchausen syndrome (fake illness for themselves).

  15. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy. PMID:26971503

  16. Barth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS) is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM), skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA). Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE), left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC), ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical), compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ) gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and recurrent male miscarriage and stillbirth. Cardiolipin testing and TAZ sequencing now provide relatively rapid diagnostic testing, both prospectively and retrospectively, from a range of fresh or stored tissues, blood or neonatal bloodspots. TAZ sequencing also allows female carrier detection and antenatal screening. Management of BTHS includes medical therapy of CM, cardiac transplantation (in 14% of patients), antibiotic prophylaxis and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy. Multidisciplinary teams/clinics are essential for minimising hospital attendances and allowing many more individuals with BTHS to live into adulthood. PMID:23398819

  17. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Roufosse, Florence E; Goldman, Michel; Cogan, Elie

    2007-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES) constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders, defined as persistent and marked blood eosinophilia (> 1.5 × 109/L for more than six consecutive months) associated with evidence of eosinophil-induced organ damage, where other causes of hypereosinophilia such as allergic, parasitic, and malignant disorders have been excluded. Prevalence is unknown. HES occur most frequently in young to middle-aged patients, but may concern any age group. Male predominance (4–9:1 ratio) has been reported in historic series but this is likely to reflect the quasi-exclusive male distribution of a sporadic hematopoietic stem cell mutation found in a recently characterized disease variant. Target-organ damage mediated by eosinophils is highly variable among patients, with involvement of skin, heart, lungs, and central and peripheral nervous systems in more than 50% of cases. Other frequently observed complications include hepato- and/or splenomegaly, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and coagulation disorders. Recent advances in underlying pathogenesis have established that hypereosinophilia may be due either to primitive involvement of myeloid cells, essentially due to occurrence of an interstitial chromosomal deletion on 4q12 leading to creation of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene (F/P+ variant), or to increased interleukin (IL)-5 production by a clonally expanded T cell population (lymphocytic variant), most frequently characterized by a CD3-CD4+ phenotype. Diagnosis of HES relies on observation of persistent and marked hypereosinophilia responsible for target-organ damage, and exclusion of underlying causes of hypereosinophilia, including allergic and parasitic disorders, solid and hematological malignancies, Churg-Strauss disease, and HTLV infection. Once these criteria are fulfilled, further testing for eventual pathogenic classification is warranted using appropriate cytogenetic and functional approaches. Therapeutic management should be adjusted to disease severity and eventual detection of pathogenic variants. For F/P+ patients, imatinib has undisputedly become first line therapy. For others, corticosteroids are generally administered initially, followed by agents such as hydroxycarbamide, interferon-alpha, and imatinib, for corticosteroid-resistant cases, as well as for corticosteroid-sparing purposes. Recent data suggest that mepolizumab, an anti-IL-5 antibody, is an effective corticosteroid-sparing agent for F/P-negative patients. Prognosis has improved significantly since definition of HES, and currently depends on development of irreversible heart failure, as well as eventual malignant transformation of myeloid or lymphoid cells. PMID:17848188

  18. Hereditary Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes are a rare group of hereditary autosomal dominant disorders that comprise less than 1% of all hereditary colorectal cancers. Hamartomatous polyps, in and of themselves, are benign entities; however, these hamartomatous polyposis syndromes have a malignant potential for the development of colorectal cancer as well as extracolonic cancers. Early detection and proper surveillance are vital to minimizing the risk of carcinoma. This article provides a critical review of the clinical presentation, pathology, genetics, and screening and surveillance guidelines of juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. PMID:20567567

  19. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pandeshwar, Padma; Jayanthi, K.; Mahesh, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched) gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions. PMID:23082255

  20. [Tic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Czapliński, Adam; Steck, Andreas J; Fuhr, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A tic is an involuntary, sudden, rapid, recurrent, nonrrhythmic, stereotyped, motor movement or vocalization. This paper reviews clinical, pathophysiological, epidemiological and treatment issues of tic disorders. The clinical presentation of tic disorders with simple and complex motor or vocal tics is reviewed in detail. The most common psychiatric comorbid conditions, such as personality disorder (PD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Self-Destructive Behavior (SDB) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are presented too. All forms of tics may be exacerbated by anger or stress, but they are usually markedly diminished during sleep. Premonitory feelings or "sensory experiences", which are distinct from the actual motor or phonic tics and precede the tics, occur in over 80% of tic-patients and in 95% of patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS). The American Psychiatric Association recognizes three types of tic disorders on the basis of clinical criteria: Transient Tic Disorder, Chronic Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder and GTS. The diagnostic criteria for these types are described. According to epidemiological data, up to 10% of children have at least somewhere a transient tic disorder. The onset of tics, whether simple or multiple, occurs at approximately 7 years of age. The accepted prevalence figure for GTS is 0.05-3%. Although tics can appear as the result of brain injury, Huntington chorea or encephalitis, they are most commonly idiopathic. Genetic factors appear to be present in many but not in all cases of tic disorders. Autosomal dominant, sex-linked models or semirecessive-semidominant-oligogenic models have been considered. Based on the review of the literature we believe that tic disorders are related to altered neurotransmitter function within the CNS, especially that the functional abnormality is somehow related to dopaminergic mechanism. Several authors have recently investigated the possible role of autoimmune response to streptococcal infection in the pathogenesis of tics. The differential diagnosis of tics is reviewed in detail. Above all tics represent a social disability. The ability to tolerate tics varies greatly from one individual to another, and the need for treatment is better defined by the patient than by the physician. Mild cases do not need be treated. Ideally, management should be multidisciplinary and can range from educative to supportive means or to intricate pharmacological interventions. The major form of treatment of the motor or vocal symptoms continues to be based on high-potency "typical" neuroleptics (tiaprid, pimozide, haloperidol), which induce a wide range of potentially serious side effects. In everyday practice we prefer to start with an "atypical" neuroleptic drug--for example, olanzapin (5-10 mg/day), risperidone or clozapine. Other drugs, such as clonidin or pergolid are widely used but their efficiency is still questionable. SSRIs (sertaline, citalopram, fluoxetin, fluvoxamine) or other antidepressants (clomipramine) have been used in treatment of psychiatric comorbid conditions, too. Botulinum toxin injections have proved useful in tics, targeting at the symptoms of blepharospasm, in neck and facial muscles. PMID:12185806

  1. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogenesis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise. PMID:23181051

  2. Nephrotic syndrome redux.

    PubMed

    Glassock, Richard J; Fervenza, Fernando C; Hebert, Lee; Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Redux: brought back, resurgent (Wikipedia free dictionary). This essay traces the history of the concepts that led to the usage of the term 'nephrotic syndrome' beginning ∼90 years ago. We then examined the various definitions used for this syndrome and modified them to conform to contemporary standards. Remarkably, only minor modifications were required. This analysis of a common clinical entity may be helpful in ensuring appropriate evaluation of patients suffering from nephrotic syndrome and nephrotic-range proteinuria. PMID:24723546

  3. [Paraneoplastic syndromes: a review].

    PubMed

    Berardi, R; Grilli, G; Romagnoli, E; Saladino, T; Freddari, F; Tamburrano, T; Galizia, E; Carbonari, G; Mariani, C; Braconi, C; Pierantoni, C; Battelli, N; Scartozzi, M; Cascinu, S

    2005-01-01

    Modern oncology often obtains good results against earlier neoplasms, whilst it's still in difficulties against the advanced ones. The knowledge of paraneoplastic syndromes is crucial both to cure patients and to do an earlier diagnosis. When we recognize a paraneoplastic syndrome that comes before the clinic beginning of a neoplasm, perhaps we save a life. This review discusses all the main paraneoplastic syndromes, focusing mainly on their clinical aspect and reminding the most commonly associated cancers. PMID:16463565

  4. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sangeeta; Chauhan, Ashutosh; Sethi, N T

    2008-10-01

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS) is a terminology used to describe a specific complication affecting patients with diabetes mellitus in the tropics. The syndrome encompasses a localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands to progressive, fulminant hand sepsis, potentially fatal. Since this syndrome is less recognized it is often under-reported. Authors present two cases of TDHS and emphasize on aggressive glycemic control and surgical therapy to prevent potential crippling or fatal complications. PMID:20165601

  5. [Chilaidity syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Candela, Stefano; Candela, Giancarlo; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Argano, Francesco; Romano, Ornella; Iannella, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Chilaidity syndrome is a mal position by bowel mal rotation o malfissation. It is more common in right side expecially in obese people. If asyimptomatic, the syndrome is an occasional comparison by radiology, surgical exploration by laparoscopy or autopsy, otherwise, if symptomatic, there are obstructive symptoms,abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, flatulence, breath, constipation and anorexia. Diagnosis is radiological. We present a rare case of this syndrome in a man with serious obstructive symptoms. PMID:22462337

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... premature joining of certain bones of the skull (craniosynostosis) during development and a skin condition called acanthosis ... Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome: Gene Review: Gene Review: FGFR-Related Craniosynostosis Syndromes Genetic Testing Registry: Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Joubert syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Joubert syndrome Joubert syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Joubert syndrome is a disorder that affects many parts ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Muenke syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Muenke syndrome Muenke syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Muenke syndrome is a condition characterized by the premature ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: WAGR syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs and symptoms of WAGR syndrome can include childhood-onset obesity, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and kidney failure. When WAGR syndrome includes childhood-onset obesity, it is often referred to as WAGRO syndrome. ...

  10. How Is Marfan Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Marfan Syndrome Treated? Marfan syndrome has no cure. However, treatments can help delay or prevent complications, especially when started early. Marfan syndrome can affect many parts of your body, including ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Jacobsen syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 11 , Jacobsen syndrome is also known as 11q terminal deletion disorder. The signs and symptoms of Jacobsen ... disorder 11q deletion syndrome 11q- deletion syndrome 11q terminal deletion disorder 11q23 deletion disorder Jacobsen thrombocytopenia Related ...

  12. [The Capgras syndrome].

    PubMed

    Anikina, M A; Levin, O S

    2013-01-01

    The Capgras syndrome is one of delusional-like misidentification syndrome in which a person holds a delusion that one or several his/her friends or relatives have been replaced by an identical-looking impostor. As any other delusional disorder, the Capgras syndrome is characterized by stability despite the indisputable arguments against fault views. Initially, this syndrome was considered as a presentation of schizophrenia but later it has been described in brain organic disorders, primarily in elderly patients with dementia. PMID:23994927

  13. Chromosome instability syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 11, discusses chromosome instability syndromes. The focus is on the most extensively studied genotypic chromosomal aberrations which include Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, ataxia telangiectasia, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The great interest in these syndromes is out of proportion to their rare occurrence; however, studies of genotypic chromosome breakage have been inspired by the hope of throwing light on chromosome structure and behavior. A table is given which relates chromosomal aberrations in Bloom syndrome which may cause or promote cancer. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Congenital Neutropenia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Congenital Neutropenia Syndromes Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Order publications Volunteer for Clinical Studies Help people ...

  15. Organic brain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    OBS; Organic mental disorder (OMS); Chronic organic brain syndrome ... Listed below are disorders associated with OBS. Brain injury caused by ... the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage ) Blood clot inside the ...

  16. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  17. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders. PMID:26265416

  18. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, B.M.J

    1999-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a rare disorder in child psychiatric practice. A case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy that was managed in the Child Psychiatric clinic, Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital is reported. Factors that suggest the diagnosis are discussed. Multidisciplinary approach to the management of such cases is warranted. PMID:22589687

  19. Fanconi-Bickel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mohandas Nair K; Sakamoto, Osamu; Jagadeesh, Sujatha; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2012-01-01

    We present the first mutation proven case of Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, a rare type of glycogen storage disease, from India. A four-year-old girl presented with severe growth retardation, genu varum and hepatomegaly. Investigations confirmed severe hypophosphatemic rickets and Fanconi syndrome. Molecular analysis confirmed a homozygous deletion insertion mutation in Glut 2 gene. PMID:21327337

  20. Unmasking Diogenes Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Kashinath; Gopinath, Hima; Kini, Hema; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual "mask" of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen. PMID:26120158

  1. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  2. Syndrome in Question.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  3. Macrocytosis in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Tom J.; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1991-01-01

    The study, with 61 Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) adult subjects, found that macrocytosis in the absence of anemia was virtually universal and erythrocyte survival half-time was shorter than normal. Findings suggest that erythrocytes have a younger mean age in persons with Down Syndrome, possibly indicating an accelerated aging process of red blood…

  4. Macrocytosis in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Tom J.; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1991-01-01

    The study, with 61 Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) adult subjects, found that macrocytosis in the absence of anemia was virtually universal and erythrocyte survival half-time was shorter than normal. Findings suggest that erythrocytes have a younger mean age in persons with Down Syndrome, possibly indicating an accelerated aging process of red blood

  5. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) happens when a woman's ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal. One result is that cysts ( ... who are obese are more likely to have polycystic ovary syndrome. Symptoms of PCOS include: Infertility Pelvic pain Excess ...

  6. Sjogren's Syndrome Information Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of the disorder are dry mouth and dry eyes. In addition, Sjogren's syndrome may cause skin, nose, and vaginal dryness, and ... may be prescribed. What is the prognosis? Sjögren's syndrome can ... the mild symptoms of dry eyes and mouth, while others go through cycles of ...

  7. Congenitally palliated scimitar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cantinotti, Massimiliano; Giordano, Raffaele; Spadoni, Isabella

    2015-08-01

    We present a rare case of scimitar syndrome in which the scimitar vessel, collecting all the right pulmonary veins, was stenotic at its junction, with the inferior caval vein and two anomalous vessels, connecting to the same venous collector, draining most of the flow to the left atrium. We arbitrarily defined this rare anatomical variant as a congenitally palliated scimitar syndrome. PMID:25341362

  8. Carotid sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Mark

    2003-02-01

    This article reviews the recent literature about carotid sinus syndrome. It looks principally at the various ways in which it may present, the limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, and the role of carotid sinus massage in the investigation of carotid sinus syndrome. PMID:12619336

  9. Empty Sella Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... there any treatment? What is the prognosis? What research is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Empty Sella Syndrome? Empty Sella Syndrome (ESS) is a disorder that involves the sella turcica , a bony structure at the base of the brain that surrounds and protects the ...

  10. Learning about Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... GenomeTV Media Contacts Media Resources NHGRI-Related News Journal Articles from NHGRI Social Media Careers & Training Educational Programs ... Children With Turner Syndrome [pediatrics.aappublications.org] An article from ... journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics Turner Syndrome [ ...

  11. Epidemiology of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Stephanie L.; Allen, Emily G.; Bean, Lora H.; Freeman, Sallie B.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identified genetic form of mental retardation and the leading cause of specific birth defects and medical conditions. Traditional epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence, cause, and clinical significance of the syndrome have been conducted over the last 100 years. DS has been estimated to occur…

  12. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.

  13. Redefining syndromic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Katz, Rebecca; May, Larissa; Baker, Julia; Test, Elisa

    2011-12-01

    With growing concerns about international spread of disease and expanding use of early disease detection surveillance methods, the field of syndromic surveillance has received increased attention over the last decade. The purpose of this article is to clarify the various meanings that have been assigned to the term syndromic surveillance and to propose a refined categorization of the characteristics of these systems. Existing literature and conference proceedings were examined on syndromic surveillance from 1998 to 2010, focusing on low- and middle-income settings. Based on the 36 unique definitions of syndromic surveillance found in the literature, five commonly accepted principles of syndromic surveillance systems were identified, as well as two fundamental categories: specific and non-specific disease detection. Ultimately, the proposed categorization of syndromic surveillance distinguishes between systems that focus on detecting defined syndromes or outcomes of interest and those that aim to uncover non-specific trends that suggest an outbreak may be occurring. By providing an accurate and comprehensive picture of this field's capabilities, and differentiating among system types, a unified understanding of the syndromic surveillance field can be developed, encouraging the adoption, investment in, and implementation of these systems in settings that need bolstered surveillance capacity, particularly low- and middle-income countries. PMID:23856373

  14. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.…

  15. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: an underdiagnosed syndrome?

    PubMed

    Engenheiro, E; Møller, R S; Pinto, M; Soares, G; Nikanorova, M; Carreira, I M; Ullmann, R; Tommerup, N; Tümer, Z

    2008-06-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder with mental retardation and variable multiple congenital abnormalities due to mutations of the ZEB2 (ZFHX1B) gene at 2q22. MWS was first described in 1998 and the causative gene was delineated in 2001. Since then, 115 different mutations of ZEB2 have been published in association with this syndrome in 161 individuals. However, recent reports suggest that due to the variability of the congenital abnormalities, this syndrome may still be underdiagnosed. We report two unrelated patients with MWS where the clinical diagnosis was established only after finding of disruption of the ZEB2 gene by a balanced translocation breakpoint and an interstitial microdeletion, respectively. PMID:18445050

  16. [The multiple hamartoma syndrome (Cowden syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Fritsch, P; Pechlaner, R; Czarnecki, N; Hintner, H

    1981-06-01

    The multiple hamartoma syndrome is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by an impressive diversity and multitude of both mesodermal and epithelial hamartomas and tumors of all organ systems. The dermatological hallmarks of this probably not too rare syndrome are lichenoid centrofacial and akral papular lesions and a marked papillomatosis of the entire oral mucosa of a highly characteristic morphology which usually extends throughout the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract. The importance of this syndrome is its frequent association with malignant tumors, predominantly carcinomas of the mammary and thyroid glands. In this paper, we describe the first three cases of the German literature. No malignancies were detected; in one case, a meningeoma causing severe increase of intracranial pressure was discovered. PMID:7263233

  17. Hyperacute cognitive stroke syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ferro, J M

    2001-10-01

    Cognitive syndromes are common clinical manifestations of hyperacute stroke and may be the single or dominant presenting features. They are related to acute dysfunction of complex integrated distributed functional networks serving different cognitive domains. The most common cortical syndromes include nonfluent or fluent aphasia, neglect, collor agnosia, pure alexia and Balint's syndrome. Disturbances of declarative memory are common following posterior cerebral artery and thalamic strokes. Abulia can follow thalamic, caudate and capsular lesions. Intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhages can cause preeminent neuropsychological changes. Disorientation is present in about 40% of acute stroke patients and delirium complicates the course of 25% of acute strokes. Some hyperacute cognitive stroke syndromes are useful indicators of later disability. Cognitive syndromes may pose special difficulties to neurology residents, unless formal teaching in neuropsychology and psychiatry is included in their training programs. PMID:11697519

  18. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. PMID:25808686

  19. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, DN; Raval, N; Patadiya, H; Tarsariya, V

    2014-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Until date, very few cases of GGS have been reported in India. Early diagnosis and treatment as well as genetic counseling are essential for this syndrome. A rare case report of a patient with characteristic features of GGS diagnosed at a rural dental college of Gujarat, India is presented here. This case report draws attention of the valuable role of dentist in diagnosis and early management of this syndrome. PMID:24761254

  20. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  1. The skinache syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bassøe, C F

    1995-01-01

    Chronic pain of unknown aetiology, and characterized by cutaneous trigger points, has been coined the skinache syndrome. The treatment of the skinache syndrome was evaluated in 94 patients by two independent methods 2 years after treatment. After one subcutaneous injection of lidocaine 68% of the patients were cured. The pain recurred in 27 patients having suffered for an average of 2 years. Surgical removal of the cutaneous trigger points cured 77% of the latter patients. The odds ratio of success of surgical treatment versus all other treatments combined was 101.3. The skinache syndrome requires a precise clinical investigation. Even when the origin of the pain in tendons, muscle and adipose tissue is excluded, the skinache syndrome remains a common, debilitating disorder. In contrast to fibromyalgia, the skinache syndrome has a simple and effective cure. PMID:8537946

  2. Sjögren syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Xerostomia-Sjögren syndrome; Keratoconjunctivitis sicca - Sjögren; Sicca syndrome ... The cause of Sjögren syndrome is unknown. It is an autoimmune disorder. This means the body attacks healthy tissue by mistake. The syndrome occurs ...

  3. Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Guillain-Barré Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Guillain-Barré Syndrome ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Guillain-Barré Syndrome? Guillain-Barré syndrome is a disorder in ...

  4. The Source for Syndromes 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different lesser-known syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Apert syndrome; (2) Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome; (3) CHARGE syndrome; (4) Cri-du-Chat…

  5. Vascular compression syndromes.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view. PMID:26515219

  6. Revisiting HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dusse, Luci Maria; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; Silva, Juliano Teixeira; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves; Brandão, Augusto Henriques; Cabral, Antônio Carlos Vieira

    2015-12-01

    HELLP syndrome was first described in 1982 by Weinstein et al. and the term HELLP refers to an acronym used to describe the clinical condition that leads to hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets. The syndrome frequency varies from 0.5 to 0.9% pregnancies and manifests preferentially between the 27th and 37th week of gestation. Approximately 30% of cases occur after delivery. Although the etiopathogenesis of this syndrome remains unclear, histopathologic findings in the liver include intravascular fibrin deposits that presumably may lead to hepatic sinusoidal obstruction, intrahepatic vascular congestion, and increased intrahepatic pressure with ensuing hepatic necrosis, intraparenchymal and subcapsular hemorrhage, and eventually capsular rupture. Typical clinical symptoms of HELLP syndrome are pain in the right upper quadrant abdomen or epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting. However, this syndrome can present nonspecific symptoms and the diagnosis may be difficult to be established. Laboratory tests and imaging exams are essential for differential diagnosis with other clinical conditions. Treatment of HELLP syndrome with corticosteroids, targeting both lung maturation of the fetus is still an uncertain clinical value. In conclusion, three decades after the tireless efforts of Dr. Weinstein to characterize HELLP syndrome, it remains a challenge to the scientific community and several questions need to be answered for the benefit of pregnant women. PMID:26525965

  7. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, M. S.; Farooque, A. I.; Wahid, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a life-threatening reaction of neuroleptic medication. The estimated incidence rate of neuroleptic malignant syndrome is between 1% and 1.5% of patients treated with neuroleptics. The reported mortality rate varies from 11% to 38%. Risk factors include younger males (80% less than 40 years) and physical disability. Although 80% of neuroleptic malignant syndrome cases develop within the first 2 weeks of treatment, the syndrome can develop anytime during the therapy period. The clinical picture and laboratory findings are not always unique. Less than 50% of cases manifest with classical symptoms. Deaths usually result from cardiovascular collapse. Renal failure, pulmonary emboli, aspiration pneumonia, and respiratory failure are also reported. Familiarity with the syndrome, baseline laboratory values including creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, serum glutamicoxaloacetic transaminase, and complete blood cell count with a differential count, and a high index of suspicion are of the utmost importance in making the diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. A judicial choice of neuroleptic medication and careful observation of patients may reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. PMID:1460685

  8. The cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, A; Allanson, J; Jadico, S K; Kavamura, M I; Noonan, J; Opitz, J M; Young, T; Neri, G

    2006-01-01

    The cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a condition of sporadic occurrence, with patients showing multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. It is characterised by failure to thrive, relative macrocephaly, a distinctive face with prominent forehead, bitemporal constriction, absence of eyebrows, hypertelorism, downward‐slanting palpebral fissures often with epicanthic folds, depressed nasal root and a bulbous tip of the nose. The cutaneous involvement consists of dry, hyperkeratotic, scaly skin, sparse and curly hair, and cavernous haemangiomata. Most patients have a congenital heart defect, most commonly pulmonic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The developmental delay usually is moderate to severe. The syndrome is caused by gain‐of‐function mutations in four different genes BRAF, KRAS, mitogen‐activated protein/extracellular signal‐regulated kinase MEK1 and MEK2, all belonging to the same RAS–extracellular signal‐regulated kinase (ERK) pathway that regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. The CFC syndrome is a member of a family of syndromes that includes the Noonan and Costello syndromes, presenting with phenotypic similarities. Noonan syndrome is caused by mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP‐2 gene (PTPN11), with a few people having a mutation in KRAS. Costello syndrome is caused by mutations in HRAS. The protein products of these genes also belong to the RAS–ERK pathway. Thus, the clinical overlap of these three conditions, which often poses a problem of differential diagnosis, is explained by their pathogenetic relatedness. PMID:16825433

  9. Black Hole Syndrome 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-08-01

    A black hole falling into the Earth would syndrome toward the center, while it would shine through mass accretion. The author has re-examined the dynamics of such a black hole in the Earth. In the case of a non-radiating black hole, the timescale of the syndrome is inversely proportional to the initial mass of the black hole. In the case of a radiating black hole, on the other hand, the syndrome time is of the order of the Eddington time. The radiating black hole in the Earth would act as a strong heat source.

  10. Recurrent Miller Fisher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, S; Geetha; Bhargavan, P V

    2004-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) is a variant of Guillan Barre syndrome characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. Recurrences are exceptional with Miller Fisher syndrome. We are reporting a case with two episodes of MFS within two years. Initially he presented with partial ophthalmoplegia, ataxia. Second episode was characterized by full-blown presentation characterized by ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia. CSF analysis was typical during both episodes. Nerve conduction velocity study was fairly within normal limits. MRI of brain was within normal limits. He responded to symptomatic measures initially, then to steroids in the second episode. We are reporting the case due to its rarity. PMID:15645989

  11. Anton's Syndrome and Eugenics

    PubMed Central

    Frahm-Falkenberg, Siska

    2011-01-01

    Anton's syndrome is arguably the most striking form of anosognosia. Patients with this syndrome behave as if they can see despite their obvious blindness. Although best known for his description of asomatognosia and visual anosognosia, Gabriel Anton (1858-1933) made other significant contributions to the clinical neurosciences, including pioneering work in neurosurgery, neuropsychology, and child psychiatry. However, it has not been recognized in the English literature that Anton was also a dedicated advocate of eugenics and racial hygiene. This paper provides a case of Anton's syndrome and puts the works of Gabriel Anton into their historic context. PMID:21779298

  12. Ischemic Bilateral Opercular Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Milanlioglu, Aysel; Aydın, Mehmet Nuri; Gökgül, Alper; Hamamcı, Mehmet; Erkuzu, Mehmet Atilla; Tombul, Temel

    2013-01-01

    Opercular syndrome, also known as Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome, is a paralysis of the facial, pharyngeal, masticatory, tongue, laryngeal, and brachial muscles. It is a rare cortical form of pseudobulbar palsies caused by vascular insults to bilateral operculum. Its clinical presentations include anarthria, weakness of voluntary muscles involving face, tongue, pharynx, larynx, and masticatory muscles. However, autonomic reflexes and emotional activities of these structures are preserved. In the present case, an 81-year-old male presented with acute onset of anarthria with difficulties in chewing, speaking, and swallowing that was diagnosed with opercular syndrome. PMID:23476665

  13. Syndrome In Question*

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Gabriela; Peruzzo, Juliano; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Reinehr, Clarissa Prieto Herman; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a case of Cowden´s syndrome in a female patient with classic cutaneous lesions, plus papillomatous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and a previous history of thyroid carcinoma. Mucocutaneous lesions occur in 90% of Cowden's syndrome cases and are characterized by facial trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomas and benign acral keratoses. Sites of extracutaneous involvement include: the thyroid, gastrointestinal tract, breast and endometrial tissue. There is risk of malignancies in these organs and they need to be monitored with imaging tests. The early diagnosis of the syndrome by a dermatologist through mucocutaneous lesions enables the investigation and diagnosis of extracutaneous involvement. PMID:25672315

  14. Melkersson-rosenthal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D R; Resident, S; Mohan, C; Minnas, R S; Mohindroo, N K; Sharma, M L

    1999-10-01

    Melkersson - Rosenthal syndrome was described by Melkersson and Rosenthal separately in the year 1928 and 1931 respectively. It is supposed to be a rare syndrome of bilateral alternating recurrent facial paralysis alongwith fissured tongue and oedema of the lips, face and eyelids. A case of Melkersson - Rosenthal syndrome is reported with all the classic findings which is a rarity. In this case there was alternating facial paralysis to begin with followed by bilateral paralysis third time, along with oedema of lips and face, fissured tongue, and dialation of sig-moid colon with absence of haustrations. PMID:23119566

  15. [Refeeding syndrome: practical issues].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Limonta, A; Pichard, C; Stirnemann, J

    2015-10-14

    The refeeding syndrome is frequent and potentially deadly, still it is underdiagnosed. It is defined by clinical and biological manifestations that are seen upon refeeding of malnourished patients. It is the consequence of the transition from catabolism to anabolism. Ions intracellular shift caused by insulin and B1 vitamin deficiency are fundamental in the development of this syndrome. Riskconditions are well summarized by the NICE criteria. To avoid refeeding syndrome, it is fundamental to find and correct any electrolytic deficiency and to give thiamine before starting a slow and progressive oral, enteral or parenteral refeeding. PMID:26665657

  16. Redefining Rowell's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeitouni, N C; Funaro, D; Cloutier, R A; Gagné, E; Claveau, J

    2000-02-01

    Rowell's syndrome is believed to be a distinct and rare clinical entity originally described as lupus erythematosus associated with erythema multiforme-like lesions with immunological findings of speckled antinuclear antibodies, anti-La antibodies and a positive test for rheumatoid factor. We report two additional patients with Rowell's syndrome and review all the diagnostic criteria found in the literature. In view of the inconsistent findings of some of the diagnostic features, we propose that major and minor criteria be used to diagnose Rowell's syndrome. PMID:10730772

  17. Shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spaide, R F; Swengel, R M; Scharre, D W; Mein, C E

    1990-04-01

    Violent shaking causes severe injury in infants, but the diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome is often difficult to make because of the lack of obvious external signs. Consultations by other specialists may not be helpful, since the findings of most organ systems, taken in isolation, are usually nonspecific. Shaken baby syndrome should be considered in infants presenting with seizures, failure to thrive, vomiting associated with lethargy or drowsiness, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypertension or hypotension, respiratory irregularities, coma or death. Shaken babies are usually less than one year old, and most are under six months of age. Head injury (notably subdural hemorrhage) and retinal hemorrhages are the hallmarks of the syndrome. PMID:2181831

  18. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-07

    Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. [Burnout syndrome epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Orbáiz, Villanueva R; Vicente, Albaladejo R; Molina, Ortega P; Rabiza, Astasio P; Purón, Calle M E; Rojas, Dominguez V

    2008-01-01

    The burnout syndrome constitutes a process which bears high prevalence and important consequences among sanitary professionals, particularly among nurses. Therefore, the authors have proposed to study the three dimensions of this syndrome, namely emotional tiredness, depersonalization and lack of a sense of achievement plus the function certain personal, labor, and institutional factors have in development of this process. The authors carried out a transversal study based on a random sample from among all the nursing staff at a Madrid hospital. Two methods to gather information were employed: one questionnaire gathered sociodemographic data, labor and institutional variables while the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), in its verified Spanish version, studied the three burnout syndrome dimensions. The authors made a multiple logistical regression analysis, using as dependent variables the three syndrome scales and adjusting parameters for all the other variables. Clear risk factors were shown; these included unfavorable opinions professionals hold regarding institutional variables; the scale for emotional tiredness warrants special note. PMID:18757013

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a problem that affects the large intestine. It can cause abdominal cramping, bloating, and a change in bowel ... go back and forth between the two. Although IBS can cause a great deal of discomfort, it ...

  1. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with a defect in chromosome number 11. Infancy can be a critical period in babies with ... Children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome who survive infancy do ... appears to be normal to very slightly decreased. Swelling of ...

  2. Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment? Treatment for Sturge-Weber syndrome is symptomatic. Laser treatment may be used to lighten or remove ... VBF-4646 (823-4646) Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  3. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  4. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) causes pain in the shoulder, arm, and neck. It happens when the nerves or blood vessels just below your ... vein is compressed, your hand might be sensitive to cold, or turn pale or bluish. Your arm ...

  5. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones ... from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms ...

  6. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dynamics of calcium homeostasis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol . 1006;1:641– 654. Grubb M, Gaurav ... Welcome to the calcium-alkali syndrome. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010;21:1440-1443. Yoshizawa H, Morishita ...

  7. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... them in areas where they have more trouble learning. Their parents work with teachers and others to come up with a plan for the best way for each child to learn. Kids with Down syndrome like their playtime, too. ...

  8. Frey's syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Haker, Jacqueline M; Mandel, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Frey's syndrome is characterized by facial sweating and flushing in the parotid area when saliva is stimulated. It usually results from damage to the auriculotemporal nerve during parotidectomy. PMID:23252196

  9. Polycystic ovary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition in which a woman has an imbalance of female sex hormones. This may ... PCOS is linked to changes in hormone levels that make it harder for the ovaries to release ...

  10. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... require surgery. Some teens may want to have surgery for cosmetic reasons. Anyone with heart problems associated with Marfan syndrome (especially anyone who's had heart surgery) should always take antibiotics before going to the ...

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink other beverages instead, such as water, fruit juices or milk. Questions to Ask Your Doctor If your baby was born with fetal alcohol syndrome: What health problems does my baby have? Does my baby ...

  12. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual's self-esteem, interpersonal relationships and social experiences relating to ... lag in the development of social maturity, emotional self control, social communication, abstract thinking and problem solving ...

  13. Pediatric focal epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-10-01

    Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, early-onset childhood occipital epilepsy (Panayiotopoulos syndrome [PS]) and late-onset childhood occipital epilepsy (Gastaut type [LOCE-G]) are the principal pediatric focal epilepsy syndromes. They share major common characteristics: the appearance and resolution of electroclinical features are age related, there is a strong genetic predisposition, the clinical course is often mild with infrequent and easy to control seizures, interictal epileptiform activity is disproportionately abundant when compared with the clinical correlate, and tends to potentiate and generalize during sleep. In this review, we outline the relevant pathophysiology underlying this electroclinical spectrum. Then, the initial description of individual syndromes is followed by a summary of overlapping features and intermediate presentations that question the boundaries between these entities and provide the basis for the concept of a childhood seizure susceptibility syndrome. Additionally, we outline the main features of the related epileptic encephalopathies. An outlook on potential future lines of research completes this review. PMID:23027100

  14. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system ( ... over a period of weeks and then stabilize. Guillain-Barre can be hard to diagnose. Possible tests include ...

  15. Shaken baby syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Shaken baby syndrome can occur from as little as 5 seconds of shaking. Shaken baby injuries usually occur in children younger than 2 years old, but may be seen in children up to the age of 5. When ...

  16. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biedl syndrome experience developmental disabilities ranging from mild impairment or delayed emotional development to mental retardation. The degree of mental retardation can range from mild cognitive disability to severe mental retardation. Individuals may also ...

  17. Klinefelter Syndrome (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... new options. previous continue What Doctors Do The earlier a guy finds out about Klinefelter syndrome, the better. Treatments are most effective if they start while a guy is still young. So if ...

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Spastic colon; Irritable colon; Mucous colitis; Spastic colitis ... Ferri FF. Irritable bowel syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:723-4. Mayer EA. Functional ...

  19. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome is a genetic disorder of the body’s connective tissue. It has some features in common with Marfan ... a mutation, growth and development of the body’s connective tissue and other body systems is disrupted, leading to ...

  20. Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is no specific treatment for Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Bone marrow transplants performed early in the disease appear to have ... Call your provider if you have a family history of this disorder and you are planning to ...

  1. Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... motor development followed by abnormal movements and increased reflexes. A striking feature of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is ... a physical exam. The exam may show: Overexaggerated reflexes Spasticity (having spasms) Blood and urine tests may ...

  2. Learning about Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Girls with Turner Syndrome are usually of normal intelligence with good verbal skills and reading skills. Some ... obtain cells from the unborn baby for chromosomal analysis. If a diagnosis is confirmed prenatally, the baby ...

  3. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detailed Story of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome In May 1993, an outbreak of an unexplained pulmonary illness occurred ... Residence Annual U.S. HPS Cases and Case-fatality, 1993-2011 International HPS Case Information Information for Health ...

  4. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Autoimmune Lymphproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Order publications ​​​​​ Contact Info​ View a list of ...

  5. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Planning Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS): A Fact Sheet for the Public ... is called the radiation dose. People exposed to radiation will get ARS only if: The radiation dose ...

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... also need to make changes in your work duties or home and sports activities. Some of the ... Call for an appointment with your provider if: You have symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome Your symptoms ...

  7. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Priya Shirish; Deshmukh, Vijay; Golgire, Someshwar

    2012-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder, which is characterized by multiple odontogenic Keratocysts and basal cell carcinomas, skeletal, dental, ophthalmic, and neurological abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri, and facial dysmorphism. Pathogenesis of the syndrome is attributed to abnormalities in the long arm of chromosome 9 (q22.3-q31) and loss or mutations of human patched gene (PTCH1 gene). Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiological criteria and ideally confirmed by deoxyribo nucleic acid analysis. We report a case of a 9-year-old girl presenting with three major and one minor feature of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Radiologic findings of the syndrome are easily identifiable on Orthopantomogram, chest X-ray, and Computed tomography scans. These investigations prompt an early verification of the disease, which is very important to prevent recurrence and better survival rates from the coexistent diseases. PMID:22363371

  8. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can happen in three different ways: A benign pituitary tumor secretes ACTH. This tumor, called a pituitary adenoma, is by far the most common tumor linked to Cushing’s syndrome. As a result, the ...

  9. The Nelson's syndrome... revisited.

    PubMed

    Assié, Guillaume; Bahurel, Hélène; Bertherat, Jérôme; Kujas, Michèle; Legmann, Paul; Bertagna, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Adrenalectomy is a radical therapeutic approach to control hypercortisolism in some patients with Cushing's disease. However it may be complicated by the Nelson's syndrome, defined by the association of a pituitary macroadenoma and high ACTH secretion after adrenalectomy. This definition has not changed since the end of the fifties. Today the Nelson's syndrome must be revisited with new to criteria using more sensitive diagnostic tools, especially the pituitary magnetic resonance imaging. In this paper we will review the pathophysiological aspects of corticotroph tumor growth, with reference to the impact of adrenalectomy. The main epidemiological data on the Nelson's syndrome will be presented. More importantly, we will propose a new pathophysiological and practical approach to this question which attempts to evaluate the Corticotroph Tumor Progression after adrenalectomy, rather than to diagnose the Nelson's syndrome. We will discuss the consequences for the management of Cushing's disease patients after adrenalectomy, and will also draw some perspectives. PMID:16132203

  10. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  11. Short Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. ​ Additional Links Crohn's Disease Diarrhea Peptic Ulcer Disease Upper GI Series What I need to ... complications of short bowel syndrome may include malnutrition peptic ulcers—sores on the lining of the stomach or ...

  12. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause certain learning challenges, including problems learning mathematics and with memory. 7 Most girls and women ... Stanford School of Medicine Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research. (n.d.). Turner syndrome . Retrieved June 26, ...

  13. Cushing syndrome - exogenous

    MedlinePlus

    McGee S. Cushing syndrome. In: Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders. 2012:chap 13. Stewart PM, Krone NP. The adrenal cortex. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, ...

  14. Ectopic Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    McGee S. Cushing syndrome. In: Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders. 2012:chap 13. Stewart PM, Krone NP. The adrenal cortex. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, ...

  15. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23 from the mother and 23 from the father. In most cases of Down syndrome, a child ... carries a small risk of complications, such as preterm labor and miscarriage. Percutaneous umbilical blood sampling (PUBS) or ...

  16. Dandy-Walker Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... The key features of this syndrome are an enlargement of the fourth ventricle (a small channel that ... early infancy, include slow motor development and progressive enlargement of the skull. In older children, symptoms of ...

  17. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Restless Legs Syndrome ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  18. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... safe. Safe activities are usually things like non-competitive bike riding, swimming, or dancing — just be sure ... tobacco products. Although Marfan syndrome does not affect intelligence, some students may need extra help in class ...

  19. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  20. Shaken Baby Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Randell C.; Smith, Wilbur L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the history, epidemiology, biomechanics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, long-term management, and prevention of shaken baby syndrome. It presents medical-legal issues as well as a discussion of programs aimed at prevention of physical abuse. (Author/DB)

  1. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome? Obesity hypoventilation (HI-po-ven-tih- ... NHLBI Research Featured in HBO Documentary Series on Obesity Hear people talk about their challenges and successes ...

  2. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some obese people in which poor breathing leads to ... Maintain a healthy weight and avoid obesity. Use your CPAP or BiPAP treatment as your provider prescribed.

  3. Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... late adolescence. What Causes Tourette’s Syndrome? Results from twin and family studies have shown convincingly that TS has a strong genetic component. For twins who share the same genetic material, the likelihood ...

  4. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health. Overview Listen Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system that affects breathing. It causes a person to ...

  5. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heise, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Legalization of marijuana use will increase the number of people who will become long-term users. A prior medical record review study in Australia, in 2004, identified 19 chronic marijuana users who entered the emergency department with recurrent vomiting associated with abdominal pain. Routine treatment of the nausea and vomiting, associated with the chronic marijuana abuse, with antiemetics is ineffective in patients with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Narcotics do not relieve the abdominal pain but may cause worsening rebound pain. The best treatment of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome was found to be abstinence from the recreational use of marijuana. It is important for advanced practice nurses to place cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome in their differentials of patients presenting to the emergency department with recurrent nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. They need to be knowledgeable about cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome to provide the proper management of care for this specific medical condition. PMID:25929220

  6. Kearns-Sayre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NINDS NINDS Kearns-Sayre Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... the number of organs involved. Early diagnosis and periodic electrocardiogram (ECG) are important since heart block can ...

  7. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  8. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine, and Vice-Chair of UAMS Department of Anesthesiology) and Michael Schmitz (MD, Director of Pediatric CV ... Arkansas Children's Hospital, Professor in UAMS Departments of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics). ndss resources Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome ...

  9. Unmasking Diogenes Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kashinath; Gopinath, Hima; Kini, Hema; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual “mask” of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen. PMID:26120158

  10. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Rami, Mohamed; Khattala, Khalid; Elmadi, Aziz; Afifi, My Abderrahmane; Youssef, Bouabdallah

    2013-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS) is a neurocristopathy and is characterized by Hirschsprung's disease (HD), deafness, and depigmentation of hairs, skin, and iris. Is a very rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression. This report describes a 4-day-old male newborn with Waardenburg's syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the colon and terminal ileum, and review the relevant literature for draws attention to the causal relationship between these two entities. PMID:23565307

  11. Hennekam lymphangiectasia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Mathew, A.; Rajesh, R.; Kurien, G.; Unni, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    Hennekam lymphangiectasia syndrome is a rare disorder comprising of intestinal and renal lymphangiectasia, dysmorphic facial appearance and mental retardation. The facial features include hypertelorism with a wide, flat nasal bridge, epicanthic folds, small mouth and small ears. We describe a case of a multigravida with bad obstetric history and characteristic facial and dental anomalies and bilateral renal lymphangiectasia. To our knowledge this is the first case of Hennekam lymphangiectasia syndrome with anodontia to be reported from India. PMID:22022089

  12. Ketonuria and HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gubbala, Phanendra Kumar; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Zakaria, Faris

    2009-01-01

    We recently managed a patient with the HELLP syndrome (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelet count) where there was a delay in diagnosis due to gastroenteritis. This case also reiterates the varied or lack of symptomatology in patients developing HELLP and obscuring the initial diagnosis. Patients with HELLP syndrome have significant maternal morbidity and mortality, hence clinical vigilance and high suspicion play a key role in the diagnosis and subsequent management. PMID:21686464

  13. Adams-Oliver syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, Nadia; Ahmad Ghumman, Faisal Iftikhar; Janjua, Shahbaz A; Ejaz, Amer; Butt, Umar Aftab

    2014-05-01

    A new-born male baby with typical features of Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is described. Adams-Oliver syndrome is the association of aplasia cutis congenita with terminal transverse limb reduction defects with or without cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita. The patient presented with brachydactyly involving all the digits of his hands and shortening of both big toes along with aplasia cutis on the scalp. There was no systemic involvement. The patient was placed on regular follow-up. PMID:24906278

  14. Hemiparkinsonism-hemiatrophy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ayromlou, Hormoz; Najmi, Safa; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2011-03-01

    The syndrome of hemiparkinsonism-hemiatrophy is an uncommon form of secondary Parkinsonism that presents with unilateral body Parkinsonism plus variable atrophy on the same side. Diagnosis of this syndrome needs a complete past medical history taking, as well as assessment of the familial history, clinical examination and complete paraclinical tests.The response to medical therapy has been variable in various researches. This case showed a good response to the addition of a dopamine agonist to levodopa therapy. PMID:21361726

  15. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Munish; Kohli, Monica; Sharma, Naresh; Siddiqui, Saif Rauf; Tulsi, S.P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder with complete penetrance and extreme variable expressivity. The authors present a case of an 11-year-old girl with typical features of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with special respect to medical and dental problems which include multiple bony cage deformities like spina bifida with scoliosis having convexity to the left side, presence of an infantile uterus and multiple odonogenic keratocysts in the maxillofacial region. PMID:22442551

  16. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jawa, Deepti Singh; Sircar, Keya; Somani, Rani; Grover, Neeraj; Jaidka, Shipra; Singh, Sanjeet

    2009-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities. Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been reported from India. We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital. PMID:21887009

  17. Metabolic syndrome update.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M

    2016-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a multiplex risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. It is composed of atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance and elevated glucose, a pro-thrombotic state, and a pro-inflammatory state. Excess energy intake and concomitant obesity are the major drivers of the syndrome. Lifestyle intervention can reverse metabolic risk factors, but at times, drug therapies or bariatric surgery may be required to control more overt risk factors. PMID:26654259

  18. Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, J C; Pilon, V A; Lee, J K

    1988-01-01

    The case of a 15-year-old white boy with a clinical diagnosis of von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis and a history of multiple fractures of long bones is presented. Radiographic studies and tissue biopsy revealed the presence of multiple nonossifying fibromas of bone. Review of the clinical features and correlation with the pathologic data support a diagnosis of Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome, a malformation syndrome different from but possibly related to von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis. PMID:3139710

  19. Locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sepcić, J; Sepić-Grahovac, D; Strenja-Grubesić, J; Antonelli, L; Andrasević, D

    1992-01-01

    A patient, young fisherman, with a locked-in syndrome is reported, in whom intact consciousness, quadriplegia of spastic type, voluntary eye blinking, (de)sursumvergence and anarthria were observed. Thrombosis of the basilar artery and slightly disturbed bioelectrogenesis of the cerebral cortex were proved by clinical examination. The patient died after 41 days. At the autopsy thrombosis a. basilaris and ventrobasal pontine infarction were confirmed. Differential diagnosis of this and similar syndromes has been discussed. PMID:1463800

  20. Hoarseness revealing Ortner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, X; Vliebergh, J; Sauer, M; Leys, M

    2015-06-01

    Hoarseness is a common phenomenon that can be caused by uncommon pathology. One seldom cause is Ortner's syndrome, a rare cardiovocal disease that can lead to hoarseness due to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy induced by mechanical compression of the nerve by cardiovascular structures. This case report describes a case of a 41-year-old woman with sudden onset of hoarseness. The patient had known pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger's syndrome. PMID:26103539

  1. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Dalapicola, Monique Coelho; Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2016-01-01

    Ross syndrome is a rare disease characterized by peripheral nervous system dysautonomia with selective degeneration of cholinergic fibers. It is composed by the triad of unilateral or bilateral segmental anhidrosis, deep hyporeflexia and Holmes-Adie's tonic pupil. The presence of compensatory sweating is frequent, usually the symptom that most afflicts patients. The aspects of the syndrome are put to discussion due to the case of a male patient, caucasian, 47 years old, with clinical onset of 25 years. PMID:26982793

  2. [Chronic exertional compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rom, Eyal; Tenenbaum, Shay; Chechick, Ofir; Burstein, Gideon; Amit, Yehuda; Thein, Ran

    2013-10-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is an uncommon phenomenon first reported in the mid 50's. This condition is characterized by sharp pain during physical activity, causing reduction in activity frequency or intensity and even abstention. This syndrome is caused by elevation of the intra-compartmental pressure which leads to decreased tissue perfusion, thus ischemic damage to the tissue ensues. Chronic exertional syndrome is usually related to repetitive physical activity, usually in young people and athletes. The physical activity performed by the patient causes a rise in intra-compartmental pressure and thereby causes pain. The patient discontinues the activity and the pain subsides within minutes of rest. Chronic exertional syndrome is reported to occur in the thigh, shoulder, arm, hand, foot and gluteal region, but most commonly in the leg, especially the anterior compartment. The diagnosis of chronic exertional syndrome is primarily based on patients' medical history, supported by intramuscular pressure measurement of the specific compartment involved. Treatment of chronic exertional syndrome, especially the anterior and lateral compartment of the leg is mainly by surgery i.e. fasciotomy. If the patient is reluctant to undergo a surgical procedure, the conservative treatment is based on abstention from the offending activity, changing footwear or using arch support. However, the conservative approach is not as successful as surgical treatment. PMID:24450036

  3. Muir-Torre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feser, Christina; Grekin, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the presence of at least one sebaceous gland neoplasm, associated with an underlying visceral malignancy. Muir-Torre syndrome is believed to be a subtype of Lynch Syndrome. Affected individuals are found to have germline mutations predominantly in DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, and much less frequently, MLH1. The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with multiple cutaneous neoplasms including sebaceoma, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma; personal history of colorectal and endometrial cancer; and family history of colorectal cancer; found to have a deletion at mismatch repair gene MLH1. It is important to recognize the role of these less common gene deletions in producing the Muir-Torre syndrome phenotype, and consider the correlation of cutaneous manifestations with internal disease. The authors discuss the clinical presentation of Muir-Torre syndrome, methods of diagnosis, and the importance of regular medical surveillance to detect and prevent disease progression in Muir-Torre syndrome patients and their family members.

  4. Infections in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Andra; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, Franois; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with a risk of severe infections. While neutropenia is likely to be the main predisposing factor, several other immune defects have been reported, including impaired neutrophil function, B-, T- and NK-cell defects and the possible consequences of iron overload due to red blood cell transfusions. The advanced age of most patients, their frequent comorbidities, and the fact that drugs such as hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide, which are effective in myelodysplastic syndromes but can transiently worsen neutropenia, may increase the risk of infection and their severity in this context. The majority of infections in myelodysplastic syndromes are bacterial, while the incidence of fungal infections is not well known and viral infections seem to be rare. No prophylactic measures against infections have demonstrated efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes. However, pending more data, we propose here some recommendations for the management of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In the future, an important contribution can be made by prospective trials testing the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to infection in these patients, especially in the context of the new drugs available for myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:22733024

  5. Psoriasis and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Malkic Salihbegovic, Eldina; Hadzigrahic, Nermina; Cickusic, Amra Jakubovic

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Psoriasis is a chronic skin ailment which can be connected with an increased occurrence of other illnesses, including the metabolic syndrome. Examinees and methods: A prospective study has been conducted which included 70 patients affected by psoriasis, both genders, older than 18 years. Average age being 47,14 (SD=±15,41) years, from that there were 36 men or 51,43 and 34 women or 48,57%. The average duration of psoriasis was 15,52 (SD= ±12,54) years. For purposes of diagnosing the metabolic syndrome, the criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, (NCEP ATP III) were used. For purposes of detecting the severity and spread of psoriasis, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) was used. Results: The incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with psoriasis was 38,57%. Average values of PASI score were 16,65. The increase in values of PASI score and metabolic syndrome were statistically highly connected. (r=0,3, p=0,0001). Conclusion: Psoriasis is connected with metabolic syndrome, there is a positive correlation between the severity of psoriasis and frequency of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26005254

  6. Metabolic syndrome and sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kostoglou-Athanassiou, I; Athanassiou, P

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder characterized by abdominal obesity, hypertension, increased triglycerides, decreased HDL cholesterol and increased blood glucose. Accumulating evidence strongly indicates that insulin resistance and an increased amount of abdominal fat are the pathogenic factors for the characteristics of metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome is characterized by an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies indicate that sleep apnea may be a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It has also been suggested that the metabolic syndrome or "syndrome X" should also comprise obstructive sleep apnea and should then be called syndrome "Z". It appears that obstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome are characterized by the same pathophysiologic environment, which increases the risk for the development of cardiovascular disease. The increased amount of visceral fat and the accompanying insulin resistance seem to be the main characteristics responsible for the development of obstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:18923660

  7. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes: A review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as Gorlin Syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B are sometimes referred to as HPS. HPS is characterized by the development of hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract as well as several extra-intestinal findings such as dermatological and dysmorphic features or extra-intestinal cancer. The syndromes are rare and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. The diagnosis of HPS has traditionally been based on clinical criteria, but can sometimes be difficult as the severity of symptoms range considerably from only a few symptoms to very severe cases - even within the same family. De novo cases are also frequent. However, because of the discovery of several associated germline-mutations as well as the rapid development in genetics it is now possible to use genetic testing more often in the diagnostic process. Management of the syndromes is different for each syndrome as extra-intestinal symptoms and types of cancers differs. Clinical awareness and early diagnosis of HPS is important, as affected patients and at-risk family members should be offered genetic counselling and surveillance. Surveillance in children with HPS might prevent or detect intestinal or extra-intestinal complications, whereas in adulthood surveillance is recommended due to an increased risk of cancer e.g. intestinal cancer or breast cancer. PMID:25022750

  8. Lemierre's syndrome--the syndrome quite forgotten.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Kavita; Diwan, A G; Gupt, Ankur

    2012-03-01

    A 17 year old male presented with seizures, headache, and fever and left chronic suppurative otitis media. A 35 year old male presented with headache, giddiness, vomiting, pain in eyes, diplopia and right chronic suppurative otitis media. Brain imaging in both revealed thrombosis of lateral and sigmoid sinus and also of internal jugular vein on the left and right side respectively. A diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome was made in both. They were treated with antibiotics and anticoagulants, and they responded to treatment. We want to report this case as we feel, that with the advent of the antibiotic era, this syndrome has become rare; and so "quite forgotten" or overlooked, by many physicians. PMID:22799122

  9. Fragile X Syndrome (FXS): Associated Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated tremor/ataxia syndrome Fragile X Syndrome (Full Mutation) Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common ... Fragile X syndrome often results from a full mutation of the FMR1 gene. Learn more about FXS ...

  10. Marfan syndrome: An eyesight of syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-12-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the glycoprotein gene fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of MFS. The revised Ghent diagnostics nosology of Marfan syndrome is established in accordance with a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. The pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. The treatment includes prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in MFS. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder. PMID:25606393

  11. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  12. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies). Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm) are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull) are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling). Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome). Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser ablation, photodynamic therapy and topical chemotherapy. Radiotherapy should be avoided. Vitamin A analogs may play a preventive role against development of new BCCs. Life expectancy in NBCCS is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications can be substantial. Regular follow-up by a multi-specialist team (dermatologist, neurologist and odontologist) should be offered. Patients with NBCCS should strictly avoid an excessive sun exposure. PMID:19032739

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Holt-Oram syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Condition atrio-digital syndrome atriodigital dysplasia cardiac-limb syndrome heart-hand syndrome, type 1 HOS ventriculo-radial syndrome ... clinical and genetic spectrum of the Holt-Oram syndrome (heart-hand syndrome). N Engl J Med. 1994 Mar ...

  14. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  15. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was

  16. Behavioral features of CHARGE syndrome (Hall-Hittner syndrome) comparison with Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M; Rosner, Beth; Dykens, Elisabeth; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2005-03-15

    CHARGE syndrome, or Hall-Hitner syndrome (HHS), has been delineated as a common syndrome that includes coloboma, choanal atresia, cranial nerve dysfunction (particularly asymmetric facial palsy and neurogenic swallowing problems), characteristic ear abnormalities, deafness with hypoplasia of the cochlea and semicircular canals, genital hypoplasia, and variable heart defects, orofacial clefting, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, thymic/parathyroid hypoplasia, spine anomalies, short broad neck with sloping shoulders, and characteristic facial features. We conducted behavioral and personality assessments in 14 boys with HHS syndrome aged 6-21 years, and compared their characteristics with similar data from 20 age-matched boys with Down syndrome (DS), 17 boys with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and 16 boys with Williams syndrome (WS). We used the Reiss Profile of Fundamental Goals and Motivation Sensitivities, the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC). All 14 boys with HHS were legally deaf, and 10 of the 14 were also legally blind. In comparison these other syndromes, boys with HHS had behavior that resembled autistic spectrum disorder. They were socially withdrawn, lacked interest in social contact, and manifested reduced seeking of attention from others, with hyperactivity and a need to maintain order. Though the boys with HHS showed decreased social interaction, they were not as socially impaired as in classic autism. Their language was delayed due to dual sensory impairment, cranial nerve deficits, and chronic medical problems, but their language style was not abnormal (no echolalia or jargon, no scripted phrases, and no pronoun reversal). Boys with HSS appeared frustrated, but they were not aggressive, or at risk for delinquency, manifesting few stereotypic behaviors or unusual preoccupations. They did not have a restricted repertoire of activities and interests. Their behavioral features appeared to be due to dual sensory impairment affecting hearing and vision, rather than to primary autistic spectrum disorder, but successful remediation requires similar educational interventions, which are discussed herein. PMID:15637708

  17. Genetics of Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The Brugada syndrome is characterized by unique 'coved-type' ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads of electrocardiogram and ventricular fibrillation, and is responsible for 4 to 12% of sudden cardiac death in the general population. The frequency is higher in Southeast Asia including Japan compared with Western countries. Brugada syndrome is an inherited disease usually transmitted in an autosomal-dominant manner, and incomplete penetrance is frequently seen within affected families. To date, 20 genes have been associated with Brugada syndrome, but pathogenic mutations in the genes are identified in only about 30% of patients. The genetic background includes mutations in genes encoding sodium channel, calcium channels and potassium channels, as well as proteins affecting ion channels. Mutations in SCN5A, encoding the cardiac predominant sodium channel α-subunit, account for 20 to 30% of patients with Brugada syndrome and mutations in other genes only account for about 5% of patients. Furthermore, a recent genome-wide association study has identified new loci associated with the susceptibility of Brugada syndrome. PMID:26223181

  18. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Robin R.

    1997-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome, an important contributor to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, has been associated with both traumatic and nontraumatic disorders. Fat embolization after long bone trauma is probably common as a subclinical event. Fat emboli can deform and pass through the lungs, resulting in systemic embolization, most commonly to the brain and kidneys. The diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is based on the patient’s history, supported by clinical signs of pulmonary, cerebral and cutaneous dysfunction and confirmed by the demonstration of arterial hypoxemia in the absence of other disorders. Treatment of fat embolism syndrome consists of general supportive measures, including splinting, maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and the administration of oxygen. Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilatory assistance can be indicated. The role of corticosteroids remains controversial. Early stabilization of long bone fractures has been shown to decrease the incidence of pulmonary complications. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that the exact method of fracture fixation plays a minor role in the development of pulmonary dysfunction. As more is learned about the specifics of the various triggers for the development of fat embolism syndrome, it is hoped that the prospect of more specific therapy for the prevention and treatment of this disorder will become a reality. PMID:9336522

  19. Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous disorder, after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, and impacts approximately 1 in 20000 live births. Sturge-Weber syndrome is not inherited, but rather occurs exclusively sporadically, in both males and females and in all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sturge-Weber syndrome presents at birth with a capillary malformation on the face (port-wine birthmark) with later diagnosis of abnormal vasculature in the eye and the brain which result in a range of complications. The underlying somatic mosaic mutation causing both Sturge-Weber syndrome and isolated port-wine birthmarks was recently discovered and is an activating mutation in GNAQ. When a newborn presents with a facial port-wine birthmark on the upper face, that child has a 15-50% risk of developing Sturge-Weber syndrome brain and/or eye involvement, depending on the extent of the birthmark, and close monitoring and appropriate screening is essential for early diagnosis and optimal treatment. Treatment options include laser therapy for lightening of the birthmark, eye drops and surgery for glaucoma management, and aggressive anticonvulsant treatment, low dose aspirin, and neurosurgery where necessary. Future possible treatments based upon new knowledge of the somatic mutation and downstream pathways are currently being considered and studied. PMID:26564078

  20. Tourette's syndrome: update.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R D; Connolly, J E; Baird, P A

    1984-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a widely misunderstood chronic disorder that develops in childhood and is usually lifelong. It is characterized by waxing and waning of involuntary motor and phonic tics. The features and differential diagnosis are discussed in this paper. The estimated prevalence rate of Tourette's syndrome, 0.05%, implies that this disorder is not rare. The reasons for diagnostic confusion are outlined, and the genetic and neurotransmitter features discussed. The management of Tourette's syndrome has become more effective with the availability of at least two psychoactive drugs, haloperidol and pimozide. Although the cause of this syndrome is thought to be organic, these drugs and their adverse effects are best known to psychiatrists. Psychiatric and multidisciplinary intervention is often necessary because of the frequent association of psychosocial problems, cognitive and learning difficulties, and aggravation of the symptoms by stress. The understanding of Tourette's syndrome will probably increase significantly with the advent of the newer imaging techniques and the rapid progress of research in the neurosciences. PMID:6587930

  1. Management of Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ruth H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The two core neuroacanthocytosis (NA) syndromes, chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) and McLeod syndrome, are progressive neurodegenerative disorders that primarily affect the basal ganglia. The characteristic phenotype comprises a variety of movement disorders including chorea, dystonia, and parkinsonism, as well as psychiatric and cognitive symptoms attributable to basal ganglia dysfunction. These disorders are symptomatically managed on a case-by-case basis, with very few practitioners seeing more than a single case in their careers. Methods A literature search was performed on PubMed utilizing the terms neuroacanthocytosis, chorea-acanthocytosis, and McLeod syndrome, and articles were reviewed for mentions of therapies, successful or otherwise. Results There have been no blinded, controlled trials and only one retrospective case series describing ChAc. The various therapies that have been used in patients with NA syndromes are summarized. Discussion Management remains at present purely symptomatic, which is similar in principle to other more common basal ganglia neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease (HD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, there are some specific issues particular to NA syndromes that merit attention. An integrated multidisciplinary approach is the ideal management strategy for these complex and multifaceted neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26504667

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Ochoa syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Ochoa syndrome Ochoa syndrome Enable ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Nager syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Nager syndrome Nager syndrome Enable ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Arts syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association of the Deaf National Ataxia Foundation The Arc: For People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Gene Reviews (1 link) Arts Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Arts syndrome Scientific ...

  5. Fatigue Fighters in Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Fatigue Fighters in Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Frederick Vivino, MD, FACR, University of Pennsylvania, Penn Rheumatology Associates & Sjögren’s Syndrome Center, Philadelphia, for authoring this Patient Education ...

  6. General Information about Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... myelodysplastic syndromes includes supportive care, drug therapy, and stem cell transplantation. Patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome who have ... in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Chemotherapy with stem cell transplant Stem cell transplant is a method of ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic Syndromes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... myelodysplastic syndromes includes supportive care, drug therapy, and stem cell transplantation. Patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome who have ... in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Chemotherapy with stem cell transplant Stem cell transplant is a method of ...

  8. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... myelodysplastic syndromes includes supportive care, drug therapy, and stem cell transplantation. Patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome who have ... in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Chemotherapy with stem cell transplant Stem cell transplant is a method of ...

  9. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Constipated Diarrhea IBS with Diarrhea Nausea and IBS Bloating in IBS Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Gynecological ... Constipated Diarrhea IBS with Diarrhea Nausea and IBS Bloating in IBS Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Gynecological ...

  10. Pregnancy and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who We Are Contact Us Donate Pregnancy and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Jump to Topic Living with IBS Relationships and ... age represent a significant portion of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). There is evidence that the menstrual cycle ...

  11. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep-wake syndrome - irregular ... routine during the day. The amount of total sleep time is normal, but the body clock loses ... have a different condition, such as shift work sleep disorder or jet lag syndrome.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by X chromosome mosaicism are said to have mosaic Turner syndrome . Researchers have not determined which genes ... and will be missing the other sex chromosome. Mosaic Turner syndrome is also not inherited. In an ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Knobloch syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... however, most people with Knobloch syndrome have normal intelligence. Related Information What does it mean if a ... Bueno MR. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome. Mol Vis. 2009;15:801- ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: FG syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... family diagnosed with the disorder. FG syndrome affects intelligence and behavior. Almost everyone with the condition has ... Pembrey M, Moraine C, Briault S. FG syndrome: linkage analysis in two families supporting a new gene localization ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Maffucci syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Maffucci syndrome usually have a normal lifespan, and intelligence is unaffected. The extent of their physical impairment ... Ollier disease and maffucci syndrome? An in-depth analysis of the literature. Neurosurgery. 2009 Dec;65(6): ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Emanuel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22 . The extra chromosome is known as a derivative 22 or der(22) chromosome. As a result ... supernumerary der(22)t(11;22) syndrome supernumerary derivative 22 chromosome syndrome Related Information How are genetic ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Lynch syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome: genetics and clinical implications. Ann Intern Med. 2003 Apr 1;138(7):560- ... Schlegelberger B, Eisinger F, Hutter P, Olschwang S. Clinical utility gene card for: Lynch syndrome (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, ...

  18. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome? Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a disorder of the neuromuscular junction-the ... electrical impulses between these nerve and muscle cells. LEMS is an autoimmune condition; in such disorders the ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart defects occur in most people with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome . The heart problems most commonly associated with this condition include ... MalaCards: cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: Cardiofaciocutaneous ... International Children's Craniofacial Association National Organization ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Feingold syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brunner HG. Feingold syndrome: clinical review and genetic mapping. Am J Med Genet A. 2003 Nov 1; ... Brunner HG. MYCN haploinsufficiency is associated with reduced brain size and intestinal atresias in Feingold syndrome. Nat ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: GRACILE syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GRACILE syndrome GRACILE syndrome Enable ...

  2. Syndromic Disorders with Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  3. Syndromic disorders with short stature.

    PubMed

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Poland syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... combination of dextrocardia with right-sided Poland syndrome. Ann Thorac Surg. 2012 Oct;94(4):e103-4. ... Clinical analysis of 113 patients with Poland syndrome. Ann Thorac Surg. 2015 Mar;99(3):999-1004. ...

  5. Clinical features of syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Rice, David P

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of normal suture development and function can result in premature suture fusion, craniosynostosis. This review focuses on syndromic forms of craniosynostosis. More than 100 syndromes in which craniosynostosis is a feature have been documented and here the most common conditions including Apert and Crouzon syndromes are described as well as other conditions with a particularly interesting molecular etiology, such as Saethre- Chotzen and craniofrontonasal syndrome. PMID:18391497

  6. [Hypoxic-ischemic syndrome

    PubMed

    Procianoy, R S; Silveira, R C

    2001-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the hypoxic-ischemic syndrome, emphasizing its physiopathology, clinical manifestations, and treatment. SOURCES: Electronic search in the Medline and LILACS databases, with selection of the most relevant articles. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The hypoxic-ischemic syndrome is a multisystem disease with generalized manifestations. The physiopathology is based on hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and reperfusion with cellular injury caused by failure of ATP production secondary to ischemia, and overproduction of oxidative substances caused by reperfusion. Neurological, cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, gastrointestinal, renal, and hematological manifestations are frequent. Multisystem clinical management is complex; the neuroprotective approach is still experimental; and the prognosis is not good for those patients with severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. CONCLUSIONS: The management of the hypoxic-ischemic syndrome is a great challenge to pediatricians., since treatment requires multisystem intervention. PMID:14676894

  7. [Messy house syndrome].

    PubMed

    Barocka, A; Seehuber, D; Schone, D

    2004-11-01

    The messy house syndrome (Diogenes syndrome) is present when, owing to a disordering of the personality structure, a person is unable to keep order, for example, in the household or his finances. Such persons are also referred to as "messies". Useless objects are hoarded in such quantities that the apartment can no longer be lived in. In many cases, the disorder is due to an underlying mental problem such as dementia, schizophrenia, ADHS or obsessive-compulsive disorders. The Prader-Willi syndrome is also associated with an unusual compulsion to hoard things or food. In the first instance, treatment is aimed at the underlying condition (neuroleptic agents, SSRI). New studies appear to suggest that the particular concomitant cognitive and emotional disturbances associated with hoarding respond to cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:15581103

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  9. The cancer cachexia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puccio, M; Nathanson, L

    1997-06-01

    The cancer cachexia syndrome is clinically characterized by anorexia, wasting, weight loss, weakness, fatigue, poor performance status, and impaired immune function, which are unresolved by forced caloric intake. Diminished nutritional intake, maladaptive metabolic processes, and increased metabolic expenditure all play roles in the development of this syndrome. Multiple mediators of both tumor and host cell origin are mechanistic in its etiology. Treatment is not entirely satisfactory and should be directed toward improvement in the quality of life of the patient and should often include nutritional counseling. It should take into consideration both disease and treatment related factors as well as the cachexia syndrome itself. Use of progestogens (megesterol acetate, medroxyprogesterone), corticosteroids (decadron, prednisone), metoclopramide, tetrahydrocannabinol (dronabinol), and possibly anabolic steroids (nandrolone decanoate, oxandrolone), melatonin, and eicosapentaenoic acid, may yield therapeutic benefit. PMID:9208884

  10. Laxative abuse syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oster, J R; Materson, B J; Rogers, A I

    1980-11-01

    Laxative abuse syndrome (LAS) is a type of Münchausen syndrome characterized by surreptitious abuse of purgatives. Clinical findings are often perplexing and may mimic inflammatory bowel disease or malabsorption syndromes. Patients frequently complain of diarrhea alternating with constipation and may have nausea, vomiting and weight loss. Psychiatric disturbances are common and may include anorexia nervosa. Melanosis coli and cathartic colon, acid-base disturbances (usually metabolic alkalosis), sodium, potassium and water depletion, hyperuricemia, hyperaldosteronism and other electrolyte changes are possible complications. Diagnosis may be extremely difficult and may require special chemical analysis of urine and feces and search of the patient's possessions. Treatment is frustrating because the patient is rarely willing to admit to laxative abuse let alone cooperate in attempting to stop it. Physicians must be aware of the LAS in order to avoid harming the patient with extensive, expensive and often invasive (including laparotomy) procedures. PMID:7234824

  11. Loin pain hematuria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Adeel S.; Salameh, Hassan; Erickson, Stephen B.; Prieto, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS), first described in 1967, is a rare pain syndrome, which is not well understood. The syndrome is characterized by severe intermittent or persistent flank pain, either unilateral or bilateral, associated with gross or microscopic hematuria. LPHS is a diagnosis of exclusion as there still is not a consensus of validated diagnostic criteria, though several criteria have been proposed. The wide differential diagnosis would suggest a meticulous yet specific diagnostic work-up depending on the individual clinical features and natural history. Several mechanisms regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS have been proposed but without pinpointing the actual causative etiology, the treatment remains symptomatic. Treatment modalities for LPHS are diverse including simple analgesia, opioid analgesic and kidney autotransplantation. This review article summarizes the current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS along with the steps required for proper diagnosis and a discussion of the different therapeutic approaches for LPHS. PMID:26798473

  12. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Adeel S; Salameh, Hassan; Erickson, Stephen B; Prieto, Mikel

    2016-02-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS), first described in 1967, is a rare pain syndrome, which is not well understood. The syndrome is characterized by severe intermittent or persistent flank pain, either unilateral or bilateral, associated with gross or microscopic hematuria. LPHS is a diagnosis of exclusion as there still is not a consensus of validated diagnostic criteria, though several criteria have been proposed. The wide differential diagnosis would suggest a meticulous yet specific diagnostic work-up depending on the individual clinical features and natural history. Several mechanisms regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS have been proposed but without pinpointing the actual causative etiology, the treatment remains symptomatic. Treatment modalities for LPHS are diverse including simple analgesia, opioid analgesic and kidney autotransplantation. This review article summarizes the current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS along with the steps required for proper diagnosis and a discussion of the different therapeutic approaches for LPHS. PMID:26798473

  13. Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Radecki, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Parsonage-Turner Syndrome (PTS), also referred to as idiopathic brachial plexopathy or neuralgic amyotrophy, is a rare disorder consisting of a complex constellation of symptoms with abrupt onset of shoulder pain, usually unilaterally, followed by progressive neurologic deficits of motor weakness, dysesthesias, and numbness. Although the etiology of the syndrome is unclear, it is reported in various clinical situations, including postoperatively, postinfectious, posttraumatic, and postvaccination. The identification of the syndrome in the postoperative patient remains a challenge as symptoms may easily be attributed to sequelae of surgical positioning, postoperative recovery, or postanesthetic block pain. The purpose of this review is to bring forth salient, identifiable factors which may assist the surgical clinician in identifying the condition sooner. An early and proper diagnosis affords the opportunity to treat the patient accordingly and to the satisfaction of both surgeon and patient. PMID:21886536

  14. [Van der Woude syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calzavara Pinton, P G; Gavazzoni, R; Carlino, A; Leali, C

    1989-04-01

    The familial occurrence of lower lip pits (fistulae, sinuses) with or without the cheilo-gnathouranoschisis complex (cleft lip and/or cleft palate) was first described by A. Van der Woude in 1954. The lip pits syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance (80%), but its clinical expression is variable. Sometimes there may be microforms with only conical elevation and/or surface openings without any deeper sinuses at the typical sites and without cleft lip/palate. We examined 8 members of an Italian family and we observed one member with lip pits and submucous cleft palate and 4 members with only lip pits. Three of these affected members had congenital absence of second premolars too. The presentation, mode of inheritance, aetiology and genetic significance of lip pits syndrome are reviewed. In our opinion this is the first Italian report of the Van der Woude syndrome. PMID:2807397

  15. Shy Drager syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hodder, J

    1997-06-01

    Shy Drager Syndrome (SDS) is a movement disorder which is often referred to as a parkinson plus syndrome or Multiple System Atrophy (MSA). For patients afflicted with this condition, rigidity and bradykinesia are the primary extrapyramidal symptoms which are present. The "plus" refers to autonomic nervous system dysfunction which leads to much of the disability seen in this disorder. Syncope, urinary incontinence, impotence, constipation, fecal incontinence, cardiac arrythmias as well as other symptoms occur as a result of widespread pathological changes in multiple areas of the central and autonomic nervous system. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the pathophysiology, signs and symptoms of and treatment for SDS. Nursing Care of the patient and family coping with Shy Drager Syndrome and the challenges it presents to the Movement Disorder Nurse are discussed. A coordinate, multidisciplinary team approach is suggested. PMID:9295481

  16. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. PMID:26603476

  17. Congenital hypothyroidism in Rieger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Örnek, Nurgül; Oğurel, Reyhan; Örnek, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    Rieger syndrome (RS) is a multiple malformation syndrome characterized by ocular manifestations and extraocular defects. Herein, we report a 9-year-old boy who exhibited Rieger Syndrome phenotype as well as congenital hypothyroidism which may be an underappreciated feature of RS. PMID:24666291

  18. 18p- syndrome and hypopituitarism.

    PubMed Central

    Artman, H G; Morris, C A; Stock, A D

    1992-01-01

    A patient is described with 18p- syndrome and hypopituitarism. This is the first patient with this syndrome who has been shown to benefit from growth hormone therapy. Patients with this syndrome who have growth deficiency should be considered for evaluation for hypopituitarism, if the quality of their lives would improve with an increase in stature. Images PMID:1404301

  19. CHARGE Syndrome: An Educators' Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Katherine G.; Smith, Isabel M.; Blake, Kim

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces educators to CHARGE syndrome (CS), a multiple anomaly developmental syndrome that is usually accompanied by some degree of hearing and visual impairment. We describe the defining medical characteristics of the syndrome, and following this, outline the behavioral features commonly seen in individuals with CS. Throughout, we…

  20. Williams Syndrome Information for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Karen

    This paper uses a question-and-answer format to summarize information about Williams syndrome, a neurobehavioral congenital disorder which affects development in cognitive, behavioral, and motor areas. Questions address the following topics: characteristics of Williams syndrome; medical problems associated with Williams syndrome; characteristic…

  1. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  2. A Journey with Klinefelter Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cover, Virginia Isaacs

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience having a son with Klinefelter Syndrome. Klinefelter Syndrome, also known as 47,XXY, is estimated to occur in 1 out of 600 males, making it the most common chromosomal disorder. Babies with Klinefelter Syndrome rarely have any physical differences that are detectable, which is the reason that so few…

  3. A Journey with Klinefelter Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cover, Virginia Isaacs

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience having a son with Klinefelter Syndrome. Klinefelter Syndrome, also known as 47,XXY, is estimated to occur in 1 out of 600 males, making it the most common chromosomal disorder. Babies with Klinefelter Syndrome rarely have any physical differences that are detectable, which is the reason that so few

  4. Anorectal malformations and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zlotogora, J; Abu-Dalu, K; Lernau, O; Sagi, M; Voss, R; Cohen, T

    1989-11-01

    During 1980 to 1986, 89 children with Down syndrome and 42 with imperforate anus were diagnosed among 64,870 liveborn infants in the Jewish population of Jerusalem. Two of the children had both Down syndrome and imperforate anus. This indicates a high incidence of imperforate anus among children with Down syndrome (2.2%). PMID:2531980

  5. Recognizing postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Daniel; Agnew, Donna; Stiles, Lauren; Ditoro, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis, and management of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), a potentially debilitating autonomic disorder that can have many causes and presentations. POTS can be mistaken for panic disorder, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Clinician suspicion for the syndrome is key to prompt patient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26967958

  6. An Overview of Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    This booklet presents information regarding the history, incidence, and effects of Down Syndrome. The first chapter, presenting an historical perspective of the condition, provides information on counseling parents of Down Syndrome children, and the chromosome structures seen in Down Syndrome patients. The next chapter discusses medical aspects in

  7. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:27226847

  8. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    MedlinePlus

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious form of pneumonia . It is caused by a virus that was first identified ... chap 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe ... syndrome (SARS)and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In: ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources (6 links) International Rett Syndrome Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders RareConnect Resource List from the University of Kansas Medical Center Rett Syndrome Association UK Rett Syndrome Research Trust Gene Reviews (1 link) MECP2-Related Disorders Genetic ...

  10. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and

  11. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and…

  12. Syndrome by Any Other Name. . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Drew

    2008-01-01

    The word "syndrome" is one of those words that has slipped into one's vocabulary with few realizing what exactly it means or all the implications it carries. The word "syndrome" can be defined as "a group of signs and symptoms that occur together and characterize a particular abnormality or condition." Typically, a syndrome will be defined by…

  13. Syndrome by Any Other Name. . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Drew

    2008-01-01

    The word "syndrome" is one of those words that has slipped into one's vocabulary with few realizing what exactly it means or all the implications it carries. The word "syndrome" can be defined as "a group of signs and symptoms that occur together and characterize a particular abnormality or condition." Typically, a syndrome will be defined by

  14. An Overview of Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    This booklet presents information regarding the history, incidence, and effects of Down Syndrome. The first chapter, presenting an historical perspective of the condition, provides information on counseling parents of Down Syndrome children, and the chromosome structures seen in Down Syndrome patients. The next chapter discusses medical aspects in…

  15. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is a disease characterized by excessively increased heart rate during orthostatic challenge associated with symptoms of orthostatic intolerance including dizziness, exercise intolerance, headache, fatigue, memory problems, nausea, blurred vision, pallor, and sweating, which improve with recumbence. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome patients may present with a multitude of additional symptoms that are attributable to vascular vasoconstriction. Observed signs and symptoms in a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome include tachycardia at rest, exaggerated heart rate increase with upright position and exercise, crushing chest pain, tremor, syncope, loss of vision, confusion, migraines, fatigue, heat intolerance, parasthesia, dysesthesia, allodynia, altered traditional senses, and thermoregulatory abnormalities. There are a number of possible dermatological manifestations of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome easily explained by its recently discovered pathophysiology. The author reports the case of a 22-year-old woman with moderate-to-severe postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with numerous dermatological manifestations attributable to the disease process. The cutaneous manifestations observed in this patient are diverse and most noticeable during postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome flares. The most distinct are evanescent, hyperemic, sharply demarcated, irregular patches on the chest and neck area that resolve upon diascopy. This distinct “evanescent hyperemia” disappears spontaneously after seconds to minutes and reappears unexpectedly. Other observed dermatological manifestations of this systemic disease include Raynaud’s phenomenon, koilonychia, onychodystrophy, madarosis, dysesthesia, allodynia, telogen effluvium, increased capillary refill time, and livedo reticularis. The treatment of this disease poses a great challenge. The author reports the unprecedented use of an oral angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist resulting in remarkable improvement. PMID:25161760

  16. Recognizing Battered Wife Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    Battered wife syndrome is difficult to detect because the women usually do not volunteer the diagnosis. They often present with vague somatic complaints such as headache, lower back pain, abdominal pain, pelvic pain and dyspareunia. Four case histories demonstrate the difficulty in recognizing the cause of these complaints. The diagnosis was often missed because straight-forward, non-threatening, open-ended questions were not asked initially. The family physician's primary role is to identify the syndrome and initiate psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is centred on reversing “learned helplessness” and developing a new self-concept. This can be enhanced by an interval or transition house. PMID:21274067

  17. Hypocomplementemic Urticarial Vasculitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jim; McCarty, Morgan

    2012-01-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, as opposed to urticarial vasculitis or urticarial vasculitis syndrome, is a rare disease process where the exact pathophysiology remains unknown. This article discusses the case of a 34-year-old Hispanic man with an ongoing history of chronic urticaria comprising episodes induced by low ambient temperatures, emotional stress, and spontaneous occurrences. This article serves as a consolidated reference for specialists to comprehensively review the plethora of systemic manifestations that may accompany urticarial vasculitis and highlights new systemic complications reported in association with this disease which are also observed in this case. PMID:22328958

  18. [Donohue syndrome or leprechaunism].

    PubMed

    Planchenault, D; Martin-Coignard, D; Rugemintwaza, D; Bah, A-G; Cosson, L; Labarthe, F; Chantepie, A; Saliba, E

    2014-02-01

    Donohue syndrome or leprechaunism is a severe congenital insulin-resistance syndrome. It is characterized by intra-uterine and neonatal growth retardation, typical dysmorphic features, and metabolic abnormalities with hyperinsulinism and hyperandrogenism. Problems in energy metabolism and loss of glucose homeostasis are responsible for early death in the first year of life. We describe a case with a novel homozygote mutation in the insulin receptor gene. This patient had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with heart failure and bronchial compression leading to clinical deterioration over 5 days and subsequently death. A treatment with recombinant IGF-1 was tried without efficacy. PMID:24388461

  19. Primary sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Chokroverty, S; Sharp, J T

    1981-01-01

    Polygraphic study in 18 men with the sleep apnoea syndrome showed central, upper airway obstructive, and mixed apnoeas. Fifty per cent of the total apnoea time was central, 33% was obstructive, and 17% was mixed. Apnoeic episodes were accompanied by oxygen desaturation, relative bradycardia and hypotonia of orofacial muscles innervated by ponto-medullary neurons. During regular breathing these muscles revealed tonic and phasic inspiratory EMG activities. The data suggest that the primary sleep apnoea syndrome results from a dysfunction of the central control of breathing. PMID:7334397

  20. Shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Altimier, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Non-accidental head trauma in infants is the leading cause of infant death from injury. Clinical features that suggest head trauma (also known as shaken baby syndrome or shaken impact syndrome) include the triad consisting of retinal hemorrhage, subdural, and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage in an infant with little signs of external trauma. Abusive head injuries are among the most common causes of serious and lethal injuries in children. These injuries may result from impact or shaking or a combination of these mechanisms. These mechanisms cause the child's head to undergo acceleration/ deceleration movements, which may create inertial movement of the brain within the cranial compartment. PMID:18287904

  1. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is a term used to describe a group of hereditary carcinoma syndromes. Patients carrying a characteristic autosomal dominant gene aberration exhibit various endocrine carcinomas, as well as other anatomical abnormalities. Unfortunately, familial endocrine carcinoma patients are too often unrecognized by primary care providers, resulting in delayed diagnosis and treatment, with profound consequences related to morbidity and mortality. This article will introduce the various MEN syndromes and the infusion nurse's role in the care of these individuals and their families. PMID:26536410

  2. [Pulmonary-renal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Risso, Jorge A; Mazzocchi, Octavio; De All, Jorge; Gnocchi, César A

    2009-01-01

    The pulmonary-renal syndrome is defined as a combination of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis. The coexistence of these two clinical conditions is due to diseases with different pathogenic mechanisms. Primary systemic vasculitis and Goodpasture syndrome are the most frequent etiologies. Systemic lupus erythematosus, connective tissue diseases, negative anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis and those secondary to drugs are far less common causes. An early diagnosis based on clinical, radiologic, laboratory and histologic criteria enables early treatment, thus diminishing its high morbidity-mortality rate. Therapy is based on high doses of corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and plasmapheresis. PMID:20053612

  3. The alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    McKeon, A; Frye, M A; Delanty, Norman

    2008-08-01

    The alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a common management problem in hospital practice for neurologists, psychiatrists and general physicians alike. Although some patients have mild symptoms and may even be managed in the outpatient setting, others have more severe symptoms or a history of adverse outcomes that requires close inpatient supervision and benzodiazepine therapy. Many patients with AWS have multiple management issues (withdrawal symptoms, delirium tremens, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, seizures, depression, polysubstance abuse, electrolyte disturbances and liver disease), which requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. Although AWS may be complex, careful evaluation and available treatments should ensure safe detoxification for most patients. PMID:17986499

  4. [The Patau syndrome].

    PubMed

    Misanović, Verica; Jonuzi, Fedat; Biscević, Emir; Uzicanin, Sajra; Vegar, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Known as D trisomy, Patau syndrome is the third chromosomopathy according to frequency. One of the 5000 newborn carries the trisomy 13. In over 80% cases there is fresh mutation with non separation in myeosis of older mother. The mosaic or translocation forms are not rare. The mail newborn with Patau syndrome is shown in this article. We notice: microcephalia, dolihocephalia, microphthalmia, cheilognatopalatoshisis, polydactilia, and found ultrasound changes at the brain, hearth and genitourinary system. Cytogenetic finding show: mail cariotype with aberrations 47, XY + 13, Sy Patau. PMID:12762245

  5. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  6. Understanding Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freischlag, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was once debated in the world of vascular surgery. Today, it is more understood and surprisingly less infrequent than once thought. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is composed of three types: neurogenic, venous, and arterial. Each type is in distinction to the others when considering patient presentation and diagnosis. Remarkable advances have been made in surgical approach, physical therapy, and rehabilitation of these patients. Dedicated centers of excellence with multidisciplinary teams have been developed and continue to lead the way in future research. PMID:25140278

  7. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. PMID:24845493

  8. The telomere syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Armanios, Mary; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    There has been mounting evidence of a causal role for telomere dysfunction in a number of degenerative disorders. Their manifestations encompass common disease states such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and bone marrow failure. Although these disorders seem to be clinically diverse, collectively they comprise a single syndrome spectrum defined by the short telomere defect. Here we review the manifestations and unique genetics of telomere syndromes. We also discuss their underlying molecular mechanisms and significance for understanding common age-related disease processes. PMID:22965356

  9. Shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Heidi A; Woodson, Arnetta; Christian, Cindy W; Helfaer, Mark A; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Huh, Jimmy W

    2006-09-01

    Unfortunately, head trauma caused by shaken baby syndrome is a common occurrence in infants and young children. The proper treatment and safety of these children can be enhanced by the nurse's ability to recognize features characteristic of this syndrome. If abuse is suspected, appropriate physicians, child-protective, and law-enforcement agencies should be notified immediately. Further research must be done to improve the understanding of the mechanisms associated with this disorder in the ultimate hope of improving the lives and outcome of infants and children. PMID:16962449

  10. Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, C J; Gilden, D H

    2001-08-01

    The strict definition of the Ramsay Hunt syndrome is peripheral facial nerve palsy accompanied by an erythematous vesicular rash on the ear (zoster oticus) or in the mouth. J Ramsay Hunt, who described various clinical presentations of facial paralysis and rash, also recognised other frequent symptoms and signs such as tinnitus, hearing loss, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and nystagmus. He explained these eighth nerve features by the close proximity of the geniculate ganglion to the vestibulocochlear nerve within the bony facial canal. Hunt's analysis of clinical variations of the syndrome now bearing his name led to his recognition of the general somatic sensory function of the facial nerve and his defining of the geniculate zone of the ear. It is now known that varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Compared with Bell's palsy (facial paralysis without rash), patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome often have more severe paralysis at onset and are less likely to recover completely. Studies suggest that treatment with prednisone and acyclovir may improve outcome, although a prospective randomised treatment trial remains to be undertaken. In the only prospective study of patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, 14% developed vesicles after the onset of facial weakness. Thus, Ramsay Hunt syndrome may initially be indistinguishable from Bell's palsy. Further, Bell's palsy is significantly associated with herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. In the light of the known safety and effectiveness of antiviral drugs against VZV or HSV, consideration should be given to early treatment of all patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome or Bell's palsy with a 7-10 day course of famciclovir (500 mg, three times daily) or acyclovir (800 mg, five times daily), as well as oral prednisone (60 mg daily for 3-5 days). Finally, some patients develop peripheral facial paralysis without ear or mouth rash, associated with either a fourfold rise in antibody to VZV or the presence of VZV DNA in auricular skin, blood mononuclear cells, middle ear fluid, or saliva. This indicates that a proportion of patients with "Bell's palsy" have Ramsay Hunt syndrome zoster sine herpete. Treatment of these patients with acyclovir and prednisone within 7 days of onset has been shown to improve the outcome of recovery from facial palsy. PMID:11459884

  11. Hair tourniquet syndrome: revisited

    PubMed Central

    HUSSIN, P.; MAWARDI, M.; MASRAN, M.S.; GANAISAN, P.

    2015-01-01

    Hair tourniquet syndrome is a rare condition. It is an important emergency condition where urgent attention is needed. In this condition, body appendages are strangulated by hair that acts like a tourniquet. A strand or strands of hair act like a circumferential constriction band and subsequently strangulate the body appendages. Commonly affected sites include fingers, toes or even genitals. Failure to identify and release the acute constriction may result in amputation of affected body part. We report two cases of hair tourniquet syndrome of the thumb and toe that were successfully released without complications. PMID:26712259

  12. Hyponatremia and Hepatorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia and hepatorenal syndrome are severe complications in patients with cirrhosis and ascites resulting from circulatory abnormalities (splanchnic and systemic vasodilatation) that develop with portal hypertension. Both conditions are associated with an increased risk of death. Hyponatremia and renal failure may develop in patients with cirrhosis due to causes other than portal hypertension. Making an accurate differential diagnosis is important both therapeutically and prognostically. In this article, we discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and management of hyponatremia and hepatorenal syndrome in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:27099594

  13. Toe tourniquet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Naglaa M; Khan, Ubaid U; Mirza, Shazia J; Al-Malki, Talal A

    2014-08-01

    Toe tourniquet syndrome refers to external, mechanical, circumferential constriction of the toes. We report a series of 4 infants with toe tourniquet syndrome from Saudi Arabia who presented during wintertime with very similar symptoms (approximately 48 hours of inconsolable crying and irritability), similar involved region (toes), and similar constricting agent (hairs). Immediate removal of the hair fibers was carried out in all patients, fortunately followed by fast healing with no signs of tissue necrosis. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of the condition were vital in attaining the good outcome and preventing ischemic complications.  PMID:25129188

  14. Purple urine bag syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pillai, B P; Chong, V H; Yong, A M

    2009-05-01

    Purple urine bag syndrome is a rare disorder where the plastic urinary catheter bag and tubing turn purple. The discolouration is due to the presence of indigo and indirubin pigments which are metabolites of tryptophan. It is associated with urinary tract infection. Bacteria that produce sulphatase and phosphatase are involved in the formation of these pigments. Purple urine bag syndrome is associated with higher morbidity and mortality, compared to urinary tract infection without this phenomenon. We present a case report of this rare phenomenon occurring in a 68-year-old woman. PMID:19495508

  15. Syndrome in Question*

    PubMed Central

    Tonolli, Vanessa Mello; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Tonello, Cláudio Sampieri; Pires, Rafaelle Batistella; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Hay-Wells syndrome or AEC (Ankyloblepharon, Ectodermal dysplasia and Cleft lip and palate syndrome) is a rare ectodermal disorder. The treatment is aimed to prevent clinical complications. We describe the case of a four-month old male patient with erosions on the scalp, trunk and arms, trachyonychia, deformity of the ears, micropenis, cleft palate, decreased eyebrow and eyelash hairs, in addition to antecedents of surgical correction of ankyloblepharon. The importance of the correct diagnosis is emphasized, besides the investigation of the associated diseases, treatment of complications and genetic counseling of the parents. PMID:24770526

  16. Parry-Romberg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Hasan; Yologlu, Zeynel; Sargın, Husamettin; Metin, Melike Rusen

    2015-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome is an acquired, slowly progressive disorder, occurring more in women, primarily affecting one side of the face, mainly characterized by unilateral atrophy, and loss of skin and subcutaneous tissues of face, muscles, and bones. Ocular and neurologic involvements are common. The possible etiology is unclear without any known cure. We report a rare case of Parry-Romberg syndrome with classical features. The clinical features, radiological imaging findings, differential diagnosis, and available treatment options are discussed in this report. PMID:26492117

  17. [Angiography in thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bogalho, L; Seixas, I; Martins, J M; Pisco, J M

    1998-01-01

    The thoracic outlet syndrome is a changeable clinical syndrome caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle of the upper extremity, within the cervicoaxillary channel. From April 1980 through May 1995, 24 patients with clinical thoracic outlet syndrome were evaluated by selective arteriography. The diagnosis was confirmed in seven patients, in 14 the exam was normal and in the last three cases another arterial pathology was detected--subclavian artery occlusion, subclavian artery kinking and vertebral steal syndrome. The authors' aim is to emphasize arteriography as a diagnostic exam for thoracic outlet syndrome, very useful in the detection and localization of arterial compression. It also allows the diagnosis of other arterial entities. PMID:9542176

  18. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the very early stages of the baby's development in the womb. More rarely, the gene changes are inherited because one of the parents carries ... on WAGR Syndrome conducted by other institutions and organizations: For ... of Child Health and Human Development and open to all children and adults with ...

  19. [Familial Wolfram syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bessahraoui, M; Paquis, V; Rouzier, C; Bouziane-Nedjadi, K; Naceur, M; Niar, S; Zennaki, A; Boudraa, G; Touhami, M

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and it is mainly characterized by the presence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Other symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, deafness, and psychiatric disorders are less frequent. The WFS1 gene, responsible for the disease and encoding for a transmembrane protein called wolframin, was localized in 1998 on chromosome 4p16. In this report, we present a familial observation of Wolfram syndrome (parents and three children). The propositus was a 6-year-old girl with diabetes mellitus and progressive visual loss. Her family history showed a brother with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness since childhood and a sister with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and bilateral hydronephrosis. Thus, association of these familial and personal symptoms is highly suggestive of Wolfram syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis (biology), which showed the presence of WFS1 homozygous mutations c.1113G>A (p.Trp371*) in the three siblings and a heterozygote mutation in the parents. Our observation has demonstrated that pediatricians should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. PMID:25282462

  20. The Tie retraction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geerling, Gerd; Neppert, Birte; Hemmant, Bridget

    2012-12-01

    Tissue retraction is implicated in the pathogenesis of various ophthalmic disorders. Here we describe the clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathophysiology of a form of retraction syndrome which - to the best of our knowledge - has not been reported in the ophthalmic literature so far. We have termed this condition - consisting of a slowly progressive pseudovertical shortening of tie length due to a horizontal extension of girth length - the "Tie retraction syndrome" (TRS). Other pathognomonic features include an increased tie tip to belt buckle distance and a prolapse of the subumbilical fat pad (SUFP). The syndrome has a clear male to female preponderance and shows an increasing incidence with age and income before tax. Based on a newly proposed grading scheme we discuss and illustrate the diagnosis as well as the medical and surgical management options of this abundant, but often undiagnosed condition. The authors have no explanation for the apparent lack of awareness for this widely preponderant syndrome and its severe cosmetically disfiguring potential. We thus would like to invite all fellow colleagues with expertise in the field to comment or present their views. PMID:23088329

  1. [Guillain-Barr syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rzeszutko, W; Sciborski, R; Bili?ska, M

    1989-05-01

    A case of the Gullain-Barr syndrome was observed in a woman aged 18 years. The course was acute and fatal. Sedimentation plasmaferesis was applied in the treatment. A peculiarity of the case was the ascending course of paralysis and coexistence of encephalomyelitis. PMID:2629331

  2. The Syndrome of Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, James Allen; Reid Duffy, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment. PMID:26690229

  3. Annotation: The Savant Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Pamela; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Whilst interest has focused on the origin and nature of the savant syndrome for over a century, it is only within the past two decades that empirical group studies have been carried out. Methods: The following annotation briefly reviews relevant research and also attempts to address outstanding issues in this research area.…

  4. Bosma arhinia microphthalmia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M; Lee, John

    2006-01-15

    Bosma et al. [1981] delineated a syndrome affecting two unrelated males with severe hypoplasia of the nose and eyes, palatal abnormalities, deficient taste and smell, inguinal hernias, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with cryptorchidism, and normal intelligence. Other patients with this syndrome have been reported as cases of arhinia with associated defects. During embryonic development, the nasal placodes form 28 days after conception shortly after the optic vesicles makes contact with the overlying surface ectoderm at 26-27 days, and both layers invaginate to form the eyes between 34 and 44 days. Mice with homozygous mutations of Pax6, manifest underdevelopment of ocular and nasal structures, and a network of developmentally regulated genes function downstream of Pax6 to form nasal, ocular, and pituitary structures. These genes represent candidate genes for this disorder, and familial recurrence of Bosma syndrome has been reported to occur. This report describes two sporadic unrelated cases of this rare syndrome and briefly reviews the findings in previously reported cases. PMID:16353241

  5. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and

  6. [Management of myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Duchmann, Matthieu; Fenaux, Pierre; Cluzeau, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are heterogeneous diseases whose molecular characteristics have only been identified in recent years. Better identification of prognostic factors, larger access to allogeneic stem cell transplantation and the advent of new drugs notably hypomethylating agents (azacitidine, decitabine) and lenalidomide have improved patient outcome. PMID:26410692

  7. Dravet Syndrome History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dravet, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) is a complex form of epilepsy that was first described in France in 1978. Because the myoclonic component of this epilepsy is not always present and because some variability has been observed in the symptomatology, the name was changed to Dravet syndrome in 1989. The genetic aetiology of this epilepsy

  8. Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarte, Andrea R.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current research on Fragile X Syndrome, and how that knowledge can be used to guide successful intervention. The genetic etiology of Fragile X is reviewed and the physical, cognitive, adaptive, behavioral, and emotional phenotypes of children with the disorder are described, highlighting the differences in…

  9. Munchausen syndrome and necrophilia.

    PubMed

    Faguet, R A

    1980-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome and necrophilia are uncommon disorders which do not appear to be related. It is suggested, however, that both of them center on "return to the womb" fantasies and may represent variants of each other. Specifically, the Munchausen patient's symptom triad (factitious illness, peregrination, pseudologia fantastica) is seen to reflect a wish for death and reunion with the maternal object. PMID:7466892

  10. Down Syndrome: Cognitive Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most prevalent cause of intellectual impairment associated with a genetic anomaly, in this case, trisomy of chromosome 21. It affects both physical and cognitive development and produces a characteristic phenotype, although affected individuals vary considerably with respect to severity of specific impairments. Studies…

  11. Vaccinations and Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Korff, Christian M

    2015-11-01

    Investigators from various university hospitals, reference medical institutions and epilepsy centers, and the national institute for public health and environment in the Netherlands, studied the effect of vaccinations on seizure risk and disease course in patients with Dravet syndrome (DS). PMID:26933542

  12. The Syndrome of Catatonia.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, James Allen; Reid Duffy, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment. PMID:26690229

  13. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... affected and will not perform normally during the test. In recent years, diagnostic ultrasonography and MRI have been used to help diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome and exclude other causes of hand and wrist symptoms. These technologies can identify swelling of the median nerve and ...

  14. Tourette Syndrome: Classroom Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaturvedi, Amrita; Gartin, Barbara C.; Murdick, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurobiological disorder characterized by various involuntary motor movements and vocal tics. Symptoms of TS emerge between the ages of 3 to 8 years old, are most severe when an individual reaches puberty, and decrease by the time a person is 20 years old. Additionally, persons with TS may have secondary disabilities of…

  15. Antiphospohlipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Danza, Alvaro; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Khamashta, Munther

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterised by a variety of clinical and immunological manifestations. The clinical hallmarks of this syndrome are thrombosis and poor obstetric outcomes, including miscarriages, fetal loss and severe pre-eclampsia. The main antiphospholipid antibodies include lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein I. The combination of aspirin and heparin is considered the standard of care for women with antiphospholipid syndrome and embryo-fetal losses; however, aspirin in monotherapy may have a place in women with recurrent early miscarriage. A good benefit-risk ratio of low-molecular-weight heparin in pregnancy thrombosis treatment has been reported. Warfarin must be avoided if possible throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Adequate pregnancy management of women with antiphospholipid syndrome should include co-ordinated medical-obstetrical care, a close follow-up protocol and a good neonatal unit. Close blood pressure control and early detection of proteinuria, together with Doppler studies of the utero-placental circulation should be included in the management protocol. PMID:22079775

  16. Pharmacotherapy for Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Adam; Wirrell, Elaine; Kenney-Jung, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is an intractable pediatric epilepsy syndrome, starting in early childhood. This disorder typically manifests with febrile status epilepticus, and progresses to a multifocal epilepsy with febrile and non-febrile seizures with encephalopathy. Most cases are due to a mutation in the SCN1A gene. This article reviews treatments for DS, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapy. While many medications are used in treating the seizures associated with DS, these patients typically have medically refractory epilepsy, and polytherapy is often required. First-line agents include valproate and clobazam, although there are supportive data for topiramate, levetiracetam, stiripentol and the ketogenic diet. Other agents such as fenfluramine are promising therapies for Dravet syndrome. Sodium channel-blocking anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine and lamotrigine are generally contraindicated in this syndrome. Nonpharmacologic therapies (such as neurostimulation or surgery) are understudied in DS. Because DS is a global encephalopathy, pharmacologic treatment of non-epileptic manifestations of the disease is often necessary. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is often encountered in patients with DS, and psychostimulants can be helpful for this indication. Other psychoactive drugs are less studied in this context. Extrapyramidal and gait disorders are often encountered in DS as well. While DS is a severe epileptic encephalopathy with a high (up to 15 %) mortality rate in childhood, careful pharmacologic management can improve these patients' clinical picture and quality of life. PMID:26966048

  17. Doege-Potter Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, N; Attia, R; Green, A; Cane, P; Routledge, T

    2015-10-01

    Doege-Potter syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome presenting as a hypoinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia from the ectopic secretion of a prohormone of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) from a solitary fibrous tumour. Surgical resection is curative in the majority of cases. If, however, the diagnosis is not suspected and treatment is delayed, it can lead to hypoxic cerebral injury or death. The underlying tumour can be a benign or malignant pleural tumour but may be present in extrapleural sites. For a diagnosis of Doege-Potter syndrome, symptoms attributable to hypoglycaemia and low blood glucose levels should be present along with the secretion of prohormone IGF-II. We report a case of severe hypoglycaemia in a 76-year-old inpatient admitted for resection of a recurrent left-sided pleural tumour. Investigation revealed true hypoglycaemia and Doege-Potter syndrome was diagnosed. The tumour was completely resected and the patient made a full recovery with no further hypoglycaemic episodes. PMID:26414372

  18. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and stress management may also help relieve symptoms. Return to top More information on premenstrual syndrome (PMS) For more information about ... 8431) The Hormone Foundation Phone: 800-467-6663 Return to top Share this information! The information on our website is provided by ...

  19. Neuropathic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, James

    2015-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. This article provides information to patients regarding the treatment of neuropathic pain syndrome. It narrates how a doctor might explain neuropathic pain to a patient and particularly discusses the use of anticonvulsants. PMID:26095492

  20. Kleine-Levin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miglis, Mitchell G; Guilleminault, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome is a rare recurrent hypersomnia associated with symptoms of behavioral and cognitive impairment. This article reviews common presenting symptoms, differential diagnosis, diagnostic workup, and potential treatment options. Current updates on functional imaging studies and long-term neuropsychological studies are reviewed. PMID:27137943

  1. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  2. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  3. Fragile X syndrome (review).

    PubMed

    Pimentel, M M

    1999-06-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation currently known, associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities in both males and females, caused by a large expansion of a (CGG)n repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. Fragile X syndrome occurs in all racial and ethnic groups, and it is a condition of major epidemiological importance among mentally handicapped males. Therefore, this disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of any child with developmental delay, mental retardation or learning disability. The fragile X syndrome is due to the shutdown of the FMR1 gene transcription, and the pathogenesis of this syndrome is a consequence of absence of the protein product of the FMR1 gene (FMRP). Since the great majority of fragile X patients have the same type of mutation in a specific location of the gene, molecular analysis is extremely accurate for diagnosis of the disease, and important for genetic counseling of family members. Others genetic disorders are also caused by expanded trinucleotide repeats. PMID:10341296

  4. THE CONTEMPORARY POVERTY SYNDROME.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEWIS, HYLAN

    THE POVERTY SYNDROME IS A COMBINATION OF MANY NEGATIVE FACTORS, AMONG WHICH ARE LOW INCOME AND ABSENCE OF FAMILY LIFE. THE EROSION OF FAMILY LIFE IN MANY POOR FAMILIES IS DUE LESS TO A LACK OF RECOGNITION AND AFFIRMATION OF SO-CALLED MIDDLE-CLASS VALUES, THAN TO THE INABILITY TO SUPPORT THESE VALUES. BEHAVIOR OF THE BULK OF POOR FAMILIES APPEARS

  5. Chronic Mononucleosis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, S. E. D.; Haynes, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Debilitating illness in patients with only vague symptoms and minimal findings from physical examination and routine laboratory tests is frustrating for both patient and physician. A case of chronic mononucleosis is presented, and the literature describing the clinical and laboratory features of the syndrome is reviewed, with reference to four recent studies. Guidelines for diagnosis are suggested. PMID:21267209

  6. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical

  7. Buschke-ollendorff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, L A; Rountree, C B; Wilkin, J K

    1983-01-01

    Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome or dermatofibrosis lenticularis disseminata with osteopoikilosis is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by focal sclerotic bone dysplasia and associated connective tissue nevi. The following case report not only illustrates classic findings in this disease but also demonstrates previously reported, but little known features. PMID:6825465

  8. Broken Heart Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... permanently damaged, and the risk of broken heart syndrome happening again is low. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: October 8, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and ...

  9. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…

  10. Stiff person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nikhilesh, J; Sayeed, Z A; Saravanan, P K; Paul, J

    2001-05-01

    This communication considers a patient with episodic muscle spasms. Pharmacological intervention and electrophysiological studies provided adequate evidence confirming the diagnosis of stiff person syndrome. Electrophysiological studies in present communication similar to earlier reports, confirmed once again the autonomous state of the anterior horn cell in this disease process. PMID:11361276

  11. Shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miehl, Nickolaus J

    2005-01-01

    Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is a violent act of abuse that can cause myriad neurologic, cognitive, and other functional deficits. In the most serious cases, death can result. Health care practitioners, child care providers, and parents must be educated on the signs of SBS. Cases should be thoroughly reviewed and prevention strategies developed to prevent future incidents. PMID:17073042

  12. Dravet Syndrome History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dravet, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) is a complex form of epilepsy that was first described in France in 1978. Because the myoclonic component of this epilepsy is not always present and because some variability has been observed in the symptomatology, the name was changed to Dravet syndrome in 1989. The genetic aetiology of this epilepsy…

  13. Fragile X Syndrome Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic disorder Fragile X syndrome, which results from mutations in a gene on the X chromosome, is the most commonly inherited form of developmental and intellectual disability. The NICHD supports and conducts research on the diagnosis, treatment, management, prevention, and inheritance ...

  14. Modelling Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Animal models are extensively used in genetics, neuroscience and biomedical research. Recent studies illustrate the usefulness and the challenges of research utilising genetically engineered mice to explore the developmental biology of Down syndrome. These studies highlight many of the issues at the centre of what we understand about Down

  15. Modelling Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Animal models are extensively used in genetics, neuroscience and biomedical research. Recent studies illustrate the usefulness and the challenges of research utilising genetically engineered mice to explore the developmental biology of Down syndrome. These studies highlight many of the issues at the centre of what we understand about Down…

  16. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Graus, Francesc; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes relevant advances in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) with emphasis on particular syndromes and the impact of antibodies against surface antigens in their management. Recent findings PNS may present with symptoms that do not raise the suspicion of a paraneoplastic origin. The best example is anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis that in adult women frequently associates with ovarian teratoma. An electroencephalogram pattern described as ‘extreme delta brush’ was recently identified in 30% of patients with this disorder. Isolated myelopathy may have a paraneoplastic origin associated with amphiphysin or CV2 (CRMP5) antibodies. Jaw dystonia and laryngospasm can be the predominant symptom of the brainstem encephalitis associated with Ri antibodies. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor antibodies are the most common antibodies found in patients with limbic encephalitis and small cell lung cancer, and contactin-associated protein 2 antibodies in patients with Morvan’s syndrome and thymoma. Lastly, a recent study identified delta/notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor (DNER) as the target antigen of Tr antibodies, a marker of cerebellar ataxia and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Summary The number of antibodies relevant to PNS is now expanded to those against surface antigens. These antibodies do not confirm the paraneoplastic origin of the syndrome but predict a better response to immunotherapy. PMID:23041955

  17. Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kundert, Deborah King

    2008-01-01

    Although known for its distinctive food-related behaviors, Prader-Willi syndrome is a multisystem disorder with genetic, developmental, and behavioral features. Two separate and distinct eating disorders are noted: initial feeding difficulties and failure to thrive, and later overeating. Additional outcomes observed with this disorder include…

  18. Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weksberg, Rosanna; Shuman, Cheryl; Beckwith, J Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a model disorder for the study of imprinting, growth dysregulation, and tumorigenesis. Unique observations in this disorder point to an important embryonic developmental window relevant to the observations of increased monozygotic twinning and an increased rate of epigenetic errors after subfertility/assisted reproduction. PMID:19550435

  19. Neurological syndromes of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bahemuka, M; Shemena, A R; Panayiotopoulos, C P; al-Aska, A K; Obeid, T; Daif, A K

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients with brucellosis presented with neurological features closely simulating transient ischaemic attacks, cerebral infarction, acute confusional state, motor neuron disease, progressive multisystem degeneration, polyradiculoneuropathy, neuralgic amyotrophy, sciatica and cauda equina syndrome. Most patients improved quickly after adequate antibiotic treatment but chronic cases responded poorly. These protean neurological manifestations of brucellosis indicate that the underlying pathological mechanisms are diverse. PMID:3145961

  20. Sudden Death Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is an important disease of soybean in North and South America. SDS first occurred in South America in the early 1990s. In the U.S.A., SDS was first detected in AK in 1971. Now SDS occurs in most soybean production areas of the U.S. The SDS pathogen is a soil-borne fungu...

  1. Os Trigonum Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Os Trigonum Syndrome Text Size Print Bookmark ... extra (accessory) bone that sometimes develops behind the ankle bone (talus). It is connected to the talus ...

  2. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE) sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la transmission autosomique récessive. La forme typique associe 5 signes cliniques: une diarrhée grave rebelle nécessitant dans la majorité des cas une nutrition parentérale du fait de la malnutrition, une dysmorphie avec un front large et bombé, une racine du nez large et un hypertélorisme, des anomalies des cheveux qui sont fragiles, cassants, incoiffables et qualifiés de « laineux », un retard de croissance intra utérine et des anomalies de l’immunité à type de déficit en immunoglobuline ou d’absence de réponse aux antigènes vaccinaux. Des anomalies de deux protéines peuvent être à l’origine du syndrome SD/THE: TTC37, une protéine à motif TPR et SKIV2L, une hélicase à ARN, toutes 2 étant des constituants du complexe SKI humain. Le complexe SKI est un co-facteur de l’exosome cytoplasmique qui assure la dégradation des ARN aberrants ou exogènes. Le diagnostic est d’abord clinique puis confirmé par le séquençage des gènes TTC37 et SKIV2L. Le diagnostic différentiel avec les autres formes de diarrhées intraitables est fait grâce aux analyses anatomopathologiques qui montrent dans les autres formes, des lésions spécifiques. La prise en charge clinique repose sur la nutrition parentérale et la supplémentation en immunoglobuline si nécessaire. Un certain nombre d’enfants peuvent être sevrés de la nutrition parentérale et des supplémentations en immunoglobulines. En cas d’atteinte hépatique, celle-ci peut être sévère et conduire au décès. Même avec une prise en charge optimale, les enfants présentent une petite taille et, dans la moitié des cas, un retard mental modéré. Disease name/synonyms – Syndromic diarrhea – Phenotypic diarrhea – Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome – Intractable diarrhea of infancy with facial dysmorphism – Trichorrhexis nodosa and cirrhosis – Neonatal hemochromatosis phenotype with intractable diarrhea and hair abnormalities – Intractable infant diarrhea associated with phenotypic abnormalities and immune deficiency- Syndromatic diarrhea. [ORPHA84064 MIM 222470 and MIM614602]. Possibly chronic diarrhea and skin hyperpigmentation. PMID:23302111

  3. Vici syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Susan; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Smith, Luke; Gautel, Mathias; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Vici syndrome [OMIM242840] is a severe, recessively inherited congenital disorder characterized by the principal features of callosal agenesis, cataracts, oculocutaneous hypopigmentation, cardiomyopathy, and a combined immunodeficiency. Profound developmental delay, progressive failure to thrive and acquired microcephaly are almost universal, suggesting an evolving (neuro) degenerative component. In most patients there is additional variable multisystem involvement that may affect virtually any organ system, including lungs, thyroid, liver and kidneys. A skeletal myopathy is consistently associated, and characterized by marked fibre type disproportion, increase in internal nuclei, numerous vacuoles, abnormal mitochondria and glycogen storage. Life expectancy is markedly reduced.Vici syndrome is due to recessive mutations in EPG5 on chromosome 18q12.3, encoding ectopic P granules protein 5 (EPG5), a key autophagy regulator in higher organisms. Autophagy is a fundamental cellular degradative pathway conserved throughout evolution with important roles in the removal of defective proteins and organelles, defence against infections and adaptation to changing metabolic demands. Almost 40 EPG mutations have been identified to date, most of them truncating and private to individual families.The differential diagnosis of Vici syndrome includes a number of syndromes with overlapping clinical features, neurological and metabolic disorders with shared CNS abnormalities (in particular callosal agenesis), and primary neuromuscular disorders with a similar muscle biopsy appearance. Vici syndrome is also the most typical example of a novel group of inherited neurometabolic conditions, congenital disorders of autophagy.Management is currently largely supportive and symptomatic but better understanding of the underlying autophagy defect will hopefully inform the development of targeted therapies in future. PMID:26927810

  4. MICRO syndrome: an entity distinct from COFS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M; Hennekam, Raoul; Dobyns, William B; Roeder, Elizabeth; Busch, David

    2004-07-30

    Children born with the findings of microcephaly, cataracts and microcornea can result not only from a prenatal viral infection, but also from an autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders. We present three pairs of affected siblings with MICRO syndrome, who were born with congenital microcephaly, microcornea, and cataracts. MICRO syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome consisting of congenital microcephaly, cortical dysplasia, microcornea, cataracts, optic atrophy, severe mental retardation, hypotonic diplegia, and hypogenitalism. At birth, MICRO syndrome resembles Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal (COFS) syndrome, but it differs in the lack of the rapidly progressive neurologic features leading to severe brain atrophy with calcifications. Patients with MICRO syndrome manifest frontal cortical dysplasia, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cortical blindness with optic atrophy, profound mental retardation, and progressive joint contractures with growth failure. COFS syndrome shares also many clinical and cellular similarities with Cockayne syndrome (CS), and cultured cells in both conditions demonstrate hypersensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation due to impaired nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER studies in cultured fibroblasts from MICRO patients give normal results, so MICRO syndrome should be considered in children with features resembling COFS syndrome and CS, but who have normal NER. MICRO should be distinguished from other similar clinical disorders with normal NER by the presence of significant visual impairment and cortical blindness despite early surgery for congenital cataracts, frontal polymicrogyria, thin corpus callosum, and cortical atrophy by MRI. PMID:15216543

  5. LEOPARD syndrome is not linked to the Marfan syndrome and the Watson syndrome loci

    SciTech Connect

    Rass-Rothchild, A.: Abeliovitch, D.; Kornstein, A. |

    1994-09-01

    The acronym LEOPARD stands for a syndromic association of Lentigines, Eletrocardiographic changes, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth and sensorineural Deafness. Inheritance is autosomal dominant with high penetrance and variable expressivity. In 1990 Torok et al. reported on the association of LEOPARD and Marfan syndrome. In addition a clinical similarity (cardiac and cutaneous involvement) exists with the Watson syndrome (neurofibromatosis and pulmonic stenosis) which is linked to the marker D17S33 on chromosome 17. We studied possible linkage of LEOPARD syndrome to the Marfan syndrome locus on chromosome 15 (D15S1, MF13, and (TAAAA)n repeats) and to the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 in a family with 9 cases of LEOPARD syndrome. Close linkage between LEOPARD syndrome and both the Marfan locus on chromosome 15 and the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 was excluded (lod score <-2.0 through {theta} = 0.1).

  6. [Premenstrual syndrome and dysphoric premenstrual syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alba, Patricio; Rodríguez, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome is characterized by physical, cognitive, affective and behavioral symptoms that occur cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolved quickly at the beginning or within few days after menstruation started. The most severe form is represented by premenstrual dysphoric disorder included in the DSM 5. Over 40% of women experience emotional symptoms such as irritability, tension, emotional lability; and physical symptoms such as breast tenderness, fatigue, and abdominal distension. It has not yet been established the underlying pathophysiological mechanism, although hypotheses related to sex hormones and the GABAergic and serotonergic regulation have been postulated. Treatment includes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions, being serotonin reuptake inhibitors the first-line treatment. PMID:25545084

  7. The developmental trajectory of disruptive behavior in Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rice, Lauren J; Gray, Kylie M; Howlin, Patricia; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J; Einfeld, Stewart L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental trajectories of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and temper tantrums in four genetic syndrome groups. Participants were part of the Australian Child to Adult Development Study (ACAD), which collected information from a cohort of individuals with an intellectual disability at five time points over 18 years. Data were examined from a total of 248 people with one of the four following syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Williams syndrome. Changes in behaviors were measured using validated items from the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC). The results indicate that, while verbal aggression shows no evidence of diminishing with age, physical aggression, and temper tantrums decline with age before 19 years for people with Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, and William syndrome; and after 19 years for people with Prader-Willi syndrome. These findings offer a somewhat more optimistic outlook for people with an intellectual disability than has previously been suggested. Research is needed to investigate the mechanisms predisposing people with PWS to persistence of temper tantrums and physical aggression into adulthood. PMID:25983069

  8. Serotonin Syndrome Following Methylene Blue Administration for Vasoplegic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hencken, Laura; To, Long; Ly, Nancy; Morgan, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been used for additional blood pressure support in patients who develop severe, refractory vasoplegia; however, MB can induce serotonin syndrome, especially when used in conjunction with other serotonergic agents. We describe a case of serotonin syndrome in a patient who received MB for vasoplegic syndrome after left ventricular assist device implantation and discuss its presentation and management. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12705 (J Card Surg 2016;31:208-210). PMID:26934199

  9. Compartment Syndrome of the Calf Due to Nicolau Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enshaei, Ali; Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Nicolau syndrome in a 15 months old girl following an intramuscular injection of penicillin 6.3.3 in her left buttock. This case is unique because she developed compartment syndrome in her left calf far from her injection site. Her toe's tips gangrened in the course of her ailment. We hypothesized that the compartment syndrome might be produced by a probable intra-arterial injection that had produced embolic obstruction of the small and medium size arteries in her leg or a probable perineural or periarteial injection had produced secondary sympathetic stimulation, extensive vasospasm, compromised microcirculation and the development of compartment syndrome. PMID:26894227

  10. Compartment Syndrome of the Calf Due to Nicolau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enshaei, Ali; Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Nicolau syndrome in a 15 months old girl following an intramuscular injection of penicillin 6.3.3 in her left buttock. This case is unique because she developed compartment syndrome in her left calf far from her injection site. Her toe’s tips gangrened in the course of her ailment. We hypothesized that the compartment syndrome might be produced by a probable intra-arterial injection that had produced embolic obstruction of the small and medium size arteries in her leg or a probable perineural or periarteial injection had produced secondary sympathetic stimulation, extensive vasospasm, compromised microcirculation and the development of compartment syndrome. PMID:26894227

  11. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome: the worrisome twosome?

    PubMed

    Shah, D; Rasool, S

    2016-02-01

    By virtue of insulin resistance being the common etiology for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and metabolic syndrome, the cardiometabolic risks of these two syndromes are shared. The usual concerns of a PCOS patient are cosmetic or reproductive. However, there are more serious concerns past the reproductive age. Early treatment of insulin resistance, hypertension and hyperlipidemia reduces the long-term risk. This review highlights the unhealthy association of metabolic syndrome with PCOS and emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis, patient education and long-term follow-up beyond the reproductive age into menopause to prevent the long-term serious co-morbidities. PMID:26624567

  12. [Recovery of Cushing syndrome revealing McCune-Albright syndrome].

    PubMed

    Halioui-Louhaichi, S; Dridi, Y; Azzabi, O; Selmi, I; Fetni, I; Siala, N; Maherzi, A

    2016-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is a rare feature of McCune-Albright syndrome. Treatments consist of bilateral adrenalectomy followed by lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment. However, cases of spontaneous remission of CS have been reported in the literature. We report a case of McCune-Albright syndrome with CS treated with metyrapone for 30 months with prolonged remission after a 12-year follow-up. Adrenalectomy may be avoided in some cases of CS caused by McCune-Albright syndrome. Metyrapone could be a good alternative to surgical treatment. PMID:26552628

  13. Exome analysis of connective tissue dysplasia: death and rebirth of clinical genetics?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Golder N

    2014-05-01

    Exome results are reported for two patients with connective tissue dysplasia, one refining a clinical diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos to Marfan syndrome, the other suggesting arthrogryposis derived from maternofetal Stickler syndrome. Patient 1 had mutations in transthyretin (TTR), fibrillin (FBN1), and a calcium channel (CACNA1A) gene suggesting diagnoses of transthyretin amyloidosis, Marfan syndrome, and familial hemiplegic migraines, respectively. Patient 2 presented with arthrogryposis that was correlated with his mother's habitus and arthritis once COL2A1 mutations suggestive of Stickler syndrome were defined. Although DNA results often defy prediction by the best of clinicians, these patients illustrate needs for ongoing clinical scholarship (e.g., to delineate guidelines for management of mutations like that for hyperekplexia in Patient 2) and for interpretation of polygenic change that is optimized by clinical genetic/syndromology experience (e.g., suggesting acetazolamide therapy for Patient 1 and explaining arthrogryposis in Patient 2). PMID:24664531

  14. INSIGHTS INTO BRAIN DEVELOPMENT FROM NEUROGENETIC SYNDROMES: EVIDENCE FROM FRAGILE X SYNDROME, WILLIAMS SYNDROME, TURNER SYNDROME AND VELOCARDIOFACIAL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Elizabeth; Mazaika, Paul; Reiss, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few decades, behavioral, neuroimaging and molecular studies of neurogenetic conditions, such as Williams, fragile X, Turner and velocardiofacial (22q11.2 deletion) syndromes, have led to important insights regarding brain development. These investigations allow researchers to examine “experiments of nature” in which the deletion or alteration of one gene or a contiguous set of genes can be linked to aberrant brain structure or function. Converging evidence across multiple imaging modalities has now begun to highlight the abnormal neural circuitry characterizing many individual neurogenetic syndromes. Furthermore, there has been renewed interest in combining analyses across neurogenetic conditions in order to search for common organizing principles in development. In this review, we highlight converging evidence across syndromes from multiple neuroimaging modalities, with a particular emphasis on functional imaging. In addition, we discuss the commonalities and differences pertaining to selective deficits in visuospatial processing that occur across four neurogenetic syndromes. We suggest avenues for future exploration, with the goal of achieving a deeper understanding of the neural abnormalities in these affected populations. PMID:19376197

  15. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome.

    PubMed

    Almashraki, Nabeel; Abdulnabee, Mukarram Zainuddin; Sukalo, Maja; Alrajoudi, Abdullah; Sharafadeen, Iman; Zenker, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypoplastic or aplastic nasal alae, cutis aplasia on the scalp, and other features including developmental delay, failure to thrive, hearing loss, mental retardation, hypothyroidism, dental abnormalities, and anomalies in cardiac and genitourinary systems. More than 60 cases of this syndrome have been reported to date. We describe the case of a male infant with typical symptoms of JBS. In addition, a new clinical feature which has not previously been documented, that is anemia requiring frequent blood transfusions and mild to moderate thrombocytopenia was observed. A molecular study was performed which revealed a novel homozygous UBR1 mutation. Possible explanations for this new association are discussed. PMID:22072859

  16. Inpatient alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monte-Secades, R; Rabuñal-Rey, R; Guerrero-Sande, H

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted for a femur fracture; an alcohol fetor was noted on admission. The following day, the patient began to experience tremors and nervousness. Intravenous haloperidol was administered. Shortly afterwards, the patient experienced two generalized seizures and then began to experience delirium and uncontrollable agitation. The patient was diagnosed with alcohol withdrawal syndrome; high doses of intravenous midazolam were prescribed and infused. A few hours later, the patient presented signs of respiratory depression, requiring a transfer to the intensive care unit. After a review of the medical history, it was determined that the patient had been admitted on 3 previous occasions due to alcohol withdrawal and had progressed to delirium tremens after experiencing seizures. Can the risk of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and the need for prophylactic treatment be assessed on admission? Were appropriate monitoring and treatment measures employed? Would it have been possible to change his outcome? PMID:25559647

  17. Delleman Oorthuys syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed Wajahat A; Siddiqui, Mohammed Azfar; Khan, Adeeb A; Siddiqui, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Oculocerebrocutaneous or Delleman syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by microphthalmia/anophthalmia with or without orbital cysts, focal skin defects, intracranial cysts and skin appendages. We here report a case of 1-year-old male child with periocular skin tags, lid colobomas, and dermal hypoplasia. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and history of tonic-clonic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed a large arachnoid cyst, aplastic cerebellar vermis and polymicrographic pattern of the cerebral cortex. A complex cyst of spleen was also noted on abdominal ultrasonography. Orbital cysts depending on the size can be excised or left alone. Neuroimaging evaluation of patients with congenital orbital cysts and skin appendages is emphasized for early and appropriate management. PMID:25624688

  18. Hemophagocytic syndromes and infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fisman, D. N.

    2000-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an unusual syndrome characterized by fever, splenomegaly, jaundice, and the pathologic finding of hemophagocytosis (phagocytosis by macrophages of erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and their precursors) in bone marrow and other tissues. HLH may be diagnosed in association with malignant, genetic, or autoimmune diseases but is also prominently linked with Epstein-Barr (EBV) virus infection. Hyperproduction of cytokines, including interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, by EBV- infected T lymphocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of HLH. EBV-associated HLH may mimic T-cell lymphoma and is treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy, while hemophagocytic syndromes associated with nonviral pathogens often respond to treatment of the underlying infection. PMID:11076718

  19. Hajdu Cheney Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Shini Susan; Shetty, Shrinath; Arunachal, Gautham; Koshy, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterised by progressive focal bone destruction. It is known to be an autosomal dominant disorder but there have been reports of sporadic cases as well. Although the disease manifestation is found to begin from birth, it is most often not diagnosed until adolescence or adulthood. It could be due to the rarity of the condition and the variation of the disease manifestation at different age groups. We report a case of Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome in a 26-year-old male who presented with severe periodontitis and premature loss of teeth. The other characteristic features included craniofacial dysmorphism, abnormalities of the digits and dental anomalies. Patients with craniofacial dysmorphism along with dental abnormalities should be thoroughly examined for any underlying systemic disorder. A team of specialists may be able to diagnose this condition before the disease is advanced. PMID:27042504

  20. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Almashraki, Nabeel; Abdulnabee, Mukarram Zainuddin; Sukalo, Maja; Alrajoudi, Abdullah; Sharafadeen, Iman; Zenker, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypoplastic or aplastic nasal alae, cutis aplasia on the scalp, and other features including developmental delay, failure to thrive, hearing loss, mental retardation, hypothyroidism, dental abnormalities, and anomalies in cardiac and genitourinary systems. More than 60 cases of this syndrome have been reported to date. We describe the case of a male infant with typical symptoms of JBS. In addition, a new clinical feature which has not previously been documented, that is anemia requiring frequent blood transfusions and mild to moderate thrombocytopenia was observed. A molecular study was performed which revealed a novel homozygous UBR1 mutation. Possible explanations for this new association are discussed. PMID:22072859