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  1. Chris Christiansen and the Chris Cross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Mathewson, Don

    2009-03-01

    The Chris Cross was the world's first crossed-grating interferometer, and was the brainchild of orte of Australia's foremost radio astronomers, W.N. (Chris) Christiansen, from the CSIRO's Division of Radiophysics in Sydney. Inspired by the innovative and highly-successful E-W and N-S solar grating arrays that he constructed at Potts Hill (Sydney) in the early 1950s, Christiansen sited the Chris Cross at the Division's Fleurs field station near Sydney, and from 1957 to 1988 it provided two-dimensional maps of solar radio emission at 1423 MHz. In 1960 an 18m parabolic antenna was installed adjacent to the Chris Cross array, and when used with the Chris Cross formed the Southern Hemisphere's first high-resolution compound interferometer. A survey of discrete radio sources was carried out with this radio telescope. The Division of Radiophysics handed the Fleurs field station over to the School of Engineering at the University of Sydney in 1963, and Christiansen and his colleagues from the Department of Electrical Engineering proceeded to develop the Chris Cross into the Fleurs Synthesis Telescope (FST) by adding six stand-alone 13.7m parabolic antennas. The FST was used for detailed studies of large radio galaxies, supernova remnants and emission nebulae. The FST was closed down in 1988, and antennas in the original Chris Cross array quickly began to deteriorate. A number of individual antennas in the central part of the array received a new lease of life in 1991 when they were refurbished by staff and students from the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Universityy of Western Sydney, but this only proved to be a temporary reprieve as even these aerials were bulldozed by the landowner in 2004, bringing to an untimely end one of the world's most remarkable radio telescopes.

  2. Cupola Corner 1 - Conversation With Chris Ferguson

    NASA Video Gallery

    Atlantis Commander Chris Ferguson joined Expedition 28 Flight Engineer Ron Garan in the International Space Station cupola for some conversation about the space shuttle, and how the astronauts can ...

  3. Close Shave for Astronaut Chris Cassidy

    NASA Video Gallery

    Using a hair trimmer and a vacuum aboard the International Space Station, Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy gives himself a serious haircut in preparation for the arrival of fellow Expedition 36 crewma...

  4. Philadelphia Eagles Honor NASA Astronaut Chris Ferguson

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson returned to his hometown on Nov. 7 to serve as the Philadelphia Eagles' Honorary Captain during the NFL's "Monday Night Football" game. The Eagles hosted the Chicago B...

  5. OBITUARY Chris Beling, 1955-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    2011-01-01

    This short tribute to Chris Beling, who died in July 2010 at the age of 54, is written on behalf of all members of the positron research community, by whom he was much loved and admired. Obituary Picture 1 Chris Beling, a much respected and admired member of the positron research community who was a familiar face at SLOPOS and other positron conferences over the past three decades, suffered heart failure as he swam out to rescue his younger brother Jeremy while holidaying in his home town of Paignton, in the southwest of England, on June 18 2010. Chris gained a first-class honours degree in physics at Keble College, Oxford, in 1977, and his PhD in Radiation Physics from the University of London in 1981. His postdoctoral research, performed with Alan Smith at St Bart's Medical College in London, focussed on positron studies of liquids [1]. His appointment as a lecturer at University College London in 1983 marked the beginning of his research involving positron beams [2] which was to continue for the rest of his life. In 1987 he moved to the University of Hong Kong (HKU), where he became professor of physics in 2007, working with Professor Steve Fung (with whom he studied at Oxford) and later with Francis Ling. During his 23 years in Hong Kong Chris developed his research interests, concentrating principally on positron beam studies of semiconductors [3]. His brother Jeremy commented that 'moving to Hong Kong was the making of Chris; he found love and happiness'. Chris's research interests reflected the deep intellectual interest he had in his work. He maintained a strong interest in developing the capabilities of positron beam systems - initially by proposing models for field-assisted moderators to increase slow positron yields [4] and later by constructing a hybrid magnetic/electrostatic beam [5] and scanning annihilation spectroscopy [6], among other imaginative advances. His interests in semiconductor physics led him to develop a positron technique analogous to

  6. The Simple Gifts of Chris Raschka.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammon, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Describes how writer and artist Chris Raschka creates children's books that transcend their silent, static medium to skip and sing their way into the hearts of children. Discusses Raschka's background as an artist and writer, as well as a bit of history about his "seemingly simple" style. (SR)

  7. OBITUARY Chris Beling, 1955-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    2011-01-01

    This short tribute to Chris Beling, who died in July 2010 at the age of 54, is written on behalf of all members of the positron research community, by whom he was much loved and admired. Obituary Picture 1 Chris Beling, a much respected and admired member of the positron research community who was a familiar face at SLOPOS and other positron conferences over the past three decades, suffered heart failure as he swam out to rescue his younger brother Jeremy while holidaying in his home town of Paignton, in the southwest of England, on June 18 2010. Chris gained a first-class honours degree in physics at Keble College, Oxford, in 1977, and his PhD in Radiation Physics from the University of London in 1981. His postdoctoral research, performed with Alan Smith at St Bart's Medical College in London, focussed on positron studies of liquids [1]. His appointment as a lecturer at University College London in 1983 marked the beginning of his research involving positron beams [2] which was to continue for the rest of his life. In 1987 he moved to the University of Hong Kong (HKU), where he became professor of physics in 2007, working with Professor Steve Fung (with whom he studied at Oxford) and later with Francis Ling. During his 23 years in Hong Kong Chris developed his research interests, concentrating principally on positron beam studies of semiconductors [3]. His brother Jeremy commented that 'moving to Hong Kong was the making of Chris; he found love and happiness'. Chris's research interests reflected the deep intellectual interest he had in his work. He maintained a strong interest in developing the capabilities of positron beam systems - initially by proposing models for field-assisted moderators to increase slow positron yields [4] and later by constructing a hybrid magnetic/electrostatic beam [5] and scanning annihilation spectroscopy [6], among other imaginative advances. His interests in semiconductor physics led him to develop a positron technique analogous to

  8. History as Story: An Interview with Chris Crowe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesesne, Teri

    2004-01-01

    This is an interview between Teacher Librarian and Chris Crowe. Chris Crowe's first novel won the International Reading Association's Children's Book Award. He is a fellow professor of YA Literature and a past-president of the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council of Teachers of English. Some interview questions include:…

  9. 5Q4: Chris Edwards - Child Presence Sensor

    NASA Video Gallery

    Five Questions For (5Q4) Chris Edwards, NASA engineer who was the team lead of a group that invented a child presence sensor designed to alert parents if they've inadvertently left their child in h...

  10. Image acquisition planning for the CHRIS sensor onboard PROBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Peter A.

    2004-10-01

    The CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) instrument was launched onboard the European Space Agency (ESA) PROBA satellite on 22 October 2001. CHRIS can acquire up to 63 bands of hyperspectral data at a ground spatial resolution of 36m. Alternatively, the instrument can be configured to acquire 18 bands of data with a spatial resolution of 17m. PROBA, by virtue of its agile pointing capability, enables CHRIS to acquire five different angle images of the selected site. Two sites can be acquired every 24 hours. The hyperspectral and multi-angle capability of CHRIS makes it an important resource for stydying BRDF phenomena of vegetation. Other applications include coastal and inland waters, wild fires, education and public relations. An effective data acquisition planning procedure has been implemented and since mid-2002 users have been receiving data for analysis. A cloud prediction routine has been adopted that maximises the image acquisition capacity of CHRIS-PROBA. Image acquisition planning is carried out by RSAC Ltd on behalf of ESA and in co-operation with Sira Technology Ltd and Redu, the ESA ground station in Belgium, responsible for CHRIS-PROBA.

  11. Recollections of two and a half years with `Chris' Christiansen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rodney D.

    2009-03-01

    I spent the period February 1951 to August 1953 in W.N. (Chris) Christiansen's group in the C.S.I.R.O.'s Division of Radiophysics in Sydney and at the Potts Hill field station. This was a particularly fruitful period of Chris' scientific career. It included the first detection of the 21-cm hydrogen line in the Southern Hemisphere and strong confirmation of the detections made at Harvard and Leiden. This, incidentally, became my own research area at Jodrell Bank beginning two years later. For Chris this was but an Interruption to his group's major effort of building a solar grating Interferometer. During the period from early 1951 to late 1953 we were intensely busy building, commissioning and operating this new solar Instrument. I was involved in most phases of this work, admittedly in a junior capacity-ranging from digging the post holes for the supports of the 32 antennas of the east-west array through to identifying the main source of radio emission with the H-alpha plages associated with sunspots using the Mt Stromlo spectroheliograph that I operated at Potts Hill. This was an exciting time to be at Radiophysics; being a member of Chris' group was inspirational to myself and the other young team members as I shall describe in this short paper.

  12. On Technology and Schools: A Conversation with Chris Dede.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, John

    1995-01-01

    According to futurist/educational technology expert Chris Dede, new technologies will revolutionize education only when used to support new models of teaching and learning. Grafting technological solutions onto antiquated structures and learning approaches is misguided. Sidebars explain schools' technology access problems and review Clifford…

  13. Chris Woodhead: A New Champion of Eugenic Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2009-01-01

    Eugenic Theories are clearly alive and well in present-day society--or this is at least true of those theories relating to the passing on of abilities and talents from one generation to the next. This depressing thought was prompted by a reading of Chris Woodhead's latest book "A Desolation of Learning."

  14. Resistance and Resilience in a Life Full of Professionals and Labels: Narrative Snapshots of Chris

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hove, Geert; Gabel, Susan L.; De Schauwer, Elisabeth; Mortier, Kathleen; Van Loon, Jos; Loots, Gerrit; Devlieger, Patrick; Roets, Griet; Claes, Lien

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors relate the life of Chris through narrative snapshots. Chris asked the authors to tell her story. They decided that it could be used to provide an insight into the different ways people with labels are confronted with professional practices and rituals. Although Chris lived a "tough life," her story is full of…

  15. 33 CFR 100.916 - Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI. 100.916 Section 100.916 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.916 Chris Craft Silver...

  16. 33 CFR 100.916 - Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI. 100.916 Section 100.916 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.916 Chris Craft Silver...

  17. 33 CFR 100.916 - Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI. 100.916 Section 100.916 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.916 Chris Craft Silver...

  18. 33 CFR 100.916 - Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI. 100.916 Section 100.916 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.916 Chris Craft Silver...

  19. 33 CFR 100.916 - Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chris Craft Silver Cup Races, Algonac, MI. 100.916 Section 100.916 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.916 Chris Craft Silver...

  20. When Chris Becomes Courtney: Preparing a Pre-K-8 School Community for a Transgendering Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, John

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares a story about Chris who publicly transitioned to Courtney during his eighth grade year. Working with a transgender student would require educators as a community to make many decisions for which they had no road map. They need time to educate the community while respecting Chris's need to express himself as…

  1. Mapping Marine Macroalgae In Case 2 Waters Using CHRIS PROBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, Florian; Oppelt, Natascha; Bartsch, Inka

    2013-12-01

    Marine macroalgae fulfil an important role in coastal ecosystems providing food and habitat for wildlife. The impacts of climate change and increasing human encroachment exert significant pressures on coastal ecosystems. Monitoring of marine macroalgae communities provides information on the state of habitats and their structural changes. At landscape scale airborne remote sensing became an acknowledged tool to monitor coastal vegetation; for an operational use of macroalgae mapping, however, satellite remote sensing has significant advantages. In this paper, we therefore analyse the performance of three approaches to assess sublitoral macroalgae communities in the turbid coastal waters around the island of Helgoland (North Sea, Germany) using CHRIS/Proba and EnMAP-like data. A Slope Based Index Classification, which has already been successfully applied in Helgolands intertidal zone during low tide, performed best; it was able to map the presence of sublitoral macroalgae with high accuracy (>80%) for both sensors. However successful detection of macroalgae was only achievable in water depths up to 2m.

  2. Quarantine Controversy: Kaci Hickox v. Governor Chris Christie.

    PubMed

    Gatter, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Nurse Kaci Hickox is among the "Ebola Fighters" honored by Time magazine as its 2014 Person of the Year, having treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone while volunteering with Médecins Sans Frontieres. When she returned to the United States in October 2014, she was quarantined in New Jersey for three days before returning home to Maine under the terms of a negotiated release. A year later, in October 2015, Hickox filed suit in federal court against Governor Chris Christie and New Jersey health officials, claiming that the quarantine violated her civil rights. Her complaint asserts that New Jersey officials lacked the authority to quarantine her because she did not pose a significant risk of transmission. The lawsuit raises important questions about disease-transmission risk, the inability of science to rule out certain theoretical risks, and the state's power to quarantine. It also demonstrates that population health depends on respecting individual liberty and using the best available epidemiological data to set public health policy. PMID:27150412

  3. I Am 95% Confident That the Earth is Round: An Interview about Statistics with Chris Spatz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Kathleen M.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an interview with Chris Spatz who is a professor of psychology at Hendrix College in Conway (Arkansas). Discusses the null hypothesis statistical texts (NHST) and the arguments for and against the use of NHST, the changes in research articles, textbook changes, and the Internet. (CMK)

  4. Learning, No Matter where You Are: Q&A with Chris Dede

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Chris Dede, the Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research interests include the use of emerging technologies in education, with emphases on online professional development, scaling up innovations, and immersive interfaces for learning. He is…

  5. A Teacher of High School Language Arts Speaks with Chris Crutcher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erenberger, Debbie

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Chris Crutcher, the 2000 recipient of the Margaret A. Early Award. Notes that he was given the award for his contributions to writing for teenagers. Talks about his life and origins as a writer, and his early influences as a writer in terms of style. Discusses the use of Crutcher's literature in the classroom. (SG)

  6. Resistance to Race TTKS of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in Chris and Related Spring Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Race TTKS (or Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, present in eastern Africa, is virulent to many stem rust resistance genes in wheat cultivars worldwide. Spring wheat cultivars AC Barrie, Chris, Thatcher and several other related wheat lines, were found to be resistant to race TTKS based on s...

  7. Fine Resolution Air Quality Monitoring from a Small Satellite: CHRIS/PROBA

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, Janet E.; Wong, Man Sing; Chan, Yuk Ying

    2008-01-01

    Current remote sensing techniques fail to address the task of air quality monitoring over complex regions where multiple pollution sources produce high spatial variability. This is due to a lack of suitable satellite-sensor combinations and appropriate aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithms. The new generation of small satellites, with their lower costs and greater flexibility has the potential to address this problem, with customised platform-sensor combinations dedicated to monitoring single complex regions or mega-cities. This paper demonstrates the ability of the European Space Agency's small satellite sensor CHRIS/PROBA to provide reliable AOT estimates at a spatially detailed level over Hong Kong, using a modified version of the dense dark vegetation (DDV) algorithm devised for MODIS. Since CHRIS has no middle-IR band such as the MODIS 2,100 nm band which is transparent to fine aerosols, the longest waveband of CHRIS, the 1,019 nm band was used to approximate surface reflectance, by the subtraction of an offset derived from synchronous field reflectance spectra. Aerosol reflectance in the blue and red bands was then obtained from the strong empirical relationship observed between the CHRIS 1,019 nm, and the blue and red bands respectively. AOT retrievals for three different dates were shown to be reliable, when compared with AERONET and Microtops II sunphotometers, and a Lidar, as well as air quality data at ground stations. The AOT images exhibited considerable spatial variability over the 11 × 11km image area and were able to indicate both local and long distance sources.

  8. Effect of the aerosol type uncertainty on the surface reflectance retrieval using CHRIS/PROBA hyperspectral images over land.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2014-12-01

    The surface reflectance is crucial for the quantitative analysis of land surface properties in geological, agricultural and urban studies. The first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation is an accurate atmospheric correction obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol loading and type. The aerosol optical thickness at 550nm is widely used to describe the aerosol loading. Recent works have highlighted the relevant role of the aerosol types on the atmospheric correction process defined by their micro-physical properties. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land. CHRIS on PROBA satellite is an high resolution multi-angular imaging spectrometer, operating in the visible near-infrared spectral domain (400 to 1000 nm). As test case the urban site of Brussels has been selected. The physically-based algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) has been developed specifically for CHRIS data by using the vector version of 6S (6SV) radiative transfer model. The atmospheric data needed for the atmospheric correction were obtained from CIMEL CE-318 of the Brussels AERONET station. CHRIS images were selected if simultaneous AERONET data were available. Other specific requirements for imagery acquisition were high aerosol loading and high solar irradiation. The aerosol radiative impact has been investigated comparing the reflectance obtained by applying the CHRIS@CRI algorithm with different aerosol types: the three aerosol standard of 6SV and two characterized by specific microphysical properties provided by the AERONET station and calculated with FlexAOD code (a post-processing tool of the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem), respectively. The results show a clear dependence of the atmospheric correction results on the aerosol absorption properties.

  9. Inversion of chlorophyll contents by use of hyperspectral CHRIS data based on radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M. C.; Niu, X. F.; Chen, S. B.; Guo, P. J.; Yang, Q.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-03-01

    Chlorophyll content, the most important pigment related to photosynthesis, is the key parameter for vegetation growth. The continuous spectrum characteristics of ground objects can be captured through hyperspectral remotely sensed data. In this study, based on the coniferous forest radiative transfer model, chlorophyll contents were inverted by use of hyperspectral CHRIS data in the coniferous forest coverage of Changbai Mountain Area. In addition, the sensitivity of LIBERTY model was analyzed. The experimental results validated that the reflectance simulation of different chlorophyll contents was coincided with that of the field measurement, and hyperspectral vegetation indices applied to the quantitative inversion of chlorophyll contents was feasible and accurate. This study presents a reasonable method of chlorophyll inversion for the coniferous forest, promotes the inversion precision, is of significance in coniferous forest monitoring.

  10. ESA's Toolboxes for Optical Earth Observation Data: BEAM, CHRIS-Box and the Glob-Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomferra, Norman; Peters, Marco; Quast, Ralf; Zuhlke, Marco; Danne, Olaf; Storm, Thomas; Brockmann, Carsten; Regner, Peter

    2010-12-01

    With the launch of ENVISAT in 2002 ESA started the development of the Basic AATSR and MERIS toolbox BEAM [1]. With the requirement to be an open platform for scientists and operational users as well as software developers, ESA laid the foundation for this sustainable and successful open source software development project. Today BEAM is a toolbox and development platform supporting a wide range of optical sensors for Earth Observation, including SMOS, CHRIS/Proba, Landsat/TM, AVNIR, PRISM, MODIS and AVHRR, and enables importing of generic formats such as Geo-TIFF and NetCDF. Widely known is the interactive Visualisation and Analysis Tool VISAT of the BEAM toolbox. On top of the various EO data sources, a wide range of tools and data processors have meanwhile been developed for BEAM.

  11. Dense registration of CHRIS-Proba and Ikonos images using multi-dimensional mutual information maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariou, Claude; Chehdi, Kacem

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the potential of multidimensional mutual information for the registration of multi-spectral remote sensing images. We devise a gradient flow algorithm which iteratively maximizes the multidimensional mutual information with respect to a differentiable displacement map, accounting for partial derivatives of the multivariate joint distribution and the multivariate marginal of the float image with respect to each variable of the mutual information derivative. The resulting terms are shown to weight the band specific gradients of the warp image, and we propose in addition to compute them with a method based on the k-nearest neighbours. We apply our method to the registration of Ikonos and CHRIS-Proba images over the region of Baabdat, Lebanon, for purposes of cedar pines detection. A comparison between (crossed) single band and multi-band registration results obtained shows that using the multidimensional mutual information brings a significant gain in positional accuracy and is suitable for multispectral remote sensing image registration.

  12. The Cooperative Health Research in South Tyrol (CHRIS) study: rationale, objectives, and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Gögele, Martin; Mascalzoni, Deborah; Melotti, Roberto; Schwienbacher, Christine; De Grandi, Alessandro; Foco, Luisa; D'Elia, Yuri; Linder, Barbara; Fuchsberger, Christian; Minelli, Cosetta; Egger, Clemens; Kofink, Lisa S; Zanigni, Stefano; Schäfer, Torsten; Facheris, Maurizio F; Smárason, Sigurður V; Rossini, Alessandra; Hicks, Andrew A; Weiss, Helmuth; Pramstaller, Peter P

    2015-01-01

    The Cooperative Health Research In South Tyrol (CHRIS) study is a population-based study with a longitudinal lookout to investigate the genetic and molecular basis of age-related common chronic conditions and their interaction with life style and environment in the general population. All adults of the middle and upper Vinschgau/Val Venosta are invited, while 10,000 participants are anticipated by mid-2017. Family participation is encouraged for complete pedigree reconstruction and disease inheritance mapping. After a pilot study on the compliance with a paperless assessment mode, computer-assisted interviews have been implemented to screen for conditions of the cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, genitourinary, nervous, behavioral, and cognitive system. Fat intake, cardiac health, and tremor are assessed instrumentally. Nutrient intake, physical activity, and life-course smoking are measured semi-quantitatively. Participants are phenotyped for 73 blood and urine parameters and 60 aliquots per participant are biobanked (cryo-preserved urine, DNA, and whole and fractionated blood). Through liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometry analysis, metabolite profiling of the mitochondrial function is assessed. Samples are genotyped on 1 million variants with the Illumina HumanOmniExpressExome array and the first data release including 4570 fully phenotyped and genotyped samples is now available for analysis. Participants' follow-up is foreseen 6 years after the first visit. The target population is characterized by long-term social stability and homogeneous environment which should both favor the identification of enriched genetic variants. The CHRIS cohort is a valuable resource to assess the contribution of genomics, metabolomics, and environmental factors to human health and disease. It is awaited that this will result in the identification of novel molecular targets for disease prevention and treatment. PMID:26541195

  13. Testing parametric BRDF models with CHRIS/PROBA acquisitions over agricultural crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, Aleixandre; Camacho-de Coca, Fernando; Meli, Joaquin

    2004-10-01

    A proper determination of the BRDF is of interest for land surface studies in different topics such as albedo estimation, correction of anisotropy effects, and retrieval of vegetation parameters by defining optimal geometries. In this paper, we evaluate a set of parametric models widely-used for BRDF characterisation (Roujean model, Ambrals combinations, non-linear RPV and the empirical Walthall's model). These models are inverted and tested against atmospherically-corrected BRF measurements acquired with the CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) instrument on board the PROBA (Project for On-Board Autonomy) satellite over an agricultural test site located in Barrax, Spain) during the SPARC (SPectra bARrax Campaign) 2003 campaign. The study area presents different land crops with high variability in LAI values from 0 to 6. The objectives of the present study are to determine how well the different parametric BRDF models are able to fit CHRIS/PROBA's observed multiangular reflectances in order to determine the nadir-zenith reflectance, which is the optimal geometry to retrieve the fractional vegetation coverage (FVC), and to describe the anisotropy of vegetation canopies, which can be useful to estimate accurately the leaf area index (LAI). To do so, performance indicators are obtained for the different models. The results of this study show that all the tested models are fairly accurate in the entire spectral range (RMS<0.016 at 674 nm and RMS<0.025 at 803 nm) and thus are suitable for normalisation purposes. However, most of them are not able to describe BRDF features such as the hot spot, which hampers the use of these models for exploiting the directional information. There are no significant differences, for the experimental conditions, among those evaluated although the best models appear to be the linear Ross-Li model (low RMS) and the non-linear RPV model (more realistic BRDF).

  14. Information Management Systems for Monitoring and Documenting World Heritage - the Silk Roads Chris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vileikis, O.; Serruys, E.; Dumont, B.; van Balen, K.; Santana Quinterod, M.; de Maeyer, P.; Tigny, V.

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses the application of Information Management Systems (IMS) for documenting and monitoring World Heritage (WH) properties. The application of IMS in WH can support all stakeholders involved in conservation, and management of cultural heritage by more easily inventorying, mining and exchanging information from multiple sources based on international standards. Moreover, IMS could assist in detecting damages and preparing management strategies to mitigate risks, and slowing down the deterioration of the integrity of WH properties. The case study of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS), a Belgian Federal Science Policy Office funded project, illustrates the capabilities of IMS in the context of the nomination of the Central Asian Silk Roads on the WH List. This multi-lingual, web-based IMS will act as a collaborative platform allowing for the completion of improved transnational nomination dossiers and subsequent monitoring activities with all necessary baseline information to easily verify consistency and quality of the proposal. The Silk Roads CHRIS Geospatial Content Management System uses open source technologies and allows to georeference data from different scales and sources including data from field recording methods and combine it with historical and heritage features documented through various means such as textual descriptions, documents, photographs, 3D models or videos. Moreover, tailored maps can also be generated by overlaying a selection of available layers and then be exported to support the nomination dossier. Finally, by using this innovative information and decision support system, the State Parties and other interested stakeholders will have access to a complete nomination dossier and could therefore respond more effectively to hazards and disaster phenomena.

  15. Estimating forest species abundance through linear unmixing of CHRIS/PROBA imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagakis, Stavros; Vanikiotis, Theofilos; Sykioti, Olga

    2016-09-01

    The advancing technology of hyperspectral remote sensing offers the opportunity of accurate land cover characterization of complex natural environments. In this study, a linear spectral unmixing algorithm that incorporates a novel hierarchical Bayesian approach (BI-ICE) was applied on two spatially and temporally adjacent CHRIS/PROBA images over a forest in North Pindos National Park (Epirus, Greece). The scope is to investigate the potential of this algorithm to discriminate two different forest species (i.e. beech - Fagus sylvatica, pine - Pinus nigra) and produce accurate species-specific abundance maps. The unmixing results were evaluated in uniformly distributed plots across the test site using measured fractions of each species derived by very high resolution aerial orthophotos. Landsat-8 images were also used to produce a conventional discrete-type classification map of the test site. This map was used to define the exact borders of the test site and compare the thematic information of the two mapping approaches (discrete vs abundance mapping). The required ground truth information, regarding training and validation of the applied mapping methodologies, was collected during a field campaign across the study site. Abundance estimates reached very good overall accuracy (R2 = 0.98, RMSE = 0.06). The most significant source of error in our results was due to the shadowing effects that were very intense in some areas of the test site due to the low solar elevation during CHRIS acquisitions. It is also demonstrated that the two mapping approaches are in accordance across pure and dense forest areas, but the conventional classification map fails to describe the natural spatial gradients of each species and the actual species mixture across the test site. Overall, the BI-ICE algorithm presented increased potential to unmix challenging objects with high spectral similarity, such as different vegetation species, under real and not optimum acquisition conditions. Its

  16. A Study Of Ips Typographus Pest Infestation With The Use Of Multi-Angular CHRIS-Proba Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filchev, Lachezar; Panayotov, Momchil; Ling, Feilong

    2013-12-01

    Insects' infestations of coniferous forests have been in the focus of the forestry community for decades. Research that is dealing with the assessment of the impacts on forests and assessment of the area affected by the infestations has been assisted by remotely sensed data after the onset of civilian remote sensing era and making the large archives of satellite data centres of NASA, ESA, and JAXA available to the researcher's community. The present study assesses the impact from European Bark beetle (Ips typhographus L.) outbreak on Norway Spruce (Picea abies L.) forests in the UNESCO MAB reserve Bistrishko Branishte in Bulgaria using the ESA's third-party mission multiangular satellite CHRIS/PROBA Mode 1 spectroradiometer data. The study aims at assessing the impact of the infestation by comparing the pre- and post-fire CHRIS/PROBA Mode 1 narrow-band vegetation indices (VIs). In order to achieve the study objective the ‘dead spruce forest' areas were extracted using eight target detection algorithms. Statistics from the CHRIS/PROBA Mode 1 VIs was drawn and compared with one another for the two dates of acquisition. It was found that the areas affected by pest infestation can be well differentiated on CHRIS/PROBA data but the results vary due to the date of acquisition, illumination conditions, and season changes. The results from the study suggest that continuous space monitoring of insect infested coniferous forests can be successfully carried out by employing present-day available hyperspectral satellite data.

  17. Mapping benthic macroalgal communities in the coastal zone using CHRIS-PROBA mode 2 images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, G.; Kutser, T.; Domínguez-Gómez, J. A.; Sánchez-Carnero, N.; Freire, J.

    2011-09-01

    The ecological importance of benthic macroalgal communities in coastal ecosystems has been recognised worldwide and the application of remote sensing to study these communities presents certain advantages respect to in situ methods. The present study used three CHRIS-PROBA images to analyse macroalgal communities distribution in the Seno de Corcubión (NW Spain). The use of this sensor represent a challenge given that its design, build and deployment programme is intended to follow the principles of the "faster, better, cheaper". To assess the application of this sensor to macroalgal mapping, two types of classifications were carried out: Maximum Likelihood and Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM). Maximum Likelihood classifier showed positive results, reaching overall accuracy percentages higher than 90% and kappa coefficients higher than 0.80 for the bottom classes shallow submerged sand, deep submerged sand, macroalgae less than 5 m and macroalgae between 5 and 10 m depth. The differentiation among macroalgal groups using SAM classifications showed positive results for green seaweeds although the differentiation between brown and red algae was not clear in the study area.

  18. Sensitivity analysis for leaf area index (LAI) estimation from CHRIS/PROBA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianjun; Gu, Zhujun; Xu, Jianhua; Duan, Yushan; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Yongjuan; Li, Dongliang

    2014-09-01

    Sensitivity analyses were conducted for the retrieval of vegetation leaf area index (LAI) from multiangular imageries in this study. Five spectral vegetation indices (VIs) were derived from Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Project for On Board Autonomy (CHRIS/PROBA) images, and were related to LAI, acquired from in situ measurement in Jiangxi Province, China, for five vegetation communities. The sensitivity of LAI retrieval to the variation of VIs from different observation angles was evaluated using the ratio of the slope of the best-fit linear VI-LAI model to its root mean squared error. Results show that both the sensitivity and reliability of VI-LAI models are influenced by the heterogeneity of vegetation communities, and that performance of vegetation indices in LAI estimation varies along observation angles. The VI-LAI models are more reliable for tall trees than for low growing shrub-grasses and also for forests with broad leaf trees than for coniferous forest. The greater the tree height and leaf size, the higher the sensitivity. Forests with broad-leaf trees have higher sensitivities, especially at oblique angles, while relatively simple-structured coniferous forests, shrubs, and grasses show similar sensitivities at all angles. The multi-angular soil and/or atmospheric parameter adjustments will hopefully improve the performance of VIs in LAI estimation, which will require further investigation.

  19. Retrieval of aerosol optical thickness from PROBA-CHRIS images acquired over a coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Carmine; Leone, Antonio P.; Menenti, Massimo; Pippi, Ivan; Maselli, Fabio; Antonelli, Paolo

    2005-10-01

    In the present work we show the potential of multiangular hyperspectral PROBA-CHRIS data to estimate aerosol optical properties over dense dark vegetation. Data acquired over San Rossore test site (Pisa, Italy) have been used together with simultaneous ground measurements. Additionally, spectral measurement over the canopy have been performed to describe the directional behavior of a Pinus pinaster canopy. Determination of aerosol properties from optical remote sensing images over land is an under-determined problem, and some assumptions have to be made on both the aerosol and the surface being imaged. Radiance measured on multiple directions add extra information that help in reducing retrieval ambiguity. Nevertheless, multiangular observations don't allow to ignore directional spectral properties of vegetation canopies. Since surface reflectivity is the parameter we wish to determine with remote sensing after atmospheric correction, at least the shape of the bi-directional reflectance factor has to be assumed. We have adopted a Rahman BRF, and have estimated its geometrical parameters from ground spectral measurements. The inversion of measured radiance to obtain aerosol optical properties has been performed, allowing simultaneous retrieval of aerosol model and optical thickness together with the vegetation reflectivity parameter of the Rahman model.

  20. U.S. Tabloid Magazine Coverage of a Celebrity Dating Abuse Incident: Rihanna and Chris Brown

    PubMed Central

    ROTHMAN, EMILY F.; NAGASWARAN, ANITA; JOHNSON, RENEE M.; ADAMS, KELLEY M.; SCRIVENS, JULIANE; BAUGHMAN, ALLYSON

    2012-01-01

    Dating abuse is a prevalent adolescent health problem with substantial public health consequences. As many as 1 in 10 high school students in the US reports being “hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by their boyfriend or girlfriend” in the past year. We used the Rihanna-Chris Brown dating abuse incident of 2009 as a case study to conduct what is, to our knowledge, the first assessment of media framing of dating abuse. We reviewed the 20 leading U.S. single copy sales magazines published February–April, 2009 and identified 48 relevant articles which were all printed in seven “tabloid” magazines. We conducted a content analysis of the media frames of the articles using five frame categories: (1) Abuse is objectionable; (2) Victim-blaming; (3) Abuse is sexualized/romanticized; (4) Myths about abuse perpetration; and (5) Abuse is normalized. “Abuse is objectionable” was the dominant frame of 40% of articles, “victim-blaming” in 36%. Although the vast majority of articles reviewed (83%) made at least passing reference to the idea that abuse is wrong, a minority (40%) used a dominant frame that condemned abuse. Instead, the majority of articles communicated “mixed messages” about dating abuse, and many minimized the seriousness of partner abuse perpetration. Advocacy is needed to improve future tabloid media framing of dating abuse incidents. PMID:22475328

  1. U.S. tabloid magazine coverage of a celebrity dating abuse incident: Rihanna and Chris Brown.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Emily F; Nagaswaran, Anita; Johnson, Renee M; Adams, Kelley M; Scrivens, Juliane; Baughman, Allyson

    2012-01-01

    Dating abuse is a prevalent adolescent health problem with substantial public health consequences. As many as 1 in 10 high school students in the United States reports being "hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose" by his or her boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year. The authors used the Rihanna-Chris Brown dating abuse incident of 2009 as a case study to conduct what is, to our knowledge, the first assessment of media framing of dating abuse. The authors reviewed the 20 leading U.S. single-copy sales magazines published from February to April 2009 and identified 48 relevant articles, which were all printed in 7 tabloid magazines. The authors conducted a content analysis of the media frames of the articles using 5 frame categories: (a) abuse is objectionable, (b) victim-blaming, (c) abuse is sexualized/romanticized, (d) myths about abuse perpetration, and (e) abuse is normalized. Abuse is objectionable was the dominant frame of 40% of articles, victim-blaming in 36%. Although the majority of articles reviewed (83%) made at least passing reference to the idea that abuse is wrong, a minority (40%) used a dominant frame that condemned abuse. Instead, the majority of articles communicated mixed messages about dating abuse, and many minimized the seriousness of partner abuse perpetration. Advocacy is needed to improve future tabloid media framing of dating abuse incidents. PMID:22475328

  2. Correction of systematic spatial noise in push-broom hyperspectral sensors: application to CHRIS/PROBA images.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Chova, Luis; Alonso, Luis; Guanter, Luis; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Calpe, Javier; Moreno, José

    2008-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing images are affected by different types of noise. In addition to typical random noise, nonperiodic partially deterministic disturbance patterns generally appear in the data. These patterns, which are intrinsic to the image formation process, are characterized by a high degree of spatial and spectral coherence. We present a new technique that faces the problem of removing the spatially coherent noise known as vertical striping, usually found in images acquired by push-broom sensors. The developed methodology is tested on data acquired by the Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) onboard the Project for On-board Autonomy (PROBA) orbital platform, which is a typical example of a push-broom instrument exhibiting a relatively high noise component. The proposed correction method is based on the hypothesis that the vertical disturbance presents higher spatial frequencies than the surface radiance. A technique to exclude the contribution of the spatial high frequencies of the surface from the destriping process is introduced. First, the performance of the proposed algorithm is tested on a set of realistic synthetic images with added modeled noise in order to quantify the noise reduction and the noise estimation accuracy. Then, algorithm robustness is tested on more than 350 real CHRIS images from different sites, several acquisition modes (different spatial and spectral resolutions), and covering the full range of possible sensor temperatures. The proposed algorithm is benchmarked against the CHRIS reference algorithm. Results show excellent rejection of the noise pattern with respect to the original CHRIS images, especially improving the removal in those scenes with a natural high contrast. However, some low-frequency components still remain. In addition, the developed correction model captures and corrects the dependency of the noise patterns on sensor temperature, which confirms the robustness of the presented approach. PMID

  3. Evaluation of the Aerosol Type Effect on the Surface Reflectance Retrieval Using Chris/proba Images Over Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance has a central role in the analysis of land surface for a broad variety of agricultural, geological and urban studies. An accurate atmospheric correction, obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol type and loading, is the first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation. The aerosol type is defined by its micro-physical properties, while the aerosol loading is described by optical thickness at 550 nm. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol model on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land by using the specifically developed algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) based on the 6SV radiative transfer model. Five different aerosol models have been used: one provided by the AERONET inversion products (used as reference), three standard aerosol models in 6SV, and one obtained from the output of the GEOS-Chem global chemistry-transport model (CTM). As test case the urban site of Bruxelles and the suburban area of Rome Tor Vergata have been considered. The results obtained encourages the use of CTM in operational retrieval and provides an evaluation of the role of the aerosol model in the atmospheric correction process, considering the different microphysical properties impact.

  4. The Use of CHRIS/PROBA Data to Assist Wheat Growth Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppelt, N.

    2010-12-01

    In order to map crop primary production and yield, complex model approaches are required taking into account the actual physical and chemical processes, which are steering the exchange of mass and energy between the crop and the atmosphere. However, these model approaches are restricted to the accuracy of the input data, which naturally is unable to include incidence of pests or diseases, lack of nutrients or unexpected events such as the crop failure due to wind- breaks, the effects of hailstorms or mechanically inflicted crop damages that are due to the applied machinery. The study presented here investigates the potential of improvement for a physically based multiscale model approach, when the static input data is enhanced by spatially dynamic remote sensing information. The land surface model PROMET (Processes of Radiation, Mass and Energy Transfer) was generally applied, while the remote sensing input data is derived from hyperspectral data of the CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) sensor. The PROMET model vegetation routine basically applies the Farquhar et al. photosynthesis approach and was used to simulate the crop development at test fields tilled with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). According to different radiation regimes, the canopy is divided into a sunlit and a shade layer. During the model run, information on the absorptive capacity of the leaves for the canopy is updated from remote sensing measurements. Control data could be acquired through intensive field sampling campaigns that monitored the development of the stand throughout the growing periods. While the model without additional dynamic input data was able to reasonably reproduce the average net primary production and field of the crop, the spatial heterogeneity in the field was severely underestimated. The combination of remote sensing information with the vegetation model led to a significant improvement of the spatial heterogeneity of the crop development in the model

  5. Comparation of Typical Wetlands Classification Accuracy in Yellow River Estuary Using Multi-Angle Proba CHRIS Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yi; Ren, Guangbo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, Multi-angle PROBA CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing images were used to study on their imaging quality and the ability of classification of Typical Wetlands in Yellow River Estuary, by the cooperation of interpretation and automatic classification. Taking 5-angle (0°, ±36°, ±55°) CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing images of mode 2 obtained in September 2006 as an example, this paper research results indicate that the 0° image has the best imaging quality, with the highest spatial resolution, the ±36° images come second, the ±55° images are last; 5 typical wetlands, such as reservoir, bulrush, watercourse, barren beach and swamp were selected as study objects, then a Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm is used to classify different-angle remote sensing images into these 5 typical wetlands using training samples in the same location, the results of classification were analyzed based on field survey data, which shows that (1) The classification accuracy differs along the viewing angle of images, the overall accuracy and Kappa factor of the 0° image is highest, and the -36° image is lowest. (2) The overall accuracy and Kappa factor of the positive-angle images is higher than which of minus-angle images. (3) The producer accuracy and user accuracy of swamp is the lowest among all 5 typical wetlands in all images. (4) The producer accuracy and user accuracy of reservoir, bulrush and barren beach are relatively stable in all 5-angle images, however, the accuracies of Watercourse and swamp are fluctuant in all 5-angle images, and highest in the 0° image.

  6. Multi-Temporal Monitoring Of Ecological Succession In Tropical Dry Forests Using Angular - Hyperspectral Data (Chris/Proba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Millan, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The tropical dry forest is the largest and most threatened ecosystem in Latin America. Remote sensing can effectively contribute to the surveillance of conservation measurements and laws through the monitoring of natural protected areas, at the required temporal and spatial scales. CHRIS/PROBA is the only satellite that presents quasi-simultaneous multi-angular pointing and hyperspectral spectroscopy. These two characteristics permit the study of structural and compositional traces of successional stages within the tropical dry forest. The current study presents the results of mapping the succession of tropical dry forest in the Parque Estadual de la Mata-Seca, in Minas Gerais, Brazil, using a temporal analysis of CHRIS/PROBA images in a time frame of 7 years, between 2008 and 2014. For the purpose the -55° angle of observation has been used, which enhances spectral differences between successional stages. Spectral Angle Mapper has been used for mapping succession of tropical dry forest and afterwards Change Detection Analysis has been performed. Based on our observations, the tropical dry forest in the Parque Estadual de la Mataseca recovers at a fast rate, for the observed period (2008-2014). More than the 50% of the early and intermediate forests has been recovered to a mature forest. Significantly, around a 12% of old pastures have been converted into forest. The spatial analysis also reveals that the areas that recover most rapidly are located in the east of the Park, close to mature forests. The provision of seeds from these forests might be the cause for the fast recovery.

  7. Estimation of leaf area index using an angular vegetation index based on in situ measurements and CHRIS/PROBA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Guimin; Lin, Hui; Liang, Liang; Niu, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is widely used for Leaf Area Index (LAI) estimation. It is well documented that the NDVI is extremely subject to the saturation problem when LAI reaches a high value. A new multi-angular vegetation index, the Hotspot-darkspot Difference Vegetation Index (HDVI) is proposed to estimate the high density LAI. The HDVI, defined as the difference between the hot and dark spot NDVI, relative to the dark spot NDVI, was proposed based on the Analytical two-layer Canopy Reflectance Model (ACRM) model outputs. This index is validated using both in situ experimental data in wheat and data from the multi-angular optical Compact High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) satellite. Both indices, the Hotspot-Darkspot Index (HDS) and the NDVI were also selected to analyze the relationship with LAI, and were compared with new index HDVI. The results show that HDVI is an appropriate proxy of LAI with higher determination coefficients (R2) for both the data from the in situ experiment (R2=0.7342, RMSE=0.0205) and the CHRIS data (R2=0.7749, RMSE=0.1013). Our results demonstrate that HDVI can make better the occurrence of saturation limits with the information of multi-angular observation, and is more appropriate for estimating LAI than either HDS or NDVI at high LAI values. Although the new index needs further evaluation, it also has the potential under the condition of dense canopies. It provides the effective improvement to the NDVI and other vegetation indices that are based on the red and NIR spectral bands.

  8. Reconstruction of hyperspectral CHRIS/PROBA signal by the Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System (EO-LDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernetskiy, Maxim; Gobron, Nadine; Gomez-Dans, Jose; Lewis, Philip

    EO-LDAS is a system that allows one to interpret spectral observations of the land surface to provide an optimal estimate of state of the Earth. It allows a consistent combination of observations from different sensors despite the difference in spatial and spectral resolution and acquisition frequencies. The system is based on a variational data assimilation (DA) scheme, and uses physically-based radiative transfer models (RTM) to map from state to observation. In addition the system takes into account observational uncertainty, prior information and a model of spatial/temporal evolution of the state. Such approach is very useful for the future satellite constellations as well as for reanalysis of historical data. The main purpose of EO-LDAS is the retrieval of biophysical land variables. However, once the state is known after inverting some observations, the system can be used to forward model and predict other observations. The main aim of this contribution is the validation of EO-LDAS by reconstructing CHRIS/PROBA hyperspectral signal on the base of MODIS 500 m, Landsat ETM+ and MISR full resolution data over the Barrax site during the SPARC 2004 campaign. First, multispectral data were inverted by EO-LDAS in order to obtain a set of biophysical parameters which were then used in a forward mode to obtain full spectra over various fields covering Barrax area. The reconstruction was performed using the same view/sun geometry as initial PROBA scene. Single set of spectra from MODIS, ETM+ and MISR were used and a combination of MODIS-ETM+ and MISR-ETM+. In addition uncertainties of output biophysical land parameters were considered for understanding real accuracy and applicability of combinations of different sensors. Finally, spatial and temporal regularisation models were applied to add extra constraints to the inversion. The proposed contribution demonstrates the capabilities of EO-LDAS for the reconstruction of hyperspectral bands on the base of different

  9. Potentials for Indication of Potentially Harmful Toxic Algal Blooms Using PROBA1-CHRIS Hyperspectral Imagery- A Case Study in Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiermann, Timo

    2010-12-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an issue affecting water quality and can cause harmful health impacts. The aim of the conducted case study is to assess such blooms by chlorophyll a and phycocyanin detection as indicators of the occurrence. Using demonstrated single reflectance ratio algorithms published as in [7] and processed with provided tools for hyperspectral Proba1-CHRIS imagery in a study site including Loumbila reservoir near Ouagadougou, capital of Burkina Faso to investigate potentials of this approach.

  10. Comparison Between Fractional Vegetation Cover Retrievals from Vegetation Indices and Spectral Mixture Analysis: Case Study of PROBA/CHRIS Data Over an Agricultural Area

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C.; Sobrino, José A.; Plaza, Antonio; Guanter, Luis; Moreno, José; Martínez, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we compare two different methodologies for Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC) retrieval from Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) data onboard the European Space Agency (ESA) Project for On-Board Autonomy (PROBA) platform. The first methodology is based on empirical approaches using Vegetation Indices (VIs), in particular the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Variable Atmospherically Resistant Index (VARI). The second methodology is based on the Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) technique, in which a Linear Spectral Unmixing model has been considered in order to retrieve the abundance of the different constituent materials within pixel elements, called Endmembers (EMs). These EMs were extracted from the image using three different methods: i) manual extraction using a land cover map, ii) Pixel Purity Index (PPI) and iii) Automated Morphological Endmember Extraction (AMEE). The different methodologies for FVC retrieval were applied to one PROBA/CHRIS image acquired over an agricultural area in Spain, and they were calibrated and tested against in situ measurements of FVC estimated with hemispherical photographs. The results obtained from VIs show that VARI correlates better with FVC than NDVI does, with standard errors of estimation of less than 8% in the case of VARI and less than 13% in the case of NDVI when calibrated using the in situ measurements. The results obtained from the SMA-LSU technique show Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE) below 12% when EMs are extracted from the AMEE method and around 9% when extracted from the PPI method. A RMSE value below 9% was obtained for manual extraction of EMs using a land cover use map. PMID:22399938

  11. PeoplePersonality: Chris Clarke - a physicist who studies ice cream Teaching Anecdotes: Annie Jump Cannon Obituary: György Marx 1927-2002 Starting Out: What Katie did next: part 3 Opinions: What is really important?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Featuring relationships, personalities, interactions, environments and reputations involved in physics and education PERSONALITY (156) Chris Clarke - a physicist who studies ice cream TEACHING ANECDOTES (157) Annie Jump Cannon OBITUARY (158) György Marx 1927-2002 Steven Chapman STARTING OUT (159) What Katie did next: part 3 Katie Pennicott OPINIONS (160) What is really important? Kerry Parker

  12. Determination of seasonal changes in wetlands using CHRIS/Proba Hyperspectral satellite images: A case study from Acigöl (Denizli), Turkey.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Muhittin; Budakoglu, Murat; Avci, Damla Uca; Ozelkan, Emre; Bulbul, Ali; Civas, Melda; Tasdelen, Suat

    2015-01-01

    The changes in wetlands that occur through natural processes, as well as through industrialization and agricultural activities, are decreasing and even annihilating the living spaces of endemic species. Acigöl (Denizli, Turkey), which is a suitable habitat for flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), is a lake that is affected by seasonal anomalies as a result of being shallow. Acigöl, which is fed by precipitation, groundwater and the springs that occur along tectonic faults, has no water output other than evaporation and industrial activities. In addition to natural factors, it is important to determine the changes in the wetlands of Acig6l, where industrial salt is produced, in order to reveal the micro-ecological equilibrium, the relationship between climate and natural life, and regulation of industrial activities. Remote sensing tools are frequently used in determination of changes in wetlands. Changes in coastlines, water level and area covered by water are parameters that can be examined by remote sensing while investigating wetlands. In this study, the water-covered area was examined using remote sensing. Within the scope of this study, CHRIS/Proba Mode 2 (water bandset) hyperspectral satellite images, acquired on 9/17/2011 for the season and on 6/18/2012 - 6/19/2012 forwet season, were used in orderto present the seasonal changes in Acigöl, during one hydrogeological period. The processes of noise reduction, cloud screening, atmospheric correction, geometric correction, and identification of wetlands have been implemented on the CHRIS/Proba images. In determining the water-covered areas, the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) was used. It was determined that W6 (560 nm) and W18 (1015 nm) and W2 (447 nm) and W18 (1015 nm) band combinations were most appropriate to be used in NDWI to demonstrate the water-land separation. Using Proba-NDWI image, it was established that an area of 27.4 km2 was covered with water during dry season, and 61.2 km2 was covered

  13. Occurrence of Vibrio Pathotypes in the Final Effluents of Five Wastewater Treatment Plants in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nongogo, Vuyokazi; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of Vibrio pathogens in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa over a 12 months period between September 2012 and August 2013 using standard membrane filtration technique followed by cultivation on thiosulphate citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar. The identities of the presumptive Vibrio isolates were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including delineation into V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. fluvialis pathotypes. The counts of Vibrio spp. varied with months in all the study sites and ranged in the order of 101 and 104 CFU/100mL. Vibrio distribution also showed seasonality with high counts being obtained in autumn and spring (p < 0.05). Prevalence of Vibrio spp. among the five WWTPs also differed significantly (p < 0.05). Of the 300 isolates that were confirmed as belonging to the Vibrio genus, 29% (86) were V. fluvialis, 28% (84) were V. vulnificus and 12% (35) were V. parahaemolyticus. The isolation of Vibrio pathogens from the final effluent suggests that this pathogen is in circulation in some pockets of the population and that the WWTPs under study do not efficiently remove bacterial pathogens from the wastewater and consequently are threats to public health. PMID:25093653

  14. Farewell remarks by Chris Mooers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooers, Chris

    1984-04-01

    For 6 years it has been my privilege and pleasure to serve the Ocean Sciences Section as an elected officer. First as Secretary, then as President-Elect, and finally, as President. The tacit theme I have pursued through these years has been to help the Ocean Sciences Community awaken to opportunities within AGU, to “flex its muscles” as a large, strong, rapidly growing segment of AGU, and to become involved in using AGU's programmatic resources for the benefit of the intellectual and professional development of the ocean sciences. (Our section is the second largest of 10 sections and may become the largest within several years, if the present relative rate of growth is sustained.) Like any large organization, AGU has inertia; however, we have learned that it is flexible and yields to and, in fact, supports the initiatives of activist. And we have only scratched the surface.

  15. Estimating seasonal changes of land cover, surface wetness and latent heat flux of wet polygonal tundra (Samoylov Island, Lena-Delta, Siberia) with high-resolution aerial and hyperspectral CHRIS Proba satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muster, S.; Langer, M.; Boike, J.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation cover, land cover and surface wetness are few of the many factors exerting control on the partitioning of energy to latent, sensible and ground heat flux. Spatial estimates of these factors can be inferred from remote sensing data. The fractionated polygonal tundra landscape of Samoylov Island of wet and dry surfaces induces strong spatial variations of resistance to evapotranspiration. The development of low-centered ice-wedge polygons results in a prominent microrelief that is the most important factor for small-scale differences in vegetation type and near surface soil moisture. Depressed polygon centers alternate with elevated polygon rims with elevation differences of up to 0.5 m over a few meters distance. In the depressed polygon centers, drainage is strongly impeded due to the underlying permafrost resulting in water-saturated soils or small ponds. A process-based understanding of the surface energy balance, however, needs to consider both the temporal and the spatial variations of the surface. In the course of the summer season, the surface wetness changes significantly since the water table falls about 5 cm below the surface. This change in surface wetness is likely to be associated with changing evapotranspiration rates. We consider the effect of seasonal changes in land cover, vegetation cover and surface wetness on latent heat flux by investigating a time-series of high-resolution aerial and hyperspectral satellite imagery and comparing them to ground-based measurements of near-surface soil moisture and latent heat flux. Two sets of aerial images from August 15 and September 11, 2008 in the VNIR provide detailed information of the polygonal landscape with a resolution of 0.3m. CHRIS Proba imagery provides hyperspectral data with 18 spectral bands in the VNIR range (400 - 1050 nm) and a resolution of 17 m. Acquisition dates are June 21, July 23 and September 10, 2008. Daily point-based measurements of near-surface soil moisture and latent

  16. An Interview with AIDS Vaccine Researcher Chris Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2010-01-01

    The search for an AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) vaccine is truly a global effort, with university laboratories, biotech firms, pharmaceutical companies, nonprofit research organizations, hospitals, and clinics all working together to develop an effective vaccine as quickly as possible. The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI)…

  17. It's All about the Money: Chris and Pat Compare Salaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renard, Monika K.

    2008-01-01

    Can you name 20 influences on pay that could cause a difference in earnings between two ostensibly equal employees? This short, involving exercise can be used to illustrate the numerous influences that affect how employees' pay is determined, for example, education, experience required for the job, supply and demand, company size, seniority, and…

  18. Chris Pierce and the Yankee Donut Company: An E-Mail-Based Management Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Danna N.; Rollag, Keith

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an e-mail-based simulation that helps students experience the fast-paced, complex world of the middle manager. In this electronic in-basket exercise, students assume the role of a district manager in a doughnut company as they respond to a rapid series of high- and low-priority e-mails ostensibly sent from…

  19. Serving the Niche: Viewing Libraries through Chris Anderson's "Long Tail" Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossman, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    The increasingly famous "Long Tail" is essentially a modernized version of the 80/20 rule, something with which most have at least a passing familiarity. The rule (credited to Vilfredo Pareto, a 19th-century philosopher) hypothesized, for example, that 80 percent of the property in Italy was owned by 20 percent of its citizens. That rule is now…

  20. Computer systems and methods for visualizStolte; Chris ing data

    DOEpatents

    Stolte, Chris; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2013-01-29

    A method for forming a visual plot using a hierarchical structure of a dataset. The dataset comprises a measure and a dimension. The dimension consists of a plurality of levels. The plurality of levels form a dimension hierarchy. The visual plot is constructed based on a specification. A first level from the plurality of levels is represented by a first component of the visual plot. A second level from the plurality of levels is represented by a second component of the visual plot. The dataset is queried to retrieve data in accordance with the specification. The data includes all or a portion of the dimension and all or a portion of the measure. The visual plot is populated with the retrieved data in accordance with the specification.

  1. A "Fourth Moment" for Music Education? A Response to Chris Philpott's Sociological Critique of Music Curriculum Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhail, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The catalyst for this paper is the ongoing debate concerning formal and informal approaches to pedagogy within the music education literature. I utilise a chapter by Philpott (2010) as a means to continue discussion about the apparent dialectic between formal and informal approaches to music learning and the case Philpott raises for radical change…

  2. Carb & Calorie Counter Cheyette Chris & Balolia Yello Carb & Calorie Counter 352pp £10.49 Chello Publishing Limited 9781908261151 1908261153 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-07-27

    This book has an interesting layout with numerous colourful and well labelled illustrations of plates of different food types. The summary of grams of carbs, protein, fat, saturated fat, fibre, calorific value and different portion sizes is useful and provides a quick reference when carb counting. PMID:27461321

  3. Science Education and Teacher Effectiveness: Implications of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): Q&A with Chris Wilson, Ph.D., and Jody Bintz, M.S. REL Mid-Atlantic Teacher Effectiveness Webinar Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This webinar explored how the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) provide an instructional framework to support professional growth and inform teacher evaluation systems for science instruction. This Q&A addressed the questions participants had for Dr. Wilson and Jody Bintz following the webinar. The webinar recording and PowerPoint…

  4. Expedition 35/36 Crew Departs Star City

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 35 Flight Enginners Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov and Alexander Misurkin participated in traditional ceremonies at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia outside Mo...

  5. Expedition 36 Crew Profile

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn more about Expedition 36 Commander Pavel Vinogradov and Flight Engineers Chris Cassidy, Alexander Misurkin, Karen Nyberg, Fyodor Yurchikhin and Luca Parmitano and their mission aboard the Int...

  6. 75 FR 67965 - Announcement of Local Government Advisory Committee Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... (Small Cities and Towns) Bob Dixson, Mayor, Greensburg, Kansas. Marilyn Murrell, Mayor, Arcadia, Oklahoma... Mary Margaret Whipple, State Senator, Commonwealth of Virginia. Chris Ross, State Representative...

  7. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  8. From Tununak to Beaufort: Taking a Critical Inquiry Stance as a First Year Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fecho, Bob; Price, Kim; Read, Chris

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors show how two first year teachers a continent apart--Kim in the village of Tununak on the Bering Sea in Alaska and Chris in Beaufort, South Carolina, on the Atlantic Ocean--were able to take inquiry stances on their classrooms. In particular, through analysis of e-mails written in Chris' and Kim's first years of…

  9. Asking "Who Are You?" when Going "into the Wild": Moving beyond an Individualized Form of Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zink, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    The story of Chris McCandless, as told by Jon Krakauer, and more recently by Sean Penn, tells a familiar tale of going alone into the wilderness in search of the truth of oneself. Chris's story provides a parable to explore some of the motifs that inform contemporary outdoor education. In this paper I draw on the work of Michel Foucault and Judith…

  10. Unanswered prayers: religiosity and the god-serving bias.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Heidi R; Uhalt, Joshua; Matthies, Brigitte K

    2014-01-01

    Two self-report experiments examined how religiosity affects attributions made for a target person's death. Online adults (Study 1, N = 427) and undergraduate students (Study 2, N = 326) read about Chris who had a heart attack, used religious or health behaviors, and lived or died. Participants made attributions to Chris and God (both studies), and reported their emotions (Study 2). Participants made more attributions to Chris when he lived than when he died, but only when he used health behaviors. The highly religious made more attributions to God, but not when Chris used religious behaviors and died (the God-serving bias); they reported the most positive emotions when Chris lived after using religious behaviors (the Hallelujah effect). Directions for future research in terms of implicit religious beliefs and normative evaluations of religion are discussed. PMID:25280166

  11. ISS Update: Expedition 34 Flight Director Describes Station Science Operations

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly interviews Chris Edelen, Expedition 34 Lead Flight Director, at Johnson Space Center’s Mission Control Center. Edelen has overseen the research and utiliza...

  12. Final Shuttle Crew Recaps Mission for Dryden Staff - Duration: 110 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    STS-135 crew members, commander Chris Ferguson, pilot Doug Hurley and mission specialists Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim, recalled personal highlights of the final shuttle mission and their involveme...

  13. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liaison, NIH Diane Striar, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Chris Thomsen, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Larry Thompson, National Human Genome Research Institute Anne Thurn, Ph.D., Office of Dietary Supplements Summer 2011 Issue: ...

  14. Expedition 34 Crew Prepares for Soyuz Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Tom Marshburn of NASA, Roman Romanenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency and Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency prepare for their Dec. 19 launch...

  15. Responses to the Learning and Skills Bill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning (England), 2000

    2000-01-01

    Includes "Commentary" (Alan Tuckett); "Lifelong Learning" (Malcolm Wicks); "An Opposition View" (Tim Boswell); "Opening up the Learning Market" (Jacqui Henderson); "Ringing in the Changes" (Chris Hughes); and "More Reasons to Be Cheerful, More Causes for Concern" (Alastair Thomson). (SK)

  16. From science to policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumey, Chris

    2015-01-01

    A recent conference on the environmental effects of nanoparticles leaves Chris Toumey reflecting on the difficulties of carrying out nanotoxicology research that can be used to develop informed environmental regulation.

  17. Quick lessons on environmental nanotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumey, Chris

    2015-07-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles to clean clothes and the use of magnetite nanoparticles to clean water provide contrasting illustrations of the potential environmental consequences of nanotechnology, as Chris Toumey explains.

  18. Lessons from before and after nanotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumey, Chris

    2012-10-01

    Ethical questions arising from biotechnology first, then nanotechnology, and synthetic biology now, present common features, but as Chris Toumey explains, the scientific and ethical issues arising in each case should be treated individually.

  19. A human perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    As we face perhaps the biggest challenge in our species' history, Chris Stringer -- a palaeoanthropologist at London's Natural History Museum and author of The Origin Of Our Species -- tells Nature Climate Change how our hominid cousins battled past climate change.

  20. EAGLE: galaxy evolution with the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Chris; Morris, Simon; Swinbank, Mark; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Lehnert, Matthew; Puech, Mathieu

    2010-04-01

    Chris Evans, Simon Morris, Jean-Gabriel Cuby, Matt Lehnert, Mark Swinbank and Mathieu Puech describe an instrument that could bring distant galaxies and stellar populations within reach of the European Extremely Large Telescope.

  1. Expedition 34/35 Crew Departs Star City

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 34/35 Soyuz Commander Roman Romanenko, NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn and Canadian Space Agency Flight Engineer Chris Hadfield participated in traditional ceremonies at the Gagarin C...

  2. Magnetotails throughout the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Milan, S. E.; Walsh, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    MEETING REPORT A key part of heliospheric and planetary physics came under scrutiny at an RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting in October. Colin Forsyth, Chris Arridge, Steve Milan and Andrew Walsh summarize.

  3. Peter Gabriel Talks With Space Station Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Singer-songwriter Peter Gabriel and family visit Mission Control Houston and talk with Expedition 33 Commander Kevin Ford and Flight Engineers Tom Marshburn and Chris Hadfield aboard the Internatio...

  4. Kennedy Space Center Wakes STS-135 Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flight Day 13 wakeup music was "Fanfare for the Common Man" by Aaron Copland played for Commander Chris Ferguson. It was followed by a prerecorded message from Kennedy Space Center employees. K...

  5. Next Station Crew in Kazakhstan for Soyuz Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 35/36 Soyuz Commander Pavel Vinogradov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, NASA Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy and Russian Flight Engineer Alexander Misurkin arrive at the Baikonur Cosmo...

  6. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... fic.nih.gov National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) www.nccam.nih.gov 1-888-644- ... Institute Chris Thomsen , National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Larry Thompson , National Human Genome Research Institute Anne ...

  7. Expedition 35/36 Final Exams

    NASA Video Gallery

    Three Expedition 35/36 crew members prepare for their final exams in their Sokol launch and entry suits at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy a...

  8. Expedition 34 Final Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Expedition 34 crew members conduct final training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center before their Dec. 19 launch to the International Space Station. Flight Engineers Chris Hadfield, Roman...

  9. Sir Paul McCartney Wake-up Song and Greeting

    NASA Video Gallery

    Paul McCartney and Beatles favorite "Good Day Sunshine" greet the Atlantis crew of Chris Ferguson, Doug Hurley, Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim first thing on Flight Day 8. Sir Paul and the Beatles’...

  10. A Celebration of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    On September 23, 2011, NASA Langley hosted a Shuttle Celebration at the Virginia Air & Space Center in Hampton, Va. More than 650 guests attended, including STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson and NAS...

  11. 78 FR 79035 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Exchange Act Release No. 70806 (November 5, 2013), 78 FR 67424. \\4\\ See letter from Chris Concannon... November 11, 2013; letter from Martin H. Kaplan, Gusrae Kaplan Nusbaum PLLC, to Kevin M. O'Neill,...

  12. Expedition 34/35 Crew Members Visit Red Square

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space Station crew members Chris Hadfield, Roman Romanenko and Tom Marshburn placed flowers at the Kremlin Wall in Red Square in Moscow, Russia, as part of ceremonial activities leading to their la...

  13. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Dennis Rodrigues , Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Chris Thomsen , National Center ...

  14. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Dennis Rodrigues , Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Chris Thomsen , National Center ...

  15. 77 FR 3019 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... CFR 240.19b-4. \\3\\ Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65877 (December 2, 2011), 76 FR 76777. \\4\\ See letter from Chris Killian, Managing Director, Securitization, Securities Industry and Financial...

  16. HOME AND HOME CONFERENCE EVENT WITH NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER AND THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    HOME AND HOME CONFERENCE EVENT WITH NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER AND THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION WITH LOCAL INDUSTRIES AND ASSOCIATION / GROUP SHOT - LEFT TO RIGHT - CATERERS / DON CAMPBELL / CHRIS TITRAN

  17. Station Commander Praises AMS

    NASA Video Gallery

    When asked what's the most important International Space Station experiment, Commander Chris Hadfield names the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2, a state-of-the-art particle physics detector that coul...

  18. STS-135: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 10, 2011, space shuttle Atlantis performed the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or “backflip.” With Commander Chris Ferguson at the helm, Atlantis rotated 360 degrees backward to ...

  19. The Multiplicative Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between three critical elements, and the associated mathematical language, to assist students to make the critical transition from additive to multiplicative thinking are examined in this article by Chris Hurst.

  20. ISS Update: Robonaut Glove Test (Part 2)

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Chris Ihrke, General Motors Lead Engineer for the Robo-Glove Project, about the Robonaut glove test. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson an...

  1. Systems approach to chemical spill response information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Parnarouskis, M.C.; Flessner, M.F.; Potts, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The Chemical Hazards Response Information System (CHRIS) has been specifically designed to meet the emergency needs of US Coast Guard field personnel, currently providing them with information on 900 hazardous chemicals, with methods of predicting hazards resulting from accidental discharges, and with procedures for selecting and implementing response to accident discharges. The major components of CHRIS and the computerized hazard assessment models within the Hazard Assessment Computer System are described in detail.

  2. ChRIS--A web-based neuroimaging and informatics system for collecting, organizing, processing, visualizing and sharing of medical data.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Rudolph; Rannou, Nicolas; Bernal, Jorge; Hahn, Daniel; Grant, P Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The utility of web browsers for general purpose computing, long anticipated, is only now coming into fruition. In this paper we present a web-based medical image data and information management software platform called ChRIS ([Boston] Children's Research Integration System). ChRIS' deep functionality allows for easy retrieval of medical image data from resources typically found in hospitals, organizes and presents information in a modern feed-like interface, provides access to a growing library of plugins that process these data - typically on a connected High Performance Compute Cluster, allows for easy data sharing between users and instances of ChRIS and provides powerful 3D visualization and real time collaboration. PMID:26736236

  3. Math and Science. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue contains six articles on improving math and science education for minority group students, particularly language-minority students. "Accelerating Content Area Gains for English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) describes the Young Scientists Acquiring English project, which seeks to improve the content-area achievement of…

  4. Assessment Update: Progress, Trends, and Practices in Higher Education. Volume 24, Issue 1, January-February 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Assessment Update" presents the following articles: (1) Expectations for Assessment Reports: A Descriptive Analysis (Keston H. Fulcher, Matthew Swain, and Chris D. Orem); (2) Editor's Notes: A Surprising Reaction (Trudy W. Banta); (3) Getting SMART with Assessment: ACTION Steps to Institutional Effectiveness (Eric…

  5. The Oral History of Evaluation: The Professional Development of James R. Sanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Evaluation, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Over a period spanning 8 years, the Oral History Project Team has conducted interviews with individuals who have made significant contributions to the scholarship, practice, and profession of evaluation. In 2006, Robin Miller, Chris Coryn, and Daniela Schroeter conducted an oral history interview with James R. Sanders at the Evaluation Center that…

  6. Supergirl Scorned: Lessons about Young Femininity in an Australian Television Satire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Claire E.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I explore the popular Australian television character of Ja'mie King--a teenage private school girl created and performed by male comedian Chris Lilley. I conceptualise Lilley's satire as a public pedagogy of young femininity. My reading of his satire responds to recent feminist scholarship around young femininities and "girl power",…

  7. On the Question of Integrating Young Adult Literature into the Mainstream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Terry

    1997-01-01

    Uses the author's own novels and those of Chris Crutcher to explore the harm that is sometimes done to literature labeled Young Adult. Explores a disturbing trend in the publishing, packaging, and attitudes toward such novels: packaging and cover art which panders, and the refusal to hold young adult literature to high standards. (SR)

  8. Terrorism, Violence, and the Collision of Masculinities in "Four Lions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labidi, Imed

    2011-01-01

    Many critics hailed the new film, "Four Lions," by director Chris Morris as "provocative, incendiary, audacious, and shocking" and "one of the funniest and boldest comedies of the year." As a satirist, Morris already established his wit signature with the production of the mockumentary series, "Brass Eye." Using the same absurdist approach, he…

  9. Literacy in the Modern World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the following books: "The Politics of Writing," (Romy Clark, Roz Ivanic); "Literacy in Society," (Ruqaiya Hasan, Geoff Williams); "Text, Role, and Context: Developing Academic Literacies" (Ann M. Johns); "Changing Literacies" by (Colin Lankshear with James Paul Gee, Michele Knobel, Chris Searle); and "Vernacular Literacy: A Re-evaluation"…

  10. Thirteen years of pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    This talk surveys a thirteen-year collaboration with Chris Bottcher on various aspects of strong field electrodynamics. Most of the work centers on the atomic physics associated with the peripheral collisions of ultrarelativistic heavy atoms. The earliest, beginning in about 1979, dealt with the spontaneous emission of positrons from nuclear quasimolecules and touched briefly on the formation of axions as a possible explanation of the anomalous peaks in the spectrum. This work stimulated the extensive studies of particle production from coherent fields that laid the foundations for investigations of nuclear form factors, structure functions, and production mechanisms for the Higgs and other exotic particles. Chris conjectured that the strong fields that are present in these collisions would give rise to nonperturbative effects. Thus, during this time, Chris also worked to develop basis-spline collocation methods for solving dynamical relativistic fermions in super strong fields. This was perhaps one of the best of times for Chris; on these problems alone, he co-authored fifty articles with more than twenty different collaborators.

  11. 10. Photocopy of photographs (original photographs in possession of Coronado ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photographs (original photographs in possession of Coronado Historical Association). Chris Ackerman, Photographer, 1992. THREE VIEWS OF BABCOCK COURT: 1) CENTRAL COURTYARD FROM SECOND STORY PORCH, 2) AREA BEHIND BUNGALOWS, 3) OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUNGALOW FRONTS WITH TWO-STORY APARTMENT IN REAR - Heilman Villas, 706-720 Orange Avenue & 1060-1090 Seventh Street, Coronado, San Diego County, CA

  12. Technology in Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles on the effective use of computers and electronic technology in education, and on equitable access to educational technologies for Hispanics and other minority groups. "Teachers and Instructional Technology: Wise or Foolish Choices" (Laura Chris Green) describes three unproductive roles for computer…

  13. 77 FR 4568 - Annual Computational Science Symposium; Public Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with the Pharmaceutical Users Software Exchange (PhUSE), is announcing a public conference entitled ``The FDA/PhUSE Annual Computational Science Symposium.'' The purpose...-5300. Contact: Chris Decker, U.S. Regional Director, Pharmaceutical Users Software Exchange (PhUSE),...

  14. Standards and Assessment. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes three articles, two of which focus on standards for student evaluation and for admission to higher education. "A Measuring Stick for Standards and TEKS: Meeting the Needs of Second Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green, Adela Solis) examines beliefs embodied in the notion of standards; defines content, performance, and…

  15. 78 FR 58269 - Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Animal Health Monitoring...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ...; National Animal Health Monitoring System; Bison 2014 Study AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... System's Bison 2014 Study to support the bison industry of the United States. DATES: We will consider all...: For information on the Bison 2014 Study, contact Mr. Chris Quatrano, Industry Analyst, Centers...

  16. Thermal Materials Protect Priceless, Personal Keepsakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    NASA astronaut Scott Parazynski led the development of materials and techniques for the inspection and repair of the shuttle’s thermal protection system. Parazynski later met Chris Shiver of Houston-based DreamSaver Enterprises LLC and used concepts from his work at Johnson Space Center to develop an enclosure that can withstand 98 percent of residential fires.

  17. An Asilomar for nanotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumey, Chris

    2014-07-01

    Although numerous statements on ethics in nanotechnology have been published, they exist as seemingly disparate, stand-alone works. Inspired by a process that the field of genetic engineering went through in the 1970s, Chris Toumey suggests one way in which some clarity could be brought to the topic.

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (81st, Baltimore, Maryland, August 5-8, 1998). Minorities and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Minorities and Communication section of these Proceedings contains the following 10 papers: "L'affaire Jake Powell: The Minority Press Goes to Bat against Segregated Baseball" (Chris Lamb); "Strategies for Surveying Small, Urban Publications on Patterns of Writing Staff Racial Diversity" (Yvonne Laurenty); "Sensing, Valuation, and the…

  19. A DIY Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Jenna

    2006-01-01

    Chris Dodge, a renowned alternative pressologist and the librarian at "Utne" magazine, has been known to say, "Every library should be a special library." In order to meet this challenge, the librarians at Barnard College decided to start a collection of underground publications known as zines. In this article, the author describes how librarians…

  20. Crash Course: Imagining a Better Future for Public Education. Luncheon Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittle, Chris

    2005-01-01

    The United States spends 100 times more money on research and development for healthcare than it does education. Does this mean then that Americans do not value education? These are the kinds of provocative questions that Chris Whittle, founder and Chief Executive Officer of Edison Schools, has been asking for more than two decades. Now, he has…

  1. 75 FR 4625 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Renewals; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... (74 FR 62632). Discussion of Comments FMCSA received no comments in this proceeding. Conclusion The... exemptions for Thomas E. Adams, Terry J. Aldridge, Lennie D. Baker, Jr., Jerry D. Bridges, William J. Corder.... Menken, Rodney M. Mimbs, Walter F. Moniowczak, William G. Mote, James R. Murphy, Chris A....

  2. "Depend on, Rely on, Count on": Economic Subjectivities Aboard "The Polar Express"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltmarsh, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Christmas literature and film produced for children is an important, albeit under-researched, site for the production of cultural values and norms. This paper analyses Chris Van Allsburg's 1985 picture book "The Polar Express", the 2004 Warner Brothers feature film of the same title, the film's official website, and resources for teachers…

  3. AGU leadership reflects back, looks forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie; Buhrman, Joan

    2011-09-01

    AGU president Mike McPhaden, president-elect Carol Finn, and executive director Chris McEntee have served in their current capacities for approximately a year. In this interview, held 18 August after the AGU Council meeting, they reflect back on the year and discuss prospects for the future.

  4. Do You Mean Us, Mr Brown?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harriman, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    This summer Chris Wardley, Chair of Access to Community Education (ACE), a small charity run by and for disabled people in Torbay, wrote to Gordon Brown. She asked him whether his mission to "fulfil the potential and realise the talents of all people" was based solely on economic goals or whether everyone, including disabled people, would be…

  5. More STELLA Narratives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English in Australia, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents brief essays by teachers of English in Australian primary and secondary schools in a bid to convey images of accomplished teaching. Introduction by Brenton Doecke, includes "Negotiating the Curriculum" (Lynne Collidge); "Year 7 Autobiographies" (Chris Melican); "Taking Ownership" (Cheryl Lawson); "Goodnight Study Guide" (Fiona Gordon).…

  6. Making an Impression: YA Authors and Their Influential Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenbach, Brooke; Kaywell, Joan F.

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts significant moments from online interviews these authors conducted with Young Adult (YA) authors concerning the teachers who left a lasting impression on them and assisted them in finding their voice and unique writing abilities. S. E. Hinton, Walter Dean Myers, Erin Gruwell, Chris Crutcher, and other popular YA authors…

  7. Exploring the Environment and Issues of Social Concern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Teaching Kids to Change the World: Lessons to Inspire Social Responsibility for Grades 6-12," by Jennifer Griffin-Wiesner and Chris Maser, is a practical guide that provides educators with the essential tools to inspire young people to change the world for the better. Focusing on eight principles of change, it includes lessons, examples and…

  8. GENETIC BACKGROUND BUT NOT METALLOTHIONEIN PHENOTYPE DICTATES SENSITIVITY TO CADMIUM-INDUCED TESTICULAR INJURY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic Background but not Metallothionein Phenotype Dictates Sensitivity to
    Cadmium-Induced Testicular Injury in Mice

    Jie Liu1,2, Chris Corton3, David J. Dix4, Yaping Liu1, Michael P. Waalkes2
    and Curtis D. Klaassen1

    ABSTRACT

    Parenteral administrati...

  9. Repair Sequences in Dysarthric Conversational Speech: A Study in Interactional Phonetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents some findings from a case study of repair sequences in conversations between a dysarthric speaker, Chris, and her interactional partners. It adopts the methodology of interactional phonetics, where turn design, sequence organization, and variation in phonetic parameters are analysed in unison. The analysis focused on the use of…

  10. Waist-High and Knee-Deep: Humane Learning beyond Polemics and Precincts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, Chris Higgins sets out to disentangle the tradition of humane learning from contemporary distinctions and debates. The first section demonstrates how a bloated and incoherent "humanism" now functions primarily as a talisman or a target, that is, as a prompt to choose sides. It closes with the image of Doris Salcedo's…

  11. Reclaiming Our Roots: The Influences of Media Curriculum on the Natural Hair Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Rhonda Baynes; Jeffries, Devair

    2014-01-01

    This article, theoretically constructed on Gramsci's notion of cultural hegemony, explores the use of Black female hair as a cultural signifier in two media texts, specifically Adrienne Kennedy's play, "Funnyhouse of a Negro," and Chris Rock's documentary, "Good Hair," in specific media texts. Analysis of the…

  12. Water Can Be Messy, but that's OK: Reflections on Preparing Elementary Teachers to Teach Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittleson, Julie M.; Tippins, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Building on Christina Siry and Johaira Lara's account of one teacher's (Johaira's) identity formation, we describe how our own experiences with elementary teacher candidates inform, and are informed by, this account. Chris and Johaira provide a lens that helps us consider how experiences in elementary science teacher preparation courses and in…

  13. Legal Currency in Special Education Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2011-01-01

    A review of some basic concepts in special education law will help principals better understand the complex laws and regulations implicated in common situations. This article cites a case scenario that illustrates various potential issues under IDEA 2004 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Chris is in the 10th grade, and his parents have…

  14. 78 FR 58268 - Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Animal Health Monitoring...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ...; National Animal Health Monitoring System; Cervid 2014 Study AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... System's Cervid 2014 Study to support the farmed cervid industry in the United States. DATES: We will...: For information on the Cervid 2014 Study, contact Mr. Chris Quatrano, Industry Analyst, Centers...

  15. Crosses on the Lawn: A Fox Family Channel Afternoon Special for Cable in the Classroom. [Videotape with] a Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    "Crosses on the Lawn," the television program featured in this videotape and teaching guide, covers the causes and effects of the issues raised by racial hatred, and it reveals attempts to heal the wounds of bigotry. The fictional town of Springdale, home of the two main characters, Chaz and Chris, one white and one black, becomes a microcosm for…

  16. Landing Day Wake Up Song and Greeting

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kate Smith’s rendition of Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America” woke Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim. But unlike most wakeup s...

  17. Seamless patient journeys the goal.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Chris Wiegand, CEO of Jibestream, a software development company for digital interactive technologies with bases in Toronto and Arlington, Virginia, explains how technologies including Wi-Fi, GPS, RFID, and Bluetooth LE are enhancing wayfinding in healthcare facilities, and, in the process, simplifying the patient journey and helping reduce the stress and anxiety often associated with a visit to the hospital. PMID:27017656

  18. 77 FR 66836 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Technologies, Inc., 1230 West Spring Street, Riverside, CA 92507. Active ingredient: Biochemical Pheromone (Mating Disruptor) with Carob Moth Pheromone Mimic (7,9,11-Dodecatrien-1-ol, formate at 90.8%. Product Type: Pheromone (Mating Disruptor). Proposed Uses: Manufacturing Use Product. Contact: Chris...

  19. Small Steps, Big Changes: Eight Essential Practices for Transforming Schools through Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confer, Chris; Ramirez, Marco

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, Chris Confer and Marco Ramirez have worked to deepen and improve mathematics instruction at schools around the country. Wherever they go, they find the raw ingredients for success already present: "The potential for positive change lies within each school. Abundance is present in the form of capable children, teachers,…

  20. Altruism and the Flourishing Teacher: Exploring a Christian Theology of Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthias, Laurie R.

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Chris Higgins' (2010) claim that perpetuating the myth of altruism is a factor that leads to teacher burnout, thus making "flourishing teacher" an oxymoron. It does so by exploring various views of the Christian concepts of agape, kenosis, and desire, debunking some persistent definitions that linger in Christian…

  1. One Book, One Community: One Great Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Beth

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, Nancy Pearl and Chris Higashi, librarians working in the Washington Center for the Book at the Seattle Public Library (SPL), had a brainstorm. Challenged with a grant to develop new audiences for literature, they were intrigued with the power of books to unite diverse audiences. With that in mind, they expanded the book club concept to…

  2. Sir Gawain Was Just Out of Middle School....

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Probst, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Notes that what all middle school students need is another kid like them but with words. Presents some examples of adolescents going through the rites of passage--someone like T.J. in Chris Crutcher's "Whale Talk," or Sara Louise Bradshaw in Katherine Paterson's "Jacob Have I Loved," or Brian in Gary Paulson's "Hatchet." (SG)

  3. Response to Mackenzie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peers, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Chris Peers begins his response to Jim Mackenzie's article, "Peers on Socrates and Plato" by asking "What is the 'masculine imaginary?'" Peers defines the term "imaginary" as it is applied in his article, "Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho-Logic of Teaching and Learning" (2012) and draws…

  4. International Issues. Paper Presentations: Session C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains eight papers from the international issues section of an international conference on vocational education and training (VET) for lifelong learning in the information era. The following papers are included: "The Impact of Globalisation and the Changing Nature of Work on Vocational Education and Training" (Chris Robinson); "In…

  5. Waves and Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2010-12-01

    Thanks to Chris Chiaverina (retired) and Frank Noschese (John Jay HS; Cross River, NY) for their contributions to this month's column. If you have a video that you use in your classroom, please send the link and a brief description to Diane, driendeau@dist113.org.

  6. Reconciling Self-Regard, Concern for Others, and a Passion for Teaching Music: Lessons from the Hunger Artist and the Hungry Ghost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Charlene A.

    2012-01-01

    In his book, Chris Higgins acknowledges the challenges of teaching associated with heavy workloads, increasing responsibilities, and often diminishing respect from the very public institutions that teachers serve. However, his purpose is not to deplore the external conditions of teaching but to raise concerns about its service culture. He argues…

  7. We Should Not Give up on Kids: Interviews with former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reno, Janet

    2001-01-01

    In two interviews Janet Reno, former U.S. Attorney General, discusses the biggest challenges facing children and youth and how government, families, and communities can come together to meet these challenges. The first interview was conducted by Mary Shahbazian; the second was conducted by Father Chris Riley. (Author)

  8. Shining Stars: Kindergartners Learn to Read. How Parents Can Help Their Kindergartners Learn to Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, C. Ralph; Goldman, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This guide begins with a story about the parents of twin kindergartners. The story models ways in which the parents of Mike and Chris help them learn to read, such as reading the newspaper together with them and asking them questions about the books they are reading. Included is another short story parents can read with their child, and a list of…

  9. A Healing Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Terry

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that Chris Crutcher, therapist and author of novels for young adults, views the world as a place where God, if He exists, does not prevent or cause good or bad things to happen to people. Suggests that Crutcher sees the human spirit as the ultimate determinant along with human relationships. (TB)

  10. Sketching to Create Meaning: The Story of a Second-Language Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Chris Altman stresses the importance of helping English language learners ascertain the medium they best work with in interpreting information presented in class. Altman reminds us that meaning does not come directly from teachers giving students information, but from students productively making meaning and clarifying understanding through a…

  11. 75 FR 42680 - Proposed Information Collection; Topographic and Bathymetric Data Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... Bathymetric Data Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION..., (843) 740- 1195 or Chris.Ellis@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract This survey will be... provide a comprehensive, publicly available, topographic and bathymetric data, Web resource. II. Method...

  12. STS-100 Crew Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Footage shows the crew of STS-100, Commander Kent Rominger, Pilot Jeffrey Ashby, and Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield, Scott Parazynski, John Phillips, Umberto Guidoni, and Yuri Valentinovich Lonchakov, during various parts of their training, including the crew photo session, postlanding egress, extravehicular activity (EVA) large tool training, EVA training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), secondary payload training, and during VHF training.

  13. Leading Change in the Primary Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Nicky; Baker, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Nicky Waller and Chris Baker believe that change can be a good thing and explain how their training has helped others to adjust to the new science curriculum. In September 2013, teachers across England received the definitive version of the new primary curriculum "Leading Change in the Primary Science Curriculum." This course aimed to…

  14. 75 FR 28101 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ....S.C. 12121 and MARAD's regulations at 46 CFR part 388 (68 FR 23084; April 30, 2003), that the... Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws AGENCY: Maritime... administrative waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws for the vessel JEN CHRIS. SUMMARY: As authorized by 46...

  15. RAS Ordinary Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    At the October 2013 meeting the President presented the Gold Medal to Prof. Chris Chapman, the Eddington Medal to Prof. James Binney, and Winton Capital Award to Dr Katherine Joy. Prof. Bob White gave the Harold Jeffreys Lecture on "Building the dynamic crust of Iceland by rifting and volcanism". At the November meeting, Prof. Eline Tolstoy gave the George Darwin Lecture on "Galactic palaeontology".

  16. The Tribulations of Reusing and Repackaging Data: A Review of "How Has School Productivity Changed in Australia?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyngier, David

    2009-01-01

    In their paper, "How has school productivity changed in Australia?" social economists Andrew Leigh and Chris Ryan (2008) attempt to show that Australian (government) schools and their teachers' productivity has declined by some 73 per cent between 1964 and 2003 compared to an overall increase of 64 per cent across the Australian economy. In…

  17. Corrigendum to "Measurement and computations for temperature dependences of self-broadened carbon dioxide transitions in the 30012←00001 and 30013←00001 bands" [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf., 111 (9) (2010) 1065-1079

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Liu, W.; Murphy, Reba; Povey, Chad; Gamache, R.; Laraia, A.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Hurtmans, Daniel; Devi, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    The group of authors would like to make the following clarification: the retrievals of self-broadened temperature dependence coefficients were performed by the authors both using the multispectrum fit program from Ref. [14] and using the multispectrum fit program of D. Chris Benner [Benner DC, Rinsland CP, Devi VM, Smith MAH, Atkins D. A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 1995;53:705-21.). To retrieve the room temperature self-broadening parameters, the authors have used the values in Ref. [4]. For reasons of consistency with the results published for air-broadening and air-shift temperature dependence coefficients in A. Predoi-Cross, A.R.W. McKellar, D. Chris Benner, V. Malathy Devi, R.R. Gamache, C.E. Miller, R.A. Toth, L.R. Brown, Temperature dependences for air-broadened Lorentz half width and pressure-shift coefficients in the 30013←00001 and 30012←00001 bands of CO2near 1600 μm, Canadian Journal of Physics, 87 (5) (2009) 517-535, Tables 2 and 3, and Figures 2 and 4 contain only the values retrieved using the multispectrum fit program of D. Chris Benner. We would like to thank D. Chris Benner for allowing us to use his fitting software.

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (84th, Washington, DC, August 5-8, 2001). Miscellaneous.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous section of the proceedings contains the following papers: "Hype versus Substance in the Final Weeks of the Broadcast Television Networks' 2000 Presidential Election Campaign Coverage" (Julia R. Fox and James Angelini); "Commercial Quality Influence on Perceptions of Television News" (Stephen Perry, Dana Trunnell; Chris Moore, and…

  19. Expedition 34 Welcomes New Trio

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Soyuz TMA-07M carrying new Expedition 34 crew members Chris Hadfield, Roman ROmanenko and Tom Marshburn docked to the International Space Station’s Rassvet module at 9:09 a.m. EST on Friday. ...

  20. Informing Educational Decisions in the Early Years: Can Evidence for Improving Pedagogy for Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder Be Found from Neuroscience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Brenda; Forlin, Chris

    2011-01-01

    It is possible that many benefits may be found for all concerned in education and child development in understanding how knowledge of the brain and its development can inform early years practice. This article, written by Brenda Peters and Chris Forlin, both from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, reviews literature based on neuroscience to…

  1. Future Training Issues in Australia's Industries. A Collection of the Papers Presented at the NCVER 1998 Conference: Industry Training Outlook '98 (Sydney, Australia, October 12-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Penelope, Ed.

    This book contains 31 papers from a conference on future training issues in Australia's industries. The following papers are included: "Training Development in Australia" (Chris Ellison); "Meeting National and Employer Training Requirements" (Mark Paterson); "Meeting Employee Training Requirements" (Bill Mansfield); "Training Challenges in…

  2. Race on the Occoquan: A President's Second Freshman Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Roger H.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author relates his experiences as a second-time college freshman at St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland. The author is a college president over the age of 50. He was also a melanoma cancer survivor who had underwent a lung surgery and chemotherapy four summers earlier. Chris Nelson, president of St. John's, had agreed to…

  3. Met Any Good Authors Lately? Classroom Author Visits Can Happen via Skype (Here's a List of Those Who Do It for Free)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messner, Kate

    2009-01-01

    In May 2007, the faculty book club that the author facilitates read Chris Bohjalian's novel "The Double Bind" (Shaye Areheart: Harmony, 2007). Bohjalian, a local author, agreed to meet them in Burlington for drinks and conversation. When he arrived, the author and her class introduced themselves, passed around some nachos, and began their…

  4. 76 FR 28029 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ..., Contact: Jill Reilly-Hauck 210- 424-8346. EIS No. 20110143, Final EIS, BLM, CA, Palen Solar Power Plant... Ends: 05/26/2011, Contact: Chris Proudfoot 760-830-3764. Revision of FR Notice Published 02/24/2011... available on the Internet at: https://www.nbkeis.com/ehw/Welcome.aspx . Revision to FR Notice Published...

  5. Innovation in Continuing Education Provision, Teaching and Learning: Research Perspectives. Papers from a Conference (Lancaster, England, United Kingdom, April 27, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Mary, Ed.; Withnall, Alexandra, Ed.

    The following conference papers cover a wide spectrum of issues in continuing education: "Introduction" (Katherine Leni Oglesby); "Footprints in the Sand?--The Legacy of the University Funding Council's Support for Research in Continuing Education" (Chris Duke); "Thinking Fragments: Learning, Life Histories and the Self" (Linden West); "Group…

  6. Instructional Technology. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on implementing instructional technology in ways that benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Cruising the Web with English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) presents three scenarios using the World Wide Web in…

  7. The Good Life of Teaching or the Life of Good Teaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    In his recent monograph, Chris Higgins (2011) offers a remarkably original, thoughtful, and provocative argument for "an ethics of professional practice" for teachers. His study brings together a wealth of ideas and authors not often discussed in relation to each other, and it draws out elusive themes and ideas often overlooked in most analyses of…

  8. User Education in the Online Age II. IATUL International Seminar Proceedings, (2nd, Delft, The Netherlands, July 30-August 2, 1984). Vol. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjallbrant, Nancy, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Papers presented at an August 1984 international seminar on online user education include "Library Policies and Strategies in The Netherlands" (Chris J. van Wijk, The Netherlands); "Promotion and Marketing of Library Services" (Nancy Fjallbrant, Sweden); "Library Promotion by Computer" (Ian Malley, United Kingdom); "Library User Education and…

  9. Aesthetic Relationships and Ethics in "The Oh Fuck Moment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breel, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the aesthetics and ethics of participatory performance through "The Oh Fuck Moment" by Hannah Jane Walker and Chris Thorpe, a performance that aesthetically explores ethically troubling material and manipulation. Ethical criticism of participatory art in recent years has focused on the way the audience member is…

  10. Learning with Technology. 1998 ASCD Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris, Ed.

    This yearbook is a collection of writings focusing technology-based innovations and illustrating exemplary projects that use technology to improve education. Following the introduction by Chris Dede, the book is divided into five parts as follows: Part 1, "Education in the 21st Century: One Vision "Connecting with the 21st Century: Technology in…

  11. The Carolinas Speech Communication Annual, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Bruce C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This 1996 issue of the "Carolinas Speech Communication Annual" contains the following articles: "Rhetoric in the Second Sophistic, Medieval, and Renaissance Periods: Implications for Pedagogy" (Omar J. Swartz and Chris Bachelder); "Thou Art Damned: Cursing as a Rhetorical Strategy of the Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials" (Colleen E. Kelley);…

  12. A Lifetime of Beating the Odds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Harold H.

    2007-01-01

    Byron Seibold recently celebrated his 70th birthday, which is not a remarkable milestone in today's era of extended longevity. Mr. Seibold has the typical maladies of aging--some vision and hearing issues, a bad hip, some memory lapses but no signs of Alzheimer's. His primary care physician, Dr. Chris Prater, attributes Mr. Seibold's good health…

  13. Deweyan Reflections on Knowledge-Producing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, S. B.; Garrison, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background/Context: Our article examines some of the philosophical underpinnings of knowledge-producing schools (KPS). KPS is an Australian initiative advanced by such researchers as Chris Bigum, Colin Lankshear, and Michael Knobel. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: We examine the epistemology and the theory of new literacy that…

  14. 77 FR 32703 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Act Release No. 66804 (April 13, 2012), 77 FR 23524 (April 19, 2012). \\4\\ See letter from Chris... was published for comment in the Federal Register on April 19, 2012.\\3\\ The Commission received two... should be disapproved. The 45th day for this filing is June 3, 2012. The Commission is extending this...

  15. Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouk, Ullik, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the theme topic "Rural Education." The first article, "Science is Everywhere," by Chris Taylor, presents a project which uses local experts as an integral part of the school's science curriculum. "Better Teachers, Better Readers" by Scott Steen describes a system of strategic reading used in rural Wisconsin school…

  16. Mentoring Alex Bick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieterle, Ed

    2005-01-01

    On February 10, 2004, Alex Bick contacted Chris Dede, the Timothy E. Wirth Professor of Learning Technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, seeking a mentor for his work to determine whether handheld computers regularly carried by high school students generally affect academic achievement. At the time, Bick was a 10th grader…

  17. Witnessing the World: The Power of True Global Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccone, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The school where Chris Piccone teaches eighth-grade English maintains a desire to pull its community from its comfort zones to experience first hand the crushing poverty in the Dominican Republic. Although he always thought of himself as a bleeding heart, who was proud that he pushed his students out of their academic comfort zones, he realized…

  18. 1992 ASCAN wilderness survival training school view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Astronaut candidates Chris A. Hadfield, Jerry M. Linenger and Koichi Wakata (left to right in foreground) are issued gear for a survival school hosted by Fairchild Air Force Base. Hadfield, from Canada, and Wakata, from Japan, are among the five international candidates in the group of astronaut candidates involved in a year-long training and evaluation program.

  19. Stigma Prolongs Global HIV Epidemic Among Gays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chris Beyrer, a professor of public health and human rights at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ... 7, 2016 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All rights ... of Health and Human Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: ...

  20. Teaching Handicapped Students English: A Resource Handbook for K-12 Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Jane W., Ed.

    One of five volumes devoted to teaching content subjects to the handicapped, the book addresses ways in which elementary and secondary regular class teachers have successfully worked with mainstreamed students in English. The following titles and authors are included: "Chris Learns to Read" (E. Roake); "Working Together" (B. Bodner-Johnson);…

  1. YA Novels in the AP Classroom: Crutcher Meets Camus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Patricia

    1989-01-01

    Describes existential elements in three novels for adolescents: "The Crazy Horse Electric Game" and "Running Loose" by Chris Crutcher; and "God, the Universe and Hot Fudge Sundaes" by Norma Howe. Asserts that adolescent literature in an advanced-placement English class can connect the classics to the present. (MM)

  2. UNO's Afghanistan Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKernan, M. D.

    This paper explores the background history and sources of the Afghanistan collection at the University Library, University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO). Credit for the impetus behind the development of the collection is given to Chris Jung, a former UNO geography/geology faculty member; Ronald Roskens, then UNO chancellor; and the Afghanistan…

  3. Of Rats and Humans: A 35-Year Odyssey in OBM from Laboratory to Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the acceptance speech given on behalf of Dr. D. Chris Anderson, the posthumous winner of the 2004 OBM Network Lifetime Achievement Award. The talk describes how the award winner first became involved in applied behavioral work, amidst a productive career as an experimental psychologist at the University of Notre Dame. The…

  4. Whittling Away at Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rist, Marilee C.

    1991-01-01

    A group of 100 experts, backed by marketer Chris Whittle, will convene in January 1992 to invent a new, for-profit U.S. school. Whittle also plans to offer his proprietary school design to public schools and/or contract to administer schools or districts. Privatization benefits and concerns are debated. Sidebars profile Whittle and other education…

  5. Virtue Ethics, Care Ethics, and "The Good Life of Teaching"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Marissa

    2012-01-01

    In "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice," Chris Higgins (2011) reminds people that "self-interest and altruism, personal freedom and social roles, and practical wisdom and personhood" have been ancient philosophical topics that remain vitally important in the practice of contemporary teaching and learning. One of the most…

  6. 1994 Honor Listing: Some Standard Writers, Some New Writers, and a Few Surprises (Young Adult Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donelson, Ken; Nilsen, Alleen Pace

    1995-01-01

    Discusses eight of the best young adult books of 1994, including those by M. E. Kerr, Cynthia Voigt, Albert Marrin, Chris Lynch, Caroline B. Cooney, Martha Brooks, and John Marsden, a newcomer from Australia, author of "Letters from Inside" and "When the World Ends." (TB)

  7. It's (Not Just) the Economy, Stupid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Malik

    2010-01-01

    Just as the recession has taken a toll in other states, New Jersey state budget coffers are shriveling up as public colleges and other state-supported services are asked to do more with less. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's slashing of $173 million from public colleges and universities has drawn the ire of higher education leaders, educators and…

  8. A Review of "99 Things Parents Wish They Knew Before[R]...Having "THE" Talk"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Carey Roth

    2012-01-01

    Numerous books exist on parent-teen communication related to sex, sexuality, and sexual health. However, Chris Fariello and Pierre-Paul Tellier take a new, question-and-answer approach to reaching today's busy parents in their book "99 Things Parents Wish They Knew Before[R]...Having "THE" Talk". The concept behind the book is innovative, but the…

  9. Researching VET and Disability. At a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Tabatha; Beddie, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    This publication is dedicated to Chris Selby Smith, who was posthumously awarded the 2009 National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) VET Researcher of the Year Award. Selby Smith's body of work displayed many aspects of the excellence for which the award is offered. His experience working in both academia and the public service gave…

  10. Peers on Socrates and Plato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2014-01-01

    There is more to be said about two of the topics Chris Peers addresses in his article "Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A morpho-logic of teaching and learning" (2012, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 44, 760-774), namely the Socratic method of teaching and Plato's stance with regard to women and feminism. My purpose in this article is…

  11. Earth Science: It's All about the Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Readers of the draft new English primary science curriculum (DfE, 2012) might be concerned to see that there is much more detail on the Earth science content than previously in the United Kingdom. In this article, Chris King, a professor of Earth Science Education at Keele University and Director of the Earth Science Education Unit (ESEU),…

  12. Math Sense: The Look, Sound, and Feel of Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moynihan, Christine

    2012-01-01

    How is that you can walk into a classroom and gain an overall sense of the quality of math instruction taking place there? What contributes to getting that sense? In "Math Sense," Chris Moynihan explores some of the components that comprise the look, sound, and feel of effective teaching and learning. Does the landscape of the classroom feature…

  13. 78 FR 32405 - Request for Public Comment; 30-day Proposed Information Collecton: Indian Self-Determination and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... was previously published in the Federal Register (78 FR 15035), as a joint submission with the Bureau.... 220, Rockville, MD 20852; send via facsimile to (301) 443-4666; or send via email to Chris.Buchanan... governs, among other things, what must be included in a Tribe's initial ISDEAA contract proposal to IHS....

  14. Justice Served: True Tales of Injustice Will Provoke and Inspire Young Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Stories about people treated unfairly stir something deep in the psyche. This article briefly discusses three stories that involve people being treated unfairly: (1) Chris Crowe's Getting Away with Murder: The Tree Story' of the Emmett Till Case; (2) Michael Cooper's Remembering Manzanar: Life in a Japanese Relocation Camp; and (3) Deborah…

  15. When a Story Must Be Told

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesesne, Teri; Crowe, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Chris Crowe, a university professor and author of young adult novels, sits with Lesesne to discuss his writing of both Mississippi Trial, 1955 (fiction) and Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Murder Case (nonfiction), related books that tell the story of a murder case that speaks to us from a half-century ago. Detailing…

  16. Deja Vu All over Again?: Schools Will Operate in the Future as They Do Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author responds to an article written by Chris Whittle, in which he maintains that most of America's education troubles will be over in just a quarter century. The author notes that Whittle's assumptions differ markedly from the available evidence on what works and ignore the complexity of the combined elements of politics,…

  17. Different Personal Skills and Competencies Which Local Agricultural Advisers Can Use to Co-Create Change in Management Procedures: A Case-Study of Danish Dairy Farmers and Advisers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, H. J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper three different skills and competencies of the local agricultural adviser are described: "The specialist, the reflective specialist and the reflective listener". The skills and competencies are framed as potentials and theoretically rooted in the ideas of George Herbert Mead, Chris Argyris and Donald Schon. The empirical background…

  18. Research and VET Decision-Making: February 1997 Symposium (Melbourne, Australia, February 19-20, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Chris Selby, Ed.

    This document contains the speaking notes, spoken comments, and prepared papers of the participants in a 1997 symposium on utilization of vocational education and training (VET) research in VET decision making in Australia. The document begins with the "Introduction" (Chris Selby Smith). The next six sections contain the speaking notes and/or…

  19. The Humanist Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In "The Humanist Moment," Chris Higgins sets out to recover a tenable, living humanism, rejecting both the version vilified by the anti-humanists and the one sentimentalized by the reactionary nostalgists. Rescuing humanism from such polemics is only the first step, as we find at least nine rival, contemporary definitions of humanism.…

  20. Starting with "I": Personal Essays by Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estepa, Andrea, Ed.; Kay, Philip, Ed.

    In personal essays, teenagers express their views on serious subjects like violence, racism, and teen parenting, and discuss common teen experiences like dating, getting a job, and starting college. This collection contains the following: (1) "Brotherly Love" (Jessica Vicuna); (2) "How To Survive Shopping with Mom" (Chris Kanarick); (3) "A…

  1. The Problem Is Education Not "Special Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellner, Gene

    2015-01-01

    In his article, "Urban special education policy and the lived experience of stigma in a high school science classroom," Chris Hale persuasively argues that the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and subsequent special education policies have largely failed to serve special education students who are stigmatized by their deficit…

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Communication Theory and Methodology Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Theory and Methodology Division of the proceedings contains the following 16 papers: "The Deep Audit as an Epistemology for the Watchdog: Computer-assisted Reporting and Investigative Journalism" (John E. Newhagen); "Race and Class in 1980s Hollywood" (Chris Jordan); "The Impact of Website Campaigning on Traditional News Media and Public's…

  3. Healthcare holds on tight. As the markets roil and financial giants fall, experts say things won't be all that bad for healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Galloro, Vince

    2008-09-22

    Investor fear stirred up by the news last week about Lehman Bros. and AIG should eventually subside, leaving little long-term effect on healthcare finance, experts say. Chris Payne, left, with healthcare financial advisory firm Ponder & Co., says, "I don't see any fundamental reason why this will cause a lack of capital to healthcare organizations". PMID:18825808

  4. 75 FR 1681 - Advisory Committee International Postal and Delivery Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... input to the meeting should contact Mr. Chris Wood, whose contact information is listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section of this notice. Each individual providing oral input is requested to... contact Christopher Wood, Office of Technical Specialized Agencies (IO/GS), Bureau of...

  5. Delicate Balances: Collaborative Research in Language Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudelson, Sarah J., Ed.; Lindfors, Judith Wells, Ed.

    This book addresses the special demands, problems, challenges, and tensions of collaborative research. Following an introduction by the editors, the articles and their authors are: "Collaborative Research: More Questions Than Answers" (Carole Edelsky and Chris Boyd); "Interactive Writing on a Computer Network: A Teacher/Researcher Collaboration"…

  6. Older Workers, Retirement and the Need for Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyton, Paul

    1984-01-01

    This literature review presents viewpoints on retirement expressed in four books: "Capitalism and the Construction of Old Age," (Chris Phillipson); "Work and Retirement," (Stanley Parker); "Work or Retirement?" (B. Casey, G. Bruche); "The Ageing Worker," (M. Doering, S.R. Rhodes, M. Schuster). (JB)

  7. Teaching and Our "Deepest Motivations": Beginning with "I-Thou"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whale, Mark

    2012-01-01

    "Why is the practice of teaching worth putting at the centre of one's life?" Chris Higgins believes that this question must be properly addressed if people who become teachers are to become themselves--are to discover a way of simultaneously practicing their profession and "flourishing" as human beings. In this essay, the author aims to give an…

  8. Making Mathematics Meaningful: Using Student-Initiated Problems to Situate Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brough, Chris; Calder, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Chris Brough and Nigel Calder share two scenarios in which students co-constructed their curriculum through generating their own problem solving and mathematical investigations. This article is a valuable exploration of the benefits of teachers working in partnership with their students.

  9. The Rumor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    An assistant professor of finance, Chris Dussold was fired by Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville in 2004 allegedly for copying another professor's teaching statement, but he believes he was dismissed because of a persistent rumor that he was sleeping with an undergraduate. A year later, Dussold discusses his crusade to restore his…

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part IX: Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Magazines section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 15 papers: "'National Geographic Magazine' and the Vietnam War: Did We Just Get Pretty Pictures?" (John W. Williams); "Free Speech at All Costs: A Short History of 'The Masses'" (Chris Lamb); "Newspapers Locally Edited Magazines Seek Ways to Maintain Place…

  11. Producing Governable Subjects: Images of Childhood Old and New

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Conceptions of childhood in terms of "evil" and "innocence" transcend time and culture. These conflicting images are deployed by Chris Jenks as the Dionysian and Apollonian models of childhood to symbolize external and internal forms of control. Drawing on the literature on governmentality this article revisits these models and introduces a…

  12. Rethinking Teacher Preparation for EBD Students: Towards a Partnership Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher; Monahan, Elizabeth C.

    2007-01-01

    Chris Blake and Elizabeth Monahan explore the role that partnerships play in developing effective teachers working with children and young people who present emotional and behavioural difficulties. A range of innovations in the United States are highlighted and the key emphasis is placed upon a continuum of teacher development.

  13. Wishful Thinking or a Bag of Tricks?: Helping the Beginning Special Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher; Monahan, Elizabeth C.

    2006-01-01

    This article, written from a North American perspective, illustrates that the beginning special educator needs more than just a behavioural "bag of tricks" to help her or him develop confidence in managing the learning environment. Chris Blake and Elizabeth Monahan work from the premise that all teachers need to be systematically trained to use…

  14. After Higgins and Dunne: Imagining School Teaching as a Multi-Practice Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There remains a concern in philosophy of education circles to assert that teaching is a social practice. Its initiation occurs in a conversation between Alasdair MacIntyre and Joe Dunne which inspired a Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education." This has been recently utilised in a further Special Issue by Chris Higgins.…

  15. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4) "The Call of Research: A…

  16. Interview with Christine Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  17. On the "Uses" of Rubrics: Reframing the Great Rubric Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turley, Eric D.; Gallagher, Chris W.

    2008-01-01

    Reframing the Great Rubric Debate beyond the taking of sides, Eric D. Turley and Chris W. Gallagher propose a set of questions designed to help educators assess the value of rubrics: (1) What is the tool for?; (2) In what context is it used?; (3) Who decides:; and (4) What ideological agenda drives those decisions? They contend that these four…

  18. The Virtuous, Wise, and Knowledgeable Teacher: Living the Good Life as a Professional Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, Elizabeth Campbell reviews three recent books that address the ethical nature of professional practice: "Knowledge and Virtue in Teaching and Learning: The Primacy of Dispositions," by Hugh Sockett; "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice," by Chris Higgins; and "Towards Professional…

  19. A Struggle Well Worth Having: The Uses of Theatre-in-education (TIE) for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Chris

    2004-01-01

    In this article Chris Cooper conveys something of his passionate belief in the importance of attending to the preconditions of learning. He stresses the crucial role of the imagination in this, bringing, as he puts it, creativity to the process of learning. His account of a drama project based on "The Tempest" provides important insights into the…

  20. How Semantic and Episodic Memory Contribute to Autobiographical Memory. Commentary on Burt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tendolkar, Indira

    2008-01-01

    In his article, Chris Burt focuses on the relationship between time and autobiographical memory. The question Burt puts forward is whether temporal markers in reports on autobiographic memories reflect specific temporal information or result from rather complex cognitive processing of time-relevant knowledge. The aspect of time is inherent to the…

  1. Making Connections through the Lens of Blue Man Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pam

    2005-01-01

    The Blue Man Group began in 1988 when friends Matt Goldman, Phil Stanton, and Chris Wink all living in New York--voiced their increasing disgruntlement and boredom with urban life. With a gut feeling that creativity and a tribal-like community could prosper in their metropolitan environment, the friends decided to confront the issues rather than…

  2. Comments about "Earth 3.0"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dator, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christopher P. McKay, Planetary Scientist with the Space Science Division of NASA Ames. Chris received his Ph.D. in AstroGeophysics from the University of Colorado in 1982 and has been a research scientist with the NASA Ames Research Center since that time. His current research focuses on the evolution of the solar system and the origin of life. He is also actively involved in planning for future Mars missions including human exploration. Chris been involved in research in Mars-like environments on Earth, traveling to the Antarctic dry valleys, Siberia, the Canadian Arctic, and the Atacama desert to study life in these Mars-like environments. His was a co-I on the Titan Huygen s probe in 2005, the Mars Phoenix lander mission for 2007, and the Mars Science Lander mission for 2009.

  3. Optically induced conductivity changes in amorphous silicon: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, D.L.

    1997-07-01

    A historical perspective of the discovery of optically induced changes in amorphous silicon is presented in this paper from my personal point of view. It includes the story of how Chris Wronski and the author discovered the effect, the key elements in the R and D environment that lead to the quick realization that the effect was reversible and reproducible, how the research environment supported the rapid publication of their first paper, and a brief look at the effect from today's perspective.

  4. 12. Photocopy of photographs (original photographs in possession of Coronado ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photographs (original photographs in possession of Coronado Historical Association). Chris Ackerman, Photographer, 1992. THREE VIEWS OF BABCOCK COURT: 1) SIDE OF BUNGALOW AND BOUGAINVILLEA IN LEFT FOREGROUND, BUNGALOW IN RIGHT BACKGROUND, 2) OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUNGALOW FRONTS ALONG SEVENTH STREET, 3) PORTION OF BUNGALOW FRONT DOOR - Heilman Villas, 706-720 Orange Avenue & 1060-1090 Seventh Street, Coronado, San Diego County, CA

  5. 11. Photocopy of photographs (original photographs in possession of Coronado ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photographs (original photographs in possession of Coronado Historical Association). Chris Ackerman, Photographer, 1992. THREE VIEWS OF BABCOCK COURT: 1) BUNGALOW FRONT WITH ORANGE AVENUE IN REAR, 2) COMMEMORATIVE BRONZE PLAQUE IN FOREGROUND, BUNGALOW FRONTS IN BACKGROUND, 3) OBLIQUE VIEW OF BUNGALOW ARCHED WINDOW AND ROOF PARAPET - Heilman Villas, 706-720 Orange Avenue & 1060-1090 Seventh Street, Coronado, San Diego County, CA

  6. STS-100 Crew Activity Report: Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-100 Endeavour mission, Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski are seen preparing for and performing their spacewalks as they check the connections between the Destiny Laboratory Module and the Canadian Robotic Arm, remove an early communications antenna from the Unity Module, and confirm power connections for the Canadian Robotic Arm. Commander Kent Rominger is seen during a workout on Endeavour's ergometer.

  7. Determining and Monitoring the Water Quality of Kizilirmak River of Turkey: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gursoy, O.; Birdal, A. C.; Ozyonar, F.; Kasaka, E.

    2015-04-01

    Water resources are getting more and more important with each passing day in case of survival of humanity. For this reason, assessing water resources' quality and also monitoring them have attracted lots of attention in the recent years. Remote sensing has been growing widely in the last decade and its resources are very usable when it comes to water resources management. In this study, by using remote sensing technology, satellite images that have 350 to 1050 nanometres wavelength band sensors (e.g. CHRIS Proba) are used to determine the quality of the Kizilirmak River's water. Kizilirmak River is born and also pours out to sea in country limits of Turkey. It is the longest river of the country by the length of 1355 kilometres. Through the river's resources, ground based spectral measurements are made to identify the quality differences of the water at the test spots that have been determined before. In this context at Imranli, where the river contacts civilization for the first time, which is located in Sivas city of Turkey, samples are gathered in order to do ground based spectroradiometer measurements. These samples are gathered simultaneously with the image acquiring time of CHRIS Proba satellite. Spectral signatures that are obtained from ground measurements are used as reference data in order to classify CHRIS Proba satellite's hyperspectral images over the study area. Satellite images are classified based on Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Turbidity and Electrical Conductivity (EC) attributes. As a result, interpretations obtained from classified CHRIS Proba satellite hyperspectral images of the study area are presented.

  8. B.Gregory Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  9. Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Somerville, Chris [Director, Energy Biosciences Institute

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

  10. Everest

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Chris Bonington, est né à Hampstead et a fait des études à University Collège School à Londres et au Royal Military Academy à Sundhorst. Il est un alpiniste mondialement connu qui a fait un grand nombre de premiers ascensions, comme celle de la face sud-ouest de l'Everest avec une équipe de 70 hommes en septembre 1975

  11. Sequencing Centers Panel at SFAF

    SciTech Connect

    Schilkey, Faye; Ali, Johar; Grafham, Darren; Muzny, Donna; Fulton, Bob; Fitzgerald, Mike; Hostetler, Jessica; Daum, Chris

    2010-06-02

    From left to right: Faye Schilkey of NCGR, Johar Ali of OICR, Darren Grafham of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Donna Muzny of the Baylor College of Medicine, Bob Fulton of Washington University, Mike Fitzgerald of the Broad Institute, Jessica Hostetler of the J. Craig Venter Institute and Chris Daum of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discuss sequencing technologies, applications and pipelines on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  12. Ion channels go to Stockholm--this time as proteins.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher

    2003-12-18

    The 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to two structural biologists, Roderick Mackinnon of Rockefeller University and Peter Agre of Johns Hopkins University, for their groundbreaking work on the structure and function of ion channels. In recognition of the outstanding impact that MacKinnon's work has had for neuroscience, Chris Miller traces MacKinnon's scientific path to the Nobel Prize. PMID:14687537

  13. Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris

    2007-06-20

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

  14. ISO 55000: Creating an asset management system.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Chris; Main, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the October 2014 issue of HEJ, Keith Hamer, group vice-president, Asset Management & Engineering at Sodexo, and marketing director at Asset Wisdom, Kevin Main, argued that the new ISO 55000 standards present facilities managers with an opportunity to create 'a joined-up, whole lifecycle approach' to managing and delivering value from assets. In this article, Kevin Main and Chris Bradley, who runs various asset management projects, examine the process of creating an asset management system. PMID:26268021

  15. Senator Mikulski Notes Exciting Endeavors at ATRF | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl and Kristine Jones, Guest Writers, and Ken Michaels, Staff Writer On October 10, U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski and Congressman Chris Van Hollen, both from Maryland, toured the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), accompanied by NCI Director Harold Varmus, Chief Technology Officer Atsuo Kuki, and other FNL leaders. Mikulski toured several Maryland scientific and biotechnology organizations recently, and the ATRF was on her list of places to visit.

  16. KSC-04PD-1255

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Lt. Keith Abell (left) hands equipment to KSC Firefighter Chris Maupin for storage. They and other KSC firefighters teamed up with task forces from Satellite Beach, Malabar, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Patrick Air Force Base and Brevard County to help fight wildfires in the Palm Bay and Malabar areas that threatened homes and property during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

  17. KSC-04PD-1254

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Lt. Keith Abell (left) and KSC Firefighter Chris Maupin store equipment on the fire truck. They and other KSC firefighters teamed up with task forces from Satellite Beach, Malabar, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Patrick Air Force Base and Brevard County to help fight wildfires in the Palm Bay and Malabar areas that threatened homes and property during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

  18. KSC-04PD-1252

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, KSC Firefighter Chris Maupin puts away a piece of equipment. He and other KSC firefighters teamed up with task forces from Satellite Beach, Malabar, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Patrick Air Force Base and Brevard County to help fight wildfires in the Palm Bay and Malabar areas that threatened homes and property during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

  19. KSC-04PD-1253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, KSC Firefighter Chris Maupin (left) takes equipment from Lt. Keith Abell. They and other KSC firefighters teamed up with task forces from Satellite Beach, Malabar, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Patrick Air Force Base and Brevard County to help fight wildfires in the Palm Bay and Malabar areas that threatened homes and property during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

  20. RANZCR Celebrates 80 Years.

    PubMed

    Milross, Chris

    2015-12-01

    2015 marks the 80th anniversary of the formation of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Radiology (ANZAR) in 1935. The association underwent several name changes over the following decades, finally becoming The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) in 1998. The following is the text from the speech given by the President of the College, A/Prof Chris Milross, at the 2015 RANZCR Annual Scientific Meeting to mark the anniversary. PMID:26768091

  1. Boiler burden reduced at Bedford site.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Chris

    2011-10-01

    With the NHS aiming to reduce its 2007 carbon footprint by 10% by 2015, Chris Horsley, managing director of Babcock Wanson UK, a provider of industrial boilers and burners, thermal oxidisers, air treatment, water treatment, and associated services, looks at how one NHS Trust has approached the challenge, and considerably reduced its carbon emissions, by refurbishing its boiler house and moving from oil to gas-fired steam generation. PMID:22049674

  2. STS-74 Walkback to O&C after scrub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The STS-74 astronauts return to the Operations and Checkout Building after a launch attempt Nov. 11 was scrubbed. In front, right, is Canadian Mission Specialist Chris A. Hadfield. Behind him are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (left) and William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr. Unfavorable weather conditions at the contingency Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) sites forced today's scrub; a second launch attempt is planned for tomorrow, Nov. 12.

  3. Radar history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  4. Everest

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-20

    Chris Bonington, est né à Hampstead et a fait des études à University Collège School à Londres et au Royal Military Academy à Sundhorst. Il est un alpiniste mondialement connu qui a fait un grand nombre de premiers ascensions, comme celle de la face sud-ouest de l'Everest avec une équipe de 70 hommes en septembre 1975

  5. Board Adds Two New Members With Expertise in Communication and Science Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine W.

    2010-11-01

    AGU's Board of Directors approved two new members during a special teleconference on 8 November. The appointments are related to AGU's strategic plan goal of addressing science and society. Specifically, they add to AGU's expertise in science communication and policy outreach. Author Chris Mooney and policy advisor Floyd DesChamps join AGU's Board of Directors immediately and will serve the remainder of the 2010-2012 term.

  6. Pen Ultimate: For Kids Who Take Part in National Novel Writing Month--the Acid Test for Would-Be Authors--It's No Guts, No Glory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barack, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Since launching in 1999, National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, has grown from a band of 21 overcaffeinated friends, as founder Chris Baty calls them, to the more than 119,000 hopeful writers who joined in 2008. While most participants simply want to finish, 36 novels begun through NaNoWriMo have been published, according to its Web site,…

  7. TeachAstronomy.com - Digitizing Astronomy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; Impey, C. D.; Austin, C.; Patikkal, A.; Paul, M.; Ganesan, N.

    2013-06-01

    Teach Astronomy—a new, free online resource—can be used as a teaching tool in non-science major introductory college level astronomy courses, and as a reference guide for casual learners and hobbyists. Digital content available on Teach Astronomy includes: a comprehensive introductory astronomy textbook by Chris Impey, Wikipedia astronomy articles, images from Astronomy Picture of the Day archives and (new) AstroPix database, two to three minute topical video clips by Chris Impey, podcasts from 365 Days of Astronomy archives, and an RSS feed of astronomy news from Science Daily. Teach Astronomy features an original technology called the Wikimap to cluster, display, and navigate site search results. Development of Teach Astronomy was motivated by steep increases in textbook prices, the rapid adoption of digital resources by students and the public, and the modern capabilities of digital technology. This past spring semester Teach Astronomy was used as content supplement to lectures in a massive, open, online course (MOOC) taught by Chris Impey. Usage of Teach Astronomy has been steadily growing since its initial release in August of 2012. The site has users in all corners of the country and is being used as a primary teaching tool in at least four states.

  8. Connecting World Heritage Nominations and Monitoring with the Support of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vileikis, O.; Dumont, B.; Serruys, E.; Van Balen, K.; Tigny, V.; De Maeyer, P.

    2013-07-01

    Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are challenging the way cultural heritage has been managed and evaluated in the past. Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are unique in that they consist of multiple sites listed as one property, distributed in different countries, involving a large diversity of stakeholders in the process. As a result, there is a need for precise baseline information for monitoring, reporting and decision making. This type of nomination requires different methodologies and tools to improve the monitoring cycle from the beginning of the nomination towards the periodic reporting. The case study of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS) illustrates the use of a Geographical Content Management System (Geo-CMS) supporting the serial transnational World Heritage nomination and the monitoring of the Silk Roads in the five Central Asian countries. The Silk Roads CHRIS is an initiative supported by UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) and the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), and developed by a consortium headed by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation (RLICC) at the KULeuven. The Silk Roads CHRIS has been successfully assisting in the preparation of the nomination dossiers of the Republics of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and will be used as a tool for monitoring tool in the Central Asian countries.

  9. Opportunities for Monitoring Vegetation Structure in River Floodplains Using High-Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooistra, Lammert; Romijn, Erika; Verrelst, Jochem

    2010-12-01

    Managers of large river catchments like the Rhine require regular information on the development of the vegetation structure in the river floodplains. The objective of this study was to develop a methodology for monitoring the location and structure properties of plant functional types in a river floodplain ecosystem using satellite-based multi-directional hyperspectral data. In this study we used data from the CHRIS sensor onboard the PROBA satellite acquired in 2005 over the test site Millingerwaard, a river floodplain ecosystem along the river Waal in the Netherlands. CHRIS data are particularly suitable for mapping vegetation structure because of its high spatial resolution (~17 m), spectral coverage (18 bands from 400 nm to 1050 nm) and angular sampling (5 viewing angles). Relevant vegetation structure properties such as leaf area index (LAI) and fractional cover (fCover) were quantified on a pixel-by-pixel basis by using the radiative transfer model FLIGHT that simulates canopy bidirectional reflectance by using Monte Carlo ray tracing. After classification of the nadir image into eight major land use classes, for three main classified plant functional types "herbaceous", "shrubs" and "forest", LAI and fCover maps were computed through model inversion of the CHRIS data. All three vegetation classes were modeled as a turbid medium in the 1D mode. LAI and fCover maps were computed for the nadir viewing direction. In order to assess the quality of the inversion, the resulting vegetation structure maps were validated with in situ LAI measurements that were collected using hemispherical photography and TRAC measurements. As a next step it will be assessed whether the inferred structural maps can be related to hydraulic roughness models and thereby leading to catchment-level water discharge capacity maps which can be used as input for modeling of future climate scenarios.

  10. KSC-04PD-1257

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Firefighter Chris Maupin (left) and Lt. Keith Abell demonstrate how the special aircraft firefighting vehicle (known as ARF) was used at the site of a recent fire in Brevard County, Fla. The firefighters sit inside the vehicle with a 'driver' in the middle. They are able to direct the hoses to attack fires from above and below. The firefighters teamed up with task forces from Satellite Beach, Malabar, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Patrick Air Force Base and Brevard County to help fight wildfires in the Palm Bay and Malabar areas that threatened homes and property during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

  11. Psychotic Events in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Pamela L.; Buckwalter, Kathleen C.

    2011-01-01

    © 2009 iStockphoto.com/ChrisSchmidt This article focuses on a review of the literature related to the known prevalence of psychotic events in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and associated aggressive, violent behavior toward family caregivers. It also describes the impact of behavioral disturbances on family caregivers and how use of the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold model and nonpharmacological interventions cited in the literature can help manage these behaviors. Geriatric nurses armed with this information will be better prepared to provide caregivers with much-needed education to better understand psychotic events, as well as strategies to cope with associated behaviors. PMID:19681559

  12. Chloride Transporting CLC Proteins1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Michael

    In the early 1980s, Chris Miller and colleagues described a curious "double-barreled" chloride channel from the electric organ of Torpedo fish reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers (Miller and White, 1980). Single-channel openings occurred in "bursts" separated by long closures. A single burst was characterized by the presence of two open conductance levels of equal size and the gating (i.e., openings and closings) during a burst could be almost perfectly described as a superposition of two identical and independent conductances that switched between open and closed states with voltage-dependent rates α and β (Hanke and Miller, 1983) (Fig. 8.1).

  13. Particle learning for probabilistic deterministic finite automata

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-01

    The plpdfa software is a product of an LDRD project at LLNL entitked "Adaptive Sampling for Very High Throughput Data Streams" (tracking number 11-ERD-035). This software was developed by a graduate student summer intern, Chris Challis, who worked under project PI Dan Merl furing the summer of 2011. The software the source code is implementing is a statistical analysis technique for clustering and classification of text-valued data. The method had been previously published by themore » PI in the open literature.« less

  14. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolically healthy obesity in Europe: a collaborative analysis of ten large cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Not all obese subjects have an adverse metabolic profile predisposing them to developing type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. The BioSHaRE-EU Healthy Obese Project aims to gain insights into the consequences of (healthy) obesity using data on risk factors and phenotypes across several large-scale cohort studies. Aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) in ten participating studies. Methods Ten different cohorts in seven countries were combined, using data transformed into a harmonized format. All participants were of European origin, with age 18–80 years. They had participated in a clinical examination for anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. Blood samples had been drawn for analysis of lipids and glucose. Presence of MetS was assessed in those with obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) based on the 2001 NCEP ATP III criteria, as well as an adapted set of less strict criteria. MHO was defined as obesity, having none of the MetS components, and no previous diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Results Data for 163,517 individuals were available; 17% were obese (11,465 men and 16,612 women). The prevalence of obesity varied from 11.6% in the Italian CHRIS cohort to 26.3% in the German KORA cohort. The age-standardized percentage of obese subjects with MetS ranged in women from 24% in CHRIS to 65% in the Finnish Health2000 cohort, and in men from 43% in CHRIS to 78% in the Finnish DILGOM cohort, with elevated blood pressure the most frequently occurring factor contributing to the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. The age-standardized prevalence of MHO varied in women from 7% in Health2000 to 28% in NCDS, and in men from 2% in DILGOM to 19% in CHRIS. MHO was more prevalent in women than in men, and decreased with age in both sexes. Conclusions Through a rigorous harmonization process, the BioSHaRE-EU consortium was able to compare key characteristics

  15. STS-100 crew takes part in TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield pauses for the camera during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency escape training at the pad and a simulated launch countdown. The mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the Canadian robotic arm, SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  16. Solyndra Loan Guarantee Announcement

    ScienceCinema

    Vice President Biden and Secretary Chu were joined by California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Solyndra CEO Dr. Chris Grone

    2010-09-01

    Vice President Biden and Secretary Chu were joined by California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Solyndra CEO Dr. Chris Grone to announce that the Department of Energy has finalized a $535 million loan guarantee for Solyndra, Inc., which manufactures innovative cylindrical solar photovoltaic panels that provide clean, renewable energy. The funding will finance construction of the first phase of the company's new manufacturing facility. Solyndra estimates the new plant will initially create 3,000 construction jobs, and lead to as many as 1,000 jobs once the facility opens.

  17. Beam Line: 100 years of elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, A.; Weinberg, S.; Quigg, C.; Riordan, M.; Panofsky, W. K. H.

    1997-04-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  18. STS-95 crew participate in a SPACEHAB familiarization exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 crew members get a briefing on equipment inside the SPACEHAB module from Chris Jaskolka of Boeing, second from left. Listening intently are crew members, from left, Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA); Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson; and Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., who also is a senator from Ohio. STS-95 will feature a variety of research payloads, including the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, and experiments on space flight and the aging process. STS-95 is targeted for an Oct. 29 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery.

  19. Editorial note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, Wolfgang; Dodson-Schleich, Kathy; Kawata, Satoshi; Nomura, Sachi; Dandliker, Rene; Dainty, Chris

    2006-11-01

    In 1989, the founding editor of Optics Communications, Florian Abeles, turned over his leadership of the journal to a quadriga of editors, consisting of Neil Abraham, Chris Dainty, Lorenzo Narducci and Herbert Walther. It is with great sadness that we have to inform the readers of Optics Communications of the deaths of Lorenzo Narducci and Herbert Walther who died within a day of each other, July 21 and July 22, 2006. Herbert Walther had served the journal commendably first for five years as an editor and then up to his death as an editorial board member.

  20. Exploring the Potential of the Massive, Open, Online Astronomy Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, C. D.; Wenger, M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronomy: State of the Art is a massive, open, online course (MOOC) in astronomy. Course content was released weekly, over 7 weeks, in the spring of 2013. More than 10 hours of video lectures were produced and deployed along with supplementary readings, podcasts, and realtime Q&A sessions with professor Chris Impey. All content is still available online as a self-paced course. Over 5,000 students have enrolled in the course through the online course platform Udemy. This poster presents student engagement data, and a discussion of lessons learned and opportunities for future improvement.

  1. The role of religion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmond, Ian

    2009-11-01

    I cannot agree with Chris Jeynes's assertion (October pp15-16) that to equate religious belief with belief in the tooth fairy is to be unaware of our cultural history. It is true, ofcourse, that cathedrals are inspiring achievements of architecture, but that has no bearing whatsoever on the truth of the beliefs of their designers. There are similarly impressive Muslim holy buildings, motivated by similar beliefs, but, to take one example, Jesus was either the son of God or he was not, so the beliefs of at least one group must therefore be incorrect. Pretty buildings make for poor evidence of universal truths.

  2. 100 years of Elementary Particles [Beam Line, vol. 27, issue 1, Spring 1997

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Pais, Abraham; Weinberg, Steven; Quigg, Chris; Riordan, Michael; Panofsky, Wolfgang K. H.; Trimble, Virginia

    1997-04-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  3. AGU Board and Council Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    The AGU Board and Council held meetings in San Francisco the weekend before Fall Meeting. Both meetings kicked off with a "Then and Now" presentation by Mike McPhaden, outgoing president; Carol Finn, incoming president; and executive director/CEO Chris McEntee. The presentation highlighted AGU's accomplishments under its strategic plan and new governance model in the past 2.5 years. The AGU leaders' written State of the Union reports can be found at http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml.

  4. STS-100 MS Parazynski practices maneuvers on a simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski practices maneuvers on a simulator for installing the Canadian-built Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). He and Mission Specialist Chris A. Hadfield will undertake two spacewalks to install the SSRMS. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will also deliver the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, carrying six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  5. STS-100 MS Hadfield practices maneuvers on a simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris A. Hadfield, with the Canadian Space Agency, practices maneuvers on a simulator for installing the Canadian-built Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). He and Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski will undertake two spacewalks to install the SSRMS. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will also deliver the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, carrying six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  6. Freeing up valuable time and resources.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Danish manufacturer, V Guldmann, says ceiling-mounted patient hoists can 'improve working environments for nurses and care staff, and, if considered correctly, provide long-term cost savings and free up resources to provide such personnel with more time to care'. Chris McConnell, the company's area sales manager, UK, examines some of the key benefits of such equipment to both patients and staff, considers the technical elements of the many different solutions available, and discusses some of the installation issues. PMID:24783331

  7. Regional discrimination studies: Phase II. Scientific report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, J.; Hayward, C.; Herrin, E.; Sorrell, G.G.

    1996-10-01

    This report consists of four parts and an appendix. Part (1) `Seismic Acoustic Studies at TXAR`, is by Eugene Herrin and C.G. Sorrells. Part (2) `Inversion of Surface Waves for Shallow Velocity Structure in the Fort Worth Basin,` is by Jessie Bonner. Part (3) `A Preliminary Investigation of the Use of Acoustic and Seismic Acoustic Observations to Identify Vented Explosive Seismic Sources`, is by C.G. Sorrells and Eugene Herrin. Part (4) consists of the Acknowledgments called for by the contract. Appendix 1 Preliminary Report` Characteristics of the Broadband Acoustic Sensors Installed in the SMU Lajitas CSE Array, is by Chris Hayward.

  8. Seven Global Goals. 2013 annual report, Southwestern Power Administration

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    For over 70 years, Southwestern has marketed and delivered reliable, renewable, and affordable hydropower, partnering with Federal power stakeholders and others in the industry to make sure the lights stay on. This kind of effective, efficient, and cost conscious operation is made possible only by hard work and dedication. Southwestern employees work individually and as a team to meet seven comprehensive agency goals that touch on all aspects of the agency’s operations. Dubbed the “Seven Global Goals” by Administrator Chris Turner, these objectives identify specific, measurable targets that support Southwestern’s mission and reinforce its responsibilities toward its customers and the Nation.

  9. Particle learning for probabilistic deterministic finite automata

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-01

    The plpdfa software is a product of an LDRD project at LLNL entitked "Adaptive Sampling for Very High Throughput Data Streams" (tracking number 11-ERD-035). This software was developed by a graduate student summer intern, Chris Challis, who worked under project PI Dan Merl furing the summer of 2011. The software the source code is implementing is a statistical analysis technique for clustering and classification of text-valued data. The method had been previously published by the PI in the open literature.

  10. KSC-04PD-1256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, KSC Firefighter Chris Maupin (left) watches as Lt. Keith Abell practices maneuvering apparatus on top of the firefighting vehicle with which they are able to direct the hoses to attack fires from above and below. The firefighters teamed up with task forces from Satellite Beach, Malabar, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Patrick Air Force Base and Brevard County to help fight wildfires in the Palm Bay and Malabar areas that threatened homes and property during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

  11. 100 years of elementary particles [Beam Line, vol. 27, issue 1, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Pais, Abraham; Weinberg, Steven; Quigg, Chris; Riordan, Michael; Panofsky, Wolfgang K.H.; Trimble, Virginia

    1997-04-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  12. The crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-100 gathered in front of the shuttle Endeavour following landi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-100 gathered in front of the shuttle Endeavour following landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, 9:11 am, May 1, 2001. From left to right: John L. Phillips, mission specialist (U.S.); Umberto Guidoni, mission specialist (European Space Agency); Chris A. Hadfield, mission specialist (Canadian Space Agency); Jeffrey S. Ashby, pilot (U.S.); Kent V. Rominger, commander (U.S.); Yuri V. Lonchakov, mission specialist (Russia); Scott E. Prazynski, mission specialist (U.S.).

  13. An Overview of W.N. Christiansen's Contribution to Australian Radio Astronomy, 1948-1960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Harry; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

    In 1948, an accomplished industrial physicist who had harboured a long-term ambition to become an astronomer joined the newly-formed Radio Astronomy Group in the CSIR's Division of Radiophysics in Sydney, Australia. Thus, W.N. (`Chris') Christiansen (1913-2007) began a new career in the fledgling field of radio astronomy. This paper reviews Christiansen's contribution to both instrumentation development and scientific research during the first phase of his career in radio astronomy, covering his work at the Potts Hill and Fleurs field stations prior to his resignation from the Division of Radiophysics in 1960.

  14. Talking about Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, Chris

    2010-08-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction Timothy Ferris, Iris Fry, Steven Dick, Ann Druyan, Pinky Nelson, Neil Tyson, Steve Benner and William Bains; Part II. Earth Roger Buick, Lynn Rothschild, John Baross, Joe Kirschvink, Andrew Knoll, Simon Conway Morris, Roger Hanlon and Lori Marino; Part III. Solar System Chris McKay, David Grinspoon, Jonathan Lunine, Carolyn Porco, Laurie Leshin, Guy Consolmagno and Peter Smith; Part IV. Exoplanets Alan Boss, Geoff Marcy, Debra Fischer, Sara Seager, David Charbonneau and Vikki Meadows; Part V. Frontiers Jill Tarter, Seth Shostak, Ray Kurzweil, Nick Bostrom, Paul Davies, Martin Rees, Ben Bova and Jennifer Michael Hecht; Reading list; Glossary; Index.

  15. Solyndra Loan Guarantee Announcement

    SciTech Connect

    Vice President Biden and Secretary Chu were joined by California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Solyndra CEO Dr. Chris Grone

    2009-09-09

    Vice President Biden and Secretary Chu were joined by California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Solyndra CEO Dr. Chris Grone to announce that the Department of Energy has finalized a $535 million loan guarantee for Solyndra, Inc., which manufactures innovative cylindrical solar photovoltaic panels that provide clean, renewable energy. The funding will finance construction of the first phase of the company's new manufacturing facility. Solyndra estimates the new plant will initially create 3,000 construction jobs, and lead to as many as 1,000 jobs once the facility opens.

  16. The Tail of BPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruba, Steve; Meyer, Jim

    Business process management suites (BPMS's) represent one of the fastest growing segments in the software industry as organizations automate their key business processes. As this market matures, it is interesting to compare it to Chris Anderson's 'Long Tail.' Although the 2004 "Long Tail" article in Wired magazine was primarily about the media and entertainment industries, it has since been applied (and perhaps misapplied) to other markets. Analysts describe a "Tail of BPM" market that is, perhaps, several times larger than the traditional BPMS product market. This paper will draw comparisons between the concepts in Anderson's article (and subsequent book) and the BPM solutions market.

  17. Flood of September 12-13, 1982 in Gibson, Carroll, and Madison Counties, western Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Clarence H.; Gamble, Charles R.; Bingham, Roy H.

    1986-01-01

    Intense rainfall on September 12-13, 1982, caused severe local flooding along many streams in Gibson County in western Tennessee. The rainfall resulted from remnants of Hurricane Chris combining with a cool front moving across the western half of the State. A maximum 1-hr rainfall intensity of 3.3 in was recorded at Humboldt. Peak discharge exceeded the 100-yr flood on many small streams. The floods caused three deaths and about 15.3 million dollars damage to crops, roads and bridges, businesses, and residential areas. Long-time residents of Gibson County reported that stream stages have not been as high since at least 1922. (USGS)

  18. Serum sample stability in ligand-binding assays: challenges in assessments of long-term, bench-top and multiple freeze-thaw.

    PubMed

    Macaraeg, Chris; Ortiz, Jessica; Calamba, Dominador; Ma, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chris Macaraeg has been a lead scientist for method development, validation, and study support intended for regulated pre-clinical/clinical studies within the Pharmacokinetics and Drug Metabolism department at Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA. He joined Amgen in 2006. His expertise also includes automation and method transfer to CROs. Chris received his BS degree in Physiological Science and Neuroscience from the University of California, Los Angeles, CA and MS in Forensic Science from Pace University, New York, NY. Stability of therapeutic proteins in biological matrix is an important parameter to evaluate in bioanalytical support of regulated nonclinical or clinical studies. Despite industry guidance publications, many questions still arise as to how these practices are implemented to establish therapeutic protein stability in bioanalytical method validations. This article presents findings from long-term, bench-top and freeze-thaw stability assessments for three therapeutic monoclonal antibodies using either ELISA or electrochemiluminescent technology. Studies illustrate the principles and challenges in stability tests which represent scenarios that samples will likely encounter during sample analysis. Thoughtful consideration of each study requirements and a fit-for-purpose approach is essential in successful establishment of the sample stability parameters in method validation. PMID:26110709

  19. A Methodology to Assess the Accuracy with which Remote Data Characterize a Specific Surface, as a Function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM): Application to Three Italian Coastal Waters

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Betti, Mattia; Campanelli, Alessandra; Di Cicco, Annalisa; Guglietta, Daniela; Penna, Pierluigi; Piermattei, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    This methodology assesses the accuracy with which remote data characterizes a surface, as a function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). The purpose is to identify the best remote data that improves the characterization of a surface, evaluating the number of bands in the spectral range. The first step creates an accurate dataset of remote simulated data, using in situ hyperspectral reflectances. The second step evaluates the capability of remote simulated data to characterize this surface. The spectral similarity measurements, which are obtained using classifiers, provide this capability. The third step examines the precision of this capability. The assumption is that in situ hyperspectral reflectances are considered the “real” reflectances. They are resized with the same spectral range of the remote data. The spectral similarity measurements which are obtained from “real” resized reflectances, are considered “real” measurements. Therefore, the quantity and magnitude of “errors” (i.e., differences between spectral similarity measurements obtained from “real” resized reflectances and from remote data) provide the accuracy as a function of FWHM. This methodology was applied to evaluate the accuracy with which CHRIS-mode1, CHRIS-mode2, Landsat5-TM, MIVIS and PRISMA data characterize three coastal waters. Their mean values of uncertainty are 1.59%, 3.79%, 7.75%, 3.15% and 1.18%, respectively. PMID:24434875

  20. Jeffries Matusita based mixed-measure for improved spectral matching in hyperspectral image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padma, S.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral matching technique by integrating the Jeffries-Matusita measure (JM) and the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm. The deterministic Spectral Angle Mapper and stochastic Jeffries-Matusita measure are orthogonally projected using the sine and tangent functions to increase their spectral ability. The developed JM-SAM algorithm is implemented in effectively discriminating the landcover classes and cover types in the hyperspectral images acquired by PROBA/CHRIS and EO-1 Hyperion sensors. The reference spectra for different land-cover classes were derived from each of these images. The performance of the proposed measure is compared with the performance of the individual SAM and JM approaches. From the values of the relative spectral discriminatory probability (RSDPB) and relative discriminatory entropy value (RSDE), it is inferred that the hybrid JM-SAM approach results in a high spectral discriminability than the SAM and JM measures. Besides, the use of the improved JM-SAM algorithm for supervised classification of the images results in 92.9% and 91.47% accuracy compared to 73.13%, 79.41%, and 85.69% of minimum-distance, SAM and JM measures. It is also inferred that the increased spectral discriminability of JM-SAM measure is contributed by the JM distance. Further, it is seen that the proposed JM-SAM measure is compatible with varying spectral resolutions of PROBA/CHRIS (62 bands) and Hyperion (242 bands).

  1. A Small Satellite Hyper-Spectral Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, M.

    This paper describes a hyper-spectral mission based around the CHRIS instrument that has been developed at Sira Technology Ltd. The CHRIS instrument is flying on the ESA PROBA platform, a small agile satellite of the 100 kg class, which was launch in October 2001. The over mission costs are significantly less than many other Earth observation missions. The instrument is currently acquires approximately 400 hyper-spectral images each month via two European ground stations. Today this instrument provides the highest sampling capability of any space-borne hyper-spectral instrument. The main purpose of the instrument is to provide images of land areas, although the applications have extended to include coastal monitoring. The platform provides pointing in both across-track and along-track directions, for target acquisition and slow pitch during imaging (motion compensation) to enhance the radiometric performance and increase the number of bands that can be acquired. An observational mission has been developed around the facility and this is catering for over 70 or so Principal Investigators (PI) around the world, including Europe, North America, Australia and China with over 100 observational sites.

  2. Teach Astronomy: An Online Textbook for Introductory Astronomy Courses and Resources for Informal Learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; Impey, C. D.; Patikkal, A.

    2012-05-01

    This year we implemented Teach Astronomy (www.teachastronomy.com) as a free online resource to be used as a teaching tool for non-science major astronomy courses and for a general audience interested in the subject. The comprehensive content includes: an introductory astronomy text book by Chris Impey, astronomy articles on Wikipedia, images from the Astronomy Picture of the Day, two to three minute topical video clips by Chris Impey, podcasts from 365 Days of Astronomy, and astronomy news from Science Daily. Teach Astronomy utilizes a novel technology to cluster, display, and navigate search results, called a Wikimap. Steep increases in textbook prices and the unique capabilities of emerging web technology motivated the development of this free online resource. Recent additions to Teach Astronomy include: images and diagrams for the textbook articles, mobile device implementation, and suggested homework assignments for instructors that utilize recent discoveries in astronomy. We present an overview of how Teach Astronomy has been implemented for use in the classroom and informal settings, and suggestions for utilizing the rich content and features of the web site.

  3. Teach Astronomy: An Online Resource for Introductory Astronomy Courses and Informal Learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, C. D.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Patikkal, A.; Ganesan, N.

    2013-01-01

    Teach Astronomy (www.teachastronomy.com) is a new, free online resource—a teaching tool for non-science major astronomy courses and a reference guide for lifelong learners interested in the subject. Digital content available includes: a comprehensive introductory astronomy textbook by Chris Impey, Wikipedia astronomy articles, images from Astronomy Picture of the Day archives and AstroPix database, two to three minute topical video clips by Chris Impey, podcasts from 365 Days of Astronomy archives, and an RSS feed of astronomy news from Science Daily. Teach Astronomy features an original technology called the Wikimap to cluster, display, and navigate site search results. Motivation behind the development of Teach Astronomy includes steep increases in textbook prices, the rapid adoption by students and the public of digital resources, and the modern capabilities of digital technology. Recent additions to Teach Astronomy include: AstroPix images—from some of the most advanced observatories and complete with metadata, mobile device functionality, links to WikiSky where users can see the location of astronomical objects in the sky, and end of chapter textbook review questions. Next in line for development are assignments for classroom use. We present suggestions for utilizing the rich content and features of the web site.

  4. Wheat growth modelling by a combination of a biophysical model approach and hyperspectral remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppelt, Natascha M.

    2009-09-01

    The study presented here investigates the potential of improvement for a physically based model approach, when the static input data is enhanced by dynamic remote sensing information. The land surface model PROMET (Processes of Radiation, Mass and Energy Transfer) was generally applied, while the remote sensing input data was derived from hyperspectral data of the CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) sensor, which is operated by ESA (European Space Agency). The PROMET model, whose vegetation routine basically applies the Farquhar et al. photosynthesis approach, was set up to a field scale model run (10 x 10m) for a test acre tilled with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) mapping the crop development of the season 2005. During the model run, information on the absorptive capacity of the leaves for two canopy layers (top, sunlit layer and bottom, shaded layer) was updated from remote sensing measurements, where angular CHRIS images were available. Control data were acquired through an intensive field campaign, which monitored the development of the stand throughout the vegetation period of the year 2005, also accompanying the satellite overflights. While the model without additional dynamic input data was able to reasonably reproduce the average development of the crop and yield, the spatial heterogeneity was severely underestimated. The combination of remote sensing information with the vegetation model led to a significant improvement of both the spatial heterogeneity of the crop development in the model and yield, which again entailed an overall improvement of the model results in comparison to measured reference data.

  5. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  6. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2004-02-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  7. Mapping Coral-Algal Dynamics in a Seasonal Upwelling Area Using Spaceborne High Resolution Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, Klaas; Goossens, Rudi; De Clerck, Olivier

    2010-12-01

    PROBA/CHRIS is one of the first satellite sensors to offer both high spatial and spectral resolutions. We explored the potential of this sensor to map the dynamics of seaweed and coral cover in an area influenced by seasonal upwelling in the Arabian Sea. Quantitative field assessments coincided with image acquisitions. After removal of sensor noise and atmospheric effects, maximum likelihood supervised classification yielded a tau accuracy of 64.09 for the summer monsoon dataset. Clearer waters and a lower spatial heterogeneity in the winter monsoon dataset resulted in a tau accuracy of 71.45. Post-classification comparison and vegetation indices illustrated the conspicuous turnover from dense macroalgal stands covering nearly all coral communities during summer to bare rock or turf communities during winter, with coral becoming the predominant bottom type. These results were further analysed using a novel maximum entropy sub-pixel approach and were shown to consistently outperform results from Landsat 7 ETM+ imagery.

  8. Mike Fuller Receives 2012 John Adam Fleming Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Thank you, Chris and Subir, for nominating me for the Fleming Medal and for your very kind comments on my research. In looking back over the medalists since 1962, it is hard to believe that I could be lucky enough to join such distinguished company. Yet, I have been very lucky through life. First, I was lucky to go to Christ's Hospital and Cambridge University. Second, my Aunt Marjorie married a physicist, Johnnie Clegg, who was an excellent teacher and inspiration for me. Third, to be born in England in the mid-1930s was to be a member of a fortunate generation of scientists. Providing one safely negotiated World War II, one joined the academic world at a time of great excitement, of expansion, and support for science.

  9. Through the Eyes of a Student: Rutgers Physics Teacher Preparation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Jonathan; D'Amato, Chris

    2010-03-01

    This talk will describe the course work and the teaching experiences in the Rutgers Physics Teacher Preparation Program that future physics teachers have before they enter the profession. The program is hosted in the Rutgers Graduate School of Education but works in close cooperation with the physics department. In addition to 5 courses in which we learn how to teach physics, we work as instructors in reformed introductory physics courses and then do student teaching in the schools where former graduates of the program teach. During the student teaching we have multiple opportunities to apply all of the ``theory'' in a real classroom and work in collaboration with those who share our views of how students learn. Jonathan is a student in the program and Chris is his cooperating teacher.

  10. STS-100 crew takes part in TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The STS-100 crew gathers at the bus when Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities are hampered by the rain. Standing with the bus driver, from left, are Mission Specialist John L. Phillips, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Mission Specialists Umberto Guidoni, Chris Hadfield, [driver], and Scott E. Parazynski, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialist Yuri V. Lonchakov. TCDT includes emergency escape training at the pad and a simulated launch countdown. The mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the Canadian robotic arm, SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  11. STS-100 crew takes part in TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The STS-100 crew gathers with the Space Station Processing Facility people who worked on the Canadian robotic arm, SSRMS. Kneeling at left is Commander Kent V. Rominger; front and ceneter, from left, Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Yuri V. Lonchakov and John L. Phillips; behind Hadfield (a head above the others) is Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency escape training at the pad and a simulated launch countdown. The mission is carrying the Multi- Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  12. STS-100 crew take a group photo before walkou

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The STS-100 crew pauses for a photo before walkout and the ride to Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown. Standing, from left, are Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Umberto Guidoni, John L. Phillips, Yuri V. Lonchakov and Chris A. Hadfield; Commander Kent V. Rominger; and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby. The STS-100 crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency escape training at the pad and the simulated launch countdown. The mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  13. Determination of Spectral Line Parameters in Selected Portions of the Infrared Spectrum of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Karen Keppler

    1999-01-01

    Pressure broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients due to water and nitrogen have been determined for water vapor transitions in the CO2 region of interest to Project HALOE. The temperature dependences of the widths and shifts have also been determined for selected transitions in this region. Results have been compared with values available in the literature. The line parameters have been obtained from the analysis of room temperature recordings of the spectrum of pure water and recordings of the spectra of heated water/nitrogen mixtures. The recordings of the water vapor spectrum were obtained with Fourier Transform Spectrometers at Kitt Peak and at the Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen. Up to eighteen spectra have been fitted simultaneously with a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner and colleagues.

  14. Exploring the attributes of critical thinking: a conceptual basis.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Susan G

    2004-01-01

    Many teaching methods used in nursing education to enhance critical thinking focus on teaching students how to directly apply knowledge; a technically rational approach. While seemingly effective at enhancing students' critical thinking abilities in structured learning situations, these methods don't prepare students to operationalize critical thinking to manage the complexities that actually exist in practice. The work of contemporary educational theorists Paulo Freire, Donald Schon, Chris Argyris, Jack Mezirow, Stephen Brookfield, and Robert Tennyson all share similar perspectives on thinking in practice and the use of reflection to achieve a coherence of understanding. Their perspectives provide insight on how educators can shift from a means-end approach to operationalizing thinking in practice. The author identifies four attributes of critical thinking in practice evidenced in these views, followed by a discussion of specific educational strategies that reflect these attributes, and operationalize a critical thinking process in nursing practice to achieve a coherence of understanding. PMID:16646900

  15. Letter of Appreciation to 2004 Journal of Optical Networking Reviewers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    The international scientific and engineering professions rely on the work of countless reviewers to ensure the quality of the research published in technical journals. Like all such journals, JON benefits from the tireless efforts of these volunteers. Below is a list of 2004 JON reviewers who have agreed to have their names published. We sincerely thank these reviewers, as well as those not listed, for their assistance to JON and praise them for their dedication to their profession. The system simply would not work without them. Charalambos Anastassiou Ivan Andonovic Nirwan Ansari Chris Bintjas Martin Birk Zoran Bojkovic Xiren Cao Yang Cao Calvin C.K. Chan Yongmao Chang Yang Chen Kwok-Wai Cheung Nim-Kwan Cheung Su Fong Chien Wilson Chu Yun Chung Tibor Cinkler Ignacio de Miguel Jiun S. Deng Jitender Deogun H.J.S. Dorren Mark Feuer Samrat Ganguly

  16. STS-100 and Expedition Two Crews Pose For Onboard Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 and Expedition Two crew members pose for an onboard portrait in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS). Bottom, from left, are Chris A. Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency, Umberto Guidoni of the European Space Agency, Kent V. Rominger, and Susan J. Helms (Expedition Two). Middle row, James S. Voss (Expedition Two), and cosmonauts Yury V. Usachev (Expedition Two) and Yuri V. Lonchakov. Top, Scott E. Parazynski, John L. Phillips, and Jeffrey S. Ashby. The crews accomplished the following objectives: The delivery of the Canadian-built Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), Canadarm2, which is needed to perform assembly operations on later flights; The delivery and installation of a UHF anterna that provides space-to-space communications capability for U.S. based space walks; and carried the Italian-built multipurpose Logistics Module Raffaello containing six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab, Destiny.

  17. [Nucleosynthesis, Rotation and Magnetism in Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bildsten, Lars

    2004-01-01

    This is my final report on the NASA ATP grant on nucleosynthesis, rotation and magnetism in accreting neutron stars (NAG5-8658). In my last two reports, I summarized the science that I have accomplished, which covered a large range of topics. For this report, I want to point out the graduate students that were partially supported on this grant and where they are now. Andrew Cumming is an Assistant Professor of Physics at McGill University, Greg Ushomirsky is a researcher at MIT s Lincoln Laboratories, Dean Townsley is a postdoctoral researcher at Univ. of Chicago, Chris Deloye is a postdoctoral researcher at Northwestern University. The other two students, Phil Chang and Tony Piro, are still at UCSB and will be completing their PhD s in Summer 05 and Summer 06.

  18. A multistage database of field measurements and synoptic remotely sensed data to support model validation and testing in Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, E. J.; Baret, F.; Rossello, P.; Anderson, E.; Rockall, E.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a novel database of ground and remotely sensed data from the United Kingdom, which is uniquely suited to scaling-up multispectral measurements from a single plot to the scale of satellite sensor observations. Multiple aircraft and satellite sensors were involved, and most of the data were acquired on a single day in June 2006, providing a synoptic view which, at its largest extent, covered most of southern England and Wales. Three airborne imaging spectrometers were involved (Specim AISA Eagle, Itres CASI-2 and -3) and three satellite sensors (UK-DMC, PROBA/CHRIS, and SPOT HRG), complemented with airborne LiDAR, multispectral survey cameras, and ground measurements (land cover, LAI, reflectance factors, and atmospheric measurements). In this paper the NCAVEO Field Campaign (NFC) database is described and an example of its use to produce a high spatial resolution leaf area index map for the validation of medium-resolution products (MODIS, VEGETATION, and MERIS) is presented.

  19. The New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-08-01

    Introduction Gordon Fraser; Part I. Matter and the Universe: 1. Cosmology Wendy Freedman and Rocky Kolb; 2. Gravity Ronald Adler; 3. Astrophysics Arnon Dar; 4. Particles and the standard model Chris Quigg; 5. Superstrings Michael Green; Part II. Quantum Matter: 6. Atoms and photons Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Jean Dalibard; 7. The quantum world of ultra-cold atoms Christopher Foot and William Phillips; 8. Superfluidity Henry Hall; 9. Quantum phase transitions Subir Sachdev; Part III. Quanta in Action: 10. Quantum entanglement Anton Zeilinger; 11. Quanta, ciphers and computers Artur Ekert; 12. Small-scale structure and nanoscience Yoseph Imry; Part IV. Calculation and Computation: 13. Nonlinearity Henry Abarbanel; 14. Complexity Antonio Politi; 15. Collaborative physics, e-science and the grid Tony Hey and Anne Trefethen; Part V. Science in Action: 16. Biophysics Cyrus Safinya; 17. Medical physics Nicolaj Pavel; 18. Physics and materials Robert Cahn; 19. Physics and society Ugo Amaldi.

  20. The New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2006-04-01

    Introduction Gordon Fraser; Part I. Matter and the Universe: 1. Cosmology Wendy Freedman and Rocky Kolb; 2. Gravity Ronald Adler; 3. Astrophysics Arnon Dar; 4. Particles and the standard model Chris Quigg; 5. Superstrings Michael Green; Part II. Quantum Matter: 6. Atoms and photons Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Jean Dalibard; 7. The quantum world of ultra-cold atoms Christopher Foot and William Phillips; 8. Superfluidity Henry Hall; 9. Quantum phase transitions Subir Sachdev; Part III. Quanta in Action: 10. Quantum entanglement Anton Zeilinger; 11. Quanta, ciphers and computers Artur Ekert; 12. Small-scale structure and nanoscience Yoseph Imry; Part IV. Calculation and Computation: 13. Nonlinearity Henry Abarbanel; 14. Complexity Antonio Politi; 15. Collaborative physics, e-science and the grid Tony Hey and Anne Trefethen; Part V. Science in Action: 16. Biophysics Cyrus Safinya; 17. Medical physics Nicolaj Pavel; 18. Physics and materials Robert Cahn; 19. Physics and society Ugo Amaldi.

  1. HiRISE Observations of Dynamical Phenomena on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Thomas, Nicolas; McEwen, Alfred

    Candice Hansen, candice.j.hansen@jpl.nasa.gov Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, United States Candice Hansen, candice.j.hansen@jpl.nasa.gov Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, United States Nicolas Thomas, nicolas.thomas@space.unibe.ch University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland Alfred McEwen, mcewen@pirl.lpl.arizona.edu Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona, United States The HiRISE Team Alan Delamere Eric Eliason John Grant Virginia Gulick Kenneth Herkenhoff Laszlo Keszthelyi Randolph Kirk Michael Mellon Steven Squyres Cathy Weitz Chris Okubo Shane Byrne Patrick Russell The presentation will provide a review of recent observations by the HiRISE imaging system onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Emphasis will be placed on dynamical phenomena such as avalanches, dune motion, and jet activity at the poles.

  2. The problem is education not ``special education''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, Gene

    2015-12-01

    In his article, Urban special education policy and the lived experience of stigma in a high school science classroom, Chris Hale persuasively argues that the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and subsequent special education policies have largely failed to serve special education students who are stigmatized by their deficit classification. Though classified students may be doubly stigmatized, research suggests that students of color who live in economically stressed communities are also subject to systemic educational policies that produce stigma; special education should be understood within the larger context of educational policy in the inner city. Though we cannot immediately dismantle the macro level structures that nurture stigma, I suggest pedagogies based on facilitating phenomenological awareness enacted through individual-collectively based methodologies to challenge the stigma that classified as well as non-classified students in the inner city often carry with them.

  3. STS-99 Mission Specialist Kavandi gets final suit check in White Room.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Before entering the orbiter Endeavour, STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi is helped with final suit preparations by members of the White Room closeout crew Travis Thompson (hidden), mechanical technician, and Chris Meinert, closeout chief. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm, on the fixed service structure, that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST, the mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour.

  4. STS-99 Commander Kregel gets final suit check in White Room.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Before entering the orbiter Endeavour, STS-99 Commander Kevin Kregel shakes hands with Chris Meinert, closeout chief of the White Room closeout crew. In the background is Carlos Gillis, suit technician. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm, on the fixed service structure, that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST, the mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour.

  5. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Converting Plants to Fuel (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris

    2007-11-12

    Berkeley Lab's Chris Somerville is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls, which comprise most of the body mass of higher plants. He views the knowledge of cell wall structure and function as furthering the development of plants with improved usefulness: these plants are strong potential sources of renewable materials and biofuel feedstocks. His scientific expertise defines an ideal match of his interest - in the development of cellulosic and other solar-to-fuel science - with his recent appointment as Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI). With colleagues in biology, physical sciences, engineering, and environmental and the social sciences, he now leads the EBI multidisciplinary teams' research efforts to develop next-generation, carbon-neutral transportation fuels.

  6. Acid rain report focuses on forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent research on acid precipitation yields “increasing general concern about possible effects on forests,” according to the second annual report of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Prepared by the Interagency Task Force on Acid Precipitation, the report outlines the accomplishments of the national program during fiscal 1983, summarizes the current state of scientific knowledge (including a change in the baseline acidity of precipitation), and describes the outlook for current progress by federally funded acid precipitation research. Chris Bernabo is the program's executive director.NAPAP's annual report agrees with the finding of a National Research Council (NRC) committee that a linear relationship exists between sulfur dioxide emissions and wet deposition of sulfate (Eos, July 26, 1983, p. 475). NRC's Committee on Atmospheric Transport and Chemical Transformation in Acid Precipitation, which issued its report last year, was chaired by Jack G. Calvert of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  7. The Rosslyn Code: Can Physics Explain a 500-Year Old Melody Etched in the Walls of a Scottish Chapel?

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Chris

    2011-10-19

    For centuries, historians have puzzled over a series of 213 symbols carved into the stone of Scotland’s Rosslyn Chapel. (Disclaimer: You may recognize this chapel from The Da Vinci Code, but this is real and unrelated!) Several years ago, a composer and science enthusiast noticed that the symbols bore a striking similarity to Chladni patterns, the elegant images that form on a two- dimensional surface when it vibrates at certain frequencies. This man’s theory: A 500-year-old melody was inscribed in the chapel using the language of physics. But not everyone is convinced. Slate senior editor Chris Wilson travelled to Scotland to investigate the claims and listen to this mysterious melody, whatever it is. Come find out what he discovered, including images of the patterns and audio of the music they inspired.

  8. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Converting Plants to Fuel (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Somerville, Chris

    2011-04-28

    Berkeley Lab's Chris Somerville is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls, which comprise most of the body mass of higher plants. He views the knowledge of cell wall structure and function as furthering the development of plants with improved usefulness: these plants are strong potential sources of renewable materials and biofuel feedstocks. His scientific expertise defines an ideal match of his interest - in the development of cellulosic and other solar-to-fuel science - with his recent appointment as Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI). With colleagues in biology, physical sciences, engineering, and environmental and the social sciences, he now leads the EBI multidisciplinary teams' research efforts to develop next-generation, carbon-neutral transportation fuels.

  9. Featured collection introduction: contaminants of emerging concern II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Kolok, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This collection of 13 articles focuses on CECs, and each of the articles highlights a specific aspect of this broad topic. The articles were solicited from researchers who participated in the second summer specialty conference on this topic, organized by the American Water Resources Association. The title of the conference was “CECs in Water Resources II: Research, Engineering and Community Action,” and the conference, as well as the articles in this featured collection, focus on a better and more comprehensive understanding of these contaminants. The conference was held in Denver, Colorado, on June 25-27, 2012, and approximately 125 conference attendees participated in an interdisciplinary forum of more than 75 presentations including keynote or plenary presentations by Dana Kolpin, Jorg Drewes, Heiko Schoenfuss, Chris Metcalfe, Vicki Blazer, and Tyrone Hayes. The first conference was held in 2007 and also produced a featured collection of articles (Battaglin and Kolpin, 2009).

  10. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    SLOPOS-12 included: Positron Interactions with Surfaces Positron Beam and Detector Technology Positron Interactions with Atoms and Molecules Positronium Science Defects and Vacancies in Materials Porosity and Open Volume in Materials Antimatter in Biomedical Science Anti-hydrogen Studies Positron Transport Annihilation On a sad note, delegates paid tribute to the contributions of one of our colleagues, Chris Beling, who tragically passed away shortly before the meeting. Chris' contributions to positron science and to the education of young scientists were noted in a number of the invited presentations. It is an honour for our community to begin these proceedings with a short tribute to Chris' life by Professor Paul Coleman. The Workshop could not have occurred without the generous support of our sponsors: The ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, The Australian National University, Flinders University, James Cook University, The Institute of Physics (UK) and the Australian Government's Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. It would also not have been possible without the hard work of the Local and International Organising Committees and the friendly and efficient staff at the All Seasons Resort, Magnetic Island. We are most grateful for the on-site assistance of Gillian Drew, the CAMS student and postdoc team, the financial wizardry of Chris Kalos, and the post-Workshop editorial assistance of Julia Wee and Adam Edwards. Finally we would like to thank all of the attendees at SLOPOS12 for their scientific contributions to the Workshop, and for the warm spirit of engagement which characterised the scientific discussions and social occasions. SLOPOS13 will be held in Germany in 2013 and we all look forward to the occasion. Stephen Buckman, James Sullivan and Ronald White(Guest Editors) Local Organising CommitteeInternational Committee Stephen Buckman (Chair, ANU, Canberra)G Amarendra (India) James Sullivan (Secretary, ANU, Canberra)M-F Barthe (France

  11. Hybrid Active-Passive Systems for Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It was proposed to continue with development and application in the two active-passive areas of Active Tuned Vibration Absorbers (ATVA) and smart foam applied to the reduction of interior noise in aircraft. In general the work was focused on making both techniques more efficient, practical and robust thus increasing their application potential. The work was also concerned with demonstrating the potential of these two technologies under realistic implementations as well as understanding the fundamental physics of the systems. The proposed work consisted of a three-year program and was tightly coordinated with related work being carried out in the Structural Acoustics Branch at NASA LaRC. The work was supervised and coordinated through all phases by Prof Chris Fuller of Va Tech.

  12. Fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images using multiresolution analysis and nonlinear PCA band reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, Giorgio Antonino; Khan, Muhammad Murtaza; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Montanvert, Annick; Condat, Laurent; Jutten, Christian

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a novel method for the enhancement of the spatial quality of hyperspectral (HS) images through the use of a high resolution panchromatic (PAN) image. Due to the high number of bands, the application of a pan-sharpening technique to HS images may result in an increase of the computational load and complexity. Thus a dimensionality reduction preprocess, compressing the original number of measurements into a lower dimensional space, becomes mandatory. To solve this problem, we propose a pan-sharpening technique combining both dimensionality reduction and fusion, making use of non-linear principal component analysis (NLPCA) and Indusion, respectively, to enhance the spatial resolution of a HS image. We have tested the proposed algorithm on HS images obtained from CHRIS-Proba sensor and PAN image obtained from World view 2 and demonstrated that a reduction using NLPCA does not result in any significant degradation in the pan-sharpening results.

  13. STS-74 leaves O&C Building for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The STS-74 flight crew walks out of the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to conduct Terminal Countdown Demostration Test (TCDT) exercises while aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. They are (from right): Mission Commander Kenneth Cameron; Pilot James Halsell; and Mission Specialists William McArthur Jr., Chris Hadfield, and Jerry Ross (back). Hadfield is an international mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency. This flight will feature the second docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station. Docking operations will be conducted with the Russian-built Docking Module attached to the end of the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) located in Atlantis payload bay. The DM will be left attached to the Mir when Atlantis undocks. This module will serve as a means to improve future Shuttle-Mir docking operations.

  14. It's the Water That Makes You Drunk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, E. J.

    1984-04-01

    It's the Water That Makes You Drunk is billed as “A Celebration in Geophysics and Oceanography—1982” in honor of Walter Munk's 65th birthday, October 19, 1982. It consists of 14 contributions of variable length and an entertaining autobiographic sketch by the honoree which updates and fills in some Freudian omissions in an earlier autobiography. The authors, an invited group from among the celebrants at a 2-day birthday party, are a diverse group of geophysicists selected to represent the wide spectrum of Walter's scientific interests (and occasional achievements, as Walter himself might say) over the last 4 decades. Thus, among others, Klaus Hasselman writes on surface waves, Chris Garrett on internal waves, Stanley Flatté on sound waves, Carl Wunsch on acoustic tomography, Peter Rhines on the general oceanic circulation, Dave Cartwright on ocean tides, Gordon MacDonald on atmospheric chemistry, Kurt Lambeck on the earth's rotation, and John Tukey on spectral analysis.

  15. The Hammer Award is presented to KSC and 45th Space Wing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC's Director of Public Affairs Joe Gordon (left) applauds as Ed Gormel and Chris Fairey are named recipients of the Hammer Award at a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Presenting the award is Morley Winograd (at the podium), director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Gormel and Fairey are co-chairs of the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base.

  16. Compact stars and accretion disks: Workshop summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    1998-07-01

    A workshop on `Compact Stars and Accretion Disks' was held on 11-12 August 1997 at the Australian National University. The workshop was opened by Professor Jeremy Mould, the Director of Mount Stromlo Observatory. The workshop was organised to coincide with visits to the ANU Astrophysical Theory Centre by Professor Ron Webbink from the University of Illinois, Professor Rainer Wehrse from the University of Heidelberg and Dr Chris Tout from the University of Cambridge. The workshop attracted over 25 participants nationwide. Participants included members of the Special Research Centre for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Sydney, led by Professor Don Melrose, Professor Dick Manchester from the ATNF, Professor Ravi Sood from ADFA, Dr John Greenhill from the University of Tasmania and Dr Rosemary Mardling from Monash University. Dr Helen Johnston from AAO and Dr Kurt Liffman from AFDL also attended the workshop. The abstracts of twelve of the workshop papers are presented in this summary.

  17. Lognormal Assimilation of Water Vapor in a WRF-GSI Cycled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. J.; Kliewer, A.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have shown the viability of both detecting a lognormally-distributed signal for water vapor mixing ratio and the improved quality of satellite retrievals in a 1DVAR mixed lognormal-Gaussian assimilation scheme over a Gaussian-only system. This mixed scheme is incorporated into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) assimilation scheme with the goal of improving forecasts from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model in a cycled system. Results are presented of the impact of treating water vapor as a lognormal random variable. Included in the analysis are: 1) the evolution of Tropical Storm Chris from 2006, and 2) an analysis of a "Pineapple Express" water vapor event from 2005 where a lognormal signal has been previously detected.

  18. STS-74 crew talk with recovery convoy crew after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-74 Commander Kenneth D. Cameron (left) and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Chris A. Hadfield chat with KSC recovery convoy crew member Shawn Greenwell, a runway measurement engineer. Cameron guided the orbiter Atlantis to the 27th end-of-mission landing at KSC in Shuttle program history, with main gear touchdown occuring at 12:01:27 p.m. EST. STS-74 marked the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir; Atlantis also was flown for the first docking earlier this year and its next mission, STS-76 in 1996, will be the third docking flight.

  19. Key Outcomes From the Inaugural AGU Board of Directors Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-10-01

    The engagement and enthusiasm of Board members and senior staff were evident as we met for the first Board of Directors meeting on 20-21 September 2010 at AGU headquarters, and much was accomplished over the 1.5 days. The meeting kicked off with a look to the future. Board members and staff had been asked to submit imagined headlines for 2019, the year that AGU will celebrate its 100th anniversary. This was a question raised by Executive Director Chris McEntee as she interacted with AGU leaders over the past several months. Board members and staff replied with a wide variety of headlines that inspired us to think about what is possible for AGU as we move forward as an organization. The headlines are posted on the AGU Web site (http://www.agu.org/about/presidents_msg/), and we encourage you to submit your own headline to agu_execdirector@agu.org.

  20. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  1. STS-100 MS Hadfield suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris A. Hadfield is ready for launch after suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building. Hadfield is with the Canadian Space Agency. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  2. STS-100 MS Parazynski suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Smiling, STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski gives thumbs up for launch as he suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS, which will be performed by Parazynski and Mission Specialist Chris A. Hadfield. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  3. BASSET: Scalable Gateway Finder in Large Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, H; Papadimitriou, S; Faloutsos, C; Yu, P S; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2010-11-03

    Given a social network, who is the best person to introduce you to, say, Chris Ferguson, the poker champion? Or, given a network of people and skills, who is the best person to help you learn about, say, wavelets? The goal is to find a small group of 'gateways': persons who are close enough to us, as well as close enough to the target (person, or skill) or, in other words, are crucial in connecting us to the target. The main contributions are the following: (a) we show how to formulate this problem precisely; (b) we show that it is sub-modular and thus it can be solved near-optimally; (c) we give fast, scalable algorithms to find such gateways. Experiments on real data sets validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed methods, achieving up to 6,000,000x speedup.

  4. The Asian Tsunami in Sri Lanka: A Personal Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Chris

    2005-01-01

    AGU Fellow Chris Chapman experienced the devastating Asian tsunami firsthand in Sri Lanka. The following is his account, written in the immediate aftermath of the disaster; the footnotes were added later. Chapman is a scientific advisor at Schlumberger Cambridge Research and a specialist in theoretical seismology. At 9:30 A.M. local time (0330 GMT) on Boxing Day, 26 December, my wife, Lillian, and I were eating breakfast at the beachside Triton Hotel1 in Ahungalla, Sri Lanka (about 30 km north of Galle). The previous week we had toured Sri Lanka, ending our trip traveling through Yala National Park and Galle. These were places we hardly knew of before, but now images of them are indelibly imprinted on the world. Of about 150 staying at the Yala Safari Game Lodge, only 11 survived. The center of Galle, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a sixteenth- to seventeenth-century Portuguese/Dutchfort and port, is essentially gone.

  5. Structure Enables Corporations with a Conscience

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-11-10

    November Economic Diversity column for the Tri-City Herald - Topic: Social Purpose Corporations - Excerpt below: On March 31, Governor Chris Gregoire made history when she signed HB2239 and created Washington’s first alternative for-profit corporate structure, the social purpose corporation, or SPC. The new structure allows for-profit entities to formally strive toward creation of social and environmental good as their top corporate priority. This significantly contrasts with the expectation that traditional companies must put creation of shareholder value first. It signals that Washington State believes corporate leadership should have the flexibility and legal backing to make decisions based on the company’s impact on all of its stakeholders rather than on the ability to maximize profits.

  6. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul

    2015-03-27

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  7. Rotationally induced magnetic chirality in clusters of single-domain permalloy islands and gapped nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Jie; Bartell, Jason; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent; Schiffer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We have studied magnetic moment configurations of clusters of single-domain ferromagnetic islands in different geometries. The magnetic moments of these clusters are imaged by MFM after rotational demagnetization, following our previous protocols. We observed that two types of the clusters showed a significant imbalance of their two-fold degenerate ground states after demagnetization, and this inequality is correlated to the rotational direction of the demagnetization. A similar imbalance was also found in nano-scale rings with a small gap: the chirality of their magnetic state can be precisely controlled by the rotational direction during demagnetization. We acknowledge the financial support from DOE and Army Research Office. We are grateful to Prof. Chris Leighton and Mike Erickson for assistance with sample preparation.

  8. Studies of isolated and interacting ferromagnetic gapped nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; Bartell, Jason; Grigas, Chris; Nisoli, Cristiano; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent; Schiffer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We have used micromagnetic simulation and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to study isolated and interacting permalloy nanorings that are lithographically fabricated with gaps that prevent a rotationally symmetric magnetic state. The gapped nanorings have inner and outer radii of 200 and 300 nm respectively, and the gap has a subtended width of ~ 20 degrees. The nanorings generate a strong magnetic field only in the gap, and thus the magnetization states of gapped nanorings are much more accessible to MFM imaging than complete rings. We have investigated the properties of these gapped nanorings, including the anisotropy in their coercive field and the relative alignment of the magnetic polarization in coupled pairs. We acknowledge the financial support from DOE and Army Research Office.We are grateful to Professor Chris Leighton and Mike Erickson for assistance with sample preparation.

  9. Estimating Light Use Efficiency Of A Pine And Beech Forest From Leaf To Ecosystem Scale Using The Photochemical Reflectance Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanikiotis, Theofilos; Markos, Nikos; Stagakis, Stavros; Tzotsos, Angelos; Sykioti, Olga; Kyparissis, Aris

    2013-12-01

    The prospect of accurately tracking photosynthetic processes using satellite observations is very important for understanding and monitoring global carbon cycle and climate change. The present study investigates the efficiency of the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) in detecting light use efficiency (ɛ) in different spatial scales. The study sites concern two dense and homogenous forests in the region of Epirus (Greece), one evergreen coniferous forest dominated by Pinus nigra species and one deciduous forest dominated by Fagus sylvatica. Field and laboratory measurements of canopy structure (Leaf Area Index - LAI, needle and shoot structure characteristics), leaf pigment concentrations, leaf photosynthesis and water potential were performed throughout the growth period. These measurements were used for an accurate description of the ecophysiological characteristics of the two species and thus the parameterization of a Canopy Photosynthesis Model in order to estimate canopy photosynthesis. During the same period, leaf and canopy reflectance measurements were performed in the field to test and evaluate PRI regarding it's efficiency to track ɛ in leaf and canopy scale. In order to investigate the potential application of PRI for estimating ɛ in a broader spatial scale, satellite hyperspectral or superspectral sensors can be used. Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are currently available for this purpose and their performances were tested within the present study. An agreement between the fluctuations of CHRIS PRI and the field measured canopy PRI has been found, with both of them appearing to track the ɛ fluctuation efficiently. However, MODIS PRI shows no intense fluctuation and no relationship with ɛ and field measured PRI, probably due to lack of atmospheric correction and the effects of viewing and illumination geometry.

  10. The first human heart transplant and further advances in cardiac transplantation at Groote Schuur Hospital and the University of Cape Town

    PubMed Central

    Brink, Johan G; Hassoulas, Joannis

    2009-01-01

    Summary Summary Christiaan (Chris) Barnard was born in 1922 and qualified in medicine at the University of Cape Town in 1946. Following surgical training in South Africa and the USA, Barnard established a successful open-heart surgery programme at Groote Schuur Hospital and the University of Cape Town in 1958. In 1967, he led the team that performed the world’s first human-to-human heart transplant. The article describing this remarkable achievement was published in the South African Medical Journal just three weeks after the event and is one of the most cited articles in the cardiovascular field. In the lay media as well, this first transplant remains the most publicised event in world medical history. Although the first heart transplant patient survived only 18 days, four of Groote Schuur Hospital’s first 10 patients survived for more than one year, two living for 13 and 23 years, respectively. This relative success amid many failures worldwide did much to generate guarded optimism that heart transplantation would eventually become a viable therapeutic option. This first heart transplant and subsequent ongoing research in cardiac transplantation at the University of Cape Town and in a few other dedicated centres over the subsequent 15 years laid the foundation for heart transplantation to become a well-established form of therapy for end-stage cardiac disease. During this period from 1968 to 1983, Chris Barnard and his team continued to make major contributions to organ transplantation, notably the development of the heterotopic (‘piggy-back’) heart transplants; advancing the concept of brain death, organ donation and other related ethical issues; better preservation and protection of the donor heart (including hypothermic perfusion storage of the heart; studies on the haemodynamic and metabolic effects of brain death; and even early attempts at xenotransplantation. PMID:19287813

  11. Line Positions and Intensities for the ν12 Band of 13C12CH_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of mono-substituted 13C-ethane (13C12CH_6) in the 12.2 μm region were recorded with a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectra were obtained for four sample pressures at three different temperatures between 130 and 208 K using a 99% 13C-enriched ethane sample contained in a 20.38-cm long coolable absorption cell. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique was used to fit the same intervals in the four spectra simultaneously to determine line positions and intensities. Similar to our previous analyses of 12C_2H_6 spectra in this same region, constraints were applied to accurately fit each pair of doublet components arising from torsional Coriolis interaction of the excited ν12 = 1 state with the nearby torsional ν_6 = 3 state. Line intensities corresponding to each spectrum temperature (130 K, 178 K and 208 K) are reported for 1660 ν12 absorption lines for which the assignments are known, and integrated intensities are estimated as the summation of the measured values. The measured line positions and intensities (re-scaled to 296 K) are compared with values in recent editions of spectroscopic databases. K. Sung, A. W. Mantz, L. R. Brown, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 162 (2010) 124-134. D. C. Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M. A. H. Smith and D. Atkins, JQSRT, 53 (1995) 705-721. V. Malathy Devi, C. P. Rinsland, D. Chris Benner, et al., JQSRT, 111 (2010) 1234-1251 V. Malathy Devi, D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, et al., JQSRT, 111 (2010) 2481-2504. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the College of William and Mary, NASA Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. Line Parameters of Carbon Dioxide in the 4850 CM-1 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Nugent, Emily; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Miller, Charles E.; Toth, Robert A.

    2011-06-01

    The spectral region near 4850 Cm-1 is used to monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide, but current accuracies of the line intensities and line shape coefficients do not permit carbon dioxide mixing ratios to be obtained to 1 ppm (about one part in 400). To improve the line parameters, we are remeasuring the prominent CO2 bands in this region specifically to characterize the non-Voigt effects of line mixing and speed dependence at room temperature. The laboratory spectra of air- and self-broadened CO2 have been recorded at a variety of pressures, path lengths, mixing ratios and resolutions (0.005 to 0.01 Cm-1) with two different Fourier transform spectrometers (the McMath-Pierce FTS at Kitt Peak and a Bruker 125 HR FTS at JPL). The line parameters of some 2000 transitions are being derived by simultaneous multispectrum fitting using a few dozen spectra encompassing a 230 Cm-1 wide spectral interval. The rovibrational constants for line positions and the band intensities and Herman-Wallis coefficients are being retrieved directly from the spectra, rather than floating positions and intensities individually. Self and foreign Lorentz widths and pressure shifts are being determined for the stronger bands while non-Voigt coefficients describing line mixing and speed dependence are being obtained for at least one of the strongest bands. D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. M. Devi, M. A. H. Smith, and D. A. Atkins, JQSRT 1995;53:705-21. V. M. Devi, D. Chris Benner, L. R. Brown, C. E. Miller, and R. A. Toth, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 2007;245:52-80. Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Support for the work at William and Mary was provided by contracts with JPL.

  13. The PROBA-1 microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teston, Frederic C.; Vuilleumier, Pierrik; Hardy, David; Bernaerts, Dirk

    2004-10-01

    PROBA-1 is a technology demonstration mission of the European Space Agency's General Support Technology Programme. It was launched on October, 22nd, 2001 in a LEO, Sun-synchronous, 681x561 km orbit. The spacecraft mass is 94 kg, with 25 kg dedicated to scientific and Earth observation instruments, in addition to the technology demonstration payloads. The principal objective is the in-orbit evaluation of new spacecraft technologies. PROBA-1, however, has also been intended as a flight opportunity for Earth observation instruments that can benefit from the agile pointing capabilities and the autonomy features of the satellite. PROBA-1 onboard automatic functions include all payload operations scheduling and execution, target fly-by prediction and control of camera pointing and scanning from raw user inputs (target latitude, longitude and altitude). The point and stare requirements of the High Resolution Camera (HRC), as well as the multiple image scan requirement to support Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) measurements with the Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) are satisfied with the specified accuracy, by this small and agile gyro-less platform, whose attitude determination is based on autonomous star tracker only. The main Earth imaging payload, CHRIS, weighing only 14 kg, is used to measure directional spectral reflectance. The instrument is capable of imaging up to 200 spectral bands simultaneously at full resolution with a spatial resolution of 20m at nadir and swath width of 15 km. The HRC is a black and white camera with a miniaturised Cassegrain telescope providing 5m geometrical resolution images. Each image covers a ground area of approximately 4 km by 4 km. The pointing agility of the spacecraft allows both cameras to take multiple images of the same target area at different viewing angles on the same orbital pass. This paper covers the spacecraft design and in-flight performance, as well as a description of the

  14. Proba, an ESA technology demonstration mission, results after 3 years in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teston, F.; Bernaerts, D.; Gantois, K.

    2004-11-01

    PROBA (Project for On Board Autonomy) is a technology demonstration mission of the European Space Agency's General Support Technology Programme. PROBA was launched on October, 22nd , 2001 on a LEO Sun-synchronous 681x561 km orbit. The spacecraft mass is 94 kg, with 25 kg dedicated to scientific and Earth observation instruments, in addition to the technology demonstration payloads. PROBA principal objectives are in-orbit evaluation of new spacecraft technologies. PROBA, however, has also been intended as a flight opportunity for Earth observation instruments which can benefit from the pointing and agility capabilities of the satellite. PROBA onboard automatic functions include all payload operations scheduling and execution, target fly-by prediction and control of cameras pointing and scanning from raw inputs from users (target latitude, longitude and altitude). The point and stare requirements of the High Resolution Camera (HRC), as well as the multiple images scan requirement to support Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) measurements with the Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) are satisfied with the specified accuracy, by this small and agile gyro-less platform, whose attitude determination is based on autonomous star trackers only. PROBA main Earth imaging payload, CHRIS, weighting only 14 kg, is used to measure directional spectral reflectance. The instrument is capable of imaging (with multiple imaging of same target area under different viewing and illumination geometries) up to 200 spectral bands simultaneously at full resolution with a spatial resolution of 20 m at nadir and swath width of 15 km. The paper will cover, the spacecraft design and in-flight performances, as well as a description of the enabling technologies.

  15. Use of remote sensing data to assist crop modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppelt, Natascha M.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents results of a study investigating the potential for improvement of a physically-based model approach, when the static input data is enhanced by dynamic remote sensing information. The model PROMET (PROcess of Radiation Mass and Energy Transfer), which is normally used to simulate the water and energy fluxes at the landscape level, was applied on a field scale to simulate crop growth and yield. The remote sensing input data was derived from hyperspectral images of the CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) sensor, which is operated by ESA (European Space Agency). PROMET was set up for a field scale model run for two test fields grown with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) mapping the crop development of the seasons 2004 and 2005. During the model runs, information on the absorptive capacity of the leaves for two canopy layers (sunlit and shaded layer) was updated using remotely sensed chlorophyll measurements. The chlorophyll contents of these two vegetation layers were assessed using angular CHRIS data. Control data were acquired through field measurements, which were conducted throughout the growing periods of both years and also accompanying the satellite overpasses. The stand-alone model was able to reproduce the average development of the crop and yield reasonably well, but the spatial heterogeneity was severely underestimated and yield was overestimated by approximately 20%. The combination of remote sensing data with the model led to an improvement of the spatial heterogeneity of the crop development and yield. The use of ground truth data to improve the modeling accuracy can be made possible.

  16. The 26th International Physics Olympiad: On top down under!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    As they opened the plane door on arrival at Canberra it was like stepping inside a freezer. I had escaped from the heatwave in Britain to experience winter in Australia. I have not found anyone who believes that there was really frost! The Australian welcome did its best to combat the cold, however, and Professor Rod Jury had soon introduced our guides and got us settled in on the campus of Canberra University. The British team of five students, selected through the British Physics Olympiad, were: Alan Bain of Birkenhead School, Chris Blake of King Edward VI School, Southampton, Richard Davies of Dulwich College, Tom Down of Embley Park School, Romsey and Chris Webb of Royal Grammar School, Worcester. The two Leaders of the party were Cyril Isenberg of the University of Kent and Guy Bagnall of Harrow School. Chris Robson of St Bee's School and myself from Stoke on Trent Sixth form College were interested Observers and Guy's wife, Jenny, completed the party. For the old hands there were many friendships stretching back years to renew, and with 51 countries this year many new ones to be made. Â Photo Figure 1. Photograph taken by C Robson of the British Physics Team immediately after the Awards Ceremony in Canberra in July 1995. From left to right: Chris Webb, Richard Davies, Tom Down, Alan Bain and Chris Blake. In addition to the confusion caused by the Sun being in the North and the Moon appearing to lie on its back, we had to get used to the flocks of chattering parrots browsing on the lawns and the kangaroos on campus! Everyone was presented with a boomerang and there were several sessions introducing the art of throwing them, even in the dark! The Opening Ceremony was colourful and a good mix of ceremony and fun with the Aboriginal entertainment and the Flame of Science to be lit. This was followed by my first examiners' meeting. Once the questions have been introduced no one is allowed to leave the group until ten hours later when the students are in bed! The

  17. Final Report- "An Algorithmic and Software Framework for Applied Partial Differential Equations (APDEC): A DOE SciDAC Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Elbridge Gerry Puckett

    2008-05-13

    All of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FC02-01ER25473 was characterized by exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This included having one of my graduate students - Sarah Williams - spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren a staff scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. As a result of this visit Sarah decided to work on a problem suggested by Dr. John Bell the head of CCSE for her PhD thesis, which she finished in June 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is a long established tradition at the University of California and I have always encouraged my students to consider doing this. For example, in 2000 one of my graduate students - Matthew Williams - finished his PhD thesis while working with Dr. Douglas Kothe at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Matt is now a staff scientist in the Diagnostic Applications Group in the Applied Physics Division at LANL. Another one of my graduate students - Christopher Algieri - who was partially supported with funds from DE-FC02-01ER25473 wrote am MS Thesis that analyzed and extended work published by Dr. Phil Colella and his colleagues in 1998. Dr. Colella is the head of the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) in the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center at LBNL and is the lead PI for the APDEC ISIC which was comprised of several National Laboratory research groups and at least five University PI's at five different universities. Chris Algieri is now employed as a staff member in Dr. Bill Collins' research group at LBNL developing computational models for climate change research. Bill Collins was recently hired at LBNL to start and be the Head of the Climate Science Department in the Earth Sciences Division at LBNL. Prior to this he had

  18. The 26th International Physics Olympiad: On top down under!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    As they opened the plane door on arrival at Canberra it was like stepping inside a freezer. I had escaped from the heatwave in Britain to experience winter in Australia. I have not found anyone who believes that there was really frost! The Australian welcome did its best to combat the cold, however, and Professor Rod Jury had soon introduced our guides and got us settled in on the campus of Canberra University. The British team of five students, selected through the British Physics Olympiad, were: Alan Bain of Birkenhead School, Chris Blake of King Edward VI School, Southampton, Richard Davies of Dulwich College, Tom Down of Embley Park School, Romsey and Chris Webb of Royal Grammar School, Worcester. The two Leaders of the party were Cyril Isenberg of the University of Kent and Guy Bagnall of Harrow School. Chris Robson of St Bee's School and myself from Stoke on Trent Sixth form College were interested Observers and Guy's wife, Jenny, completed the party. For the old hands there were many friendships stretching back years to renew, and with 51 countries this year many new ones to be made. Â Photo Figure 1. Photograph taken by C Robson of the British Physics Team immediately after the Awards Ceremony in Canberra in July 1995. From left to right: Chris Webb, Richard Davies, Tom Down, Alan Bain and Chris Blake. In addition to the confusion caused by the Sun being in the North and the Moon appearing to lie on its back, we had to get used to the flocks of chattering parrots browsing on the lawns and the kangaroos on campus! Everyone was presented with a boomerang and there were several sessions introducing the art of throwing them, even in the dark! The Opening Ceremony was colourful and a good mix of ceremony and fun with the Aboriginal entertainment and the Flame of Science to be lit. This was followed by my first examiners' meeting. Once the questions have been introduced no one is allowed to leave the group until ten hours later when the students are in bed! The

  19. Reminiscences regarding Professor R.N. Christiansen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarup, Govind

    2008-11-01

    In this short paper I describe my initiation into the field of radio astronomy fifty years ago, under the guidance of Professor W.N. ('Chris') Christiansen, soon after I joined the C.S.I.R.O.'s Division of Radiophysics (RP) in Sydney, Australia, in 1953 under a 2-year Colombo Plan Fellowship. During the early 1950s Christiansen had developed a remarkable 21 cm interferometric grating array of 32 east-west aligned parabolic dishes and another array of 16 dishes in a north-south direction at Potts Hill. Christiansen and Warburton used these two arrays to scan the Sun strip-wise yielding radio brightness distribution at various position angles. During a three month period I assisted them in making a 2-dimensional map of the Sun by a complex Fourier transform process. In the second year of my Fellowship, Parthasarathy and I converted the 32-antenna east-west grating array to study solar radio emission at 60cm. During this work, I noticed that the procedure adopted by Christiansen for phase adjustment of the grating array was time consuming. Based on this experience, I later developed an innovative technique at Stanford in 1959 for phase adjustment of long transmission lines and paths in space. In a bid to improve on the method used by Christiansen to make a 2-dimensional map of the Sun from strip scans, I suggested to R.N. Bracewell in 1962 a revolutionary method for direct 2-dimensional imaging without Fourier transforms. Bracewell and Riddle developed the method for making a 2-dimensional map of the Moon using strip scans obtained with the 32 element interferometer at Stanford. The method has since revolutionized medical tomography. I describe these developments here to highlight my initial work with Christiansen and to show how new ideas often are developed by necessity and have their origin in prior experience! The 32 Potts Hill solar grating array dishes were eventually donated by the C.S.I.R.0. to India and were set up by me at Kalyan near Mumbai, forming the

  20. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  1. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  2. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Dysarthria in Greek with a Focus on Lexical Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakyritsis, Ioannis

    The field of motor speech disorders in Greek is substantially underresearched. Additionally, acoustic studies on lexical stress in dysarthria are generally very rare (Kim et al. 2010). This dissertation examined the acoustic and perceptual effects of Greek dysarthria focusing on lexical stress. Additional possibly deviant speech characteristics were acoustically analyzed. Data from three dysarthric participants and matched controls was analyzed using a case study design. The analysis of lexical stress was based on data drawn from a single word repetition task that included pairs of disyllabic words differentiated by stress location. This data was acoustically analyzed in terms of the use of the acoustic cues for Greek stress. The ability of the dysarthric participants to signal stress in single words was further assessed in a stress identification task carried out by 14 naive Greek listeners. Overall, the acoustic and perceptual data indicated that, although all three dysarthric speakers presented with some difficulty in the patterning of stressed and unstressed syllables, each had different underlying problems that gave rise to quite distinct patterns of deviant speech characteristics. The atypical use of lexical stress cues in Anna's data obscured the prominence relations of stressed and unstressed syllables to the extent that the position of lexical stress was usually not perceptually transparent. Chris and Maria on the other hand, did not have marked difficulties signaling lexical stress location, although listeners were not 100% successful in the stress identification task. For the most part, Chris' atypical phonation patterns and Maria's very slow rate of speech did not interfere with lexical stress signaling. The acoustic analysis of the lexical stress cues was generally in agreement with the participants' performance in the stress identification task. Interestingly, in all three dysarthric participants, but more so in Anna, targets stressed on the 1st

  3. EEAP boiler and chiller study II at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-31

    This energy conservation study was performed by Huitt-Zollars Inc, for the U.S. Army Engineer District (USAED), Fort Worth, under contract number DACAC63-94-D-0015. The study was conducted at Fort Sam Houston (FSH) in San Antonio, Texas, between September 28, 1995 and May 31, 1996. The site survey, data collection and analysis was performed by John Carter, E.I.T, Chris Pieper, P.E., and M. A. Shafiq, P.E. The purpose of the study was to perform a limited site survey of specific buildings at the facility, identify specific Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) that exist, and then evaluate these ECOs for technical and economic feasibility. These ECOs were limited to central boiler and chiller plant systems serving specific building groups at FSH. This study is the second phase of a Boiler/Chiller study completed by Huitt-Zollars, Inc. for The Corp of Engineers on September 18, 1995. In addition to the work that was accomplished in that project, additional buildings for three of the areas analyzed previously andtwo new areas have been added to the Scope of Work for this phase. Therefore, much of the same data that was gathered for the first phase will again be used in this second phase to identify ECO`s.

  4. STS-100 Photo-op/Shut-up/Depart O&C/Launch Endeavour On Orbit/Landing/Crew Egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This video shows an overview of crew activities from STS-100. The crew of Space Shuttle Shuttle Endeavour includes: Commander Kent Rominger; Pilot Jeffrey Ashby; and Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield, John Phillips, Scott Parazynski, Umberto Guidoni, and Yuri Lonchakov. Sections of the video include: Photo-op; Suit-up; Depart O&C; Ingress; Launch with Playbacks; On-orbit; Landing with Playbacks; Crew Egress & Departure. Voiceover narration introduces the astronauts at their pre-flight meal, and continues during the video, except for the launch and landing sequences. Launch playback views include: NEXT; Beach Tracker; VAB; PAD-A; Tower-1; UCS-15; Grandstand; OTV-60; OTV-70; OTV-71; DOAMS; UCS-10 Tracker; UCS-23 Tracker; On-board Ascent Camera. The On-orbit section of the video shows preparations for an extravehicular activity (EVA) to install Canadarm 2 on the International Space Station (ISS). Preparation for docking with the ISS, and the docking of the orbiter and ISS are shown. The attachment of Canadarm 2 and the Raffaello Logistics Module, a resupply vehicle, are shown. The crew also undertakes some maintenance of the ISS. Landing playback views include: TV-1; TV-2; LRO-1; LRO-2; PPOV.

  5. STS-96 crew members in the white room are prepared for entry into Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Before entering the orbiter Discovery, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (center) is checked out by white room closeout crew members Mechanical Technician Chris Meinert and Quality Assurance Specialist Jim Davis on the left, and Closeout Chief Travis Thompson and Suit Technician Jean Alexander on the right. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  6. STS-96 crew members in the white room are prepared for entry into Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the white room prior to launch, STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger reaches to shake hands with Suit Technician Jean Alexander. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. At right are closeout crew members Chief Travis Thompson and Quality Assurance Specialist James Davis; at left is Mechanical Technician Chris Meinert. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.- built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  7. The Mexico City Policy: a "gag rule" that violates free speech and democratic values.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S A

    1998-04-01

    With the support of the Republican leadership of the US House of Representatives, Representative Chris Smith of New Jersey continues to attempt to limit provision of US family planning (FP) funding to foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) who agree to enforce absolute prohibitions on engaging in abortion-related activities. Despite the fact that the House is withholding funds to meet US obligations to the UN and to support the International Monetary Fund, US President Clinton refuses to give in to pressure to enforce what amounts to a "gag rule." The Secretary of State explains that Clinton has no intention of punishing organizations engaging in free-speech protected democratic activities in foreign countries. Smith has offered a self-styled "compromise" that would allow Clinton to waive disqualification for a foreign NGO offering abortion services with its own funds in compliance with the laws of its country. This waiver would penalize the international FP program by $44 million and would not apply to the broad prohibitions against abortion lobbying (including lobbying for changes in laws, sponsoring conferences and workshops on "alleged" defects in abortion laws, and drafting and distributing materials or public statements on "alleged defects"). Smith's emphasis on the "lobbying" ban has widened the issue from a debate on abortion to a debate on democracy and free speech. Opposition to Smith's proposal is, thus, rising in many quarters. Smith also endorses withholding US contributions to the UN Population Fund because the fund has resumed work in China. PMID:12293660

  8. Paediatric liver transplantation for children treated at public health facilities in South Africa: time for change.

    PubMed

    Lala, S G; Britz, R; Botha, J; Loveland, J

    2014-11-01

    Paediatric liver transplantation (PLT) is the only therapeutic option for many children with end-stage chronic liver disease or irreversible fulminant hepatic failure, and is routinely considered as a therapy by paediatric gastroenterologists and surgeons working in developed countries. In South Africa (SA), a PLT programme has been available at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town since November 1991, and another has rapidly developed at the Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre in Johannesburg over the past decade. However, for most children with progressive chronic liver disease who are reliant on the services provided at state facilities in SA, PLT is not an option because of a lack of resources in a mismanaged public health system. This article briefly outlines the services offered at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital--which is typical of state facilities in SA--and proposes that resources be allocated to establish an innovative, nationally funded centre that would enable greater numbers of children access to a PLT programme. PMID:26038799

  9. Tolerance and Safety of Different Concentrations of Chlorhexidine for Peripartum Vaginal and Infant Washes: HIVNET025

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Craig M.; Gray, Glenda; Read, Jennifer S.; Mwatha, Anthony; Lala, Sanjay; Johnson, Saul; Violari, Avye; Sibiya, Portia Mabali; Fleming, Thomas R.; Koonce, Ann; Vermund, Sten H.; McIntyre, James

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a continuing need to evaluate sustainable interventions for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV type 1. We evaluated different concentrations (0.25%, 1%, and 2%) of chlorhexidine (CHX) for perinatal maternal and infant washes to identify the maximum tolerable concentration of CHX for such an intervention. Methods Women were enrolled during their third trimester at the maternity unit of the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa, and perinatal maternal and infant washes were completed. Subjective maternal symptoms as well as infant examinations were used to assess tolerability of the washes. Results The 0.25% concentration of CHX was well tolerated by the mothers (n = 29). Ten of 79 women (13%) with 1% CHX washes complained of mild vaginal area burning or itching, and washes were stopped in 5 (6%). Twenty-three of 75 women (31%) in the 2% CHX wash group had subjective complaints, and the washes were stopped in 12 (16%). There were no clinical indications of toxicity of the CHX washes among infants. Conclusion A 1% solution of CHX appears to be a safe and tolerable concentration of CHX for consideration in an MTCT prevention trial. PMID:14722445

  10. High School Roundtable Discussion on the Process and Implications of the Physics TEKS Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Hugh

    2008-03-01

    On January 29 - February 2, 2008, several committees appointed by the Texas State Board of Education and consisting of high school and college teachers met in Austin to revise the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for all high school science courses, including physics, chemistry, integrated physics and chemistry (IPC), biology, astronomy, environmental systems, and aquatic science. Members of the Physics TEKS revision committee were Jill Marshall, Daniel Marble, Jeff Funkhouser, Cheryl Cowley, and Hugh Henderson. The committee members began the process by considering the revision suggestions made by members of TSAAPT during the past year. This session will clarify the TEKS revision process and communicate the changes to the Physics TEKS suggested by the committee, as well as provide a panel discussion on political and policy implications of TEKS revision, implications of TEKS revision for future teachers, and possible implications for physics education at the university level. All pre-college science teachers and college faculty are encouraged to attend and join the discussion. In collaboration with Chris Comer, Science Consultant; Jill Marshall, University of Texas; David Bixler, Angelo State University; and Toni Sauncy, Angelo State University.

  11. Measurements of the CO_2 15 μm Band System Broadened by Air, N_2 and CO_2 at Terrestrial Atmospheric Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A. H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Blake, T. A.; Sams, R. L.

    2009-06-01

    In earth remote sensing, retrievals of atmospheric temperature profiles are often based on observed radiances in infrared spectral regions where emission from atmospheric CO_2 predominates. To achieve improved retrieval accuracy, systematic errors in the forward model must be reduced, especially those associated with errors in the spectroscopic line calculation. We have recorded more than 110 new high-resolution infrared spectra of the 15-μm band system of CO_2 to accurately determine line intensities, self-, air- and N_2-broadened widths and pressure-induced line shifts, along with their temperature dependences. The spectra were recorded with the Bruker IFS 120 HR Fourier transform spectrometer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and temperature-controlled sample cells. Sample temperatures were between 206K and 298K. Maximum total pressures were 15 Torr for self-broadening and 613 Torr for air- and N_2-broadening. Analysis is done using a multispectrum fitting technique to retrieve the spectroscopic parameters. Line mixing and other non-Lorentz, non-Voigt line shapes are also assessed. The resulting line parameters are compared with the HITRAN database and with other measurements. D. Chris Benner, C.P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M.A.H. Smith, and D. Atkins, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 53, 705-721 (1995) L.S. Rothman et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 96, 139-204 (2005) L.S. Rothman et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, in press (2009)

  12. STS-96 crew takes part in payload Interface Verification Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the SPACEHAB Facility, the STS-96 crew looks over equipment during a payload Interface Verification Test for the upcoming mission to the International Space Station. From left are Commander Kent Rominger, Mission Specialists Tamara Jernigan and Valery Tokarev of Russia, Pilot Rick Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa and Julie Payette (backs to the camera). They are listening to Chris Jaskolka of Boeing talk about the equipment. Mission STS-96 carries the SPACEHAB Logistics Double Module, which will have equipment to further outfit the International Space Station service module and equipment that can be off-loaded from the early U.S. assembly flights. It carries internal logistics and resupply cargo for station outfitting, plus an external Russian cargo crane to be mounted to the exterior of the Russian station segment and used to perform space walking maintenance activities. The double module stowage provides capacity of up to 10,000 lbs. with the ability to accommodate powered payloads, four external rooftop stowage locations, four double-rack locations (two powered), up to 61 bulkhead-mounted middeck locker locations, and floor storage for large unique items and Soft Stowage. STS-96 is targeted to launch May 20 about 9:32 a.m. EDT.

  13. The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Sitting in front of SPACEHAB is STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt listening to instruction by Chris Jaskolka, Boeing SPACEHAB Program senior engineer, as Lynn Ashby, Boeing SPACEHAB Program principal engineer, looks on.

  14. Characterization of floating element balance for field panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsucker, J. Travis; Gardner, Harrison; Swain, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Multiple experiments were performed to investigate and characterize the uncertainty and bias of a through-hull flush mounted floating element balance designed to measure the hydrodynamic drag forces of biofouling and marine coatings on 25 x 30 cm test panels. The instrument is located in a wet well on the aft portion of a 27' Chris Craft Commander. Testing occurs over a series of speeds ranging from a Froude number of 0.50-2.20 on calm days (force 3 or less) in waters along the central east coast of Florida. Recent modifications have been made to the instrumentation in an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the system. This study compares frictional drag measurements of the floating element balance to those obtained using the Clauser chart and Preston tube methods for a smooth surface. Boundary layer velocity profiles are examined to understand the nature of the flow over the testing section. Roughness function values for 60 and 220 grit sandpaper were calculated from data obtained using the floating element balance. These values were compared with previous work to examine the overall bias of the methodology. Repeat measurements for a smooth panel were analyzed to characterize the overall uncertainty in the system. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research under grants N00014-10-1-0919 and N00014-11-1-0915.

  15. KSC-03PD-0817

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Lockheed Martin Vice President/Associate Program Manager Brian Duffy (second from left) and NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Roy Bridges (next to Duffy) talk with student participants in the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition. Chris Fairey, the former director of Spaceport Services at KSC, looks on in the background. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty student teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA/Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind.

  16. New spectral vegetation indices based on the near-infrared shoulder wavelengths for remote detection of grassland phytomass

    PubMed Central

    VESCOVO, LORIS; WOHLFAHRT, GEORG; BALZAROLO, MANUELA; PILLONI, SEBASTIAN; SOTTOCORNOLA, MATTEO; RODEGHIERO, MIRCO; GIANELLE, DAMIANO

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the possibility of exploiting ground reflectance in the near-infrared (NIR) for monitoring grassland phytomass on a temporal basis. Three new spectral vegetation indices (infrared slope index, ISI; normalized infrared difference index, NIDI; and normalized difference structural index, NDSI), which are based on the reflectance values in the H25 (863–881 nm) and the H18 (745–751 nm) Chris Proba (mode 5) bands, are proposed. Ground measurements of hyperspectral reflectance and phytomass were made at six grassland sites in the Italian and Austrian mountains using a hand-held spectroradiometer. At full canopy cover, strong saturation was observed for many traditional vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), modified simple ratio (MSR), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI 2), renormalized difference vegetation index (RDVI), wide dynamic range vegetation index (WDRVI)). Conversely, ISI and NDSI were linearly related to grassland phytomass with negligible inter-annual variability. The relationships between both ISI and NDSI and phytomass were however site specific. The WinSail model indicated that this was mostly due to grassland species composition and background reflectance. Further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of these indices (e.g. using multispectral specific sensors) for monitoring vegetation structural biophysical variables in other ecosystem types and to test these relationships with aircraft and satellite sensors data. For grassland ecosystems, we conclude that ISI and NDSI hold great promise for non-destructively monitoring the temporal variability of grassland phytomass. PMID:24347746

  17. Collaborative Research and Education in the Ross Sea: A broader impact evaluation report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, C.; Kohut, J. T.; Lichtenwalner, C. S.; Clark, H.

    2010-12-01

    An interdisciplinary team of researchers will focus on describing the high productivity patchiness observed in phytoplankton blooms in the mid-to-late summer in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. They will use a novel sampling strategy that employs a remotely controlled glider (AUV) to locate and map circumpolar deep water in near real time and also to direct further ship-based sampling. This unusual coordination of a polar research vessel with AUVs provides an exciting opportunity to engage formal and informal educators in a research adventure. As part of this NSF-funded project’s Criterion 2 broader impact, joining the researchers virtually will be 30 New Jersey middle-school teachers and their students. This summer in New Jersey, in partnership with Liberty Science Center educators, COSEE-NOW (Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence-Networked Ocean World) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the project team introduced teachers to the Ross Sea, the research, the science behind it and the AUV. The summer workshop and ongoing schoolyear support is providing the teachers with the tools they need to bring the excitement of the research into their classrooms in real time during the Ross Sea cruise at the end of this year. This presentation by Chris Parsons, the project evaluator, will summarize the evaluation plan for this broader impact project, which follows teachers and their classes for a year, and provide the latest evaluation results from this project.

  18. Structural Colors of Birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cecilia; Dushkina, Natalia

    2016-03-01

    Structural colors create iridescent colors in bird feathers. The goal is to understand why structural colors act the way they do in certain situations. The research conducted over the course of the fall semester was to understand the optical phenomenon producing colors in individual barbules. Through the use of a polarizing optical microscope, certain hypotheses were built to explain certain phenomenon. Using a dark field illumination involving light acting at wide angles in microscopy, the barbules were not affected by polarization. So it can be suggested that the barbules have certain characteristics, possibly internal, which prevents wide-angle polarization. More recently, it was found that the barbules, when stacked upon one another, create a discoloration at the cross over point. It can be suggested that the barbules act as thin films and create a situation of thin film interference. More data will be taken using the Scanning Electron Microscope as well as getting cross sectional data to help understand the internal characteristics of the barbules. From the support of the Neimeyer-Hodgson Grant, Chris Stull, and Millersville University of Pennsylvania.

  19. Helping nuclear power help us

    SciTech Connect

    Schecker, Jay A

    2009-01-01

    After a prolonged absence, the word 'nuclear' has returned to the lexicon of sustainable domestic energy resources. Due in no small part to its demonstrated reliability, nuclear power is poised to playa greater role in the nation's energy future, producing clean, carbon-neutral electricity and contributing even more to our energy security. To nuclear scientists, the resurgence presents an opportunity to inject new technologies into the industry to maximize the benefits that nuclear energy can provide. 'By developing new options for waste management and exploiting new materials to make key technological advances, we can significantly impact the use of nuclear energy in our future energy mix,' says Chris Stanek, a materials scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stanek approaches the big technology challenges by thinking way small, all the way down to the atoms. He and his colleagues are using cutting edge atomic-scale simulations to address a difficult aspect of nuclear waste -- predicting its behavior far into the future. Their research is part of a broader, coordinated effort on the part of the Laboratory to use its considerable experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities to explore advanced materials central to not only waste issues, but to nuclear fuels as well.

  20. STS-100 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is the official crew portrait of the STS-100 mission. Seated are astronauts Kent V. Rominger, (left) and Jeffrey S. Ashby, commander and pilot, respectively. Standing (from the left) are cosmonaut Yuri V. Lonchakov with astronauts Scott E. Parazynski, Umberto Guidoni of the European Space Agency, Chris A. Hadfield, and John L. Phillips, all mission specialists. The seven launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Space shuttle Orbiter Endeavour on April 19, 2001 for an 11-day mission. The STS-100 mission, the sixth International Space Station (ISS) assembly flight, accomplished the following objectives: The delivery of the Canadian-built Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), Canadarm2, which is needed to perform assembly operations on later flights; The delivery and installation of a UHF antenna that provides space-to-space communications capability for U.S.-based space walks; and carried the Italian-built Multipurpose Logistics Module Raffaello containing six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab, Destiny.

  1. Practical approaches to earthquake prediction and warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Carl

    1984-04-01

    The title chosen for this renewal of the U.S.-Japan prediction seminar series reflects optimism, perhaps more widespread in Japan than in the United States, that research on earthquake prediction has progressed to a stage at which it is appropriate to begin testing operational forecast systems. This is not to suggest that American researchers do not recognize very substantial gains in understanding earthquake processes and earthquake recurrence, but rather that we are at the point of initiating pilot prediction experiments rather than asserting that we are prepared to start making earthquake predictions in a routine mode.For the sixth time since 1964, with support from the National Science Foundation and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, as well as substantial support from the U.S. Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) for participation of a good representation of its own scientists, earthquake specialists from the two countries came together on November 7-11, 1983, to review progress of the recent past and share ideas about promising directions for future efforts. If one counts the 1980 Ewing symposium on prediction, sponsored by Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, which, though multinational, served the same purpose, one finds a continuity in these interchanges that has made them especially productive and stimulating for both scientific communities. The conveners this time were Chris Scholz, Lamont-Doherty, for the United States and Tsuneji Rikitake, Nihon University, for Japan.

  2. Business Models for Successfully Maintaining Games for Health.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Moderator Tom; Isaac, Participants Fikry; Ashford, Chris; Goldman, Ron; Lenihan, David J; Poole, Brent; Buday, Richard; van Rijswijk, Jurriaan

    2013-04-01

    Videogames for health provide innovative, exciting, and possibly highly effective new media for helping players change their behaviors or otherwise benefit their health. Getting the right videogames into the hands of players who can benefit most in a way that pays for the continued innovation and creation of such games is a current challenge. Entertainment videogame companies, which create games primarily to enhance players' enjoyment, have used the general business marketplace (e.g., online stores, walk-in stores, app stores) to deliver their products directly to consumers and earn enough capital to invest in making new products. No one believes, however, that enough kids or adults would use the general business marketplace to purchase games for health in sufficient volume to provide the down payment for the innovation and creation of new games for health. A successful business model is critical to the financial future of games for health. We asked members of our Editorial Board who are in health-related companies (Fikry Isaac, MD, MPH), in several game development companies (Chris Ashford, Ron Goldman, David J. Lenihan, Brent Poole, and Richard Buday, FAIA), and the head of the Games for Health Europe Foundation (Jurriaan van Rijswijk, MSc) to address questions in a roundtable about the current and possible future business models for games for health. PMID:26192123

  3. KSC-03PD-0819

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Observing the festivities at the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition are, from left, David Culp, executive intern to the director of KSC; Chris Fairey, former director of Spaceport Services at KSC; Roy Bridges, KSC director; and Brian Duffy, Lockheed Martin vice president/associate program manager. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty student teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA/Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind.

  4. KSC-03PD-0818

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Observing the festivities at the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition are, from left, David Culp, executive intern to the director of KSC; Chris Fairey, former director of Spaceport Services at KSC; Roy Bridges, KSC director; and Brian Duffy, Lockheed Martin vice president/associate program manager. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty student teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA/Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind.

  5. Transsexuality: some remarks based on clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hertoft, P; Sørensen, T

    People with severe gender identity problems have always existed. Some hope to find a solution to their deep intrapersonal conflicts in a so-called sex transformation. The term 'transsexual' was coined by Cauldwell in 1949 and since then an unknown number of people all over the world, probably more biological men than women, have undergone a hormonal and surgical sex-transformation procedure. In this chapter we discuss the impossibility of real sex change from man to woman and vice versa. We briefly touch on two classical cases of sex transformation with some connection with Denmark: the Lili Elbe case of 1930 and the famous Chris Jorgensen case from the early fifties. We discuss the incidence of transsexuality and follow-up studies of patients, and give preliminary results from a Danish study of 110 people (81 men and 29 women) who during the past 25 years have applied for a sex-change operation. Of these, 56 individuals (42 men and 14 women) have had such operations. These are minimum figures since some transsexuals are known to have had operations in other countries but have not contacted Danish hospitals or health personnel. PMID:256828

  6. In Situ Boundary Layer Coral Metabolism in the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillis, Wade

    2013-04-01

    and Chris Langdon, Brice Loose, Dwight Gledhill, Diana Hsueh, Derek Manzello, Ian Enochs, Ryan Moyer We present net ecosystem productivity (nep) and net ecosystem calcification (nec) in coral and seagrass ecosystems using the boundary layer gradient flux technique (CROSS). Coastal anthropogenic inputs and changes in global ocean chemistry in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide has emerged in recent years as a topic of considerable concern. Coral reefs are particularly vulnerable from eroded environmental conditions including ocean acidification and water pollution. The Atlantic Ocean Acidification Testbed (AOAT) project monitors metabolism to ascertain the continuing health of coral reef ecosystems. The CROSS boundary layer nep/nec approach is one component of this diagnostic program. Certification of CROSS as an operational monitoring tool is underway in the AOAT. CROSS inspects a benthic community and measures productivity/respiration and calcification/dissolution over an area of 10 square meters. Being a boundary layer tool, advection and complex mesoscale flows are not a factor or concern and CROSS is autonomous and can be used at deep benthic sites. The interrogation area is not enclosed therefore exposed to ambient light, flow, and nutrient levels. CROSS is easy to deploy, unambiguous, and affordable. Repeated measurements have been made from 2011-2012 in reefal systems in La Parguera Puerto Rico and the Florida Keys, USA. Diurnal, seasonal and regional metabolism will be compared and discussed. The ability to accurately probe benthic ecosystems provides a powerful management and research tool to policy makers and researchers.

  7. A Multiscale Mapping Assessment of Lake Champlain Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms

    PubMed Central

    Torbick, Nathan; Corbiere, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Lake Champlain has bays undergoing chronic cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms that pose a public health threat. Monitoring and assessment tools need to be developed to support risk decision making and to gain a thorough understanding of bloom scales and intensities. In this research application, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), Rapid Eye, and Proba Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images were obtained while a corresponding field campaign collected in situ measurements of water quality. Models including empirical band ratio regressions were applied to map chlorophyll-a and phycocyanin concentrations; all sensors performed well with R2 and root-mean-square error (RMSE) ranging from 0.76 to 0.88 and 0.42 to 1.51, respectively. The outcomes showed spatial patterns across the lake with problematic bays having phycocyanin concentrations >25 µg/L. An alert status metric tuned to the current monitoring protocol was generated using modeled water quality to illustrate how the remote sensing tools can inform a public health monitoring system. Among the sensors utilized in this study, Landsat 8 OLI holds the most promise for providing exposure information across a wide area given the resolutions, systematic observation strategy and free cost. PMID:26389930

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Briefing: HST Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video release presents a broad overview of the science that is now possible as a result of the servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Dr. Ed Weiler (HST Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters), Dr. Dave Leckrone (HST, Senior Project Scientist, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)), Dr. John Trauger (Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) Principal Investigator, Jet Propulsion Lab. (JPL)), Dr. Chris Burrows (WFPC2 Co-Investigator, Space Telescope Science Inst.(STSci)-European Space Agency (ESA), Jim Crocker ((Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement) COSTAR Team Leader, STSci), Dr. Holland Ford (COSTAR Project Scientist, Johns Hopkins Univ., STSci), and Dr. Duccio Machetto (European Space Agency (ESA)) give brief presentations, which feature images of stars and galaxies taken from the ground, from WFPC1 (prior to the servicing mission), and from WFPC2 (after the servicing mission). The main theme of the discussions center around the spherical aberration that was found in the images prior to servicing and the corrected images seen without the aberration following servicing. A question and answer period rounds out the press conference, with questions posed from scientific journalists at GSFC and other NASA centers.

  9. New Results in Black Hole Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Bernard F.

    Brief statements are given on recent results in the following areas: 1) The derivation of a variational (maximum) principle for black hole entropy, and an outline of the physically reasonable properties of the related solution for the density of states in the microcanonical equilibrium ensemble (with Jeffrey Melmed, University of Maine). 2) Analysis of topological contributions to black hole entropy in Lovelock gravity, and the corresponding thermodynamic identity (with Jonathan Z. Simon, University of Maryland). 3) Stability analysis for a shell of matter surrounding a black hole in microcanonical (thermal) equilibrium (with Gerald Horwitz, Hebrew University, Jerusalem)—results from this work can be compared with an earlier analysis of the purely mechanical stability of the shell, and with known properties of both the dynamical and thermal stability for the black hole without a shell. 4) The study of a simple ‘singularity'-free model of gravitational collapse, and an examination of the relationship between the ensuing preservation of quantum coherence and the usual perception that mixed states should be associated with the late time emission of Hawking radiation from a classically formed black hole (with Gerard ’t Hooft and Chris Stephens, University of Utrecht).

  10. Conference Scene: Induced pluripotent cells: a new path for regenerative medicine. 7 October 2010, BioPark, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, Hélène S G

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are embryonic stem-like cells derived from adult tissues, have the broadest differentiation potential. These cells are unique in their ability to self-renew, to be maintained in an undifferentiated state for long periods of culturing and to give rise to many different cell lineages including germ-line cells. They therefore represent an invaluable tool for facilitating research towards the realization of regenerative medicine. The recent developments in embryonic stem cell and iPS cell technology have allowed human cell models to be developed that will hopefully provide novel platforms for disease analysis not only at the basic science level, but also for drug discovery and screening, and other clinical applications. This 1-day conference, chaired by Professor Peter Andrews from the University of Sheffield, UK, and Dr Chris Denning from the University of Nottingham, UK, focused on generation of iPS cells, their differentiation into specific fates and applications to disease modeling. It consisted of 11 talks by UK-based and international researchers, and three posters; Ms Azra Fatima from Cologne University, Germany, won the competition for her poster on the derivation of iPS cells from a patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. PMID:21175284

  11. STS-74 clears the tower (front view)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis breaks free from its Earthly ties and soars toward the stars. The five astronauts assigned to Mission STS-74 are headed for an historic rendezvous in space: the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 7:30:43.071 a.m. EST, Nov. 12. The mission commander is Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot, and the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr., and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. The profile of Mission STS-74 represents a direct precursor to the types of activities flight crews will carry out during assembly and operation of the international space station later this decade. During their eight-day spaceflight, the crew will deliver a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir. The Docking Module will be attached to the docking port on Mir's Kristall module to serve as a permanent extension to the station to simplify future linkups with the Shuttle. The Shuttle astronauts and the three cosmonauts on Mir also will transfer logistics materials to and from Mir.

  12. STS-74 clears tower (45 degree view thru trees)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis breaks free from its Earthly ties and soars toward the stars. The five astronauts assigned to Mission STS-74 are headed for an historic rendezvous in space: the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 7:30:43.071 a.m. EST, Nov. 12. The mission commander is Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot, and the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr., and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. The profile of Mission STS-74 represents a direct precursor to the types of activities flight crews will carry out during assembly and operation of the international space station later this decade. During their eight-day spaceflight, the crew will deliver a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir. The Docking Module will be attached to the docking port on Mir's Kristall module to serve as a permanent extension to the station to simplify future linkups with the Shuttle. The Shuttle astronauts and the three cosmonauts on Mir also will transfer logistics materials to and from Mir.

  13. STS-74 liftoff (across water thru trees)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis breaks free from its Earthly ties and soars toward the stars. The five astronauts assigned to Mission STS-74 are headed for an historic rendezvous in space: the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 7:30:43.071 a.m. EST, Nov. 12. The mission commander is Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot, and the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr., and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. The profile of Mission STS-74 represents a direct precursor to the types of activities flight crews will carry out during assembly and operation of the international space station later this decade. During their eight-day spaceflight, the crew will deliver a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir. The Docking Module will be attached to the docking port on Mir's Kristall module to serve as a permanent extension to the station to simplify future linkups with the Shuttle. The Shuttle astronauts and the three cosmonauts on Mir also will transfer logistics materials to and from Mir.

  14. STS-74 liftoff (45 degree view across water)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis breaks free from its Earthly ties and soars toward the stars. The five astronauts assigned to Mission STS-74 are headed for an historic rendezvous in space: the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 7:30:43.071 a.m. EST, Nov. 12. The mission commander is Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot, and the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr., and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. The profile of Mission STS-74 represents a direct precursor to the types of activities flight crews will carry out during assembly and operation of the international space station later this decade. During their eight-day spaceflight, the crew will deliver a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir. The Docking Module will be attached to the docking port on Mir's Kristall module to serve as a permanent extension to the station to simplify future linkups with the Shuttle. The Shuttle astronauts and the three cosmonauts on Mir also will transfer logistics materials to and from Mir.

  15. STS-74 clears the tower (side view)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis breaks free from its Earthly ties and soars toward the stars. The five astronauts assigned to Mission STS-74 are headed for an historic rendezvous in space: the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 7:30:43.071 a.m. EST, Nov. 12. The mission commander is Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot, and the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr., and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. The profile of Mission STS-74 represents a direct precursor to the types of activities flight crews will carry out during assembly and operation of the international space station later this decade. During their eight-day spaceflight, the crew will deliver a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir. The Docking Module will be attached to the docking port on Mir's Kristall module to serve as a permanent extension to the station to simplify future linkups with the Shuttle. The Shuttle astronauts and the three cosmonauts on Mir also will transfer logistics materials to and from Mir.

  16. Few-body physics for bosonic and fermionic dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujun

    2012-06-01

    This invited talk, coauthored by Jose D'Incao and Chris Greene, will review our theoretical evidence that predicts an Efimov effect for three interacting bosonic polar molecules. Interestingly, the hyperspherical coordinate treatment shows a universal barrier which implies that the three-body parameter is rather accurately known in terms of the dipole length. It was not a foregone conclusion that three bosonic dipoles would exhibit Efimov physics, given that the original derivation and also subsequent work was for systems with short-range interactions only, and moreover, for systems having conserved angular momentum. Despite the fact that neither of these properties holds for three bosonic dipoles oriented in an external electric field, Efimov physics emerges naturally. For three fermionic dipoles in the same spin substate, on the other hand, there is no Efimov effect, but there is a single universal bound (or quasi-bound) state predicted to occur. Conditions under which these novel 3-dipole states could be observed experimentally will be discussed at the meeting.

  17. A compact imaging spectrometer (COMIS) for the microsatellite STSAT3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. W.; Kang, K. I.; Jang, T. S.; Yang, H. S.; Han, W.; Park, J. O.; Rhee, S. W.

    2007-10-01

    STSAT-3, a ~150kg micro satellite, is the third experimental microsatellite of the STSAT series designated in the Long- Term Plan for Korea's Space Development by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Korea. The STSAT-3 satellite was initiated in October 2006 and will be launched into a lower sun-synchronous earth orbit (~ 700km) in 2010. This paper presents a brief introduction of STSAT-3 and also introduces its secondary payload, i.e. COMIS, a compact imaging spectrometer, which was inspired by the success of CHRIS, a previous PROBA payload. COMIS takes hyperspectral images of 30m/60m ground sampling distance over a 30km swath width. The number of bands is selectable among 18 or 62. COMIS takes hyper-spectral images in two different modes: a) Pushbroom and b) multi-directional observation. The payload will be used for environmental monitoring, such as in-land water quality monitoring of Paldang Lake located next to Seoul, the capital of South Korea.

  18. Unscientific America: What's the Problem? What's the Solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, C.

    2012-08-01

    It's a staggering paradox. Thee United States has the finest universities in the world and invests more money in scientific research than any other nation. Yet we're allowing ourselves to fall behind in science education, and behind other countries like China, in green energy innovation. Meanwhile, most Americans know very little about science, and often don't even understand what they're missing - or why science matters to their lives. No wonder we have unending battles over the science of global warming, the teaching of evolution, and whether or not to vaccinate our children. How could the U.S. become so...unscientific? And what can we do about it? How can we make science popular again, or even...sexy? In this talk, Chris Mooney explains the reasons for the gap between science and the U.S. public, and what we can do to bring these two worlds - both of which need the other - back together again.

  19. Checklist of the terrestrial vertebrates of the Guiana Shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2005-01-01

    Distributions are given for 1850 species of terrestrial vertebrates in the Guiana Shield region of northeastern South America, with introductory text by the authors of each section. Distributions cover the three Guianas (Guyana, Surinam, and French Guiana), and the states of the Venezuelan Guayna (Amazonas, Bolivar, and Delta Amacuro), and in some cases the states of the Brazilian portion of the Guiana Shield (Amazonas, Roraima, Para, and Amapa), and the Colombian portion of the Guiana Shield. The first section is a checklist of amphibians of the Guiana Shield, by J. Celsa Sefiaris and Ross MacCulloch, detailing the distribution of 269 species. The second section is a checklist of the reptiles of the Guiana Shield by Teresa C. S. de Avila Pires, detailing the distribution of 295 species. The third section is a checklist of the birds of the Guiana Shield, by Chris Milensky, Wiltshire Hinds, Alexandre Aleixo, and Maria de Fatima C. Lima, detailing the distribution of 1004 species. The fourth section is a checklist of the mammals of the Guiana Shield, by Burton K. Lim, Mark D. Engstrom, and Jose Ochoa G., detailing the distribution of 282 species.

  20. MS/MS-based networking and peptidogenomics guided genome mining revealed the stenothricin gene cluster in Streptomyces roseosporus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Ting; Lamsa, Anne; Wong, Weng Ruh; Boudreau, Paul D.; Kersten, Roland; Peng, Yao; Moree, Wilna J.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Moore, Bradley S.; Gerwick, William H.; Linington, Roger G.; Pogliano, Kit; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2014-01-01

    Most (75%) of the anti-infectives that save countless lives and enormously improve quality of life originate from microbes found in nature. Herein, we described a global visualization of the detectable molecules produced from a single microorganism, which we define as the ‘molecular network’ of that organism, followed by studies to characterize the cellular effects of antibacterial molecules. We demonstrate that Streptomyces roseosporus produces at least four non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-derived molecular families and their gene subnetworks (daptomycin, arylomycin, napsamycin and stenothricin) were identified with different modes of action. A number of previously unreported analogs involving truncation, glycosylation, hydrolysis and biosynthetic intermediates and/or shunt products were also captured and visualized by creation of a map through MS/MS networking. The diversity of antibacterial compounds produced by S. roseosporus highlights the importance of developing new approaches to characterize the molecular capacity of an organism in a more global manner. This allows one to more deeply interrogate the biosynthetic capacities of microorganisms with the goal to streamline the discovery pipeline for biotechnological applications in agriculture and medicine. This is a contribution to a special issue to honor Chris Walsh’s amazing career. PMID:24149839

  1. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-09-01

    The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

  2. When combinatorial processing results in reconceptualization: toward a new approach of compositionality

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Petra B.

    2013-01-01

    Propositional content is often incomplete but comprehenders appear to adjust meaning and add unarticulated meaning constituents effortlessly. This happens at the propositional level (The baby drank the bottle) but also at the phrasal level (the wooden turtle). In two ERP experiments, combinatorial processing was investigated in container/content alternations and adjective-noun combination transforming an animate entity into a physical object. Experiment 1 revealed that container-for-content alternations (The baby drank the bottle) engendered a Late Positivity on the critical expression and on the subsequent segment, while content-for-container alternations (Chris put the beer on the table) did not exert extra costs. In Experiment 2, adjective-noun combinations (the wooden turtle) also evoked a Late Positivity on the critical noun. First, the Late Positivities are taken to reflect discourse updating demands resulting from reference shift from the original denotation to the contextually appropriate interpretation (e.g., the reconceptualization form animal to physical object). This shift is supported by the linguistic unavailability of the original meaning, exemplified by copredication tests. Second, the data reveal that meaning alternations differ qualitatively. Some alternations involve (cost-free) meaning selection, while others engender processing demands associated with reconceptualization. This dissociation thus calls for a new typology of metonymic shifts that centers around the status of the involved discourse referents. PMID:24098293

  3. Selective conservatism in trauma management: a South African contribution.

    PubMed

    Clarke, D L; Thomson, S R; Madiba, T E; Muckart, D J J

    2005-08-01

    Trauma in South Africa has been termed the malignant epidemic. This heritage was the result of a violent colonial legacy which spawned the apartheid system of injustice and the struggle against it The Apartheid regime created overcrowding, unemployment, social stagnation, and the disruption of normal family life. These were the catalysts for the incredible amount of criminal and interpersonal conflict in South Africa over the last 50 years. African townships such as Soweto in Johannesburg and Umlazi in Durban were crime-ridden ghettoes where the apartheid police were more interested in fueling the "black on black" violence rather than trying to curb it. Baragwanath (Chris Hani-Baragwanath) and King Edward the VIII Hospital in Durban were the "trauma care epicenters" on the fringes of these huge urban conurbations. Both were designated black hospitals and both were underfunded and dilapidated. Even the architecture was similar, with prefabricated, poorly ventilated structures serving as wards and clinics in both institutions. Trauma volumes consisted of between 10 and 20 laparotomies on weekend nights at the height of political unrest. This led to vast individual experience in several areas of trauma typified by Demetriades' experience with 70 penetrating cardiac injuries. In this setting of limited resources and an overwhelming volume of trauma, selective conservatism as a surgical philosophy took root and has profoundly influenced the way the world manages trauma. We detail and illustrate the evolution of this approach and its continued application. PMID:15983718

  4. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudritz, Ralph; Higgs, Paul; Stone, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life: 1. Observations of extrasolar planetary systems Shay Zucker; 2. The atmospheres of extrasolar planets L. Jeremy Richardson and Sara Seager; 3. Terrestrial planet formation Edward Thommes; 4. Protoplanetary disks, amino acids and the genetic code Paul Higgs and Ralph Pudritz; 5. Emergent phenomena in biology: the origin of cellular life David Deamer; Part II. Life on Earth: 6. Extremophiles: defining the envelope for the search for life in the Universe Lynn Rothschild; 7. Hyperthermophilic life on Earth - and on Mars? Karl Stetter; 8. Phylogenomics: how far back in the past can we go? Henner Brinkmann, Denis Baurain and Hervé Philippe; 9. Horizontal gene transfer, gene histories and the root of the tree of life Olga Zhaxybayeva and J. Peter Gogarten; 10. Evolutionary innovation versus ecological incumbency Adolf Seilacher; 11. Gradual origins for the Metazoans Alexandra Pontefract and Jonathan Stone; Part III. Life in the Solar System?: 12. The search for life on Mars Chris McKay; 13. Life in the dark dune spots of Mars: a testable hypothesis Eörs Szathmary, Tibor Ganti, Tamas Pocs, Andras Horvath, Akos Kereszturi, Szaniszlo Berzci and Andras Sik; 14. Titan: a new astrobiological vision from the Cassini-Huygens data François Raulin; 15. Europa, the Ocean Moon: tides, permeable ice, and life Richard Greenberg; Index.

  5. Research on Streamlines and Aerodynamic Heating for Unstructured Grids on High-Speed Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeJarnette, Fred R.; Hamilton, H. Harris (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Engineering codes are needed which can calculate convective heating rates accurately and expeditiously on the surfaces of high-speed vehicles. One code which has proven to meet these needs is the Langley Approximate Three-Dimensional Convective Heating (LATCH) code. It uses the axisymmetric analogue in an integral boundary-layer method to calculate laminar and turbulent heating rates along inviscid surface streamlines. It requires the solution of the inviscid flow field to provide the surface properties needed to calculate the streamlines and streamline metrics. The LATCH code has been used with inviscid codes which calculated the flow field on structured grids, Several more recent inviscid codes calculate flow field properties on unstructured grids. The present research develops a method to calculate inviscid surface streamlines, the streamline metrics, and heating rates using the properties calculated from inviscid flow fields on unstructured grids. Mr. Chris Riley, prior to his departure from NASA LaRC, developed a preliminary code in the C language, called "UNLATCH", to accomplish these goals. No publication was made on his research. The present research extends and improves on the code developed by Riley. Particular attention is devoted to the stagnation region, and the method is intended for programming in the FORTRAN 90 language.

  6. Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

  7. The second Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), Chris Voorhees (left) and Satish Krishnan (right), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, remove the second Mars microprobe from a drum. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  8. The first Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory open the drums containing the Mars microprobes that will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander. From left, they are Satish Krishnan, Charles Cruzan, Chris Voorhees and Arden Acord. Scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  9. An analysis of United States K-12 stem education versus STEM workforce at the dawn of the digital revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Franca

    The world is at the dawn of a third industrial revolution, the digital revolution, that brings great changes the world over. Today, computing devices, the Internet, and the World Wide Web are vital technology tools that affect every aspect of everyday life and success. While computing technologies offer enormous benefits, there are equally enormous safety and security risks that have been growing exponentially since they became widely available to the public in 1994. Cybercriminals are increasingly implementing sophisticated and serious hack attacks and breaches upon our nation's government, financial institutions, organizations, communities, and private citizens. There is a great need for computer scientists to carry America's innovation and economic growth forward and for cybersecurity professionals to keep our nation safe from criminal hacking. In this digital age, computer science and cybersecurity are essential foundational ingredients of technological innovation, economic growth, and cybersecurity that span all industries. Yet, America's K-12 education institutions are not teaching the computer science and cybersecurity skills required to produce a technologically-savvy 21st century workforce. Education is the key to preparing students to enter the workforce and, therefore, American K-12 STEM education must be reformed to accommodate the teachings required in the digital age. Keywords: Cybersecurity Education, Cybersecurity Education Initiatives, Computer Science Education, Computer Science Education Initiatives, 21 st Century K-12 STEM Education Reform, 21st Century Digital Literacies, High-Tech Innovative Problem-Solving Skills, 21st Century Digital Workforce, Standardized Testing, Foreign Language and Culture Studies, Utica College, Professor Chris Riddell.

  10. Validation Of The Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System By The Field Data Of ESA SPARC Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernetskiy, Maxim; Gomez-Dans, Jose; Lewis, Philip

    2013-12-01

    The Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System (EO-LDAS) project is uses the weak constraint variational data assimilation (DA) technique for the estimation of land surface parameters and their uncertainties by the remote sensing data. The main goal of the project is to make full use of different sources of optical sensors data, to provide improved estimation of structural and biophysical parameters of land surface. Therefore a software tool - the EO-LDAS prototype - was developed. Within the frame of this work, the possibilities of EO- LDAS have been demonstrated for MERIS/Envisat and CHRIS/Proba data acquired during ESA SPARC 2004 field campaign over an agricultural test-site near Barrax (Spain). We have used a regularization approach and conditions of spatial smoothness in order to better constrain the problem. The EO-LDAS prototype has been used to implement the weak constrain data assimilation (DA) system, to estimate leaf area index (LAI) and Chlorophyll (a + b) concentration as well as their uncertainties.

  11. MeshVoro: A three-dimensional Voronoi mesh building tool for the TOUGH family of codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, C. M.; Boyle, K. L.; Reagan, M.; Johnson, J.; Rycroft, C.; Moridis, G. J.

    2014-09-01

    Few tools exist for creating and visualizing complex three-dimensional simulation meshes, and these have limitations that restrict their application to particular geometries and circumstances. Mesh generation needs to trend toward ever more general applications. To that end, we have developed MeshVoro, a tool that is based on the Voro++ (Chris H. Rycroft, 2009. Chaos 19, 041111) library and is capable of generating complex three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation-based (unstructured) meshes for the solution of problems of flow and transport in subsurface geologic media that are addressed by the TOUGH (Pruess, K., Oldenburg C., Moridis G., 1999. Report LBNL-43134, 582. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA) family of codes. MeshVoro, which includes built-in data visualization routines, is a particularly useful tool because it extends the applicability of the TOUGH family of codes by enabling the scientifically robust and relatively easy discretization of systems with challenging 3D geometries. We describe several applications of MeshVoro. We illustrate the ability of the tool to straightforwardly transform a complex geological grid into a simulation mesh that conforms to the specifications of the TOUGH family of codes. We demonstrate how MeshVoro can describe complex system geometries with a relatively small number of grid blocks, and we construct meshes for geometries that would have been practically intractable with a standard Cartesian grid approach. We also discuss the limitations and appropriate applications of this new technology.

  12. Promoting inclusive education, civic scientific literacy, and global citizenship with videogames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Hayes, Michael T.

    2012-12-01

    In this response to Yupanqui Munoz and Charbel El-Hani's paper, "The student with a thousand faces: From the ethics in videogames to becoming a citizen", we examine their critique of videogames in science education. Munoz and El-Hani present a critical analysis of videogames such as Grand Theft Auto, Street Fight, Command and Conquer: Generals, Halo, and Fallout 3 using Neil Postman's (1993) conceptualization of technopoly along with Bill Green and Chris Bigum's (1993) notion of the cyborg curriculum. Our contention is that these games are not representative of current educational videogames about science, which hold the potential to enhance civic scientific literacy across a diverse range of students while promoting cross-cultural understandings of complex scientific concepts and phenomenon. We examine games that have undergone empirical investigation in general education science classrooms, such as River City, Quest Atlantis, Whyville, Resilient Planet, and You Make Me Sick!, and discuss the ways these videogames can engage students and teachers in a constructivist dialogue that enhances science education. Our critique extends Munoz and El-Hani's discussion through an examination of the ways videogames can enhance science education by promoting inclusive education, civic scientific literacy, and global citizenship.

  13. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Technologies of national importance, by Tsutomu Ohkubo, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan; Modeling and simulation advances brighten future nuclear power, by Hussein Khalil, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy and desalination projects, by Ratan Kumar Sinha, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India; A plant with simplified design, by John Higgins, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; A forward thinking design, by Ray Ganthner, AREVA; A passively safe design, by Ed Cummins, Westinghouse Electric Company; A market-ready design, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada; Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, by Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France, and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory; Innovative reactor designs, a report by IAEA, Vienna, Austria; Guidance for new vendors, by John Nakoski, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Road map for future energy, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria; and, Vermont's largest source of electricity, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Intelligent monitoring technology, by Chris Demars, Exelon Nuclear.

  14. The 4850 cm^{-1} Spectral Region of CO_2: Constrained Multispectrum Nonlinear Least Squares Fitting Including Line Mixing, Speed Dependent Line Profiles and Fermi Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Nugent, Emily; Brown, Linda R.; Miller, Charles E.; Toth, Robert A.; Sung, Keeyoon

    2009-06-01

    Room temperature spectra of carbon dioxide were obtained with the Fourier transform spectrometers at the National Solar Observatory's McMath-Pierce telescope and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique is being used to derive accurate spectral line parameters for the strongest CO_2 bands in the 4700-4930 cm^{-1} spectral region. Positions of the spectral lines were constrained to their quantum mechanical relationships, and the rovibrational constants were derived directly from the fit. Similarly, the intensities of the lines within each of the rovibrational bands were constrained to their quantum mechanical relationships, and the band strength and Herman-Wallis coefficients were derived directly from the fit. These constraints even include a pair of interacting bands with the interaction coefficient derived directly using both the positions and intensities of the spectral lines. Room temperature self and air Lorentz halfwidth and pressure induced line shift coefficients are measured for most lines. Constraints upon the positions improve measurement of pressure-induced shifts, and constraints on the intensities improve the measurement of the Lorentz halfwidths. Line mixing and speed dependent line shapes are also required and characterized. D. Chris Benner, C.P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M.A.H. Smith, and D. Atkins, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 53, 705-721 (1995)

  15. Line Parameters of Ethane (12C_2H_6) at 12 μm with Constrained Multispectrum Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Sams, R. L.; Blake, T. A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Mantz, A. W.

    2010-06-01

    A multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique was applied to simultaneously fit 43 infrared absorption spectra of C_2H_6 between 795 and 850 cm-1. The high resolution (0.0016-0.005 cm-1) spectra were recorded with two different Bruker Fourier transform spectrometers at PNNL and JPL to support Earth and planetary atmosphere studies, e.g. Titan's cold stratosphere. Accurate line positions and absolute intensities at room temperature were retrieved for over 1750 transitions of ν_9. N_2- and self-broadened halfwidth coefficients with their temperature dependences were obtained for over 1330 lines using sample temperatures between ˜150 and 298 K. Constraints to intensity ratios, torsional splittings, halfwidth coefficients and their temperature dependence exponents were incorporated in the analysis to determine these parameters for both torsional split components. The variations of the observed halfwidth coefficients and their temperature dependences with respect to J, K quanta are discussed. No pressure-induced shifts were measured or even required to fit the spectra to their noise levels. Present results are compared with previously reported measurements and predictions. D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. M. Devi, M. A. H. Smith, and D. A. Atkins, JQSRT 1995;53:705-21. Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, the College of William and Mary, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley Research Center under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. KSC-03PD-0272

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Don Maxwell, Safety, United Space Alliance, checks a map of Texas during a meeting of the Recovery Management Team at KSC. The team is part of the investigation into the accident that claimed orbiter Columbia and her crew of seven on Feb. 1, 2003, over East Texas as they returned to Earth after a 16-day research mission. Other team members are Russ DeLoach, chief, Shuttle Mission Assurance Branch, NASA; George Jacobs, Shuttle Engineering; Jeff Campbell, Shuttle Engineering; Dave Rainer, Launch and Landing Operations; the two co-chairs of the Response Management Team, Denny Gagen, Landing Recovery Manager, Chris Hasselbring, Landing Operations, USA; and Larry Ulmer, Safety, NASA. The team is coordinating KSC technical support and assets to the Mishap Investigation Team in Barksdale, La., and providing support for the Recovery teams in Los Angeles, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. In addition, the team is following up on local leads pertaining to potential debris in the KSC area. .

  17. US poised to outlaw late abortion technique.

    PubMed

    Bozalis, D

    1995-11-18

    The House of Representatives passed a bill, by a two-thirds majority (288-139), prohibiting late (at 19-20 weeks gestation) abortion using intrauterine cranial decompression. The bill now awaits judgment from the Senate Judiciary Committee for hearings. If the bill becomes law, physicians performing the procedure could face up to two years in prison. Chris Smith, Republican cochairman of the House Pro-Life Caucus, who introduced the bill in the House, described the vote as historic. During his emotional speech, the procedure was described in order to desanitize a form of abortion that he called barbaric torture. Patricia Schroeder, Colorado House Representative, argued that the wording of the bill allowed the procedure only when it was the only possible way of saving the mother's life; the woman's health and future fertility were, in effect, set aside. There is no exception clause for when the woman's life or health is endangered. Schroeder fears women will be forced to choose more dangerous methods of abortion and believes more discussion is required regarding health risks and a more precise definition of when the procedure may be used. She is joined by the California Medical Association, the American Medical Women's Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, and the American Medical Association. PMID:7496271

  18. Genome increase as a clock for the origin and evolution of life

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A

    2006-01-01

    Background The size of non-redundant functional genome can be an indicator of biological complexity of living organisms. Several positive feedback mechanisms including gene cooperation and duplication with subsequent specialization may result in the exponential growth of biological complexity in macro-evolution. Results I propose a hypothesis that biological complexity increased exponentially during evolution. Regression of the logarithm of functional non-redundant genome size versus time of origin in major groups of organisms showed a 7.8-fold increase per 1 billion years, and hence the increase of complexity can be viewed as a clock of macro-evolution. A strong version of the exponential hypothesis is that the rate of complexity increase in early (pre-prokaryotic) evolution of life was at most the same (or even slower) than observed in the evolution of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Conclusion The increase of functional non-redundant genome size in macro-evolution was consistent with the exponential hypothesis. If the strong exponential hypothesis is true, then the origin of life should be dated 10 billion years ago. Thus, the possibility of panspermia as a source of life on earth should be discussed on equal basis with alternative hypotheses of de-novo life origin. Panspermia may be proven if bacteria similar to terrestrial ones are found on other planets or satellites in the solar system. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V. Koonin, Chris Adami and Arcady Mushegian. PMID:16768805

  19. Period Evolution of Double White Dwarf Binaries Under the Influence of Gravitational Wave Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kylee; Benacquista, Matt; Belczynski, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects, such as Double White Dwarf (DWD) binaries, are the most populous producers of gravitational waves (GW) at low frequencies. The gravitational radiation (GR) emitted from the Galactic DWD binary population will create an unresolvable signal known as the confusion noise-limit (CNL) in the space-based evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA). It is predicted that many thousand DWD binary signals will rise above the CNL and create resolvable GW signals. In previous work, Heather Johnson, from the University of Texas-Austin, produced ~61 million DWD systems using the binary population features in the StarTrack population synthesis code created by Chris Belczynski. We have created an evolutionary code that continues the period evolution of the DWD binaries under the effects of GR. Our present model only accounts for detached binary systems, but we are working on incorporating more features. Current period evolution models often extrapolate data based on smaller binary populations, however our model will utilize ~61 million binary systems in order to avoid inaccuracies.We then use two standard cylindrical density distributions to populate a galaxy with the evolved systems. We also discuss correlations between the progenitor binaries and the eLISA sources.

  20. The Hammer Award is presented to KSC and 45th Space Wing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, the Hammer Award is presented to Kennedy Space Center and the 45th Space Wing. Among the attendees in the audience are (center) Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr., flanked by (at left) Commander of the 45th Space Wing Brig. Gen. F. Randall Starbuck and (at right) Commander of the Air Force Space Command General Richard B. Myers. Standing second from right is NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin. At the far right is Morley Winograd, director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government, who presented the award. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J- BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Ed Gormel and Chris Fairey, co-chairs of the SEB, accepted the awards for the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base.

  1. STS-74 landing after nose wheel touchdown (front view)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The highly successful Mission STS-74 comes to a smooth conclusion as the orbiter Atlantis returns to Kennedy Space Center. Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 of the Shuttle Landing Facility at 12:01:27 p.m. EST, November 20. The final Space Shuttle flight of 1995 marked the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. To simplify the remaining five Shuttle-Mir docking currently scheduled, the five astronauts on Atlantis attached a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir during the eight-day mission. Two solar arrays were stowed on the module, which will serve as a permanent extension to the Kristall docking port on the station. Atlantis' crew and the three cosmonauts on Mir also transferred materials to and from the station. Leading the STS-74 crew is Commander Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot; the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr. and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. This was the 27th end-of-mission landing at KSC in Shuttle program history. The Shuttle-Mir dockings are one aspect of Phase 1 activities leading the way toward the international space station; the United States, Russian, Canada, Japan and a group of European nations have joined together to build the orbiting outpost in space later this decade.

  2. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    SLOPOS-12 included: Positron Interactions with Surfaces Positron Beam and Detector Technology Positron Interactions with Atoms and Molecules Positronium Science Defects and Vacancies in Materials Porosity and Open Volume in Materials Antimatter in Biomedical Science Anti-hydrogen Studies Positron Transport Annihilation On a sad note, delegates paid tribute to the contributions of one of our colleagues, Chris Beling, who tragically passed away shortly before the meeting. Chris' contributions to positron science and to the education of young scientists were noted in a number of the invited presentations. It is an honour for our community to begin these proceedings with a short tribute to Chris' life by Professor Paul Coleman. The Workshop could not have occurred without the generous support of our sponsors: The ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, The Australian National University, Flinders University, James Cook University, The Institute of Physics (UK) and the Australian Government's Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. It would also not have been possible without the hard work of the Local and International Organising Committees and the friendly and efficient staff at the All Seasons Resort, Magnetic Island. We are most grateful for the on-site assistance of Gillian Drew, the CAMS student and postdoc team, the financial wizardry of Chris Kalos, and the post-Workshop editorial assistance of Julia Wee and Adam Edwards. Finally we would like to thank all of the attendees at SLOPOS12 for their scientific contributions to the Workshop, and for the warm spirit of engagement which characterised the scientific discussions and social occasions. SLOPOS13 will be held in Germany in 2013 and we all look forward to the occasion. Stephen Buckman, James Sullivan and Ronald White(Guest Editors) Local Organising CommitteeInternational Committee Stephen Buckman (Chair, ANU, Canberra)G Amarendra (India) James Sullivan (Secretary, ANU, Canberra)M-F Barthe (France

  3. Conference Committees: Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Günther Schmahl University Göttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

  4. The Max Rover submersible is tested at the Trident pier, Port Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Thomas Lippitt of NASA's Advanced Systems Development (ASD) laboratory observes robotic operations as Chris Nicholson, owner of Deep Sea Systems, and Bill Jones of NASA's ASD laboratory operate the unmanned robotic submersible recovery system, known as Max Rover, during a test of the system at the Trident Pier at Port Canaveral. The submersible is seen in the water with the Diver Operated Plug (DOP). Kennedy Space Center's solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval team and ASD laboratory staff hope that the new robotic technology will make the process of inserting the plug safer and less strenuous. Currently, scuba divers manually insert the DOP into the aft nozzle of a jettisoned SRB 60 to 70 feet below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. After the plug is installed, water is pumped out of the booster allowing it to float horizontally. It is then towed back to Hangar AF at Cape Canaveral Air Station for refurbishment. Deep Sea Systems of Falmouth, Mass., built the submersible for NASA.

  5. STS-74 liftoff (front view across water with bird)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis breaks free from its Earthly ties and soars toward the stars. The five astronauts assigned to Mission STS-74 are headed for an historic rendezvous in space: the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 7:30:43.071 a.m. EST, Nov. 12. The mission commander is Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot, and the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr., and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. The profile of Mission STS-74 represents a direct precursor to the types of activities flight crews will carry out during assembly and operation of the international space station later this decade. During their eight-day spaceflight, the crew will deliver a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir. The Docking Module will be attached to the docking port on Mir's Kristall module to serve as a permanent extension to the station to simplify future linkups with the Shuttle. The Shuttle astronauts and the three cosmonauts on Mir also will transfer logistics materials to and from Mir.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: FAMA code for stellar parameters and abundances (Magrini+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, L.; Randich, S.; Friel, E.; Spina, L.; Jacobson, H.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Donati, P.; Baglioni, R.; Maiorca, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Sordo, R.; Vallenari, A.

    2013-07-01

    FAMA v.1, July 2013, distributed with MOOGv2013 and Kurucz models. Perl Codes: read_out2.pl read_final.pl driver.pl sclipping_26.0.pl sclipping_final.pl sclipping_26.1.pl confronta.pl fama.pl Model atmopheres and interpolator (Kurucz models): MODEL_ATMO MOOG_files: files to compile MOOG (the most recent version of MOOG can be obtained from http://www.as.utexas.edu/~chris/moog.html) FAMAmoogfiles: files to update when compiling MOOG OUTPUT: directory in which the results will be stored, contains a sm macro to produce final plots automoog.par: files with parameters for FAMA 1) OUTPUTdir 2) MOOGdir 3) modelsdir 4) 1.0 (default) percentage of the dispersion of FeI abundances to be considered to compute the errors on the stellar parameters, 1.0 means 100%, thus to compute e.g., the error on Teff we allow to code to find the Teff corresponding to a slope given by σ(FeI)/range(EP). 5) 1.2 (default) σ clipping for FeI lines 6) 1.0 (default) σ clipping for FeII lines 7) 1.0 (default) σ clipping for the other elements 8) 1.0 (default) value of the QP parameter, higher values mean less strong convergence criteria. star.iron: EWs in the correct format to test the code sun.par: initial parameters for the test (1 data file).

  7. New spectral vegetation indices based on the near-infrared shoulder wavelengths for remote detection of grassland phytomass.

    PubMed

    Vescovo, Loris; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Balzarolo, Manuela; Pilloni, Sebastian; Sottocornola, Matteo; Rodeghiero, Mirco; Gianelle, Damiano

    2012-04-10

    This article examines the possibility of exploiting ground reflectance in the near-infrared (NIR) for monitoring grassland phytomass on a temporal basis. Three new spectral vegetation indices (infrared slope index, ISI; normalized infrared difference index, NIDI; and normalized difference structural index, NDSI), which are based on the reflectance values in the H25 (863-881 nm) and the H18 (745-751 nm) Chris Proba (mode 5) bands, are proposed. Ground measurements of hyperspectral reflectance and phytomass were made at six grassland sites in the Italian and Austrian mountains using a hand-held spectroradiometer. At full canopy cover, strong saturation was observed for many traditional vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), modified simple ratio (MSR), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI 2), renormalized difference vegetation index (RDVI), wide dynamic range vegetation index (WDRVI)). Conversely, ISI and NDSI were linearly related to grassland phytomass with negligible inter-annual variability. The relationships between both ISI and NDSI and phytomass were however site specific. The WinSail model indicated that this was mostly due to grassland species composition and background reflectance. Further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of these indices (e.g. using multispectral specific sensors) for monitoring vegetation structural biophysical variables in other ecosystem types and to test these relationships with aircraft and satellite sensors data. For grassland ecosystems, we conclude that ISI and NDSI hold great promise for non-destructively monitoring the temporal variability of grassland phytomass. PMID:24347746

  8. High Fidelity Simulations of Large-Scale Wireless Networks (Plus-Up)

    SciTech Connect

    Onunkwo, Uzoma

    2015-11-01

    Sandia has built a strong reputation in scalable network simulation and emulation for cyber security studies to protect our nation’s critical information infrastructures. Georgia Tech has preeminent reputation in academia for excellence in scalable discrete event simulations, with strong emphasis on simulating cyber networks. Many of the experts in this field, such as Dr. Richard Fujimoto, Dr. George Riley, and Dr. Chris Carothers, have strong affiliations with Georgia Tech. The collaborative relationship that we intend to immediately pursue is in high fidelity simulations of practical large-scale wireless networks using ns-3 simulator via Dr. George Riley. This project will have mutual benefits in bolstering both institutions’ expertise and reputation in the field of scalable simulation for cyber-security studies. This project promises to address high fidelity simulations of large-scale wireless networks. This proposed collaboration is directly in line with Georgia Tech’s goals for developing and expanding the Communications Systems Center, the Georgia Tech Broadband Institute, and Georgia Tech Information Security Center along with its yearly Emerging Cyber Threats Report. At Sandia, this work benefits the defense systems and assessment area with promise for large-scale assessment of cyber security needs and vulnerabilities of our nation’s critical cyber infrastructures exposed to wireless communications.

  9. BRISC v.1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-01-06

    BRISC is a developmental prototype for a nextgeneration “systems-level” integrated performance and safety code (IPSC) for nuclear reactors. Its development served to demonstrate how a lightweight multi-physics coupling approach can be used to tightly couple the physics models in several different physics codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled “burner” nuclear reactor. For example, the RIO Fluid Flow and Heat transfer codemore » developed at Sandia (SNL: Chris Moen, Dept. 08005) is used in BRISC to model fluid flow and heat transfer, as well as conduction heat transfer in solids. Because BRISC is a prototype, its most practical application is as a foundation or starting point for developing a true production code. The sub-codes and the associated models and correlations currently employed within BRISC were chosen to cover the required application space and demonstrate feasibility, but were not optimized or validated against experimental data within the context of their use in BRISC.« less

  10. Temperature Dependences of Air-Broadening and Shift Parameters in the ν_3 Band of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2015-06-01

    Line parameter errors can contribute significantly to the total errors in retrievals of terrestrial atmospheric ozone concentration profiles using the strong 9.6-μm band, particularly for nadir-viewing experiments Detailed knowledge of the interfering ozone signal is also needed for retrievals of other atmospheric species in this spectral region. We have determined Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with their temperature dependences for a number of transitions in the ν_3 fundamental band of 16O_3. These results were obtained by applying the multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique to a set of 31 high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of O_3 recorded at temperatures between 160 and 300 K with several different room-temperature and coolable sample cells at the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. We compare our results with other available measurements and with the ozone line parameters in the HITRAN database. J.~Worden et al., J.~Geophys.~Res. 109 (2004) 9308-9319. R.~Beer et al., Geophys.~Res.~Lett. 35 (2008) L09801. D.~Chris Benner et al., JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. Rothman et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 130 (2013) 4. JQSRT 130 (2013) 4-50.

  11. Canadian Association of University Surgeons’ Annual Symposium. Surgical simulation: The solution to safe training or a promise unfulfilled?

    PubMed Central

    Brindley, Peter G.; Jones, Daniel B.; Grantcharov, Teodor; de Gara, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    At its 2009 annual symposium, chaired by Dr. William (Bill) Pollett, the Canadian Association of University Surgeons brought together speakers with expertise in surgery and medical education to discuss the role of surgical simulation for improving surgical training and safety. Dr. Daniel Jones, of Harvard University and the 2009 Charles Tator Lecturer, highlighted how simulation has been used to teach advanced laparoscopic surgery. He also outlined how the American College of Surgeons is moving toward competency assessments as a requirement before surgeons are permitted to perform laparoscopic surgery on patients. Dr. Teodor Grantcharov, from the University of Toronto, highlighted the role of virtual reality simulators in laparoscopic surgery as well as box trainers. Dr. Peter Brindley from the University of Alberta, although a strong proponent of simulation, cautioned against an overzealous adoption without addressing its current limitations. He also emphasized simulation’s value in team training and crisis resource management training. Dr. Chris de Gara, also from the University of Alberta, questioned to what extent simulators should be used to determine competency. He raised concerns that if technical skills are learned in isolation, they may become “decontextualized,” and therefore simulation might become counterproductive. He outlined how oversimplification can have an “enchanting” effect, including a false sense of security. As a result, simulation must be used appropriately and along the entire education continuum. Furthermore, far more needs to be done to realize its role in surgical safety. PMID:22854147

  12. Kaiser Permanente's innovation on the front lines.

    PubMed

    McCreary, Lew

    2010-09-01

    The Innovation Consultancy, a small team within the health care provider Kaiser Permanente, practices an expansive, service-focused version of innovation that is both rapid and economical in comparison with the conventional version. The team's members observe how health care providers interact with one another, with technology, and with patients, and how the patients respond. They take photographs, draw pictures, write stories, and try to capture experiences from the point of view of everyone involved. During KP MedRite, a project to reduce the error rate in dispensing medication to hospital patients, the team asked nurses what they thought was wrong with the dispensing process. The nurses usually replied, "Nothing". But when given a chance to make self-portraits, they would draw themselves with sad faces and frazzled hair. Interruptions appeared to be the leading cause of errors-so one of the resulting innovations was a bright-yellow sash signaling that its wearer was not to be disturbed. KP's Chris McCarthy founded the Innovation Learning Network to accelerate knowledge transfer among peers in the nonprofit health care industry. One promising process that has emerged, Inflection Navigator, helps patients who've received a frightening diagnosis handle the consequent urgent tasks-follow-up tests, visits to specialists, decision making about treatment and care--with the aid of care coordinators. This innovation and others like it arise from a brand of creativity that transcends the media version of the health care debate. PMID:20821969

  13. Don't Be Such a Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R.

    2006-12-01

    Academics are bad enough at communication. Science academics are worse. They think too much, they don't care about their image, they assume audiences cherish every word they say, and when the general public fails to embrace them, they blame it on the audience. This is the message of my recent documentary feature film, "Flock of Dodos: the evolution-intelligent design circus." I'm not alone with this message -- others are saying it as well. The world has changed. We live in a new media environment, and changed environments bring about new selective forces. Academic scientists are being challenged as never before, as documented in part in Chris Mooney's bestselling book, "The Republican War on Science." And they must now consider whether they need to adapt, or run the risk of going the way of the dodo. In this talk I will offer up my ten suggestions on how to more effectively reach a broader audience, and then wait for all the scientists to tell me I'm wrong.

  14. George A. Kolstad (1919-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luth, W.; Heiken, G.; Weill, D.; Wang, H.; Gilbert, C.; Mitterer, R.; Duba, A.; Goldstein, N.

    George A. Kolstad, creator and leader of the U.S. Department of Energy's Geosciences Research Program, died of an aneurysm August 7, 1996, in Baltimore, Md. He is survived by Chris, his wife of 52 years, three children, Martha Rae Kolstad Wilhelm of Grinnell, Iowa, Charles D. Kolstad of Santa Barbara, Calif., and Peter K. Kolstad, of Los Angeles, Calif., and four grandchildren. George is also survived by three brothers and a sister.George was born in Elmira, N.Y., on December 10, 1919. Following high school graduation in 1937, he worked at Eastman Kodak while enrolled in night courses at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester. He entered Bates College in 1939 and completed his B.S. in physics and mathematics in 1943. During World War II, he worked on piezo-electricity, radar countermeasures, and information flow from radar systems in combat environments. Following his Ph.D. in physics at Yale and brief service on the faculty there, he joined the Atomic Energy Commission in 1950. He began a career of fostering and nurturing basic research efforts, first in physics and mathematics, and then in the geosciences. He was a guest staff member at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, Copenhagen, in 1956-1957, and served as a trustee of Bates College from 1958 to 1964.

  15. STS-96 crew members in the white room are prepared for entry into Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-96 Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa chats with white room closeout crew members while being checked out for entry into the orbiter Discovery. At left are Mechanical Technicians Al Schmidt and Chris meinert; at right is Quality Assurance Specialist James Davis and Closeout Chief Travis Thompson. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10- day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  16. EnMAP Specific BRDF Measurements and Vegetation Indices for Low-Growing Biomes in the Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhorn, M.; Heim, B.; van der Linden, S.

    2011-12-01

    Global warming is highest in the Arctic where the tundra regions are expected to undergo pronounced changes. Remote sensing can provide spatial and temporal data on variables linked to vegetation and ecosystem processes on global scale. Specifically, hyperspectral remote sensing data can relate to Vegetation Indices (VIs), Leaf Area Index (LAI) and the fraction of Photosynthetically active Radiation (fPAR). Currently, spaceborne hyperspectral imaging data is provided by the CHRIS/PROBA and the Hyperion programs. The Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program (EnMAP), a German hyperspectral mission, is the next step in this line and will provide high spectral resolution observations with a ground sampling distance of 30 meter. The continuous spectral sampling provided by imaging spectroscopy offers the possibility to develop robust algorithms for vegetation indices in low-growing tundra biomes. Since the EnMAP sensor has pointing capabilities, both spectral and directional reflection characteristics need to be taken into account. In order to examine the influence of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) on spectral variables such as the Vegetation Indices, LAI and fPAR, we developed the EnMAP specific field goniospectrometer, EyeSight. We took part at the summer field campaign of the Earth Cryosphere Institute (RU) in 2011 on the Yamal Peninsula, Western Siberia, Russia. Field spectroscopy, vegetation and biomass analysis, and field goniometer measurements under varying sun zenith angles and moisture conditions have been conducted. The spectral measurements and BRDF measurements of the low-growing tundra are presented and discussed.

  17. STS-100 crew heads for the Astrovan to travel to Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Leaving the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-100 crew waves to well-wishers and heads to the Astrovan for transport to Launch Pad 39A. . Leading in front are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (left) and Commander Kent V. Rominger (right). Behind them are (left to right) Mission Specialists Yuri Lonchakov and Chris A. Hadfield. Next are Mission Specialists Umberto Guidoni (left) and John L. Phillips (right). Following in the rear is Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski. An international crew, Guidoni represents the European Space Agency, Lonchakov the Russian Aviation and Space Agency and Hadfield the Canadian Space Agency. Space Shuttle Endeavour and its crew will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator System and the UHF Antenna. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS, which will be performed by Parazynski and Hadfield. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  18. STS-100 crew exits the O&C to travel to Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The STS-100 crew walks out of the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to Launch Pad 39A and liftoff for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. Leading in front are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (left) and Commander Kent V. Rominger (right). Behind them are (left to right) Mission Specialists Umberto Guidoni, Yuri Lonchakov and Chris A. Hadfield. Following in the rear are Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski (left) and John L. Phillips (right). An international crew, Guidoni represents the European Space Agency, Lonchakov the Russian Aviation and Space Agency and Hadfield the Canadian Space Agency. Space Shuttle Endeavour and its crew will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator System and the UHF Antenna. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS, which will be performed by Parazynski and Hadfield. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19.

  19. Gravity Probe B Number 4 Gyro Inspected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. In this photograph, Stanford engineer, Chris Gray, is inspecting the number 4 gyro under monochromatic light. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Stanford University.)

  20. HUBBLE PICTURES SHOW HOT GAS BUBBLE EJECTED BY YOUNG STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 reveal the evolution of bubbles of glowing gas being blown out from the young binary star system XZ Tauri. Gas from an unseen disk around one or both of the stars is channeled through magnetic fields surrounding the binary system and then is forced out into space at nearly 300,000 miles per hour (540,000 kilometers per hour). This outflow, which is only about 30 years old, extends nearly 60 billion miles (96 billion kilometers). Hubble first discovered this unique bubble in 1995, and additional observations were made between 1998 and 2000. These images show that there was a dramatic change in its appearance between 1995 and 1998. In 1995, the bubble's edge was the same brightness as its interior. However, when Hubble took another look at XZ Tauri in 1998, the edge was suddenly brighter. This brightening is probably caused by the hot gas cooling off, which allows electrons in the gas to recombine with atoms, a process that gives off light. This is the first time that astronomers have seen such a cooling zone 'turn on.' These images provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the development of a very recent outflow from young (about 1 million years old) stars. Credits: NASA, John Krist (Space Telescope Science Institute), Karl Stapelfeldt (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Jeff Hester (Arizona State University), Chris Burrows (European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute)

  1. Cerebellum: from Fundamentals to Translational Approaches. The Seventh International Symposium of the Society for Research on the Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2016-02-01

    In terms of cerebellar research and ataxiology, a most fascinating period is currently going on. Numerous academic groups are now focusing their innovative research on the so-called little brain, hidden at the bottom of our brain. Indeed, its unique anatomical features make the cerebellum a wonderful window to address major questions about the central nervous system. The seventh international symposium of the SRC was held in Brussels at the Palace of Academies from May 8 to 10, 2015. The main goal of this dense symposium was to gather in a 2-day meeting senior researchers of exceptional scientific quality and talented junior scientists from all over the world working in the multidisciplinary field of cerebellar research. Fundamental and clinical researchers shared the latest knowledge and developments in this rapidly growing field. New ideas, addressed in a variety of inspiring talks, provoked a vivid debate. Advances in genetics, development, electrophysiology, neuroimaging, neurocognition and affect, as well as in the cerebellar ataxias and the controversies on the roles and functions of the cerebellum were presented. The Ferdinando Rossi lecture and the key-note lecture were delivered by Jan Voogd and Chris De Zeeuw, respectively. Contacts between researchers of different neuroscientific disciplines established a robust basis for novel trends and promising new cooperations between researchers and their centers spread all over the world. PMID:26744149

  2. CCBuilder: an interactive web-based tool for building, designing and assessing coiled-coil protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christopher W.; Bruning, Marc; Ibarra, Amaurys Á.; Bartlett, Gail J.; Thomson, Andrew R.; Sessions, Richard B.; Brady, R Leo; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The ability to accurately model protein structures at the atomistic level underpins efforts to understand protein folding, to engineer natural proteins predictably and to design proteins de novo. Homology-based methods are well established and produce impressive results. However, these are limited to structures presented by and resolved for natural proteins. Addressing this problem more widely and deriving truly ab initio models requires mathematical descriptions for protein folds; the means to decorate these with natural, engineered or de novo sequences; and methods to score the resulting models. Results: We present CCBuilder, a web-based application that tackles the problem for a defined but large class of protein structure, the α-helical coiled coils. CCBuilder generates coiled-coil backbones, builds side chains onto these frameworks and provides a range of metrics to measure the quality of the models. Its straightforward graphical user interface provides broad functionality that allows users to build and assess models, in which helix geometry, coiled-coil architecture and topology and protein sequence can be varied rapidly. We demonstrate the utility of CCBuilder by assembling models for 653 coiled-coil structures from the PDB, which cover >96% of the known coiled-coil types, and by generating models for rarer and de novo coiled-coil structures. Availability and implementation: CCBuilder is freely available, without registration, at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/app/cc_builder/ Contact: D.N.Woolfson@bristol.ac.uk or Chris.Wood@bristol.ac.uk PMID:25064570

  3. Crimes amendment (Zoe's law) Bill 2013 (No 2): paradoxical commercial impacts of the conservative agenda on fetal rights.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, Roseanna; Faunce, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, Liberal MP Chris Spence introduced a Private Member's Bill to the New South Wales Parliament, reinvigorating an earlier Bill introduced by Christian Democrat MP Fred Nile. If passed, the Bill would have bestowed legal personhood on fetuses of 20 weeks or more for the purpose of grievous bodily harm offences in the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW). The Bill had the potential to undermine freedom of choice for women in relation to abortions prior to the point of viability (capacity for fetal existence outside the womb) as well as other decisions concerning pregnancy and childbirth. One hypothesis is that legislative measures such as this that support the rights of the fetus are well intentioned initiatives by those for whom the fetus is an essentially independent entity or symbol of innocence and moral purity whose existence must be protected over and above the interests and independent decision-making capacity of the mother. This column explores this hypothesis in the context of the paradoxical negative commercial implications of such legislation on multiple areas involving fetal-maternal interaction including surrogacy. PMID:25715533

  4. STS-74 landing (Main Gear Touchdown closeup)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The highly successful Mission STS-74 comes to a smooth conclusion as the orbiter Atlantis returns to Kennedy Space Center. Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 of the Shuttle Landing Facility at 12:01:27 p.m. EST, November 20. The final Space Shuttle flight of 1995 marked the second docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. To simplify the remaining five Shuttle-Mir docking currently scheduled, the five astronauts on Atlantis attached a Russian-built Docking Module to Mir during the eight-day mission. Two solar arrays were stowed on the module, which will serve as a permanent extension to the Kristall docking port on the station. Atlantis' crew and the three cosmonauts on Mir also transferred materials to and from the station. Leading the STS-74 crew is Commander Kenneth D. Cameron; James D. Halsell Jr. is the pilot; the three mission specialists are Jerry L. Ross, William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr. and Chris A. Hadfield, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. This was the 27th end-of-mission landing at KSC in Shuttle program history. The Shuttle-Mir dockings are one aspect of Phase 1 activities leading the way toward the international space station; the United States, Russian, Canada, Japan and a group of European nations have joined together to build the orbiting outpost in space later this decade.

  5. Extra-binomial variation approach for analysis of pooled DNA sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The invention of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to study the rare variants that are more likely to pinpoint causal disease genes. To make such experiments financially viable, DNA samples from several subjects are often pooled before sequencing. This induces large between-pool variation which, together with other sources of experimental error, creates over-dispersed data. Statistical analysis of pooled sequencing data needs to appropriately model this additional variance to avoid inflating the false-positive rate. Results: We propose a new statistical method based on an extra-binomial model to address the over-dispersion and apply it to pooled case-control data. We demonstrate that our model provides a better fit to the data than either a standard binomial model or a traditional extra-binomial model proposed by Williams and can analyse both rare and common variants with lower or more variable pool depths compared to the other methods. Availability: Package ‘extraBinomial’ is on http://cran.r-project.org/ Contact: chris.wallace@cimr.cam.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics Online. PMID:22976083

  6. When combinatorial processing results in reconceptualization: toward a new approach of compositionality.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Petra B

    2013-01-01

    Propositional content is often incomplete but comprehenders appear to adjust meaning and add unarticulated meaning constituents effortlessly. This happens at the propositional level (The baby drank the bottle) but also at the phrasal level (the wooden turtle). In two ERP experiments, combinatorial processing was investigated in container/content alternations and adjective-noun combination transforming an animate entity into a physical object. Experiment 1 revealed that container-for-content alternations (The baby drank the bottle) engendered a Late Positivity on the critical expression and on the subsequent segment, while content-for-container alternations (Chris put the beer on the table) did not exert extra costs. In Experiment 2, adjective-noun combinations (the wooden turtle) also evoked a Late Positivity on the critical noun. First, the Late Positivities are taken to reflect discourse updating demands resulting from reference shift from the original denotation to the contextually appropriate interpretation (e.g., the reconceptualization form animal to physical object). This shift is supported by the linguistic unavailability of the original meaning, exemplified by copredication tests. Second, the data reveal that meaning alternations differ qualitatively. Some alternations involve (cost-free) meaning selection, while others engender processing demands associated with reconceptualization. This dissociation thus calls for a new typology of metonymic shifts that centers around the status of the involved discourse referents. PMID:24098293

  7. A Multiscale Mapping Assessment of Lake Champlain Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms.

    PubMed

    Torbick, Nathan; Corbiere, Megan

    2015-09-01

    Lake Champlain has bays undergoing chronic cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms that pose a public health threat. Monitoring and assessment tools need to be developed to support risk decision making and to gain a thorough understanding of bloom scales and intensities. In this research application, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), Rapid Eye, and Proba Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images were obtained while a corresponding field campaign collected in situ measurements of water quality. Models including empirical band ratio regressions were applied to map chlorophylla and phycocyanin concentrations; all sensors performed well with R² and root-mean-square error (RMSE) ranging from 0.76 to 0.88 and 0.42 to 1.51, respectively. The outcomes showed spatial patterns across the lake with problematic bays having phycocyanin concentrations >25 μg/L. An alert status metric tuned to the current monitoring protocol was generated using modeled water quality to illustrate how the remote sensing tools can inform a public health monitoring system. Among the sensors utilized in this study, Landsat 8 OLI holds the most promise for providing exposure information across a wide area given the resolutions, systematic observation strategy and free cost. PMID:26389930

  8. Sensor Intercalibration for the ESA GlobAlbedo Project Using QA4EO Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Dale; Mackin, Stephen; Behnert, Irina; Muller, Jan-Peter; Fox, Nigel

    2010-12-01

    Sensor inter-calibration is required in order to facilitate the merging of ATSR2, MERIS, AATSR, VEGETATION and VEGETATION2 spectral surface directional reflectance into a fifteen year land surface broadband albedo map of the entire Earth's land surface (snow and snow-free) for use in Global Climate Model initialisation and verification as part of the ESA GlobAlbedo project (Muller et al., this conference). To achieve this, a measure of the accuracy of every element in the processing chain needs to be made, so that the final broadband albedo contains as accurate as possible an estimate of uncertainty. The Quality Assurance for Earth Observation (QA4EO) protocols, described elsewhere (Fox et al., this conference) are an attempt to establish standardised methods for tasks of this nature. As part of the formulation of the cal/val protocols of QA4EO, an uncertainty assessment is currently being demonstrated using 2 months of data from December 2008-January 2009 from numerous satellites over the Antarctic CEOS endorsed "landnet" test-site, Dome C. Using multi- and hyperspectral data from AATSR, MERIS, AVNIR-2, CBERS, CHRIS-PROBA, Landsat-7, NigeriaSat-1, SPOT and UK-DMC-1, spectral radiance is corrected for atmospheric (mainly O3) and BRDF effects in preparation for intercomparison. The site selection and method of the group project is discussed and some preliminary results of this inter-calibration are shown.

  9. Mexican-US cooperation on renewable energy programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddle, D. B.

    1991-04-01

    I traveled to Mexico on April 1 with Pete Smith and Chris Rovero of Oak Ridge Associated Universities on a mission sponsored by the Agency for International Development (AID) to initiate a technical support project with Mexican government and private institutions. We met with officials of AID; the Programa Nacional de Solidaridad; the Laboratorio de Energia Solar; Instituto Investigaciones de Electricidad; Comision Federal de Electricidad; Compania de Luz y Fuerza del Centro; and several private firms to discuss the terms of support. An AIDE Memoire was drafted outlining the scope of future assistance. I traveled to San Jose, Cost Rica on April 7, 1991. There I met with Carlos Rodriguez, manager of Cooperativa Electrica de San Carlos, and Federico Baltodano, the director of BEL Ingenieria to discuss the San Lorenzo hydroelectric project. Details of an engineering and financial analysis outlining the costs and benefits of adding daily pondage to the project were discussed, as was the project development schedule and other issues. I returned to Oak Ridge on April 9, 1991.

  10. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    pt. 1. Wavefront correctors and control. Liquid crystal lenses for correction of presbyopia (Invited Paper) / Guoqiang Li and Nasser Peyghambarian. Converging and diverging liquid crystal lenses (oral paper) / Andrew X. Kirby, Philip J. W. Hands, and Gordon D. Love. Liquid lens technology for miniature imaging systems: status of the technology, performance of existing products and future trends (invited paper) / Bruno Berge. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer deformable mirrors for high energy laser applications (oral paper) / S. R. Restaino ... [et al.]. Tiny multilayer deformable mirrors (oral paper) / Tatiana Cherezova ... [et al.]. Performance analysis of piezoelectric deformable mirrors (oral paper) / Oleg Soloviev, Mikhail Loktev and Gleb Vdovin. Deformable membrane mirror with high actuator density and distributed control (oral paper) / Roger Hamelinck ... [et al.]. Characterization and closed-loop demonstration of a novel electrostatic membrane mirror using COTS membranes (oral paper) / David Dayton ... [et al.]. Electrostatic micro-deformable mirror based on polymer materials (oral paper) / Frederic Zamkotsian ... [et al.]. Recent progress in CMOS integrated MEMS A0 mirror development (oral paper) / A. Gehner ... [et al.]. Compact large-stroke piston-tip-tilt actuator and mirror (oral paper) / W. Noell ... [et al.]. MEMS deformable mirrors for high performance AO applications (oral paper) / Paul Bierden, Thomas Bifano and Steven Cornelissen. A versatile interferometric test-rig for the investigation and evaluation of ophthalmic AO systems (poster paper) / Steve Gruppetta, Jiang Jian Zhong and Luis Diaz-Santana. Woofer-tweeter adaptive optics (poster paper) / Thomas Farrell and Chris Dainty. Deformable mirrors based on transversal piezoeffect (poster paper) / Gleb Vdovin, Mikhail Loktev and Oleg Soloviev. Low-cost spatial light modulators for ophthalmic applications (poster paper) / Vincente Durán ... [et al.]. Latest MEMS DM developments and the path ahead

  11. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  12. What Do You Get When Two Neutron Stars Merge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The merger of two neutron stars (a NSNS merger) is suspected to be the most likely source of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) powerful explosions that can be seen from billions of light-years away. But whether a GRB is launched is dependent on what remnant is created by the merging NSs. Do they form another NS? Or a black hole (BH)?Uncertain RemnantIf the NSNS merger forms a BH remnant, a GRB can be launched during the ensuing accretion. But if it instead forms a NS, a GRB may only be launched if the remnant collapses to a BH within 100 milliseconds; any longer, and theory says that the GRB jet will become loaded with baryons and choke.Unfortunately, determining whether the merger will produce a NS or a BH is difficult. A major limitation is that we dont know what equation of state describes the interior of a NS which means we also dont know what maximum mass a NS can have before it collapses into a BH.Led by Chris Fryer of the University of Arizona and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a group of researchers undertook a highly collaborative study to better understand the fates of NSNS mergers.Maximum MassThe fraction of mergers that produce BHs (and, consequently, GRBs) and NSs, as a function of the maximum NS mass allowed by the equation of state. Lines labeled BHAD are mergers that produce BHs (under two different initial conditions); lines labeled NS are those that produce NSs. [Fryer et al. 2015]The authors used a combination of merger calculations, neutron star equation of state studies, and population synthesis simulations to model the outcome of the merger of two NSs. With this information, they determined the statistical likelihood that the remnant that forms in the merger collapses directly to a BH, collapses to a BH after a delay, or remains a NS.Fryer and collaborators find that the outcome is highly dependent upon the maximum mass allowed by the uncertain NS equation of state. If this maximum NS mass is below 2.32.4 solar masses, most NS

  13. Time series analysis of satellite multi-sensors imagery to study the recursive abnormal grow of floating macrophyte in the lake victoria (central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusilli, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Laneve, Giovanni; Pignatti, Stefano; Santilli, Giancarlo; Santini, Federico

    2010-05-01

    Remote sensing allows multi-temporal mapping and monitoring of large water bodies. The importance of remote sensing for wetland and inland water inventory and monitoring at all scales was emphasized several times by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and from EU projects like SALMON and ROSALMA, e.g. by (Finlayson et al., 1999) and (Lowry and Finlayson, 2004). This paper aims at assessing the capability of time series of satellite imagery to provide information suitable for enhancing the understanding of the temporal cycles shown by the macrophytes growing in order to support the monitor and management of the lake Victoria water resources. The lake Victoria coastal areas are facing a number of challenges related to water resource management which include growing population, water scarcity, climate variability and water resource degradation, invasive species, water pollution. The proliferation of invasive plants and aquatic weeds, is of growing concern. In particular, let us recall some of the problems caused by the aquatic weeds growing: Ø interference with human activities such as fishing, and boating; Ø inhibition or interference with a balanced fish population; Ø fish killing due to removal of too much oxygen from the water; Ø production of quiet water areas that are ideal for mosquito breeding. In this context, an integrated use of medium/high resolution images from sensors like MODIS, ASTER, LANDSAT/TM and whenever available CHRIS offers the possibility of creating a congruent time series allowing the analysis of the floating vegetation dynamic on an extended temporal basis. Although MODIS imagery is acquired daily, cloudiness and other sources of noise can greatly reduce the effective temporal resolution, further its spatial resolution can results not always adequate to map the extension of floating plants. Therefore, the integrated use of sensors with different spatial resolution, were used to map across seasons the evolution of the phenomena. The

  14. The Future of Theoretical Physics and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Rankin, S. J.

    2009-08-01

    Preface; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Popular Symposium: 2. Our complex cosmos and its future Martin J. Rees; 3. Theories of everything and Hawking's wave function of the Universe James B. Hartle; 4. The problem of space-time singularities: implications for quantum gravity? Roger Penrose; 5. Warping spacetime Kip Thorne; 6. 60 years in a nutshell Stephen W. Hawking; Part II. Spacetime Singularities: 7. Cosmological perturbations and singularities George F. R. Ellis; 8. The quantum physics of chronology protection Matt Visser; 9. Energy dominance and the Hawking-Ellis vacuum conservation theorem Brandon Carter; 10. On the instability of extra space dimensions Roger Penrose; Part III. Black Holes: 11. Black hole uniqueness and the inner horizon stability problem Werner Israel; 12. Black holes in the real universe and their prospects as probes of relativistic gravity Martin J. Rees; 13. Primordial black holes Bernard Carr; 14. Black hole pair creation Simon F. Ross; 15. Black holes as accelerators Steven Giddings; Part IV. Hawking Radiation: 16. Black holes and string theory Malcolm Perry; 17. M theory and black hole quantum mechanics Joe Polchinski; 18. Playing with black strings Gary Horowitz; 19. Twenty years of debate with Stephen Leonard Susskind; Part V. Quantum Gravity: 20. Euclidean quantum gravity: the view from 2002 Gary Gibbons; 21. Zeta functions, anomalies and stable branes Ian Moss; 22. Some reflections on the status of conventional quantum theory when applied to quantum gravity Chris Isham; 23. Quantum geometry and its ramifications Abhay Ashtekar; 24. Topology change in quantum gravity Fay Dowker; Part VI. M Theory and Beyond: 25. The past and future of string theory Edward Witten; 26. String theory David Gross; 27. A brief description of string theory Michael Green; 28. The story of M Paul Townsend; 29. Gauged supergravity and holographic field theory Nick Warner; 30. 57 varieties in a NUTshell Chris Pope; Part VII. de Sitter Space

  15. The ultimate creativity machine. How BMW turns art into profit.

    PubMed

    Bangle, C

    2001-01-01

    Many companies face the challenge of balancing art with commerce. The conflict between corporate pragmatism and artistic passion and quality is persistent: designers chafe under corporate requirements, budgets, and deadlines, and nondesigners struggle to understand the business value of artistic choices. At German carmaker BMW, the fanaticism about design excellence is matched only by the company's driving desire to remain profitable. Global design director Chris Bangle presides over the intersection of art and commerce at BMW, managing the often-strained relationships among the designers, engineers, and business managers. Bangle goes to great lengths to protect his designers from the unproductive commentary of others in the company, literally posting "Stop: No Entry" signs on the design studio doors. He also protects the design process, making sure that time-to-market pressures do not harm the designs by shifting the focus to engineering too soon. As a mediator, Bangle appeals to the core values of the company and a deeply held sense about BMW-ness--a pride of product shared by everyone in the company that expresses itself in the classic quality of the cars. Every employee, designer and nondesigner alike, understands that if a car doesn't meet this standard of excellence, it's simply not a BMW--and customers won't buy it. Managing at the intersection of art and commerce means translating the language of art into the language of the corporation. In this First Person account, the author describes his inventive techniques for getting the best from his artists--and getting his ideas across to corporate managers. PMID:11189462

  16. Polar Hydra Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Hall, Van Allen

    1998-01-01

    The science activities are: 1) Hydra is still operating successfully on orbit. 2) A large amount of analysis and discovery has occurred with the Hydra ground data processing this past year. 3) Full interdetector calibration has been implemented and documented. This intercalibration was necessitated by the incorrect installation of bias resistors in the pre-acceleration stage to the electron channeltrons. This had the effect of making the counting efficiency for electrons energy dependent as well as channeltron specific. The nature of the error had no impact on the ion detection efficiency since they have a different bias arrangement. This intercalibration is so effective, that the electron and ion moment densities are routinely produced with a level of agreement better than 20%. 4) The data processing routinely removes glint in the sensors and produces public energy time spectrograms on the web overnight. 6) Routine, but more intensive computer processing codes are operational that determine for electrons and ions, the density, the flow vector, the pressure tensor and the heat flux by numerical integration. These codes use the magnetic field to sustain the quality of their output. To gain access to this high quality magnetic field within our data stream we have monitored Russell's web page for zero levels and timing files (since his data acquisition is not telemetry synchronous) and have a local reconstruction of B for our use. We have also detected a routine anomaly in the magnetometer data stream that we have documented to Chris Russell and developed an editing algorithm to intercept these "hits" and remove them from the geophysical analysis.

  17. CORESS feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This edition of CORESS feedback reinforces the very basic principles of obtaining and using an accurate history and examination to make an appropriate diagnosis in the face of equivocal or uninformative investigations and failing equipment. Case 126 illustrates once again the potential deleterious consequences of failing to check a drug correctly prior to administration. We are grateful to the clinicians who have provided the material for these reports. The online reporting form is on our website (www.coress.org.uk), which also includes all previous feedback reports. Published contributions will be acknowledged by a ‘Certificate of Contribution’, which may be included in the contributor’s record of continuing professional development. CORESS relies heavily on the expertise of the specialty members of the Advisory Board in the preparation of feedback reports and dissemination of safety information related to surgical practice. The organisation is grateful to the following members of the Advisory Board and Board of Directors who have contributed to published reports in 2010 and 2011: Board of Directors: Viscount Bridgeman, Mr Chris Chilton, Mr Martin Else, Professor Nicholas Gair, Mr Adam Lewis CVO, Miss Clare Marx, Mr Andrew May, Lord Bernard Ribeiro, Mr Frank Smith, Mr Peter Tait, Mr Denis Wilkins. Advisory Board: Ms E Baird, Mr Daryl I Baker, Mr Ken Catchpole, Dr Lauren Morgan, Mr Stephen Clark, Mr Robert Davies, Mr Mark Deakin, Ms D Eastwood, Mr Barry Ferris, Mr Mark Fordham, Mr Paul J Gibbs, Mr Grey Giddins, Mr Robert Greatorex, Mr Mervyn Griffiths, Mr John Hammond, Mr William Harkness, Mr M Hemadri, Mr Richard Holdsworth, Miss Claire Hopkins, Professor Zygmunt Krukowski, Mr N Mamode, Mr Ian Martin, Surgeon Commander Mark Midwinter, Mr J Richard Novell, Professor Gerald O’Sullivan, Dr Gerard Panting, Mr Mike Pittam, Dr Mike Powers QC, Ms Patricia Scott, Professor Alastair Thompson, Dr J P van Besouw, Mr Mark Vipond, Mr David Webster, Mr Michael Wyatt.

  18. Learning Without Boundaries: A NASA - National Guard Bureau Distance Learning Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Susan H.; Chilelli, Christopher J.; Picard, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    With a variety of high-quality live interactive educational programs originating at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and other space and research centers, the US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a proud track record of connecting with students throughout the world and stimulating their creativity and collaborative skills by teaching them underlying scientific and technological underpinnings of space exploration. However, NASA desires to expand its outreach capability for this type of interactive instruction. In early 2002, NASA and the National Guard Bureau -- using the Guard's nationwide system of state-ofthe-art classrooms and high bandwidth network -- began a collaboration to extend the reach of NASA content and educational programs to more of America's young people. Already, hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students have visited Guard e-Learning facilities and participated in interactive NASA learning events. Topics have included experimental flight, satellite imagery-interpretation, and Mars exploration. Through this partnership, NASA and the National Guard are enabling local school systems throughout the United States (and, increasingly, the world) to use the excitement of space flight to encourage their students to become passionate about the possibility of one day serving as scientists, mathematicians, technologists, and engineers. At the 54th International Astronautical Conference MAJ Stephan Picard, the guiding visionary behind the Guard's partnership with NASA, and Chris Chilelli, an educator and senior instructional designer at NASA, will share with attendees background on NASA's educational products and the National Guard's distributed learning network; will discuss the unique opportunity this partnership already has provided students and teachers throughout the United States; will offer insights into the formation by government entities of e-Learning partnerships with one another; and will

  19. Check Out These Books

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Michelle (Editor); Mulenburg, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    The book entitled "Fusion Leadership: Unlocking the Subtle Forces that Change People and Organizations Richard L. Daft and Robert H. Lengel (1998) Berett-Koehler Publishers, Inc." was Reviewed by Dr. Michelle Collins, NASA Headquarters. If you've already read books on leadership and organizational change by authors such as Moshe Rubinstein and Iris Firstenberg, Peter Senge, Tom Peters, and Steven Covey, and you were thinking of rereading them, you don't have to do that now. Just read this book instead. It's a fusion of many of their same concepts presented from a different view. The book does not explore any particular subject in depth. Rather the authors "skim" many subjects and concepts, interlacing them to develop the concept of "Fusion Leadership". The fundamental concept of treating people as people rather than machines is the main theme. "Fusion Leadership" is the process of fusing people together by nurturing six "subtle" forces: mindfulness, courage, vision, heart, communication, and integrity. To do so, hierarchy is diminished and responsibility both for oneself as well as for the team is emphasized. There are a number of organizations and managers that will find such a change threatening. The concepts behind such a management style are straightforward and the benefits are intuitive once you've reflected on them; however, the obvious benefits of the behavioral change proposed in Fusion Leadership can be completely lost in a fear-based system. The concept of caring about people in one's organization was the common thread in Chris Turner's book All Hat, No Cattle (see book review, ASK 5). Much is being written about the re-humanizing of the workplace, but the basis of it is so common sense that one wonders what's taking so long for the workplace to change? Whether you're in a position to change your organization or simply your project team, you'll find the concepts in fusion leadership equally applicable.

  20. Concepts for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, M.; Tenerelli, D.

    1996-12-01

    In collaboration with NASA GSFC, we have examined a wide range of potential concepts for a large, passively cooled space telescope. Our design goals were to achieve a theoretical imaging sensitivity in the near-IR of 1 nJy and an angular resolution at 1 micron of 0.06 arcsec. Concepts examined included a telescope/spacecraft system with a 6-m diameter monolithic primary mirror, a variety of telescope/spacecraft systems with deployable primary mirror segments to achieve an 8-m diameter aperture, and a 12-element sparse aperture phased array telescope. Trade studies indicate that all three concept categories can achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, but that considerable technology development is required to bring any of the concepts to fruition. One attractive option is the system with the 6-m diameter monolithic primary. This option achieves high sensitivity without telescope deployments and includes a stiff structure for robust attitude and figure control. This system capitalizes on coming advances in launch vehicle and shroud technology, which should enable launch of large, monolithic payloads into orbit positions where background noise due to zodiacal dust is low. Our large space telescope study was performed by a consortium of organizations and individuals including: Domenick Tenerelli et al. (Lockheed Martin Corp.), Roger Angel et al. (U. Ariz.), Tom Casey et al. (Eastman Kodak Co.), Jim Gunn (Princeton), Shel Kulick (Composite Optics, Inc.), Jim Westphal (CIT), Johnny Batache et al. (Harris Corp.), Costas Cassapakis et al. (L'Garde, Inc.), Dave Sandler et al. (ThermoTrex Corp.), David Miller et al. (MIT), Ephrahim Garcia et al. (Garman Systems Inc.), Mark Enright (New Focus Inc.), Chris Burrows (STScI), Roc Cutri (IPAC), and Art Bradley (Allied Signal Aerospace).

  1. Comparing IRI and IRI-Real-Time with SWARM Electron Density Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, D.; Galkin, I. A.; Stolle, C.; Vesnin, A.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    We will present first comparisons between the electron densities measured by the SWARM Langmuir Probes and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza et al., 2014) involving both the standard IRI and the Real-Time IRI. The Real-Time IRI is based on the IRI Real-Time Assimilative Mapping (IRTAM) algorithm for the F2 peak density and height that was developed by Galkin et al. (2012). IRTAM assimilates digisonde data from the Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) into the IRI-CCIR models for the F-peak parameters. The goals of this study are twofold. On one hand our comparisons are intended to help and to support SWARM validation efforts for the electron density and on the other hand our comparisons are intended to investigate how well the IRI Real-Time algorithm reproduces detailed spatial and temporal structures that are not included in the standard IRI. The results will be a starting point for future inclusion of SWARM data into the assimilative Real-Time IRI process. Bilitza Dieter, David Altadill, Yongliang Zhang, Chris Mertens, Vladimir Truhlik, Phil Richards, Lee-Anne McKinnell, and Bodo Reinisch, The International Reference Ionosphere 2012 - A Model of International Collaboration, J, Space Weather Space Clim., 4, A07(1-12), DOI: 10.1051/swsc/2014004, 2014. Galkin, I. A., B. W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), Assimilation of GIRO data into a real-time IRI, Radio Sci., 47, RS0L07, doi:10.1029/2011RS004952.

  2. The reproductive health needs of refugees: emerging consensus attracts predictable controversy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S A

    1998-10-01

    According to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, there are approximately 40 million refugees and other internally displaced people worldwide, with the overwhelming majority coming from and still living in developed countries. 80% of all refugees are estimated to be women and children. Many refugees spend months and even years in what are designed to be temporary settings where efforts are made to accommodate their basic needs such as food, clean water, shelter, security, and primary health care during emergency situations. Women refugees, however, have certain unique needs beyond what traditionally have been considered basic in relief programs. Many women in developing countries suffer considerable health risks during the best of times due to their poverty or low social status. When fleeing conflict or natural disaster, their health status is at even higher risk of being compromised by severe living conditions and the complete absence of reproductive health services. The recognition that women refugees often face serious and sometimes life-threatening reproductive health-related situations led to the development of a field manual on reproductive health for use at the local level. Planned for publication in late 1998 or early 1999, the guide will describe the goals of a minimum array of reproductive health services in the early phase of an emergency and provide direct guidance on care relating to sexual violence, STDs, family planning, adolescents' needs, and other reproductive health concerns such as female genital mutilation and treatment for septic and incomplete abortion. The manual has garnered worldwide attention and support, as well as scrutiny by abortion opponents in the US, in particular New Jersey Republican Representative Chris Smith. PMID:12348740

  3. Moving mountains.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    What could be more fundamental to management, or more difficult, than motivating people? After all, a manager, by definition, is someone who gets work done through others. But how? A typical recipe for motivation calls for a mixture of persuasion, encouragement, and compulsion. Yet the best leaders, we suspect, need no recipe: They get people to produce great results by appealing to their deepest drives, needs, and desires. And so we discovered when we asked a dozen of the world's top leaders to describe how they each met a daunting challenge in motivating an individual, a team, or an organization. Their answers are as varied as human nature. Some of the leaders appeal to people's need for the rational and the orderly: Mattel's Robert Eckert emphasizes the reassuring power of delivering a consistent message, and HP's Carly Fiorina focuses on facing hard truths on setting step-by-step goals. Some, like celebrated oceanographer Robert Ballard, Pfizer CEO Hank McKinnell, and BP America president Ross Pillari, see the powerful motivating effects of asking people to rise to difficult challenges. Others focus more on the human spirit, appealing to the desire to do something, as BMW's Chris Bangle puts it, "rare, marvelous, and lasting." And quite a few inspire through example, as Dial chairman Herb Baum did when he donated $1,000 from his bonus to each of the company's 155 lowest-paid people. "If you draw the line on your own greed, and your employees see it," he says, "they will be incredibly loyal and perform much better for you." And he has the numbers to prove it. "Right now," he adds, "we're experiencing our lowest level of attrition in 11 years, and we're tracking toward another banner year because people are happy." PMID:12545921

  4. 3-D sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Janok P. Bhattacharya; George A. McMechan

    2007-02-16

    This project examined the internal architecture of delta front sandstones at two locations within the Turonian-age Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in Wyoming. The project involved traditional outcrop field work integrated with core-data, and 2D and 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging from behind the outcrops. The fluid-flow engineering work, handled through a collaborative grant given to PI Chris White at LSU, focused on effects on fluid flow of late-stage calcite cement nodules in 3D. In addition to the extensive field component, the work funded 2 PhD students (Gani and Lee) and resulted in publication of 10 technical papers, 17 abstracts, and 4 internal field guides. PI Bhattacharya also funded an additional 3 PhD students that worked on the Wall Creek sandstone funded separately through an industrial consortium, two of whom graduated in the fall 2006 ((Sadeque and Vakarelov). These additional funds provided significant leverage to expand the work to include a regional stratigraphic synthesis of the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in addition to the reservoir-scale studies that DOE directly funded. Awards given to PI Bhattacharya included the prestigious AAPG Distinguished Lecture Award, which involved a tour of about 25 Universities and Geological Societies in the US and Canada in the fall of 2005 and Spring of 2006. Bhattacharya gave two talks, one entitled “Applying Deltaic and Shallow Marine Outcrop Analogs to the Subsurface”, which highlighted the DOE sponsored work and the other titled “Martian River Deltas and the Origin of Life”. The outcrop analog talk was given at about 1/2 of the venues visited.

  5. Open-market innovation.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Darrell; Zook, Chris

    2002-10-01

    Companies in many industries are feeling immense pressure to improve their ability to innovate. Even in these tough economic times, executives have pushed innovation initiatives to the top of their priority lists, but they know that the best ideas aren't always coming out of their own R&D labs. That's why a growing number of companies are exploring the idea of open-market innovation--an approach that uses tools such as licensing, joint ventures, and strategic alliances to bring the benefits of free trade to the flow of new ideas. For instance, when faced with the unanticipated anthrax scare last fall, Pitney Bowes had nothing in its R&D pipeline to help its customers combat the deadly spores. So it sought help from outside innovators to come up with scanning and imaging technologies that could alert its customers to tainted letters and packages. And Dow Chemical and Cargill jointly produced a new form of plastic derived from plant starches--a breakthrough product that neither company could have created on its own. In this article, Bain consultants Darrell Rigby and Chris Zook describe the advantages and disadvantages of open-market innovation and the ways some companies are using it to gain competitive advantage. By importing ideas from the outside, the authors say, companies can collect more and better ideas from different kinds of experts. Creative types within a company will stick around longer if they know their ideas will eventually find a home--as internal R&D projects or as concepts licensed to outside buyers. Exporting ideas also gives companies a way to measure an innovation's real value. However, the authors warn against entering into open-market innovation without properly structuring deals: Xerox and TRW virtually gave away their innovations and had to stand by while other companies capitalized on them. PMID:12389463

  6. On the Thermal Anomaly of Lake Untersee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevington, James

    2015-01-01

    Reported here is the outcome from a student internship undertaken with Dr. Chris McKay at the NASA Ames Research Center. The project for this internship focuses on Lake Untersee, an Earth analog for icy moons. The anoxic hole of Lake Untersee has a thermal bump that was first observed by Wand et al., 1997 and has been confirmed several times (Wand et al., 2006; Andersen 2011). The expected thermal profile of the hole is linear from 0 C at the thermocline to approximately 4 C, the ground temperature in Antarctica, at the bottom. Instead, there is an increase from 0 C near the thermocline to 5 C which is maintained for 7 m, then a linear profile to approximately 4 C near the bottom. Thermal modeling was conducted to quantify the energy input required to maintain the bump. The results revealed 2 sources. Chemical reactions and radiative energy were analyzed as possible explanation. The chemical analysis revealed a peak in Chlorophyll a at the same depth as the shallower source and several interesting reactions with maximum rates at the same location as the lower depth source. However, the energy released from these reactions was orders of magnitude smaller than required source. The radiation analysis revealed a profile with two peaks in similar locations to the sources and a total energy input within a factor of 1.5 of the required sources. The conclusion from this work is that photosynthesis and the chemical reactions support microbial life in the water column which in turn acts as an opacity to convert radiative energy into thermal energy. Recommendations for future work are aimed at quantifying the quantity and types of microbes present in the water column. Beyond the work of the project, two field trips are described and a discussion on benefits to the student of the internship is given.

  7. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  8. Retrieving Biome Types from Multi-angle Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schull, M. A.; Xu, L.; Latorre, P.; Samanta, A.; Myneni, R. B.; Knyazikhin, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Many studies have been conducted to demonstrate the ability of multi-angle spectral data to discriminate plant dominant species. Most have employed the use of empirically based techniques, which are site specific, requires some initial training based on characteristics of known leaf and/or canopy spectra and therefore may not be extendable to operational use or adapted to changing/unknown land cover. An ancillary objective of the MISR LAI/FPAR algorithm is classification of global vegetation into biome types. The algorithm is based on the 3D radiative transfer equation. Its performance suggests that is has valid LAI retrievals and correct biome identification in about 20% of the pixels. However with a probability of about 70%, uncertainties in LAI retrievals due to biome misclassification do not exceed uncertainties in the observations. In this poster we present an approach to improve reliability of the distribution of biomes and dominant species from multi angle spectral data. The radiative transfer theory of canopy spectral invariants underlies the approach, which facilitates parameterization of the canopy bidirectional reflectance factor in terms of the leaf spectrum and two spectrally invariant and structurally varying variables - recollision and directional escape probabilities. Theoretical and empirical analyses of ground and airborne data acquired by AVIRIS, AirMISR over two sites in New England and CHRIS/PROBA over BARAX site in Spain suggest that the canopy spectral invariants convey information about canopy structure at both the macro and micro scales. These properties allow for the natural separation of biome classes based on the location of points on the total escape probability vs the proportional escape ratio log-log plane.

  9. Risk and Exploration: Earth, Sea and Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, Steven J. (Editor); Cowing, Keith L. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The NASA History Division is pleased to present the record of a unique meeting on risk and exploration held under the auspices of the NASA Administrator, Sean O Keefe, at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, from September 26-29, 2004. The meeting was the brainchild of Keith Cowing and astronaut John Grunsfeld, NASA's chief scientist at the time. Its goals, stated in the letter of invitation published herein, were precipitated by the ongoing dialogue on risk and exploration in the wake of the Columbia Shuttle accident, the Hubble Space Telescope servicing question, and, in a broader sense, by the many NASA programs that inevitably involve a balance between risk and forward-looking exploration. The meeting, extraordinarily broad in scope and participant experience, offers insights on why we explore, how to balance risk and exploration, how different groups defi ne and perceive risk differently, and the importance of exploration to a creative society. At NASA Headquarters, Bob Jacobs, Trish Pengra, and Joanna Adamus of NASA Public Affairs led the meeting's implementation. The Naval Postgraduate School, commanded by Rear Admiral Patrick W. Dunne, provided a congenial venue. The meeting was broadcast on NASA TV, and thanks are due in this regard to Al Feinberg, Tony Stewart, Jim Taylor, and the planners collaborative: Mark Shaddock and Spotlight Productions, Donovan Gates of Donovan Gates Production, and Michael Ditertay and his staff on this 30-person television crew. Thanks to their efforts, a DVD record of the meeting has also been produced. Thanks are also due to the moderators: Miles O Brien of CNN, Chris McKay of NASA Ames, David Halpern of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and John Grunsfeld, NASA Headquarters. In order to maintain the informal flavor of the meetings, these proceedings are based on transcripts that have been lightly edited for grammar and punctuation. Most references to slides shown during the

  10. Efficiency evaluation of a groundwater monitoring network using a risk-based decision- support process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Birdsell, K.; Davis, P.; Echohawk, C.

    2006-12-01

    Efficiency evaluation of a groundwater monitoring network using a risk-based decision-support process Velimir V Vesselinov, Kay Birdsell, Paul David, Chris Echohawk A series of contaminant sources have the potential to impact the quality of regional groundwater resources beneath the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Currently, 21 areas have been identified where contaminants could possibly reach the regional aquifer at the water table. Because the temporal variability of the contaminant mass fluxes through the vadose zone is not well defined, source strength uncertainty at the regional aquifer is represented by a series of unit-mass source functions. Uncertainties in the potential contaminant pathways within the aquifer and the breakthrough curves at the potential discharge locations (receptors), which include water-supply wells and springs, are investigated. Risk-based analyses of the performance of the existing groundwater monitoring network are carried out. The network should be capable of detecting the potential contaminant plumes before they reach (1) the receptors and/or (2) the LANL boundaries at unacceptably high concentrations. Individual monitoring boreholes are ranked based on their importance for plume detection. Suggestions regarding optimal sampling frequency for the monitoring boreholes are also made. The study utilizes a risk-based decision-support process. The goal is to facilitate the decision process by means of risk-based analyses of model predictions that incorporate current data and conceptual understandings. The most important question is whether the existing knowledge is adequate and sufficient for each particular contamination source / pathway in order to select a remedy(ies) now without any further characterization. The immediate evaluation of remedy options can help prioritize our efforts and reduce the time to completion and cost of the LANL environmental program. Our study addresses fundamental questions related to building

  11. The scientific legacy of Howard Vincent Malmstadt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlick, Gary

    2006-06-01

    Howard Malmstadt was a true giant of Analytical Chemistry and clearly one of the most influential analytical chemists of the last 50 years. Howard, through his own work and that of his students (first generation) and their students (second generation) and their students' students (third generation) changed the course of Analytical Chemistry. His research interests were broad and ranged from analytical solution chemistry (titrimetry and reaction rates) and electrochemistry to atomic and molecular spectroscopy, chemical instrumentation, clinical chemistry and automation. Howard was also one of the most innovative and influential educators of our time. He changed forever the analytical curriculum through his many books on Electronics for Scientists, most written in conjunction with Chris Enke and Stan Crouch. Their texts and short courses went from pioneering the application of tube-based analog electronics (servo systems and operational amplifiers) in scientific measurements to the impact that integrated circuits and digital electronics would have on laboratory measurements. He strongly believed in the importance of "hands-on" in education. To this end, he expended considerable personal effort and time to see not only the development and commercialization of an effective laboratory infrastructure to support education in analog and digital electronics, but also oversaw the development of modular instrumentation for spectroscopy. Over the years he received many awards from the Analytical Chemistry community for his outstanding efforts and contributions to teaching and research. Many of Howard's students went on into academia. They and their students now represent the ongoing legacy for analytical chemistry that evolved from Howard's laboratory at Illinois. A remarkable diversity of research programs are underway in their laboratories. Topics range from atomic, laser, mass, and Raman spectroscopy to detection technology, analytical education, micro

  12. PREFACE: 4th Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries (DISCRETE2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domenico, Antonio; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2015-07-01

    The DISCRETE 2014: Fourth Symposium in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries took place at King's College London, Strand Campus, London WC2R 2LS, from Tuesday, December 2 2014 till Saturday, December 6 2014. This is the fourth Edition of the DISCRETE conference series, which is a biannual event, having been held previously in Valencia (Discrete'08), Rome (Discrete2010) and Lisbon (Discrete2012). The topics covered at the DISCRETE series of conferences are: T, C, P, CP symmetries; accidental symmetries (B, L conservation); CPT symmetry, decoherence and entangled states, Lorentz symmetry breaking (phenomenology and current bounds); neutrino mass and mixing; implications for cosmology and astroparticle physics, dark matter searches; experimental prospects at LHC, new facilities. In DISCRETE 2014 we have also introduced two new topics: cosmological aspects of non-commutative space-times as well as PT symmetric Hamiltonians (non-Hermitian but with real eigenvalues), a topic that has wide applications in particle physics and beyond. The conference was opened by the King's College London Vice Principal on Research and Innovation, Mr Chris Mottershead, followed by a welcome address by the Chair of DISCRETE 2014 (Professor Nick E. Mavromatos). After these introductory talks, the scientific programme of the DISCRETE 2014 symposium started. Following the tradition of DISCRETE series of conferences, the talks (138 in total) were divided into plenary-review talks (25), invited research talks (50) and shorter presentations (63) — selected by the conveners of each session in consultation with the organisers — from the submitted abstracts. We have been fortunate to have very high-quality, thought stimulating and interesting talks at all levels, which, together with the discussions among the participants, made the conference quite enjoyable. There were 152 registered participants for the event.

  13. Small field detector correction factors: effects of the flattening filter for Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Madelaine K; Liu, Paul Z Y; Lee, Christopher; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are becoming the preferred beam type for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), as they enable an increase in dose rate and a decrease in treatment time. This work assesses the effects of the flattening filter on small field output factors for 6 MV beams generated by both Elekta and Varian linear accelerators, and determines differences between detector response in flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Relative output factors were measured with a range of detectors (diodes, ionization cham-bers, radiochromic film, and microDiamond) and referenced to the relative output factors measured with an air core fiber optic dosimeter (FOD), a scintillation dosimeter developed at Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney. Small field correction factors were generated for both FF and FFF beams. Diode measured detector response was compared with a recently published mathematical relation to predict diode response corrections in small fields. The effect of flattening filter removal on detector response was quantified using a ratio of relative detector responses in FFF and FF fields for the same field size. The removal of the flattening filter was found to have a small but measurable effect on ionization chamber response with maximum deviations of less than ± 0.9% across all field sizes measured. Solid-state detectors showed an increased dependence on the flattening filter of up to ± 1.6%. Measured diode response was within ± 1.1% of the published mathematical relation for all fields up to 30 mm, independent of linac type and presence or absence of a flattening filter. For 6 MV beams, detector correction factors between FFF and FF beams are interchangeable for a linac between FF and FFF modes, providing that an additional uncertainty of up to ± 1.6% is accepted. PMID:27167280

  14. Comparison of indirect cost multipliers for vehicle manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A.; Santini, D.; Cuenca, R.

    2000-05-16

    In the process of manufacturing and selling vehicles, a manufacturer incurs certain costs. Among these costs are those incurred directly as a part of manufacturing operations and those incurred indirectly in the processes of manufacturing and selling. The indirect costs may be production-related, such as R and D and engineering; business-related, such as corporate staff salaries and pensions; or retail-sales-related, such as dealer support and marketing. These indirect costs are recovered by allocating them to each vehicle. Under a stable, high-volume production process, the allocation of these indirect costs can be approximated as multipliers (or factors) applied to the direct cost of manufacturing. A manufacturer usually allocates indirect costs to finished vehicles according to a corporation-specific pricing strategy. Because the volumes of sales and production vary widely by model within a corporation, the internal corporate percent allocation of various accounting categories (such as profit or corporate overheat) can vary widely among individual models. Approaches also vary across corporations. For these purposes, an average value is constructed, by means of a generic representative method, for vehicle models produced at high volume. To accomplish this, staff at Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) Center for Transportation Research analyzed the conventional vehicle cost structure and developed indirect cost multipliers for passenger vehicles. This memorandum summarizes the results of an effort to compare and put on a common basis the cost multipliers used in ANL's electric and hybrid electric vehicle cost estimation procedures with those resulting from two other methodologies. One of the two compared methodologies is derived from a 1996 presentation by Dr. Chris Borroni-Bird of Chrysler Corporation, the other is by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA), as described in a 1995 report by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), Congress of the United

  15. (Pre-) calibration of a Reduced Complexity Model of the Antarctic Contribution to Sea-level Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckert, K. L.; Guan, Y.; Shaffer, G.; Forest, C. E.; Keller, K.

    2015-12-01

    (Pre-) calibration of a Reduced Complexity Model of the Antarctic Contribution to Sea-level ChangesKelsey L. Ruckert1*, Yawen Guan2, Chris E. Forest1,3,7, Gary Shaffer 4,5,6, and Klaus Keller1,7,81 Department of Geosciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 2 Department of Statistics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 3 Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 4 GAIA_Antarctica, University of Magallanes, Punta Arenas, Chile 5 Center for Advanced Studies in Arid Zones, La Serena, Chile 6 Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 7 Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 8 Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA * Corresponding author. E-mail klr324@psu.eduUnderstanding and projecting future sea-level changes poses nontrivial challenges. Sea-level changes are driven primarily by changes in the density of seawater as well as changes in the size of glaciers and ice sheets. Previous studies have demonstrated that a key source of uncertainties surrounding sea-level projections is the response of the Antarctic ice sheet to warming temperatures. Here we calibrate a previously published and relatively simple model of the Antarctic ice sheet over a hindcast period from the last interglacial period to the present. We apply and compare a range of (pre-) calibration methods, including a Bayesian approach that accounts for heteroskedasticity. We compare the model hindcasts and projections for different levels of model complexity and calibration methods. We compare the projections with the upper bounds from previous studies and find our projections have a narrower range in 2100. Furthermore we discuss the implications for the design of climate risk management strategies.

  16. Evolution of glyoxylate cycle enzymes in Metazoa: evidence of multiple horizontal transfer events and pseudogene formation

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Koonin, Eugene V; Morgunov, Igor G; Finogenova, Tatiana V; Kondrashova, Marie N

    2006-01-01

    Research), Andrey Osterman (Burnham Institute for Medical Research), Chris Ponting (Oxford University). PMID:17059607

  17. Undergraduate Research Experiences in Support of Dryland Monitoring: Field and Satellite Remote Sensing of Change in Savanna Structure, Biomass, and Carbon after Prescribed Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington-Allen, R. A.; Twidwell, D. L., Jr.; Mendieta, V. P.; Delgado, A.; Redman, B.; Trollope, W. S.; Trollope, L.; Govender, N.; Smit, I.; Popescu, S. C.; de Bruno Austin, C.; Reeves, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    The status and trend of degradation in the world’s Drylands, that support over 1.2 billion people, is unknown because monitoring & assessment has not occurred on a globally consistent basis and skilled personnel with a cultivated interest in natural resource science and management are lacking. A major monitoring dataset is the 37-year Landsat data archive that has been released free to the world, but this dataset requires persons who understand how to process and interpret this and similar datasets applicable to the desertification problem. The College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (COALS) at Texas A&M University (TAMU) has an initiative to provide undergraduates with both international and research experiences. The lead author used start-up money, USFS project funds for livestock footprint studies in the US, and seed money from COALS to 1) develop academic mentor contacts in Mozambique, Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, and Tunisia to prepare a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (NSF-REU) Site proposal and 2) launch a pilot REU for two TAMU undergraduate students. Mr. Delgado and Mr. Redman received lidar processing and visualization, field survey training on global positioning systems (GPS), terrestrial LIDAR, and ground penetrating radar technologies and conducted carbon change studies by collecting pre- and post-fire laser scans on experimental burn (EPB) sites in Texas and South Africa. Mr. Redman also developed GIS databases of Landsat timeseries for these EPBs and others in southern Africa. Mr. Delgado participated in the Savanna Fire Ignition Research Experiment (SavFIRE) in Kruger National Park (KNP) by collected laser scan data on 3 EPBs. He also received mentoring from Dr. Winston Trollope, a prominent fire ecologist, and Mr. Chris Austin both of Working with Fire International and Navashni Govender, KNP’s Fire Ecologist. He also was an active participant in a NASA sponsored workshop on remote sensing of global

  18. The College of Charleston's 400-Student Observational Lab Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, C. M.

    2006-06-01

    For over thirty years the College of Charleston has been teaching a year-long introductory astronomy course incorporating a mandatory 3 hour lab. Despite our location in a very light polluted, coastal, high humidity, and often cloudy metropolitan area we have emphasized observational activities as much as possible. To accommodate our population of between 300-400 students per semester, we have 28 8-inch Celestron Telescopes and 25 GPS capable 8-inch Meade LX-200 telescopes. Finally, we have a 16 DFM adjacent to our rooftop observing decks. For indoor activities we have access to 42 computers running a variety of astronomy education software. Some of the computer activities are based on the Starry Night software (Backyard and Pro), the CLEA software from Gettysburg College, and Spectrum Explorer from Boston University. Additionally, we have labs involving cratering, eclipses and phases, coordinate systems with celestial globes, the inverse square law, spectroscopy and spectral classification, as well as others. In this presentation we will discuss the difficulties in managing a program of this size. We have approximately 14 lab sections a week. The lab manager's task involves coordinating 8-10 lab instructors and the same number of undergraduate teaching assistants as well as trying to maintain a coherent experience between the labs and lecture sections. Our lab manuals are produced locally with yearly updates. Samples from the manuals will be available. This program has been developed by a large number of College of Charleston astronomy faculty, including Don Drost, Bob Dukes, Chris Fragile, Tim Giblin, Jon Hakkila, Bill Kubinec, Lee Lindner, Jim Neff, Laura Penny, Al Rainis, Terry Richardson, and D. J. Williams, as well as adjunct and visiting faculty Bill Baird, Kevin Bourque, Ethan Denault, Kwayera Davis, Francie Halter, and Alan Johnson. Part of this work has been funded by NSF DUE grants to the College of Charleston.

  19. IPY Storytelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, C. A.; Lippsett, L.; Carlowicz, M.

    2007-12-01

    "Live from the Poles" tells the stories of science on ice. This NSF-sponsored education and outreach project (polardiscovery.whoi.edu) aims to go beyond results and sound bites to convey the full experience of polar research with all its trials, triumphs, and nuances. It uses a multimedia approach, including online photo essays posted daily during expeditions, along with videos, interviews, podcasts, animations, and audio clips-plus live satellite phone calls to audiences in major museums and science centers throughout the country. Our media team, typically a science writer and photographer, are embedded into the research program for the duration of the project. They live in the polar environment with the science party, bolstering their ability to convey the "human side" of the story that engages the public: What inspired the researchers to study the Arctic? What do they eat for dinner? How do they cope with the environment and being away from home? What other unexpected challenges will arise and how will they be overcome? The first expedition, in April 2007, shared the excitement of working in Nunavut, Canada, as researchers prepared to deploy instruments at the North Pole Environmental Observatory. The second followed an international scientific team's search for hydrothermal vents aboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden in July-August 2007. The Polar Discovery Web site has attracted more than 74,000 online visitors in its first eight months of operation. During the first two expeditions, the project facilitated 15 live audio talks to museum audiences, media outlets, and teacher workshops. This presentation will focus on lessons learned from the first two expeditions, with perspectives on science reporting and writing in the field from a science writer at AGU, and on the art of documentary photography, from photographer and project manager Chris Linder, who will speak via satellite phone from the third Polar Discovery expedition in Antarctica.

  20. Resistance of Wheat Accessions to the English Grain Aphid Sitobion avenae.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang-Shun; Liu, Ying-Jie; Wang, Yu-Han; Wang, Zhe; Yu, Xin-Lin; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Gai-Sheng; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Hu, Zu-Qing; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    The English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, is a major pest species of wheat crops; however, certain varieties may have stronger resistance to infestation than others. Here, we investigated 3 classical resistance mechanisms (antixenosis, antibiosis, and tolerance) by 14 wheat varieties/lines to S. avenae under laboratory and field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, alatae given the choice between 2 wheat varieties, strongly discriminated against certain varieties. Specifically, the 'Amigo' variety had the lowest palatability to S. avenae alatae of all varieties. 'Tm' (Triticum monococcum), 'Astron,' 'Xanthus,' 'Ww2730,' and 'Batis' varieties also had lower palatability than other varieties. Thus, these accessions may use antibiosis as the resistant mechanism. In contrast, under field conditions, there were no significant differences in the number of alatae detected on the 14 wheat varieties. One synthetic line (98-10-30, a cross between of Triticum aestivum (var. Chris) and Triticum turgidum (var. durum) hybridization) had low aphid numbers but high yield loss, indicating that it has high antibiosis, but poor tolerance. In comparison, 'Amigo,' 'Xiaoyan22,' and some '186Tm' samples had high aphid numbers but low yield loss rates, indicating they have low antibiosis, but good tolerance. Aphid population size and wheat yield loss rates greatly varied in different fields and years for '98-10-35,' 'Xiaoyan22,' 'Tp,' 'Tam200,' 'PI high,' and other '186Tm' samples, which were hybrid offspring of T. aestivum and wheat related species. Thus, these germplasm should be considered for use in future studies. Overall, S. avenae is best adapted to 'Xinong1376,' because it was the most palatable variety, with the greatest yield loss rates of all 14 wheat varieties. However, individual varieties/lines influenced aphid populations differently in different years. Therefore, we strongly recommend a combination of laboratory and long-term field experiments in targeted planting

  1. Enhancement of the Microscopy Facilities at the NSLS X1A Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Chris

    1999-08-31

    As originally proposed, the authors constructed a new Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope, STXM IV. The design and construction was led by Chris Jacobsen, and involved graduate students Michael Feser, Mary Carlucci-Dayton and Tobias Beetz. This microscope has the following new features: It has a new and improved high resolution scanning stage that should make it possible to perform higher resolution imaging without distortions. Preliminary results indicate that the stage performs as designed. It has an enclosure that can be evacuated and backfilled with helium. This makes it possible to perform imaging in the neighborhood of the nitrogen and oxygen edges without interference from residual air. It has a motorized detector stage for easy interchange of detectors and alignment microscope. We expect to use this to align the new segmented detector which makes it possible to perform brightfield and dark field microscopy simultaneously, and to record images in differential phase contrast as well. The microscope is located upstream of cryoSTXM, the instrument we use to examine specimens in a frozen hydrated state. The design of STXM IV is such that it makes it quick and easy to switch between STXM IV and cryo-STXM operations and vice versa. IEEE488 based control electronics provides multiple channels of data collection. The microscope is run from a LINUX PC with all new software, developed in-house. The stages for the zone plate and the order sorting aperture (OSA) have kinematic mounts. This way different sets of zone plates (optimized for different wavelengths and working distances) can be exchanged without the need for complete realignment of the instrument. The enclosure can be used as a glove-box, making it possible to examine specimens which require anaerobic handling.

  2. CENTAURUS A: THE INSIDE STORY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to probe the core of the nearest active galaxy to Earth, Centaurus A. [UPPER LEFT] - A close-up high resolution Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the dramatic dust disk which is thought to be the remnant of a smaller spiral galaxy that merged with the large elliptical galaxy. The shock of the collision compressed interstellar gas, precipitating a flurry of star formation and giving the material a fleecy pattern. Dark filaments of dust mixed with cold hydrogen gas are silhouetted against the incandescent yellow-orange glow from stars behind it. [LOWER RIGHT] - Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer was used to peer past the dust to discover a tilted disk of hot gas at the galaxy's center (white bar running diagonally across image center). This 130 light-year diameter disk encircles a suspected black hole which may be one billion times the mass of our Sun. The disk feeds material to presumably an inner, unresolved accretion disk that is made up of gas entrapped by the black hole. The red blobs near the disk are glowing gas clouds which have been heated up and ionized by the powerful radiation from the active nucleus. The false-color NICMOS image was taken on Aug. 11, 1997 at a wavelength of 1.87 microns ('Paschen alpha'), characteristic of ionized Hydrogen. Centaurus A (NGC 5128) Fast Facts Right Ascension: 13 : 25.5 (hours : minutes) Declination: -43 : 01 (degrees : minutes) Apparent Magnitude: 7.0 Apparent Diameter: 18.2 (arc minutes) Distance: 10 million light-years Constellation: Centaurus (southern sky) Credit: E.J. Schreier, (STScI) and NASA Team members are: Ethan J. Schreier, Alessandro Marconi, David J. Axon, Nicola Caon, Duccio Macchetto ( STScI), Alessandro Capetti - (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Italy), James H. Hough, Stuart Young ( University of Hertfordshire, UK), and Chris Packham (Isaac Newton Group, Islas Canarias, SPAIN)

  3. House subcommittee rejects effort to remove abortion coverage.

    PubMed

    1994-05-27

    On May 12, (1994) a subcommittee of the House Education and Labor Committee voted 16-11 in support of retaining abortion coverage in the President's proposed health care plan. With its vote, the Labor/Management Relations subcommittee rejected an amendment by Representative Ron Klink (D-PA), which would have allowed insurers to cover abortions only in cases of forcible rape or incest, or life endangerment. Two Republican Representatives joined 14 Democrats voting against the amendment, while 3 Democratic Representatives were among the 11 people supporting the Klink amendment. The subcommittee also defeated an amendment introduced by Representative Dick Armey (R-TX), which would have prohibited any language in a health care reform bill from overruling constitutional state laws restricting abortion. 14 subcommittee members voted against the Armey amendment; 11 voted in favor. The subcommittee is not expected to act on a final health care measure before the Memorial Day recess. In related news, a Veterans' Affairs House subcommittee voted 11-8 on May 11 to prohibit the performance of abortions at Department of Veterans' Affairs Hospitals or the coverage of abortion services by VA funds. The amendment was introduced in the Hospitals and Health Care subcommittee by Representative Chris Smith (R-NJ). Neither subcommittee action represents a final decision on abortion coverage in health care reform and none of the 5 Congressional committees considering health reform is expected to finalize their proposals before the Memorial Day recess. The Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee and the House Ways and Means Committee started work on health care reform on May 18. The Senate Finance Committee has only been meeting privately thus far, while neither the full House Education and Labor Committee nor the House Energy and Commerce Committee has met. PMID:12319328

  4. Exploring tidewater glacier retreat using past and current observations at Columbia Glacier, Alaska. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neel, S.; Pfeffer, W. T.; Howat, I. M.; Conway, H.; Columbia Glacier Consortium

    2010-12-01

    Since fulfilling Austin Post’s prediction of impending retreat in the late 1970s, Columbia Glacier has repeatedly surprised both casual and careful observers with its ability for rapid change. Over the last three decades, Columbia Glacier has lost approximately 18 km of its original 66 km length, while thinning by approximately 50% at the present terminus. The total ice volume lost to the Gulf of Alaska Estimates upwards of 120 km3 constrain the total ice volume lost to the Gulf of Alaska. Recently, the terminus supported a ~1.5 km long floating tongue for over than a year, contradicting the common assumption that the mechanical properties of temperate ice prohibit flotation over sustained time intervals. The rich history of study offers an opportunity to better understand tidewater glacier retreat, and a valuable analog to the dynamic instability underway at several ice sheet outlet glaciers. Current research aims to improve processing resolution of existing aerial photographic data, while complimenting the 30-year photogrammetric record with a suite of field observations. Recent instrumentation includes: oblique time lapse and still imagery, semi-permanent GPS, airborne radar, mass balance, passive seismology and LiDAR. This presentation will focus on innovative methods developed in recent field seasons, sharing insight each has provided into the retreat process . 1The Columbia Glacier Consortium consists of: Fabian Walter (SIO), Kenichi Matsuoka (NPI), Ben Smith (UW), Ethan Welty (CU-Boulder), Chris Larsen (UAF), Dave Finnegan (CRREL), Dan McNamara (USGS), Yushin Ahn (OSU), Julie Markus (OSU), Adam LeWinter (EIS).

  5. Supply chain challenges. building relationships.

    PubMed

    Beth, Scott; Burt, David N; Copacino, William; Gopal, Chris; Lee, Hau L; Lynch, Robert Porter; Morris, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    Supply chain management is all about software and systems, right? Put in the best technology, sit back, and watch as your processes run smoothly and the savings roll in? Apparently not. When HBR convened a panel of leading thinkers in the field of supply chain management, technology was not top of mind. People and relationships were the dominant issues of the day. The opportunities and problems created by globalization, for example, are requiring companies to establish relationships with new types of suppliers. The ever-present pressure for speed and cost containment is making it even more important to break down stubbornly high internal barriers and establish more effective cross-functional relationships. The costs of failure have never been higher. The leading supply chain performers are applying new technology, new innovations, and process thinking to far greater advantage than the laggards, reaping tremendous gains in all the variables that affect shareholder value: cost, customer service, asset productivity, and revenue generation. And the gap between the leaders and the losers is growing in almost every industry. This roundtable gathered many of the leading thinkers and doers in the field of supply chain management, including practitioners Scott Beth of Intuit, Sandra Morris of Intel, and Chris Gopal of Unisys. David Burt of the University of San Diego and Stanford's Hau Lee bring the latest research from academia. Accenture's William Copacino and the Warren Company's Robert Porter Lynch offer the consultant's perspectives. Together, they take a wide-ranging view of such topics as developing talent, the role of the chief executive, and the latest technologies, exploring both the tactical and the strategic in the current state of supply chain management. PMID:12858712

  6. Maximizing Mission Science Return Through use of Spacecraft Autonomy: Active Volcanism and the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, S.; Davies, A. G.; Sherwood, R.; ASE Science Team

    2005-08-01

    Deep-space missions have been unable to react to dynamic events as encounter observation sequences are planned well in advance. In the case of planet, asteroid and comet fly-bys, the limited resources available are allocated to individual instruments long beforehand. However, for monitoring or mapping mission phases, alternative strategies and technologies are now available. Now, onboard data processing allows greater spacecraft and instrument flexibility, affording the ability to react rapidly to dynamic events, and increasing the science content of returned data. Such new technology has already been successfully demonstrated in the form of the New Millennium Program Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE). In 2004 ASE successfully demonstrated advanced autonomous science data acquisition, processing, and product downlink prioritization, as well as autonomous fault detection and spacecraft command and control. ASE is software onboard the EO-1 spacecraft, in Earth-orbit. ASE controlled the Hyperion instrument, a hyperspectral imager with 220 wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.5 μm and 30 m/pixel spatial resolution. ASE demonstrated that spacecraft autonomy will be advantageous to future missions by making the best use of limited downlink, e.g., by increasing science content per byte of returned data, and by avoiding the return of null (no-change/no feature) datasets. and by overcoming communication delays through decision-making onboard enabling fast reaction to dynamic events. We envision this flight-proven science-driven spacecraft command-and-control technology being used on a wide range of missions to search for and monitor dynamic events, such as active, high-temperature volcanism on Earth and Io, and cryovolcanism on Triton and possibly other icy satellites. Acknowledgements: Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the EO-1 Flight Management Team and Chris Stevens and Art

  7. Performance of a Cryogenic Multipath Herriott Cell Vacuum-Coupled to a Bruker IFS-125HR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Arlan; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Brown, Linda; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate modeling of atmospheric trace gases requires detailed knowledge of spectroscopic line parameters at temperatures and pressures relevant to the atmospheric layers where the spectroscopic signatures form. Pressure-broadened line shapes, frequency shifts, and their temperature dependences, are critical spectroscopic parameters that limit the accuracy of state-of-the-art atmospheric remote sensing. In order to provide temperature dependent parameters from controlled laboratory experiments, a 20.946 ± 0.001 m long path Herriott cell and associated transfer optics were designed and fabricated at Connecticut College to operate in the near infrared using a Bruker 125 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The cell body and gold coated mirrors are fabricated with Oxygen-Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper. Transfer optics are through-put matched for entrance apertures smaller than 2 mm. A closed-cycle Helium refrigerator cools the cell and cryopumps the surrounding vacuum box. This new system and its transfer optics are fully evacuated to ˜10 mTorr (similar to the pressure inside the interferometer). Over a period of several months, this system has maintained extremely good stability in recording spectra at gas sample temperatures between 75 and 250 K. The absorption path length and cell temperatures are validated using CO spectra. The characterization of the Herriott cell is described along with its performance and future applications. We thank Drs. V. Malathy Devi and D. Chris Benner at The College of William and Mary for helpful discussion. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and NASA Langley Research Center, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Cosmic Noise: The Pioneers of Early Radio Astronomy and Their Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T., III

    2012-01-01

    Extraterrestrial radio waves (the galactic background), often referred to as "cosmic noise", were first detected accidentally by Karl Jansky at a frequency of 20 MHz in 1932, with significant followup by Grote Reber. Yet after World War II it was England and Australia that dominated the field. An entirely different sky from that of visual astronomy was revealed by the discoveries of solar noise, "radio stars” (discrete sources such as Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, Cen A and Vir A), galactic noise, lunar and meteor radar experiments, the detection of the 21 cm hydrogen line, and eventually optical identifications such as the Crab Nebula and M87. Key players included wartime radar experts such as Stanley Hey (the British Army's Operational Research Group), Martin Ryle (Cambridge University), Bernard Lovell (Jodrell Bank) and Joe Pawsey (Radiophysics Lab, Sydney). Younger leaders also emerged such as Graham Smith, Tony Hewish, John Davies, "Chris" Christiansen, Bernie Mills, Paul Wild, and John Bolton. Some optical astronomers (Jan Oort, Henk van de Hulst, Jesse Greenstein, Rudolph Minkowski, and Walter Baade) were also extremely supportive. By the end of the postwar decade, radio astronomy was firmly established within the gamut of astronomy, although very few of its practitioners had been trained as astronomers. I will also trace the technical and social aspects of this wholly new type of astronomy, with special attention on military and national influences. I argue that radio astronomy represents one of the key developments in twentieth century astronomy not only because of its own discoveries, but also its pathfinding for the further opening the electromagnetic spectrum. This study is based on exhaustive archival research and over one hundred interviews with pioneering radio astronomers. Full details are available in the book "Cosmic Noise: A History of Early Radio Astronomy" (Cambridge Univ. Pr.).

  9. Revision of Spectral Parameters for the b- and γ-BANDS of Oxygen and Their Validation Using Atmospheric Spectra with the Sun as Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Toon, G. C.

    2011-06-01

    Until recently the B (B1ΣG+ (v=1)←X3Σ-G (v=0)) and γ (B1ΣG+ (v=2)←X3Σ-G (v=0)) bands of oxygen in the visible region had not been used extensively in satellite remote sensing. However, these bands (in particular the B-band) are now being considered for future satellite missions. In this light, it is important to make sure that the reference spectroscopic parameters are accurate enough to provide means of deducing important physical characteristics from the atmospheric spectra. The energy levels and intensities currently given for these bands in the HITRAN spectroscopic database had not been updated for over two decades. We have collected the best available measured line positions that involve the B1ΣG+ (v=1 and v=2) states for the three most abundant isotopologues of oxygen and performed a combined fit to obtain a consistent set of spectroscopic constants. These constants were then used to calculate the line positions. A careful review of the available intensity and line-shape measurements was also carried out, and new parameters were derived based on that review. In particular, line shift parameters that were not previously available were introduced. The new data have been tested in application to high-resolution atmospheric spectra measured with the Fourier transform spectrometers at Park Falls, WI (B-band) and Kitt Peak, AZ (γ-band) and have yielded substantial improvement. In addition, we report the first direct observation and analysis of the 16O18O lines in the γ-band. L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.Chris Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al, ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009).

  10. Controlling the two-dimensional electron gas at complex oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janotti, Anderson

    2014-03-01

    Heterostructures of complex oxides have attracted great interest since the demonstration of a high-density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 (STO/LAO) interface. Still, the density of the 2DEG is only one tenth of what was expected from simple electron counting, i.e., 1/2 electron per unit-cell area. Since then, the origin and amount of the charge, the electrical properties of the 2DEG, the role of native defects, and the abrupt variation of the electron density with the thickness of the LAO top layer have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies. More recently, a 2DEG with the full density of 1/2 electron per unit cell area has been observed at the interface between the band insulator STO and the Mott insulator GdTiO3 (GTO), shedding additional light on the origin of the 2DEG, and raising important questions on the differences between the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures. Here we will discuss the similarities of the 2DEG at the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures from the perspective of first-principles simulations. We will address the differences in band alignments in the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures, and how the 2DEG is affected by the surface of the LAO top layer in the STO/LAO, but apparently not in the STO/GTO case. Finally, we will also discuss how heterostructures can be used to drastically alter the electronic structure of STO, transforming it from a band insulator into a Mott insulator. This work was performed in collaboration with Lars Bjaalie, Luke Gordon, Burak Himmetoglu, and Chris G. Van de Walle, and supported by ARO and NSF.

  11. Listening begins at home.

    PubMed

    Stengel, James R; Dixon, Andrea L; Allen, Chris T

    2003-11-01

    Procter & Gamble has long been regarded as a major power of the marketing world and a prime training ground for marketers. But in the summer of 2000, with half of P&G's top 15 brands losing market share and employee morale in ruins, company executives realized that the marketing organization was in trouble. Training programs had been dramatically downsized and in some cases eliminated, employees were being fast-tracked up the career ladder without sufficient time to develop and hone their skills, mentoring had all but disappeared, and the marketing career path had lost its prestige. In an attempt to rebuild P&G's marketing strength, James Stengel, the heir apparent to the chief marketing officer position, began working with University of Cincinnati professors Chris Allen and Andrea Dixon on a new training program to fix the weaknesses in the marketing organization. But when the two professors began interviewing P&G senior executives, they discovered that the plans in motion for mapping out the marketing group's recovery were based not on data but on the intuition of a few individuals at corporate headquarters. So began the most comprehensive internal research endeavor in P&G marketing's history. Using the company's existing process for consumer research, Allen and Dixon shadowed employees, conducted one-on-one interviews, held focus-group sessions, and surveyed 3,500 members of the marketing staff to learn what the company was doing right--and wrong--and what mattered most to its people. The results led to the most sweeping redesign of P&G's marketing organization in 60 years. In this article, the authors explore the value of listening to employees--and truly hearing them. One of their conclusions: A structured research process can show you what's really on employees' minds. PMID:14619156

  12. The Impact of the SESAME Project on Science and Society in the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2008-04-01

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is a UNESCO-sponsored project that is constructing an international research laboratory, closely modeled on CERN, in Jordan (www.sesame.org.jo). Ten Members of the governing Council (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, and Turkey) have responsibility for the project, led by Herwig Schopper, Council President since 1999. In late 2008 Chris Llewellyn-Smith will become Council President. SESAME was initiated by a gift from Germany of the decommissioned BESSY I facility. The BESSY I 0.8 GeV injector is now being installed in the recently completed building, funded by Jordan, as components are procured for a new 133 m circumference, 2.5 GeV third-generation storage ring with 12 locations for insertion devices. Beam line equipment has been provided by laboratories in France, UK, and US. Support also comes from EU, IAEA, ICTP, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the US Department of Energy and State Department, and laboratories around the world. The broad scientific program includes biomedical, environmental, and archaeological programs particularly relevant to the Middle East. Five scientific workshops and six annual Users' meetings have brought together several hundred scientists from the region, along with researchers from around the world. Training programs have enabled about 100 scientists from the region to work at synchrotron radiation laboratories. These activities have already had significant impact on science and society in the Middle East, for example leading to collaborations between scientists from countries that are not particularly friendly with each other, and to national planning emphasizing synchrotron radiation research. When research starts in 2011 this impact will grow as graduate students are trained in the region in many scientific disciplines, and scientists working abroad are attracted to return.

  13. Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

  14. Hybrid functional studies of defects and hole polarons in oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, Joel

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are ubiquitous, appearing in windows, flat-panel displays, solar cells, solid-state lighting, and transistors that all exploit TCOs' combination of high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. Thanks to this large and growing list of applications, there has been a surge of interest in the science of these materials, focusing on the fundamental properties and doping opportunities in traditional TCOs as well as the exploration of promising new candidate materials. Hybrid density functional theory has proven instrumental in elucidating the physics of TCOs. One example is the study of dopants and defects that determine the conductivity. Accurate formation energies and charge-state transition levels can now be obtained thanks to the accurate electronic structure provided by a hybrid functional. This allows us to address the origins of unintentional conductivity: for SnO2, In2O3, and Ga2O3, we demonstrate that this is not due to native defects such as oxygen vacancies, but must be attributed to unintentional incorporation of impurities. We can also provide guidelines for achieving higher doping levels, suggesting several impurities as candidate donors with high solubility. Limitations on doping due to the formation or incorporation of compensating centers are addressed as well. Hybrid functional calculations also overcome the shortcomings associated with traditional local or semi-local functionals, which do not properly describe charge localization. Hybrid functionals accurately describe polaron formation, i.e., the self-trapping of holes when p - type doping of the oxide materials is attempted. Consequences of polaron formation for optical characterization of the material will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with Anderson Janotti and Chris G. Van de Walle, and was in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. The Challenges and Achievements in 50 Years of Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    On April 12, 1961 the era of human spaceflight began with the orbital flight of Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. On May 5, 1961 The United States responded with the launch of Alan Shepard aboard Freedom 7 on the first flight of Project Mercury. The focus of the first 20 years of human spaceflight was developing the fundamental operational capabilities and technologies required for a human mission to the Moon. The Mercury and Gemini Projects demonstrated launch and entry guidance, on-orbit navigation, rendezvous, extravehicular activity, and flight durations equivalent to a round-trip to the Moon. Heroes of this epoch included flight directors Chris Kraft, Gene Kranz, and Glynn Lunney along with astronauts like John Young, Jim Lovell, Tom Stafford, and Neil Armstrong. The "Race to the Moon” was eventually won by the United States with the landing of Apollo 11 on July 20, 1969. The Apollo program was truncated at 11 missions and a new system, the Space Shuttle, was developed which became the focus of the subsequent 30 years. Although never able to meet the flight rate or cost promises made in the 1970s, the Shuttle nevertheless left a remarkable legacy of accomplishment. The Shuttle made possible the launch and servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope and diverse activities such as life science research and classified national security missions. The Shuttle launched more than half the mass ever put into orbit and its heavy-lift capability and large payload bay enabled the on-orbit construction of the International Space Station. The Shuttle also made possible spaceflight careers for scientists who were not military test pilots - people like me. In this talk I will review the early years of spaceflight and share my experiences, including two missions with HST, from the perspective of a five-time flown astronaut and a senior flight operations manager.

  16. Magnetic sifters and biochips for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earhart, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with biomolecules or recognition moieties are finding wide applications in medicine. In this context, we are developing a micromachined magnetic sifter and magnetic nanoparticles aimed for sample preparation applications in early diagnosis of cancer. The microfabricated sifter consisting of arrays of micron sized slits etched through a silicon wafer. A magnetic film is deposited on the wafer, producing high magnetic field gradients, comparable in magnitude to gradients in planar flow devices. As the solution flows through the die, magnetic particles are captured by the magnetic material surrounding the slits. The large number of slits allows for processing of large volumes of liquid, much greater than that of planar microfluidic devices. The sifters can be simply attached to a syringe or tube, resulting in a portable and user-friendly tool for molecular biology. Separation efficiencies of ˜ 50% for one pass through the sifter have been achieved. We have also designed and fabricated several types of magnetic biochips consisting of arrays of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) spin valve detectors with appropriate dimensions, surface chemistry, and microfluidics. An advanced electronic test station has been set up as a demonstration vehicle for the integrated evaluation of our magnetic biochips with commercial and custom magnetic nanoparticle labels for DNA or protein biomarkers. The magnetic biochip is capable of detecting down to 1-30 nanotags. Real-time detection of DNA signatures and protein targets in buffer and serum samples has been successfully performed in our laboratories, suggesting that magnetic biochips hold great promises for molecular diagnostics of cancer and other diseases. In collaboration with Chris M. Earhart, Wei Hu, Robert J. Wilson, Sebastian J. Osterfeld, Robert L. White, Nader Pourmand, and Shan X. Wang @ Stanford University. This work was supported by grants from NIH (1U54CA119367-01) and DARPA/Navy (N00014-02-1-0807).

  17. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  18. The Drake Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.; Dowd, Matthew F.; Drake, Frank

    2015-07-01

    List of contributors; Foreword Frank Drake; Preface; Acknowledgements; Introduction Steven Dick; 1. Rate of formation of stars suitable for the development of intelligent life, R*, pre-1961 David DeVorkin; 2. Rate of formation of stars suitable for the development of intelligent life, R*, 1961 to the present Patrick François and Danielle Briot; 3. Fraction of stars with planetary systems, fp, pre-1961 Matthew F. Dowd; 4. Fraction of stars with planetary systems, fp, 1961 to the present Chris Impey; 5. Number of planets, per solar system, with an environment suitable for life, ne, pre-1961 Florence Raulin Cerceau; 6. Number of planets, per solar system, with an environment suitable for life, ne, 1961 to the present Danielle Briot and Jean Schneider; 7. Fraction of suitable planets on which life actually appears, fl, pre-1961 Stephané Tirard; 8. Fraction of suitable planets on which life actually appears, fl, 1961 to the present David J. Des Marais; 9. Fraction of life-bearing planets on which intelligent life emerges, fl, pre-1961 Michael Crowe; 10. Fraction of life-bearing planets on which intelligent life emerges, fl, 1961 to the present Lori Marino; 11. Fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space, fc, pre-1961 Florence Raulin Cerceau; 12. Fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space, fc, 1961 to the present Seth Shostak; 13. Length of time such civilizations release detectable signals into space, L, pre-1961 David Dunér; 14. Length of time such civilizations release detectable signals into space, L, 1961 to the present Garry Chick; Afterword Paul Davies; Index.

  19. Ask the Experts: Facial expressions of pain: clinical meaning and research possibilities.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amanda

    2011-07-01

    Amanda Williams qualified as a clinical psychologist in 1985. She joined the first residential pain management programme, INPUT, at St Thomas' Hospital (London, UK) at its start in 1988, running the research program, initially a large randomized controlled trial and generalization trial, and then a series of studies nested within the ongoing program. In 1996 she completed her PhD on the psychology of pain management and took a part-time academic post in the Guy's, King's & St Thomas' medical school (London, UK). In 2004, she moved to University College London (UK), teaching and supervising undergraduate and postgraduate psychologists, and continuing some clinical work in the long-established Pain Management Centre of the National Hospital (London, UK). For over 10 years she has been a volunteer and then a consultant at the Medical Foundation for Victims of Torture (London, UK) working clinically and developing audit and evaluation of clinical work there. She continues these strands of work and they include: evaluation of psychological methods of pain management, mainly in systematic reviews with Chris Eccleston and Stephen Morley; and understanding chronic pain from torture. She has worked extensively on facial expression of pain and its recognition by others, applying an explicitly evolutionary model. This work has led to a major grant to develop automated therapeutic feedback to people with pain, using their behavior as input. She has spoken at many national and international pain meetings, including a plenary at the World Congress of Pain in 2002; she has published over 100 papers and chapters and is on the editorial boards of several major pain journals. PMID:24645656

  20. Electron-electron interactions and lattice distortions in the perovskite titanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjaalie, Lars

    A two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with the unprecedented high density of 3x1014 (corresponding to 1/2 electron per interface unit cell area) can be formed at the interface between SrTiO3 and a rare-earth titanate (RTiO3). The 2DEG resides in the SrTiO3, and arises from a polar discontinuity at the interface. The formation of this 2DEG has led us to study these perovskite titanates in detail. Some of these compounds are Mott insulators, where a Mott-Hubbard gap opens up between partially filled Ti 3 d bands. This talk focuses on the importance of the interplay between electron-electron interactions and lattice distortions in these complex oxides, which we study with density functional theory using a hybrid functional, capable of correctly describing electron localization and Mott-insulating behavior. These effects are crucial to understanding the metal-to-insulator transition as a function of electron density. Indeed, very thin SrTiO3 layers inserted in GdTiO3 show insulating behavior, in contrast to the metallic character of thicker layers in which the electrons form a 2DEG. The same physics is observed in bulk SrTiO3 when doped with 1/2 electron per Ti atom. Charge localization and lattice distortions also govern the formation of small hole polarons in the rare-earth titanates. We demonstrate that these polarons impact the optical absorption measurements commonly used to determine the value of the Mott-Hubbard gap. Work performed in collaboration with Anderson Janotti, Burak Himmetoglu, and Chris G. Van de Walle, and supported by NSF and ARO.

  1. Semi-Empirical Dipole Moment Function of X^{1}Σ^{+} CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2013-06-01

    A new dipole moment function (DMF) for the ground X^{1}Σ^{+} electronic states of carbon monoxide (CO) has been obtained using a direct fit approach that fits the best available and appropriately weighted experimental line intensity data for individual ro-vibrational transitions. This method was recently successfully applied to HF, HCl, HBr and HI molecules. The new dipole moment function benefits from the use of new accurate and extensive experimental data. Also our method allows proper weighting of the data as well as not being dependent on the amount of measured transitions within a band. Combining the newly developed (taking into account the most recent experiments) empirical potential energy functions and the DMF, line positions and line intensities of CO and their isotopologues have been calculated numerically using program LEVEL. In addition, new semi-empirical algorithms for assigning line-shape parameters and line shifts for these species have been developed. Using these improvements, new line lists for CO were created to update the HITRAN spectroscopic database. G. Li, I.E. Gordon, R.J. Le Roy, P.G. Hajigeorgiou, J.A. Coxon, P.F. Bernath, and L.S. Rothman, ``Reference spectroscopic data for Hydrogen Halides. Part I: Construction and Validation of the Ro-vibrational Dipole Moment Functions,'' JQSRT 2013 (In Press). R. Le Roy, ``LEVEL. 8.0 ed2007'' University of Waterloo Chemical Physics Research Report CP-663 (2007). L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.Chris Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al, ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009). L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, R.J. Barber, H. Dothe, R.R. Gamache, A. Goldman, V. Perevalov, S.A. Tashkun, and J. Tennyson, ``HITEMP, the high-temperature molecular spectroscopic database,'' JQSRT 111, 2139-2150 (2010).

  2. A stake in the business.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Chris T

    2005-09-01

    When Chris Sullivan and three friends opened the first Outback Steakhouse in March 1988, in Tampa, Florida, they were hoping it would be successful enough to spawn a few more and maybe some other kinds of restaurants as well. Since then, their chain of Australia-themed restaurants has grown to some 900 locations and counting-plus another 300 or so "concept" restaurants that operate from under Outback's corporate umbrella. Growth like that doesn't happen accidentally, Sullivan says, but it certainly wasn't part of the original plan. In this first-person account, Outback's chairman describes the organization's formula for growth and development, which is consciously rooted in the founders' belief in putting people first. They've created an organizational model in which field managers make most of the decisions, garner the rewards, and live with the consequences. Specifically, the founders believe that the most effective way to make customers happy is to first take care of the people who cook for them, serve them, and supervise operations at the restaurants. Outback servers have fewer tables to worry about than those at other restaurant chains; the cooks have bigger, cooler, better-equipped kitchens; and the supervisors work their way up the ranks toward an equity stake in the restaurant or region they run. There are no administrative layers between field managers and the executives at headquarters. Giving employees good working conditions and the chance to become owners has proved to be good business: Turnover among hourly employees is low, and Outback and its subsidiaries opened 120 restaurants last year, increasing sales by 20.1%. The company must grow in order to keep offering career opportunities to its workers; in turn, those opportunities ensure that Outbackers remain committed to making customers happy and the company successful. PMID:16171211

  3. FIRST LEGO League Kickoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    FIRST LEGO League participants listen to Aerospace Education Specialist Chris Copelan explain the playing field for 'Nano Quest' during a recent FLL kickoff event at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA Stennis Space Center. The kickoff began the 2006 FLL competition season. Eighty-five teachers, mentors, parents and 9- to 14-year-old students from southern and central Mississippi came to SSC to hear the rules for Nano Quest. The challenge requires teams to spend eight weeks building and programming robots from LEGO Mindstorms kits. They'll battle their creations in local and regional competitions. The Dec. 2 competition at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College will involve about 200 students. FIRST LEGO League, considered the 'little league' of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition, partners FIRST and the LEGO Group. Competitions aim to inspire and celebrate science and technology using real-world context and hands-on experimentation, and to promote the principles of team play and gracious professionalism. Because NASA advocates robotics and science-technology education, the agency and SSC support FIRST by providing team coaches, mentors and training, as well as competition event judges, referees, audio-visual and other volunteer staff personnel. Two of Mississippi's NASA Explorer Schools, Bay-Waveland Middle and Hattiesburg's Lillie Burney Elementary, were in attendance. The following schools were also represented: Ocean Springs Middle, Pearl Upper Elementary, Long Beach Middle, Jackson Preparatory Academy, North Woolmarket Middle, D'Iberville Middle, West Wortham Middle, Picayune's Roseland Park Baptist Academy and Nicholson Elementary, as well as two home-school groups from McComb and Brandon. Gulfport and Picayune Memorial-Pearl River high schools' FIRST Robotics teams conducted robotics demonstrations for the FLL crowd.

  4. Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Families and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krełowski, J.

    2014-02-01

    The term ``families of diffuse bands'' (DIBs) appeared in 1986/87 when my collaborators: Gordon A.H. Walker, Bengt E. Westerlund and I found that the strength ratio of the major DIBs 5780 and 5797 is heavily variable. We proved that at the same E(B-V) the DIB intensities may vary by as much as a factor of three or more. A similar result was published by Karl Josafatsson and Ted Snow soon after. A decade later, we proved (with Chris Sneden) that certain DIB strength ratios seem to be related to intensities of the known features of simple molecular species; this led to the introduction of the so called σ and ζ type interstellar clouds. The former are characterized by very weak molecular features (but broad DIBs - very strong) while the latter by rather strong bands of simple radicals and weak broad DIBs. Currently we face a bunch of questions: are the DIB intensities related to those of certain molecular species, e.g. C2 as suggested by Lew Hobbs' and Ted Snow's group? Do the DIB profiles, found to be complex by Peter Sarre, depend on e.g. the rotational temperatures of simple, linear carbon species? Do the DIB profiles depend on the irradiation of interstellar clouds by nearby stars? The relative DIB strengths as well as those of the simple radicals seem to be related to the shapes of interstellar extinction curves. We thus face three players in the interstellar translucent clouds: dust particles, simple radicals and the DIB carriers. Apparently, their mutual relations depend on local physical parameters of intervening clouds; these relations are not clear yet.

  5. Magnetic Charge Organization and Screening in Thermalized Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian

    2014-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a material-by-design in which interacting single-domain ferromagnetic nanoislands are used to model Ising spins in frustrated spin systems. Artificial spin ice has proved a useful system in which to directly probe the physics of geometrical frustration, allowing us to better understand materials such as spin ice. Recently, several new experimental techniques have been developed that allow effective thermalization of artificial spin ice. Given the intense interest in magnetic monopole excitations in spin ice materials and artificial spin ice's success in modeling these materials, it should not come as a surprise that interesting monopole physics emerges here as well. The first experimental investigation of thermalized artificial square spin ice determined that the system's monopole-like excitations obeyed a Boltzmann distribution and also found evidence for monopole-antimonopole interactions. Further experiments have implicated these monopole excitations in the growth of ground state domains. Our recent study of artificial kagome spin ice, whose odd-coordinated vertices always possess a net magnetic charge, has revealed a theoretically-predicted magnetic charge ordering transition which has not been previously observed experimentally. We have also investigated the details of magnetic charge interactions in lattices of mixed coordination number. This work was done in collaboration with Sheng Zhang, Cristiano Nisoli, Gia-Wei Chern, Michael Erickson, Liam O'Brien, Chris Leighton, Paul Lammert, Vincent Crespi, and Peter Schiffer. This work was primarily funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division, grant no. DE-SC0005313.

  6. Data Assimilation of Photosynthetic Light-use Efficiency using Multi-angular Satellite Data: II Model Implementation and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilker, Thomas; Hall, Forest G.; Tucker, J.; Coops, Nicholas C.; Black, T. Andrew; Nichol, Caroline J.; Sellers, Piers J.; Barr, Alan; Hollinger, David Y.; Munger, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit and temporally continuous estimates of photosynthesis will be of great importance for increasing our understanding of and ultimately closing the terrestrial carbon cycle. Current capabilities to model photosynthesis, however, are limited by accurate enough representations of the complexity of the underlying biochemical processes and the numerous environmental constraints imposed upon plant primary production. A potentially powerful alternative to model photosynthesis through these indirect observations is the use of multi-angular satellite data to infer light-use efficiency (e) directly from spectral reflectance properties in connection with canopy shadow fractions. Hall et al. (this issue) introduced a new approach for predicting gross ecosystem production that would allow the use of such observations in a data assimilation mode to obtain spatially explicit variations in e from infrequent polar-orbiting satellite observations, while meteorological data are used to account for the more dynamic responses of e to variations in environmental conditions caused by changes in weather and illumination. In this second part of the study we implement and validate the approach of Hall et al. (this issue) across an ecologically diverse array of eight flux-tower sites in North America using data acquired from the Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (CHRIS) and eddy-flux observations. Our results show significantly enhanced estimates of e and therefore cumulative gross ecosystem production (GEP) over the course of one year at all examined sites. We also demonstrate that e is greatly heterogeneous even across small study areas. Data assimilation and direct inference of GEP from space using a new, proposed sensor could therefore be a significant step towards closing the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  7. Measurements of Methane at 7.5 μm Broadened by Nitrogen at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mary-Ann H.; Mantz, A. W.; Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Crawford, T. J.; Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. Chris

    2010-10-01

    Since the ν4 band system of methane (CH4) at 7.5 µm appears prominently in infrared spectra of Titan's atmosphere, we are conducting laboratory studies to examine the temperature-dependence of infrared transitions of CH4 broadened by N2 in this spectral region. Spectra of methane-nitrogen mixtures at temperatures from 79 to 297 K were obtained at 0.006 cm-1 resolution (resolving power = 2x105) using the Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with new temperature-controlled gas cells designed specifically to fit in the spectrometer's sample compartment. Details of the cells and spectrometer performance [1] are described in an adjacent poster by Sung et al. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique [2] is used to fit selected intervals of 9 or more spectra simultaneously to obtain the temperature dependences of line broadening, pressure-induced shift and line mixing parameters. Results for 13CH4 at 80 to 297 K are discussed relative to our previous high-resolution studies of air- and self-broadened 12CH4 and 13CH4 [3-5] at terrestrial atmospheric temperatures (210 to 314 K). This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program. 1. K. Sung et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. (2010) doi:10.1016/j.jms.2010.05.004. 2. D. Chris Benner et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 53 (1995) 705-721. 3. M. A. H. Smith et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 110 (2009) 639-653. 4. M. A. H. Smith et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 111 (2010) 1152-1166. 5. M. A. H. Smith et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer (2010) submitted.

  8. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry; Miller, Gregory Hale

    2012-10-14

    . Phillip Colella, the head of ANAG, and some of his colleagues. Chris Algieri is now employed as a staff member in Dr. Bill Collins' Climate Science Department in the Earth Sciences Division at LBNL working with computational models of climate change. Finally, it should be noted that the work conducted by Professor Puckett and his students Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri and described in this final report for DOE grant # DE-FC02-03ER25579 is closely related to work performed by Professor Puckett and his students under the auspices of Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER25473 An Algorithmic and Software Framework for Applied Partial Differential Equations: A DOE SciDAC Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC). Dr. Colella was the lead PI for this SciDAC grant, which was comprised of several research groups from DOE national laboratories and five university PI's from five different universities. In theory Professor Puckett tried to use funds from the SciDAC grant to support work directly involved in implementing algorithms developed by members of his research group at UCD as software that might be of use to Puckett's SciDAC CoPIs. (For example, see the work reported in Section 2.2.2 of this final report.) However, since there is considerable lead time spent developing such algorithms before they are ready to become `software' and research plans and goals change as the research progresses, Professor Puckett supported each member of his research group partially with funds from the SciDAC APDEC ISIC DE-FC02-01ER25473 and partially with funds from this DOE MICS grant DE-FC02-03ER25579. This has necessarily resulted in a significant overlap of project areas that were funded by both grants. In particular, both Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri were supported partially with funds from grant # DE-FG02-03ER25579, for which this is the final report, and in part with funds from Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant # DE-FC02-01ER25473. For example, Sarah Williams

  9. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    ''. Besides the inspiring scientific arrangements, I encourage you to taste Taiwan's wonderful gourmet cuisine, and to explore the beauty of the sweet-potato-shaped island. I wish you a joyful, fruitful and memorable stay. Victor TY Lin, PhD Chairman Local Organizing Committee Met & Props 2013 International Programme Committee Professor Mohamed El Mansori (Arts et Metiers ParisTech, France) Professor H Zahouani (Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France) Professor B-G Rosen (Halmstad University, Sweden) Professor Tom R Thomas (Halmstad University, Sweden) Professor Liam Blunt (University of Huddersfield, UK) Professor Richard Leach (National Physical Laboratory, UK) Professor Chris Brown (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA) Dr Jia-Ruey Duann (Center for Measurement Standards, ITRI, Taiwan) International Scientific Committee Professor H Zahouani (Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France) Dr Rolf Krüger-Sehm (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany) Professor Pawel Pawlus (Rzeszów University of Technology, Poland) Professor B-G Rosen (Halmstad University, Sweden) Professor Tom R Thomas (Halmstad University, Sweden) Professor Liam Blunt (University of Huddersfield, UK) Professor Derek Chetwynd (University of Warwick, UK) Professor Jane Jiang (University of Huddersfield, UK) Professor Richard Leach (National Physical Laboratory, UK) Professor Paul Scott (University of Huddersfield, UK) Dr Andrew Yacoot (National Physical Laboratory, UK) Professor Chris Brown (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA) Dr Chris Evans (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA) Professor Jay Raja (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA) Dr Ted Vorburger (National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA) Dr Andrew Baker (National Measurement Institute, Australia) Professor David Lee Butler (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) Dr Benny Cheung (The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China) Professor Yetai Fei (Hefei University of Technology, China) Dr Kazuya Naoi (National Metrology Institute

  10. A New Breed of Database System: Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosweller, H. S.; Sparks, R. S.; Siebert, L.

    2009-12-01

    VOGRIPA originated as part of the Global Risk Identification Programme (GRIP) that is being co-ordinated from the Earth Institute of Columbia University under the auspices of the United Nations and World Bank. GRIP is a five-year programme aiming at improving global knowledge about risk from natural hazards and is part of the international response to the catastrophic 2004 Asian tsunami. VOGRIPA is also a formal IAVCEI project. The objectives of VOGRIPA are to create a global database of volcanic activity, hazards and vulnerability information that can be analysed to identify locations at high risk from volcanism, gaps in knowledge about hazards and risk, and will allow scientists and disaster managers at specific locations to analyse risk within a global context of systematic information. It is this added scope of risk and vulnerability as well as hazard which sets VOGRIPA apart from most previous databases. The University of Bristol is the central coordinating centre for the project, which is an international partnership including the Smithsonian Institution, the Geological Survey of Japan, the Earth Observatory of Singapore (Chris Newhall), the British Geological Survey, the University of Buffalo (SUNY) and Munich Re. The partnership is intended to grow and any individuals or institutions who are able to contribute resources to VOGRIPA objectives are welcome to participate. Work has already begun (funded principally by Munich Re) on populating a database of large magnitude explosive eruptions reaching back to the Quaternary, with extreme-value statistics being used to evaluate the magnitude-frequency relationship of such events, and also an assessment of how the quality of records affect the results. The following 4 years of funding from the European Research Council for VOGRIPA will be used to establish further international collaborations in order to develop different aspects of the database, with the data being accessible online once it is sufficiently

  11. An enhanced rate-based emission trading program for NOX: the Dutch model.

    PubMed

    Sholtz, A M; Van Amburg, B; Wochnick, V K

    2001-12-01

    Since 1997 government and industry in The Netherlands have been engaged in intensive policy discussions on how to design an emission trading program that would satisfy the Government's policy objectives within the national and international regulatory framework and accommodate industry's need for a flexible and cost-effective approach. Early on in the discussion the most promising solution was a rate-based approach, which dynamically allocated saleable emission credits based on a performance standard rate and actual energy used by facilities. All industrial facilities above a threshold of 20 MWth would be judged on their ability to meet this performance rate. Those "cleaner" than the standard can sell excess credits to others with an allocation that is less than their actual NOX emission. With some changes in law, such a design could be made to fit well into the national and EU legislative framework while at the same time uniquely meeting industry's requirement of flexibility toward economic growth and facility expansion. (An analysis of the legislative changes required will be given in a separate paper by Chris Dekkers.) However, the environmental outcome of such a system is not as certain as under an absolute emission cap. At the request of the Netherlands Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM), Automated Credit Exchange (ACE), in close cooperation with the working group of government and industry representatives introduced a number of features into the Dutch NOX program allowing full exploitation of market mechanisms while allowing intermediate adjustments in the performance standard rates. The design is geared toward meeting environmental targets without jeopardizing the trading market the program intends to create. The paper discusses the genesis of the two-tier credit system ACE helped to design, explains the differences between primary (fixed) and secondary (variable) credits, and outlines how the Dutch system is expected to

  12. VLBI2010 Demonstrator Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niell, A.

    2008-12-01

    . Observations demonstrating the full four-band configuration are planned for October. In this talk the results of these tests, the improvements that are anticipated for the operational VLBI2010 network, and the status of other developments in the next generation of geodetic VLBI systems will be presented. * Bruce Whittier, Mike Titus, Jason SooHoo, Dan Smythe, Alan Rogers, Jay Redmond, Mike Poirier, Chuck Kodak, Alan Hinton, Ed Himwich, Skip Gordon, Mark Evangelista, Irv Diegel, Brian Corey, Tom Clark, Chris Beaudoin (in reverse alphabetical order)

  13. HUBBLE IMAGES REVEAL A YOUNG STAR'S DYNAMIC DISK AND JETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Krist and Chris Burrows (European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute)

  14. Aviation Simulators for the Desktop: Panel and Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Greg; Rosekind, Marl R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Panel Members are: Christine M. Mitchell (Georgia Tech), Michael T. Palmer (NASA Langley), Greg Pisani (NASA Ames), and Amy R. Pritchett (MIT). The Panel members are affiliated with aviation human factors groups from NASA Ames, NASA Langley, MITCHELL Department of Aerospace and Aeronautical Engineering, and Georgia Technics Center for Human-Machine Systems Research. Panelists will describe the simulator(s) used in their respective institutions including a description of the FMS aircraft models, software, hardware, and displays. Panelists will summarize previous, on-going, and planned empirical studies conducted with the simulators. Greg Pisanich will describe two NASA Ames simulation systems: the Stone Soup Simulator (SSS), and the Airspace Operations Human Factors Simulation Laboratory. The the Stone Soup Simulator is a desktop-based, research flight simulator that includes mode control, flight management, and datalink functionality. It has been developed as a non-proprietary simulator that can be easily distributed to academic and industry researchers who are collaborating on NASA research projects. It will be used and extended by research groups represented by at least two panelists (Mitchell and Palmer). The Airspace Operations Simulator supports the study of air traffic control in conjunction with the flight deck. This simulator will be used provide an environment in which many AATT and free flight concepts can be demonstrated and evaluated. Mike Palmer will describe two NASA Langley efforts: The Langley Simulator and MD-11 extensions to the NASA Amesbury simulator. The first simulator is publicly available and combines a B-737 model with a high fidelity flight management system. The second simulator enhances the S3 simulator with MD-11 electronic flight displays together with modifications to the flight and FMS models to emulate MD-11 dynamics and operations. Chris Mitchell will describe GT-EFIRT (Georgia Tech-Electronic Flight Instrument Research Tool) and B

  15. PREFACE: XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. D.; van der Hart, H. W.; McCann, J. F.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2012-11-01

    The XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held at Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, 27 July - 2 August 2011. Members of the Local Organising Committee were drawn from the School of Mathematics and Physics of Queen's University Belfast, the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University, the School of Physics at University College Dublin and the Department of Experimental Physics at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. The Conference was attended by 566 participants with contributions from 54 countries. The meeting attracted 786 contributed papers for presentation in the poster sessions. The conference included 20 Special Reports selected from the contributed papers, and these are included in part 1 of this volume. During the meeting a total of 65 Progress Reports were also presented, and the authors invited to submit written versions of their talks (see Part 1). Of the total number of contributed papers, 663 are included as refereed abstracts in parts 2 to 15 of this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Part 1 of this volume includes detailed write-ups of the majority of plenary lectures, progress reports and special reports, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting, and is additionally published in hard-copy as the Conference Proceedings. There were 5 plenary lectures given by Margaret Murnane on Ultrafast processes in atomic dynamics; Chris Greene on Few-body highly-correlated dynamics; Michael Allan on Electron-molecule collisions; Yasunori Yamazaki on Antiproton and positron collisions and Thomas Stöhlker on Relativistic ion collisions. Ian Spielman, winner of the IUPAP Young Scientist Prize for 2011, gave a special lecture entitled Modifying interatomic interactions using Raman coupling: a tale of slowly colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition an evening public lecture by Mike Baillie on How precise tree-ring dating raises issues concerning the

  16. Acoustic Emission Patterns and the Transition to Ductility in Sub-Micron Scale Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Xia, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    We report observation of a transition from the brittle to ductile regime in precursor events from different rock materials (Granite, Sandstone, Basalt, and Gypsum) and Polymers (PMMA, PTFE and CR-39). Acoustic emission patterns associated with sub-micron scale laboratory earthquakes are mapped into network parameter spaces (functional damage networks). The sub-classes hold nearly constant timescales, indicating dependency of the sub-phases on the mechanism governing the previous evolutionary phase, i.e., deformation and failure of asperities. Based on our findings, we propose that the signature of the non-linear elastic zone around a crack tip is mapped into the details of the evolutionary phases, supporting the formation of a strongly weak zone in the vicinity of crack tips. Moreover, we recognize sub-micron to micron ruptures with signatures of 'stiffening' in the deformation phase of acoustic-waveforms. We propose that the latter rupture fronts carry critical rupture extensions, including possible dislocations faster than the shear wave speed. Using 'template super-shear waveforms' and their network characteristics, we show that the acoustic emission signals are possible super-shear or intersonic events. Ref. [1] Ghaffari, H. O., and R. P. Young. "Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes." Nature Scientific reports 3 (2013). [2] Xia, Kaiwen, Ares J. Rosakis, and Hiroo Kanamori. "Laboratory earthquakes: The sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear rupture transition." Science 303.5665 (2004): 1859-1861. [3] Mello, M., et al. "Identifying the unique ground motion signatures of supershear earthquakes: Theory and experiments." Tectonophysics 493.3 (2010): 297-326. [4] Gumbsch, Peter, and Huajian Gao. "Dislocations faster than the speed of sound." Science 283.5404 (1999): 965-968. [5] Livne, Ariel, et al. "The near-tip fields of fast cracks." Science 327.5971 (2010): 1359-1363. [6] Rycroft, Chris H., and Eran Bouchbinder

  17. Gravitational Lensing: Recent Progress & Future Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, Tereasa

    2001-01-01

    This award was intended to provide financial support for an international astrophysics conference on gravitational lensing which was held at Boston University from July 25 to July 30, 1999. Because of the nature of the award, no specific research was proposed, nor was any carried out. The participants at the conference presented results of their on-going research efforts, and written summaries of their presentations have been published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific as part of their conference series. The reference to the conference proceedings book is Gravitational Lensing: Recent Progress and Future Goals, ASP Conference Series volume 237, eds. T. G. Brainerd and C. S. Kochanek (2001). The ISBN number of this book is 1-58381-074-9. The goal of the conference was to bring together both senior and junior investigators who were actively involved in all aspects of gravitational lensing research. This was the first conference in four years to address gravitational lensing from such a broad perspective (the previous such conference being IAU Symposium 173 held in Melbourne, Australia in July 1995). The conference was attended by 190 participants, who represented of order 70 different institutions and of order 15 different countries. The Scientific Organizing Committee members were Matthias Bartelmann (co-chair), Tereasa Brainerd (co-chair), Ian Browne, Richard Ellis, Nick Kaiser, Yannick Mellier, Sjur Refsdal, HansWalter Rix, Joachim Wambsganss, and Rachel Webster. The Local Organizing Committee members were Tereasa Brainerd (chair), Emilio Falco, Jacqueline Hewitt, Christopher Kochanek, and Irwin Shapiro. The oral sessions were organized around specific applications of gravitational lensing and included invited reviews, invited 'targeted talks', and contributed talks. The review speakers were Roger Blandford, Tereasa Brainerd, Gus Evrard, Nick Kaiser, Guinevere Kaufmann, Chris Kochanek, Charley Lineweaver, Gerry Luppino, Shude Mao, Paul Schechter, Peter

  18. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jr., Lloyd

    1997-09-21

    This document contains the final reports from the five panels that comprised a Workshop held to explore future directions, scientific impacts and technological connections of research in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. This workshop was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and was held at the Westfields International Conference Center in Chantilly, Virginia on September 21-24, 1997. The workshop was chaired by Lloyd Armstrong, Jr., University of Southern California and the five panels focused on the following topics: Panel A: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - Low Field Daniel Kleppner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), chair Panel B: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - High Field Phil Bucksbaum (University of Michigan), chair Panel C: Surface Interactions with Photons, Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules J. Wayne Rabalais (University of Houston), chair Panel D: Theory of Structure and Dynamics Chris Greene (University of Colorado), chair Panel E: Nano- and Mesocopic Structures Paul Alivisatos (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), chair The choice of focus areas reflects areas of significant interest to DOE/BES but is clearly not intended to span all fields encompassed by the designation of atomic, molecular and optical physics, nor even all areas that would be considered for review and funding under DOE’s AMOP program. In a similar vein, not all research that might be suggested under these topics in this report would be appropriate for consideration by DOE’s AMOP program. The workshop format included overview presentations from each of the panel chairs, followed by an intensive series of panel discussion sessions held over a two-day period. The panels were comprised of scientists from the U. S. and abroad, many of whom are not supported by DOE’s AMOP Program. This workshop was held in lieu of the customary “Contractors Meeting” held annually for

  19. IUSSP activities. Committee on Historical Demography. Report: Conference on Asian Population History, Taipei, Taiwan, 4-8 January 1996.

    PubMed

    Osirike, A B

    1996-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the Asian Population History Conference held in Taipei, Taiwan, January 4-8, 1996. 41 papers were presented on seven themes: Asian population growth, epidemiological transition and public health, mortality trends in pretransitional populations, marriage patterns and demographic systems, fertility levels and trends in pretransitional Asian populations, migration and population distribution, and family systems. Papers were presented by Anthony Reid; Chris Wilson; Bruce Fetter; Sumit Guha; Sheila Zurbrigg; Timothy Dyson and Monica Das Gupta; Cameron Campbell; Robert Shepherd; Ann Jannetta; Chai-Bin Park, Eise Yokoyama, and Sadahiko Nozaki; Peter Boomgaard; Jose Antonio Ortega Osona; Osamu Saito; Ts'ui-jung Liu and Shi-yung Liu; Wen Shang Yang; Dallas Fernando; Bruce Caldwell; A. Francis Gealogo; S. Irudaya Rajan; Kiyoshi Hamano; Guo Songyi; Wang Feng and James Lee; Christopher Langford; Terence H. Hull; Paul K.C. Liu; Xizhe Peng and Yangfang Hou; Ken'ichi Tomobe; Nokiro O. Tsuya; Peter Xenos; Daniel Doeppers; Chaonan Chen and Su-fen Liu; Jiang Tao; Akira Hayami and Emiko Ochiai; Arthur P. Wolf and Chuang Ying-chang; Myron L. Cohen; Burton Pasternak; Zhongwei Zhao; Li-shou Yang, Arland Thornton, and Tamara Hareven; Chi-chun Yi and Yu-hsia Lu; Lai Huimin; Ding Yizhuang; and John Caldwell, who chaired the concluding session. John Caldwell concluded that the conference provided an impressive collection of findings on Asian population history. There was much more research possible, particularly research based on India's rich historical data archives. Research was needed to confirm the assertion that Asian mortality transition began after the two world wars. A focus on natural family planning methods used prior to the transition was suggested. International Union for Scientific Study of Population Committee Chairman David Reher suggested multidisciplinary research on Asian differences in fertility, mortality, and migration. Hayami and Ts

  20. Ocean acidification and its impacts: an expert survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, J.; Mach, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    pertaining to policy and socio-economic impacts, for example on food security, were also relatively low. Thanks are due to the respondents: Andreas Andersson, James Barry, Jerry Blackford, Philip Boyd, Ken Caldeira, Long Cao, Sinead Collins, Sarah Cooley, Kim Currie, Allemand Denis, Brad deYoung, Andrew Dickson, Ken Drinkwater, Sam Dupont, Jonathan Erez, Richard Feely, Maoz Fine, Kunshan Gao, Marion Gehlen, Jason Hall-Spencer, Christoph Heinze, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Gretchen Hofmann, Roberto Iglesias-Prieto, Maria Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez, Akio Ishida, Masao Ishii, Atsushi Ishimatsu, Haruko Kurihara, Kitack Lee, Su Mei Liu, Salvador Lluch-Cota, Jeremy T. Mathis, Ben McNeil, Philip Munday, John Pandolfi, Gian-Kasper Plattner, Alexander Polonsky, Hans-Otto Pörtner, Ulf Riebesell, Rongshuo, Chris Sabine, Daniela Schmidt, Brad Seibel, Yoshihisa Shirayama, Atsushi Suzuki, Carol Turley, Nicola Wannicke, Poh Poh Wong, Michiyo Yamamoto-Kawai and Peter Zavialov.