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Sample records for stills disease complicated

  1. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Lyme Disease - Neurological Complications ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial ...

  2. Myocarditis in Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Sève, Pascal; Iwaz, Jean; Gagnard, Anne; Broussolle, Christiane; Durieu, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Hot, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study highlights the clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of the rare myocarditis in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Among a case series of 57 patients fulfilling either Yamaguchi or Fautrel AOSD criteria and seen between 1998 and 2010, we identified 4 cases of myocarditis. From a comprehensive literature review, we collected 20 additional cases of myocarditis-complicated AOSD. The characteristics of patients with myocarditis were compared with those of AOSD patients without myocarditis. In these 24 myocarditis-complicated AOSD cases, myocarditis occurred early and was present at AOSD onset in 54% of the cases. Myocarditis was often symptomatic (96% of patients) with nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormalities (79% of patients) and a left ventricle ejection fraction ?50% (67% of patients). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed features consistent with myocarditis in 4 patients and a mononuclear interstitial inflammatory infiltrate in 4 others. Steroids alone were effective in 50% of patients with myocarditis. Intravenous immunoglobulins, methotrexate, and tumor necrosis factor-?-blockers were also prescribed and often found effective. Only 1 patient died from cardiogenic shock. Patients with myocarditis-complicated AOSD were younger and more frequently male than patients with AOSD alone. Pericarditis was more frequent in the myocarditis group; white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear cell count, and serum ferritin levels were also higher. Myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening complication of AOSD but responds positively to steroids and other immunomodulatory drugs. Its prognosis remains good (only 1 death occurred), but the condition requires close monitoring of heart function. PMID:25398063

  3. Economy class syndrome: still a recurrent complication of long journeys.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Bertamini, Francesca; Michieletto, Elisa; Ori, Carlo

    2007-04-01

    Economy class syndrome is a rare but still unavoidable complication of long haul flights, particularly in patients who carry various intrinsic risk factors. The tendency to affect even asymptomatic young people and the greater risk to fragment and propagate to the pulmonary circulation are the main characteristics of deep vein thrombosis of long-flight travelers. We report the clinical history of eight patients admitted to intensive care unit for confirmed or highly suspected economy class syndrome. Seven of them developed the syndrome within 72 h from a long return flight, one suffered from pulmonary embolism after a 12-h car trip. Two out of eight patients died, one because of extremely severe hemodynamic impairment, the other as a consequence of multiple organ failure caused by a concomitant myocardial infarction. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism represent one of the main medical problems of air travel and cause almost 20% of deaths in people with no medical history. Although economy class syndrome occurs mostly in elderly, even the healthy young population can be affected and, in fact, three out of eight patients of our series were under 50 years of age. All our patients but one carried a well recognized risk factor for deep vein thrombosis. Clinical symptoms of deep vein thrombosis can sometimes be aspecific and confusing, so that a certain proportion of post-travel deep vein thrombosis, evolving favorably and not giving rise to pulmonary embolism, might effectively remain undiagnosed. Economy class syndrome is still quite difficult to deal with and controversial in terms of preventive strategies. PMID:17496687

  4. Neurological complications of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Pengiran, T; Wills, A; Holmes, G

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neurological disorders have been reported in association with coeliac disease including epilepsy, ataxia, neuropathy, and myelopathy. The nature of this association is unclear and whether a specific neurological complication occurs in coeliac disease remains unproved. Malabsorption may lead to vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Therefore, patients who develop neurological dysfunction should be carefully screened for these. However, malabsorption does not satisfactorily explain the pathophysiology and clinical course of many of the associated neurological disorders. Other mechanisms proposed include altered autoimmunity, heredity, and gluten toxicity. This review attempts to summarise the literature and suggests directions for future research. PMID:12151653

  5. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Jul 24,2013 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  6. Are reactive oxygen species still the basis for diabetic complications?

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Elyse; Jha, Jay C; Sharma, Arpeeta; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A; de Haan, Judy B

    2015-07-01

    Despite the wealth of pre-clinical support for a role for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the aetiology of diabetic complications, enthusiasm for antioxidant therapeutic approaches has been dampened by less favourable outcomes in large clinical trials. This has necessitated a re-evaluation of pre-clinical evidence and a more rational approach to antioxidant therapy. The present review considers current evidence, from both pre-clinical and clinical studies, to address the benefits of antioxidant therapy. The main focus of the present review is on the effects of direct targeting of ROS-producing enzymes, the bolstering of antioxidant defences and mechanisms to improve nitric oxide availability. Current evidence suggests that a more nuanced approach to antioxidant therapy is more likely to yield positive reductions in end-organ injury, with considerations required for the types of ROS/RNS involved, the timing and dosage of antioxidant therapy, and the selective targeting of cell populations. This is likely to influence future strategies to lessen the burden of diabetic complications such as diabetes-associated atherosclerosis, diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25927680

  7. Reviewing Dengue: Still a Neglected Tropical Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a “neglected tropical disease” (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003–2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  8. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  9. Clinical features and prognosis of adult-onset Still’s disease: 75 cases from China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Lv, Xiaoju; Tang, Guangmin

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and complications of patients with adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD) in our local Chinese population. Patients with AOSD attending our hospital from 2008 to 2011 were identified and followed up. Their clinical and laboratory features at presentation, as well as their disease progression, treatments, and outcomes were recorded and compared with other reported series. A total of 75 patients with AOSD were identified. Forty-four were female. Thirty-nine had disease onset between 16 and 35 years of age. The most common presenting features were fever (96%), arthritis (57.33%), rash (78.67%), and sore throat (49.3%). The acute phase response was marked in most patients, with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rates (77.05%) and C-reactive protein levels (84.06%). Hyperferritinemia was present in 74.14% of cases, and serum ferritin (SF) levels declined after treatment in most cases. Liver abnormalities were usually transient, but were more severe in 5 patients. Most patients (92%) required corticosteroid therapy; of these, 33.3% also received disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or immunosuppressive drugs. Sixty-four and 45.33% patients with AOSD achieved partial and complete remission, respectively, after 2 weeks of treatment, and 92% and 74.67%, respectively, after 1 month. The cumulative relapse rate was 45.3%. Patients with AOSD had complex symptoms with no specific laboratory findings. Reduced SF levels after treatment and liver abnormalities may be used to follow treatment outcome. PMID:26629195

  10. Surgical complications of amyloid disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, D. P.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Bouch, D. C.; Wood, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The case of a man with primary systemic amyloidosis without myelomatosis and long-term survival is described. The patient has had major surgical complications from large amyloid deposits in the colon, dorsal spine and peritoneal cavity. The patient remains well 14 years after diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3684836

  11. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is known as "invasive disease." Depending on what type of invasive infection the bacteria cause, the complications can be different. For example, if meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and ...

  12. Ocular Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mady, Rana; Grover, Will; Butrus, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Though inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a specific predilection for the intestinal tract, it is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organs, including the eye. Ocular complications directly related to IBD are categorized as primary and secondary. Primary complications are usually temporally associated with IBD exacerbations and tend to resolve with systemic treatment of the intestinal inflammation. These include keratopathy, episcleritis, and scleritis. Secondary complications arise from primary complications. Examples include cataract formation due to treatment with corticosteroids, scleromalacia due to scleritis, and dry eye due to hypovitaminosis A following gut resection. Some ocular manifestations of IBD can lead to significant visual morbidity and temporally associated complications can also be a herald of disease control. Furthermore, ocular manifestations of IBD can occasionally manifest before the usual intestinal manifestations, leading to an earlier diagnosis. Thus, it is important to understand the clinical presentation of possible ocular manifestations in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to help prevent significant visual morbidity. PMID:25879056

  13. Tangier disease: still more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Nofer, J-R; Remaley, A T

    2005-10-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play a central role in transporting cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for elimination from the body. Impairment of HDL-mediated cholesterol transport favors cholesterol deposition in the arterial wall and promotes development of arteriosclerosis. Tangier disease is a severe HDL deficiency syndrome characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol in tissue macrophages and prevalent atherosclerosis. A three-decade search for a culprit in Tangier disease led to the identification of mutations in a cell membrane protein called ABCA1, which mediates the secretion of excess cholesterol from cells into the HDL metabolic pathway. Because of its ability to deplete cells of cholesterol and to raise plasma HDL levels, ABCA1 has become a promising therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease. PMID:16235041

  14. Chagas Disease: Still Many Unsolved Issues

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, José M.; Fonseca, Raissa; Borges da Silva, Henrique; Marinho, Cláudio R. F.; Bortoluci, Karina R.; Sardinha, Luiz R.; Epiphanio, Sabrina; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the immune effector mechanisms involved in the control of Trypanosoma cruzi, as well as the receptors participating in parasite recognition by cells of the innate immune system, have been largely described. However, the main questions on the physiopathology of Chagas disease remain unanswered: “Why does the host immune system fail to provide sterile immunity?” and “Why do only a proportion of infected individuals develop chronic pathology?” In this review, we describe the mechanisms proposed to explain the inability of the immune system to eradicate the parasite and the elements that allow the development of chronic heart disease. Moreover, we discuss the possibility that the inability of infected cardiomyocytes to sense intracellular T. cruzi contributes to parasite persistence in the heart and the development of chronic pathology. PMID:25104883

  15. Chagas disease: still many unsolved issues.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, José M; Fonseca, Raissa; Borges da Silva, Henrique; Marinho, Cláudio R F; Bortoluci, Karina R; Sardinha, Luiz R; Epiphanio, Sabrina; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the immune effector mechanisms involved in the control of Trypanosoma cruzi, as well as the receptors participating in parasite recognition by cells of the innate immune system, have been largely described. However, the main questions on the physiopathology of Chagas disease remain unanswered: "Why does the host immune system fail to provide sterile immunity?" and "Why do only a proportion of infected individuals develop chronic pathology?" In this review, we describe the mechanisms proposed to explain the inability of the immune system to eradicate the parasite and the elements that allow the development of chronic heart disease. Moreover, we discuss the possibility that the inability of infected cardiomyocytes to sense intracellular T. cruzi contributes to parasite persistence in the heart and the development of chronic pathology. PMID:25104883

  16. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  17. Gaucher disease: haematological presentations and complications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alison S; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, required for the degradation of glycosphingolipids. Clinical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, bone disease and a bleeding diathesis, frequently resulting in presentation to haematologists. Historically managed by splenectomy, transfusions and orthopaedic surgery, the development of specific therapy in the form of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy in the 1990s has resulted in dramatic improvements in haematological and visceral disease. Recognition of complications, including multiple myeloma and Parkinson disease, has challenged the traditional macrophage-centric view of the pathophysiology of this disorder. The pathways by which enzyme deficiency results in the clinical manifestations of this disorder are poorly understood; altered inflammatory cytokine profiles, bioactive sphingolipid derivatives and alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment have been implicated. Further elucidating these pathways will serve to advance our understanding not only of GD, but of associated disorders. PMID:24588457

  18. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked ?-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children. PMID:22898981

  19. [Special surgical complications in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kroesen, A J

    2015-04-01

    After colorectal and anorectal interventions for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, specific complications can occur.In Crohn's disease these complications mainly occur after proctocolectomy. Pelvic sepsis can be prevented by omentoplasty with fixation inside the pelvis. A persisting sepsis of the sacral cavity can be treated primarily by dissection of the anal sphincter which ensures better drainage. In cases of chronic sacral sepsis, transposition of the gracilis muscle is a further effective option. Early recurrence of a transsphincteric anal fistula should be treated by reinsertion of a silicon seton drainage.Complications after restorative proctocolectomy are frequent and manifold (35%). The main acute complications are anastomotic leakage and pelvic sepsis. Therapy consists of transperineal drainage of the abscess with simultaneous transanal drainage. Late complications due to technical and septic reasons are still a relevant problem even 36 years after introduction of this operative technique. A consistent approach with detailed diagnostic and surgical therapy results in a 75% rescue rate of ileoanal pouches. PMID:25693779

  20. [Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease and adult-onset Still's disease : A rare co-occurence].

    PubMed

    Sondermann, W; Hillen, U; Reis, A C; Schimming, T; Schilling, B

    2015-12-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease and adult-onset Still's disease are rare inflammatory conditions with overlapping clinical features. Adult-onset Still's disease causes high fevers, a typical salmon-colored rash, and joint pain. The principal symptom of Kikuchi's disease is cervical lymphadenopathy with typical histopathological features including extensive necrosis of the involved lymph nodes. Here, we report on a rare case of concurrent adult-onset Still's disease and Kikuchi-Fujimoto syndrome in a young Caucasian patient. PMID:26115972

  1. Neurological complications of Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Salvatore; Arnao, Valentina; Licata, Giuseppe; Pinto, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic clinical manifestations of AFD such as acroparesthesias, angiokeratoma, corneal opacity, hypo/ and anhidrosis, gastrointestinal symptoms, renal and cardiac dysfunctions can occur in male and female patients, although heterozygous females with AFD usually seem to be less severely affected. The most prominent CNS manifestations consist of cerebrovascular events such as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and (recurrent) strokes. For the most part, CNS complications in AFD have been attributed to cerebral vasculopathy, including anatomical abnormalities. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial accumulation of Gb-3. White matter lesions (WML) on occur MRI. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. Stroke in Anderson-Fabry disease study of 721 patients with cryptogenic stroke, aged 18-55 years, showed a high prevalence of Fabry disease in this group: 5% (21/432) of men and 3% (7/289) of women. Combining results of both sexes showed that 4% of young patients with stroke of previously unknown cause had Fabry disease, corresponding to about 1-2% of the general population of young stroke patients. Cerebral micro- and macro-vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease. Neuronal globotriaosylceramide accumulation in selective cortical and brain stem areas including the hippocampus has been reported by autopsy studies in FD, but clinical surrogates as well as the clinical relevance of these findings have not been investigated so far. Another Neurologic hallmark of Fabry disease (FD) includes small fiber neuropathy as well as cerebral micro- and macroangiopathy with premature stroke. Cranial MRI shows progressive white matter lesions (WML) at an early age, increased signal intensity in the pulvinar, and tortuosity and dilatation of the larger vessels. Conventional MRI shows a progressive load of white matter lesions (WMLs) due to cerebral vasculopathy in the course of FD. Another study has been conducted to quantify brain structural changes in clinically affected male and female patients with FD. The peripheral neuropathy in Fabry disease manifests as neuropathic pain, reduced cold and warm sensation and possibly gastrointestinal disturbances. Patients with Fabry disease begin having pain towards the end of the first decade of life or during puberty. Children as young as 6 years of age have complained of pain often associated with febrile illnesses with reduced heat and exercise tolerance. The patients describe the pain as burning that is often associated with deep ache or paresthesiae. Some patients also have joint pain. A high proportion of patients with Fabry disease is at increased risk of developing neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression and neuropsychological deficits. Due to both somatic and psychological impairment, health-related quality of life (QoL) is considerably reduced in patients with Fabry disease. Targeted screening for Fabry disease among young individuals with stroke seems to disclose unrecognized cases and may therefore very well be recommended as routine in the future. Furthermore, ischemic stroke is related to inflammation and arterial stiffness and no study had addressed this relationship in patients with AF disease and cerebrovascular disease, so this topic could represent a possible future research line. PMID:23448452

  2. Iron: Protector or Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease? Still Controversial

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, Mario; Gómez-Aracena, Jorge; García-Rodríguez, Antonio; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the second most abundant metal in the Earth’s crust. Despite being present in trace amounts, it is an essential trace element for the human body, although it can also be toxic due to oxidative stress generation by the Fenton reaction, causing organic biomolecule oxidation. This process is the basis of numerous pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The relationship between iron and cardiovascular disease was proposed in 1981 by Jerome Sullivan. Since then, numerous epidemiological studies have been conducted to test this hypothesis. The aim of this review is to present the main findings of the chief epidemiological studies published during the last 32 years, since Sullivan formulated his iron hypothesis, suggesting that this element might act as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have analyzed 55 studies, of which 27 supported the iron hypothesis, 20 found no evidence to support it and eight were contrary to the iron hypothesis. Our results suggest that there is not a high level of evidence which supports the hypothesis that the iron may be associated with CVD. Despite the large number of studies published to date, the role of iron in cardiovascular disease still generates a fair amount of debate, due to a marked disparity in results. PMID:23857219

  3. Adult-Onset Still’s Disease Associated with Thyroid Dysfunction: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingchun; Wang, Han; Deng, Juelin

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, the possible unveiled interaction between adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) has never been reported although it is well established that systemic autoimmune disease may usually occur in relation to AITD. As increasingly clear links of AITD with other autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) have been reported, and the incidence of AOSD concurrent AITD draws our attention rapidly. In this study, we searched relevant literatures published in the past 30 years to explore that condition. PMID:25067964

  4. A complicated disease: what can be done to manage thalassemia major more effectively?

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Baldan, Alessandro; Marsella, Maria; Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina

    2015-12-01

    Patients with thalassemia major suffer from many complications, but in the last two decades their lives have improved both in length and quality. We report herein the most common complications and the recent advances that have changed the course of this disease. Also, we report in detail some of the new therapeutic strategies already introduced in practice and briefly some that are still being developed. PMID:26470003

  5. Treatment- and Disease-Related Complications of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Anne R

    2006-01-01

    One of the highlights of the 16th International Prostate Cancer Update was a session on treatment- and disease-related complications of prostate disease. It began with presentation of a challenging case of rising prostate-specific antigen levels after radical prostatectomy, followed by an overview of the use of zoledronic acid in prostate cancer, a review of side effects of complementary medicines, an overview of complications of cryotherapy, an assessment of complications of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy, and a comparison of laparoscopy versus open prostatectomy. PMID:17021643

  6. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician’s tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients’ education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections. PMID:25110408

  7. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26?women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4?±?14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n?=?8), mild leukopenia (n?=?3), myopathy (n?=?1), and infections (n?=?5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  8. Hematological manifestations and complications of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a multisystemic metabolic disorder due to a genetic deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation within the lysosomes of macrophages of its natural substrate, glucosylceramide and its deacylated product glucosylsphingosine. The most prevalent form of the disease is the so-called non-neuronopathic form (type 1) characterized by anemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities. Etiology of anemia and thrombocytopenia may be multifactorial and not necessarily predicted by the degree of splenomegaly. Bleeding diathesis may not always be related to absolute platelet count but may be influenced by abnormal platelet function or coagulation factor deficiencies. A significant increased risk of severe hematological co-morbidities, including multiple myeloma and B-cell lymphoma, has been reported. Accumulation of glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosyne in macrophages and the resulting chronic inflammation with the secretion of cytokines leading to polyclonal and monoclonal B cell proliferation up to multiple myeloma, as a continuum clonal expansion, is a key pathophysiological mechanism. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucosylceramide storage burden and the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation, including hematological manifestations. PMID:26565753

  9. [A case of hepatocellular carcinoma complicated with Caroli's disease].

    PubMed

    Ijima, Masashi; Shimoda, Ryuya; Katakai, Kenji; Seki, Asako; Oshimoto, Hirokazu; Masuda, Jun; Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kakizaki, Satoru; Arai, Taido

    2010-09-01

    A 29-year-old man was admitted with right hypochondralgia and fever. Markedly dilated bile ducts were observed, mainly in the right lobe of the liver. Based on both the clinical findings and imaging, we diagnosed Caroli's disease and choledochal cyst complicated with cholangitis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was also observed in segment 3, and the tumor measured 4cm in diameter. The patient was successfully treated with hepatectomy of the right lobe, partial hepatectomy of the left lateral lobe, and bile duct reconstruction. A histopathological examination revealed moderately differentiated HCC without any components of cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). Although Caroli's disease is complicated with CCC, a case of Caroli's disease complicated with HCC, as in the present case, is quite rare and therefore is considered to be worthy of reporting. PMID:20827046

  10. Health technologies for rare diseases: does conventional HTA still apply?

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven

    2014-06-01

    As part of a health technology assessment, economic evaluation of health technologies for rare diseases poses specific challenges given that such technologies are rarely cost-effective. Therefore, conventional economic evaluation techniques appear to be less relevant to health technologies for rare diseases. However, the definition of health technology assessment points to multi-criteria decision analysis by stating that a health technology needs to be assessed against multiple criteria in order to pronounce a judgement about the value of the health technology. Thus, this editorial argues that a full health technology assessment which uses a multi-criteria decision analysis framework to evaluate the value of a technology can be applied to health technologies for rare diseases. Past experiences demonstrate that the specific characteristics of health technologies for rare diseases can fit in the conventional health technology assessment paradigm by means of multi-criteria decision analysis. PMID:24702042

  11. Extraintestinal manifestations and complications in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rothfuss, Katja S; Stange, Eduard F; Herrlinger, Klaus R

    2006-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that often involve organs other than those of the gastrointestinal tract. These nonintestinal affections are termed extraintestinal symptoms. Differentiating the true extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases from secondary extraintestinal complications, caused by malnutrition, chronic inflammation or side effects of therapy, may be difficult. This review concentrates on frequency, clinical presentation and therapeutic implications of extraintestinal symptoms in inflammatory bowel diseases. If possible, extraintestinal manifestations are differentiated from extraintestinal complications. Special attention is given to the more recently described sites of involvement; i.e. thromboembolic events, osteoporosis, pulmonary involvement and affection of the central nervous system. PMID:16937463

  12. Internal jugular vein thrombosis in Behcet's disease: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Bilici, Muhammet; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Kimyon, Gezmis; Kisacik, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterised by oral/genital ulcers, ocular lesions, and gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurological and major vessel involvements. Venous manifestations are more common than arterial involvements. In this case report, we present a patient with internal jugular vein thrombosis, which is a very rare complication of BD. PMID:25239979

  13. Complications Following Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Hashimi, Samad; Bremner, Ross M

    2015-11-01

    Surgical procedures to treat reflux disease are common, but good outcomes rely on both a thorough preoperative workup and careful surgical techniques. Although complications are uncommon, surgeons should recognize these and possess the skills to overcome them in clinical practice. PMID:26515948

  14. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  15. Levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease: an old drug still going strong

    PubMed Central

    Poewe, Werner; Antonini, Angelo; Zijlmans, Jan CM; Burkhard, Pierre R; Vingerhoets, François

    2010-01-01

    After more than 40 years of clinical use, levodopa (LD) remains the gold standard of symptomatic efficacy in the drug treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Compared with other available dopaminergic therapies, dopamine replacement with LD is associated with the greatest improvement in motor function. Long-term treatment with LD is, however, often complicated by the development of various types of motor response oscillations over the day, as well as drug-induced dyskinesias. Motor fluctuations can be improved by the addition of drugs such as entacapone or monoamine oxidase inhibitors, which extend the half-life of levodopa or dopamine, respectively. However, dyskinesia control still represents a major challenge. As a result, many neurologists have become cautious when prescribing therapy with LD. This review summarizes the available evidence regarding the use of LD to treat PD and will also address the issue of LD delivery as a critical factor for the drug’s propensity to induce motor complications. PMID:20852670

  16. Overuse of Computed Tomography in Patients with Complicated Gallstone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Boyd, Casey A.; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND When compared to ultrasound, computed tomography scans (CT) are more expensive, have significant radiation exposure, and have lower sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for patients with gallstone disease. METHODS We reviewed data on patients emergently admitted with complicated gallstone disease between 1/2005 and 5/2010. The use of CT and ultrasound imaging on admission was described. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate factors predicting receipt of CT. RESULTS 562 consecutive patients presented emergently with complicated gallstone disease. The mean age was 45 years. 72% of patients were female, 46% were white, and 41% were Hispanic. 72% of patients had an ultrasound during the initial evaluation and 41% had a CT. Both studies were performed in 25% of patients (n=141), while 16% (n=93) had CT only and 47% (n=259) had ultrasound only. CT was performed first in 67% of those who underwent both studies. Evening imaging (7pm–7am; OR=4.44, 95% CI 2.88–6.85), increased age (OR=1.14 per 5-year increase, 95% CI 1.07–1.21), leukocytosis (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.10–2.53), and hyperamylasemia (OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.16–3.51) predicted receipt of CT. CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates the overuse of CT in the evaluation of complicated gallstone disease. Evening imaging was the biggest predictor of CT use, suggesting that CT is performed not to clarify the diagnosis, but rather a surrogate for the indicated study. Surgeons and emergency physicians should be trained to perform right upper quadrant ultrasounds to avoid receipt of unnecessary studies in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:21862355

  17. Bone Health and Associated Metabolic Complications in Neuromuscular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Nanette C.; Hache, Lauren P.; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews the recent literature regarding bone health as it relates to the patient living with neuromuscular disease (NMD). Poor bone health with related morbidity is a significant problem for patients with NMD. Although the evidence addressing issues of bone health and osteoporosis have increased as a result of the Bone and Joint Decade, studies defining the scope of bone-related disease in NMD are scant. The available evidence is discussed focusing on abnormal calcium metabolism, increased fracture risk, and the prevalence of both scoliosis and hypovitaminosis D in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. These problems appear common. Osteomalacia often complicates disease-related baseline osteoporosis and may reduce fracture risk if treated. Future directions are discussed, including the urgent need for studies to both determine the nature and extent of poor bone health, and to evaluate the therapeutic effect of available osteoporosis treatments in patients with NMD. PMID:23137737

  18. Supratentorial Ependymoma: Disease Control, Complications, and Functional Outcomes After Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Efrat; Boop, Frederick A.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Ependymoma is less commonly found in the supratentorial brain and has known clinical and molecular features that are unique. Our single-institution series provides valuable information about disease control for supratentorial ependymoma and the complications of supratentorial irradiation in children. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 children with newly diagnosed supratentorial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT); conformal methods were used in 36 after 1996. The median age at RT was 6.5 years (range, 1-18.9 years). The entire group was characterized according to sex (girls 27), race (white 43), extent of resection (gross-total 46), and tumor grade (anaplastic 28). The conformal RT group was prospectively evaluated for neurologic, endocrine, and cognitive effects. Results: With a median follow-up time of 9.1 years from the start of RT for survivors (range, 0.2-23.2 years), the 10-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% + 7% and 76% + 6%, respectively. None of the evaluated factors was prognostic for disease control. Local and distant failures were evenly divided among the 16 patients who experienced progression. Eleven patients died of disease, and 1 of central nervous system necrosis. Seizure disorders were present in 17 patients, and 4 were considered to be clinically disabled. Clinically significant cognitive effects were limited to children with difficult-to-control seizures. The average values for intelligence quotient and academic achievement (reading, spelling, and math) were within the range of normal through 10 years of follow-up. Central hypothyroidism was the most commonly treated endocrinopathy. Conclusion: RT may be administered with acceptable risks for complications in children with supratentorial ependymoma. These results suggest that outcomes for these children are improving and that complications may be limited by use of focal irradiation methods.

  19. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, weakness, fractures and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of severe osteomalacia. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and iron. This case affirms that chronic untreated celiac disease, can lead to an important bone loss and irreversible complications like skeletal deformities. PMID:25667705

  20. [Management of acute complications in sickle cell disease ].

    PubMed

    Gellen-Dautremer, Justine; Brousse, Valentine; Arlet, Jean-Benoît

    2014-10-01

    Acute complications in sickle cell disease are a major and life-long cause for hospital referral. The most frequent events are painful acute vaso-occlusive crisis involving the limbs and back, and acute chest syndrome. Acute vaso-occlusive crisis is a therapeutic emergency because of the very high level of pain. Acute chest syndrome may be potentially fatal and must be adequately searched for and treated. Sickle cell patients are susceptible to pneumococcal infections notably, but any infection may favour vaso-occlusive crisis. Triggers of sickle cell vase occlusion must be tracked and corrected, if possible. Moderate crisis can be managed at home, but referral is necessary as soon as opiates are needed and/or if acute chest syndrome is suspected. Additional treatments besides opiates include co analgesics, oxygen, hydration, physiotherapy. Blood transfusion may be required but is not systematic. Acute spleen sequestration occurs in young children and requires immediate hospital referral for transfusion. PMID:25510139

  1. The end of the BSE saga: do we still need surveillance for human prion diseases?

    PubMed

    Budka, Herbert; Will, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The epidemics of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) related to BSE-infected food are coming to an end. The decline in concern about these diseases may invite complacency and questions whether surveillance for human prion diseases is still necessary. This article reviews the main points of surveillance and why it is still needed: animal sources for human prion infection other than BSE cannot be excluded; the potentially increasing circulation of prions between humans by blood, blood products and medical procedures; the prevalence of vCJD prion carriers in the UK; and the scientific study of prion diseases as paradigm for other neurodegenerative diseases with "prion-like" spread of pathological proteins. We conclude that continuation of detailed surveillance of human prion disorders would be prudent in view of all these points that deserve clarification. PMID:26715203

  2. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1?year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  3. Still's disease, lupus-like syndrome, and silicone breast implants. A case of 'ASIA' (Shoenfeld's syndrome).

    PubMed

    Jara, L J; Medina, G; Gómez-Bañuelos, E; Saavedra, M A; Vera-Lastra, O

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, four conditions, siliconosis, Gulf War syndrome (GWS), macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome (MMF) and post-vaccination phenomena, were linked to a previous exposure to an adjuvant, suggesting a common denominator, and it has been proposed to incorporate comparable conditions under a common syndrome entitled Autoimmune/inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA). We report a case of a female who at the age of 11 years was diagnosed with Still's disease. At the age of 22 she underwent silicone breast implants and presented with a transient lupus-like syndrome. Then, at 25 years old she had a severe activation of Still's disease in association with rupture of silicone breast implants. When the prostheses were removed, the clinical picture improved. This case fulfills the criteria for ASIA and complements seven previous reports of Still's disease in association with silicone breast implants. PMID:22235044

  4. Peyronie’s disease after urethral swab, an unusual complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Paulis, Gianni; Barletta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Urethral swabs are still currently used as a diagnostic tool when urethritis or prostatitis are suspected. Urologists are certainly aware that Peyronie’s disease may occur after traumatic urethral instrumentation (catheterization, urethrocystoscopy, etc), but onset of Peyronie’s disease after urethral swab for diagnostic purposes has never been reported in the literature. This paper presents the case of a patient who developed Peyronie’s disease after a clumsy urethral swab insertion. It is an unusual, and to date unreported, complication which we would like to call attention to. In the case of our patient, the swab had been inserted to a greater depth than normally required and strong pressure had also been applied. During the procedure, the patient experienced severe urethral and penile pain, which was followed by urethrorrhagia, and later penile curvature. The patient was treated conservatively with good results, partly because the disease was still in its active stage and not yet stable. In the light of what we report, when ordering a urethral swab, physicians should always recommend that it be performed at testing centers that follow accurate, rigorous standards. Patients should also be informed that the test they are to undergo consists of a swab being inserted into the urethra for a short distance, not more than 2–3 cm. PMID:26605209

  5. July 21, 2009 Volume 3, Issue 15 Disease management: As blueberries are still

    E-print Network

    Isaacs, Rufus

    July 21, 2009 Volume 3, Issue 15 Disease management: As blueberries are still ripening, continue for Japanese beetle. Aphid numbers are decreasing. Harvest is in full gear! BLUEBERRY NEWS YOU CAN USE... Michigan Blueberry IPM Newsletter GROWING DEGREE DAYS From March 1GROWING DEGREE DAYS From March 1GROWING

  6. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  7. Association Between Genetics of Diabetes, Coronary Artery Disease, and Macrovascular Complications: Exploring a Common Ground Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, André G.; Selvatici, Lívia; Krieger, José E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) are conditions that cause a substantial public health burden. Since both conditions often coexist in the same individual, it has been hypothesized that they have a common effector. Insulin and hyperglycemia are assumed to play critical roles in this scenario. In recent years, many genetic risk factors for both diabetes and CAD have been discovered, mainly through genome-wide association studies. Genetic aspects of diabetes, diabetic macrovascular complications, and CAD are assumed to have intersections leading to the common effector hypothesis. However, only a few genetic risk factors could be identified that modulate the risk for both conditions. Polymorphisms in TCF7L2 and near the CDKN2A/B genes seem to be of great importance in this regard since they appear to modulate both conditions, and they are not necessarily related to insulinism, or hyperglycemia, for CAD development. Other issues related to this hypothesis, such as the problems of phenotype heterogeneity, are also of interest. Recent studies have contributed to a better understanding of the complex genetics of diabetic macrovascular complications. Much effort is still needed to clarify the associations in the genetics of diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. At present, there is little genetic evidence to support a common effector hypothesis, other than insulin or hyperglycemia, for the association between these conditions. PMID:22189546

  8. Spectrum of supraesophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Hogan, W J

    1997-11-24

    There is a growing body of clinical and research evidence to support the role of gastroesophageal reflux in the etiology of certain disorders occurring in structures located above the body of the esophagus. These supraesophageal complications have only recently been identified but substantiation of the role of gastroesophageal reflux has been difficult and sometimes impossible with the technology currently available. This introductory article to the clinical issues involved in supraesophageal complications of GERD presents several index cases and asks far more questions than it gives answers about these patients. Clinical evidence supporting the role of GERD is discussed and the results of therapy reviewed. Education of the practicing physician to the role of supraesophageal complications of GERD is urged to help recognize the likelihood of such clinical conditions. There is a real need for additional clinical use and evaluation of multi site intraesophageal and pharyngeal pH probes in patients with suspected supraesophageal complications of GERD. More importantly, development of new techniques for measuring micro reflux events and sophisticated methods for determining the duration of acid exposure in tissues above the esophagus is essential. Finally, more prospective controlled outcome studies of patients with supraesophageal complications of GERD are needed utilizing specific treatment algorithms. PMID:9422629

  9. Ferritin in Adult-Onset Still's Disease: Just a Useful Innocent Bystander?

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bella; Efthimiou, Petros

    2012-01-01

    Background. Adult-Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is an immune-mediated systemic disease with quotidian-spiking fever, rash, and inflammatory arthritis. Hyperferritinemia is a prominent feature, often used for screening. Methods. The key terms “ferritin” and “hyperferritinemia” were used to search PubMed and Medline and were cross-referenced with “Still's Disease.” Results. Hyperferritinemia, although nonspecific, is particularly prevalent in AOSD. While most clinicians associate ferritin with iron metabolism, this is mostly true for the H isoform and not for the L isoform that tends to increase dramatically in hyperferritenemia. In these situations, hyperferritinemia is not associated with iron metabolism and may even mask an underlying iron deficiency. We review, in systematic fashion, the current basic science and clinical literature regarding the regulation of ferritin and its use in the diagnosis and management of AOSD. Conclusion. Serum hyperferritinemia in AOSD has been described for 2 decades, although its mechanism has not yet been completely elucidated. Regulation by proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-6, IL-18, MCSF, and INF-? provides a link to the disease pathogenesis and may explain rapid resolution of hyperferritinemia after targeted treatment and inhibition of key cytokines. PMID:22536541

  10. [Still a small problem with the mad cow disease? Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other prion diseases: current status].

    PubMed

    Lundberg, P O

    2001-01-10

    This review is based on recent published research on the BSE/CJD/vCJD problem mainly from UK, Germany and France. The situation in Sweden seems to be fortunate for several reasons. The use of meat and bonemeal as animal fodder was forbidden in this country 13 years ago. Sweden has not had any sheep with scrapie for many years. No animals with BSE have so far been found in our country. The incidence of sporadic CJD in this country followed retrospectively from 1985 to 1996 and prospectively from 1997 to 1999 has been around 1.2 per million per year with no significant increase. Only few cases of familial CJD are known. No patient with iatrogenic CJD has ever been found. The use of growth hormone derived from human pituitary glands was abandoned in 1985 when recombinant human growth hormone became available. So far there is no indication that any of the CJD cases diagnosed in Sweden has been of the vCJD type, the one linked to BSE. However, as the incubation period for prion diseases is very long and the Swedes are frequent travellers there is a risk that people from our country could have contracted vCJD through consuming meat products in countries with BSE. As a precaution the consumption of brain, spinal cord, lymphatic tissue, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract should be avoided. Human pituitary derived growth hormone is still available in some countries and might be illegally imported into Sweden. PMID:11213704

  11. Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean = 35.1%, SD ±28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean = 1.3%, SD ±4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 6.2%, SD ±22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean = 23.1%, SD ±15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 51.5%, SD ±22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean = 27.9 GBP, SD ±22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe. PMID:24148185

  12. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Treatment and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... goes away without specific treatment. Antibiotics provide no benefit for someone with Pontiac fever. Related Links ELITE Program Application CDC Legionella Healthy Swimming CDC Vessel Sanitation Program Unexplained Respiratory Disease Outbreaks ( ...

  13. Pulmonary Complications Resulting from Genetic Cardiovascular Disease in Two Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been considered a risk factor for exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms of variation in susceptibility. Pulmonary complications and altered iron homeost...

  14. A pruritic linear urticarial rash, fever, and systemic inflammatory disease in five adolescents: adult-onset still disease or systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis sine arthritis?

    PubMed

    Prendiville, Julie S; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Crawford, Richard I

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic rash of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a transient erythematous eruption associated with a quotidian spiking fever. Usually asymptomatic, it can be pruritic, with dermatographism at sites of scratching or pressure. An illness similar to this entity in adults is designated adult-onset Still disease. The relationship between the pediatric and adult disease is uncertain and differences in case definition have evolved. Specifically, a sustained arthritis for at least 6 weeks is required for a diagnosis of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whereas transient arthritis and arthralgia are accepted criteria in adult-onset Still disease. We describe five patients less than 16 years of age who presented with an acute illness characterized by fever and a distinctive skin eruption. Intense pruritus and linear erythematous lesions flared with a spiking fever, usually in the late afternoon and evening. Periorbital edema/erythema and nonlinear urticarial lesions were also seen. Two children had splinter hemorrhages of the nail beds and one girl developed a fixed, scaling, pigmented, linear eruption. Severe malaise, myalgia, arthralgia, and leukocytosis were present in every patient. Other systemic manifestations included sore throat, transient arthritis, abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, hyperferritinemia, and hepatic dysfunction. No patient had a sustained arthritis. The course of the disease was variable. One patient, diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome, recovered on oral naproxen. Two patients responded to systemic corticosteroid therapy. One girl developed status epilepticus and died from aspiration and asphyxia. A boy with severe hepatitis developed renal failure and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and was treated with plasmapheresis, dialysis, and systemic corticosteroids; he had recurrent episodes of rash and fever into adult life. These children did not fulfill the case definition of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis because they lacked a persistent arthritis. Adolescent and adult patients with the same clinical and laboratory findings are described under the rubric of adult-onset Still disease. Recognition of the distinctive urticarial skin eruption and spiking fever is important in the diagnosis of a disease with severe morbidity and potentially life-threatening complications. PMID:15461768

  15. Supradiaphragmatic early stage Hodgkin's disease: does mantle radiation therapy still have a role?

    PubMed

    Frezza, G; Barbieri, E; Zinzani, P L; Babini, L; Tura, S

    1996-01-01

    Extended field radiation therapy represents the main therapeutic option in early stage Hodgkin's disease with favorable prognostic features. Its role however has recently been criticized, mainly due to the high incidence of late complications in irradiated tissues. Furthermore, surgical staging, which in the opinion of many is mandatory for proper selection of patients for radiotherapy alone, has a well-known morbidity, and splenectomy has been associated with a high risk of secondary leukemias. Lastly, the failure rate after radiotherapy only is not negligible and second-line treatment is not always successful. A review of our experience and of the recent literature has allowed us to refute these objections. The results of radiotherapy, when properly performed, are highly reliable and have been reproducible in many Institutions. Chemotherapy alone cannot yet be regarded as an alternative to radiotherapy in these patients since data reported on this issue are conflicting. Present knowledge regarding the relationship between clinical features and the risk of occult subdiaphragmatic spread allows patients with localized disease to be selected without surgical staging; the results of radiotherapy in clinically staged patients confirm this statement. Concern for the late effects in irradiated tissues is justified, and future efforts should be directed at reducing the toxicity of this treatment. Associating a short chemotherapy course with low-dose radiotherapy to involved sites could help to achieve this goal. PMID:8641642

  16. Co-occurrence of Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease and Still's disease: case report and review of previously reported cases.

    PubMed

    Toribio, Karen A; Kamino, Hideko; Hu, Stephanie; Pomeranz, Miriam; Pillinger, Michael H

    2015-12-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease (KFD) and adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) are rare inflammatory conditions with some overlapping features. We encountered a 22-year-old male patient who presented with daily fevers, neck discomfort, and sore throat and subsequently developed rash, arthritis, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the skin rash was consistent with KFD skin involvement. Given that the patient also met criteria for AOSD, a final diagnosis of KFD/AOSD co-occurrence was made. Anti-IL-1? therapy with anakinra resulted in rapid resolution of all symptoms. A literature search identified eight more cases of KFD/AOSD. Fever, rash, arthritis, and lymphadenopathy were present in all patients. No case report demonstrated an association of rash eruption clearly associated with fever spikes. Duration of symptoms ranged from 3 weeks to 10 years. Seven patients had leukocytosis, six had anemia, and five demonstrated elevated ferritin and/or decreased glycosylated ferritin. Seven patients had elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and seven had transaminitis. Eight of nine patients had no evidence of infectious disease. Autoantibodies were absent from all patients. KFD and AOSD are very rare diseases, yet they may overlap. The two conditions not only share several clinical and laboratory characteristics but also differ in characteristic ways. Given the rapid response observed with anakinra in the index patient, IL-1? likely plays a role in both diseases. PMID:25098416

  17. Preventing complications in celiac disease: our experience with managing adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mulder, C J; Wierdsma, N J; Berkenpas, M; Jacobs, M A J M; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    Celiac disease is, as we know it, rather than being a rare and incurable disease until the 1950's, both quite common in screening studies and readily treatable. Three conditions are triggered by gluten consumption: celiac disease, the skin rash dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia. We describe our follow up for out clinic management, as evidence based data about such an approach are lacking in current literature. No food, beverages or medications containing any amount of gluten can be taken. Compliance is often difficult especially when patients are asymptomatic. We control a cohort, in daily practice, of over 700 adult patients. The majority of patients manage the diet without any problems. We describe our follow up in general, for serology, laboratory and histology. Forty percent of our newly diagnosed celiac patients do have a BMI over 25 kg/m(2). An appropriate attitude for this problem is lacking. The problem of slowly weaning off Dapsone over 5-10 years in DH is recognized. The bone density is checked in all newly diagnosed celiac patients. We control, if necessary, by telephone and lab controls done in local cities and see our patients only every two years face-to-face for follow up. The main question is if the adherence to a GFD, quality of life and prevention of complications is improved by visiting a dedicated celiac clinic. We hope to standardize this attitude on evidence data in the years to come. PMID:26060110

  18. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  19. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  20. Atypical and complicated Kawasaki disease in infants. Do we need criteria?

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, A; Kabani, A; Jadavji, T

    1995-01-01

    Case reports suggest that infants with Kawasaki disease have atypical presentations and a high complication rate, likely related to delayed diagnosis and treatment. To date, no study of consecutive cases has compared infants with older children who have both atypical and typical Kawasaki disease. We retrospectively reviewed 44 cases of Kawasaki disease treated at our hospital from March 1980 to 1990: 11 (25%) were infants; 9 (20%) had atypical Kawasaki disease, of which 5 (56%) were infants; the male to female ratio was 1.7:1. Infants had a higher incidence of atypical Kawasaki disease (5 [45%] versus 4 [12%]; P = .007) and of coronary artery complications (7 [64%] versus 3 [9%]; P = .002), and coronary artery complications developed in all of the infants with atypical Kawasaki disease (5 [100%] versus 0 [0%]; P < .01). Yet, the other manifestations and laboratory changes were at least as common as in the older children. Coronary artery complications did not develop in any patient who received early intravenous immune globulin therapy. We suggest that in infants with Kawasaki disease, accepted criteria are too restrictive to allow early diagnosis and effective treatment. Until a definitive test is available, clinical judgment is required in the diagnosis of atypical Kawasaki disease. Intravenous immune globulin is known to be safe, and its early use in patients with suspected atypical Kawasaki disease is appropriate. PMID:7747497

  1. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ellen C; Nagar, Michael; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of the beta-globin chain of hemoglobin (Hb), resulting in poorly deformable sickled cells that cause microvascular occlusion and hemolytic anemia. The spleen is almost always affected by SCD, with microinfarcts within the first 36 months of life resulting in splenic atrophy. Acute liver disorders causing right-sided abdominal pain include acute vaso-occlusive crisis, liver infarction, and acute hepatic crisis. Chronic liver disease might be due to hemosiderosis and hepatitis and possibly to SCD itself if small, clinically silent microvascular occlusions occur chronically. Black pigment gallstones caused by elevated bilirubin excretion are common. Their small size permits them to travel into the common bile duct but cause only low-grade obstruction, so hyperbilirubinemia rather than bile duct dilatation is typical. Whether cholecystectomy should be done in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The most common laboratory abnormality is an elevation of unconjugated bilirubin level. Bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels correlate with one another, suggesting that chronic hemolysis and ineffective erythropoiesis, rather than liver disease, are the sources of hyperbilirubinemia. Abdominal pain is very common in SCD and is usually due to sickling, which resolves with supportive care. Computed tomography scans might be ordered for severe or unremitting pain. The liver typically shows sickled erythrocytes and Kupffer cell enlargement acutely and hemosiderosis chronically. The safety of liver biopsies has been questioned, particularly during acute sickling crisis. Treatments include blood transfusions, exchange transfusions, iron-chelating agents, hydroxyurea, and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. PMID:20215064

  2. Benign duodenocolic fistula as a complication of peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Fereshteh; Abrishami, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old man with upper abdominal pain, diarrhea and 25 kg weight loss since 3 months ago was admitted. He had a history of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease 4 months before admission. Gastroduodenal endoscopy and upper gastrointestinal series with barium study were done. Biopsies and CT-scan ruled out malignancies. Endoscopy and radiology studies revealed a duodenocolic fistula. He underwent right hemicolectomy, fistula en bloc excision, and distal gastrectomy surgery with gastrojejunostomy and ileocolic anastomosis. Radiologic modalities are necessary before surgery. Surgery is the only curative treatment in benign cases and reconstruction method is dependent on patient's situation. PMID:25436101

  3. The effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease.

    PubMed

    Lönnerfors, Celine; Reynisson, Petur; Geppert, Barbara; Persson, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The study objective was to assess the effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease. This is a retrospective cohort study. It is a Canadian Task Force classification II-2 study conducted at the University Hospital, Sweden. The patients were 949 women planned for robotic hysterectomy for malignant (75 %) and benign (25 %) gynecological disease between October 2005 and December 2013. They were continuously evaluated for the rate of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to 1-year post-surgery, the latter according to Clavien-Dindo classification following the introduction of robotic surgery with special awareness of complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors, the description of refinement of practice and assessment of the effect of these measures. The rate of intraoperative complications, the overall rate of complications and the rate of ?grade 3 complications decreased from the first to the last time period (4.8 vs 2.6 %, p = 0.037, 34 vs 19 %, p = 0.003 and 13.5 vs 3.2 %, p = 0.0003, respectively). The rate of intraoperative complications and the rate of postoperative complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors was reduced from the first to the last time period (3.8 vs 0.6 %, p = 0.028 and 7.7 vs 1.5 %, p = 0.003, respectively). In patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease intraoperative and postoperative complications and complications possibly related to the robotic approach diminish with training, experience and refinement of practice. PMID:26530844

  4. Spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog with bronchopulmonary disease complicated by pyothorax and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Simone; Rocchi, Paola M.; Raiano, Vera; Diana, Daniela; Greci, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumopericardium is a rare condition consisting of pericardial gas in the absence of iatrogenic or traumatic causes; it has been described secondary to pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchopulmonary disease. This report describes a case of spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog presenting with dyspnea secondary to pyopneumothorax complicating a bronchopulmonary disease. PMID:25477548

  5. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Meng-Jie; Wang, Cai-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Wang, Guo-Lin; Sun, Mei-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Xu, Liqin

    2015-12-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) has become useful for the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory conditions, including rheumatic diseases, immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related disease and giant cell arteritis. However, few articles based on small sample sizes (n?=?7) diagnosed as adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) have been published. The study aim was to observe the reliable characteristics and usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of consecutive patients with AOSD. Eligible patients were selected from among those who had undergone (18)F-FDG PET/CT between May 2007 and June 2014. Twenty-six consecutive AOSD patients were recruited retrospectively according to criteria set by Yamaguchi et al. All patients underwent evaluation by (18)F-FDG PET/CT. The characteristics and usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for evaluation of consecutive patients with AOSD were evaluated. All 26 patients had (18)F-FDG-avid lesion(s) related to their particular disease. Diffuse and homogeneous accumulation of (18)F-FDG was seen in the bone marrow (26/26; 100 %; maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax), 2.10-6.73) and spleen (25/26; 96.15 %). The SUVmax of affected lymph nodes was 1.3-9.53 (mean?±?SD, 4.12?±?2.24). The SUVmax and size factors (maximum diameter and areas) of affected lymph nodes were significantly different (P?=?0.033 and P?=?0.012, respectively). (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed the general distribution of (18)F-FDG accumulation. This factor helped to exclude malignant disease and aided the diagnosis of AOSD (42.3 %) in 11 cases when combined with clinical features and aided decisions regarding appropriate biopsy sites, such as the lymph nodes (n?=?9) and bone marrow (n?=?13). (18)F-FDG PET/CT is a unique imaging method for the assessment of metabolic activity throughout the body in subjects with AOSD. Characteristics or patterns of AOSD observed on (18)F-FDG PET/CT can be used for the indication and diagnosis or to guide the clinical management of ASOD. PMID:25711875

  6. Pictorial review: Imaging features of unusual patterns and complications of hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhammad Umar; Mahmood, Rabia; Shafique, Mobeen; Khan, Muhammad Shoib; Bilal, Aamir; Siddiqi, Hammad Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. We demonstrate rare locations and unusual complications of this entity during past 6 years. Rare locations during our observation included lumbar spine, sacral spine, spleen, ovary, abdominal wall, diaphragm, pelvis and right kidney. Unusual complications included formation of bronchopulmonary fistula, complete collapse of left lung secondary to hilar location of Hydatid cyst and hydatiduria. PMID:22470631

  7. Invasive pneumococcal disease complicated by cerebral vasculitis, transient diabetes insipidus and spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Domingues, Vital; Faria, Raquel M; Mendonça, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a potential life-threatening situation that requires immediate recognition and treatment. Cerebrovascular complications are uncommon and have been reported less frequently in adults than in children. We report a case of 59-year-old man with IPD complicated by cerebral vasculitis, transient central diabetes insipidus and spondylodiscitis. Each of these complications is rare and needs specific approach. Their association is even rarer and to the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported. PMID:23960149

  8. Is routine antenatal venereal disease research laboratory test still justified? Nigerian experience

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Betrand O; Eleje, George U; Obi-Nwosu, Amaka L; Ahiarakwem, Ita F; Akujobi, Comfort N; Egwuatu, Chukwudi C; Onyiuke, Chukwudumebi O C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the seroreactivity of pregnant women to syphilis in order to justify the need for routine antenatal syphilis screening. Methods A multicenter retrospective analysis of routine antenatal venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test results between 1 September 2010 and 31 August 2012 at three specialist care hospitals in south-east Nigeria was done. A reactive VDRL result is subjected for confirmation using Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay test. Analysis was by Epi Info 2008 version 3.5.1 and Stata/IC version 10. Results Adequate records were available regarding 2,156 patients and were thus reviewed. The mean age of the women was 27.4 years (±3.34), and mean gestational age was 26.4 weeks (±6.36). Only 15 cases (0.70%) were seropositive to VDRL. Confirmatory T. pallidum hemagglutination assay was positive in 4 of the 15 cases, giving an overall prevalence of 0.19% and a false-positive rate of 73.3%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of syphilis in relation to maternal age and parity (P>0.05). Conclusion While the prevalence of syphilis is extremely low in the antenatal care population at the three specialist care hospitals in south-east Nigeria, false-positive rate is high and prevalence did not significantly vary with maternal age or parity. Because syphilis is still a serious but preventable and curable disease, screening with VDRL alone, without confirmatory tests may not be justified. Because of the increase in the demand for evidence-based medicine and litigation encountered in medical practice, we may advocate that confirmatory test for syphilis is introduced in routine antenatal testing to reduce the problem of false positives. The government should increase the health budget that will include free routine antenatal testing including the T. pallidum hemagglutination assay. PMID:25610000

  9. Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.; Kesen, Muge R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C.; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S.; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG ? GTG) in exon 1 of the ? globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the ? globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

  10. [Management of complications related to intraduodenal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa in patients with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Santos-Garcia, Diego; de Deus, Teresa; Lopez-Pazos, Elina; Macias-Arribi, Mercedes; Llaneza-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Echarri-Piudo, Ana; Carpintero, Pedro; de la Fuente-Fernandez, Raúl

    2014-06-01

    Continuous infusion of intraduodenal levodopa/carbidopa is an effective treatment that improves the motor complications and the quality of life of patients in the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. However, it is not free of complications. These may present in the post-operative period following surgery (gastrostomy) or in the long-term during the follow-up period and can be related with the medication (levodopa/carbidopa), the stoma, the gastrostomy or the device (pump, enteral tube, parts of the FREKA system). The aim of this review is to report on the management of the complications that can be observed in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease treated with continuous infusion of intraduodenal levodopa/carbidopa. PMID:24861226

  11. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  12. A Case of Pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii Disease Complicated with Tension Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Ki Yung

    2015-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an extremely rare complication of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection. A 52-year-old man presenting with difficulty breathing and chest pain was admitted to our hospital. A right-sided pneumothorax was observed on chest radiography and chest computed tomography showed multiple cavitating and non-cavitating nodules with consolidation in the upper to middle lung zones bilaterally. Serial sputum cultures were positive for Mycobacterium kansasii, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. kansasii disease complicated by tension pneumothorax. After initiation of treatment including decortications and pleurodesis, the patient made a full recovery. We herein describe this patient's course in detail and review the current relevant literature. PMID:26508923

  13. A case of mixed connective tissue disease complicated with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hideki; Tateishi, Seiko; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ida, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Taku; Sasaki, Michiyo; Koide, Yuji; Ashizawa, Naoto; Seto, Shinji; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Sato, Shinichi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2008-10-01

    A 54-year-old female was diagnosed as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) complicated with secondary Sjögren's syndrome. Although she had no dyspnea on exertion, the chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with interstitial pneumonia. The echocardiogram demonstrated asymmetric hypertrophy of the interventricular septum. Diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) was confirmed by left ventriculography and myocardial biopsy. She was treated with prednisolone, resulting in improvement of swollen hand, elevated muscle enzymes and interstitial pneumonia. A rare complication of HOCM with MCTD was described. PMID:18493766

  14. Risk of Fecal Diversion in Complicated Perianal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Geis, M.; Glatzle, J.; Kasparek, M.; Meile, T.; Jehle, E. C.; Kreis, M. E.; Zittel, T. T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the overall risk of a permanent stoma in patients with complicated perianal Crohn’s disease, and to identify risk factors predicting stoma carriage. A total of 102 consecutive patients presented with the first manifestation of complicated perianal Crohn’s disease in our outpatient department between 1992 and 1995. Ninety-seven patients (95%) could be followed up at a median of 16 years after first diagnosis of Crohn’s disease. Patients were sent a standardized questionnaire and patient charts were reviewed with respect to the recurrence of perianal abscesses or fistulas and surgical treatment, including fecal diversion. Factors predictive of permanent stoma carriage were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Thirty of 97 patients (31%) with complicated perianal Crohn’s disease eventually required a permanent stoma. The median time from first diagnosis of Crohn’s disease to permanent fecal diversion was 8.5 years (range 0–23 years). Temporary fecal diversion became necessary in 51 of 97 patients (53%), but could be successfully removed in 24 of 51 patients (47%). Increased rates of permanent fecal diversion were observed in 54% of patients with complex perianal fistulas and in 54% of patients with rectovaginal fistulas, as well as in patients that had undergone subtotal colon resection (60%), left-sided colon resection (83%), or rectal resection (92%). An increased risk for permanent stoma carriage was identified by multivariate analysis for complex perianal fistulas (odds ratio [OR] 5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2–18), temporary fecal diversion (OR 8; 95% CI 2–35), fecal incontinence (OR 21, 95% CI 3–165), or rectal resection (OR 30; 95% CI 3–179). Local drainage, setons, and temporary stoma for deep and complicated fistulas in Crohn’s disease, followed by a rectal advancement flap, may result in closing of the stoma in 47% of the time. The risk of permanent fecal diversion was substantial in patients with complicated perianal Crohn’s disease, with patients requiring a colorectal resection or suffering from fecal incontinence carrying a particularly high risk for permanent fecal diversion. In contrast, patients with perianal Crohn’s disease who required surgery for small bowel disease or a segmental colon resection carried no risk of a permanent stoma. PMID:17436140

  15. With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-04

    In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

  16. Knocked-out and still walking: prion protein-deficient cattle are resistant to prion disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are caused by the propagation of a misfolded form (PrP**d) of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP**c. Disruption of PrP**c expression in the mouse results in resistance to PrP-propagation and disease. However, the impa...

  17. Care of the injured worldwide: trauma still the neglected disease of modern society

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, surgical diseases including emergency and injury care have garnered less attention and support internationally when compared to other medical specialties. Over the past decade however, healthcare professionals have increasingly advocated for the need to address the global burden of non-communicable diseases. Surgical disease, including traumatic injury, is among the top causes of death and disability worldwide and the subsequent economic burden is substantial, falling disproportionately on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The future of global health in these regions depends on a redirection of attention to diseases managed within surgical, anesthesia and emergency specialties. Increasing awareness of these disparities, as well as increasing focus in the realms of policy and advocacy, is crucial. While the barriers to providing quality trauma and emergency care worldwide are not insurmountable, we must work together across disciplines and across boundaries in order to negotiate change and reduce the global burden of surgical disease. PMID:22980446

  18. [Toxic substances at the work place: do occupational diseases still occur in Switzerland?].

    PubMed

    Hotz, P; Hinnen, U; Schuler, G; Gutzwiller, F

    1992-02-01

    The statistics about work-related diseases influence greatly the setting of prevention priorities. It is consequently of prime importance that these statistics correctly mirror the reality. This paper summarizes the results of studies which show that the real prevalence of work-related diseases is probably two to three times greater than generally admitted; therefore, it seems very important to improve the quality of diagnosis and of data collection. PMID:1553630

  19. Risk factors and implications of anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Kristen T; Messaris, Evangelos

    2015-10-27

    Anastomotic complications occur more frequently in patients with Crohn's disease leading to postoperative intra-abdominal septic complications (IASC). Patients with IASC often require re-operation or drainage to control the sepsis and have an increased frequency of disease recurrence. The aim of this article was to examine the factors affecting postoperative IASC in Crohn's disease after anastomoses, since some risk factors remain controversial. Studies investigating IASC in Crohn's operations were included, and all risk factors associated with IASC were evaluated: nutritional status, presence of abdominal sepsis, medication use, Crohn's disease type, duration of disease, prior operations for Crohn's, anastomotic technique, extent of resection, operative timing, operative length, and perioperative bleeding. In this review, the factors associated with an increased risk of IASC are preoperative weight loss, abdominal abscess present at time of surgery, prior operation, and steroid use. To prevent IASC in Crohn's patients, preoperative optimization with nutritional supplementation or drainage of abscess should be performed, or a diverting stoma should be considered for patients with multiple risk factors. PMID:26523211

  20. Risk factors and implications of anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Kristen T; Messaris, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic complications occur more frequently in patients with Crohn’s disease leading to postoperative intra-abdominal septic complications (IASC). Patients with IASC often require re-operation or drainage to control the sepsis and have an increased frequency of disease recurrence. The aim of this article was to examine the factors affecting postoperative IASC in Crohn’s disease after anastomoses, since some risk factors remain controversial. Studies investigating IASC in Crohn’s operations were included, and all risk factors associated with IASC were evaluated: nutritional status, presence of abdominal sepsis, medication use, Crohn’s disease type, duration of disease, prior operations for Crohn’s, anastomotic technique, extent of resection, operative timing, operative length, and perioperative bleeding. In this review, the factors associated with an increased risk of IASC are preoperative weight loss, abdominal abscess present at time of surgery, prior operation, and steroid use. To prevent IASC in Crohn’s patients, preoperative optimization with nutritional supplementation or drainage of abscess should be performed, or a diverting stoma should be considered for patients with multiple risk factors. PMID:26523211

  1. [Scurvy, an old disease still in the news: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Pailhous, S; Lamoureux, S; Caietta, E; Bosdure, E; Chambost, H; Chabrol, B; Bresson, V

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy is the clinical manifestation of a deficiency in vitamin C, which is present in fresh fruits and vegetables. It is historically linked to the era of great maritime expeditions. Manifestations are misleading in children, in contrast with adults: bone disease and hemorrhagic syndrome are the earliest and most frequent manifestations due to a collagen biosynthesis defect. Scurvy is an old, potentially fatal disease but is easily curable with ascorbic acid. It can be prevented with vitamin C treatment in pediatric populations with unusual eating habits. We describe two cases of pediatric scurvy in two 7-year-old boys who had dietary restrictions stemming from developmental disorders. PMID:25455083

  2. The French Gaucher’s disease registry: clinical characteristics, complications and treatment of 562 patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical features, complications and treatments of Gaucher’s disease (GD), a rare autosomal–recessive disorder due to a confirmed lysosomal enzyme (glucocerebrosidase) deficiency, are described. Methods All patients with known GD, living in France, with ?1 consultations (1980–2010), were included in the French GD registry, yielding the following 4 groups: the entire cohort, with clinical description; and its subgroups: patients with ?1 follow-up visits, to investigate complications; recently followed (2009–2010) patients; and patients treated during 2009–2010, to examine complications before and during treatment. Data are expressed as medians (range) for continuous variables and numbers (%) for categorical variables. Results Among the 562 registry patients, 265 (49.6%) were females; 454 (85.0%) had type 1, 22 (4.1%) type 2, 37 (6.9%) perinatal–lethal type and 21 (3.9%) type 3. Median ages at first GD symptoms and diagnosis, respectively, were 15 (0–77) and 22 (0–84) years for all types. The first symptom diagnosing GD was splenomegaly and/or thrombocytopenia (37.6% and 26.3%, respectively). Bone-marrow aspiration and/or biopsy yielded the diagnosis for 54.7% of the patients, with enzyme deficiency confirming GD for all patients. Birth incidence rate was estimated at 1/50,000 and prevalence at 1/136,000. For the 378 followed patients, median follow-up was 16.2 (0.1–67.6) years. Major clinical complications were bone events (BE; avascular necrosis, bone infarct or pathological fracture) for 109 patients, splenectomy for 104, and Parkinson’s disease for 14; 38 patients died (neurological complications for 15 type-2 and 3 type-3 patients, GD complications for 11 type-1 and another disease for 9 type-1 patients). Forty-six had monoclonal gammopathy. Among 283 recently followed patients, 36 were untreated and 247 had been treated during 2009–2010; 216 patients received treatment in December 2010 (126 with imiglucerase, 45 velaglucerase, 24 taliglucerase, 21 miglustat). BE occurred before (130 in 67 patients) and under treatment (60 in 41 patients) with respective estimated frequencies (95% CI) of first BE at 10 years of 20.3% (14.1%–26.5%) and 19.8% (13.5%–26.1%). Conclusion This registry enabled the epidemiological description of GD in France and showed that BE occur even during treatment. PMID:23046562

  3. Nutrition therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and related nutritional complications.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Amanda Carla; Bezerra, Olívia Maria de Paula Alves

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible airway obstruction. The innumerable complications that occur during the progression of the disease can affect the nutritional state of patients suffering from this illness. The objective of this study was to present a brief review of the literature regarding the nutrition therapy used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To that end, we performed a bibliographic search for related articles published within the last 18 years and indexed for the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and Medline databases. Malnutrition is associated with a poor prognosis for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, since it predisposes such patients to infections, as well as reducing respiratory muscle force, exercise tolerance and quality of life. Despite the fact that such malnutrition is extremely common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, it should be recognized as an independent risk factor, since it can be modified through appropriate and efficacious diet therapy and monitoring. For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nutrition therapy is initiated after the evaluation of the nutritional state of the patient, which identifies nutritional risk, thereby allowing the proper level of treatment to be established. In this evaluation, anthropometric and biochemical markers, as well as indicators of dietary consumption and body composition, should be used. The prescribed diet should contain appropriate proportions of macronutrients, micronutrients and immunonutrients in order to regain or maintain the proper nutritional state and to avoid complications. The physical characteristics of the diet should be tailored to the individual needs and tolerances of each patient. In the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, individualized nutrition therapy is extremely important and has been shown to be fundamental to improving quality of life. PMID:17268751

  4. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor ? antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  5. CT and MRI evaluation of cardiac complications in patients with hematologic diseases: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yun; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hwan Wook; Lee, Hae Giu

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac complications with hematologic diseases are not uncommon but it is difficult to diagnose, due to non-specific clinical symptoms. Prompt recognition of these potentially fatal complications by cardiac computed tomography (CT) or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to direct clinicians to specific treatments according to causes. Thrombosis is often related to central venous catheter use and is usually located at the catheter tip near the atrial wall. Differentiation of thrombosis from normal structure is possible with CT and, distinction of a thrombus from a tumor is possible on a delayed enhancement MRI with a long inversion time (500-600 ms). Granulocytic sarcoma of the heart is indicated by an infiltrative nature with involvement of whole layers of myocardium on CT and MRI. MRI with T2* mapping is useful in evaluating myocardial iron content in patients with hemochromatosis. Diffuse subendocardial enhancement is typically observed on delayed MRIs in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. T1 mapping is an emerging tool to diagnose amyloidosis. Myocardial abscess can occur due to an immunocompromised status. CT and MRI show loculated lesions with fluid density and concomitant rim-like contrast enhancement. Awareness of CT and MRI findings of cardiac complications of hematologic diseases can be helpful to physicians for clinical decision making and treatment. PMID:25651878

  6. Host defense molecule polymorphisms influence the risk for immune-mediated complications in chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, C B; Lehrnbecher, T; Mol, F; Steinberg, S M; Venzon, D J; Walsh, T J; Noack, D; Rae, J; Winkelstein, J A; Curnutte, J T; Chanock, S J

    1998-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of phagocyte function in which defective superoxide production results in deficient microbicidal activity. CGD patients suffer from recurrent, life-threatening infections, and nearly half develop chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications (colitis, gastric outlet obstruction, or perirectal abscess) and/or autoimmune/rheumatologic disorders (AIDs). To identify genetic modifiers of disease severity, we studied a cohort of 129 CGD patients, in whom seven candidate genes (myeloperoxidase [MPO], mannose binding lectin [MBL], Fcgamma receptors IIa, IIIa, IIIb, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 receptor antagonist), each containing a physiologically relevant polymorphism predicted to influence the host inflammatory response, were selected for analysis. Genotypes of MPO (P = 0.003) and FcgammaRIIIb (P = 0.007) were strongly associated with an increased risk for GI complications, while an FcgammaRIIa (P = 0.05) genotype was suggestive for an association. Patients with all three associated genotypes had the highest risk for GI complications (P < 0.0001). The risk of AIDs was strongly associated with variant alleles of MBL (P = 0.01) and weakly associated with an FcgammaRIIa genotype (P = 0.04). Patients with variant forms of both MBL and FcgammaRIIa had the highest risk of developing an AID (P = 0.003). PMID:9854050

  7. Complicated pancreatic inflammatory disease: Diagnostic and therapeutic role of interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Wittich, G.R.; Casola, G.; Stauffer, A.E.; Polansky, A.D.; Coons, H.G.; Cabrera, O.A.; Gerver, P.S.

    1985-05-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic interventional radiology techniques in 41 patients with complications of pancreatic inflammatory disease are described. Computed tomography or ultrasound-guided aspiration or percutaneous pancreatic ductography enabled specific diagnoses in 43 of 45 patients (96%). Single-step needle aspiration of noninfected pseudocysts was successful in only three of ten patients (30%). Catheter drainage cured six of seven noninfected pseudocysts (85.7%) and seven of nine infected pseudocysts (77.7%). Pancreatic abscesses were drained successfully in nine of 13 patients (69.2%); temporizing benefit was achieved in the other four who eventually underwent surgery in improved condition. Early diagnosis of the complications of pancreatitis may be established almost uniformly, and at least 70% of patients with infected or noninfected pseudocysts and pancreatic abscesses may be cured by nonoperative drainage.

  8. A Case of Orf Disease Complicated with Erythema Multiforme and Bullous Pemphigoid-Like Eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Shahriar; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Arabsheybani, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Parapoxvirus infection in sheep and goats is usually referred to as contagious pustular dermatitis/ecthyma, or orf, and the corresponding human infection is referred to as orf. In humans, after a brief incubation period of 3 to 5 days, lesions begin as pruritic erythematous macules and then rise to form papules, often with a target appearance. Lesions become nodular or vesicular, and orf lesions often ulcerate after 14 to 21 days. Erythema multiforme and bullous pemphigoid have been associated with parapoxvirus infections and they are rare complications of orf disease. In this case report, we presented a 36-year-old woman with history of contact with sheep, developing a typical orf lesion that is complicated with erythema multiforme and bullous pemphigoid-like eruptions. PMID:26294986

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  10. Investigating emotions in Parkinson's disease: what we know and what we still don't know.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Igor; Rusconi, Maria L

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increasing attention to the role played by emotional processes in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, most of what is known in this area is based on research conducted in laboratory or clinical settings. In this article, the authors underline the need to expand our current knowledge of the psychological correlates of PD by investigating patients' everyday emotions in natural contexts. Specifically, the authors illustrate new research avenues based on the implementation of experience sampling methods. It is argued that these methods could permit future researchers to ecologically assess the frequency and intensity with which parkinsonian patients experience specific emotions (either negative or positive) during their everyday life, providing at the same time precious information on what are the most typical situations in which these emotions occur and on how patients behave in these circumstances. Potential practical implications associated with investigating these issues are discussed. PMID:23772218

  11. Neurologic Complications Associated with Sjögren's Disease: Case Reports and Modern Pathogenic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Colaci, Michele; Cassone, Giulia; Manfredi, Andreina; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Sjögren's syndrome (SS) may be complicated by some neurological manifestations, generally sensory polyneuropathy. Furthermore, involvement of cranial nerves was described as rare complications of SS. Methods. We reported 2 cases: the first one was a 40-year-old woman who developed neuritis of the left optic nerve as presenting symptom few years before the diagnosis of SS; the second was a 54-year-old woman who presented a paralysis of the right phrenic nerve 7 years after the SS onset. An exhaustive review of the literature on patients with cranial or phrenic nerve involvements was also carried out. Results. To the best of our knowledge, our second case represents the first observation of SS-associated phrenic nerve mononeuritis, while optic neuritis represents the most frequent cranial nerve involvement detectable in this connective tissue disease. Trigeminal neuropathy is also frequently reported, whereas neuritis involving the other cranial nerves is quite rare. Conclusions. Cranial nerve injury is a harmful complication of SS, even if less commonly recorded compared to peripheral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may precede the clinical onset of SS; therefore, in patients with apparently isolated cranial nerve involvement, a correct diagnosis of the underlying SS is often delayed or overlooked entirely; in these instances, standard clinicoserological assessment is recommendable. PMID:25161786

  12. Infective Endocarditis and Chronic Kidney Disease: How to Deal with Complications

    PubMed Central

    HABIB KHAN, Yusra; SARRIFF, Azmi; HAYAT KHAN, Amer; Azreen Syazril, ADNAN; MALLHI, Tauqeer Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is the one of the most important causes of increased mortality and morbidity among haemodialysis patients. The reason for this increasing prevalence of infection among these patients is the use of haemodialysis catheters during dialysis, as these patients are highly susceptible to infections that are easily transmitted via blood access points. The present case was a geriatric end stage renal disease (ESRD) patient who was readmitted to the hospital two days after her scheduled haemodialysis session with symptoms of nosocomial endocarditis. Her concurrent medical complications were hypertension, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Based on her previous medical history and current examination, the patient was suspected to have IE due to catheter related infection. The goal of therapy is to manage the comorbidities and infection by provision of appropriate treatment based on close monitoring of the patient condition. PMID:26715911

  13. An aortoduodenal fistula as a complication of immunoglobulin G4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarac, Momir; Marjanovic, Ivan; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Zoranovic, Uros; Petrovic, Stanko; Mihajlovic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    Most primary aortoduodenal fistulas occur in the presence of an aortic aneurysm, which can be part of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease. We present a case who underwent endovascular grafting of an aortoduodenal fistula associated with a high serum IgG4 level. A 56-year-old male underwent urgent endovascular reconstruction of an aortoduodenal fistula. The patient received antibiotics and other supportive therapy, and the postoperative course was uneventful, however, elevated levels of serum IgG, IgG4 and C-reactive protein were noted, which normalized after the introduction of steroid therapy. Control computed tomography angiography showed no endoleaks. The primary aortoduodenal fistula may have been associated with IgG4-related sclerosing disease as a possible complication of IgG4-related inflammatory aortic aneurysm. Endovascular grafting of a primary aortoduodenal fistula is an effective and minimally invasive alternative to standard surgical repair. PMID:23155348

  14. Vitamin D receptor polymorphism in chronic kidney disease patients with complicated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Lucisano, Silvia; Gagliostro, Giorgia; Alibrandi, Angela; Benvenga, Salvatore; Ientile, Riccardo; Bellinghieri, Guido; Buemi, Michele; Caccamo, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Several studies indicate a relationship between vitamin D and cardiovascular disease. Pleiotropic actions of vitamin D and its analogs are mediated by vitamin D receptor (VDR). VDRs have been identified in almost all tissues, including vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and endothelial cells. The FokI and BsmI polymorphisms of the VDR gene are regarded as strong markers of disturbed vitamin D signaling pathway. Studies investigating the relationship between VDR genotypes and left ventricular hypertrophy revealed a highly significant association with the BsmI Bb heterozygous genotype. There are conflicting data on the action of vitamin D in left ventricular hypertrophy. Experimental as well as observational studies and small clinical trials have suggested that vitamin D administration may favorably influence left ventricular hypertrophy, whereas large randomized clinical trials have shown negative results. However, a beneficial effect on the left atrial volume index and the duration of hospitalization were observed in patients treated with vitamin D analogs. Larger clinical trials with robust clinical end points are needed to confirm that vitamin D is effective in preventing cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients and in general population. PMID:25499229

  15. Proteomic and biomarker studies and neurological complications of pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lance, Eboni I; Casella, James F; Everett, Allen D; Barron-Casella, Emily

    2014-12-01

    Biomarker analysis and proteomic discovery in pediatric sickle cell disease has the potential to lead to important discoveries and improve care. The aim of this review article is to describe proteomic and biomarker articles involving neurological and developmental complications in this population. A systematic review was conducted to identify relevant research publications. Articles were selected for children under the age of 21 years with the most common subtypes of sickle cell disease. Included articles focused on growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor), intra and extracellular brain proteins (glial fibrillary acidic protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor), and inflammatory and coagulation markers (interleukin-1?, l-selectin, thrombospondin-1, erythrocyte, and platelet-derived microparticles). Positive findings include increases in plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and platelet-derived growth factor with elevated transcranial Dopplers velocities, increases in platelet-derived growth factor isoform AA with overt stroke, and increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein with acute brain injury. These promising potential neuro-biomarkers provide insight into pathophysiologic processes and clinical events, but their clinical utility is yet to be established. Additional proteomics research is needed, including broad-based proteomic discovery of plasma constituents and blood cell proteins, as well as urine and cerebrospinal fluid components, before, during and after neurological and developmental complications. PMID:25290359

  16. Hyperferritinemic syndrome: Still's disease and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome triggered by fulminant Chikungunya infection: a case report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Juan-Felipe; Navarro, Erika-Paola; Echeverry, Alex; Moncada, Pablo A; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    There are four medical conditions characterized by high levels of ferritin, the macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), adult onset Still' s disease (AOSD), catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), and septic shock, that share similar clinical and laboratory features, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. This common syndrome entity is termed "the hyperferritinemic syndrome." Here, we describe two different cases of hyperferritinemic syndrome triggered by Chikungunya fever virus infection: a 21-year-old female with SLE and a 32-year-old male patient who developed AOSD after the coinfection of dengue and Chikungunya viruses. PMID:26233722

  17. Complicated Whipple’s disease and endocarditis following tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFI) is associated with complications of Tropheryma whipplei (T. whipplei) infection. METHODS: Because unexplained arthritis is often the first Whipple’s disease (WD) symptom, patients may undergo treatment with TNFI before diagnosis. This may influence the course of infection with T. whipplei, which causes WD, because host immune defects contribute to the pathogenesis of WD. A literature search and cross referencing identified 19 reports of TNFI treatment prior to WD diagnosis. This case-control study compared clinical data in patients receiving TNFI therapy (group?I, n = 41) with patients not receiving TNFI therapy (group II, n = 61). Patients from large reviews served as controls (group III, n = 1059). RESULTS: The rate of endocarditis in patient group?I?was significantly higher than in patient group II (12.2% in group?I vs 1.6% in group II, P < 0.05), and group III (12.2% in group?I?vs 0.16% in group III, P < 0.01). Other, severe systemic or local WD complications such as pericarditis, fever or specific organ manifestations were increased also in group?I?as compared to the other patient groups. However, diarrhea and weight loss were somewhat less frequent in patient group?I. WD is typically diagnosed with duodenal biopsy and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. PAS-stain as standard diagnostic test had a very high percentage of false negative results (diagnostic failure in 63.6% of cases) in group I. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for T. whipplei was more accurate than PAS-stainings (diagnostic accuracy, rate of true positive tests 90.9% for PCR vs 36.4% for PAS, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: TNFI trigger severe WD complications, particularly endocarditis, and lead to false-negative PAS-tests. In case of TNFI treatment failure, infection with T. whipplei should be considered. PMID:25548618

  18. Small bowel adenocarcinomas complicating Crohn's disease are associated with dysplasia: a pathological and molecular study.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Svrcek M; Piton G; Cosnes J; Beaugerie L; Vermeire S; Geboes K; Lemoine A; Cervera P; El-Murr N; Dumont S; Scriva A; Lascols O; Ardizzone S; Fociani P; Savoye G; Le Pessot F; Novacek G; Wrba F; Colombel JF; Leteurtre E; Bouhnik Y; Cazals-Hatem D; Cadiot G; Diebold MD; Rahier JF; Delos M; Fléjou JF; Carbonnel F

    2014-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). However, there are no guidelines for the screening and early diagnosis of SBA. Colorectal cancer associated with chronic colitis arises from dysplasia. High-risk patients benefit from surveillance colonoscopies aimed to detect dysplasia. The dysplasia-carcinoma sequence remains poorly documented in CD-associated SBA. Moreover, molecular data about SBA complicating CD and associated dysplasia are very limited. We therefore assessed dysplasia and several key molecular markers of carcinogenesis in SBA and dysplasia developed in patients with CD.METHODS: Forty-five SBA complicating CD and 4 specimens with dysplasia without SBA were screened. In SBA, we looked for dysplasia and determined their pathological characteristics (type, grade, distribution). We also stained for mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2), p53, ?-catenin, and p16 and looked for KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations.RESULTS: All neoplastic lesions, except 1 lesion, were found in inflamed mucosal areas. Dysplasia was found in 20 of 41 patients with SBA (49%). Dysplasia was flat or raised, low grade or high grade, and adjacent or distant to concomitant SBA. Molecular markers of SBA carcinogenesis complicating CD were similar to those observed in chronic colitis-related colorectal cancer (KRAS, BRAF, p53, MSI), although differences were observed for ?-catenin and p16. No PIK3CA mutations were observed.CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that there is an inflammation-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence in at least half of CD-related SBA, similar to what is observed in chronic colitis-related colorectal cancer and may have implications for the prevention and treatment of this cancer.

  19. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D'Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-11-21

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial "fingerprint", characterized by the reduced ratio of "good" to "potentially pathogenic" bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease. PMID:26604640

  20. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D’Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial “fingerprint”, characterized by the reduced ratio of “good” to “potentially pathogenic” bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease. PMID:26604640

  1. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Complicated With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Dong Sik; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Hun; Cho, Hee Mun

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is the most common adult muscular dystrophy characterized by multi-systemic clinical manifestations involving the brain, smooth muscle, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. However, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is an uncommon presentation of MD type 1 (DM1), which has not been reported in recent literature. A 53-year-old female, previously confirmed as DM1, presented with vague claudication of both lower limbs. The diagnosis of PAOD based on results of ankle-brachial index, ultrasonography, and abdominal computed tomography angiography studies was followed by aortobifemoral artery bypass surgery. Although the arterial patency was restored after the operation, she did not recover from post-operative respiratory complications. Screening of PAOD is necessary for DM1 with general risk factors of occlusive arteriopathy. However, surgery should be reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:26361604

  2. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Complicated With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Dong Sik; Lee, Sang Hun; Cho, Hee Mun

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is the most common adult muscular dystrophy characterized by multi-systemic clinical manifestations involving the brain, smooth muscle, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. However, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is an uncommon presentation of MD type 1 (DM1), which has not been reported in recent literature. A 53-year-old female, previously confirmed as DM1, presented with vague claudication of both lower limbs. The diagnosis of PAOD based on results of ankle-brachial index, ultrasonography, and abdominal computed tomography angiography studies was followed by aortobifemoral artery bypass surgery. Although the arterial patency was restored after the operation, she did not recover from post-operative respiratory complications. Screening of PAOD is necessary for DM1 with general risk factors of occlusive arteriopathy. However, surgery should be reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:26361604

  3. Infectious complications after surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Cypriano Petrus; Fonseca, Patricia Belintani Blum; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of infectious complications in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) after surgical splenectomy for acute splenic sequestration crisis. METHODS: Retrospective cohort of children with SCD who were born after 2002 and were regularly monitored until July 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: cases (children with SCD who underwent surgical splenectomy after an episode of splenic sequestration) and controls (children with SCD who did not have splenic sequestration and surgical procedures), in order to compare the frequency of invasive infections (sepsis, meningitis, bacteremia with positive blood cultures, acute chest syndrome and/or pneumonia) by data collected from medical records. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: 44 patients were included in the case group. The mean age at the time of splenectomy was 2.6 years (1-6.9 years) and the mean postoperative length of follow-up was 6.1 years (3.8-9.9 years). The control group consisted of 69 patients with a mean age at the initial follow-up visit of 5.6 months (1-49 months) and a mean length of follow-up of 7.2 years (4-10.3 years).All children received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. No significant difference was observed between groups in relation to infections during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease that had splenic sequestration did not affect the frequency of infectious complications during 6 years of clinical follow-up. PMID:25913493

  4. THAOS: Gastrointestinal manifestations of transthyretin amyloidosis - common complications of a rare disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transthyretin amyloidosis is a systemic disorder caused by amyloid deposits formed by misfolded transthyretin monomers. Two main forms exist: hereditary and wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis, the former associated with transthyretin gene mutations. There are several disease manifestations; however, gastrointestinal complications are common in the hereditary form. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal manifestations in transthyretin amyloidosis and to evaluate their impact on the patients’ nutritional status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods The Transthyretin Amyloidosis Outcomes Survey (THAOS) is the first global, multicenter, longitudinal, observational survey that collects data on patients with transthyretin amyloidosis and the registry is sponsored by Pfizer Inc. This study presents baseline data from patients enrolled in THAOS as of June 2013. The modified body mass index (mBMI), in which BMI is multiplied with serum albumin, was used to assess the nutritional status and the EQ-5D Index was used to assess HRQoL. Results Data from 1579 patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis and 160 patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis were analyzed. Sixty-three percent of those with the hereditary form and 15% of those with the wild-type form reported gastrointestinal symptoms at enrollment. Unintentional weight loss and early satiety were the most frequent symptoms, reported by 32% and 26% of those with transthyretin gene mutations, respectively. Early-onset patients (<50 years) reported gastrointestinal complaints more frequently than those with a late onset (p?complications, the prevalence of gastrointestinal manifestations was not evidently higher than that expected in the general population. Both upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms were significant negative predictors of mBMI and the EQ-5D Index Score (p?complications did not show an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal disturbances. PMID:24767411

  5. Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications: The Role of Adipokines and the Relationship between Obesity, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is closely associated with an increased risk of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure, which leads to an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is now recognized not only as a main site of storage of excess energy derived from food intake but also as an endocrine organ. The expansion of adipose tissue produces a number of bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines or adipokines, which trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and interact with a range of processes in many different organs. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, dysregulated production or secretion of these adipokines caused by excess adipose tissue and adipose tissue dysfunction can contribute to the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of several adipokines associated with obesity and the potential impact on obesity-related metabolic diseases. Multiple lines evidence provides valuable insights into the roles of adipokines in the development of obesity and its metabolic complications. Further research is still required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the metabolic actions of a few newly identified adipokines. PMID:24733068

  6. Obesity and its metabolic complications: the role of adipokines and the relationship between obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is closely associated with an increased risk of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure, which leads to an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is now recognized not only as a main site of storage of excess energy derived from food intake but also as an endocrine organ. The expansion of adipose tissue produces a number of bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines or adipokines, which trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and interact with a range of processes in many different organs. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, dysregulated production or secretion of these adipokines caused by excess adipose tissue and adipose tissue dysfunction can contribute to the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of several adipokines associated with obesity and the potential impact on obesity-related metabolic diseases. Multiple lines evidence provides valuable insights into the roles of adipokines in the development of obesity and its metabolic complications. Further research is still required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the metabolic actions of a few newly identified adipokines. PMID:24733068

  7. Interleukin 1 inhibition with anakinra in adult-onset Still disease: a meta-analysis of its efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhihai; Han, Shuyin; Liang, Xingguang; Ma, Kuifen; Zhang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Anakinra is the first interleukin-1 inhibitor to be used in clinical practice, and recent evidence showed that interleukin-1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of adult-onset Still disease (AoSD). However, data concerning efficacy with anakinra use in different clinical trials has not been evaluated, and the overall remission of AoSD with anakinra treatment has not been well defined. Methods We conducted a search on Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the overall remission rates, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI), by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity. Results Of the 273 articles that were identified, 265 were excluded. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion. The overall remission rate and complete remission rate of anakinra in AoSD patients were 81.66% (95% CI: 69.51%–89.69%) and 66.75% (95% CI: 59.94%–75.3%), respectively. Compared with the controls, the use of anakinra was associated with a significant remission in AoSD, with an OR of 0.16 (95% CI: 0.06–0.44, P=0.0005). There were also significant reductions of the dosage of corticosteroid (mean difference =21.19) (95% CI: 13.2–29.18, P<0.0001) from anakinra onset to the latest follow up time. Clinical and laboratory parameters were all improved, and anakinra was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion Our study has shown that anakinra is effective in remitting the manifestations of AoSD, with reduction of the dose of corticosteroid in patients with AoSD. Further, anakinra therapy was not associated with increased risk of adverse events, and it was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. Further research is still recommended to investigate these findings. PMID:25473268

  8. [Multiple pulmonary emboli complicating infective endocarditis in a child with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ajdakar, S; Elbouderkaoui, M; Rada, N; Drais, G; Bouskraoui, M

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare condition, associated with high mortality. Clinical presentation is nonspecific. Pulmonary embolism may present initially similar to bacterial endocarditis of the right heart, septic thrombophlebitis, or osteomyelitis. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl who had dyspnea over the four months before consultation, complicated three months later by hemoptysis. She was diagnosed with subacute bacterial endocarditis secondary to group D Streptococcus, developed upon a ventricular septal defect. Two weeks later, the child had sudden chest pain and tachypnea. Lung scintigraphy showed multiple pulmonary embolisms. The therapeutic approach was to continue antibiotics without anticoagulant treatment. The outcome was favorable with apyrexia and stabilization on the respiratory level. Pulmonary embolism is a rare disease in children with an incidence of 3.7%. Classically, it presents with fever, hemoptysis, and nonspecific infiltrates on chest X-ray. These signs were noted in our patient, although the infiltrates on the chest X-ray were hidden by the pulmonary edema associated with heart failure. The persistence of these left basal opacities after antidiuretic treatment suggested an infectious origin. Subsequently, lung scintigraphy showed that it was a pulmonary infarct. The therapy of septic pulmonary embolism is the same as that for infective endocarditis. Antibiotic treatment alone was maintained without anticoagulants because of the high risk of bleeding at the seat of the pulmonary embolism and the insubstantial significant benefit of this therapy. Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare disease, but its incidence is underestimated. Better knowledge on its actual impact and etiologies in children is necessary. Multicenter studies are needed to establish recommendations. PMID:25725970

  9. Miliary tuberculosis disease complicated by Pott's abscess in an infant: Seven year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bayhan, Gulsum Iclal; Tanir, Gonul; Gayretli Ayd?n, Zeynep Gokce; Yildiz, Yasemin Tasci

    2015-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy presented with 1-year history of persistent fever, cough, and progressive abdominal distention. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hepatomegaly and multiple calcifications in the liver and spleen. Thoracic computed tomography showed multiple mediastinal lymph nodes and consolidation in both lungs. Additionally, there was a 2-cm thick retroperitoneal soft tissue mass destroying the T7-8 and L1-L2 vertebral bodies. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with miliary tuberculosis (TB) and Pott's disease, and began administering anti-TB treatment consisting of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Acid-resistant bacilli analysis and mycobacterial culture of the biopsy specimen of Pott's abscess were positive. Mycobacterial culture and PCR of gastric aspirate were also positive. The patient's condition progressively improved with anti-TB treatment and he received 12 months of antiTB therapy. At the end of the treatment all of the patient's symptoms were relieved and he was well except for kyphosis. Miliary TB complicated by Pott's abscess is a very rare presentation of childhood TB. The presented case shows that when Pott's abscess is diagnosed and surgically corrected without delay, patients can recover without squeal. PMID:25983412

  10. Extramedullary hematopoiesis of the liver in a child with sickle cell disease: A rare complication.

    PubMed

    Barrier, Angela; Willy, Simo; Slone, Jeremy S

    2015-08-01

    We present the case of a 7-year-old Cameroonian girl with sickle cell disease (SCD) who presented with progressive abdominal distension, fever, severe anemia, respiratory distress, and fatigue. Abdominal ultrasound showed a 15.3 cm × 11.5 cm × 15.5 cm solid echogenic mass within the left lobe of the liver. Fine-needle aspiration showed features of extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Despite transfusions, antibiotics, and initiation of hydroxyurea the patient died of respiratory failure during the hospital stay. There is a paucity of information on EMH in the pediatric sickle cell population, especially from resource-limited settings such as western Africa. EMH, however, is a known complication of SCD and should be considered in patients presenting with mass lesions in the setting of chronic anemia. With limited therapeutic interventions for EMH, including radiation and hydroxyurea, the emphasis should be on improving overall treatment of patients with chronic and untreated hemolytic anemia, especially in low-income countries. PMID:26171586

  11. Transfusion Complications in Thalassemia Patients: A Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    PubMed Central

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Neumayr, Lynne; Trimble, Sean; Giardina, Patricia J.; Cohen, Alan R.; Coates, Thomas; Boudreaux, Jeanne; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Kenney, Kristy; Grant, Althea; Thompson, Alexis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives Transfusions are the primary therapy for thalassemia but have significant cumulative risks. In 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established a national blood safety monitoring program for thalassemia. The purpose of this report is to summarize the patient population as well as previous non-immune and immune transfusion complications at the time of enrollment into the program. A focus on factors associated with allo- and auto-immunization in chronically transfused patients and a description of blood product preparation and transfusion practices at the participating institutions are included. Study Design and Methods The CDC Thalassemia Blood Safety Network is a consortium of thalassemia centers, longitudinally following patients to determine transfusion-related complications. Enrollment occurred from 2004 through 2012 and annual data collection is ongoing. Demographic data, transfusion history, and previous transfusion and non-transfusion complications were summarized for patients enrolled between 2004 and 2011. Logistic analyses of factors associated with allo- and auto-immunization were developed. Summary statistics of infections reported at the time of enrollment were also calculated. Results The race/ethnicity of the 407 thalassemia patients enrolled in the Network was predominantly Asian or Caucasian and 27% were immigrants. The average age was 22.3 years ± 13.2 and patients received an average total number of 149 ± 103.4 units of red blood cells. Iron-induced multi-organ dysfunction was common despite chelation. At study entry, 86 patients had previously been exposed to possible transfusion-associated pathogens, including Hepatitis-C (61), Hepatitis B (20), Hepatitis A (3), Parvovirus (9), HIV (4), malaria (1), staphylococcus aureus (1) and babesia (1). As 27% of the population was born outside of the United States (India, Pakistan, Thailand, China, Vietnam and Iran accounting for 57%), the source of infection cannot be unequivocally tied to transfusion. In total, 24% of transfused patients were reported to have possible transfusion-associated pathogens. Transfusion reactions occurred in 48% of patients, including allergic, febrile, and hemolytic; 19% of transfused patients were alloimmunized (defined as a having an antibody to a foreign red blood cell antigen). The most common antigens were E, Kell and C. One hemolytic reaction to an anti-Mia antibody was noted. Years of transfusion was the strongest predictor of alloimmunization. However, initiating transfusions in infancy may induce immune tolerance. Autoantibodies occurred in 6.5% and were predicted by previous alloimmunization (p < .0001). Local institutional transfusion policies, rather than patient characteristics, were the major determinants in the preparation of red-blood cells for transfusion. Conclusion Hemosiderosis and immunologic and non-immunologic transfusion reactions are major problems in thalassemia patients. Infections continue to be a problem in thalassemia and new pathogens have been noted. National transfusion guidelines for red cell phenotyping and preparation are needed in thalassemia to decrease transfusion-related morbidity. PMID:23889533

  12. [Is obesity an adverse prognostic factor for pulmonary manifestations of influenza? Lesson from complicated disease course H1N1].

    PubMed

    Zoubková, Renata; Máca, Jan; Handlos, Petr; Rudinská, Lenka; Nytra, Ivana; Chýlek, Václav; Vavrošová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics that occur at different times in both the northern and southern hemisphere. In cases of seasonal influenza these are usually mild forms of the disease, which rarely lead to death of the patient. Vulnerable groups include the elderly, the young or those with comorbidities, where the virus affects tens of thousands of victims around the world. Occasionally, however, large epidemics appear caused by a dangerous variant of a new virus, which is usually characterized by high contagiousness and pathogenicity (virulence). Consequently, it is often accompanied by a complicated disease course and associated with high mortality. In 2009, a viral pandemic disease marked pH1N1 2009 Influenza A appeared. Even though the initial predictions were far worse, the course of influenza caused by this virus was often complicated by acute respiratory failure in the form of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This formed part of the wider multiple organ failure syndrome (MODS). This type of virus often infects younger age groups and is more contagious compared to the seasonal flu. In order to illustrate the complicated forms of viral infections pH1N1 2009 Influenza A we present three case studies which demonstrate complicated pulmonary manifestation, which take the primary form of ARDS. PMID:25561242

  13. The Pathologic Findings of Skin, Lymph Node, Liver, and Bone Marrow in Patients With Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Kwon, Jee Eun; Yim, Hyunee; Suh, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ju-Yang; Han, Jae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is characterized by fever, skin rash, and lymphadenopathy with leukocytosis and anemia as common laboratory findings. We investigated the characteristic pathologic findings of skin, lymph node, liver, and bone marrow to assist in proper diagnosis of AOSD. Forty AOSD patients were included in the study. The skin (26 patients), lymph node (8 patients), liver (8 patients), or bone marrow biopsies (22 patients) between 1998 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. AOSD patients were diagnosed according to the Yamaguchi criteria after excluding common infections, hematological and autoimmune diseases. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Epstein–Barr virus–encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization were performed. Most skin biopsies revealed mild lymphocytic or histiocytic infiltration in the upper dermis. Nuclear debris was frequently found in the dermis in 14 cases (53.8%). More than half of the cases (n?=?14, 53.8%) showed interstitial mucin deposition. Some cases showed interface dermatitis with keratinocyte necrosis or basal vacuolization (n?=?10; 38.5%). The lymph node biopsies showed a paracortical or diffuse hyperplasia pattern with immunoblastic and vascular proliferation. The liver biopsies showed sparse portal and sinusoidal inflammatory cell infiltration. All cases showed various degrees of Kupffer cell hyperplasia. The cellularity of bone marrow varied from 20% to 80%. Myeloid cell hyperplasia was found in 14 out of the 22 cases (63.6%). On immunohistochemistry, the number of CD8-positive lymphocytes was greater than that of CD4-positive lymphocytes in the skin, liver, and bone marrow, but the number of CD4-positive lymphocytes was greater than that of CD8-positive lymphocytes in the lymph nodes. The relatively specific findings with respect to the cutaneous manifestation of AOSD were mild inflammatory cell infiltration in the upper dermis, basal vacuolization, keratinocyte necrosis, presence of karyorrhexis, and mucin in the dermis. In all cases, pathologic findings in the lymph nodes included paracortical hyperplasia with vascular and immunoblastic proliferation. Skin and lymph node pathology in addition to clinical findings can aid in the diagnosis of AOSD. PMID:25929927

  14. Diabetes Care, Glycemic Control, Complications, and Concomitant Autoimmune Diseases in Children with Type 1 Diabetes in Turkey: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    ?im?ek, Damla Gök?en; Aycan, Zehra; Özen, Samim; Çetinkaya, Semra; Kara, Cengiz; Abal?, Sayg?n; Demir, Korcan; Tunç, Özgül; Uçaktürk, Ahmet; Asar, Gülgün; Ba?, Firdevs; Çetinkaya, Ergun; Ayd?n, Murat; Karagüzel, Gülay; Orbak, Zerrin; Orbak, Zerrin; ??klar, Zeynep; Alt?nc?k, Ayça; Ökten, Ay?enur; Özkan, Behzat; Öçal, Gönül; Semiz, Serap; Arslano?lu, ?lknur; Evliyao?lu, Olcay; Bundak, Rüveyde; Darcan, ?ükran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiologic and clinical features of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may show substantial differences among countries. The primary goal in the management of T1DM is to prevent micro- and macrovascular complications by achieving good glycemic control. The present study aimed to assess metabolic control, presence of concomitant autoimmune diseases, and of acute and long-term complications in patients diagnosed with T1DM during childhood and adolescence. The study also aimed to be a first step in the development of a national registry system for T1DM, in Turkey. Methods: Based on hospital records, this cross-sectional, multicenter study included 1 032 patients with T1DM from 12 different centers in Turkey, in whom the diagnosis was established during childhood. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, diabetes care, complications, and concomitant autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: Mean age, diabetes duration, and hemoglobin A1c level were 12.5±4.1 years, 4.7±3.2 years, and 8.5±1.6%, respectively. Acute complications noted in the past year included ketoacidosis in 5.2% of the patients and severe hypoglycemia in 4.9%. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis was noted in 12%, Graves’ disease in 0.1%, and celiac disease in 4.3% of the patients. Chronic complications including neuropathy, retinopathy, and persistent microalbuminuria were present in 2.6%, 1.4%, and 5.4% of the patients, respectively. Diabetic nephropathy was not present in any of the patients. Mean diabetes duration and age of patients with neuropathy, retinopathy and microalbuminuria were significantly different from the patients without these long-term complications (p<0.01). A significant difference was found between pubertal and prepubertal children in terms of persistent microalbuminuria and neuropathy (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Of the patients, 4.4% (n:38) were obese and 5% had short stature; 17.4% of the patients had dyslipidemia, and 14% of the dyslipidemic patients were obese. Conclusions: Although the majority of the patients in the present study were using insulin analogues, poor glycemic control was common, and chronic complications were encountered. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419424

  15. Risk Factors for Neurologic Complications of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in the Republic of Korea, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Joon; Kang, Jin-Han; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Kim, Young-Hoon; Chung, Ju-Young; Bin, Joong Hyun; Jung, Da Eun; Kim, Ji Hong; Kim, Hwang Min; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kang, Byung Hak; Seo, Soon Young

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the first outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) or herpangina (HP) caused by enterovirus 71 occurred in the Republic of Korea. This study inquired into risk factors associated with complications of HFMD or HP. A retrospective medical records review was conducted on HFMD or HP patients for whom etiologic viruses had been verified in 2009. One hundred sixty-eight patients were examined for this investigation. Eighty patients were without complications while 88 were accompanied by complications, and 2 had expired. Enterovirus 71 subgenotype C4a was the most prevalent in number with 67 cases (54.9%). In the univariate analysis, the disease patterns of HFMD rather than HP, fever longer than 4 days, peak body temperature over 39?, vomiting, headache, neurologic signs, serum glucose over 100 mg/dL, and having an enterovirus 71 as a causative virus were significant risk factors of the complications. After multiple logistic analysis, headache (Odds ratio [OR], 10.75; P < 0.001) and neurologic signs (OR, 42.76; P < 0.001) were found to be the most significant factors. Early detection and proper management of patients with aforementioned risk factors would be necessary in order to attain a better clinical outcome. PMID:23341722

  16. Mechanisms of disease: Mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neuropathy and other complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Paul; Jonathan, McGavock

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that involves the sensory and autonomic nervous systems and leads to significant morbidity and impact on quality of life of patients. Mitochondrial stress has been proposed as a major mediator of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes and a trigger of diabetic complications such as nephropathy and cardiomyopathy in humans and animal models. Recent studies in the peripheral nervous system in type 1 and type 2 diabetic animal models suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegeneration in diabetes. This chapter focuses on the nature of sensory nerve dysfunction in diabetes and presents these findings in the context of diabetes-induced nerve degeneration mediated by alterations in mitochondrial physiology. Diabetes-induced dysfunction in calcium homeostasis is discussed and causative associations with suboptimal mitochondrial physiology are developed. Comparisons are made with mitochondrial-dependent dysfunction in muscle and cardiac tissue in diabetes. It is clear that across a range of complications of diabetes mitochondrial physiology is impaired; in general, a reduction in respiratory chain capability is apparent. Where appropriate, we provide clinical evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of complications in patients with diabetes. This abnormal activity may predispose mitochondria to generate elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), although experimental proof remains lacking, but more importantly will deleteriously alter the bioenergetic status of neurons. PMID:25410234

  17. Complications after video-assisted thoracic surgery in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who underwent preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Akira; Murase, Kazuma; Yamada, Katsuo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation are effective in preventing postoperative complications in patients with cardiopulmonary disease. The present study aims to elucidate the presence of postoperative pneumonia and atelectasis in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who underwent lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who had undergone lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were enrolled in this study. The presence of postoperative pneumonia and atelectasis was evaluated, and preoperative and postoperative pulmonary functions were compared. [Results] Postoperative pneumonia and postoperative atelectasis were not observed. Decreases of pulmonary function were 5.9% (standard deviation, 8.5) in forced vital capacity (percent predicted) and 9.6% (standard deviation, 11.1) in forced expiratory volume in 1?s (percent predicted). [Conclusion] The present study indicates that the combination of lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease may be effective in preventing postoperative complications. PMID:26357436

  18. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Renal Failure Complicating a Systemic Genetic Disease: Diagnostic Dilemma. Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Benmoussa, Leila; Renoux, Marion; Radoï, Loredana

    2015-11-01

    Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, owing mainly to secondary hyperparathyroidism complicating this disease. However, any systemic disease responsible for kidney failure can produce oral manifestations, which can be misdiagnosed. This report describes the case of a 40-year-old male patient referred for oral assessment before kidney and liver transplantation. He had primary hyperoxaluria complicated by end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Panoramic radiography indicated not only external root resorption, but also maxillary and mandibular radiolucencies consistent with brown tumors. Unexpectedly, histologic study of the bone biopsy specimen led to the diagnosis of jaws oxalosis. Primary hyperoxaluria is a systemic genetic disease. The affected genes are involved in glyoxylate metabolism and their deficiency results in overproduction of oxalates. Inability of the kidney to excrete oxalates leads to deposition of these crystals in almost all tissues (oxalosis) and to multiple-organ failure. Several oral findings have been described in patients with oxalosis, such as periodontal disease and root resorptions, but radiolucencies in the jaws have rarely been described. This case report is of particular interest because of the unusual location of oxalate crystal deposition in the jaws, which could be misdiagnosed in a patient with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26071361

  19. A neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema:A complete recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shi-Jie; Wang, Dong-Xuan; Dai, Chun-Lai; Wu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with serious complications and fatal cases have been reported over the last decade worldwide. The authors report a rare case of HFMD in a neonate complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema. She had fever, lethargy, dyspnea. Physical examination revealed shock signs, fine rales on both lungs, absent Moro reflex. The patient had a rapidly progressive course with seizures, coma, no spontaneous breathing, chemosis. There were some vesicles on left sole and red maculopapular rashes on perianal skin. She had a history of exposure to HFMD. Fecal sample was positive for EV71 RNA by real-time PCR. Chest X-rays showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. MRI of the brain showed significant hypointensity in the brainstem on T1WI and hyperintensity on T2WI. She recovered well. This case highlights severe HFMD in neonates is rare. Medical history and physical examination are important in making diagnosis. PMID:25097545

  20. Cardiovascular disease risk profile and microvascular complications of diabetes: comparison of Indigenous cohorts with diabetes in Australia and Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Indigenous populations of Australia and Canada experience disproportionately high rates of chronic disease. Our goal was to compare cardiovascular (CVD) risk profile and diabetes complications from three recent comprehensive studies of diabetes complications in different Indigenous populations in Australia and Canada. Methods We compared participants from three recent studies: remote Indigenous Australians (2002-2003, n = 37 known diabetes), urban Indigenous Australians (2003-2005, n = 99 known diabetes), and remote Aboriginal Canadians (2001-2002, n = 188 known diabetes). Results The three groups were similar for HbA1c, systolic BP, diabetes duration. Although leaner by body-mass-index criteria, remote Indigenous Australians displayed a more adverse CVD risk profile with respect to: waist-hip-ratio (1.03, 0.99, 0.94, remote Indigenous Australians, urban Indigenous Australians, remote Canadians, p < 0.001); HDL-cholesterol (0.82, 0.96, 1.17 mmol/L, p < 0.001); urine albumin-creatinine-ratio (10.3, 2.4, 4.5 mg/mmol); and C-reactive protein. With respect to diabetes complications, microalbuminuria (50%, 25%, 41%, p = 0.001) was more common among both remote groups than urban Indigenous Australians, but there were no differences for peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy or peripheral vascular disease. Conclusions Although there are many similarities in diabetes phenotype in Indigenous populations, this comparison demonstrates that CVD risk profiles and diabetes complications may differ among groups. Irrespective, management and intervention strategies are required from a young age in Indigenous populations and need to be designed in consultation with communities and tailored to community and individual needs. PMID:22455801

  1. Snippets From the Past: Cohort Analysis of Disease Rates—Another Piece in a Seemingly Still Incomplete Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    For almost a century, epidemiologists have stratified age-specific disease rates by year of birth to better understand the distribution of a disease in a population and its evolution across time. In the present article, I review the contributions of John Brownlee, Kristian Feyer Andvord, and Wade Hampton Frost and, to accentuate the similarities of their approaches, redraw their original graphs of age-specific death rates of tuberculosis organized either by year of death or year of birth. In addition, this article reports on an apparently universally forgotten publication in the American Journal of Hygiene published in 1929, which both upsets the conventional history of the earliest reports of disease rates stratified by birth cohorts and challenges the theory that Frost discovered cohort analysis independently and gave it its name. PMID:24920785

  2. Snippets from the past: cohort analysis of disease rates-another piece in a seemingly still incomplete puzzle.

    PubMed

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-07-15

    For almost a century, epidemiologists have stratified age-specific disease rates by year of birth to better understand the distribution of a disease in a population and its evolution across time. In the present article, I review the contributions of John Brownlee, Kristian Feyer Andvord, and Wade Hampton Frost and, to accentuate the similarities of their approaches, redraw their original graphs of age-specific death rates of tuberculosis organized either by year of death or year of birth. In addition, this article reports on an apparently universally forgotten publication in the American Journal of Hygiene published in 1929, which both upsets the conventional history of the earliest reports of disease rates stratified by birth cohorts and challenges the theory that Frost discovered cohort analysis independently and gave it its name. PMID:24920785

  3. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  4. Typical evanescent and atypical persistent polymorphic cutaneous rash in an adult Brazilian with Still's disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Despina; Shin, Junghee; Forde, Inga; Gopalratnam, Kavitha; Cohen, Paul; DeGirolamo, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic auto-inflammatory condition of unknown etiology, characterized by high fever, an evanescent, salmon-pink maculopapular skin rash, arthralgia or arthritis and leukocytosis. AOSD can also present with atypical cutaneous manifestations, such as persistent pruritic coalescent papules or plaques and linear lesions that have highly distinctive pathological features and are usually associated with severe disease. Herein, we present a 31-year-old Brazilian man with both typical Still's rash and atypical persistent polymorphic cutaneous manifestations associated with severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Eosinophils that are consistently lacking in the AOSD-associated skin lesions were evident in the skin biopsy of the persistent atypical cutaneous manifestations and were either drug-related or AOSD-associated. PMID:26423534

  5. [Treatment and outcome of Crohn's disease without initial complications. Results of a retrospective, multicenter Tunisian study].

    PubMed

    Cheikh, Imed; Ben Ammar, Ahmed; Essid, Mejda; Azzouz, Messadak; Ettahri, Nabil; Krichene, Mohamed; Bouzaidi, Slim; Ennajar, Taoufik

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate and achieve the factors that have an influence on the evolution of the Chron's disease. This study was done in 124 patients reaching the diagnosis of Chron's disease between 1988 and 1997. The evolution of this disease was achieved in 87 patients. The Chron's disease was inactive among 31 patients (35-6%)--with discontinous evolution in 42 patients (48.3%) and active chronic in 14 patients (16-1%). The active chronic form of Chron's disease was twice more frequent among the smokers and the patients with age above 40 years--but this difference has no statistical significance. The indication of surgical treatment was realised in 21 patients and it takes place as result of failure of medical treatment in 16 patients (76-2%)--an abcess in 2 patents (9-5%) and iatrogenic perforation in 1 patient (4-8%). The age-sexe-smoke--the intensity of the initial attack and the nature of the treatment had no influence in the need of the surgical interfference. The Chron's disease showed the less severe evolution in this study--the age above 40 years and the consumption of smoke increased the frequency of active chronic form. PMID:12416354

  6. Maternal obesity in females born small: Pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk.

    PubMed

    Mahizir, Dayana; Briffa, Jessica F; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wadley, Glenn D; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes that leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth-restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth-restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus, the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood. PMID:26173914

  7. Association of Serum Adiponectin, Leptin, and Resistin Concentrations with the Severity of Liver Dysfunction and the Disease Complications in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Surdacka, Agata; Smolen, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. There is growing evidence that white adipose tissue is an important contributor in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We investigated serum concentrations of total adiponectin (Acrp30), leptin, and resistin in patients with chronic alcohol abuse and different grades of liver dysfunction, as well as ALD complications. Materials and Methods. One hundred forty-seven consecutive inpatients with ALD were prospectively recruited. The evaluation of plasma adipokine levels was performed using immunoenzymatic ELISA tests. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Results. Acrp30 and resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with ALD than in controls. Lower leptin levels in females with ALD compared to controls, but no significant differences in leptin concentrations in males, were found. High serum Acrp30 level revealed an independent association with advanced liver dysfunction, as well as the development of ALD complications, that is, ascites and hepatic encephalopathy. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in serum leptin concentrations may influence the ALD course, different in females compared with males. Serum Acrp30 level may serve as a potential prognostic indicator for patients with ALD. PMID:24259947

  8. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Dyslipidemia, Risk for Cardiovascular Complications, and Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Qing; Lu, Lun-Gen

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with several metabolic disorders and diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. In NAFLD, dyslipidemia is manifested as increased serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, all of which are key risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is a leading cause of mortality in NAFLD patients. Thus, implementation of an aggressive therapeutic strategy for dyslipidemia with hypolipidemic agents may mitigate the risk for CVD among NAFLD patients. Here, we provide a current review of literature regarding NAFLD, with particular emphasis on dyslipidemia and available treatment options. PMID:26357637

  9. A rare presentation of a relatively common disease: psoas abscess as a complication of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ho?oleanu, Cristina; Bheecarry, Kunal

    2014-01-01

    Psoas abscess is a rare condition that might represent a diagnostic challenge. We report the case of a 47 years old male patient with diabetes mellitus and chronic pancreatitis, who was admitted for fever and severe pain of the left shoulder, in spite of a normal rheumatologic exam. The pain was interpreted as Kehr's sign when complementary investigations revealed a perisplenic collection, leading to the irritation of the diaphragm; the collection was extended to the left psoas muscle and resulted in psoas abscess. The psoas abscess represents a very rare complication of pancreatitis, favored in this case by the diabetic terrain. After the needle aspiration and percutaneous catheter drainage, along with antibiotics, the course was favorable. The case illustrates the importance of the referred pain and the clinical difficulties in the assessment of psoas abscess, manifested here only with fever and antalgic position. A brief review of the literature is then presented. PMID:25000679

  10. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  11. T cell abnormalities in mixed connective tissue disease complicated with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Yoshimura, M; Nakao, H; Kanakura, Y; Kanayama, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    1994-11-01

    We report a 28-year-old Japanese with Klinefelter's syndrome who developed mixed connective disease (MCTD) and Sjögren syndrome. Previously being well, he presented with Raynaud's phenomenon, dry eye, fever and polyarthralgia. Clinical examinations revealed anti-nRNP autoantibody, leukopenia and lung fibrosis. Then he was found to have Klinefelter's syndrome. Flow cytometric analysis showed a relative increase of peripheral CD8+ T lymphocytes carrying either HLA-DR or CD57. Lymphocyte IL-2 production induced in vitro by concanavalin A was decreased. Such T cell abnormalities may be implicated in the development of autoimmune disease in Klinefelter's syndrome. PMID:7849389

  12. Radiation-induced chondrosarcoma of the clavicle complicating Hodgkin's disease. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Aprin, H.; Calandra, J.; Mir, R.; Lee, J.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Review of the literature reveals that postradiation chondrosarcoma is a rare secondary malignant bone tumor. This case report demonstrates a Grade 1 chondrosarcoma of the proximal right clavicle in a 17-year-old boy, eight years after extensive chemotherapy and radiation therapy for a Stage IIB Hodgkin's disease.

  13. Humeral Lateral Epicondylitis Complicated by Hydroxyapatite Dihydrite Deposition Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Andrée-Anne; O’Shaughnessy, Julie; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this case report is to differentiate the recovery timeline expected for patients with simple lateral epicondylitis from an abnormal recovery period, in which case an underlying condition should be suspected. Clinical features A 49-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with posterolateral right elbow pain. The history included chronic recurrent lateral elbow pain, followed by a traumatic event leading to sustained pain and disability. Intervention and outcomes Following a trial of conservative therapy including activity restrictions, soft tissue therapy, joint mobilizations, and therapeutic ultrasonography that led to no significant improvement, the patient was referred for diagnostic imaging that revealed hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease. Conclusion This report describes a case for which lateral epicondylitis symptoms failed to resolve because of an underlying condition (hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease). This case emphasizes that primary care practitioners treating lateral epicondylitis should consider referral for further investigations when positive results are not achieved. PMID:24711788

  14. Georg Friedrich Händel: a case of large vessel disease with complications in the eighteenth century.

    PubMed

    Bäzner, Hansjörg

    2015-01-01

    Georg Friedrich Händel was not only one of the greatest musical giants ever but also he was probably the first composer who was also the manager and promoter of his own works. Various myths embellish his various biographies. This is also true for his pathography: several articles written by authors from various specialties suggested him having suffered from psychiatric diseases, like cyclothymia or mania, and rheumatologic disorders, like arthritis, while others tended to interpret his recurrent palsies as typical sequelae of ischemic strokes. More recently, reports proposing lead poisoning as the main source of disease in Händel gained the attention of musical and lay press. During his last years of life, Händel was struck with blindness, which in his era had been interpreted as being due to cataracts. This led to three "coucher" operations, all of them without any lasting effect. Although a definite diagnosis cannot be proven from the original sources, the most plausible explanation for Händel's palsies and visual impairment may be based on one single context, i.e., cerebrovascular disease. The possible differential diagnosis will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:25684296

  15. Correlation between congenital heart disease complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension and circulating endothelial cells as well as endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Qiu, Jun; Pan, Min; Zheng, Dongdong; Su, Yamin; Wei, Meifang; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei; Zhu, Jiahua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in the level of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in peripheral venous blood of the patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), and research on their effects in the onset and progress of CHD complicated with PAH. Methods: A case-control study including 30 cases of healthy controls, 15 cases of left-to-right shunt CHD without PAH, 26 cases of CHD complicated with mild PAH, and 17 cases of CHD complicated with moderate-severe PAH was performed. We used flow cytometry to measure the percentage of CECs accounting for nucleated cells in whole blood, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the level of ET-1 in serum. The differences of above-mentioned biomarkers between different groups were compared. Results: (1) The level of CECs and ET-1in the group of moderate-severe PAH was significantly higher than those in the group of mild PAH and the group of CHD without PAH. Significantly difference was also observed between the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of mild PAH and those in the group of CHD without PAH and the control group. Meanwhile, the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of large shunt was significantly higher than those in the group few shunt and few-medium shunt. (2) Strong positive correlations were observed between pulmonary artery systolic pressure and percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. Mean pulmonary artery pressure also positively correlated with percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. (3) Arterial partial pressure of oxygen as well as arterial oxygen saturation negatively correlated with the level of CECs, whereas the volume of left-to-right shunt positively correlated with the level of ET-1. (4) The level of CECs and ET-1 were positively correlated as well in CHD patients. Conclusions: CHD complicated with PAH is associated with increased CEC counts and ET-1 production. This study suggests that CECs and ET-1 could be used as clinical biomarkers to define medical strategies for control of PAH. PMID:26617785

  16. Bilateral popliteal aneurysms complicating adult polycystic kidney disease in a patient with a marfanoid habitus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, W; Goldsmith, D

    2003-01-01

    In 1994 he had noticed a painful swelling behind his left knee. Computed tomography with contrast showed a large popliteal aneurysm. This was replaced with a vein graft. The right popliteal artery showed milder changes, and this was repaired in 1999. Popliteal aneurysms develop most often in older vasculopaths with multiple risk factors; connective tissue disorders have rarely been associated with their presence in younger patients. Polycystic kidney disease has been associated with several aneurysms, most notably cerebral, but not popliteal. The patient's marfanoid habitus also may have played a part. This case emphasises the mixed aetiology of popliteal aneurysms. PMID:12954963

  17. Jejunal overexpression of peptide YY in celiac disease complicated with pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gurrado, Angela; Giungato, Simone; Catacchio, Ivana; Piscitelli, Domenico; Arborea, Graziana; Piccinni, Giuseppe; Testini, Mario; Vacca, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year old man with coeliac disease and chronic lack of appetite, malabsorption and weight loss, despite the gluten-free diet, was operated because of a sub-diaphragmatic free air due to a small-bowel pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI). The jejunum showed granulomatous lesions with a honeycombed appearance of air cysts in the submucosa/subserosa. We found overexpression of peptide YY (PYY) into only the jejunum with PCI, while the expression was very weak or absent in the tissue without cysts. One year after surgery, he had no abdominal pain or PCI recurrence. The above chronic symptoms were plausibly attributable to the PYY. PMID:25291987

  18. Impact of glucocerebrosidase mutations on motor and nonmotor complications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oeda, Tomoko; Umemura, Atsushi; Mori, Yuko; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Inoue, Kimiko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    Homozygous mutations of the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) cause Gaucher disease (GD), and heterozygous mutations of GBA are a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examined the impact of GBA mutations on the longitudinal clinical course of PD patients by retrospective cohort design. GBA-coding regions were fully sequenced in 215 PD patients and GD-associated GBA mutations were identified in 19 (8.8%) PD patients. In a retrospective cohort study, time to develop dementia, psychosis, wearing-off, and dyskinesia were examined. Survival time analysis followed a maximum 12-year observation (median 6.0 years), revealing that PD patients with GD-associated mutations developed dementia and psychosis significantly earlier than those without mutations (p < 0.001 and p = 0.017, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios of GBA mutations were 8.3 for dementia (p < 0.001) and 3.1 for psychosis (p = 0.002). No statistically significant differences were observed for wearing-off and dyskinesia between the groups. N-isopropyl-p[(123)I] iodoamphetamine single-photon emission tomography pixel-by-pixel analysis revealed that regional cerebral blood flow was reduced in the bilateral parietal cortex, including the precuneus of GD-associated mutant PD patients, compared with matched PD controls without mutations. PMID:26422360

  19. Utility of adenosine deaminase (ADA), PCR & thoracoscopy in differentiating tuberculous & non-tuberculous pleural effusion complicating chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sravan; Agarwal, Ritesh; Bal, Amanjit; Sharma, Kusum; Singh, Navneet; Aggarwal, Ashutosh N.; Verma, Indu; Rana, Satyawati V.; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pleural effusion is a common occurrence in patients with late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). In developing countries, many effusions remain undiagnosed after pleural fluid analysis (PFA) and patients are empirically treated with antitubercular therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA), nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) and medical thoracoscopy in distinguishing tubercular and non-tubercular aetiologies in exudative pleural effusions complicating CKD. Methods: Consecutive stage 4 and 5 CKD patients with pleural effusions underwent PFA including ADA and PCR [65 kDa gene; multiplex (IS6110, protein antigen b, MPB64)]. Patients with exudative pleural effusion undiagnosed after PFA underwent medical thoracoscopy. Results: All 107 patients underwent thoracocentesis with 45 and 62 patients diagnosed as transudative and exudative pleural effusions, respectively. Twenty six of the 62 patients underwent medical thoracoscopy. Tuberculous pleurisy was diagnosed in six while uraemic pleuritis was diagnosed in 20 subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid ADA, 65 kDa gene PCR, and multiplex PCR were 66.7 and 90 per cent, 100 and 50 per cent, and 100 and 100 per cent, respectively. Thoracoscopy was associated with five complications in three patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Uraemia remains the most common cause of pleural effusion in CKD even in high TB prevalence country. Multiplex PCR and thoracoscopy are useful investigations in the diagnostic work-up of pleural effusions complicating CKD while the sensitivity and/or specificity of ADA and 65 kDa gene PCR is poor. PMID:25963491

  20. A Systematic Review of Xuezhikang, an Extract from Red Yeast Rice, for Coronary Heart Disease Complicated by Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Qinghua; Liu, Zhaolan; Chen, Keji; Xu, Hao; Liu, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aims to evaluate the benefit and side effect of Xuezhikang for coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by dyslipidemia. Methods. All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with Xuezhikang as a treatment for CHD combined with dyslipidemia were considered for inclusion. Data extraction and analyses and quality assessment were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. Results. We included 22 randomized trials. Xuezhikang showed significant benefit on the incidence of all-cause deaths, CHD deaths, myocardial infarction, and revascularization as compared with placebo based on conventional treatment for CHD. It remarkably lowered total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) as compared with the placebo or inositol nicotinate group, which was similar to statins group. Xuezhikang also raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared to placebo or no intervention, which was similar to Inositol nicotinate and slightly inferior to statins. The incidence of adverse events did not differ between the Xuezhikang and control group. Conclusions. Xuezhikang showed a comprehensive lipid-regulating effect and was safe and effective in reducing cardiovascular events in CHD patients complicated by dyslipidemia. However, more rigorous trials with high quality are needed to give high level of evidence. PMID:22567033

  1. The impact of a regular erythrocytapheresis programme on the acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Kalff, Anna; Dowsing, Claire; Grigg, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    Thirteen adult patients aged 22-63 (median 30) years with sickle cell disease (SCD) were enrolled in a regular erythrocytapheresis (ECP) programme at a single institution between December 1998 and November 2008. The indications for enrolment were recurrent painful crises (PC), acute chest syndrome (ACS), silent cortical ischaemia, pulmonary hypertension, multi-organ crises and pregnancy. Endpoints retrospectively evaluated included the incidence of SCD-related acute events requiring hospitalization following and prior to regular ECP, the development of new and progression of pre-existing related end-organ damage, the effectiveness in reducing HbS levels acutely and prior to the next exchange and the transfusion-related complications. Sixteen acute sickle-related events occurred in five patients in 846 months of patient follow-up. In all patients with reliable data available pre-ECP, the frequency of such events was reduced following commencing regular ECP. No patient experienced stroke, multi-organ crises or developed new and/or progression of end-organ dysfunction. Regular ECP reduced HbS levels to the target of <30% immediately post-exchange. Alloimmunization rates were comparable to the literature and ECP was effective in preventing progressive iron overload. Regular ECP was demonstrated to be an effective, well-tolerated therapy for both acute and chronic complications of SCD in adults. PMID:20346014

  2. Potential influences of complementary therapy on motor and non-motor complications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A; Evatt, Marian L

    2009-10-01

    Nearly two-thirds of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use vitamins or nutritional supplements, and many more may use other complementary therapies, yet <50% of patients have discussed the use of these complementary therapies with a healthcare professional. Physicians should be aware of the complementary therapies their patients with PD are using, and the possible effects of these therapies on motor and non-motor symptoms. Complementary therapies, such as altered diet, dietary supplements, vitamin therapy, herbal supplements, caffeine, nicotine, exercise, physical therapy, massage therapy, melatonin, bright-light therapy and acupuncture, may all influence the symptoms of PD and/or the effectiveness of dopaminergic therapy. Preliminary evidence suggests complementary therapy also may influence non-motor symptoms of PD, such as respiratory disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, mood disorders, sleep and orthostatic hypotension. Whenever possible, clinicians should ensure that complementary therapy is used appropriately in PD patients without reducing the benefits of dopaminergic therapy. PMID:19739693

  3. Severe Legionnaires' Disease Complicated by Rhabdomyolysis and Clinically Resistant to Moxifloxacin in a Splenectomised Patient: Too Much of a Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Koufakis, Theocharis; Gabranis, Ioannis; Chatzopoulou, Marianneta; Margaritis, Anastasios; Tsiakalou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We here report a case of Legionnaires' disease in a splenectomised patient, complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure and characterized by a poor clinical response to moxifloxacin. Splenectomy is not included among the factors, typically associated with higher risk or mortality in patients with Legionellosis. However, our report is consistent with previous case reports describing severe Legionella infections in asplenic subjects. The possibility that functional or anatomic asplenia may be a factor predisposing to severe clinical course or poor response to therapy in patients with Legionella infection cannot be excluded, deserving further investigation in the future. More studies are required in order to clarify the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that connect asplenia, immunological response to Legionella, and pathogen's resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26682076

  4. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  5. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  6. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  7. [Infectious complications in patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Bogomolova, N S; Vishnevskaia, G A; Bol'shakov, L V; Oreshkina, T D; Kuznetsova, S M; Cherny?, S S

    2010-01-01

    Methods for microbiological monitoring could analyze the microflora isolated in 372 patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus, who were treated at the Department for Surgery of the Lung and Mediastinum, Acad. B. V. Petrovsky Russian Research Center of Surgery, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, in 2003 to 2009. Major groups of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree in patients who had undergone long-term resuscitation, injuries, surgery, etc. and in those who had admitted to the department from other clinics are identified. The main clinically significant microorganisms isolated during the pathological process in this area were Staphylococcus epidermadis (3.9-13.3%), St. aureus (12.4-21.1%), Pseudomonas eruginosa (9.2-17.5%), and Candida fungi (7.8-12.2%). This indicates the greater importance of the fungal microflora and its representatives' resistance to the most commonly used drugs. Rational antibacterial therapy regimens are proposed in relation to the type of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree. PMID:21395146

  8. Prevalence and predictors of aortic dilation as a novel cardiovascular complication in children with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Uthup, Susan; Madueme, Peace; O’Rourke, Matthew; Hooper, David K.; Taylor, Michael D.; Colan, Steven D.; Jefferies, John L.; Rao, Marepalli B.; Goebel, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Isolated aortic dilation (AD) is rare in children. We aimed to determine the prevalence and the risk factors for AD in children with ESRD. Methods and study design: We reviewed records of all ESRD patients followed at our institution from January 2007 to October 2012. AD was defined as Z-score > 2 in the dimension of at least one of the following echocardiographic aortic parameters: annulus, root at the sinus, sino-tubular junction, ,or ascending aorta. Results: The records of 78 patients on dialysis and 19 kidney transplant recipients were available. 30 patients (30.9%) had AD. Multivariate analysis revealed independent associations of AD with body mass index (BMI) Z-score (OR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.35 – 0.78) and ESRD secondary to glomerular disease (OR = 4.58, 95% CI: 1.45 – 14.46). We developed a classification and regression tree (CART) model to identify patients at low vs. high AD risk. Our model classified 62 patients of the cohort (64%) to be high- or low-risk, with a positive predictive value of 89% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusion: Our data suggest that AD, as a possible marker of aortopathy and early aneurysm formation, is a novel and prevalent cardiovascular complication in ESRD children. Glomerular disease and low BMI Z-score appear to be potent predictors. CART modeling helps identify high-risk children, potentially guiding decisions regarding targeted echocardiographic evaluations. PMID:25816808

  9. The Relationship between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kirsten E.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P?=?0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Conclusions Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. PMID:24019966

  10. Cardiovascular and respiratory dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by impaired peripheral oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Huang, Shih-Feng; Su, Chun-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired peripheral oxygenation (IPO)-related variables readily achieved with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) represent cardiovascular dysfunction. These variables include peak oxygen uptake ( (V?O2)<85% predicted, anaerobic threshold <40%V?O2max predicted, V?O2-work rate slope <8.6 mL/watt, oxygen pulse <80% predicted, and ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 at nadir of >31 and >34, respectively. Some of these six variables may be normal while the others are abnormal in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This may result in confusion when using the interpretation algorithm for diagnostic purposes. We therefore hypothesized that patients found to have abnormal values for all six variables would have worse cardiovascular function than patients with abnormal values for none or some of these variables. Methods In this cross-sectional comparative study, 58 COPD patients attending a university teaching hospital underwent symptom-limited CPET with multiple lactate measurements. Patients with abnormal values in all six IPO-related variables were assigned to an IPO group while those who did not meet the requirements for the IPO group were assigned to a non-IPO group. Cardiovascular function was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography and ?lactate/?V?O2, and respiratory dynamics were compared between the two groups. Results Fourteen IPO and 43 non-IPO patients were entered into the study. Both groups were similar with regard to left ventricular ejection fraction and right ventricular morphology (P>0.05 for both). At peak exercise, both groups reached a similar heart rate level and ?lactate/?V?O2. The IPO patients had an unfavorable dead space to tidal volume ratio, mean inspiratory tidal flow, and shallow breathing (P<0.05–P<0.001). Conclusion Our IPO and non-IPO patients with COPD had similar cardiovascular performance at rest and at peak exercise, indicating that IPO variables are non-specific for cardiovascular function in these patients. COPD patients with full IPO variables have more deranged ventilatory function. PMID:25709427

  11. Increased Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis Associated with Cardiovascular Complications – A National Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien-Hsun; Chen, Hung-An; Yeh, Chia-Lun; Chiu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Chun; Cheng, Yu-Pin; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives There have been few large population-based studies of the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and glomerulonephritis. This nationwide cohort study investigated the risks of developing CKD and glomerulonephritis in patients with RA, and the associated risks for cardiovascular complications. Methods From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified a study cohort of 12,579 patients with RA and randomly selected 37,737 subjects without RA as a control cohort. Each subject was individually followed for up for 5 years, and the risk of CKD was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results During the follow-up period, after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors RA was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of CKD (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–1.40) and glomerulonephritis (aHR 1.55; 95% CI 1.37–1.76). Increased risk of CKD was also associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclosporine, glucocorticoids, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclophosphamide. Patients with comorbidities had even greater increased risk of CKD. Moreover, RA patients with concurrent CKD had significantly higher likelihood of developing ischemic heart disease and stroke. Conclusions RA patients had higher risk of developing CKD and glomerulonephritis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Their increased risk of CKD may be attributed to glomerulonephritis, chronic inflammation, comorbidities, and renal toxicity of antirheumatic drugs. Careful monitoring of renal function in RA patients and tight control of their comorbid diseases and cardiovascular risk factors are warranted. PMID:26406879

  12. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  13. Successful Use of Higher-Dose Etanercept for Multirefractory Systemic Flare of Adult-Onset Still's Disease with Liver Failure with No Response to Tocilizumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamechika, Shinya; Iwagaitsu, Shiho; Maeda, Shinji; Togawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with refractory systemic flare of adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure despite high-dose corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and tocilizumab, was successfully treated with additional use of etanercept. Etanercept at a dose of 50?mg weekly was partially effective but could not reduce the dose of concomitant betamethasone from 5?mg/day. Etanercept at a dose of 75?mg weekly could lead her to clinical remission and enabled successful tapering off the corticosteroids and discontinuation of etanercept. Normalization of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and persistent elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor ? under the treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressants suggest that tumor necrosis factor ? was more deeply involved than at least interleukin 6 in the pathogenesis of refractoriness of the disease in this patient, and these findings might be indicative of potential efficacy for adjunctive use of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor rather than an interleukin 6 inhibitor. PMID:24455384

  14. Sudden cardiac death due to coronary artery involvement by IgG4-related disease: a rare, serious complication of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimesh R; Anzalone, Mary L; Buja, L Maximilian; Elghetany, M Tarek

    2014-06-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disorder characterized by multiorgan fibrosis with IgG4-producing plasma cells, increased IgG4 serum concentration, and responsiveness to steroid therapy. Involvement of the pancreas, salivary glands, orbit, aorta, and other sites has been well documented in the literature; however, there have been limited reports of cases involving the coronary arteries. We report the case of a 53-year-old Hispanic man who was brought to the emergency center and diagnosed with sudden cardiac death. Autopsy was subsequently performed, revealing multiorgan involvement by IgG4-RD, including involvement of the coronary arteries. The inflammation and fibrosis, in combination with concomitant atherosclerotic disease, resulted in severe stenosis of the coronary arteries. Two of the coronary arteries were further occluded by thrombosis. These factors led to cardiac hypoperfusion, myocardial infarction and, ultimately, sudden cardiac death. Fatal involvement of the coronary arteries has not been previously reported, raising a new concern for a severe complication of IgG4-RD. PMID:24878025

  15. Association Between Early Helicobacter pylori Eradication and a Lower Risk of Recurrent Complicated Peptic Ulcers in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori plays a central role in the development of peptic ulcers. The effect of early H pylori eradication on the recurrence of complicated peptic ulcer disease in ESRD patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether early H pylori eradication therapy in ESRD patients can reduce the risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers. We conducted a population-based cohort study and recruited patients with ESRD who had developed peptic ulcers. We categorized patients into early (time lag ?120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis) and late H pylori eradication therapy groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used. The endpoint was based on hospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcers. The early and late H pylori eradication therapy groups consisted of 2406 and 1356 ESRD patients, respectively, in a time lag of 120 days. After adjusting for possible confounders, the early eradication group exhibited a lower rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease (hazard ratio [HR]?=?0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?0.64–0.91, P?=?0.003) in a time lag of ?120 days, but a similar rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease in time lags of ?1 year (HR?=?0.97, 95% CI 0.79–1.19, P?=?0.758) and 2 years (HR?=?1.11, 95% CI 0.86–1.44, P?=?0.433) compared with the late eradication group. We recommend administering H pylori eradication within 120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis to H pylori infected ESRD patients who have developed peptic ulcers. PMID:25569660

  16. Increased serum concentration of BAFF/APRIL and IgA2 subclass in patients with mixed connective tissue disease complicated by interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Amano, Hirofumi; Kawano, Shinya; Minowa, Kentaro; Ando, Seiichiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Nakano, Soichiro; Suzuki, Jun; Morimoto, Shinji; Tokano, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    2014-03-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) are known to be crucial for B cell maturation and survival, and increased expression of these factors in various autoimmune diseases has been reported. Human B cells produce two IgA subclasses: IgA1 and IgA2, the latter being abundant in the distal intestine, saliva, colostrum and bronchial fluid. We investigated these parameters in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) complicated by interstitial lung disease (ILD+), and compared them with those in MCTD patients without ILD (ILD-). Sixty-three MCTD patients were divided into two groups: 21 ILD+ patients and 42 ILD- patients. In each patient group we analyzed soluble BAFF/APRIL using ELISA, and IgA1 and IgA2 using double immunodiffusion. Furthermore, we analyzed BAFF-APRIL receptors, BCMA, BAFF-R and TACI, using flow cytometry. The ILD+ patients had significantly higher levels of BAFF/APRIL than the ILD- patients. There were significant correlations between BAFF/APRIL, BAFF/KL-6 and APRIL/KL-6. Although there was no significant inter-group difference in the serum IgA1 level, ILD+ patients had a significantly elevated IgA2 level in comparison with ILD- patients. Moreover, although there were no significant inter-group differences in the expression of BCMA, BAFF-R and TACI on B cells, the expression of BAFF-R was significantly decreased in the ILD+ patients. In recent years, relationships between BAFF/APRIL and IgA subclass have been reported. Our results suggest that an elevated level of BAFF/APRIL drives the maturation of B cells, subsequently leading to IgA2 class switching, and possibly to the development of ILD in patients with MCTD. PMID:24252051

  17. Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease Combined with IgA Nephropathy Complicated with Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome: An Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ya-ting; Liao, Jin-lan; Liang, Wei; Xiong, Zu-ying

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 24 Final Diagnosis: Crescentic glomerulonephritis (type I) with IgA nephropathy Symptoms: Headache • gross hematuria • nocturia • seizures Medication: Cyclophosphamide Clinical Procedure: Dignosis to treatment Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (anti-GBM disease) is an autoimmune glomerulonephritis disease that is characterized by IgG linear deposition along the non-collagen domain of ?3 chains of type IV collagen on the GBM. Although anti-GBM disease accompanied with IgA linear deposition along GBMs was discussed previously in some papers, anti-GBM disease combined with IgA granular deposition in the mesangial area, especially complicated with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), was rarely reported. RPLS is usually caused by hypertensive encephalopathy, renal decompensation, fluid retention, and adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Case Report: A male patient with the chief complaints of headache, gross hematuria, and nocturia was referred to our hospital. Based on renal biopsy, the diagnosis was finally confirmed as anti-GBM disease combined with IgA nephropathy and, the patient received comprehensive treatment, including cyclophosphamide (CTX), which led to symptom improvement. Two days after the third impulse CTX was given, he suddenly experienced headache and dizziness, which eventually developed into a tonic-clonic seizure. RPLS was identified by cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with reversible neuroimaging. After diazepam and antihypertension management, seizures were controlled. RPLS, a neurological complication, was found in anti-GBM disease with IgA nephropathy during our immunosuppressants therapy for the first time. Conclusions: It is worth paying more attention to patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), as they might be complicated with RPLS during intravenous administration of CTX and methylprednisolone. We suggest the neuroimaging be examined as soon as the seizure happens. PMID:26621456

  18. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  19. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered kidney complications of IBD—particularly oxalate stones. Kidney stones are more common in Crohn's patients with disease ...

  20. Late Corrective Arthrodesis in Nonplantigrade Diabetic Charcot Midfoot Disease Is Associated with High Complication and Reoperation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Wussow, Annekatrin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Charcot arthropathy may lead to a loss of osteoligamentous foot architecture and consequently loss of the plantigrade alignment. In this series of patients a technique of internal corrective arthrodesis with maximum fixation strength was provided in order to lower complication rates. Materials/Methods. 21 feet with severe nonplantigrade diabetic Charcot deformity Eichenholtz stages II/III (Sanders/Frykberg II/III/IV) and reconstructive arthrodesis with medial and additional lateral column support were retrospectively enrolled. Follow-up averaged 4.0 years and included a clinical (AOFAS score/PSS), radiological, and complication analysis. Results. A mean of 2.4 complications/foot occurred, of which 1.5/foot had to be solved surgically. 76% of feet suffered from soft tissue complications; 43% suffered hardware-associated complications. Feet with only 2 out of 5 high risk criteria according to Pinzur showed significantly lower complication counts. Radiographs revealed a correct restoration of all foot axes postoperatively with superior fixation strength medially. Conclusion. Late corrective arthrodesis with medial and lateral column stabilization in the nonplantigrade stages of neuroosteoarthropathy can provide reasonable reconstruction of the foot alignment. Nonetheless, overall complication/reoperation rates were high. With separation into low/high risk criteria a helpful guide in treatment choice is provided. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) under number DRKS00007537. PMID:26000309

  1. Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease Combined with IgA Nephropathy Complicated with Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome: An Unusual Case.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ya-Ting; Liao, Jin-Lan; Liang, Wei; Xiong, Zu-Ying

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (anti-GBM disease) is an autoimmune glomerulonephritis disease that is characterized by IgG linear deposition along the non-collagen domain of a3 chains of type IV collagen on the GBM. Although anti-GBM disease accompanied with IgA linear deposition along GBMs was discussed previously in some papers, anti-GBM disease combined with IgA granular deposition in the mesangial area, especially complicated with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), was rarely reported. RPLS is usually caused by hypertensive encephalopathy, renal decompensation, fluid retention, and adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs. CASE REPORT A male patient with the chief complaints of headache, gross hematuria, and nocturia was referred to our hospital. Based on renal biopsy, the diagnosis was finally confirmed as anti-GBM disease combined with IgA nephropathy and, the patient received comprehensive treatment, including cyclophosphamide (CTX), which led to symptom improvement. Two days after the third impulse CTX was given, he suddenly experienced headache and dizziness, which eventually developed into a tonic-clonic seizure. RPLS was identified by cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with reversible neuroimaging. After diazepam and antihypertension management, seizures were controlled. RPLS, a neurological complication, was found in anti-GBM disease with IgA nephropathy during our immunosuppressants therapy for the first time. CONCLUSIONS It is worth paying more attention to patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), as they might be complicated with RPLS during intravenous administration of CTX and methylprednisolone. We suggest the neuroimaging be examined as soon as the seizure happens. PMID:26621456

  2. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1 ± 17.7 vs 25.3 ± 18.3, p = 0.02). However, there was no difference in the change scores in ODI and absolute scores across all other PROs between the 2 groups. In multivariable linear regression analysis, after controlling for an array of preoperative variables, the occurrence of a major complication was not associated with worsening ODI scores 12 months after surgery. There was no difference in the percentage of patients achieving the MCID for disability (66% vs 64%), back pain (55% vs 56%), leg pain (62% vs 59%), or quality of life (19% vs 14%) or in patient satisfaction rates (82% vs 80%) between those without and with major complications. CONCLUSIONS Major complications within 90 days following lumbar spine surgery have significant impact on the short-term PROs. Patients with complications, however, do eventually achieve clinically meaningful outcomes and report satisfaction equivalent to those without major complications. This information allows a physician to counsel patients on the fact that a complication creates frustration, cost, and inconvenience; however, it does not appear to adversely affect clinically meaningful long-term outcomes and satisfaction. PMID:26621422

  3. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  4. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  5. Site and still life

    E-print Network

    Willey, Guy Phillip

    1993-01-01

    This thesis uses the still life as a medium for investigating architecture and the city . An analogy is established between what the thesis defines as still life and an urban composition (a site in East Cambridge). Through ...

  6. Foot Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your feet or toes may also cause problems. Neuropathy Although it can hurt, diabetic nerve damage can ... Diabetes Forecast® magazine: cc-feet-and-hands-peripheral-neuropathy, In this section Living With Diabetes Complications Skin ...

  7. Hepatic transplantation: postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Heller, Matthew T; Tublin, Mitchell E

    2013-12-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppression have made orthotopic liver transplantation a first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. The early detection and treatment of postoperative complications has contributed significantly to improved graft and patient survival with imaging playing a critical role in detection. Complications that can lead to graft failure or patient mortality include vascular abnormalities, biliary abnormalities, allograft rejection, and recurrent or post-transplant malignancy. Vascular abnormalities include stenosis and thrombosis of the hepatic artery, portal vein, and inferior vena cava, as well as hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and celiac stenosis. Biliary abnormalities include strictures, bile leak, obstruction, recurrent disease, and infection. While imaging is not used to diagnose allograft rejection, it plays an important role in identifying complications that can mimic rejection. Ultrasound is routinely performed as the initial imaging modality for the detection and follow-up of both early and delayed complications. Cholangiography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are used to characterize biliary complications and computed tomography is used to confirm abnormal findings on ultrasound or for the evaluation of postoperative collections. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the imaging appearances and management of complications associated with liver transplantation. PMID:23644931

  8. Cardiovascular disease and arterial calcification in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: interrelations and risk factor profiles. Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study-V.

    PubMed

    Maser, R E; Wolfson, S K; Ellis, D; Stein, E A; Drash, A L; Becker, D J; Dorman, J S; Orchard, T J

    1991-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a frequent complication of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), but the prevalence, interrelations, and risk factors of its principal components (coronary, cerebrovascular, and lower-extremity arterial disease) and of medial arterial wall calcification are not well understood. To address these issues, data from the Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (n = 657) baseline examination were examined. The term coronary heart disease (CHD) was applied to those with myocardial infarction or angina, whereas lower-extremity arterial disease (LEAD) was applied to those who had undergone amputation of a lower limb or who had an ankle to arm blood pressure ratio less than 0.8 at rest or after exercise. Calcification of the lower-extremity arteries was considered to be present if ankle pressure was more than 100 mm Hg higher than brachial pressure. Although the prevalence of CHD was low, LEAD was significantly more common in women than in men (p less than 0.01), whereas calcification was more frequent in men than in women (p less than 0.01). Ten percent of those with LEAD also had CHD, and 8% with LEAD had calcification. Modeling of potential risk factors (e.g., diabetes duration and glycosylated hemoglobin) revealed that duration, female gender, fibrinogen, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol to apolipoprotein A-I ratio were independent predictors of LEAD, whereas for CHD only, diabetes duration and hypertension contributed to CHD. Calcification revealed a mixed pattern, with duration, hypertension, and triglyceride to apolipoprotein A-I ratio being the statistically significant associated factors. The results suggest that although LEAD, CHD, and calcification often coexist, their risk factor profiles differ. PMID:2065046

  9. A clinical study on the role of psychosomatic therapy in evaluation and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated with anxiety-depression disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Wu, Chi; Gao, Yang; Chen, Lijuan; Liu, Yuejian

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of psychotic therapy on patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) complicated with anxiety-depression disorder by Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and modified British Medical research Council (mMRC). Thirty-five patients with COPD were evaluated by pulmonary physicians with CAT and mMRC. They were further evaluated with HAMD and HAMA by psychologists and diagnosed and grouped into group B and D according to the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) version 2014. Patients were given psychotic therapy and followed up for at least 1 month. Comparison and analysis were performed with clinical data before and after treatment. Fourteen patients were subscribed into B group, while 21 patients were subscribed into D group, accounting for 40% and 60% respectively. After psychotic therapy, the HAMA and MAMD score of patients in both groups improved significantly (P<0.05). The CAT and Mmrc score of 8 patients in B group improved as A, while 10 patients in D group improved as B. The longest follow-up was 12 months. Symptoms were significantly alleviated after combined respiratory and psychotic therapy. COPD complicated with anxiety-depression is of high prevalence. The psychosomatic problems usually aggravate respiratory symptoms. Make better use of the evaluation methods such as HAMA, HAMA, CAT, mMRC may facilitate the treatment for patients.

  10. Management of medical complications.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Carolin I; Reding, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Medical comorbidities and complications are expected following stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. The neurorehabilitation physician's role is to manage these comorbidities, prevent complications, and serve as a medical and neurologic resource for the patient, family, and neurorehabilitation team. The most common comorbidities are similar to those found in the general population, namely hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Frequent complications encountered in the neurorehabilitation unit relate to medication side effects, medical comorbidities, and the direct effect of the neurologic injury. They include orthostatic hypotension; syncope or presyncope; cardiac arrhythmia; bowel and bladder dysfunction; seizures; pressure sores; dysphagia-related pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; venous thromboembolism; falls; and sexual dysfunction. This article discusses strategies for managing comorbidities and avoiding complications. PMID:22810865

  11. Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome complicated with multiple cerebral infarction: a rare case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Yao, Fang; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Cui, Quan-Cai

    2015-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare hematological disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy and skin changes. Castleman disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that can be present in POEMS patients, which can be defined as Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome. Herein, we described a 24-year-old male patient diagnosed with this syndrome and also suffered from multiple cerebral infarctions. This patient showed no evidence of monoclonal gammopathy and failed to have electromyography examined. The final diagnosis was established with the help of the axillary lymph node biopsy. As a rare case of POEMS syndrome without evidence fulfilling the major mandatory diagnostic criteria and with cerebrovascular involvement, its characteristics was discussed with a brief literature review in order to facilitate further understanding of the POEMS syndrome. PMID:26722578

  12. Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome complicated with multiple cerebral infarction: a rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hang; Yao, Fang; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Cui, Quan-Cai

    2015-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare hematological disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy and skin changes. Castleman disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that can be present in POEMS patients, which can be defined as Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome. Herein, we described a 24-year-old male patient diagnosed with this syndrome and also suffered from multiple cerebral infarctions. This patient showed no evidence of monoclonal gammopathy and failed to have electromyography examined. The final diagnosis was established with the help of the axillary lymph node biopsy. As a rare case of POEMS syndrome without evidence fulfilling the major mandatory diagnostic criteria and with cerebrovascular involvement, its characteristics was discussed with a brief literature review in order to facilitate further understanding of the POEMS syndrome. PMID:26722578

  13. They can't bury you while you're still moving: A review of the European Respiratory Society statement on physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; ZuWallack, Richard

    2015-10-28

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are interrelated but separate concepts. PA refers to bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure. Exercise is a subset of PA, in which generally higher levels of muscular activity are performed for a purpose, such as achieving physical fitness or winning a sporting contest. Higher exercise capacity is considered to be permissive of greater PA in the home and community settings. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are physically inactive when compared with healthy age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, physical inactivity is independently associated with adverse outcome in patients with COPD, including more rapid disease progression, impaired health status, and increased health care utilization and mortality risk. While there are several methods to objectively measure PA, recent scientific studies have commonly utilized questionnaires and activity monitors. The latter include simple pedometers and complex accelerometers, which can measure and record movement in up to 3 planes. In COPD, multiple patient characteristics and disease severity markers are related to activity level, including pulmonary physiological abnormalities such as airway obstruction and hyperinflation; exercise capacity such as the 6-minute walking distance; exacerbations of respiratory disease; and comorbid conditions. Clinical trials of bronchodilators, supplemental oxygen therapy, exercise training or pulmonary rehabilitation, or PA counseling have provided inconsistent results in demonstrating increased PA from the interaction. This is probably because the phenomenon of physical inactivity is complex, resulting not only from physiological impairments, but symptoms, cultural, motivational, and environmental factors. PMID:26307102

  14. Transrectal Prostate Biopsy-Associated Prophylaxis and Infectious Complications: Report of a Query to the Emerging Infections Network of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Polgreen, Philip M.; Beekmann, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Fluoroquinolone-resistant infections after transrectal prostate biopsy (TRPB) are increasing. Methods.?Members of the Emerging Infections Network, a consortium of adult infectious diseases physicians sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Diseases Society of America, were administered an electronic 9-question survey regarding post-TRPB infections and associated prophylaxis. Results were compared with respondent characteristics. Results.?The overall response rate was 47% (552 of 1180). Of the 552 respondents, 234 (42%) reported that this problem was not applicable to their practice. The remaining 318 (58%) reported that, despite widespread recent changes in prophylactic regimens, fluoroquinolone monotherapy still was most common, but diverse alternate or supplemental oral and parenteral antibiotics (including imipenem) also were used. Reports of culture-guided prophylaxis were rare (9%). The most common duration of prophylaxis was a single prebiopsy antibiotic dose. However, 16%–23% of respondents reported prophylaxis continuing for ?24 hours postbiopsy. Post-TRPB infections were reported as being more frequent now than 4 years ago, with sepsis and genitourinary presentations predominating, but with osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and epidural abscess also occurring. Infection isolates reportedly were usually resistant to the prophylactic regimen. Conclusions.?Emerging Infections Network members perceive post-TRPB infections as increasingly frequent, caused by resistant strains, and involving serious illness. Prophylactic approaches, although in flux, still usually entail ciprofloxacin monotherapy, which often is given for excessive durations. Multiple opportunities exist for infectious diseases specialists to partner with proceduralists in devising, studying, and implementing improved prophylaxis regimens for TRPB. PMID:26034753

  15. Classification of Surgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dindo, Daniel; Demartines, Nicolas; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Although quality assessment is gaining increasing attention, there is still no consensus on how to define and grade postoperative complications. This shortcoming hampers comparison of outcome data among different centers and therapies and over time. Patients and Methods: A classification of complications published by one of the authors in 1992 was critically re-evaluated and modified to increase its accuracy and its acceptability in the surgical community. Modifications mainly focused on the manner of reporting life-threatening and permanently disabling complications. The new grading system still mostly relies on the therapy used to treat the complication. The classification was tested in a cohort of 6336 patients who underwent elective general surgery at our institution. The reproducibility and personal judgment of the classification were evaluated through an international survey with 2 questionnaires sent to 10 surgical centers worldwide. Results: The new ranking system significantly correlated with complexity of surgery (P < 0.0001) as well as with the length of the hospital stay (P < 0.0001). A total of 144 surgeons from 10 different centers around the world and at different levels of training returned the survey. Ninety percent of the case presentations were correctly graded. The classification was considered to be simple (92% of the respondents), reproducible (91%), logical (92%), useful (90%), and comprehensive (89%). The answers of both questionnaires were not dependent on the origin of the reply and the level of training of the surgeons. Conclusions: The new complication classification appears reliable and may represent a compelling tool for quality assessment in surgery in all parts of the world. PMID:15273542

  16. Neurological Complications Comparing Endoscopically vs. Open Harvest of the Radial Artery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-28

    Complications Due to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  17. Case of Behçet's disease complicated by oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a relapsing systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology involving systemic vasculitis. Vasculitis in BD results from the involvement of arteries, veins and blood vessels of all sizes, which leads to the three major manifestations of this condition: venous occlusion, arterial occlusion and aneurysm formation. Therefore, whole-body vascular involvement should always be considered in BD patients. Here, we describe the first appearance of an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm, resulting in complete oculomotor nerve palsy in a BD patient. A 44-year-old Japanese man suffered from recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum that had presented on the lower extremities for the past 2 years. His condition was diagnosed as an incomplete type of BD based on relapsing oral and genital ulcers, skin eruptions, such as erythema nodosum and folliculitis, a positive pathergy test and systemic arthralgia. Ten years after his initial clinical presentation, he had manifestations of right-sided ptosis and cyclic dull pain in his right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a BD patient has not been reported previously, our report highlights the fact that this abnormal manifestation should be considered in those with vasculo-BD. PMID:25573207

  18. Books Still Worth Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 10 major articles in this special journal issue deal with literary works designated by individual educators as "still worth reading." The works discussed are (1) "Madeline" by L. Bemelmans; (2) "The Assistant" by B. Malamud; (3) "The Pitfalls for Readers of Fiction" by H. Sample, the first of the pamphlet publications by the National Council…

  19. Turnaround Momentum Still Fragile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    The federal program providing billions of dollars to help states and districts close or remake some of their worst-performing schools remains a work in progress after two years, with more than 1,200 turnaround efforts under way but still no definitive verdict on its effectiveness. The School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, supercharged by a…

  20. Encaustic Still Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Len

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used in an advanced high school art class where students used the encaustic painting technique by melting wax and combining various pigments. Explains that the students painted a still-life of flowers in the style of Vincent van Gogh. (CMK)

  1. Is Information Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  2. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  3. Comparative Histological Study on the Therapeutic Effect of Green Tea and Stem Cells in Alzheimer’s Disease Complicating Experimentally Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bassiony, Hend Shafik; Zickri, Maha Baligh; Metwally, Hala Gabr; Elsherif, Hala Ahmed; Alghandour, Sarah Mohammed; Sakr, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Increasing evidence implicates diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor for AD. Green tea (GT) has several beneficial effects attributed to its anti-oxidant phenolic compounds. Adipose tissue is a rich source of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs). This study was designed to evaluate and compare the possible therapeutic effect of green tea extract (GTE) and ADSCs on AD complicating induced DM in male rat. Methods 31 adult male albino rats were divided into 5 groups. Group I (Control), Group II received GTE, 50 mg/kg daily orally for 4 weeks, Group III received a single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin (STZ), 50 mg/kg, Group IV: received STZ followed by GTE and Group V: received STZ followed by human ADSCs (hADSCs) intravenously. Results Multiple acidophilic masses, deformed neurons, Congo red +ve masses and Caspase 3 +ve neurons were seen in group III, became few in group IV and occasional in group V. Multiple Prussian blue +ve cells were detected in group V. Some CD44 +ve cells were noticed in group III, became multiple in groups IV and V. The mean area of neurons exhibiting acidophilic cytoplasm, mean area of amyloid plaques and mean area % of Caspase 3 +ve cells indicated a significant increase in group III. The mean area % of CD44 +ve cells recorded a significant increase in group IV. Conclusions hADSCs exerted a more marked therapeutic effect on the neurodegenerative changes complicating DM and corresponding to AD. PMID:26634066

  4. Orbital Complications of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Radovani, Pjerin; Vasili, Dritan; Xhelili, Mirela; Dervishi, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the modern antibiotherapies applied in the practice of otorhinolaryngology, the orbital complications of sinusitis are still considered a serious threat to essential functions of the eye, including loss of vision, and at worst, life threatening symptoms. Aims: The goal of this study is to consider and analyse patients who were treated for these complications in the last decade in our hospital, which is the only tertiary hospital in our country. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of cases. Methods: In our practice, cases treated in the hospital are rhinosinusitis cases where surgical intervention is necessary, or those with a suspicion of complications. Between the years 1999 and 2009 there were 177 cases, the clinical charts of which were reviewed. The cases that are omitted from this study are those involving soft tissues, bone, and intracranial complications. The diagnoses were determined based on anamnesis, anterior rhinoscopy, x-rays of the sinuses with the Water’s projection or where there was a suspicion of a complication, and CT scans with coronal and axial projections. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of cefalosporines, aminoglycosides and Proetz manoeuvre. When an improvement in the conditions did not occur within 24–48 hours, we intervened with a surgical procedure, preferably the Lynch-Patterson external frontoethmoidectomy. Results: In our study, we encountered 35 cases (19.8%) of orbital complications with an average age of 25 (range: 3–75); Palpebral inflammatory oedema (15), orbital cellulitis (10), subperiosteal abscess (6), orbital abscess (3), and cavernous sinus thrombosis (1 patient). The average time that patients remained in hospital was 4.6 days; for those with orbital complications this was 7 days. Conclusion: Orbital complications of sinusitis are considered to be severe pathologies. The appearance of oedema in the corner of the eye should be evaluated immediately and the means to exclude acute sinusitis should be taken under serious consideration. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are key to the reduction of these unwanted manifestations. PMID:25207092

  5. Endometriosis still a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mehedintu, C; Plotogea, MN; Ionescu, S; Antonovici, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endometriosis is a debilitating disease with features of chronic inflammation. Endometriosis appears to be one of the most common benign gynecological proliferations in premenopausal women since it is estimated that 10–15% of reproductive aged women suffer from pelvic endometriosis. The biology of endometriosis is unclear. Despite its prevalence, this disease remains poorly understood and current studies prove that there is no relationship between the extent of the disease and its symptomatology. There is no blood test available for the diagnosis of endometriosis. Up to this point, there is no single very successful option for the treatment of endometriosis. Due to the relatively poor efficacy of hormonal therapy for endometriosis, several other experimental therapies are currently undergoing clinical trial. PMID:25408753

  6. Digestive system fistula: a problem still relevant today.

    PubMed

    G?uszek, Stanis?aw; Korczak, Maria; Kot, Marta; Matykiewicz, Jaros?aw; Kozie?, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    Digestive system fistula originates most frequently as a complication after surgical procedures, less often occurs in the course of inflammatory diseases, but it can also result from neoplasm and injuries. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was to analyze the causes and retrospectively assess the perioperative procedures as well as the results of digestive system fistula treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Own experience in digestive system fistula treatment was presented. The subject group consisted of 32 patients treated at the General Surgery, Oncology and Endocrinology Clinical Department between 01.05.2005 and 30.04.2010 due to different digestive tract diseases. The causes of the occurrence of digestive system fistula, methods and results of treatment were analyzed. RESULTS. The analysis covered 32 patients with digestive system fistula, among them 15 men and 17 women. Average age for men was 57 years (20-78), and for women 61 years (24-88). In 11 patients idiopathic fistula causally connected with primary inflammatory disease (7 cases) and with neoplasm (4 cases) was diagnosed, in 19 patients fistula was the result of complications after surgery, in 2 - after abdominal cavity injury. Recovery from fistula was achieved in 23 patients (72%) with the use of individually planned conservative therapy (TPN, EN, antibiotics, drainage, and others) and surgery, depending on the needs of individual patient. 5 patients (16%) died, whereas in 4 left (12%) recovery wasn't achieved (fistula in palliative patients, with advanced stages of neoplasm - bronchoesophageal fistula, the recurrence of uterine carcinoma). CONCLUSIONS. Recently the results of digestive system fistula treatment showed an improvement which manifests itself in mortality decrease and shortening of fistula healing time. Yet, digestive system fistula as a serious complication still poses a very difficult surgical problem. PMID:22166240

  7. Pneumococcal Disease Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccination For Clinicians Streptococcus pneumoniae Transmission Clinical Features Risk Factors Diagnosis & Management Prevention For Laboratorians Drug Resistance Surveillance & Reporting Global ...

  8. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  9. Benorylate in management of Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Powell, R H; Ansell, B M

    1974-01-26

    The present recommended dose of benorylate is not satisfactory for the management of children suffering from inflammatory polyarthritis. A starting dose of 200 mg/kg/day should be used, and the salicylate level checked at seven days and the dosage adjusted to give an anti-inflammatory effect-that is, a blood salicylate level of between 25 and 30 mg/100 ml. Once a satisfactory level has been achieved, this dosage should be maintained with occasional monitoring of the salicylate level. The paracetamol level does not need to be estimated as it tends to follow the salicylate level, provided that liver function is normal; thus it is quite safe to monitor only the salicylate level. Given in an adequate dosage, benorylate seems to be an acceptable salicylate preparation for use in juveniles suffering from chronic polyarthritis. PMID:4812408

  10. Benorylate in Management of Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Richard H.; Ansell, Barbara M.

    1974-01-01

    The present recommended dose of benorylate is not satisfactory for the management of children suffering from inflammatory polyarthritis. A starting dose of 200 mg/kg/day should be used, and the salicylate level checked at seven days and the dosage adjusted to give an anti-inflammatory effect—that is, a blood salicylate level of between 25 and 30 mg/100 ml. Once a satisfactory level has been achieved, this dosage should be maintained with occasional monitoring of the salicylate level. The paracetamol level does not need to be estimated as it tends to follow the salicylate level, provided that liver function is normal; thus it is quite safe to monitor only the salicylate level. Given in an adequate dosage, benorylate seems to be an acceptable salicylate preparation for use in juveniles suffering from chronic polyarthritis. PMID:4812408

  11. Gulf operations still recovering

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that reports of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew were leveling off last week at the U.S. Minerals Management Service as Gulf of Mexico operators pressed ahead with repairs. The hurricane struck South Florida Aug. 4, churned west into the gulf, then swung north and hit the South Louisiana coast Aug. 5. By the close of business Sept. 8 MMS had received damage reports covering 83 pipeline segments and 193 platforms and satellite installations. MMS last week estimated about 500 MMcfd of gas production had been restored in the gulf and 100,000-150,000 b/d of oil. Production still lost as a result of Andrew was estimated at 2-2.5 bcfd of gas and 90,000-120 b/d of oil. MMS estimates Gulf of Mexico wells before the storm were producing about 12.5-13 bcfd of gas and 750,000 b/d of oil.

  12. Endocrine and Bone Complications in ?-Thalassemia Intermedia: Current Understanding and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, MohammadHassan A.; Abbas, Hussein A.

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia (TI), also known as nontransfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT), is a type of thalassemia where affected patients do not require lifelong regular transfusions for survival but may require occasional or even frequent transfusions in certain clinical settings and for defined periods of time. NTDT encompasses three distinct clinical forms: ?-thalassemia intermedia (?-TI), Hb E/?-thalassemia, and ?-thalassemia intermedia (Hb H disease). Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular features, pathophysiology, and complications of NTDT particularly ?-TI has increased tremendously but data on optimal treatment of disease and its various complications are still lacking. In this paper, we shall review a group of commonly encountered complications in ?-TI, mainly endocrine and bone complications. PMID:25834825

  13. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  14. Body Mass Index Is a Marker of Nutrition Preparation Sufficiency Before Surgery for Crohn's Disease From the Perspective of Intra-Abdominal Septic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhi, Min; Chen, Huangwei; Tang, Jian; Su, Minli; Yao, Jiayin; Yang, Qingfan; Chen, Junrong; Hu, Pinjin; Liu, Huanliang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Poor preoperative nutritional status for individuals with Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with intra-abdominal septic complications (IASCs). The present study aimed to investigate the association of the common nutrition indices serum albumin and body mass index (BMI) with IASCs. Sixty-four CD patients who had received elective intestinal operations were retrospectively investigated. Among these patients, 32 had received individualized fortified nutrition support. IASCs occurred in 7 patients (10.9%). Compared with non-IASC patients, IASC patients had a lower BMI (17.6?±?2.7 vs 15.6?±?1.3?kg/m2, P?=?0.048). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve according to the BMI-based IASC prediction was 0.772 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.601–0.944; P?=?0.020) with an optimum diagnostic cutoff value of 16.2?kg/m2. A BMI?

  15. Colostomy closure: still a hazardous procedure.

    PubMed

    Hubens, G; Minten, L; Hubens, A; Willems, G

    1987-01-01

    Seventy nine patients with closure of a loop (51 patients) or a terminal (28 patients) colostomy were reviewed retrospectively. Operative mortality was 2.5%. Wound infection in 19% and anastomotic breakdown in 7.7% were the most important postoperative complications. Restoring continuity after a Hartmann intervention, closure of left sided colostomies and early closure (before 12 weeks) all accounted for a statistically significant higher complication rate, while age and sex, the underlying disease, bowel preparation and the method of closure had no influence on the operative outcome. PMID:3310475

  16. Still hope for schistosomiasis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Alessandra; Ndao, Momar

    2015-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by helminths belonging to the Schistosoma genus. Approximately 700 million people are at risk of infection and 200 million people are currently infected. Schistosomiasis is the most important helminth infection, and treatment relies solely on the drug praziquantel. Worries of praziquantel resistance as well as high disease burden are only some of the justifications which support the development of a vaccine against schistosomiasis. To date, only 2 schistosome vaccines have made it into clinical trials: Sh28GST (Bilhvax) and Sm14. However, there are several vaccine candidates, such as TSP-2, sm-p8, and Sm-Cathepsin B, which are generating promising results in pre-clinical studies. Schistosomiasis vaccine development has been an uphill battle, and there are still several hurdles to overcome in the future. Fortunately, the research groups involved in the research for vaccine development have not abandoned their work. Furthermore, in the last few years, schistosomiasis has garnered some additional attention on a global scale due to its significant impact on public health. PMID:26176659

  17. Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation

    E-print Network

    Stromswold, Karin

    1 Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation Preterm Labor Labor that starts and uterine tenderness. Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy induced high blood sugar. Diabetes that begins in pregnancy and goes away after delivery. Preeclampsia (hypertension) Pregnancy induced high blood pressure

  18. Noncoding RNAs in diabetes vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Cristina; Angelini, Timothy G; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder and is recognised as a dominant health threat of our time. Diabetes induces a widespread damage of the macro- and microvasculature in different organs and tissues and disrupts the endogenous vascular repair mechanisms, thus causing diffuse and severe complications. Moreover, diabetic patients respond poorly to surgical interventions aiming to "revascularise" (i.e., to restore blood flow supply) the ischemic myocardium or lower limbs. The molecular causes underpinning diabetes vascular complications are still underappreciated and druggable molecular targets for therapeutic interventions have not yet clearly emerged. Moreover, diabetes itself and diabetes complications are often silent killers, requiring new prognostic, diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for use in the clinical practice. Noncoding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) have opened the field capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focuses at the ncRNA roles in diabetes vascular complications. Furthermore, we discuss the potential value of ncRNAs as clinical biomarkers, and we examine the possibilities for therapeutic intervention targeting ncRNs in diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25536178

  19. [Long-term complications of sulfur mustard exposure: a therapeutic update].

    PubMed

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Rosman, Yossi; Krivoy, Amir; Statlender, Liran; Kassirer, Michael; Shrot, Shai

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is an alkylating chemical warfare agent with high military significance due to its high toxicity, resistance and availability. SM was widely used in military conflicts, the last being the Iran-Iraq war with more than 100,000 Iranians exposed, one-third of whom are still suffering from late effects. The intensity of the delayed complications correlates to the extent, the area and the route of exposure. The clinical manifestations most commonly involve respiratory, ocular and dermal effects. Respiratory complications include dyspnea, cough and expectorations and various obstructive and restrictive lung diseases. Dermal complications are itching, burning sensation, blisters, dry skin, dermatitis and pigmentary changes. Ocular complications include photophobia, red eye, tearing, corneal ulcers and blindness. Although the picture remains incomplete the major mechanisms responsible for the clinical and pathological effects of SM are: DNA alkylation and cross-linking, protein modification and membrane damage in addition to induction of inflammatory mediators in the target tissues causing extensive necrosis, apoptosis and loss of tissue structure. The current report reviews long-term complications of SM exposure, focusing on new treatments tested in clinical trials conducted on humans. Such treatments include: N-acetyl cysteine, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, Interferon-gamma, furosemide and morphine for the respiratory complications. Ocular complications may entail: Invasive procedures treating corneal complication, limbal ischemia and stem cell deficiency. Treatment for dermatological complications include: anti-depressants, pimercrolimus, Unna's boot, capsaicin, phenol and menthol, Aloe vera and olive oil, curcumin and Interferon-gamma. PMID:24791566

  20. Study of Pulmonary Complications in Pediatric Patients With Storage Disorders Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    I Cell Disease; Fucosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Mannosidosis; Niemann-Pick Disease; Pulmonary Complications; Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Wolman Disease

  1. Bordetella pertussis: why is it still circulating?

    PubMed

    Guiso, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causal agent of whooping cough, a highly contagious respiratory disease that is life-threatening in infants under the age of three months and may also be very severe in pregnant women and seniors. This disease can be prevented by vaccination but it remains a public health problem in many developed and developing countries.(1) So, why is B. pertussis still circulating? We need to consider several aspects of this vaccine-preventable disease when answering this question: (i) the history of the disease and the historical context in which the vaccine was developed; (ii) the type of vaccine used; (iii) the vaccination strategy and coverage; (iv) the disease surveillance after the introduction of generalized vaccination and (v) the surveillance for the causal agent of the disease. PMID:24103807

  2. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  3. [The complications of pulmonary resection treatment of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Pereszlenyi, A; Harustiak, S; Benej, R; Bohucky, S

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the complications of the pulmonary resection treatment in lung cancer. A significant decrease in incidence of cardiovascular and respiratory complications has already been achieved during the last decades. However, infectious complications, mainly pneumonias and postpneumonectomy empyemas still remain and belong among treacherous complications which are often associated with significant mortality. This article devotes special attention to the possibilities of influencing and decreasing the incidence of these complications. PMID:11725397

  4. Stilling the waters: Stilling basin design for stepped chutes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy dissipation is a desired feature of stepped chute design because it may lead to a shorter length of stilling basin than that of a traditional smooth chute design. Design parameters for stilling basins include Froude number, clear water flow depth, the sequent flow depth, and tailwater. Rese...

  5. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  6. Dangerous surgical scavenger hunt: the complicated course of a patient with left ventricular assist device and end-stage renal disease undergoing reconstructive flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Freundt, M; Haneya, A; Schmid, C; Hirt, S

    2015-09-01

    Patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) who develop stage IV sacral pressure sores (SPS) have an increased procedural risk. We present the complications, including severe intra- and postoperative bleeding, diarrhea with metabolic acidosis, volume loss and acute on chronic renal failure, flap dehiscence and late LVAD outflow cannula thrombosis, in a 54-year-old male who underwent diverting ileostomy (DI) and subsequent fasciocutaneous flap (FCF) surgery for stage IV SPS while supported with an LVAD. Our experience suggests that, despite continuous heparinization, life-threatening thrombotic complications, such as device clotting, can occur. Therefore, the benefit of intervention has to outweigh the risk of bleeding, which should be managed with meticulous surgical technique and substitution of red blood cells rather than the reversal of heparinization or the substitution of clotting factors. Continuation of double anti-platelet therapy should also be considered. PMID:25378418

  7. The impact of mathematical modeling on the understanding of diabetes and related complications

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, I; Swat, M; Laibe, C; Novère, N Le; Chelliah, V

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic and complex multifactorial disease caused by persistent hyperglycemia and for which underlying pathogenesis is still not completely understood. The mathematical modeling of glucose homeostasis, diabetic condition, and its associated complications is rapidly growing and provides new insights into the underlying mechanisms involved. Here, we discuss contributions to the diabetes modeling field over the past five decades, highlighting the areas where more focused research is required. PMID:23842097

  8. Wild Beasts of Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a project with a transformative approach to color theory and still life. Students' use of an arbitrary color scheme can open their eyes, push their creativity and produce exciting paintings. Ordinary still-life objects will be transformed into dramatic, vibrant visuals. The Fauve style of painting is a great art history…

  9. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  10. New treatments for levodopa-induced motor complications.

    PubMed

    Rascol, Olivier; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2015-09-15

    Levodopa (l-dopa)-induced motor complications, including motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, affect almost all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) at some point during the disease course, with relevant implications in global health status. Various dopaminergic and nondopaminergic pharmacological approaches as well as more invasive strategies including devices and functional surgery are available to manage such complications. In spite of undisputable improvements during the last decades, many patients remain significantly disabled, and a fully satisfying management of l-dopa-induced motor complications is still an important unmet need of PD therapy. This article reviews the recent trial results published from 2013 to April 2015 about pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat motor complications. Randomized controlled trials conducted in patients suffering from already established complications showed that new levodopa (l-dopa) formulations such as intrajejunal l-dopa-carbidopa infusion and bilayered extended-release l-dopa-carbidopa (IPX066) can improve motor fluctuations. Positive results were also obtained with a new monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor (safinamide) and a catechol-O-methyltransferase COMT inhibitor (opicapone). Pilot data suggest that new formulations of dopamine agonists (inhaled apomorphine) are also of potential interest. The development of novel nondopaminergic adenosine A2A antagonists (istradefylline, preladenant, and tozadenant) to treat motor fluctuations showed conflicting results in phase 2 and phase 3 trials. For dyskinesia, trials with new amantadine extended-release formulations confirmed the interest of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist approach. Positive pilot antidyskinetic effects were also recently reported using serotonin agents such as eltoprazine and glutamate mGluR5 modulators such as mavoglurant. However, the translation to clinical practice of such innovative concepts remains challenging, because subsequent phase 2 trials conducted to confirm the antidyskynetic effects of mavoglurant failed, leading to the interruption of the development of this compound for this indication. PMID:26293004

  11. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  12. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  13. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Information Page Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of AIDS? AIDS is primarily an immune system disorder caused ...

  14. A 20-year-old female with Hirayama disease complicated with dysplasia of the cervical vertebrae and degeneration of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masaya; Yoshioka, Masayuki; Sakimoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female patient was presented with a 1-year history of progressive weakness of the left hand. Examination on admission showed atrophy of the muscles of the left forearm, cold paralysis and minipolymyoclonus. MR images of the cervical cord showed anterior transfer of the cervical cord on anterior flexion and cervical cord compression at the site of cervical kyphosis, confirming the diagnosis of Hirayama disease. Many features of the present case are unusual: the patient is a female (who are rarely afflicted by this disease), with cervical kyphosis and a history of exercise involving cervical vertebral loading, suggesting a potential involvement of the latter two factors in the disease onset. The findings suggest that cervical vertebral dysplasia and intervertebral disc degeneration may influence cervical kyphosis, and be involved in the onset of Hirayama disease. PMID:23144342

  15. A 20-year-old female with Hirayama disease complicated with dysplasia of the cervical vertebrae and degeneration of intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masaya; Yoshioka, Masayuki; Sakimoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female patient was presented with a 1-year history of progressive weakness of the left hand. Examination on admission showed atrophy of the muscles of the left forearm, cold paralysis and minipolymyoclonus. MR images of the cervical cord showed anterior transfer of the cervical cord on anterior flexion and cervical cord compression at the site of cervical kyphosis, confirming the diagnosis of Hirayama disease. Many features of the present case are unusual: the patient is a female (who are rarely afflicted by this disease), with cervical kyphosis and a history of exercise involving cervical vertebral loading, suggesting a potential involvement of the latter two factors in the disease onset. The findings suggest that cervical vertebral dysplasia and intervertebral disc degeneration may influence cervical kyphosis, and be involved in the onset of Hirayama disease. PMID:23144342

  16. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  17. Complications of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: Frequency and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko; Santin, Stephanie; Gomes, Luiz Guilherme Lisboa; Waisberg, Jaques; Ribeiro Jr., Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an important option in the therapy of primary and secondary hepatic tumors. Surgical resection is still the best treatment option, but only a few of these patients are candidates for surgery: multilobar disease, insufficient liver reserve that will lead to liver failure after resection, extra-hepatic disease, proximity to major bile ducts and vessels, and co-morbidities. RFA has a low mortality and morbidity rate and is considered to be safe. Thus, complications occur and vary widely in the literature. Complications are caused by thermal damage, direct needle injury, infection and the patient’s co-morbidities. Tumor type, type of approach, number of lesions, tumor localization, underlying hepatic disease, the physician’s experience, associated hepatic resection and lesion size have been described as factors significantly associated with complications. The physician in charge should promptly recognize high-risk patients more susceptible to complications, perform a close post procedure follow-up and manage them early and adequately if they occur. We aim to describe complications from RFA of hepatic tumors and their risk factors, as well as a few techniques to avoid them. This way, others can decrease their morbidity rates with better outcomes. PMID:24672640

  18. [Catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias : Complications and emergency situations].

    PubMed

    Wasmer, Kristina; Eckardt, Lars

    2015-12-01

    Catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias is an established treatment for patients with and without structural heart disease. For patients without structural heart disease, the aim is symptomatic relief, while the ultimate goals for patients with underlying structural heart disease are reduction of ICD therapies and improved prognosis. Rates for major complications range between 6-10?% in patients with structural heart disease. Vascular complications are most common; life-threatening complications (e.g., pericardial tamponade and stroke) are less frequent. Procedure-associated mortality is reported to be 0-3?%. In patients with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia, the complication rate is much lower compared to patients with structural heart disease. PMID:26602759

  19. Teen Brain: Still Under Construction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Teen Brain Reprints For more information The Teen Brain: Still Under Construction Order a free hardcopy Introduction ... the ups and downs of adolescence. The "Visible" Brain A clue to the degree of change taking ...

  20. Amyopathic Dermatomyositis Complicated by Pneumomediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Randy; Green, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is an inflammatory disease of unclear etiology with characteristic cutaneous and musculoskeletal findings. Amyopathic dermatomyositis is a subtype without musculoskeletal involvement. Many cases of dermatomyositis are associated with underlying malignancy, but pulmonary manifestations can also be seen, the most common of which is interstitial lung disease. Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication that is important for clinicians to recognize, as it may be fatal if left untreated. The sudden onset of facial edema and shortness of breath in the setting of dermatomyositis should raise the suspicion of this condition. PMID:23556036

  1. A case of left main coronary artery disease in an octogenarian treated surgically and complicated by myocardial infarction: decisions, techniques, rescue and final outcome.

    PubMed

    Kossaify, Antoine; Grollier, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    We report on an octogenarian patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome due to significant left main coronary artery disease and severe ostial stenosis of the left anterior descending artery disease. Emergent bypass graft performed with "beating heart" consisted of left internal mammary graft to the mid left anterior descending artery with an "over-stent" anastomosis. The immediate post-operative phase was simple, however the patient presented on post-operative day 8 with extensive anterior myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. Emergent coronary angiogram showed subocclusive anastomotic stenosis. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed on left main, proximal left anterior descending, and proximal circumflex arteries. Subsequently, the patient restored a satisfactory hemodynamic condition. A focus on the importance of decision for management of left main disease especially in octogenarian is presented, along with a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:23641159

  2. Management of gallstones and its related complications.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, P; Di Ciaula, A; de Bari, O; Garruti, G; Palmieri, V O; Wang, Dq-H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of gallstone patients remain asymptomatic; however, interest toward the gallstone disease is continuing because of the high worldwide prevalence and management costs and the development of gallstone symptoms and complications. For cholesterol gallstone disease, moreover, a strong link exists between this disease and highly prevalent metabolic disorders such as obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and the metabolic syndrome. Information on the natural history as well as the diagnostic, surgical (mainly laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and medical tools available to facilitate adequate management of cholelithiasis and its complications are, therefore, crucial to prevent the negative outcomes of gallstone disease. Moreover, some risk factors for gallstone disease are modifiable and some preventive strategies have become necessary to reduce the onset and the severity of complications. PMID:26560258

  3. Paediatric reduced intensity conditioning: analysis of centre strategies on regimens and definitions by the EBMT Paediatric Diseases and Complications and Quality of Life WP.

    PubMed

    Lawitschka, A; Faraci, M; Yaniv, I; Veys, P; Bader, P; Wachowiak, J; Socie, G; Aljurf, M D; Arat, M; Boelens, J J; Duarte, R; Tichelli, A; Peters, C

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this analysis was to explore the diversity of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in paediatric allo-SCT in daily practice across Europe. Data from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Promise database from 1994 to 2008 were supplemented by a survey of EBMT centres performing paediatric allo-SCT on the current policy asking for the underlying diseases and for the drug combinations. Records from 161 centres from 30 countries were analysed and 139 various RIC regimens were reported. More centres applied RIC for malignant rather than for non-malignant diseases. In general, fludarabine (FLU)-based regimens predominated except for BU-based regimens in myeloid malignancies and haemoglobinopathies. Treosulfan (TREO) was mainly applied for unspecified malignant diseases and for haemophagocytic diseases. FLU-based regimens revealed the greatest number of different combinations. Correlating the number of regimens with the number of treating centres revealed the lowest variety in FLU and the highest variety in TBI and TREO. FLU/melphalane and FLU/CY were the most frequent combinations. This extreme heterogeneity in RIC may influence both the efficacy and the safety of the procedures, which requires further investigation. Optimization and standardization of RIC is the final goal to provide a platform for future prospective studies. PMID:25621804

  4. A case of Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) due to lamin A/C (LMNA) mutations complicated by end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imachi, Hitomi; Murao, Koji; Ohtsuka, Shouji; Fujiwara, Mako; Muraoka, Tomie; Hosokawa, Hitoshi; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2009-02-01

    Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is a rare monogenic adipose tissue disorder in which the affected subjects have increased predisposition to insulin resistance and related metabolic complications, such as glucose intolerance, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. Our patient was a 35-year-old female who had been receiving insulin injection therapy for diabetes mellitus and was transferred to our hospital. She was diagnosed with FPLD on the basis of the following symptoms: increase in subcutaneous fat in the face, neck, and upper trunk; loss of subcutaneous fat in the lower limbs and the gluteal region. We found a heterozygous CGG to CAG transition in codon 482 of exon 8 in the gene encoding lamin A/C (LMNA), which leads to an arginine to glutamine substitution (R482Q). At the time of admission, her serum creatinine level was 8.4 mg/dl, and her blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level was 81 mg/dl. Her serum creatinine level was elevated and hemodialysis was performed twice every week. However, she died of cerebral hemorrhage 9 months after hemodialysis. Although it is uncommon for patients with FPLD to exhibit renal dysfunction and require hemodialysis, this case suggests the need for careful analysis of renal function in a patient with FPLD. PMID:19011997

  5. Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu ZhiYong; Liang Shixiong; Zhu Ji; Zhu Xiaodong; Zhao Jiandong; Lu Haijie; Yang Yunli; Chen Long; Wang Anyu; Fu Xiaolong; Jiang Guoliang . E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD{sub 5} (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD{sub 5}) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended.

  6. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  7. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. PMID:26600443

  8. A Beautiful Britto Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Romero Britto is a wonderful artist for young students to study when learning the building blocks of art and design. Colorful, linear, and full of bold patterns, Britto's work blends a contemporary cubist style and pop art commercial appeal. Themes of this contemporary artist's work include animals, flowers, still life, and people in joyful…

  9. Why Are Chimps Still Chimps?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Norman A.; Smith, James J.; Pobiner, Briana; Schrein, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may be posed with such questions as, "If we evolved from chimps, why are there still chimps?" We provide teachers with answers to this and related questions in the context of the latest genetic, fossil, and behavioral evidence. We also provide references they can use to further students' understanding of human evolution and evolution in…

  10. Value-Able Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how she made a major improvement to her fifth-grade lesson plan by providing a hands-on Internet experience before students worked on their own oil pastel still life. It was a success with beautiful finished products and highly motivated, engaged students. Details of this lesson are described in this article.

  11. Perioperative thrombotic complications in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Cillo, Umberto; Zanus, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Ori, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Although the perioperative bleeding complications and the major side effects of blood transfusion have always been the primary concern in liver transplantation (OLT), the possible cohesion of an underestimated intrinsic hypercoagulative state during and after the transplant procedure may pose a major threat to both patient and graft survival. Thromboembolism during OLT is characterized not only by a complex aetiology, but also by unpredictable onset and evolution of the disease. The initiation of a procoagulant process may be triggered by various factors, such as inflammation, venous stasis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, vascular clamping, anatomical and technical abnormalities, genetic factors, deficiency of profibrinolytic activity, and platelet activation. The involvement of the arterial system, intracardiac thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, portal vein thrombosis, and deep vein thrombosis, are among the most serious thrombotic events in the perioperative period. The rapid detection of occlusive vascular events is of paramount importance as it heavily influences the prognosis, particularly when these events occur intraoperatively or early after OLT. Regardless of the lack of studies and guidelines on anticoagulant prophylaxis in this setting, many institutions recommend such an approach especially in the subset of patients at high risk. However, the decision of when, how and in what doses to use the various chemical anticoagulants is still a difficult task, since there is no common consensus, even for high-risk cases. The risk of postoperative thromboembolism causing severe hemodynamic events, or even loss of graft function, must be weighed and compared with the risk of an important bleeding. In this article we briefly review the risk factors and the possible predictors of major thrombotic complications occurring in the perioperative period, as well as their incidence and clinical features. Moreover, the indications to pharmacological prophylaxis and the current treatment strategies are also summarized. PMID:26185371

  12. Early Detection Still Key to Breast Cancer Survival

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_154995.html Early Detection Still Key to Breast Cancer Survival: Study Despite advances in treatment, finding smaller ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even with recent strides in breast cancer treatment, a woman's chances of surviving the disease ...

  13. Enhanced formation and impaired degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps in dermatomyositis and polymyositis: a potential contributor to interstitial lung disease complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Shu, X; Tian, X; Chen, F; Lu, X; Wang, G

    2014-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyosits (PM) are systemic autoimmune diseases whose pathogeneses remain unclear. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are reputed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. This study tests the hypothesis that NETs may be pathogenic in DM/PM. Plasma samples from 97 DM/PM patients (72 DM, 25 PM) and 54 healthy controls were tested for the capacities to induce and degrade NETs. Plasma DNase I activity was tested to further explore possible reasons for the incomplete degradation of NETs. Results from 35 DM patients and seven PM patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) were compared with results from DM/PM patients without ILD. Compared with control subjects, DM/PM patients exhibited a significantly enhanced capacity for inducing NETs, which was supported by elevated levels of plasma LL-37 and circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in DM/PM. NETs degradation and DNase I activity were also decreased significantly in DM/PM patients and were correlated positively. Moreover, DM/PM patients with ILD exhibited the lowest NETs degradation in vitro due to the decrease in DNase I activity. DNase I activity in patients with anti-Jo-1 antibodies was significantly lower than in patients without. Glucocorticoid therapy seems to improve DNase I activity. Our findings demonstrate that excessively formed NETs cannot be degraded completely because of decreased DNase I activity in DM/PM patients, especially in patients with ILD, suggesting that abnormal regulation of NETs may be involved in the pathogenesis of DM/PM and could be one of the factors that initiate and aggravate ILD. PMID:24611519

  14. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Complicated by Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO – Devic’s Disease): Clinic-Pathological Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Adawi, Mohammad; Bisharat, Bishara; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is usually a relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis involving three or more contiguous spinal cord segments, and seropositivity for NMO-IgG antibody. NMO is often mistaken for multiple sclerosis and there are relatively sporadic publications about NMO and overlapping systemic or organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We described a unique case of a 25-year-old Arab young woman who was diagnosed with SLE, depending on clinical, laboratory investigations and after she had fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SLE and had presented the following findings: constitutional findings (fatigue, fever, and arthralgia); dermatologic finding (photosensitivity and butterfly rash); chronic renal failure (proteinuria up to 400 mg in 24 hours); hematologic and antinuclear antibodies (positivity for antinuclear factor (ANF), anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, direct Coombs, ANA and anti-DNA, low C4 and C3, aCL by IgG and IgM). Recently, she presented with several episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings especially seropositivity for NMO-IgG were compatible with NMO. Accurate diagnosis is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention. This case illustrates that NMO may be associated with SLE. PMID:24948869

  15. Amniocentesis: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    Vrettos, A S; Koliopoulos, C; Panayotou, P P

    1975-02-01

    Transabdominal amniocentesis is described and our experience with this method is presented. No severe maternal complications were recorded. In two cases accidental puncture of fetal blood vessels in pregnancies over 40 weeks led to delivery by cesarean section. We believe that, although fetal complications are rare, the indications for amniocentesis should be significant enough to discount the hazards of the procedure. PMID:1116906

  16. UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre

    E-print Network

    UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre The UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre (DCRC) investigates the microvascular complications of diabetes. Our work focuses on identifying novel drivers innovative therapeutic paradigms and biomarkers. Diabetes Complications Research Centre The DCRC comprises

  17. Evaluation of Percutaneous Liver Biopsy Complications in Patients with Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Sukran; Ersan, Gursel; Tatar, Bengu; Adar, Pelin; Sengel, Buket Erturk

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Liver biopsy is still the gold standard for the determination of liver fibrosis and necroinflammatory activity. It is an invasive method and may lead to severe complications. The aim of this study was to determine the evaluation of percutaneous liver biopsy complications in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Materials and Methods: 1165 patients, who were followed with the diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis and who were applied percutaneous liver biopsy between January 2000 and February 2013 at the out-patient clinic of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, were included in the study. Results: Of 1165 patients who underwent liver biopsy, 196 (86 male, 110 female) were diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C, 969 (559 male, 410 female) were diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B. The mean age was 43.3 and 55.4% were male. 11% of the patients were diagnosed with chronic renal failure and underwent haemodialysis. Minor complication rate was about 20% (severe pain required usage of analgesic drugs in 19.8%, abdominal pain in 22.6%) whereas major complication rate was 1.15% (pneumothorax in 0.17%, heamobilia in 0.08%, hematoma in 0.9%). We did not observe severe complications such as fever, abscess, anaphylaxis, bacteraemia, organ perforations, sepsis or death. Conclusion: Despite being an invasive procedure, percutaneous liver biopsy can be considered a safe method because of the low rates of severe complications observed in our patients.

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  19. Diagnosis and management of complicated intra-abdominal infection in adults and children: guidelines by the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John E; Bradley, John S; Rodvold, Keith A; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Baron, Ellen J; O'Neill, Patrick J; Chow, Anthony W; Dellinger, E Patchen; Eachempati, Soumitra R; Gorbach, Sherwood; Hilfiker, Mary; May, Addison K; Nathens, Avery B; Sawyer, Robert G; Bartlett, John G

    2010-01-15

    Evidence-based guidelines for managing patients with intra-abdominal infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those previously published in 2002 and 2003. The guidelines are intended for treating patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. New information, based on publications from the period 2003-2008, is incorporated into this guideline document. The panel has also added recommendations for managing intra-abdominal infection in children, particularly where such management differs from that of adults; for appendicitis in patients of all ages; and for necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates. PMID:20034345

  20. Diagnosis and management of complicated intra-abdominal infection in adults and children: guidelines by the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John E; Bradley, John S; Rodvold, Keith A; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Baron, Ellen J; O'Neill, Patrick J; Chow, Anthony W; Dellinger, E Patchen; Eachempati, Soumitra R; Gorbach, Sherwood; Hilfiker, Mary; May, Addison K; Nathens, Avery B; Sawyer, Robert G; Bartlett, John G

    2010-02-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for managing patients with intra-abdominal infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those previously published in 2002 and 2003. The guidelines are intended for treating patients who either have these infections or may be at risk for them. New information, based on publications from the period 2003-2008, is incorporated into this guideline document. The panel has also added recommendations for managing intra-abdominal infection in children, particularly where such management differs from that of adults; for appendicitis in patients of all ages; and for necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates. PMID:20163262

  1. [Complications of purulent meningoencephalitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rubin, A N; Shcherbuk, Yu A; Lyapin, A P

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of 19 cases of meningoencephalitis was made in infants aged under one year old. The disease was complicated by chronic subdural hematomas in 11 patients and by hydrocephalus in 8 patients. The article presents the strategy, treatment results and diagnostic procedures volume. Based on their work, the authors made a conclusion that meningoencephalitis required an emergency neurosurgical interference in order to avoid complications in convalescence period. PMID:25962294

  2. Pleural space complications associated with lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Andrew; Boffa, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents a life-saving option for some end-stage lung diseases. Despite the magnitude of anatomic manipulation and the fragility of the patient population, the procedures have become progressively safer. Perioperative morbidity, however, remains high. Pleural space complications are particularly common. This article discusses hemothorax, chylothorax, air leak or pneumothorax, recurrent effusion, empyema, trapped lung, and chronic pleural complications. PMID:25430432

  3. Esophageal stricture secondary to drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis presenting in an adult: an unusual complication of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Njei, Basile; Schoenfeld, Adam; Vaziri, Haleh

    2013-10-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an idiosyncratic, potentially life-threatening skin disease characterized by widespread inflammation and necrosis of the epidermis and mucous membranes. It may result in narrowing of the esophageal lumen through fibrosis and esophageal stricture in rare situations, mostly encountered in children. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of esophageal stricture secondary to allopurinol-induced TEN in an adult patient. A 70-year-old male presented to our clinic with severe dysphagia secondary to allopurinol-induced TEN involving his mouth and esophagus. At the time of presentation the patient had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tube and was unable to handle his oral secretions. Endoscopy revealed near complete proximal esophageal stricture. A bidirectional esophageal dilatation procedure via the mouth and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy site was successfully performed over a guidewire for treatment of this patient. The patient tolerated the procedure well. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy with dilation was performed in a regular anterograde fashion five times over the next three months. Triamcinolone acetonide was injected using Carr-Locke injection needle from ultrasound endoscopy during the last three sessions. He currently tolerates a regular diet without difficulty. PMID:24273804

  4. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  5. Solar stills for agricultural purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.; Tran, V. V.

    1975-01-01

    Basic concepts of using desalinated water for agricultural purposes are outlined. A mathematical model describing heat and mass transfer in a system combining a solar still with a greenhouse, its solution, and test results of a small-scale unit built at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, are discussed. The unit was employed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the system. Further development and modifications are necessary for larger-scale operations. The basis of an optimization study which is underway at the Brace Research Institute of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, aimed at finding the best combination of design and operation parameters is also presented.

  6. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: oncology, cosmesis and complications.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Warren M; Ashton, Mark W

    2012-08-01

    Breast reconstruction plays a highly important role in the management of patients with breast cancer, from a psycho-social and sexual stand-point. Given that immediate breast reconstruction does not impair the oncologic safety of breast cancer management, with no increase in local recurrence rates, and no delays in the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy, the need to balance cosmesis in reconstruction with the oncologic needs of breast cancer patients is no more evident than in the discussion of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is essential adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer, with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy widely shown to reduce local recurrence after both partial and total mastectomy and shown to prolong both disease-free and overall survival in patients with nodal disease. In the setting of breast reconstruction, the effects of radiotherapy are potentially two-fold, with consideration required of the impact of breast reconstruction on the administration of and the initiation of radiotherapy, as well as the effects of radiotherapy on operative complications and cosmetic outcome following immediate breast reconstruction. The current editorial piece aims to analyze this balance, contrasting both autologous and implant-based reconstruction. The literature is still evolving as to the relative role of autologous vs. alloplastic reconstruction in the setting of radiotherapy, and the more recent introduction of acellular dermal matrix and other compounds further complicate the evidence. Fat grafting and evolving techniques in breast reconstruction will herald new discussions on this front. PMID:25083434

  7. Complications of cirrhosis. A 50 years flashback.

    PubMed

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2015-06-01

    In patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, it is largely the frequency and severity of complications relating to the diseased liver, degree of portal hypertension and hemodynamic derangement that determine the prognosis. It can be considered as a multiple organ failure that apart from the liver involves the heart, lungs, kidneys, the immune systems and other organ systems. Progressive fibrosis of the liver and subsequent metabolic impairment leads to a systemic and splanchnic arteriolar vasodilatation. With the progression of the disease development of portal hypertension leads to formation of esophageal varices and ascites. The circulation becomes hyperdynamic with cardiac, pulmonary as well as renal consequences for dysfunction and reduced survival. Infections and a changed cardiac function known as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be involved in further aggravation of other complications such as renal failure precipitating the hepatorenal syndrome. Patients with end-stage liver disease and related complications as for example the hepatopulmonary syndrome can only radically be treated by liver transplantation. PMID:25881709

  8. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. PMID:26589696

  9. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IgM Serology Publications and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ...

  11. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    PubMed

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. PMID:24863025

  12. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  13. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient’s age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management. PMID:24255744

  14. 1996 Budget picture still clouded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Four months and three work stoppages into fiscal 1996, whole departments and agencies of the United States federal government remain in budgetary limbo. Five annual spending bills still await approval, and parts of nine federal departments and several agencies face the possibility of yet another shutdown, as the current continuing resolution for temporary funding expires on March 15.In the wake of the recent three-week shutdown of the federal government, congressional leaders worked in January to ease future political pain by funding a list of “essential services” for the remainder of the fiscal year. Deemed essential were government programs with the most immediate and conspicuous public impact, such as the National Parks Service and the Passport Services Office. Included on that list of essential services was the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which not only received full funding for the entire fiscal year but also got a 5.7% increase over its 1995 budget.

  15. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off. PMID:26610152

  16. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  17. Neuromuscular complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular diseases such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, peripheral neuropathy, and disorders of neuromuscular transmission are reported to be complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although cases have been reported with allogeneic HSCT in the setting of chronic graft versus host disease, they are also known to occur without evidence thereof and even occur in the setting of autologous HSCT. The 2005 National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria classify polymyositis and dermatomyositis as "distinctive" features, and neuropathy and MG as "other" features. These neuromuscular complications present very similarly to the idiopathic autoimmune disorders and respond to similar treatment modalities. Muscle Nerve, 2015 Muscle Nerve 52: 480-487, 2015. PMID:26044357

  18. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the disease over time. Long-term complications include malnutrition liver diseases intestinal cancer lymphoma [ Top ] What other ... care provider usually examines the patient's body for malnutrition or a rash uses a stethoscope to listen ...

  19. Complications of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media and Their Management: A Single Institution 12 Years Experience.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeta; Jaiswal, Ashwin Ashok; Banerjee, Praveer Kumar; Garg, Amrish Kumar

    2015-12-01

    To determine the incidence of otogenic complications of Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and its management. The study was conducted at the tertiary referral centre and teaching hospital. An analysis was made about the clinical and operative findings, surgical techniques and approaches, the overall management and recovery of the patient. The data were then compared with the relevant and available literature. Over the study period of 12 years, a total 45 cases of CSOM with complications were reviewed. Out of these 45 cases, 20 cases had extracranial (EC) while 25 cases had intracranial (IC) complications. The prevalence of each complication was 0.17 and 0.13 %, IC and EC respectively. The commonly encountered IC complications were brain abscess, meningitis and lateral sinus thrombophlebitis. Among the EC complications, mastoid abscess followed by labyrinthitis and facial nerve palsy were encountered. The reliable warning signs and symptoms of IC complications were fever, headache, earache vestibular symptoms, meningeal signs and impairment of consciousness. Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis were the common organism isolated. Cholesteatoma and granulation in the middle ear were the major findings in both groups of cases. Surgery was main modality of management of these conditions. We observed that two patients fail to regain full facial nerve function despite of surgery. Mortality rate was zero but morbidity was seen in 15 % (3) and 28 % (7) of cases in EC and IC group respectively. The epidemiological presentation, clinical features and results of treatment are discussed. CSOM complications, despite its reduced incidence still pose a great challenge in developing countries, as the disease present in the advanced stage leading to difficulty in management and consequently higher morbidity. In this study we emphasize the importance of the accurate and early diagnosis followed by adequate surgical therapy with multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26693451

  20. Hypertension and the pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leguizamón, Gustavo F; Zeff, Natalia P; Fernández, Alberto

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes is a frequent complication of pregnancy. Type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased incidence of preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. When renal dysfunction is present, the incidence of these complications is remarkably increased. White's class, poor glycemic control during the first half of pregnancy, and early blood pressure elevation are also independent risk factors for developing preeclampsia. Whether gestational diabetes increases the background incidence of preeclampsia is still debated. Because therapeutic interventions such as low-dose aspirin and antioxidants have not been shown to be effective, preventive measures rely on tight blood glucose control, as well as adequate blood pressure treatment. PMID:16879782

  1. Anesthetic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Amie; Yu, Albert; Kaminski, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia complications in the parturient can be divided into 2 categories: those related to airway manipulation and those related to neuraxial anesthesia. Physiologic changes of pregnancy can lead to challenging intubating conditions in a patient at risk of aspiration. Neuraxial techniques are used to provide analgesia for labor and anesthesia for surgical delivery. Therefore, complications associated with neuraxial techniques are often seen in this population. In the event of maternal cardiac arrest, modification to advanced cardiac life support algorithms must be made to accommodate the gravid uterus and to deliver the fetus if return of maternal circulation is not prompt. PMID:26600441

  2. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  3. "Gastric cytoprotection" is still relevant.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Sandor

    2014-12-01

    Although Andre Robert's historic article on "gastric cytoprotection" in 1979 introduced this new name and concept, gastroprotective drugs (e.g. sofalcone, sucralfate), which prevent and/or accelerate healing of gastric ulcers without inhibiting acid secretion, were known in Japan before or around that time. But since Robert's studies were solely focused on prostaglandins (PG), they became the center of gastrointestinal research for more than 30 years. As endogenous products, PG were implicated in mediating the gastroprotective effect of other drugs such as sofalcone and sucralfate, despite that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin diminished but never abolished gastroprotection by other drugs. Another group of endogenous substances, that is, sulfhydryls (SH), investigated in parallel with PG, also seem to play a mechanistic role in gastroprotection, especially since SH alkylators like N-ethylmaleimide counteract virtually any form of gastroprotection. In Robert's terms of "prevention of chemically induced acute mucosal lesions," so far no single mechanism could explain the beneficial effects of diverse protective agents, but I argue that these two endogenous substances (i.e. PG, SH), in addition to histamine, are the main mechanistic mediators of acute gastroprotection: PG and histamine, because as mediators of acute inflammation, they increase vascular permeability (VP), and SH scavenge free radicals. This is contrary to the search for a single mechanism of action, long focused on enhanced secretion of mucus and/or bicarbonate that may contribute but cannot explain all forms of gastroprotection. Nevertheless, based on research work of the last 30 years, in part from our lab, a new mechanistic explanation of gastroprotection may be formulated: it's a complex but orderly and evolution-based physiologic response of the gastric mucosa under pathologic conditions. Namely, one of the first physiologic defense responses of any organ is inflammation that starts with rapid vascular changes (e.g. increased VP and blood flow), followed by cellular events (e.g. infiltration by acute and chronic inflammatory cells). Thus, PG and histamine, by increasing VP create a perivascular edema that dilutes and delays toxic agents reaching the subepithelial capillaries. Otherwise, damaging chemicals may induce severe early vascular injury resulting in blood flow stasis, hypoxia, and necrosis of surrounding epithelial and mesenchymal cells. In this complex response, increased mucus and/or bicarbonate secretion seem to cause luminal dilution of gastrotoxic chemicals that is further reinforced by a perivascular, histodilutional component. This mechanistic explanation would encompass the protective actions of diverse agents as PG, small doses of histamine, motility stimulants, and dilute irritants (i.e. "adaptive cytoprotection"). Thus, although markedly increased VP is pathologic, slight increase in VP seems to be protective, that is, a key element in the complex pathophysiologic response during acute gastroprotection. Over the years, "gastroprotection" was also applied to accelerated healing of chronic gastroduodenal ulcers without reduction of acid secretion. The likely main mechanism here is the binding of angiogenic growth factors (e.g. basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor) to the heparin-like structures of sucralfate and sofalcone. Thus, despite intensive research of the last 30 years, gastroprotection is incompletely understood, and we are still far away from effectively treating Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers and preventing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-caused erosions and ulcers in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract; hence "gastric cytoprotection" research is still relevant. PMID:25521744

  4. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  5. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: a clinical strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Edelson, J D; Hyland, R H

    1989-01-01

    Infectious and noninfectious forms of pulmonary disease are the most common complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and many are amenable to treatment. We describe the clinical and radiologic features of the most common causes of lung disease in AIDS patients and review the drugs available for treatment. In addition, we provide a strategy for the clinical assessment and management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection who have lung infiltrates. PMID:2655853

  6. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  7. Can statins prevent pregnancy complications?

    PubMed

    Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-03-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The beneficial effects of the statins in preventing cardiovascular diseases are not entirely due to cholesterol reduction. Numerous studies suggest that the benefits observed with statins may be mediated by pleiotropic effects that are cholesterol-independent. There is now compelling evidence that statin therapy may diminish inflammation and oxidative stress, increase angiogenesis, inhibit the coagulation cascade and protect the endothelium. Several animal studies demonstrated that statins prevent pregnancy complications such as recurrent miscarriages and preeclampsia. Epidemiological data collected to date suggest that statins are not major teratogens. Clinical trials should be performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of statins in preventing bad pregnancy outcomes in women. Some of these trials recently started. This article summarizes the numerous effects of statins that can contribute to the pregnancy protection observed in animal models. PMID:24012117

  8. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  9. Early complications. Chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Vallières, E; Karmy-Jones, R; Wood, D E

    1999-08-01

    Postpneumonectomy chylothorax is a very common but serious complication. Drainage of the pneumonectomy space, metabolic and nutritional support with TPN, and absolute enteral rest may lead to control of the leak. Failure of these measures to obtain a rapid resolution of the chyle losses should be followed by early surgical intervention in most instances in an effort to alleviate the chronic metabolic, nutritional, and immunological consequences of prolonged chyle losses. PMID:10459431

  10. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  11. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  12. Diabetic complications and dysregulated innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Graves, Dana T; Kayal, Rayyan A

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that leads to the development of a number of complications. The etiology of each diabetic complication is undoubtedly multifactorial. We will focus on one potential component that may be common in many diabetic complications, dysregulation of innate immunity associated with an increased inflammatory response. High glucose levels lead to shunting through the polyol pathway, an increase in diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C, an increase in the release of electrons that react with oxygen molecules to form superoxides, and the non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins that result in greater formation of advanced glycation end products. Each of these can lead to aberrant cell signalling that affects innate immunity for example, by activating the MAP kinase pathway or inducing activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB. This may be a common feature of several complications including periodontal disease, atherosclerosis, nephropathy, impaired healing and retinopathy. These complications are frequently associated with increased expression of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species. Cause and effect relationship between dysregulation of key components of innate immunity and diabetic complications in many instances have been demonstrated with the use of cytokine blockers and antioxidants. PMID:17981625

  13. [Complications during myelographic examination in dogs].

    PubMed

    Sevcík, A; Ledecký, V; Legáth, J

    1996-06-01

    The occurrence of spinal disease in dogs is quite frequent. Clinical examination and survey radiography do not allow to make an exact diagnosis in many cases. Therefore the radiographic method-myelograhy is used to make an exact diagnosis and to locate the pathological process in the spinal cord. Myelography can be accompanied by some complications caused by a contrast medium of anaesthesia. In this study, the occurrence of complications was evaluated when the contrast medium Dimer X and three types of general anaesthesia were used: xylazine-ketamine, chlorpromazine-piritramide, chlorpromazine-pentobarbital. Certain relations between the origin of complications, dog weight and total time of anaesthesia are indicated. The results obtained show that the highest number of cases with complicated regeneration was observed after the use of the combination xylazine-ketamine when the average duration of anesthesia was 31.1 minutes comparing to the combination chlorpromazine-pentobarbitale with average duration of anaesthesia was 127.7 minutes with the lowest number of complications. We also refer to certain relations between weight and the occurrence of complications where the highest correlation (r = 0.59) was recorded for xylazine-ketamine anaesthesia. The correlation coefficient (r = 0.27) for chlorpromazine-pentobarbital documents very low correlations of the followed values. PMID:8711878

  14. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zv??ina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Sk?ivan, Ji?í; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  15. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Neal; Nguyen, Nhat; DePasquale, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser. PMID:24839446

  16. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  17. [Infectious complications of lymphedema].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, L; Gironet, N

    2002-06-01

    Erysipelas and lymphangitis are frequent complications of lymphedemas (20 to 30%). The most important risk factor for erysipelas is lymphedema since this is a protein rich edema that contributes to the risk of infection. In case of lymphedema the treatment is the usual consensus treatment for erysipelas. A prophylactic treatment with penicillin is requested as soon as the first recurrence. This prophylactic treatment includes skin care, particularly treatment of injuries and intertrigos. Hyperplastic skin leads to maceration and then mycoses. Physiotherapy does not increase the risk for infection. Moreover an infection needs a complex decongestive physiotherapy which decreases risks of recurrence. PMID:12162204

  18. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  19. Overweight and pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Abrams, B; Parker, J

    1988-01-01

    The association between increased prepregnancy weight for height and seven pregnancy complications was studied in a multi-racial sample of more than 4100 recent deliveries. Body mass indices were calculated and used to classify women as average weight (90-119 percent of ideal or BMI 19.21-25.60), moderately overweight (120-135 percent ideal or BMI 25.61-28.90), and very overweight (greater than 135 percent ideal or BMI greater than 28.91) prior to pregnancy. Compared to women of average weight for height, very overweight women had a higher risk of diabetes, hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension and primary cesarean section delivery. Moderately overweight women were also at higher risk than average for diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension and primary cesarean deliveries but the relative risks were of a smaller magnitude than for very overweight women. With women of average prepregnancy body mass as reference, moderately elevated, but not significant relative risks were found for perinatal mortality in the very overweight group, for urinary tract infections in both overweight groups, and a decreased risk for anemia was found in the very overweight group. However, post-hoc power analyses indicated that the number of overweight women in the sample did not allow adequate statistical power to detect these small differences in risk. To overcome limitations associated with low statistical power, the results of three recent studies of these outcomes in very overweight pregnant women were combined and summarized using Mantel-Haenzel techniques. This second, larger analysis suggested that very overweight women are at significantly higher risk for all seven outcomes studied. Summary results for moderately overweight women could not be calculated, since only two of the studies had evaluated moderately overweight women separately. These latter results support other findings that both moderate overweight and very overweight are risk factors during pregnancy, with the highest risk occurring in the heaviest group. Although these results indicate that moderate overweight is a risk factor during pregnancy, additional studies are needed to confirm the impact of being 20-35 percent above ideal weight prior to pregnancy. The results of this analysis also imply that since the baseline incidence of many perinatal complications is low, studies relating overweight and pregnancy complications should include large enough samples of overweight women so that there is adequate statistical power to reliably detect differences in complication rates. PMID:3058615

  20. Measles: Still a Significant Health Threat.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Claire; Lanzi, Maria; Lindberg, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Measles (Rubeola), although considered eradicated in the United States, still causes periodic outbreaks. Vaccine refusal leads to vulnerable pockets of individuals who may become infected once the virus is imported from countries where it is endemic. In turn, these individuals may spread the virus to young infants and to other vulnerable individuals. Many healthcare providers are not familiar with this disease or with the factors that contribute to the risk of spread. Measles causes a serious febrile illness that may lead to pneumonia, blindness, deafness, neurological disorders, and even death. Patients with measles need supportive care and administration of oral vitamin A. The measles vaccine is highly effective and considered extremely safe, but misinformation about the safety of this and other vaccines has decreased immunization coverage in some areas of the country. Mandatory immunization laws exist in every state and have been upheld by courts including the United States Supreme Court, but laws and exemptions vary among states. Nurses can play a strong role in care of patients with measles, case identification, and prevention of transmission. Most importantly, because nurses hold positions of trust in their communities, they should be tireless frontline advocates for immunization. The purpose of this article is to provide information on measles, its transmission, signs and symptoms, treatment, prevention, and relevant laws and regulations. PMID:26110575

  1. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  2. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  3. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  4. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  5. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  6. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hearing and balance, altered mental states, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, coma, and retinal disease that may lead to ... AIDS may suffer from several different forms of neuropathy , or nerve pain, each strongly associated with a ...

  7. Management of acute diverticulitis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Welbourn, Hannah L; Hartley, John E

    2014-12-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a common condition, and around a quarter of people affected by it will experience acute symptoms at some time. The most common presentation is uncomplicated acute diverticulitis that can be managed conservatively with bowel rest and antibiotics. However, some patients will present with diverticular abscesses or purulent or faeculent peritonitis due to perforated diverticular disease. Whilst most mesocolic abscesses can be managed with percutaneous drainage alone, pelvic abscesses are associated with a higher rate of future complications and usually require percutaneous drainage followed by interval sigmoid resection. Patients who require emergency surgery for complicated acute diverticulitis most commonly undergo a Hartmann's procedure, although resection with primary anastomosis and laparoscopic peritoneal lavage have emerged as alternative treatment options for patients with purulent peritonitis in recent years. However, robust evidence from randomized trials is lacking for these alternative procedures, and the studies that have reported good outcomes from them have included carefully selected patient groups. There has been a move away from recommending elective prophylactic colectomy after two episodes of acute diverticulitis in the light of evidence that most patients will not experience a significant recurrence of their symptoms; elective surgery is indicated for those with ongoing symptoms, pelvic abscesses, complications-such as fistulating disease, strictures or recurrent diverticular bleeding-and those who are at high risk of perforation during future episodes, for example, due to immunosuppression, chronic renal failure or collagen-vascular diseases. PMID:25614717

  8. Curcumin: a pleiotropic phytonutrient in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Jeenger, Manish Kumar; Shrivastava, Shweta; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Naidu, V G M; Ramakrishna, Sistla; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin is the major polyphenolic constituent of an indigenous herb, Curcuma longa, found to have a wide range of applications right from its kitchen use as a spicy ingredient to therapeutic and medicinal applications in various diseases. Curcumin has been identified to have a plethora of biologic and pharmacologic properties owing to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This pleiotropic regulation of redox balance of cell and inflammation might be the basis of curcumin's beneficial activities in various pathologic conditions including diabetic complications. This review summarizes various in vitro, in vivo studies done on curcumin and its therapeutic utility in diabetic micro-vascular complications. This review also emphasizes the importance of curcumin in addition to the existing therapeutic modalities in diabetic complications. PMID:25441584

  9. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal ?-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual ?-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal ?-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked ?-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human ?-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs, nephroprotection (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptors blockers) and antiarrhythmic agents, whereas dialysis or renal transplantation are available for patients experiencing end-stage renal failure. With age, progressive damage to vital organ systems develops and at some point, organs may start to fail in functioning. End-stage renal disease and life-threatening cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications limit life-expectancy of untreated males and females with reductions of 20 and 10 years, respectively, as compared to the general population. While there is increasing evidence that long-term enzyme therapy can halt disease progression, the importance of adjunctive therapies should be emphasized and the possibility of developing an oral therapy drives research forward into active site specific chaperones. PMID:21092187

  10. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... much you need. DO NOT smoke. Smoking makes diabetes complications worse. If you do smoke, work with your ... Brownlee M, Aiello LP, Cooper ME, et al. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Mehmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  11. Gut microbiota-related complications in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays an important role in cirrhosis. The liver is constantly challenged with commensal bacteria and their products arriving through the portal vein in the so-called gut-liver axis. Bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen through the intestinal wall and to mesenteric lymph nodes is facilitated by intestinal bacterial overgrowth, impairment in the permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and deficiencies in local host immune defences. Deranged clearance of endogenous bacteria from portal and systemic circulation turns the gut into the major source of bacterial-related complications. Liver function may therefore be affected by alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota and a role for commensal flora has been evidenced in the pathogenesis of several complications arising in end-stage liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy, splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The use of antibiotics is the main therapeutic pipeline in the management of these bacteria-related complications. However, other strategies aimed at preserving intestinal homeostasis through the use of pre-, pro- or symbiotic formulations are being studied in the last years. In this review, the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of the most frequent complications arising in cirrhosis and the different clinical and experimental studies conducted to prevent or improve these complications by modifying the gut microbiota composition are summarized. PMID:25400446

  12. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 2. Medical complications.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S B; Yarkony, G M; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in understanding medical complications of spinal cord injury through the lifespan. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article covers reasons for transferring patients to specialized spinal cord injury centers once they have been stabilized, and the management of common medical problems, including fever, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary tract infection, acute and chronic abdominal complications, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary complications, and heterotopic ossification. Formulation of an educational program for prevention of late complications is also discussed, including late renal complications, syringomyelia, myelomalacia, burns, pathologic fractures, pressure ulcers, and cardiovascular disease. New advances covered in this section include new information on old problems, and a discussion of exercise tolerance in persons with tetraplegia, the pathophysiology of late neurologic deterioration after spinal cord injury, and a view of the care of these patients across the lifespan. PMID:9084368

  13. Liver biopsy: complications and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Thampanitchawong, Pornpen; Piratvisuth, Teerha

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To study the complications and the risk factors of percutaneous liver biopsy, and to compare the complication rate between the periods o f 1987-1993 and 1994-1996. METHODS: Medical records of all patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy between January 1, 1987 to September 31, 1996 in Songklanagarind Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 484 percutaneous liver biopsies performed. The total complication rate was 6.4%, of which 4.5% were due to major bleeding; the death rate was 1.6%. The important risk factors correlated with bleeding complications and deaths were a platelet count of 70 × 109/L or less, a prolonged prothrombin time of > 3 s over control, or a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time of > 10 s over control. Although physician inexperience was not statistically significantly associated with bleeding complications and deaths, there was a reduction of death rate from 2.2% in 1987-1993 to 0% in 1993-1996. This reduction is thought to result from both increased experience o f senior staff and increased supervision of residents. CONCLUSIONS: Screening of platelet count, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time should be done and need to be corrected in case of abnormality before liver biopsy. Percutaneous liver biopsy should be performed or supervised by an expert in gastrointestinal diseases, especially in high risk cases. PMID:11819452

  14. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30?years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Tanios, M A; Kogelman, L; McGovern, B; Hassoun, P M

    2001-03-01

    Malaria is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world, and severe respiratory complications have been described mainly in association with Plasmodium falciparum. We describe a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating infection with P. vivax in the setting of relatively low parasitemia in a 47-yr-old woman after a brief trip to Papua New Guinea. A review of the literature shows that pulmonary complications of P. vivax are rare but occur more frequently than generally acknowledged. Pathogenic mechanisms of these complications are discussed. PMID:11373440

  16. Severe scurvy: an underestimated disease.

    PubMed

    Levavasseur, M; Becquart, C; Pape, E; Pigeyre, M; Rousseaux, J; Staumont-Sallé, D; Delaporte, E

    2015-09-01

    Scurvy is one of the oldest diseases in human history. Nowadays, although scurvy tends to become a forgotten disease in developed country, rare cases still occur, especially in people undergoing extreme diet, old people or children with poor diet and patients with malabsorption. We describe three cases of scurvy. The first case is a patient diagnosed with Crohn's disease, the second one is in a context of anorexia nervosa and drug addiction, and the third case is in a context of social isolation. Early recognition of scurvy can be difficult because symptoms may appear nonspecific and can mimic more common conditions. In any patient with spontaneous hematoma and purpura, in the context of nutritional disorder, scurvy should be systematically considered. As this disease can lead to severe complications, such as bone pain, heart failure or gastrointestinal symptoms, nothing should delay vitamin C supplementation, which is a simple and rapidly effective treatment. PMID:26081492

  17. [Radiologic aspects of the complications of duodenal diverticula].

    PubMed

    Oddo, F; Chevallier, P; Souci, J; Baque, J; Buckley, M J; Fabiani, P; Diaine, B; Coussement, A

    1999-02-01

    The duodenum is the second most common site, after the colon, for intestinal diverticulae. This condition is most often asymptomatic and is usually an accidental finding. Complications, with variable clinical presentations, may occur in up to 5% of such individuals. We report a retrospective analysis of 5 patients who presented with complicated duodenal diverticular disease. The complications, either isolated or multiple, consisted of bezoar formation (n = 2), diverticulitis (n = 2), extrinsic compression of the common bile duct (n = 3), perforation (n = 1), choledocholithiasis (n = 1), and an abnormality of the bilio-pancreatic ductal convergence (n = 1). The radiological aspects, in particular, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features are reviewed. These are, to our knowledge, the first descriptions of MRI and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatographic (MRCP) findings in complicated duodenal diverticular disease. MRI facilitates precise delineation of the complicated duodenal diverticulum while MRCP allows assessment of the effects on the biliary and pancreatic ducts. PMID:10209709

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation complicated by acute pericardial tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Suwalski, Piotr; Pawlak, Agnieszka; Kulawik, Tomasz; Byczkowska, Katarzyna; Gil, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted standard of care for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery or have high surgical risk. Despite its more widespread adoption as a treatment option and increasing experience of centers, TAVR is still associated with several complications. We therefore report a case of TAVR complicated by acute pericardial tamponade, one of the most severe potential complications of this procedure. We describe the way we approached the problem and we try to give a potential take-home message for others who might encounter such a situation in their own cath lab. PMID:24799924

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation complicated by acute pericardial tamponade.

    PubMed

    Mo?e?ska, Olga; Suwalski, Piotr; Pawlak, Agnieszka; Kulawik, Tomasz; Byczkowska, Katarzyna; Gil, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted standard of care for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery or have high surgical risk. Despite its more widespread adoption as a treatment option and increasing experience of centers, TAVR is still associated with several complications. We therefore report a case of TAVR complicated by acute pericardial tamponade, one of the most severe potential complications of this procedure. We describe the way we approached the problem and we try to give a potential take-home message for others who might encounter such a situation in their own cath lab. PMID:24799924

  20. Complications of Continuous-Flow Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), more importantly the continuous-flow subclass, have revolutionized the medical field by improving New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class status, quality of life, and survival rates in patients with advanced systolic heart failure. From the first pulsatile device to modern day continuous-flow devices, LVADs have continued to improve, but they are still associated with several complications. These complications include infection, bleeding, thrombosis, hemolysis, aortic valvular dysfunction, right heart failure, and ventricular arrhythmias. In this article, we aim to review these complications to understand the most appropriate approach for their prevention and to discuss the available therapeutic modalities. PMID:26052234

  1. Emerging and Underrecognized Complications of Illicit Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Wurcel, Alysse G; Merchant, Elisabeth A; Clark, Roger P; Stone, David R

    2015-12-15

    Illicit drug use can result in a wide range of medical complications. As the availability, synthesis, and popularity of illicit drugs evolve over time, new syndromes associated with their use may mimic infections. Some of these symptoms are anticipated drug effects, and others are complications of adulterants mixed with drugs or complications from the method of using drugs. Some illicit drugs are associated with rare infections, which are difficult to diagnosis with standard microbiological techniques. The goal of this review is to orient a wide range of clinicians-including general practitioners, emergency medicine providers, and infectious diseases specialists-to complications of illicit drug use that may be underrecognized. Improving awareness of infectious and noninfectious complications of illicit drug can expedite diagnosis and medical treatment of persons who use drugs and facilitate targeted harm reduction counseling to prevent future complications. PMID:26270683

  2. Complications of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bergh, M S; Peirone, B

    2012-01-01

    The tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) is one of the most common surgical procedures used to treat cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs. Complications occurring during or after TPLO can range in severity from swelling and bruising to fracture and osteomyelitis. Ten to 34% of TPLO surgical procedures are reported to experience a complication and approximately two to four percent require revision surgery to address a complication. Although the risk factors for many complications have not been fully assessed, the best available evidence suggests that complications of TPLO can be reduced with increased surgeon experience, careful surgical planning, and accurate execution of the surgical procedure. Identification of known or suspected risk factors and intra-operative technical errors allow subsequent action to be taken that is aimed at decreasing postoperative morbidity. There is a need for prospective studies with consistent data reporting in order to fully reveal the incidence risk factors for complications associated with TPLO. PMID:22534675

  3. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Imaging and Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John M. Vora, Parag; Midia, Mehran; Rawlinson, John

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study was to highlight technical challenges and potential pitfalls of diagnostic imaging, intervention, and postintervention follow-up of vascular complications of pancreatitis. Diagnostic and interventional radiology imaging from patients with pancreatitis from 2002 to 2006 was reviewed. We conclude that biphasic CT is the diagnostic modality of choice. Catheter angiography may (still) be required to diagnose small pseudoaneurysms. Endovascular coiling is the treatment of choice for pseudoaneurysms. Close clinical follow-up is required, as patients may rebleed/develop aneurysms elsewhere.

  4. Still Life with Fruit and Seashell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gojeski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Henri Matisse's painting, "Sideboard," opens the door to the author's first-grade students' lesson on still life. This lesson is about the process of designing, the act of making decisions, and the knowledge of one's own preferences. In this article, the author describes how the students made still life with fruit and seashells.

  5. Importing Video Stills into Computer Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Martie; Miller, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Notes that students at Dr. N. H. Jones Elementary School in Ocala, Florida use capture freeze-frame (still) photographs from videotapes and import them into computer documents. Outlines equipment needed and procedures for importing video stills for Macintosh users and PC users. (AEF)

  6. Humans 'still evolving' John von Radowitz

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    Humans 'still evolving' John von Radowitz Tuesday 01 May 2012 Darwinian "survival scientists. A popular misconception is that humans stopped evolving when they took up farming and embraced: "We have shown advances have not challenged the fact that our species is still evolving, just like all

  7. Apprentice Still Photographic Specialist (AFSC 23132).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for apprentice still photographic specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are general subjects (career ladder progression, security, photographic safety, and photographic laboratory administration); still photographic…

  8. Drugs for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Levodopa combined with carbidopa is still the most effective treatment for symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agonists, the next most effective class of drugs, can be used alone before the introduction of levodopa or as an adjunct to levodopa.Addition of a peripherally-acting COMT inhibitor or an MAO-B inhibitor to levodopa can reduce motor fluctuations in patients with advanced disease.Amantadine may have mild symptomatic benefit and can decrease levodopa-induced dyskinesias.Anticholinergics are rarely used because of their adverse effects, but can be a useful addition to levodopa for control of tremor and drooling.Subcutaneous apomorphine should be available for rescue use in patients with 'off' episodes. Deep brain stimulation is an option for patients with levodopa-induced motor complications and relatively intact cognition. PMID:24165688

  9. Complications and mortality in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, Tricia M.; Hall, Ian P.; Hubbard, Richard B.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies report that the risks of significant neurologic complications (including stroke, cerebral abscess, and migraine) and hemorrhagic sequelae are high in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), and that life expectancy in this cohort is reduced. However, most published cohorts derive from specialist centers, which may be susceptible to bias. Methods: We used a population-based approach to estimate the risks of developing neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of HHT, the association of a diagnosis of HHT with common cardiovascular and malignant comorbidities, and also long-term survival of those with the disease. Results: From a UK primary care database of 3.5 million patients (The Health Improvement Network), we identified 675 cases with a diagnosis of HHT and compared them with 6,696 controls matched by age, sex, and primary care practice. Risks of stroke (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–2.6), cerebral abscess (OR 30.0, CI 3.1–288), and migraine (OR 1.7, CI 1.3–2.2) were elevated over controls. Bleeding complications including epistaxis (OR 11.6, CI 9.1–14.7) and gastrointestinal hemorrhage (OR 6.1, CI 2.8–13.4) were more common in cases with HHT. Survival of cases with HHT was poorer than controls with a hazard ratio for death of 2.0 (CI 1.6–2.6) and a median age at death 3 years younger. Conclusions: Patients with HHT are at substantially increased risk of serious neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of the disease. Because a diagnosis of HHT is associated with a significantly poorer survival compared with those who have no disease, evaluation of new strategies to improve clinical management is required. PMID:25862798

  10. [Medical complications of extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Idrissi Kaitouni, M; Roumeguère, T

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is one of the most frequently applied procedures for the treatment of urolithiasis. ESWL breaks and splits stones by the means of repeated acoustic shock waves. Despite its non invasive nature, ESWL has been intuitively associated with potential complications, mostly related to residual stone fragments. While non stone-related complications are rare (< 1 %), awareness and identification of these complications could help clinicians to prevent and manage them safely and effectively. The current study reviews the pathophysiology, predicting factors and possible preventive measures of non stone-related medical complications after ESWL. PMID:23951856

  11. Varicella Zoster Complications

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.; Gilden, Don

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With advancing age or immunosuppression, cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines and virus reactivates to cause zoster (shingles), which can occur anywhere on the body. Skin lesions resolve within 1-2 weeks, while complete cessation of pain usually takes 4-6 weeks. Zoster can be followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia), cranial nerve palsies, zoster paresis, meningoencephalitis, cerebellitis, myelopathy, multiple ocular disorders and vasculopathy that can mimic giant cell arteritis. All of the neurological and ocular disorders listed above may also develop without rash. Diagnosis of VZV-induced neurological disease may require examination of CSF, serum and/ or ocular fluids. In the absence of rash in a patient with neurological disease potentially due to VZV, CSF should be examined for VZV DNA by PCR and for anti-VZV IgG and IGM. Detection of VZV IgG antibody in CSF is superior to detection of VZV DNA in CSF to diagnose vasculopathy, recurrent myelopathy, and brainstem encephalitis. Oral antiviral drugs speed healing of rash and shorten acute pain. Immunocompromised patients require intravenous acyclovir. First-line treatments for post-herpetic neuralgia include tricyclic antidepressants gabapentin, pregabalin, and topical lidocaine patches. VZV vasculopathy, meningoencephalitis, and myelitis are all treated with intravenous acyclovir. PMID:23794213

  12. The Scientific Method: Is It Still Useful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Scott B.; James, Linda

    2004-01-01

    While the scientific method is a logical, orderly way to solve a problem or answer a question, it is not a magical formula that is too complicated for nonscientists to comprehend (Keeton and Gould 1986). The scientific method may include a variety of steps, processes, and definitions. It should not be seen as a single series of steps, with no…

  13. Drinking Water: Health Hazards Still Not Resolved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Nicholas

    1977-01-01

    Despite the suggested link between cancer deaths and drinking obtained from the Mississippi River, New Orleans still treats its water supply in the same manner as before the Environmental Defense Fund's epidemiological study. (BT)

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicating simple silicosis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C D; Amft, N; Reid, P T

    2014-07-01

    Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to result in silicosis: an irreversible, disabling and potentially fatal occupational lung disease, which is associated with a variety of pulmonary and non-pulmonary complications including autoimmunity. A potential link between silicosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is currently recognized only in cases of acute or accelerated silicosis. We report a case of SLE, a disease which usually affects young females, arising in a male former stonemason with simple silicosis. Epidemiological and clinical literature on the association of silica exposure and development of SLE are briefly reviewed. This case report and literature review highlight the link between occupational silica exposure and autoimmune disease including SLE, establishes that even simple silicosis appears linked to development of autoimmunity and emphasizes the importance of an occupational history, especially in male patients who develop SLE. PMID:24919786

  15. Alimentary tract complications after renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, W C; Harris, N; Stein, S; Brooks, M; Jones, R S; Thompson, W M; Stickel, D L; Seigler, H F

    1979-01-01

    A computer analysis of post renal transplantation gastrointestinal problems was performed to identify important associated clinical factors. Thirty-seven per cent of all transplant recipients developed one or more significant problems. Hemorrhage, nondiverticular intestinal perforation, and esophagitis occurred most frequently in hospitalized patients. Pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and gastroduodenal perforation occurred characteristically in long-term survivors with well functioning allografts. Eleven of 32 HLA identical recipients treated with maintenance corticosteroids during stable kidney function developed gastrointestinal disease while only one of 13 HLA identical recipients not given maintenance steroids developed a problem, which strongly suggests a causal role for steroids in the development of late complications. The association of preexisting peptic ulcer and diverticular disease with hemorrhage and perforation supports previous recommendations that documented peptic ulcer disease or diverticulitis should be corrected surgically prior to transplantation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:384945

  16. Minimizing femoral artery access complications during percutaneous coronary intervention: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Applegate, Bob; Rao, Sunil V; Kirtane, Ajay J; Seto, Arnold; Stone, Gregg W

    2014-07-01

    Major bleeding complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) increase patient morbidity, prolong the hospital stay and costs, and are associated with reduced survival. Transfemoral access is still preferred at many centers given its familiarity and ease of use and is necessary in cases where large bore access is needed. Multimodality imaging with fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, and angiography can facilitate proper puncture of the common femoral artery. A proper technique (which includes femoral artery puncture and vascular access site closure) associated with adequate pharmacotherapy (both during PCI and peri-procedural, for the treatment of the underlying coronary artery disease) has been shown to reduce the risk of bleeding and vascular complications associated with femoral artery access. Avoiding the use of arterial sheaths >6 French may further reduce the risk of bleeding. Data with vascular closure devices as a bleeding avoidance strategy are evolving but when used appropriately may further reduce the risk of bleeding and vascular access complications, and in this regard are synergistic with bivalirudin. Randomized trials to confirm these recommendations are needed. PMID:24677734

  17. Pulmonary complications of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Huffmyer, Julie L; Groves, Danja S

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary complications after the use of extracorporeal circulation are common, and they range from transient hypoxemia with altered gas exchange to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with variable severity. Similar to other end-organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation, pulmonary complications are attributed to the inflammatory response, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and reactive oxygen species liberated as a result of cardiopulmonary bypass. Several factors common in cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation may worsen the risk of pulmonary complications including atelectasis, transfusion requirement, older age, heart failure, emergency surgery, and prolonged duration of bypass. There is no magic bullet to prevent or treat pulmonary complications, but supportive care with protective ventilation is important. Targets for the prevention of pulmonary complications include mechanical, surgical, and anesthetic interventions that aim to reduce the contact activation, systemic inflammatory response, leukocyte sequestration, and hemodilution associated with extracorporeal circulation. PMID:26060028

  18. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential. PMID:26493558

  19. Complications associated with cheek tooth extraction in the horse.

    PubMed

    Earley, Edward T; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Baratt, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Common indications for cheek tooth extraction in the horse include dental fracture, periodontal disease, severe decay/ caries, mandibular fracture with alveolar/tooth involvement, and periapical abscess. Complications secondary to extraction of cheek teeth are prevalent. Typical complications may include retained root tip(s), collateral damage of neighboring teeth and alveolar bone, mandibular fracture non-union or delayed union, cemental ankylosis, dilacerated root(s), oroantral/oronasal fistula, palatal deviation of cheek teeth, bone sequestration, sinus involvement, alveolar plug failure, and palatine artery laceration. This paper presents a series of cases that had complications following cheek tooth extraction. Anticipation of problematic extractions, recognition of complications, and appropriate treatment will aid the clinician in managing the inevitable cheek tooth extraction complication. PMID:24660307

  20. Increased cardiovascular disease risk in the HIV-positive population on ART: potential role of HIV-Nef and Tat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Yi, Ru; Green, Linden Ann; Chelvanambi, Sarvesh; Seimetz, Michael; Clauss, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    With effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), many HIV-infected people die of diseases other than acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In particular, coronary artery disease has emerged as one of most critical complications of HIV infection and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Although reportedly antiretroviral combination therapy itself may accelerate atherosclerosis by enhancing dyslipidemia, most recent epidemiological studies support the notion that HIV infection itself contributes to cardiovascular disease. However, it is still a mystery how the virus can contribute to cardiovascular disease development even while suppressed by ARTs. This review discusses the current understanding of interactions between HIV infection and cardiovascular diseases in both clinical and experimental studies with special focus on those viral proteins that are still produced by HIV. This will help infectious disease/vascular biology experts to gain insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease and new trends to treat and prevent cardiovascular disease in the HIV-infected population. PMID:26233281

  1. Is this still just sarcoidosis, or should we a-DRESS a different diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Rolls, Sophie; Hyams, Catherine; Sheaff, Michael; O'Shaughnessy, Terence C

    2015-01-01

    An Afro-Caribbean woman presented with worsening breathlessness, weight loss, lethargy and fevers, developing a bilateral florid erythematous rash on her legs. She was recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy was found on thoracic CT imaging. She was tachycardic and investigations revealed pancytopenia, eosinophilia, raised serum ACE, acute kidney injury and deranged liver function tests. Biopsy of the lymphadenopathy revealed mixed lymphoid cells and liver biopsy revealed extramedullary haematopoiesis, with hypercellular marrow found on bone marrow biopsy. Cardiac MRI was normal, excluding cardiac sarcoid. The patient developed status epilepticus and phenytoin was started. She subsequently developed skin desquamation, in keeping with toxic epidermal necrosis. Skin biopsies revealed atypical granulomas and multinucleated giant cells, which subsequently resolved on steroid treatment. This case highlights an overlap syndrome, with an unclear diagnosis between sarcoidosis, drug reaction or rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and/or hypereosinophilic syndrome and Still's disease. Hence varied serological and clinical features can complicate the distinction between diagnoses. PMID:26123453

  2. Psychological complications of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Mitchell, Elisha R

    2011-12-01

    Psychological complications associated with pediatric obesity include low self-esteem, depression, body dissatisfaction, loss-of-control eating, unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors, impaired social relationships, obesity stigma, and decreased health-related quality of life. Bioecological models offer a framework for understanding the interaction between pediatric obesity and psychological complications and illustrate system-level approaches for prevention and intervention. As the medical setting is often the first point of contact for families, pediatricians are instrumental in the identification and referral of children with psychological complications. Motivational interviewing, patient talking points, brief screening measures, and referral resources are important tools in this process. PMID:22093858

  3. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding. PMID:26016095

  4. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  5. IL-6 in diabetes and cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dan; Liu, Jian; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that participates in normal functions of the immune system, haematopoiesis, metabolism, as well as in the pathogenesis of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles of IL-6 have been described, which are distinguished by different cascades of signalling transduction, namely classic and trans-signalling. The present review summarizes the basic principles of IL-6 signalling and discusses its roles in diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications, with emphasis on the different outcomes mediated by the two modes of IL-6 signalling and the value of developing therapeutic strategies to specifically target the deleterious trans-signalling of IL-6. PMID:24697653

  6. Diabetes and Associated Complications in the South Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arti; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes in South Asians has significant health and economic implications. South Asians are predisposed to the development of diabetes due to biologic and lifestyle factors. Furthermore, they experience significant morbidity and mortality from complications of diabetes, most notably coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology and genetics of diabetes risk factors and its associated complications in South Asians is paramount to curbing the diabetes epidemic. With this understanding, the appropriate screening, preventative and therapeutic strategies can be implemented and further developed. In this review, we discuss in detail the biologic and lifestyle factors that predispose South Asians to diabetes and review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes in South Asians. We also review the ongoing and completed diabetes prevention and management studies in South Asians. PMID:24643902

  7. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... because of two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your feet, taking ... to the bone. Because of poor circulation and neuropathy in the feet, cuts or blisters can easily ...

  8. Intramuscular injection-site complications.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, D J; Allen, M D

    1978-08-11

    Among 26,294 hospitalized medical patients monitored by the Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, 46% received at least one intramuscular (IM) injection. Drugs for which IM injection was the route of administration in more than 80% of all exposures included penicillin G procaine, mercurial diuretics, cyanocobalamin, streptomycin sulfate, colistimethate sodium, meperidine hydrochloride, cephaloridine, scopolamine hydrobromide, kanamycin sulfate, and iron dextran injection. Local complications of IM injection were reported in a total of only 48 patients (0.4% of all IM recipients). Local complications were most commonly associated with IM injection of cephalothin sodium. Clinically important local complications are uncommonly associated with IM injections in general. However, certain drugs, eg, cephalothin, produce injection-site complications with relatively high frequency; the clinical role of IM injection of such drugs should be reevaluated. PMID:671665

  9. Complications in cochlear implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, DC; Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A

    2015-01-01

    For the last 6 years, cochlear implantation has become a standard practice in our department. The number of patients rose from 5 to 21/ year. Using multiple types of cochlear implants and indicating the surgery also to malformed inner ears led to the encounter of some complications. Objective: to present the surgical complications from our department. Material: all the patients admitted and operated in our clinic have been reviewed. Results: 9 complications (8,86%) have occurred: the impossibility of establishing a reliable cochleostomy (due to ossification), air in the cochlea through lack of sealing of the cochleostomy (exteriorization of the electrode array), cochlear implant postoperative migration from its bed, weak hearing discrimination due to “double electrodes” in the scala tympani, gusher. Conclusions: cochlear implanting needs to respect the technical steps of the surgery and the best technical/ tactical solution has to be found to whatever complications arise in complex or malformed cases! PMID:26351535

  10. Complications in Pediatric Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mimi T.; Losee, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric facial fractures, little has been published on the complications of these fractures. The existing literature is highly variable regarding both the definition and the reporting of adverse events. Although the incidence of pediatric facial fractures is relative low, they are strongly associated with other serious injuries. Both the fractures and their treatment may have long-term consequence on growth and development of the immature face. This article is a selective review of the literature on facial fracture complications with special emphasis on the complications unique to pediatric patients. We also present our classification system to evaluate adverse outcomes associated with pediatric facial fractures. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to fully understand and appreciate the complexity of treating children with facial fractures and determining the true incidence, subsequent growth, and nature of their complications. PMID:22110803

  11. Landsat still contributing to environmental research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, Thomas R.; Cochrane, Mark A.; Henebry, Geoffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    Landsat data have enabled continuous global monitoring of both human-caused and other land cover disturbances since 1972. Recently degraded performance and intermittent service of the Landsat 7 and Landsat 5 sensors, respectively, have raised concerns about the condition of global Earth observation programs. However, Landsat imagery is still useful for landscape change detection and this capability should continue into the foreseeable future.

  12. States Still Grappling with Multicultural Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    A debate over a New York state commission formed to study how slavery was portrayed in schools showed that after more than a decade of adding multicultural curricula, educators there were still at odds over how the distinctive experiences of racial and ethnic groups should be taught, and who should decide. While some educators and observers in the…

  13. Drawing Ready-Made Still Lifes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole D.

    2006-01-01

    Observational drawing is one of the most important skills art students need; however, it can be difficult to put a new spin on an otherwise old concept. In this article, the author relates how she had used a new approach--ready-made still lifes--to observational drawing in her art class. This approach requires the artist to discover ready-made…

  14. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five trends that…

  15. The JPEG 2000 Still Image Compression Standard

    E-print Network

    Mignotte, Max

    The JPEG 2000 Still Image Compression Standard Athanassios Skodras, Charilaos Christopoulos. This effort has been known as JPEG, the Joint Photographic Experts Group. (The "joint" in JPEG refers to the collabora- tion between ITU and ISO; see Fig. 1). Officially, JPEG corresponds to the ISO/IEC international

  16. Mathematics from Still and Moving Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye; Ball, Lynda

    2005-01-01

    Digital photos and digital movies offer an excellent way of bringing real world situations into the mathematics classroom. The technologies surveyed here are feasible for everyday classroom use and inexpensive. Examples are drawn from the teaching of Cartesian coordinates, linear functions, ratio and Pythagoras' theorem using still images, and…

  17. Still Foreign after All These Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, David

    2007-01-01

    Paul Snowden's appointment as a dean to the School of International Liberal Studies at Waseda University was considered so unusual that he compared it to the first moonwalk. Snowden's new position was the highest position reached by a non-Japanese at Waseda, Japan's top private university. Waseda's embrace of foreigners is still considered an…

  18. Never Stand Still Science Mathematics and Statistics

    E-print Network

    Blennerhassett, Peter

    Never Stand Still Science Mathematics and Statistics UNSW SCIENCE FOR SOCIETY #12;The School of Mathematics & Statistics empowers discovery through creative human thought, ranging from pure abstractions decisions in the face of uncertainty. Modern Statistics is a rapidly evolving science in which revolutions

  19. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  20. Advanced Glycation End Products and Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-01-01

    During long standing hyperglycaemic state in diabetes mellitus, glucose forms covalent adducts with the plasma proteins through a non-enzymatic process known as glycation. Protein glycation and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiomyopathy along with some other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and aging. Glycation of proteins interferes with their normal functions by disrupting molecular conformation, altering enzymatic activity, and interfering with receptor functioning. AGEs form intra- and extracellular cross linking not only with proteins, but with some other endogenous key molecules including lipids and nucleic acids to contribute in the development of diabetic complications. Recent studies suggest that AGEs interact with plasma membrane localized receptors for AGEs (RAGE) to alter intracellular signaling, gene expression, release of pro-inflammatory molecules and free radicals. The present review discusses the glycation of plasma proteins such as albumin, fibrinogen, globulins and collagen to form different types of AGEs. Furthermore, the role of AGEs in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications including retinopathy, cataract, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiomyopathy is also discussed. PMID:24634591

  1. Ocular Complications of Leprosy in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Raga A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the main ocular- and vision-threatening complications of leprosy in Yemen. Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational study which took place from February to July 2010. Leprosy patients attending the Skin and Venereal Diseases Hospital in the City of Light in Taiz, Yemen, who consented to participate in the study, were enrolled. Detailed demographic and medical histories were taken and clinical examination findings were recorded. A detailed eye examination, including visual acuity (VA), slit-lamp, and fundus examinations, was conducted on each patient by a qualified ophthalmologist. Results: A total of 192 patients (180 male, 12 female, with a male to female ratio of 15:1) were included in the study. The majority of the patients (157; 81.8%) were over 40 years. Over two-thirds of the patients (129; 67.2%) had had leprosy for more than 20 years. Ocular complications were found in 97% of cases; 150 (39.1%) of the patients’ eyes had at least one pathology. Eyelid involvement was the most common problem observed in 102 (26.5%) patients. Half of the eyes (192; 50%) had a VA of <6/60. The main cause of blindness among these patients was corneal opacity detected in 69 out of 192 patients (35.9%). Conclusion: Ocular complications are frequent among leprosy patients in Yemen. They are true vision-threatening lesions. It is important to prevent these lesions through early diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:23275842

  2. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  3. Role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of diverticular disease: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Orsenigo, Elena; Staudacher, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The clinical spectrum of diverticular disease varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications, such as perforation or bleeding. While the presence of diverticula is common, symptomatic diverticulitis is relatively uncommon, occurring in an estimated 10-30 % of patients. There is continued debate as to whether patients should undergo elective resection for diverticular disease and regarding the role of minimally invasive surgery. Since the first publication on laparoscopic colorectal procedures, the interest in minimally invasive surgery has kept growing. Laparoscopic sigmoid resection with restoration of continuity is currently the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent sigmoid diverticulitis. However, it still remains unclear whether laparoscopy should be recommended also for complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. The potential benefits of reduced pain and analgesic requirements, smaller scars, and shorter hospital stay but longer operative times are appealing to both patients and surgeons. Nevertheless, there many concerns regarding the time and the type of surgery. Although the role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of colonic diseases is progressively increased, current randomized controlled trials should demonstrate whether laparoscopic lavage, Hartmann's procedure or resection and anastomosis achieve the best results for patients. This review aimed to analyze the results of laparoscopic colonic resection for patients with uncomplicated and complicated forms of sigmoid diverticular disease and to determine what stages profit from a laparoscopic procedure and whether the approach can be performed with a low complication rate even for patients with complicated forms of the disease. PMID:26449963

  4. Robotic adrenalectomy: the jury is still out.

    PubMed

    Ball, Mark W; Allaf, Mohamad E

    2015-08-01

    A minimally-invasive approach is the gold standard for surgical management of the majority of adrenal masses. While laparoscopy has traditionally been used, robotic adrenalectomy is becoming increasingly utilized. This article discusses a recent systematic review and meta-analysis from European Urology that analyzed evidence comparing laparoscopic and robotic adrenalectomy. Robotic adrenalectomy is associated with lower blood loss, length of stay and fewer complications compared to laparoscopic adrenalectomy; however information on efficacy and cost are not addressed. Ultimately, well-done randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are necessary to determine the benefits and cost of robotics in adrenal surgery. PMID:26311226

  5. Robotic adrenalectomy: the jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Allaf, Mohamad E.

    2015-01-01

    A minimally-invasive approach is the gold standard for surgical management of the majority of adrenal masses. While laparoscopy has traditionally been used, robotic adrenalectomy is becoming increasingly utilized. This article discusses a recent systematic review and meta-analysis from European Urology that analyzed evidence comparing laparoscopic and robotic adrenalectomy. Robotic adrenalectomy is associated with lower blood loss, length of stay and fewer complications compared to laparoscopic adrenalectomy; however information on efficacy and cost are not addressed. Ultimately, well-done randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are necessary to determine the benefits and cost of robotics in adrenal surgery. PMID:26311226

  6. Vascular complications in the diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leguizamón, Gustavo; Trigubo, Denise; Pereira, Juan Ignacio; Vera, María Fernanda; Fernández, José Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Long-standing hyperglycemia frequently leads to vasculopathy. Microvascular disease is characterized by retinopathy and nephropathy, while macrovascular involvement can affect coronary arteries. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy, when present, is generally associated with retinal and/or renal involvement. Early identification of these diabetic complications allows appropriate counseling and early treatment. Among women with diabetic vasculopathy, nephropathy, chronic hypertension, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and fetal growth restriction are frequently observed. Furthermore, women with impaired renal function in early pregnancy have increased risk of long-term deterioration of glomerular filtration rate. Proliferative retinopathy can progress during pregnancy and 1 year after delivery, but long-term effects are not likely to occur. When coronary artery disease or gastroparesis diabeticorum are present, excessive maternal and fetal morbidity is observed. When modern management is synchronized with early medical care, favorable maternal and perinatal outcomes can be expected. PMID:25732848

  7. Practical approach to management of respiratory complications in neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mangera, Zaheer; Panesar, Gurkirat; Makker, Himender

    2012-01-01

    Patients with certain neurological diseases are at increased risk of developing chest infections as well as respiratory failure due to muscular weakness. In particular, patients with certain neuromuscular disorders are at higher risk. These conditions are often associated with sleep disordered breathing. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory complications early in the course of their disease, although patients with neuromuscular disorders often present in the acute setting with respiratory involvement. This review of the respiratory complications of neurological disorders, with a particular focus on neuromuscular disorders, explores why this happens and looks at how to recognize, investigate, and manage these patients effectively. PMID:22505823

  8. [Pancreas transplantation: a survey on indications, surgical techniques, immunosuppression, complications and outcome].

    PubMed

    Drognitz, O; Hopt, U T

    2003-10-01

    Since its introduction in 1966, pancreas transplantation has undergone considerable progress. Refinements in surgical technique, better organ preservation solutions, and more potent immunosuppressive therapies have improved patient and graft-survival rates dramatically. Survival rates for patient and pancreas at 1 year approach 95 and 83 %, resp., for simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation, and 97 and 78 %, resp., for pancreas alone. US pancreas graft and patient survival rates do not significantly differ from the results of the European centers. However, there is still a hesitant acceptance of combined pancreas-kidney transplantation in Germany. Combined pancreas-kidney transplantation is nowadays the treatment of choice in carefully selected patients with type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal failure. Many US centers even advocate combined transplantation in diabetic patients at a pre-uremic stage. Pancreas transplantation significantly improves quality of life and provides excellent long-term glycemic control which halts or even ameliorates secondary diabetic complications such as microangiopathy and neuropathy. In addition, there is increasing evidence that successful pancreas transplantation significantly prolongs patient survival mainly by a reduction of cardiovascular-related mortality. Current 10-year patient survival rate after SPK exceeds 70 %. For diabetics with end-stage renal disease there is no alternative treatment available with comparable live expectancy. However, morbidity and mortality after SPK is still higher than for kidney transplantation alone in the first year. Outcome of isolated pancreas transplantation is also improving but this technique is still restricted to non-uremic patients with severe diabetic complications or with brittle diabetes and severe impairment of quality of life. PMID:14628231

  9. Infrared Thermal Imaging for Automated Detection of Diabetic Foot Complications

    PubMed Central

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability of high-resolution infrared thermal imaging for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease. Methods The plantar foot surfaces of 15 diabetes patients were imaged with an infrared camera (resolution, 1.2 mm/pixel): 5 patients had no visible signs of foot complications, 5 patients had local complications (e.g., abundant callus or neuropathic ulcer), and 5 patients had diffuse complications (e.g., Charcot foot, infected ulcer, or critical ischemia). Foot temperature was calculated as mean temperature across pixels for the whole foot and for specified regions of interest (ROIs). Results No differences in mean temperature >1.5 °C between the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were found in patients without complications. In patients with local complications, mean temperatures of the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were similar, but temperature at the ROI was >2 °C higher compared with the corresponding region in the contralateral foot and to the mean of the whole ipsilateral foot. In patients with diffuse complications, mean temperature differences of >3 °C between ipsilateral and contralateral foot were found. Conclusions With an algorithm based on parameters that can be captured and analyzed with a high-resolution infrared camera and a computer, it is possible to detect signs of diabetic foot disease and to discriminate between no, local, or diffuse diabetic foot complications. As such, an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease is one step closer. Future studies are essential to confirm and extend these promising early findings. PMID:24124937

  10. Treatment of levodopa-induced motor complications.

    PubMed

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Tagliati, Michele; Olanow, C Warren

    2008-01-01

    Chronic levodopa treatment for Parkinson's disease patients is frequently associated with the development of motor complications such as end-of-dose wearing-off and dyskinesias. In this review, we provide an overview of the strategies available for dealing with these problems. Medical management includes manipulation of levodopa dosing to establish the optimum treatment schedule, improving levodopa absorption, catechol-O-methyl transferase-inhibition (COMT), Monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibition, dopaminergic agonists, amantadine, and continuous dopaminergic infusions. Surgical procedures and particularly deep brain stimulation are also reviewed. It should be noted that none of these treatments has been shown to provide anti-parkinsonian efficacy that is greater than what can be achieved with levodopa. We highlight the importance of initiating therapy with a treatment strategy that reduces the risk that a Parkinson's disease patient will develop motor complications in the first place. Key Words: Advanced PD, dyskinesias, motor fluctuations, levodopa, dopamine agonists, COMT inhibitors, MAO-B inhibitors. PMID:18781681

  11. Pleural procedural complications: prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Psallidas, Ioannis; Wrightson, John M.; Hallifax, Robert J.; Rahman, Najib M.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural disease is common with a rising case frequency. Many of these patients will be symptomatic and require diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures. Patients with pleural disease present to a number of different medical specialties, and an equally broad range of clinicians are therefore required to have practical knowledge of these procedures. There is often underestimation of the morbidity and mortality associated with pleural interventions, even those regarded as being relatively straightforward, with potentially significant implications for processes relating to patient safety and informed consent. The advent of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has had a major influence on patient safety and the number of physicians with the necessary skill set to perform pleural procedures. As the variety and complexity of pleural interventions increases, there is increasing recognition that early specialist input can reduce the risk of complications and number of procedures a patient requires. This review looks at the means by which complications of pleural procedures arise, along with how they can be managed or ideally prevented. PMID:26150919

  12. Generator and Lead-Related Complications of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Yaminisharif, Ahmad; Soofizadeh, Nader; Shafiee, Akbar; Kazemisaeid, Ali; Jalali, Arash; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increase in the number of patients treated with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) requests more attention regarding its complications. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the generator- and lead-related complications at implantation and during follow-up in the patients who were treated with ICD for primary and secondary prevention reasons. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 255 consecutive patients who underwent transvenous ICD implantation for the first time in a 7-year period and were followed-up for 3 years at Tehran Heart Center. The personal and clinical data of the patients as well as specific data on the ICD implantation were retrieved. The frequency of each of the complications was reported and the study variables were compared between the patients with and without complications using Student’s t-test and chi-square test where appropriate. P values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: Out of a total of 525 implanted leads and 255 implanted devices in 255 patients (mean age = 62.57 ± 13.50 years; male = 196 [76.9%]), complications leading to generator or lead replacement occurred in 32 patients (12.5%). The results revealed no significant difference between the patients with and without complications regarding gender and age (P = 0.206 and P = 0.824, respectively). Also, no significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the ejection fraction (P = 0.271). Lead fracture was the most frequent lead-related complication and was observed in 17 patients (6.6%). Besides, it was mainly observed in the RV leads. Generator-related complications leading to generator replacement were observed in 2 patients (0.7%). Conclusions: Despite considerable improvements in the ICD technology, the rate of the ICD complications leading to device replacement and surgical revision, especially those related to the leads, is still clinically important. PMID:24936484

  13. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in elderly patients – analysis of outcome and complications

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Jan; Haak, Susanne; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing discussion about age limits for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Current indications for DBS are tremor-dominant disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Electrode implantation for DBS with analgesia and sedation makes surgery more comfortable, especially for elderly patients. However, the value of DBS in terms of benefit-risk ratio in this patient population is still uncertain. Methods Bilateral electrode implantation into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was performed in a total of 73 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Patients were analyzed retrospectively. For this study they were divided into two age groups: group I (age <65 years, n = 37) and group II (age ? 65 years, n = 36). Examinations were performed preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up intervals for 24 months postoperatively. Age, UPDRS motor score (part III) on/off, Hoehn & Yahr score, Activity of Daily Living (ADL), L-dopa medication, and complications were determined. Results Significant differences were found in overall performance determined as ADL scores (group I: 48/71 points, group II: 41/62 points [preoperatively/6-month postoperatively]) and in the rate of complications (group I: 4 transient psychosis, 4 infections in a total of 8 patients, group II: 2 deaths [unrelated to surgery], 1 intracerebral hemorrhage, 7 transient psychosis, 3 infections, 2 pneumonia in a total of 13 patients), (p < 0.05). Interestingly, changes in UPDRS scores, Hoehn & Yahr scores, and L-dopa medication were not statistically different between the two groups. Conclusion DBS of the STN is clinically as effective in elderly patients as it is in younger ones. However, a more careful selection and follow-up of the elderly patients are required because elderly patients have a higher risk of surgery-related complications and a higher morbidity rate. PMID:17367531

  14. Severe complications of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    The usual presentation of herpes zoster is as a self-limiting vesicular rash, often accompanied by post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), its most common complication. However, herpes zoster can give rise to other complications, many of which have unusual presentations and serious sequelae. The incidence and burden of many of these less common complications are poorly understood. Ocular complications of ophthalmic zoster are relatively frequent but, with early antiviral therapy, need not be sight-threatening. Delayed contralateral hemiparesis is a rare complication of ophthalmic zoster that may present as stroke, temporally remote from the zoster episode. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) involving the facial nerve; facial paralysis, ear pain and vesicles in the ear are diagnostic. Facial paralysis in the absence of vesicles may indicate zoster sine herpete, which can be mistaken for Bell's palsy. Herpetic facial palsies may respond to combination therapy with an antiviral plus steroid, but further research is needed to determine the benefit of such treatments. PMID:17939894

  15. Unprecedented side reactions in Stille coupling: desired ones for Stille polycondensation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongyan; Jiao, Guanyuan; Liu, Shuli; Li, Quan; Shi, Xin; Fu, Nina; Wang, Lianhui; Zhao, Baomin; Huang, Wei

    2015-10-20

    Two types of unprecedented side reactions were identified in the Stille coupling reaction, including the direct C-H stannylation of the ?-hydrogen of thiophene and the stannylation of arylbromides with trialkylstannane bromide. These results reveal the major source of enhancements for Stille polycondensation efficiency. PMID:26376609

  16. Inherited neurovascular diseases affecting cerebral blood vessels and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sam, Christine; Li, Fei-Feng; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Neurovascular diseases are among the leading causes of mortality and permanent disability due to stroke, aneurysm, and other cardiovascular complications. Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) and Marfan syndrome are two neurovascular disorders that affect smooth muscle cells through accumulation of granule and osmiophilic materials and defective elastic fiber formations respectively. Moyamoya disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II), and Fabry's disease are disorders that affect the endothelium cells of blood vessels through occlusion or abnormal development. While much research has been done on mapping out mutations in these diseases, the exact mechanisms are still largely unknown. This paper briefly introduces the pathogenesis, genetics, clinical symptoms, and current methods of treatment of the diseases in the hope that it can help us better understand the mechanism of these diseases and work on ways to develop better diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25893882

  17. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc sex analysis suggests that women with PsA have a greater articular involvement and a higher activity of disease compared to males. Immunosuppressive treatment with cyclosporine seems not to increase susceptibility to new infections or infectious reactivations, with no sex differences.

  18. Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  19. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosi?ska, Justyna; ?ukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  20. Neurological complications of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R H; Marshall, W C; Chessells, J M

    1977-01-01

    We have reviewed the neurological complications not directly attributable to leukaemic infiltration in a group of 438 children with leukaemia or lymphoma. 61 children had one or more complications due chiefly to bleeding, infection, or drug toxicity. Early death from intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 1% of children with lymphoblastic leukaemia and 7% of children with myeloblastic leukaemia. Measles and chicken pox were the most serious infective complications; one child remains severely retarded after presumed measles encephalitis, one child with chicken pox died, and a second remains disabled. 2 additional cases of measles encephalitis and one of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy are described. Drugs which caused neurotoxicity included vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, L-asparaginase, and phenothiazines, but most problems were caused by methotrexate. Methotrexate toxicity was more prevalent and more serious in children who had had previous central nervous system leukaemia. We conclude that viral infections and methotrexate pose the greatest neurological hazards to children with leukaemia. PMID:596922

  1. Attachment, loss, and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Shear, Katherine; Shair, Harry

    2005-11-01

    Bereavement is a highly disruptive experience that is usually followed by a painful but time-limited period of acute grief. An unfortunate minority of individuals experience prolonged and impairing complicated grief, an identifiable syndrome that differs from usual grief, major depression, and other DSM IV diagnostic entities. Underlying processes guiding symptoms are not well understood for either usual or complicated grief. We propose a provisional model of bereavement, guided by Myron Hofer's question "What exactly is lost when a loved one dies?" We integrate insights about biobehavioral regulation from Hofer's animal studies of infant separation, research on adult human attachment, and new ideas from bereavement research. In this model, death of an attachment figure produces a state of traumatic loss and symptoms of acute grief. These symptoms usually resolve following revision of the internalized representation of the deceased to incorporate the reality of the death. Failure to accomplish this integration results in the syndrome of complicated grief. PMID:16252293

  2. Plants Used in the Management of Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dodda, D.; Ciddi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease, which has assumed vital public health importance because of the complications associated with it. Various mechanisms including polyol pathway along with a complex integrating paradigm have been implicated in glucose-mediated complications. Though polyol pathway was established as a major mechanism, precise pathogenesis of these complications is not yet completely elucidated. Thus research focus was shifted towards key enzyme, aldose reductase in the pathway. Even though various compounds with aldose reductase inhibitory activity were synthesised, a very few compounds are under clinical use. However, studies on these compounds were always under conflicting results and an attempt has been made to review various natural substances with aldose reductase inhibitory activity and their role in management of diabetic complications. PMID:24843182

  3. Toxic stress, inflammation and symptomatology of chronic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2015-05-15

    Diabetes affects at least 382 million people worldwide and the incidence is expected to reach 592 million by 2035. The incidence of diabetes in youth is skyrocketing as evidenced by a 21% increase in type 1 diabetes and a 30.5% increase in type 2 diabetes in the United States between 2001 and 2009. The effects of toxic stress, the culmination of biological and environmental interactions, on the development of diabetes complications is gaining attention. Stress impacts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and contributes to inflammation, a key biological contributor to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its associated complications. This review provides an overview of common diabetic complications such as neuropathy, cognitive decline, depression, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. The review also provides a discussion of the role of inflammation and stress in the development and progression of chronic complications of diabetes, associated symptomatology and importance of early identification of symptoms of depression, fatigue, exercise intolerance and pain. PMID:25987953

  4. Toxic stress, inflammation and symptomatology of chronic complications in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes affects at least 382 million people worldwide and the incidence is expected to reach 592 million by 2035. The incidence of diabetes in youth is skyrocketing as evidenced by a 21% increase in type 1 diabetes and a 30.5% increase in type 2 diabetes in the United States between 2001 and 2009. The effects of toxic stress, the culmination of biological and environmental interactions, on the development of diabetes complications is gaining attention. Stress impacts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and contributes to inflammation, a key biological contributor to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its associated complications. This review provides an overview of common diabetic complications such as neuropathy, cognitive decline, depression, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. The review also provides a discussion of the role of inflammation and stress in the development and progression of chronic complications of diabetes, associated symptomatology and importance of early identification of symptoms of depression, fatigue, exercise intolerance and pain. PMID:25987953

  5. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene: A rare complication of plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Atul; Singh, DP; Kaur, Gurdeep; Verma, SK; Mahur, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Malaria, the most important of the parasitic diseases of humans, is transmitted in 108 countries containing 3 billion people and causes nearly 1 million deaths each year. With the re-emergence of malaria various life-threatening complications of malaria have been observed. Unarousable coma/cerebral malaria, severe normochromic, normocytic anemia, renal failure, pulmonary edema/adult respiratory distress syndrome, hypoglycemia, hypotension/shock, bleeding/disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), hemoglobinuria and jaundice are few of the common complications of severe malaria. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG) has been reported as a rare complication of malaria. We report a rare and unique case of Plasmodium falciparum malaria complicated by DIC, severe normocytic normochromic anemia, and SPG. PMID:26629458

  6. Asymmetric dimethylarginine, a biomarker of cardiovascular complications in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Konya, Hiroyuki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Satani, Kahori; Matsutani, Satoshi; Yano, Yuzo; Tsunoda, Taku; Ikawa, Takashi; Matsuo, Toshihiro; Ochi, Fumihiro; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Tokuda, Masaru; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) complications are an essential causal element of prospect in diabetes mellitus (DM), with carotid atherosclerosis being a common risk factor for prospective crisis of coronary artery diseases and/or cerebral infarction in DM subjects. From another point of view, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) has been established as an inhibitor of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis and the relationship between ADMA and arteriosclerosis has been reported. In our study with 87 type 2 DM (T2DM) patients, we have examined whether ADMA and other CV risk factors are the useful predictors of DMCV complications. After the measurement of the respective CV risk factors, we have followed the enrolled T2DM patients for 5 years. We have finally analyzed 77 patients. DMCV complications developed in 15 cases newly within 5 years, and 4 cases recurred. The concentrations of ADMA in plasma were markedly more elevated in 19 DM patients with CV complications than in 58 DM patients without CV complications. Urinary albumin (U-Alb), mean intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and ankle brachial index (ABI) were also higher in patients with CV complications. Multiple regression analyses showed that U-Alb had an influence on the high level of ADMA (standardized ? = 6.59, P = 0.00014) independently of age, systolic BP, fibrinogen, mean IMT, plaque score, and ABI. The review indicates what is presently known regarding plasma ADMA that might be a new and meaningful biomarker of CV complications in DM subjects. PMID:25992325

  7. Still Giving Thanks for Good Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Still Giving Thanks for Good Health (QTVR)

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this full-circle panorama of the region near 'Husband Hill' (the peak just to the left of center) over the Thanksgiving holiday, before ascending farther. Both the Spirit and Opportunity rovers are still going strong, more than a year after landing on Mars.

    This 360-degree view combines 243 images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera over several martian days, or sols, from sol 318 (Nov. 24, 2004) to sol 325 (Dec. 2, 2004). It is an approximately true-color rendering generated from images taken through the camera's 750-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. The view is presented here in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

    Spirit is now driving up the slope of Husband Hill along a path about one-quarter of the way from the left side of this mosaic.

  8. Electronic Still Camera Project on STS-48

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    On behalf of NASA, the Office of Commercial Programs (OCP) has signed a Technical Exchange Agreement (TEA) with Autometric, Inc. (Autometric) of Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of this agreement is to evaluate and analyze a high-resolution Electronic Still Camera (ESC) for potential commercial applications. During the mission, Autometric will provide unique photo analysis and hard-copy production. Once the mission is complete, Autometric will furnish NASA with an analysis of the ESC s capabilities. Electronic still photography is a developing technology providing the means by which a hand held camera electronically captures and produces a digital image with resolution approaching film quality. The digital image, stored on removable hard disks or small optical disks, can be converted to a format suitable for downlink transmission, or it can be enhanced using image processing software. The on-orbit ability to enhance or annotate high-resolution images and then downlink these images in real-time will greatly improve Space Shuttle and Space Station capabilities in Earth observations and on-board photo documentation.

  9. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  10. Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... grief process Next Topic Coping with loss Major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, pain, ... might be getting worse—going into a major depression. About 1 in 5 bereaved people will develop ...

  11. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  12. Mining Diabetes Complication and Treatment Patterns for Clinical Decision Support

    E-print Network

    Mining Diabetes Complication and Treatment Patterns for Clinical Decision Support Lu Liu , Jie Tang to utilize the heterogeneous medical records to aid the clinical treatments of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus, simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases, which is often accompa- nied with many

  13. Nutrition in the management of cirrhosis and its neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:25755550

  14. A Complication in Hypospadias Surgery Due to Anchoring Suture

    PubMed Central

    Gollu, Gulnur; Kucuk, Gonul; Karabulut, Ayse An?l; Yagmurlu, Aydin; Cakmak, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The complication rates are still 1–90% both in proximal and distal hypospadias regardless of the surgeon’s experience and the usage of most developed techniques. The literature survey revealed few complications of glans penis including meatal stenosis, prolapsus and retraction. Despite our literature survey, we could not find any article concerning the permanent scar tissue at the dorsal part of glans following hypospadias surgeries. A new complication can be added to these, concerning glans which is the formation of postoperative scar tissue as a reaction to suture material used in traction, stent anchoring or both. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate four cases which had glanular scar due to traction suture following the surgical procedures for hypospadias repair. PMID:26180503

  15. "Hu's line" still holds effective for China.

    PubMed

    1992-02-01

    The population distribution data of the 1990 census showed no significant change in the geographic distribution of population in China since 1933. In 1935 a population geographer drew up China's 1st population map based on 1933 population figures of 458 million. A demarcation line called Hu's Line, which is still valid today, indicated regional distribution of population from Aihui (now Heihe City in the northeast Heilongjiang Province) to Tengchong (in the southwest Yunnan Province). The territory to the east of the line accounted for 36% of the total national area while the territory to the west of the line represented 64%. The population in the territory to the east of the line accounted for 96% while those living on the west only for 4% of the people. In 1990 China, had 1.16 billion people (including Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao), with 94.2% in the east and 5.8% in the west. There was only a 1.8% change in the proportions after 56 years caused by migration to the west from 1949 to 1982 and a higher total fertility rate in the west. From 1933 the formerly densely populated areas become even denser by 1990. In the Yangtze River Delta and Qiantang River Plain population density increased form 500 persons/sq km in 1933 to 750 in 1990; in the Huang (River) Huai (River) Hai (River) Big Plain, it increased from 300 to 700 and in the deltas of the China's southeast coastal areas, from 400 to 700. Eastern China consists of plains and hilly land which account for 25.2% of the country's territory and 79.1% of population. But the immense 1.49 million sq km of desert, gobi, and desertified land (15.6% of the territory) in the west is still uninhabited as in 1933. The rural population still comprises 73.77% of the total. The East possesses 82% of the national railways, 85% of highways, and 99% of navigable rivers. 16 of 17 megacities with more than 2 million population are located in the East. PMID:12285649

  16. Metabolism in HD - Still a relevant mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenzhen; Jiang, Mali; Jin, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The polyglutamine expansion within huntingtin is the causative factor in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease (HD). Although the underlying mechanisms by which mutant huntingtin causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration have not been fully elucidated, the compelling evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and compromised energy metabolism are key players in HD pathogenesis. Longitudinal studies of HD subjects have shown that reductions in glucose utilization before the disease clinical onset. Preferential striatal neurodegeneration, a hallmark of HD pathogenesis, has also been associated with interrupted energy metabolism. Data from genetic HD models indicate that mutant huntingtin disrupts mitochondrial bioenergetics and prevents ATP generation, implying altered energy metabolism as an important component of HD pathogenesis. Here we revisit the evidence of abnormal energy metabolism in the central nervous system of HD patients, overview our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal metabolism induced by mutant huntingtin, and discuss the promising therapeutic development by halting abnormal metabolism in HD. PMID:25124273

  17. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 2: Other complications.

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.; Dittmer, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged immobilization affects almost every organ system. Respiratory complications include decreased ventilation, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Decreased basal metabolic rate, increased diuresis, natriuresis, and nitrogen and calcium depletion affect metabolism. Genitourinary problems include renal stones and more frequent urinary tract infections. Glucose intolerance, anorexia, constipation, and pressure sores might develop. Central nervous system changes could affect balance and coordination and lead to increasing dependence on caregivers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8324412

  18. Liver disease.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Essential facts Liver disease is the fifth biggest killer in the UK and, according to the British Liver Trust, the only major cause of death still increasing year on year. NHS Choices says there are more than 100 different types of liver disease affecting at least two million people in the UK at any one time. PMID:26530565

  19. Recent progress in the genetics of diabetic microvascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy are as major causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetes individuals worldwide and current therapies are still unsatisfactory. One of the reasons for failure to develop effective treatment is the lack of fundamental understanding for underlying mechanisms. Genetic studies are powerful tools to dissect disease mechanism. The heritability (h2) was estimated to be 0.3-0.44 for diabetic nephropathy and 0.25-0.50 for diabetic retinopathy respectively. Previous linkage studies for diabetic nephropathy have identified overlapped linkage regions in 1q43-44, 3q21-23, 3q26, 10p12-15, 18q22-23, 19q13, 22q11-12.3 in multiple ethnic groups. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of diabetic nephropathy have been conducted in several populations. However, most of the identified risk loci could not be replicated by independent studies with a few exceptions including those in ELMO1, FRMD3, CARS, MYO16/IRS2, and APOL3-MYH9 genes. Functional studies of these genes revealed the involvement of cytoskeleton reorganization (especially non-muscle type myosin), phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, fibroblast migration, insulin signaling, and epithelial clonal expansion in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Linkage analyses of diabetic retinopathy overlapped only in 1q36 region and current results from GWAS for diabetic retinopathy are inconsistent. Conclusive results from genetic studies for diabetic neuropathy are lacking. For now, small sample sizes, confounding by population stratification, different phenotype definitions between studies, ethnic-specific associations, the influence of environmental factors, and the possible contribution of rare variants may explain the inconsistencies between studies. PMID:26069720

  20. Is this (still) a man's world?

    PubMed

    Metaxa, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    During the past 50 years, the participation of women in medicine has increased dramatically. However, this encouraging influx has not been accompanied by equality for male and female faculty in terms of rank attainment, leadership roles and salaries. There is considerable evidence that women are still under-represented in the higher echelons of academic medicine, either as heads of departments, authors of scientific papers or members of editorial boards. Participation in medical congresses is another important measure of medical achievement; this manuscript comments on the female representation in four of the largest international meetings in the field of intensive care medicine (ICM). It notes the scarcity of female faculty members and proposes several explanations for this phenomenon. The notable under-representation of women in the ICM congresses suggests the existence of a 'glass ceiling' in the field of intensive care medicine, a specialty that, up until today, hasn't been considered as traditionally 'male'. PMID:23360566

  1. DOE's Geothermal Program still in game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    In the ongoing search to find cost-effective, renewable forms of energy that neither contribute to global warming nor threaten national security, geothermal energy remains a player. Although Department of Energy funding for geothermal research has declined over the past decade, from its peak in 1979 of $160 million, there is still tremendous potential in terms of geothermal development, said Gladys Hooper, program manager of DOE's Hot Dry Rock and Brine Chemistry divisions. Technology for harnessing geothermal power is by and large there, she said. What is needed is more awareness and publicity regarding the merits of geothermal energy.For fiscal year 1993, proposed DOE funding for geothermal research was $24 million, down from $27 million in fiscal 1992 and nearly $30 million in fiscal 1991. DOE's Geothermal Division oversees the network of national laboratories and universities involved in developing the nation's geothermal resources and bringing them into commercial competitiveness.

  2. Accommodation response for integral photography still images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Sumio; Park, Min-Chul

    2015-05-01

    In this paper the accommodation responses for integral photography still images were measured. The experimental results showed that the accommodation responses for integral photography images showed a linear change with images showing the depth position of integral photography, even if the integral photography images were located out of the depth of the field. Furthermore, the discrimination of depth perception, which relates to a blur effect in integral photography images, was subjectively evaluated for the examination of its influence on the accommodation response. As a result, the range of the discrimination of depth perception was narrow in comparison to the range of the rectilinear accommodation response. However, these results were consistent according to the propensity of statistical significance for the discrimination of depth perception in the out range of subjectively effective discriminations.

  3. [Regional conventions: still up-to-date?].

    PubMed

    Skrobek, L; Honacker, A; Hegele, A; Hofmann, R

    2014-09-01

    This article poses the question whether regional meetings are still contemporary for continuing medical education using the example of this year's joint meeting of the Vereingung der Mitteldeutschen Urologen e. V. and the Sächsischen Gesellschaft für Urologie e. V., which took place in Marburg from May 22nd - 24th , 2014. It gives an overview of the most important and interesting topics of the meeting and highlights the advantages of regional meetings in comparison to other kinds of medical education possibilities such as national conventions or internet-based courses. The authors conclude that in spite of a significant financial costs and organisational effort, regional meetings contain unique and favourable characteristics and hence should remain a permanent feature of the scientific landscape in Germany. PMID:25275689

  4. The peroxisome: still a mysterious organelle

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, H. Dariush

    2008-01-01

    More than half a century of research on peroxisomes has revealed unique features of this ubiquitous subcellular organelle, which have often been in disagreement with existing dogmas in cell biology. About 50 peroxisomal enzymes have so far been identified, which contribute to several crucial metabolic processes such as ?-oxidation of fatty acids, biosynthesis of ether phospholipids and metabolism of reactive oxygen species, and render peroxisomes indispensable for human health and development. It became obvious that peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that rapidly assemble, multiply and degrade in response to metabolic needs. However, many aspects of peroxisome biology are still mysterious. This review addresses recent exciting discoveries on the biogenesis, formation and degradation of peroxisomes, on peroxisomal dynamics and division, as well as on the interaction and cross talk of peroxisomes with other subcellular compartments. Furthermore, recent advances on the role of peroxisomes in medicine and in the identification of novel peroxisomal proteins are discussed. PMID:18274771

  5. Smallpox: can we still learn from the journey to eradication?

    PubMed

    Smith, Kendall A

    2013-05-01

    One of the most celebrated achievements of immunology and modern medicine is the eradication of the dreaded plague smallpox. From the introduction of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner, to its popularization by Louis Pasteur, to the eradication effort led by Donald Henderson, this story has many lessons for us today, including the characteristics of the disease and vaccine that permitted its eradication, and the obviousness of the vaccine as a vector for other intractable Infectious diseases. The disease itself, interpreted in the light of modern molecular immunology, is an obvious immunopathological disease, which occurs after a latent interval of 1-2 weeks, and manifests as a systemic cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) syndrome. The vaccine that slayed this dragon was given the name vaccinia, and was thought to have evolved from cowpox virus, but is now known to be most closely related to a poxvirus isolated from a horse. Of interest is the fact that of the various isolates of orthopox viruses, only variola, vaccinia and monkeypox viruses can infect humans. In contrast to the systemic disease of variola, vaccinia only replicates locally at the site of inoculation, and causes a localized DTH response that usually peaks after 7-10 days. This difference in the pathogenicity of variola vs. vaccinia is thought to be due to the capacity of variola to circumvent innate immunity, which allows it to disseminate widely before the adaptive immune response occurs. Thus, the fact that vaccinia virus is attenuated compared to variola, but is still replication competent, makes for its remarkable efficacy as a vaccine, as the localized infection activates all of the cells and molecules of both innate and adaptive immunity. Accordingly vaccinia itself, and not modified replication incompetent vaccina, is the hope for use as a vector in the eradication of additional pathogenic microbes from the globe. PMID:23760373

  6. Linezolid therapy in a perinatal late-onset Staphylococcus aureus sepsis complicated by spondylodiscitis and endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Krzysztofiak, Andrzej; Bozzola, Elena; Lancella, Laura; Boccuzzi, Elena; Vittucci, Anna Chiara; Marchesi, Alessandra; Villani, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a two-month-old immunocompetent girl affected by Staphylococcus aureus sepsis complicated with pneumonia and pleural effusion, spondylodiscitis and endophthalmitis treated with linezolid. She developed a S. aureus sepsis in the neonatal period antibiotically treated with clinical resolution. Ten days after therapy discontinuation, the infant experienced a new S. aureus sepsis complicated by pneumonia with pleural effusion. Due to the presence of dorsal swelling, a pulmonary computer tomography was performed that showed a dorsal D5-D6 spondylodiscitis. Since the sepsis was scarcely responsive to several appropriate antibiotics, we finally decided to treat the patient with linezolid. A few weeks after changing antibiotics, the child underwent an ophthalmologic visit. Due to the finding of ocular lesions, imaging examinations were performed. The diagnosis was compatible with retinoblastoma, such that the eye was enucleated. Nevertheless, histological and microbiological investigations did not confirm the tumour hypothesis, but revealed a S. aureus abscess with retinal detachment. The child completed antibiotic therapy with linezolid and was visited periodically at the Infectious Disease Unit for a follow-up. She underwent progressive resolution of discitis and did not present any further flare of sepsis. Nevertheless, she still has a replacement device in her right eye and a D5-D6 severe kyphosis with spinal fusion. PMID:26700087

  7. Posterior sagittal approach in complicated Swenson's pull-through

    PubMed Central

    Sowande, O. A.; Adejuyigbe, O.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Swenson's pull-through is one of the standard operations for the treatment of children with Hirschsprung's disease. Complications arising from the operation are difficult to treat because of fibrosis in the pelvis. The posterior sagittal approach may be a safer alternative. Aims: The aim of this paper is to highlight our experience with the use of the posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach to treat unusual complications of Swenson's pull-through. Settings and Design: A retrospective study of four patients who had posterior sagittal repair of their complications of Swenson pull-through at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile Ife, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Four cases of Hirschsprung's disease that developed post-Swenson pull-through complications are presented. There were three males and one female. Their age ranged between 10 months and 15 years. The patients had rectovaginal fistula, rectourethral fistula, high trans-sphincteric fistula-in-ano and complete anastomotic disruption. Result: All the patients were successfully treated using the posterior sagittal approach. The approach was used twice in one patient without significant sequelae. The three patients were old enough to be assessed and had a Kelly score of 4-6 at follow-up. Conclusion: The posterior sagittal technique offers a safe approach to treat the complications of Swenson pull-through. PMID:20177480

  8. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:24347858

  9. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  10. [Body piercing complications in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    García Callejo, F J; Martínez Beneito, M P; Ortega Navarro, M C

    1998-05-01

    Piercing is used to designate an ornamentation technique used on skin and mucosa in any site of the body, which consists of perforation and placement of studs, hoops, or earrings for esthetic or attention-seeking purposes. This fashion has spread in Spain in the last decade and although practitioners and users consider it to be inoffensive, we have observed an increasing number of hospital consultations resulting from the placement of such ornaments in ears, nose, tongue and lips. Local infection, bleeding, and contact dermatitis are the most frequent complications. The lack of legislation and health education of the practitioners can be expected to increase the number and intensity of the complications. PMID:9707749

  11. Lumbar Endoscopic Microdiscectomy: Where Are We Now? An Updated Literature Review Focused on Clinical Outcome, Complications, and Rate of Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Anichini, Giulio; Landi, Alessandro; Caporlingua, Federico; Beer-Furlan, André; Brogna, Christian; Delfini, Roberto; Passacantilli, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic disc surgery (EDS) for lumbar spine disc herniation is a well-known but developing field, which is increasingly spreading in the last few years. Rate of recurrence/residual, complications, and outcomes, in comparison with standard microdiscectomy (MD), is still debated and need further data. We performed an extensive review based on the last 6 years of surgical series, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses reported in international, English-written literature. Articles regarding patients treated through endoscopic transforaminal or interlaminar approaches for microdiscectomy (MD) were included in the present review. Papers focused on endoscopic surgery for other spinal diseases were not included. From July 2009 to July 2015, we identified 51 surgical series, 5 systematic reviews, and one meta-analysis reported. In lumbar EDS, rate of complications, length of hospital staying, return to daily activities, and overall patients' satisfaction seem comparable to standard MD. Rate of recurrence/residual seems higher in EDS, although data are nonhomogeneous among different series. Surgical indication and experience of the performing surgeon are crucial factors affecting the outcome. There is growing but still weak evidence that lumbar EDS is a valid and safe alternative to standard open microdiscectomy. Statistically reliable data obtained from randomized controlled trials (better if multicentric) are desirable to further confirm these results. PMID:26688809

  12. Prevalence Estimates of Complicated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Pedersen, Rolf; Marra, Christina M; Kerani, Roxanne P; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed 68 cases of possible neurosyphilis among 573 syphilis cases in King County, WA, from 3rd January 2012 to 30th September 2013; 7.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.8%-10.5%) had vision or hearing changes, and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.4%) had both symptoms and objective confirmation of complicated syphilis with either abnormal cerebrospinal fluid or an abnormal ophthalmologic examination. PMID:26562700

  13. Multicystic dysplastic kidney complicated by pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Said, Sarmad; Khalillullah, Sayeed; Salameh, Hasan J.; Hernandez, German T.

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 21 Final Diagnosis: Multicystic Dysplastic Kidney Disease complicated by pyelonephritis Symptoms: Left flank pain (CVAT) • dysuria • fever Medication: Levofloxacin Clinical Procedure: Dimercaptosuccinic acid scan • voiding cystouretrogram Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) is a renal dysplasia characterized by the presence of multiple cysts that are non-communicating, separated by dysplastic parenchyma that consumes the renal cortex resulting in a nonfunctional kidney. MCDK has an incidence of 1: 4300 of live births and is usually unilateral, most commonly occurring in the left kidney. Simple MCDK is defined as unilateral dysplasia with a normal contralateral kidney but with compensatory hypertrophy of the contralateral kidney, and no associated genitourinary anomalies. Case Report: A 21 year old Hispanic American female, presented with intermittent, sharp, severe left flank pain, fever and dysuria for two days but had gradually worsened within the last 24 hours prior to presentation. Previous history of multicystic dysplastic kidney, diagnosed four years ago. No pertinent physical examination findings except left costovertebral angle tenderness (CVAT). Urinalysis findings were positive for infection and urine culture grew pan sensitive Escherichia coli. A CT scan of abdominal and pelvis without contrast revealed a normal right kidney and left kidney had multiple non-communicating dilated cystic spaces, but no hydronephrosis, left ureteropelvic junction obstruction and finding were consistent with multicystic dysplastic kidney and also noted perinephric stranding. Conclusions: VUR is the most common renal abnormality in patients with MCDK, occurring in about 25% of contralateral kidney. Infections involving the MCDK are rare. In fact, cases of infections such as pyelonephritis or an infected renal cyst of MCDK are almost non-existent in the current literature. This patient presented with findings consistent with MCDK complicated by pyelonephritis. PMID:24349603

  14. Management of complicated duodenal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Oukachbi, N; Brouzes, S

    2013-06-01

    The duodenum is the second most common location of intestinal diverticula after the colon. Duodenal diverticulum (DD) is usually located in the second portion of the duodenum (D2), close to the papilla. Most duodenal diverticula are extraluminal and acquired rather than congenital; more rare is the congenital, intraluminal diverticulum. DD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, but can become symptomatic in 1% to 5% of cases when complicated by gastroduodenal, biliary and/or pancreatic obstruction, by perforation or by hemorrhage. Endoscopic treatment is the most common first-line treatment for biliopancreatic complications caused by juxtapapillary diverticula and also for bleeding. Conservative treatment of perforated DD based on fasting and broad-spectrum antibiotics may be offered in some selected cases when diagnosis is made early in stable patients, or in elderly patients with comorbidities who are poor operative candidates. Surgical treatment is currently reserved for failure of endoscopic or conservative treatment. The main postoperative complication of diverticulectomy is duodenal leak or fistula, which carries up to a 30% mortality rate. PMID:23810155

  15. Preventing and treating foot complications associated with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Frank L; Rashid, S Tawqeer; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a series of macrovascular and microvascular changes that can manifest as a wide range of complications. Foot ulcerations affect ?2-4% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Risk factors for foot lesions include peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, vascular disease and previous foot ulceration, as well as other microvascular complications, such as retinopathy and end-stage renal disease. Ulceration is the result of a combination of components that together lead to tissue breakdown. The most frequently occurring causal pathways to the development of foot ulcers include peripheral neuropathy and vascular disease, foot deformity or trauma. Peripheral vascular disease is often not diagnosed in patients with diabetes mellitus until tissue loss is evident, usually in the form of a nonhealing ulcer. Identification of patients with diabetes mellitus who are at high risk of ulceration is important and can be achieved via annual foot screening with subsequent multidisciplinary foot-care interventions. Understanding the factors that place patients with diabetes mellitus at high risk of ulceration, together with an appreciation of the links between different aspects of the disease process, is essential to the prevention and management of diabetic foot complications. PMID:26284447

  16. Pancreaticoduodenectomy: expected post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, L P; Hoare, S M; O'Neill, A C; Awan, F N; Malone, D E; Ryan, E R; McCann, J W; Heffernan, E J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is a complex, high-risk surgical procedure performed for tumours of the pancreatic head and other periampullary structures. The rate of perioperative mortality has decreased in the past number of years but perioperative morbidity remains high. This pictorial review illustrates expected findings in early and late post-operative periods, including mimickers of pathology. It aims to familiarize radiologists with the imaging appearances of common and unusual post-operative complications. These are classified into early non-vascular complications such as delayed gastric emptying, post-operative collections, pancreatic fistulae and bilomas; late non-vascular complications, for example, biliary strictures and hepatic abscesses; and vascular complications including haemorrhage and ischaemia. Options for minimally invasive image-guided management of vascular and non-vascular complications are discussed. Familiarity with normal anatomic findings is essential in order to distinguish expected post-operative change from surgical complications or recurrent disease. This review summarizes the normal and abnormal radiological findings following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25026968

  17. The current role of endourologic management of renal transplantation complications.

    PubMed

    Duty, Brian D; Conlin, Michael J; Fuchs, Eugene F; Barry, John M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Complications following renal transplantation include ureteral obstruction, urinary leak and fistula, urinary retention, urolithiasis, and vesicoureteral reflux. These complications have traditionally been managed with open surgical correction, but minimally invasive techniques are being utilized frequently. Materials and Methods. A literature review was performed on the use of endourologic techniques for the management of urologic transplant complications. Results. Ureterovesical anastomotic stricture is the most common long-term urologic complication following renal transplantation. Direct vision endoureterotomy is successful in up to 79% of cases. Urinary leak is the most frequent renal transplant complication early in the postoperative period. Up to 62% of patients have been successfully treated with maximal decompression (nephrostomy tube, ureteral stent, and Foley catheter). Excellent outcomes have been reported following transurethral resection of the prostate shortly after transplantation for patients with urinary retention. Vesicoureteral reflux after renal transplant is common. Deflux injection has been shown to resolve reflux in up to 90% of patients with low-grade disease in the absence of high pressure voiding. Donor-gifted and de novo transplant calculi may be managed with shock wave, ureteroscopic, or percutaneous lithotripsy. Conclusions. Recent advances in equipment and technique have allowed many transplant patients with complications to be effectively managed endoscopically. PMID:24023541

  18. Low light performance of digital still cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wueller, Dietmar

    2013-03-01

    The major difference between a dSLR camera, a consumer camera, and a camera in a mobile device is the sensor size. The sensor size is also related to the over all system size including the lens. With the sensors getting smaller the individual light sensitive areas are also getting smaller leaving less light falling onto each of the pixels. This effect requires higher signal amplification that leads to higher noise levels or other problems that may occur due to denoising algorithms. These Problems become more visible at low light conditions because of the lower signal levels. The fact that the sensitivity of cameras decreases makes customers ask for a standardized way to measure low light performance of cameras. The CEA (Consumer Electronics Association) together with ANSI has addressed this for camcorders in the CEA-639 [1] standard. The ISO technical committee 42 (photography) is currently also thinking about a potential standard on this topic for still picture cameras. This paper is part of the preparation work for this standardization activity and addresses the differences compared to camcorders and also potential additional problems with noise reduction that have occurred over the past few years. The result of this paper is a proposed test procedure with a few open questions that have to be answered in future work.

  19. Diagnosis of Atopic Dermatitis: Mimics, Overlaps, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Elaine C.; Hebert, Adelaide A.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common skin diseases affecting infants and children. A smaller subset of adults has persistent or new-onset AD. AD is characterized by pruritus, erythema, induration, and scale, but these features are also typical of several other conditions that can mimic, coexist with, or complicate AD. These include inflammatory skin conditions, infections, infestations, malignancies, genetic disorders, immunodeficiency disorders, nutritional disorders, graft-versus-host disease, and drug eruptions. Familiarity of the spectrum of these diseases and their distinguishing features is critical for correct and timely diagnosis and optimal treatment. PMID:26239454

  20. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Role of Interventional Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  1. Vascular complications of pancreatitis: role of interventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Barge, Jaideep U; Lopera, Jorge E

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  2. Prevention and management of complications in frontal sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Javer, Amin R; Alandejani, Talal

    2010-08-01

    Frontal sinus surgery continues to remain one of the most challenging areas for sinus surgeons. Many different techniques have been introduced for dealing with the frontal sinus. These can range from conservative, mucus membrane-preserving, strictly endoscopic techniques to radical endoscopic and open procedures using drills and burrs to create large openings, all with the aim of keeping the frontal sinus aerated, disease free, and functional in the long-term. This article deals not only with ways in which surgical techniques can be used to minimize or prevent complications in this difficult area but also on how to deal with complications when they occur. PMID:20599087

  3. Spectrum of biliary complications following live donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Simoes, Priya; Kesar, Varun; Ahmad, Jawad

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with advanced liver disease, including decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and acute liver failure. Organ shortage is the main determinant of death on the waiting list and hence living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) assumes importance. Biliary complications are the most common post operative morbidity after LDLT and occur due to anatomical and technical reasons. They include biliary leaks, strictures and cast formation and occur in the recipient as well as the donor. The types of biliary complications after LDLT along with their etiology, presenting features, diagnosis and endoscopic and surgical management are discussed. PMID:26207167

  4. Underwater terrain mapping of dam stilling basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Ted O.

    1995-05-01

    The high-resolution acoustic mapping (HRAM) system was developed in response to a stated need by the United States Army Corps of Engineers to evaluate the floor of a navigation lock that could not be dewatered. Navigation Lock #26 on the Mississippi River was constructed on piles and mats over a sandy bottom. Over the years the footings had shifted, probably damaging the floor. The lock could not be dewatered because of leakage around the lock-wall footings. Based on our work in ultrasonic inspection; using B-scan, C-scan and holographic imaging to display hidden faults in metal; we were asked to propose a solution to the navigation-lock imaging problem. The C-scan ultrasonic method employs a single ultrasonic transducer stepped over a regularly spaced grid to collect a set of data that can be displayed on an oscilloscope screen to evaluate the material being inspected. It is well suited for the inspection of large flat areas. We proposed to build in essence a large C-scan system. A boat supporting several ultrasonic transducers would move in a regular X-Y pattern over the floor of the lock. The data from the scan would be computer processed to provide a plot of the surface of the floor. We called this a 3D plot since it would be a nearly three-dimensional view of the inspected surface. I should point out that this work was proposed in 1975 and conducted in 1976, when small high-powered computers were still well in the future. The results of the program were spectacular. The 3D plot of the Lock 26 floor showed that individual concrete slabs had broken, some slabs had been tilted, the entire river side of the lock floor had settled nearly two meters, and piles of silt had built up in front of the lock gates.

  5. Late complications of operative hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J M; Brady, R M

    2000-06-01

    The late complications of operative hysteroscopy result from either persistent endometrium after ablation or myometrial damage during surgery. Residual endometrium can become neoplastic, cause pain, or support a pregnancy. Myometrial damage can produce catastrophic consequences during a later pregnancy. These long-term problems place the impetus on the operating physician to select patients carefully, prepare the endometrium, and operate in such a way as to minimize the likelihood of residual endometrium and unnecessary myometrial damage. The value of operative hysteroscopy for infertility secondary to adhesions and uterine septa is unequivocal. Hysteroscopic surgery offers increased fertility rates while avoiding the risks of open surgery. For the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, endometrial ablation can be performed safely, and the long-term benefits are durable. As more operative hysteroscopy is performed, more delayed complications will arise. Easy-to-perform global ablation techniques and multifunctional operative hysteroscopes have enticed more gynecologists to test the waters of endometrial ablation and operative hysteroscopy. Although they empower the hysteroscopist to offer more advanced and more valuable minimally invasive options to patients, these tools simultaneously can tempt the surgeon to forego meticulous preoperative evaluation. Evidence exists that too often women undergo surgery without complete diagnostic assessment. In one study, 50% of women underwent hysterectomy without any diagnostic evaluation of the endometrium. Hysterectomy possesses a saving grace in that it provides cover for many missed diagnoses. Conservative, nonextirpative procedures offer no such life raft. Meticulous diagnostic assessment and preoperative consideration of risk factors for residual endometrium and future pregnancy remain the keys to minimizing late complications. PMID:10857126

  6. Decomposed bodies--still an unrewarding autopsy?

    PubMed

    Ambade, Vipul Namdeorao; Keoliya, Ajay Narmadaprasad; Deokar, Ravindra Baliram; Dixit, Pradip Gangadhar

    2011-04-01

    One of the classic mistakes in forensic pathology is to regard the autopsy of decomposed body as unrewarding. The present study was undertaken with a view to debunk this myth and to determine the characteristic pattern in decomposed bodies brought for medicolegal autopsy. From a total of 4997 medicolegal deaths reported at an Apex Medical Centre, Yeotmal, a rural district of Maharashtra over seven year study period, only 180 cases were decomposed, representing 3.6% of the total medicolegal autopsies with the rate of 1.5 decomposed body/100,000 population per year. Male (79.4%) predominance was seen in decomposed bodies with male female ratio of 3.9:1. Most of the victims were between the ages of 31 and 60 years with peak at 31-40 years (26.7%) followed by 41-50 years (19.4%). Older age above 60 years was found in 8.6% cases. Married (64.4%) outnumbered unmarried ones in decomposition. Most of the decomposed bodies were complete (83.9%) and identified (75%). But when the body was incomplete/mutilated or skeletonised then 57.7% of the deceased remains unidentified. The cause and manner of death was ascertained in 85.6% and 81.1% cases respectively. Drowning (35.6%) was the commonest cause of death in decomposed bodies with suicide (52.8%) as the commonest manner of death. Decomposed bodies were commonly recovered from open places (43.9%), followed by water sources (43.3%) and enclosed place (12.2%). Most of the decomposed bodies were retrieved from well (49 cases) followed by barren land (27 cases) and forest (17 cases). 83.8% of the decomposed bodies were recovered before 72 h and only in 16.2% cases the time since death was more than 72 h, mostly recovered from barren land, forest and river. Most of the decomposed bodies were found in summer season (42.8%) with peak in the month of May. Despite technical difficulties in handling the body and artefactual alteration of the tissue, the decomposed body may still reveal cause and manner of death in significant number of cases. PMID:21420645

  7. Avian colibacillosis: still many black holes.

    PubMed

    Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Schouler, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains cause severe respiratory and systemic diseases, threatening food security and avian welfare worldwide. Intensification of poultry production and the quick expansion of free-range production systems will increase the incidence of colibacillosis through greater exposure of birds to pathogens and stress. Therapy is mainly based on antibiotherapy and current vaccines have poor efficacy. Serotyping remains the most frequently used diagnostic method, only allowing the identification of a limited number of APEC strains. Several studies have demonstrated that the most common virulence factors studied in APEC are all rarely present in the same isolate, showing that APEC strains constitute a heterogeneous group. Different isolates may harbor different associations of virulence factors, each one able to induce colibacillosis. Despite its economical relevance, pathogenesis of colibacillosis is poorly understood. Our knowledge on the host response to APEC is based on very descriptive studies, mostly restricted to bacteriological and histopathological analysis of infected organs such as lungs. Furthermore, only a small number of APEC isolates have been used in experimental studies. In the present review, we discuss current knowledge on APEC diversity and virulence, including host response to infection and the associated inflammatory response with a focus on pulmonary colibacillosis. PMID:26204893

  8. Long-term complications of past glucocorticoid use.

    PubMed

    Seguro, Luciana P C; Rosario, Cristina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-03-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are essential in the management of several medical conditions but its long-term use is associated with complications in diverse organs and systems. The aim of the present study is to review the long-term complications of past GC use. Permanent damage related to GC can affect patient's life even years after its withdrawal. Classical examples are cataracts and esthetic problems like skin atrophy, striae, acne and obesity. Interestingly, for some complications, the risk of an incident event can persist for past GC use. Higher risks of osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, cardiovascular disease, infections and cancer have been associated with prior GC therapy. These evidences reinforce the importance of limiting our GC prescriptions at its lower possible dose. PMID:23261815

  9. Iatrogenic Submandibular Duct Rupture Complicating Sialography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharouny, Hadi; Omar, Rahmat Bin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Sialolithiasis is the most common disease of salivary glands. Sialography is particularly important for the assessment of the outflow tract and in diagnosing obstructive salivary gland lesions including calculi. Case Presentation: We report on a 38-year-old female with sialolithiasis whom had Wharton’s duct perforation, complicating the sialography. She was treated conservatively with a course of co-amoxiclav, oral prednisolone for three days and pain-killers. The patient was clinically well on follow-up reassessments at the end of the first week and three weeks post procedure. Conclusions: Perforation of salivary duct complicating the sialography is rare. Awareness of this potential complication and utilizing a good sialography technique need to be advocated amongst radiologists. Response to treatment by conservative management is preferred as illustrated in this case. PMID:25593739

  10. [Infectious complications in patients after cardiac arrest undergoing therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Sýkora, R

    2011-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is currently recommended neuroprotective therapeutic measure for comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Hypothermia has been proven not only to affect the neurological outcomes but also the survival of patients after cardiac arrest. This communication summarizes the issue of early infectious complications in patients after cardiac arrest undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. Diagnosis of infectious events is complicated in patients after cardiac arrest not only by the physiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia but also by the consequences of reperfusion injury and development of postresuscitation disease associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Furthermore, there are discussed limited diagnostic options of infectious complications. The significance of the usual symptoms of infections is reduced, as well as the value of laboratory markers such as procalcitonin and C-reactive protein. Finally, the possibility of antibiotic treatment and eventual antibiotic prophylaxis during therapeutic hypothermia in patients after cardiac arrest outside hospitals is mentioned. PMID:21695930

  11. Pulmonary Abscess as a Complication of Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsy.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Kern, Ryan M; Midthun, David E; Edell, Eric S; Maldonado, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man who developed pulmonary abscess as a complication of transbronchial lung cryobiopsy. He had been receiving prednisone therapy, but otherwise had no specific risk factors for lung abscess. Cryobiopsy is a novel technique for obtaining peripheral lung parenchymal tissue for the evaluation of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Cryobiopsy is being increasingly proposed as an alternative to surgical lung biopsy or conventional bronchoscopic transbronchial forceps biopsy, but the safety profile of the procedure has not been fully appreciated. Pulmonary abscess has been rarely reported as a complication of other bronchoscopic procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle biopsy, however, to our knowledge this is the first reported case of pulmonary abscess complicating peripheral lung cryobiopsy. PMID:26705015

  12. Complications of Rigid Internal Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Chris A.; Lin, Kant Y.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as “open internal fixation” of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery. PMID:22110796

  13. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  14. Process of care compliance is associated with fewer diabetes complications

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Felicia J.; Galusha, Deron; Slade, Martin; Chu, Isabella M.; Taiwo, Oyebode; Cullen, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between processes measures of diabetes care and time to progression for four complications of diabetes - Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Stroke, Heart Failure (HF), and Renal Disease (RD). Study Design This retrospective study followed outcomes from 2003 through 2009 in a cohort of 1,797 employees with diabetes who worked for a large US manufacturer and were enrolled in the same health insurance plan. Methods Quality of care was measured by consensus standards for testing A1C, lipids and microalbuminuria. Employees with diabetes who received all three measures of care in the baseline year (2003) were compared to those who received less complete testing. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to assess potential associations between diabetes care and time to complication, controlling for potential confounders. Results Observed differences between the two groups in time-to-event were significant for two of the four complications: HF (HR 0.39, 95% CI [0.19 – 0.81], p = 0.0117), and RD (HR 0.48, 95% CI [0.24 – 0.95], p = 0.0339) and any of the four complications (HR 0.66, 95% CI [0.48 – 0.91], p = 0.0101). Differences in time to complication for CAD (HR 0.70, 95% CI [0.49 – 1.02], p = 0.0635) and Stroke (HR 0.63, 95% CI [0.38 – 1.07], p = 0.0891) showed the same trend but were not significant. Conclusions In this cohort, employees with diabetes who received all three quality measures experienced reduced complication risk - adjusting for other factors. These results provide support for the importance of care quality and its assessment. PMID:24512164

  15. Is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology?

    PubMed Central

    Mordi, Ify; Tzemos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Although the endothelium has a number of important functions, the term endothelial dysfunction is commonly used to describe impairment in its vasodilatory capacity. There have been numerous studies evaluating the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, however assessment of endothelial function is perhaps still primarily thought of as a research tool and has not reached widespread clinical acceptance. In this review we explore the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, its prognostic significance, methods of pharmacological reversal of endothelial dysfunction, and ask the question, is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology? PMID:25228961

  16. [Neurological complications during treatment of the tumor necrosis alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Piusi?ska-Macoch, Renata

    2013-05-01

    Medications with TNF-alpha inhibitors family are successfully applicable in rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and neurology. Still, the ongoing research on the safety assessment of their application, also due to neurological complications. The vast majority of these complications is associated with an increased risk of serious virus (Herpes simplex--JC) and bacterial (Listeria monocytogenes) neuroinfections. They can cause the occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy--PML with a severe clinical course and poor prognosis or herpes simplex encephalitis--HSE. Meta-analysis revealed a number of cases of PML and the HSE in the first 6 months of treatment with natalizumab, efalizumab, rituximab, abatacept and infliximab. Common complication occasionally turning on this biologics is chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy or Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Described are cases of central and peripheral demyelination typical of multiple sclerosis (MS). Are also reported cases of motor multifocal neuropathy with conduction block acute encephalithis with polyneuropathy or mononeuropathy in the form of anterior optic neuropathy Guillen-Barre' syndrome and its variant, Miller-Fisher syndrome have been confirmed as adverse events following treatment with infliximab. Also revealed several cases of myasthenia gravis after using etanercept. In the few cases of systemic lupus CNS involvement caused by treatment with TNF inhibitors, the mechanism of these disorders is still considered too vague. Due to the emerging reports on the number of neurological adverse events of TNF antagonists, significantly higher than those described in the literature, the safety of their use requires further monitoring and multicenter studies. PMID:23894783

  17. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... only thing that determines a person's risk for diabetes complications. Other factors, like genes, can also play a ... the body that can be most affected by diabetes complications are the: eyes kidneys nerves heart and blood ...

  18. Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Download PDF Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Tools and Tips Printer-friendly PDF Click here ...

  19. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within 'post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy' on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  20. Twin gestations: I. Antenatal care and complications.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, B W; Kirschbaum, T H; Paul, R H

    1989-09-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of antenatal complications in twin pregnancies, we examined the medical records of 939 consecutive twin gestations delivered at Women's Hospital, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center between 1980-1985. The rates of occurrence of the eight most common antenatal complications were determined and compared with their incidence in singleton gestations. In addition, complication rates were related to zygosity, levels of antenatal care, and time of antenatal diagnosis. Twin gestations had an 83% incidence of antenatal complications, in contrast to a 32% incidence in singleton gestations. The increased complication rate was due to the disproportionate increase in three complications: preterm labor, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and fetal death. Other complications did not occur more frequently in twin gestations than in singleton gestations. Monozygotic gestations were more frequently complicated by fetal death, and dizygotic gestations by pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:2761906

  1. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  2. Cardiovascular complications of radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Finch, William; Shamsa, Kamran; Lee, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular sequelae of radiation exposure are an important cause of morbidity and mortality following radiation therapy for cancer, as well as after exposure to radiation after atomic bombs or nuclear accidents. In the United States, most of the data on radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) come from patients treated with radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease and breast cancer. Additionally, people exposed to radiation from the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, and the Chernobyl, Ukraine, nuclear accident have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The total dose of radiation, as well as the fractionation of the dose, plays an important role in the development of RIHD. All parts of the heart are affected, including the pericardium, vasculature, myocardium, valves, and conduction system. The mechanism of injury is complex, but one major mechanism is injury to endothelium in both the microvasculature and coronary arteries. This likely also contributes to damage and fibrosis within the myocardium. Additionally, various inflammatory and profibrotic cytokines contribute to injury. Diagnosis and treatment are not significantly different from those for conventional cardiovascular disease; however, screening for heart disease and lifelong cardiology follow-up is essential in patients with past radiation exposure. PMID:25290729

  3. Prevalence of risk factors for diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Fatma; El-Sadig, Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Background Foot complications are common in diabetic patients and are considered one of the most expensive diabetes (DM) complications to treat. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for foot complications among diabetic patients in Al-Ain district, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods The study was part of a general cross-sectional survey carried out to assess the prevalence of DM complications in Al-Ain district, UAE. A sample of 513 diabetic patients with a mean age of 53 years (SD: ± 13) were randomly selected during 2003/2004. All completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and underwent medical assessment including foot examination and assessment of presence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Results Forty nine percent of the study populations were diagnosed to have DM without presenting with symptoms of diabetes and 35% had hypertension. The majority (86%) had type 2 DM. Of the total sample, 39% (95% CI: 35.1-43.7%) had PN and 12% (95% CI: 8.8–14.4%) had PVD. There were no cases of amputation and only one case had previous history of lower extremity ulceration. Significant risk factors for PN and PVD were: male gender, poor level of education, UAE nationality, increased duration of diabetes, type 2 DM, presence of hypertension and microalbuminuria (MA). Conclusion Despite the low prevalence of foot ulceration and amputation among the study population, nevertheless, a substantial proportion had potential risk factors for foot complications. PMID:17927826

  4. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that shows the glowing hydrogen gas, were coloured red. Light in the yellow-green part of the spectrum is coloured green, blue light is coloured blue and light that passed through an ultraviolet filter has been coloured purple. The exposure times were about 52 minutes through each filter. This image was processed by ESO using the observational data found by Igor Chekalin (Russia) [1], who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition [2], organised by ESO in October-November 2010, for everyone who enjoys making beautiful images of the night sky using real astronomical data. Notes [1] Igor searched through ESO's archive and identified datasets that he used to compose his image of Messier 42, which was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, out of almost 100 entries. His original work can be seen here. Igor Chekalin was awarded the first prize of the competition for his composition of Messier 78, and he also submitted an image of NGC3169, NGC3166 and SN 2003cg, which was ranked second highest. [2] ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 competition gave amateur astronomers the opportunity to search through ESO's vast archives of astronomical data, hoping to find a well-hidden gem that needed polishing by the entrants. Participants submitted nearly 100 entries and ten skilled people were awarded some extremely attractive prizes, including an all expenses paid trip for the overall winner to ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Cerro Paranal, in Chile, the world's most advanced optical telescope. The ten winners submitted a total of 20 images that were ranked as the highest entries in the competition out of the near 100 images. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 15 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focu

  5. CTEP Simplified Disease Classification Overview

    Cancer.gov

    CTEP Simplified Disease Classification Overview The CTEP Simplified Disease Classification (CTEP SDC) v1.0 is a restructured, more intuitive classification of diseases, designed to meet the needs of CTEP while still allowing reporting based on the

  6. Progeria syndrome with cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Saadia; Ilyas, Hajira; Hameed, Abdul; Ilyas, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    A case report of 6-year-old boy with progeria syndrome, with marked cardiac complications is presented. The boy had cardiorespiratory failure. Discoloured purpuric skin patches, alopecia, prominent forehead, protuberant eyes, flattened nasal cartilage, malformed mandible, hypodentition, and deformed rigid fingers and toes were observed on examination. The boy was unable to speak. A sclerotic systolic murmur was audible over the mitral and aortic areas. Chest x-rays showed cardiac enlargement and the electrocardiogram (ECG) showed giant peaked P waves (right atrial hypertrophy) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Atherosclerotic dilated ascending aorta, thickened sclerotic aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves with increased echo texture, left and right atrial and right ventricular dilatation, reduced left ventricular cavity, and thickened speckled atrial and ventricular septa were observed on echocardiography. PMID:24601202

  7. Skeletal complications of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Abigail A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  8. Minimally Invasive Surgical Approach to Complicated Recurrent Pilonidal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Vahit Onur; Destek, Sebahattin; Ozer, Serhat; Etkin, Ergin; Ahioglu, Serkan; Ince, Mehmet; Cimin, Vedat; Sen, Deniz; Erbil, Yesim

    2015-01-01

    Pilonidal sinus is considered as a simple and frequently occurring disease localized at the sacrococcygeal area. However, at the intergluteal region, it can often turn into a chronic and complicated disease. In some cases, it can fistulize up to the gluteal region and appear at the secondary orifices. Minimally invasive surgical techniques are becoming widespread in recent years due to the increased experience and development of new instruments. Limited excision of the pilonidal sinus tract can be a better treatment option compared with large excisions in terms of recovery time and patient's comfort. This case study reports the single-phase surgical treatment of complicated and recurrent pilonidal sinus localized at the gluteal area, with minimal tissue loss and inflammation. PMID:26576314

  9. Emerging Risk Factors and Prevention of Perioperative Pulmonary Complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Modern surgery is faced with the emergence of newer “risk factors” and the challenges associated with identifying and managing these risks in the perioperative period. Obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome pose unique challenges in the perioperative setting. Recent studies have identified some of the specific risks arising from caring for such patients in the surgical setting. While all possible postoperative complications are not yet fully established or understood, the prevention and management of these complications pose even greater challenges. Pulmonary hypertension with its changing epidemiology and novel management strategies is another new disease for the surgeon and the anesthesiologist in the noncardiac surgical setting. Traditionally most such patients were not considered surgical candidates for any required elective surgery. Our review discusses these disease entities which are often undiagnosed before elective noncardiac surgery. PMID:24578647

  10. A Fatal and Extremely Rare Obstetric Complication: Neglected Shoulder Presentation at Term Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Orkun; Yolli, Halise; Cim, Numan; Y?ld?zhan, Recep; Sahin, Han?m Guler

    2015-01-01

    Stillbirth is still an important problem for parents and healthcare providers worldwide. Nowadays, the neglected shoulder presentation is usually observed in developing countries and is associated with increased risk of fetomaternal morbidity and mortality. In recent years, there were limited reports about obstetric management of this serious complication in the literature. In this case report, we aimed at describing the neglected shoulder presentation at term pregnancy that caused fetal death and discussing management options for this rare obstetric complication during labor. PMID:26347294

  11. [Pregnancy in Gaucher disease].

    PubMed

    Boufettal, H; Quessar, A; Jeddaoui, Z; Mahdoui, S; Noun, M; Hermas, S; Samouh, N

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. The association with pregnancy exposes the worsening of the disease and complications of pregnancy and puerperium. We report a case of pregnancy in a woman of 35 years, suffering from Gaucher disease type 1. Pregnancy had a favorable outcome. Complications occurred. They were kept under control. The outcome was favorable. The authors discuss the evolution of the disease during pregnancy and management of complications. They can occur during pregnancy, post-partum and breastfeeding. Support begins with preconception consultation. It involves finding and correcting the biological problems and deficiencies, and management of complications. Genetic counseling is important, it helps prevent inbreeding. PMID:23578492

  12. Celiac Disease Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the complications a person may experience, such as malnutrition , malabsorption , and the involvement of other organs. Tests ... someone has signs and symptoms suggesting celiac disease, malnutrition , and/or malabsorption . The symptoms are often nonspecific ...

  13. Pseudoaneurysm of pulmonary artery: rare complication of systemic chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shivani; King, Gentry; Varadi, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon yet fatal clinical entity. Its presentation can mimic a number of common diseases and can be easily missed. As pseudoaneurysm is associated with a number of fatal complications, clinicians should be aware of imaging features which distinguishes pseudoaneurysms from its close differentials. Early recognition and treatment of pseudoaneurysm can prevent fatal outcomes including hemothorax, rupture, or death. PMID:26509021

  14. Parkinson's disease: A risk factor for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Malochet-Guinamand, Sandrine; Durif, Franck; Thomas, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. On the long term, it may be complicated by various musculoskeletal problems, such as osteoporotic fractures, that have significant socioeconomic consequences. Indeed, patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have a higher fracture risk, particularly hip fracture risk, than other subjects of the same age because of both a higher risk of falls and lower bone mineral density. Bone loss in Parkinson's disease may be associated with the severity and duration of the disease. We review here the different suspected mechanisms of accelerated bone loss in Parkinson's disease, amongst which weight loss and reduced mobility appear to play key roles. Antiparkinsonian drugs, particularly levodopa, may also be associated with decreased bone mineral density as a result of hyperhomocysteinaemia. We discuss the role of other nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folate or vitamin K. In conclusion, it seems necessary to screen for and treat osteoporosis in this at-risk population, while actions to prevent falls are still disappointing. A better understanding of the factors explaining bone loss in this population would help implementing preventive actions. PMID:26453100

  15. A competing risk analysis of sequential complication development in Asian type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Chen, Jeng-Huei; Lin, Ming-Yen; Chen, Li-Chia; Lao, Chun-Huan; Luh, Hsing; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the progression risk of sequential complication in Asian type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients using the Taiwan Pay-for-Performance Diabetes Registry and claim data from November 2003 to February 2009. 226,310 adult T2D patients without complication were followed from diagnosis to complications, including myocardial infarction (MI), other ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke, chronic kidney disease (CKD), retinopathy, amputation, death or to the end of study. Cumulative incidences (CIs) of first and second complications were analyzed in 30 and 4 years using the cumulative incidence competing risk method. IHD (29.8%), CKD (24.5%) and stroke (16.0%) are the most common first complications. The further development of T2D complications depends on a patient's existing complication profiles. Patients who initially developed cardiovascular complications had a higher risk (9.2% to 24.4%) of developing IHD or CKD, respectively. All-cause mortality was the most likely consequence for patients with a prior MI (12.0%), so as stroke in patients with a prior MI (10.8%) or IHD (8.9%). Patients with CKD had higher risk of developing IHD (16.3%), stroke (8.9%) and all-cause mortality (8.7%) than end-stage renal disease (4.0%). Following an amputation, patients had a considerable risk of all-cause mortality (42.1%). PMID:26507664

  16. A competing risk analysis of sequential complication development in Asian type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Chen, Jeng-Huei; Lin, Ming-Yen; Chen, Li-Chia; Lao, Chun-Huan; Luh, Hsing; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the progression risk of sequential complication in Asian type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients using the Taiwan Pay-for-Performance Diabetes Registry and claim data from November 2003 to February 2009. 226,310 adult T2D patients without complication were followed from diagnosis to complications, including myocardial infarction (MI), other ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke, chronic kidney disease (CKD), retinopathy, amputation, death or to the end of study. Cumulative incidences (CIs) of first and second complications were analyzed in 30 and 4 years using the cumulative incidence competing risk method. IHD (29.8%), CKD (24.5%) and stroke (16.0%) are the most common first complications. The further development of T2D complications depends on a patient’s existing complication profiles. Patients who initially developed cardiovascular complications had a higher risk (9.2% to 24.4%) of developing IHD or CKD, respectively. All-cause mortality was the most likely consequence for patients with a prior MI (12.0%), so as stroke in patients with a prior MI (10.8%) or IHD (8.9%). Patients with CKD had higher risk of developing IHD (16.3%), stroke (8.9%) and all-cause mortality (8.7%) than end-stage renal disease (4.0%). Following an amputation, patients had a considerable risk of all-cause mortality (42.1%). PMID:26507664

  17. Noninfectious Complications of Peritoneal Dialysis in Korean Children: A 26-Year Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Park, Se Jin; Oh, Ji Young; Kim, Ji Hong; Lee, Jae Seung; Kim, Pyung Kil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate noninfectious complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD), including mechanical and metabolic complications, at a single center in Korea. Materials and Methods We analyzed data from 60 PD patients aged ?18 years (40 boys and 20 girls) during the period between 1986 and 2012. The collected data included gender, age, causes of PD, incidence of noninfectious complications, and treatment for the complications. Results The mean duration of PD therapy was 28.7±42.1 months (range 1-240 months). The most common cause of end-stage renal disease was glomerular disease (43.3%). There were no statistically significant differences between patients with and without mechanical complications regarding gender, age at the start of PD, and total duration of PD. Outflow failure was the most common catheter-related complication (14.3%), followed by leakage (10.0%) and hernia (8.6%). Metabolic complications, such as hyperglycemia and hypokalemia, were observed in three of 16 patients. The frequency of noninfectious complications of PD in our study was comparable with those in previous pediatric studies. PD was switched to hemodialysis (HD) in only three patients. Conclusion Our results indicate that noninfectious complications of PD are common, though they hardly lead to catheter removal or HD in pediatric patients on PD. PMID:26256980

  18. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–associated Glomerulonephritis Complicated by Pneumatosis Intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Saki; Akimoto, Tetsu; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Okada, Mari; Miki, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatosis intestinalis is a characteristic imaging phenomenon indicating the presence of gas in the bowel wall. The link between pneumatosis intestinalis and various kinds of autoimmune diseases has been reported anecdotally, while information regarding the cases with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)–associated vasculitis complicated by concurrent pneumatosis intestinalis is lacking. In this report, we describe our serendipitous experience with one such case of pneumatosis intestinalis in a patient with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. We also discuss several therapeutic concerns that arose in the current case, which had an impact on the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26309421

  19. Imaging and Percutaneous Management of Acute Complicated Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Banks, Peter A.

    2004-11-15

    Acute pancreatitis varies from a mild, self-limited disease to one with significant morbidity and mortality in its most severe forms. While clinical criteria abound, imaging has become indispensable to diagnose the extent of the disease and its complications, as well as to guide and monitor therapy. Percutaneous interventional techniques offer options that can be life-saving, surgery-sparing or important adjuncts to operation. Close cooperation and communication between the surgeon, gastroenterologist and interventional radiologist enhance the likelihood of successful patient care.

  20. Minimising complications in abdominoplasty: An approach based on the root cause analysis and focused preventive steps

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Significant complications still occur after abdominoplasty, the rate varies widely in different series. This variation suggests that there is a lot of scope for improvement. This paper reviews the various complications and also the technical improvements reported in the last 20 years. The root cause of each complication is analysed and preventive steps are suggested based on the literature and the author's own personal series with very low complication rates. Proper case selection, risk stratified prophylaxis of thromboembolism, initial synchronous liposuction, flap elevation at the Scarpa fascia level, discontinuous incremental flap dissection, vascular preservation and obliteration of the sub-flap space by multiple sutures emerge as the strongest preventive factors. It is proposed that most of the complications of abdominoplasty are preventable and that it is possible to greatly enhance the aesthetic and safety profile of this surgery. PMID:24501473

  1. Phlebovirus meningoencephalis complicated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Vassiliki; Sdouga, Maria; Volakli, Hellen; Violaki, Asimina; Papa, Anna

    2011-05-01

    In June 2004 an 8-year-old boy was admitted to a hospital in Thessaloniki, Greece, because of high fever, tachypnea, hypotonia, diarrhea, and tonoclonic convulsions. Phlebovirus infection was diagnosed by IgG seroconversion to Toscana virus. As IgM antibodies were not detected, it is suggested that this was an acute infection caused by a phlebovirus virus distinct from Toscana virus. Complication by a hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia resulted in 2 months of hospitalization. Slight ataxia was still present on discharge. PMID:20575643

  2. Diabetic nephropathy – complications and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Andy KH

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure globally. Much research has been conducted in both basic science and clinical therapeutics, which has enhanced understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and expanded the potential therapies available. This review will examine the current concepts of diabetic nephropathy management in the context of some of the basic science and pathophysiology aspects relevant to the approaches taken in novel, investigative treatment strategies. PMID:25342915

  3. Oral and Perioral Piercing Complications

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M.A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-01-01

    Background. The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing Methods. A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ``oral and perioral, piercing ´´, ``oral, piercing and disease”, ``recessions and oral piercing´´. It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series Results. A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. Conclusion. Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. Clinical implications. Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures. PMID:19444317

  4. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  5. [Complications of synthetic hair implantation].

    PubMed

    Lange-Ionescu, S; Frosch, P J

    1995-01-01

    Five men (average age 35 years) suffering from the sequelae of hair implants were examined in the course of claims for legal compensation. Polyether amide hair fibres had been implanted, 1000 per patient and session. In all cases the improved implantation technique with a fine needle and subcutaneous knotting had been used in a total of three institutions. Three patients developed bacterial folliculitis after 4-8 weeks; in the other two patients this developed later, after 3-6 months. In two patients the possible triggering event was the wearing of a motorcycle helmet and a vacation in a tropical climate respectively. In another patient the artificial hair curled considerably after he visited a sauna. The implanted hair had fallen out almost completely in all cases (100% in two patients after 9-12 months, 50-75% in three patients after 7 months to 2 years). All patients showed cosmetically disturbing small scars and pigmentary changes. Despite an apparently improved complication rate, the new technique of hair fibre implantation remains a doubtful procedure and cannot be recommended in view of possible permanent sequelae. PMID:7875965

  6. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  7. Fasting: The History, Pathophysiology and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kerndt, Peter R.; Naughton, James L.; Driscoll, Charles E.; Loxterkamp, David A.

    1982-01-01

    An appreciation of the physiology of fasting is essential to the understanding of therapeutic dietary interventions and the effect of food deprivation in various diseases. The practice of prolonged fasting for political or religious purposes is increasing, and a physician is likely to encounter such circumstances. Early in fasting weight loss is rapid, averaging 0.9 kg per day during the first week and slowing to 0.3 kg per day by the third week; early rapid weight loss is primarily due to negative sodium balance. Metabolically, early fasting is characterized by a high rate of gluconeogenesis with amino acids as the primary substrates. As fasting continues, progressive ketosis develops due to the mobilization and oxidation of fatty acids. As ketone levels rise they replace glucose as the primary energy source in the central nervous system, thereby decreasing the need for gluconeogenesis and sparing protein catabolism. Several hormonal changes occur during fasting, including a fall in insulin and T3 levels and a rise in glucagon and reverse T3 levels. Most studies of fasting have used obese persons and results may not always apply to lean persons. Medical complications seen in fasting include gout and urate nephrolithiasis, postural hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 4. PMID:6758355

  8. Pulmonary complications of smoked substance abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, D P

    1990-01-01

    After tobacco, marijuana is the most widely smoked substance in our society. Studies conducted within the past 15 years in animals, isolated tissues, and humans indicate that marijuana smoke can injure the lungs. Habitual smoking of marijuana has been shown to be associated with chronic respiratory tract symptoms, an increased frequency of acute bronchitic episodes, extensive tracheobronchial epithelial disease, and abnormalities in the structure and function of alveolar macrophages, key cells in the lungs' immune defense system. In addition, the available evidence strongly suggests that regularly smoking marijuana may predispose to the development of cancer of the respiratory tract. "Crack" smoking has become increasingly prevalent in our society, especially among habitual smokers of marijuana. New evidence is emerging implicating smoked cocaine as a cause of acute respiratory tract symptoms, lung dysfunction, and, in some cases, serious, life-threatening acute lung injury. A strong physician message to users of marijuana, cocaine, or both concerning the harmful effects of these smoked substances on the lungs and other organs may persuade some of them, especially those with drug-related respiratory complications, to quit smoking. PMID:2190420

  9. New Developments in Extraesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saritas Yuksel, Elif

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can present with a wide variety of extraesophageal symptoms that are usually difficult to diagnose because of the absence of typical GERD symptoms (ie, regurgitation or heartburn). The diagnostic process is further complicated by the lack of a definitive test for identifying GERD as the cause of extraesophageal reflux symptoms. Due to the low predictive value of upper endoscopy and pH testing—as well as the lack of reliability of the symptom index and symptom association probability—extraesophageal reflux disease is still an area of investigation. This paper discusses recent developments in this field, with special emphasis on new diagnostic modalities and treatment options. PMID:23483833

  10. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akku?, Selami; U?urlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  11. Pregnancy Complications May Be Linked to Later Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of child health and development studies at the Public Health Institute in Berkeley, Calif. "We discovered there were ... P.H., director, child health and development studies, Public Health Institute, Berkeley, Calif.; Rita Redberg, M.D., professor ...

  12. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222... § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  13. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222... § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  14. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52...Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  15. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52...Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  16. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222... § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  17. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52...Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  18. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52...Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  19. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222... § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  20. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222... § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  1. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52...Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  2. 27 CFR 24.193 - Conversion into still wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conversion into still wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Production of Effervescent Wine § 24.193 Conversion into still wine. Sparkling wine or artificially carbonated wine may be dumped for use as still wine. The dumping process...

  3. 27 CFR 24.193 - Conversion into still wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conversion into still wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Effervescent Wine § 24.193 Conversion into still wine. Sparkling wine or artificially carbonated wine may be dumped for use as still wine. The dumping process...

  4. 27 CFR 24.193 - Conversion into still wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conversion into still wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Effervescent Wine § 24.193 Conversion into still wine. Sparkling wine or artificially carbonated wine may be dumped for use as still wine. The dumping process...

  5. 27 CFR 24.193 - Conversion into still wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conversion into still wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Effervescent Wine § 24.193 Conversion into still wine. Sparkling wine or artificially carbonated wine may be dumped for use as still wine. The dumping process...

  6. 27 CFR 24.193 - Conversion into still wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conversion into still wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Production of Effervescent Wine § 24.193 Conversion into still wine. Sparkling wine or artificially carbonated wine may be dumped for use as still wine. The dumping process...

  7. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Still wines containing... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  8. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Still wines containing... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  9. Surgical Treatments for Infantile Purulent Meningitis Complicated by Subdural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Zhang, Xiaoru; Cao, Hongbin; Jing, Shiyuan; Yang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Zhenghai; Liu, Ye; Li, Xin; Gao, Feifei; Ji, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile purulent meningitis (PM) is a commonly severe intracranial infectious disease in infants under age 1 year. In recent years, several diagnostic and treatment methods were reported, but in these cases the neurological complications and sequel were often observed, among which subdural effusion (SE) is the most common complication in PM. Timely diagnosis and early intervention are vital for better outcomes. In this study, the surgical treatments for infantile PM complicated by SE were investigated. Material/Methods Patients who had PM complicated by SE in the Children’s Hospital of Hebei Province from June 2000 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed and 170 patients were enrolled in the study. Surgical treatment for each patient was adopted according to producing effusion time, leucocyte count, protein content, intracranial pressure, and bacteria culture, coupled with cranial ultrasound examination, CT, and MRI scans. Results Nearly, 15 patients were cured using serial taps, with a 50% cure rate. Seventeen out of 30 (56.6%) patients receiving subcutaneous reservoir drainage had better outcome. Nearly 80% of patients (55/69) who underwent minimally invasive trepanation and drainage were positive. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage combined with drug douche was effective in 63% of patients (19/30). In addition, 6 patients were cured with subdural-peritoneal shunt. Only 1 patient died, after the recurrence of meningitis, and the remaining 4 patients were cured by craniotomy. Conclusions For infantile PM complicated with SE, treatment needs be chosen according to the specific situation. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage is a very effective treatment in curing PM complicated by SE. The treatment was highly effective with the use of drug douche. Subdural-peritoneal shunt and craniotomy were as effective as in refractory cases. PMID:26482715

  10. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  11. Periprocedural complications in endovascular stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Suha H; Yilmaz, Guliz

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stroke treatment is a neurointerventional emergency where the main goal is the early recanalization of the occlusion within the critical time window, as safely as possible. Although the time window and rate of complications for endovascular stroke treatment differ with anterior and posterior circulation strokes, awareness of potential periprocedural complications is important, as they affect patient morbidity and mortality. Periprocedural complications are classified as haemorrhagic complications, procedure-/device-related, puncture site complications, and late-onset events including vascular stenosis. We present the digital subtraction angiography and CT imaging findings related to these complications in a study of 56 stroke patients, as they relate to previous findings in the literature. PMID:26529228

  12. Extravascular complications following abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Low, G; Jaremko, J L; Lomas, D J

    2015-08-01

    A variety of transplants have been performed in the abdomen including liver, kidney, pancreas and islet, bowel, and multivisceral transplants. Imaging plays an important role in graft surveillance particularly to exclude post-transplant complications. When complications occur, therapeutic image-guided interventions are invaluable as these may be graft-saving and even life-saving. Vascular complications following transplantation have been extensively reported in recent reviews. The focus of this review is to discuss post-transplant complications that are primarily extravascular in location. This includes biliary, urological, intestinal, malignancy, infections, and miscellaneous complications. Familiarity with the imaging appearances of these complications is helpful for radiologists as accurate diagnosis and expedient treatment has an impact on graft and patient survival. PMID:25979853

  13. Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Popescu, M; Strambu, V; Sandu, AM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of laparoscopic treatment in abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Methods: We report a retrospective study including 17 patients with abdominal complications secondary to VP shunt for hydrocephalus, laparoscopically treated in our department, between 2000 and 2007. Results: Patients' age ranged from 1 to 72 years old (mean age 25.8 years old). Male: female ratio was 1.4. Abdominal complications encountered were: shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration 47.05% (8/17), infections 23.52% (4/17) such as abscesses and peritonitis, pseudocysts 11.76% (2/17), CSF ascites 5.88% (1/17), inguinal hernia 5.88% (1/17), and shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube 5.88% (1/17). Free–disease interval varies from 1 day to 21 years, depending on the type of complication, short in peritoneal irritation syndrome and abscesses (days) and long in ascites, pseudocysts(months– years). Laparoscopic treatment was: extraction of the foreign body in shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration, evacuation, debridement, lavage and drainage for pseudocysts, abscess and peritonitis, shortening of the tube in shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube a nd hernioraphy. One diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in a peritoneal irritation syndrome, which found only CSF ascites. There were no conversions to open surgery. The overall mortality was of 5.88% and postoperative morbidity was of 11.76%. In 7 patients operated for abscesses, peritonitis, pseudocysts, and CSF ascites the shunting system was converted in to a ventriculocardiac shunt. Conclusions: Abdominal complication following VP shunt can be successfully performed laparoscopically. Abdominal surgery required, in selected cases, the repositioning of the distal catheter, frequently as a ventriculocardiac shunt. There are abdominal complications with no indication of surgery, like peritoneal irritation syndrome and CSF ascites. Free– disease interval varies from days (peritoneal irritation syndrome, abscesses) to month–years (pseudocyst, ascites), according to type of complication. PMID:20108757

  14. Skull base fractures and their complications.

    PubMed

    Baugnon, Kristen L; Hudgins, Patricia A

    2014-08-01

    Basilar skull fractures are a relatively frequent occurrence in significant head trauma, and their detection is important, as even linear nondisplaced fractures can be associated with critical complications. The management of skull base fractures depends on the location and extent of these associated complications. This article reviews skull base anatomy; morphology of the common fracture patterns within the anterior, central, and posterior skull base; associated complications; imaging findings; and possible pitfalls in imaging of skull base trauma. PMID:25086806

  15. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  16. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  17. Hepatobiliary complications in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C; Auld, C D; Schlinkert, R; Hasan, A H; Imrie, C W; MacSween, R N; Carter, D C

    1989-01-01

    Thirty nine patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis were investigated for evidence of hepatobiliary disease. In addition to pre-operative assessment by liver function tests, ultrasound, ERCP (in 33) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (in five), all had peroperative liver biopsy. Common bile duct stenosis was diagnosed in 16 (62%) of the 26 patients with successful cholangiography. Features of extrahepatic biliary obstruction were found on biopsy in 11 patients, three of whom showed features of secondary sclerosing cholangitis. No patients had secondary biliary cirrhosis. Three had parenchymal liver disease (cirrhosis, resolving hepatitis and alcoholic hepatitis respectively) and two others had features suggestive of previous alcohol-induced injury. Five (83%) of the patients with clinical jaundice had biopsy features of extrahepatic biliary obstruction, as did eight (67%) with alkaline phosphatase above twice normal and seven (44%) with radiological common bile duct stenosis. Neither alkaline phosphatase rise, nor common bile duct stenosis alone or in combination, were a reliable indication of the need for biliary enteric bypass surgery. Pre-operative liver biopsy may be a valuable adjunct in the assessment of such patients. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2714685

  18. Interventional therapy of vascular complications following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Libicher, Martin; Radeleff, Boris; Grenacher, Lars; Hallscheidt, Peter; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Richer, Götz M; Kauffmann, Günther; Hosch, Waldemar

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is accepted as the preferred treatment for most cases of end-stage renal disease. Postoperative vascular complications include stenosis or thrombosis of the transplant renal artery or arteriovenous fistulas after biopsy. Impaired arterial perfusion of the transplant may be the leading cause for graft dysfunction or refractory hypertension. Therefore, non-invasive imaging modalities are required to detect and locate vascular complications with high accuracy. Doppler ultrasound is suited as a screening method for the detection of impaired graft perfusion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for an accurate diagnosis of vascular complications and to support decision for appropriate surgical or interventional treatment. Minimal invasive techniques like percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement have evolved as safe procedures with a high technical success rate reducing substantial morbidity. They can be considered as an alternative to surgical treatment of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS). Embolization of severe arteriovenous fistulas is the method of choice if the feeding artery can be occluded through a microcatheter. In selected cases, even catheter-guided fibrinolytic treatment of arterial thrombosis might be considered, if instantaneous surgery is considered a high-risk procedure. This article reviews the imaging features of common vascular complications after renal transplantation with focus on MRI. In addition, interventional radiological techniques are described for the treatment of TRAS, acute thrombotic occlusion, and arteriovenous fistulas. PMID:17100702

  19. The chain of postoperative complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Mehmet; Gönenç, Murat; Al??, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct injuries are among the most dreadful complications of cholecystectomy. As laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become increasingly popular, the incidence of this complication increased and has remained unchanged in spite the learning curve being completed. A 50-year-old female underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstone disease. A complicated bile duct injury occurred during the procedure. As the injury was immediately recognized, it was treated with concomitant hepaticojejunostomy. In the postoperative period, biliary fistula, which was assumed to be the result of an anastomotic leak, was encountered. Diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was considered. It revealed that the anastomosis was intact and the source of biliary leak was an aberrant right posterior sectorial branch. A severe bleeding through the biliary catheter occurred due to transmigration of the catheter into the portal vein. Bleeding was controlled with embolization by the interventional radiologist. The patient thereafter was re-operated, and the leakage was sealed by ligation of the aberrant right posterior sectorial branch. The postoperative period was uneventful. As long as cholecystectomy is performed, bile duct injuries will always exist. Therefore, every abdominal surgeon should be aware of possible consequences of complications related to this procedure. PMID:25931907

  20. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  1. The Impact of Obesity on Complications of Elbow, Forearm, and Hand Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    London, Daniel A.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Lalchandani, Gopal R.; Okoroafor, Ugochi C.; Wildes, Troy S.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rates of postoperative complications in obese and non-obese patients following elbow, forearm, and hand surgeries. Methods: This case-control study examined 436 patients whose body mass index (BMI) was over 35 and who underwent hand, wrist, forearm, or elbow surgery between 2009-2013. Controls were patients (n=433) with a BMI<30 who had similar surgeries over the same period, and frequency-matched by type of surgery (i.e., bony, soft tissue, or nerve), age, and sex. Postoperative complications were defined as infection requiring antibiotic or reoperation, delayed incision healing, nerve dysfunction, wound dehiscence, hematoma, and other reoperation. Medical comorbidities (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, stroke, vascular disease, kidney disease, and liver disease) were recorded. Chi-square analyses were performed to explore the association between obesity and postoperative complications. Similar analyses were performed stratified by surgery type and BMI classification. Logistic regression modeling was performed to identify predictors of postoperative complications accounting for surgery type, BMI, the presence of comorbidities, patient age, and patient sex. This same model was also run separately for case and control patients. Results: The overall complication rate was 8.7% with similar rates between obese and non-obese patients (8.5% vs 9.0%). Bony procedures resulted in the greatest risk of complication in both groups (15% each group). Multivariate analysis confirmed surgery type as the only significant predictor of complications for non-obese patients. However, among obese patients, both bony surgery and increasing BMI were associated with greater complication rates. Discussion: Not all obese patients appear to be at any higher risk for complications after elbow, forearm, and hand surgery compared to non-obese patients. However, there appears to be a dose-dependent effect of BMI among obese patients such that increasing-obesity heightens the risk of complications, especially for those with a BMI greater than 45. Level of Evidence: Prognostic, Level II PMID:24975260

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-11-01

    Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins.We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH.Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18-84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n?=?13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n?=?9), mediastinal irradiation (n?=?2), and idiopathic (n?=?3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27-90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m (range 1.6-4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5-1?mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1 receiving corticosteroids and PAH therapy). Survival was 88%, 73%, and 56% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively.We found no clear clinical improvement with the use of specific PAH therapy. Corticosteroid therapy may be associated with clinical improvement, in some patients with fibrosing mediastinitis due to sarcoidosis. Although never performed for this indication, lung transplantation may be proposed in eligible patients with severe PH and fibrosing mediastinitis. PMID:26554778

  3. Beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jones Williams, W.

    1988-01-01

    The increasing use of beryllium in a variety of industries continues to be a hazard. New cases are still being reported to the UK Beryllium Case Registry, now numbering 60 in the period 1945-1988. The majority of cases follow inhalation which results in acute beryllium disease (chemical pneumonitis) or more commonly chronic beryllium disease--a granulomatous pneumonitis. Granulomatous skin nodules also occur following local implantation. The clinical and radiological features are briefly described with the emphasis on pathology and immunology. Laser microprobe mass spectrometry analysis of tissue sections is a major advance in diagnosis. Detection of beryllium distinguishes the granulomas of chronic beryllium disease from other diseases, in particular sarcoidosis. The role of beryllium lymphocyte transformation tests is discussed. Chronic beryllium disease is steroid dependent and local excision of skin lesions appears to be curative. There is no evidence that beryllium is carcinogenic. Images Figure 1 PMID:3074283

  4. [Complication management in prolapse and incontinence surgery].

    PubMed

    Hampel, C; Roos, F; Neisius, A; Thüroff, J W; Thomas, C

    2014-07-01

    Tension-free alloplastic slings (TFAS) have revolutionized surgery for female stress urinary incontinence for more than 20 years. The procedure is easy to perform, minimally invasive with a short operating time in an outpatient setting and has proven efficacy comparable to retropubic colposuspension. The frequency of surgery for female stress incontinence has tripled within one decade which has to have an impact on the number of complications. In contrast, sacrocolpopexy has remained the gold standard in urological prolapse surgery as none of the new techniques has reached similar efficacy or safety; however, possible complications have to be named and their causes have to be understood to maintain the highest quality of care in the future. Possible complications of TFAS are potentially underestimated with respect to prevalence and manageability. Possible complications of prolapse and incontinence surgery are presented and the underlying causes are identified. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and the cause of complications together with the results of a postoperative diagnostic work-up, allow complication management to be tailored to each individual patient. To prevent complications all conservative treatment options should have been tried preoperatively and a complete evaluation (including urodynamics) should have been carried out for every patient. Postoperative urodynamics may help to document treatment success and to identify and quantify complications. PMID:25023238

  5. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates.

  6. [Neurological complications of surgery for spinal deformities].

    PubMed

    Michel, F; Rubini, J; Grand, C; Bérard, J; Kohler, R; Michel, C R

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to precisely analyse the physio-pathogenic mechanisms, bring to light the risk factors, and find a more practical way of proceeding in spinal surgery. Out of 667 spinal instrumentation surgical operations carried out between 1980-1989, we found 33 (4.8 per cent) neurological complications and have divided them into 2 groups: 7 peripheral complications, 26 cord and central complications. After further analysis, especially of the cord complications (2.5 per cent), we were able to pick out the factors which influence the rate of neurological complications and their evolution: secondary aetiology and the kyphotic composition of spinal deformation, and above all the notion of cord at risk. The delay of cord complications and especially the relation between the severity of the neurological syndrome and its evolution is extremely important. Somesthesic evoked potential monitoring confirmed that per operative diagnosis of a cord injury is possible. The steps to take when confronted with neurological complications, depend on the results of many examinations: pre and post-operative neurological evaluations electrophysiological exploration of the cord and neuro radiological explorations (myelography, scanner and IRM). This helps to complete aetiology and eliminate mechanical causes, which are the only positive indications of iterative surgery. The problems of instrumentation removal in emergency and the legal-medical aspect brought on by this type of complication are discussed. PMID:1410727

  7. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®) General Information About Oral Complications Key Points ... bleeding in the mouth. Nerve damage. Complications of radiation therapy Oral complications caused by radiation therapy to ...

  8. Osteomyelitis complicating fracture: pitfalls of /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Gobuty, A.H.; Traina, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging has shown greater accuracy and specificity than alternative noninvasive methods in the detection of uncomplicated osteomyelitis. Forty patients with suspected osteomyelitis complicating fractures (with and without surgical intervention) were evaluated with /sup 111/In-labeled leukocytes. All five patients with intense focal uptake, but only one of 13 with no uptake, had active osteomyelitis. However, mild to moderate /sup 111/In leukocyte uptake, observed in 22 cases, indicated the presence of osteomyelitis in only four of these; the other false-positive results were observed in noninfected callus formation, heterotopic bone formation, myositis ossificans, and sickle-cell disease. These results suggest that /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating fracture but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid false-positive results.

  9. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy – An unexpected complication in spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Niels; Kühne, Christian; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Hänsel, Bernd; Winkler, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an apical ballooning syndrome, which can be triggered by stress. Only few case reports describe the onset of Takotsubo as a complication of neurosurgery procedures. Clinical presentation A case of a 53 year-old female with a spinal neurinoma and surgery-associated Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is demonstrated. The patient developed typical signs of a myocardial infarction with circulation depression and ST elevation, but normal cardiac enzymes at the end of surgery. Cardiac catheterization and levocardiography confirmed the absence of any critical coronary disease but the presence of a typical apical ballooning and midventricular hypokinesis. The patient recovered completely under supportive conservative and cardiological therapy, showing regular left ventricular pump function. Conclusion Interventions in neurosurgery and perioperative care should be kept as stress free as possible. Due to the possibility of neurogenic mechanisms related to cardiomyopathy, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy as an entity of stress-induced complications should be taken into consideration. PMID:25544485

  10. An Unusual Complication Following Transarterial Chemoembolization: Acute Myocardial Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Yiliang; Chang Weichou; Kuo Wuhsien; Huang Tienyu; Chu Hengcheng; Hsieh Tsaiyuan; Chang Weikuo

    2010-02-15

    Transarterial chemoembolization has been widely used to treat unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Various complications have been reported, but they have not included acute myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction results mainly from coronary artery occlusion by plaques that are vulnerable to rupture or from coronary spasm, embolization, or dissection of the coronary artery. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case report that describes a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent transarterial chemoembolization and died subsequently of acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of this complication induced by transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. This case illustrates the need to be aware of acute myocardial infarction when transarterial chemoembolization is planned for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in patients with underlying coronary artery disease.

  11. Complicated brucellar spondylodiscitis: experience from an endemic area.

    PubMed

    Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Sayar, Merve Sefa; Tütüncü, Ediz; Sezen, Figen; Sencan, Irfan

    2013-11-01

    The demographical, clinical, and therapeutical features of patients with brucellar spondylodiscitis (BS) were evaluated in this study. Of the 96 patients with brucellosis, 20 (20.8%) were diagnosed with spondylodiscitis. Patients who had BS were more likely to be older (p = 0.001), have higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (p = 0.01), and more likely to be anemic (p = 0.017). Lumbar segment (18/20) was frequently involved region. BS was complicated with paravertebral or epidural abscess in seven, radiculitis in six, and psoas abscess in five of cases. Antibiotic regimens including two or three antibiotics with combination of doxycycline, rifampin, and streptomycin were used. In this series, the mean duration of antimicrobial therapy was 18 weeks (range 12-56 weeks). Attention is drawn to this disease given the need for prolonged duration of treatment especially in complicated cases in order to avoid possible sequelae. PMID:23124695

  12. Female genital mutilations: genito-urinary complications and ethical-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Vella, Marco; Argo, Antonina; Costanzo, Angela; Tarantino, Lucia; Milone, Livio; Pavone, Carlo

    2015-09-18

    Many women in the world are still undergoing female genital mutilations (FGMs) even if in almost all the countries, the practice of FGM is illegal. The increase of immigration, particularly from African Countries, to Europe, and Italy too, led to consider this phenomenon with particular attention and skill. All the operators in health services need to know the different types of FGMs and the related complications and the psychological and sexual sequels. Urological complications, in particular, are not rare and the changing anatomy of the external genital apparatus can also make the catheter insertion sometimes difficult. This review analyzes the epidemiology of FGMs, the reasons why the practice is still made, the complications, the ethical, and the principal legal aspects of this practise that must be hopefully early banned. PMID:25744709

  13. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  14. 7. PUMPING PLANT, SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES, AND STILLING POND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PUMPING PLANT, SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES, AND STILLING POND - Outlook Irrigation District, Pumping Plant & Woodstave Pipe, Hudson Road & Snipes Lateral Road vicinity, Outlook, Yakima County, WA

  15. Enucleation and evisceration: indications, complications and clinicopathological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Naseripour, Masood; Asghari, Rajab; Parhizgar, Seyed Hamid; Parhizgar, Seyed Ehsan; Taghvaei, Mohammad; Miri, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    AIM To assess main indications, postoperative complications and clinicopathological correlation of ocular enucleation-evisceration. METHODS A total of 107 subjects who underwent enucleation and/or evisceration and received hydroxyapatite implants (Scleral wrap or mesh) were assessed. For each patient clinicopathological data was collected which included demographic information, clinical history, primary clinical diagnosis, main cause of ophthalmic surgery (traumatic, non-traumatic), type of surgical procedure (enucleation, evisceration) and pathological report. Patients' postoperative clinical visits were checked for procedure-related complications during first year after surgery. RESULTS One hundred and seven patients (male: 65.4%; mean age: 26y) underwent enucleation (n=100) or evisceration (n=7) due to traumatic (n=41) and non-traumatic (n=66) causes. Disfiguring painful blind eye was the most common indication of surgery (66.4%), followed by leukocoria (19.6%) and endophthalmitis (4.7%). The main types of injury included ?recracker, traf?c and work accidents, and sharp object perforating injury. In 53 (80.3%) subjects in non-traumatic group the initial clinical diagnosis matched the histopathological results. Malignant tumors (retinoblastoma: 47.5%, malignant melanoma: 27.3%) were the most common pathological diagnoses followed by phthisis bulbi (25.8%). The most common procedure-related complications were major eye discharge (39.6%), and implant exposure and discharge (20.8%). CONCLUSION Trauma and malignant tumors are the leading causes of enucleation-evisceration. Despite developing new techniques and materials, enucleation is still associated with considerable postoperative complications. PMID:25161942

  16. Effect of Preoperative Biliary Drainage on Complications Following Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinting; Ou, Guangsheng; Lian, Guoda; Luo, Hui; Huang, Kaihong; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) prior to pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is still controversial; therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of PBD on complications following PD. A meta-analysis was carried out for all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective and retrospective studies published from inception to March 2015 that compared PBD and non-PBD (immediate surgery) for the development of postoperative complications in PD patients. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using fixed-effect analyses, or random-effects analyses if there was statistically significant heterogeneity (P?complication (OR 1.52, CI 1.07 to 2.17; P?=?0.02), wound infection (OR 2.09, CI 1.39 to 3.13; P?=?0.0004), and delayed gastric emptying (DGE) (OR 1.37, CI 1.08 to 1.73; P?=?0.009). This meta-analysis suggests that biliary drainage before PD increased postoperative infectious complication, wound infection, and DGE. In light of the results of the study, PBD probably should not be routinely carried out in PD patients. PMID:26200634

  17. [Loss of renal function due to deep infiltrating endometriosis; a complicated consideration in women who wish to have children].

    PubMed

    de Graaff, Aisha A; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Beets, Geerard L; van de Beek, C Kees; Dunselman, Gerard A J

    2009-01-01

    Three nulliparous women, aged 39, 34 and 26 years, who were treated for fertility problems and who were affected by endometriosis, presented with ureteral obstruction caused by deep infiltrating endometriosis. The first two patients had complete unilateral loss of kidney function at the time of diagnosis. They chose to have fertility treatment first and both became pregnant. The third patient still had 24% renal function in the affected left kidney. She was treated by complete surgical resection of the endometriosis and reimplantation of the ureter. Ureteral obstruction is a rare, but serious, complication of deep infiltrating endometriosis. Timely recognition is important, since delay results in unnoticed loss of renal function. Clinical investigation for endometriosis of the posterior vaginal fornix is recommended for all patients with chronic abdominal pain, severe dysmenorrhoea or deep dyspareunia. On diagnosis of deep infiltrating endometriosis, further examination is necessary to detect possible ureteral obstruction and consequent hydronephrosis, which can be demonstrated by ultrasound. MRI is of value to map the extent of disease, which is usually multi-focal. Surgery to relieve ureteral obstruction and remove all endometriotic lesions is the treatment of choice if the kidney is still functional. PMID:19857296

  18. [Corneal complications of climatic keratopathy].

    PubMed

    Resnikoff, S; Filliard, G; Dell'Aquila, B

    1990-01-01

    The "keratopathie de Bietti" or climatic droplet keratopathy or keratopathie climatique (KC) is a degenerative disease of the cornea which is probably due to the exposure to ultraviolet rays. Usually the evolution is a progressive invasion of cornea by amber nodules which lift up the corneal epithelium. We observed that numerous patients suffered from severe corneal ulcerations which appeared to be spontaneous and which evolution was frequently disastrous. The aim of this work was to pick up epidemiologic data on KC in order to check the following hypothesis: the corneal opaquenesses, due to non traumatic perforations, would be more frequent among patients suffering from KC than among the rest of population. The study, carried out in Republic of Djibouti, dealed with two groups of people: an hospitable group of 217 patients suffering from a KC and a random sample of 2,446 persons among Djibouti people, from which a study ill-healthy was carried out among people from 40 years old. The mistakes were controled by adjustment on age and climatic conditions. The result is that corneal blindnesses which seemed to be spontaneous were more frequent in a significative way among people suffering from KC than among healthy people as old as ill people and living in the same conditions (12% against 0.7%; p = 0.003; Odds ratio adjusted on age: 31.8 IC: 8.8-115.20). On the etiopathogenic point of view the bacterial, fungal and deficiency causes could scarcely be accepted. The unfavourable evolution, resisting to all the treatments, drove to several hypothesis among them is responsibility of free amoebas as acanthamoeba. PMID:2135081

  19. The cost of diabetes chronic complications among Iranian people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the cost of diabetes related micro- and macrovascular complications in Iranian people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods In routine clinical practice, people with type 2 diabetes mellitus were assessed for 10 years at a diabetes care center. The type of medications and clinical data were extracted from patients’ documents. Mortality rate and the incidence of micro- and macrovascular complications recorded in patients’ documents were analyzed. Cost analysis was comprised of 1) para clinic costs as well as laboratory, medications, clinical visits and nonmedical costs 2) inpatient costs as well as hospital admission costs, disability, and mortality costs. Results From 1562 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a total of 1000 patients with mean duration disease of 11.2 years, who had completed information in their documents, were studied. All people were free from complications at baseline. Mean cumulative incidence of diabetes-related complications over 10 years were 10.9?±?3.5%, 8.0?±?3.1%, 4.6?±?1.7%, 9.1?±?3.6% and 2.3?±?0.9% for peripheral neuropathy and diabetic foot ulcer, nephropathy, ophthalmic complications, cardiovascular disease and death, respectively. People with better glycemic control had less complication and also related expenditures. Average para clinic cost per patient was 393.6?±?47.8 and average inpatient cost per patient was 1520.7?±?104.5 USD. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate considerable incidence of diabetes chronic complications and also high health care expenditure for related complications among our patients. As the number of people with diabetes continues to rise, early detection of the disease and implementation of timely and appropriate therapeutic strategies could decrease the burden of diabetes chronic complications and also huge related expenditures. PMID:24593991

  20. Complications of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: How to Avoid and Manage Them

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Nicholas M.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a therapeutic procedure used to treat problems associated with biliary and pancreatic diseases. The benefits of ERCP over surgical treatment are well documented; however, complications including infection, pancreatitis, hemorrhage, and perforation can occur even in expert hands. Several factors, such as patient selection, skill of the operator, and the complexity of the procedure, can add to the intrinsic risks of ERCP This review outlines the current knowledge regarding ERCP complications and solutions for improved outcomes. PMID:24719597