These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Life-threatening complications of adult-onset Still's disease.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's Disease (AOSD) since its description in 1971 has proven to be a very complex and challenging disease entity. This rare auto-inflammatory disease is classically described by the "Still's triad" of fever, rash, and arthritis, although the atypical cases frequently outnumber the typical ones. The exact pathogenesis and etiologic factors responsible for the clinical features remain largely obscure, despite recent suggestive cytokine biology findings. Diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, following the exclusion of mimickers of infectious, autoimmune or neoplastic etiology, with the additional consideration of non-specific laboratory abnormalities such as peripheral leukocytosis and elevation of serum ferritin and other acute phase reactants. The disease manifestations are protean and can include diverse complications, affecting multiple organ systems. Moreover, the severity of the organ involvement can vary considerably, representing a wide spectrum from the self-limited to severe. The mainstay of therapy has evolved from the traditional use of corticosteroids and oral immunosupressants to the newer targeted treatments with biologic agents. The scope of this review is to alert the clinician to the existence of life-threatening AOSD complications, namely the macrophage activation syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Such knowledge may lead in earlier recognition, prompt treatment, and, ideally, improved patient outcomes. PMID:24435354

Efthimiou, Petros; Kadavath, Sabeeda; Mehta, Bella

2014-03-01

2

A case of adult onset Still's disease complicated with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia.  

PubMed

Only a few pathologic reports exist describing adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) with pulmonary involvement. We report this very rare case of AOSD complicated with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). A 32-year-old woman was referred with high spiking fever, salmon-pink rash in her arms and legs, and polyarthralgia. The laboratory data showed marked increases in white blood cell count, an erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C reactive protein, ferritin, and liver dysfunction. All cultures remained negative, as were autoantibodies and rheumatoid factor. The patient was strongly suspected of AOSD according to specific diagnostic criteria. However, chest X ray disclosed an infiltrative shadow accompanied by air bronchogram in the upper lobe of the right lung and therapy with antibiotics was initiated. As the patient did not respond to antibiotics and a remittent fever of over 38°C, a flexible bronchoscopy was performed. Organizing pneumonia was diagnosed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) histology and radiologically, and the lesions were thought to be due to pulmonary involvement of AOSD. Therefore, she was diagnosed with AOSD complicated with COP. Oral treatment with prednisolone (30 mg/day) resulted in rapid disappearance of the infiltrative shadow. Symptoms and markers of inflammation also improved. Clinicians should be aware that COP can be a complication of AOSD. PMID:21297329

Sato, Hiroshi; Yokoe, Isamu; Nishio, Shinya; Onishi, Tsubasa; Takao, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Haraoka, Hitomi

2011-01-01

3

A novel therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension as a complication of adult-onset Still's disease: targeting IL-6.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's Disease (AOSD), often though as the adult variant of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), has an incidence of 1-3 cases per 1 million. Cardinal manifestations include fever, arthritis, skin rash, sore throat, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Prolongation in diagnosing this disease results from its similarity to infectious, malignant and rheumatic diseases and lack of biomarkers. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare pulmonary complication of AOSD, and we are aware of only six cases reported in literature to date. Here we present a patient with AOSD who has developed pulmonary hypertension as a complication. We report a case of AOSD complicated by PAH treated successfully with tocilizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to human interleukin (IL)-6 receptor. A Pubmed and Medline search for evidence of pulmonary hypertension in AOSD and use of IL-6 inhibition in management was performed. Data for this study was collected from the patient's chart records. No infectious or neoplastic cause of her disease was identified and after extensive diagnostic workup, the patient was diagnosed with AOSD fulfilling Yamaguchi criteria. After initiation of IL-6 therapy the patient was followed over time to monitor the hemodynamic changes in pulmonary vasculature. Following treatment with Tocilizumab, the patient showed dramatic improvement in her clinical symptoms and remains in remission, through combination of tocilizumab (8 mg/kg), methotrexate and prednisone. Improvement of systemic symptoms, right heart catheterization (RHC) findings and the VECTRA-DA score served as a measure of treatment response. Tocilizumab has been effective in demonstrating marked improvement in both the clinical and laboratory parameters. Tocilizumab is an effective novel treatment for AOSD with PAH. This is the first documented report of successful use of tocilizumab in AOSD patients presenting with PAH. Prospective comparative studies could help validate its efficacy and safety. PMID:24581387

Kadavath, Sabeeda; Zapantis, Ekaterini; Zolty, Ronald; Efthimiou, Petros

2014-03-01

4

[Adult onset Still's disease].  

PubMed

Adult onset Still's disease is a rare, febrile, multisystem rheumatic disease with unknown etiology, which runs an intermittent course and can either go into remission after months to years or progress to a chronic course with substantial joint destruction. The prevalence of this disease has been increasing in the last decade presumably caused by better diagnostic tools but also by a higher awareness among physicians taking care of patients with "fever of unknown origin". This review is intended to augment this trend, since research on the role of proinflammatory cytokines in this disease has led to an improved diagnostic and therapeutic repertoire over the last few years. Ferritin and interleukin-18 serum levels are valuable diagnostic parameters and blockade of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor-necrosis-factor alpha can effectively control the inflammatory activity of this disease in most cases and also in life-threatening conditions. PMID:18696089

Manger, B

2008-09-01

5

Adult-onset Still's disease.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder characterised by high spiking fever, an evanescent salmon pink rash and arthritis, frequently accompanied by sore throat, myalgias, lymphadenopathies, splenomegaly and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Aetiology is still unknown, however, it seems that an important role is played by various infectious agents, which would act as triggers in genetically predisposed hosts. Diagnosis is a clinical one and may be lengthy because it requires exclusion of infectious neoplasms, including malignant lymphomas and leukaemias, and other autoimmune diseases. Different diagnostic or classification criteria have been proposed, but not definitely accepted. There are no specific laboratory tests for AOSD, but they reflect the systemic inflammation: the ESR is consistently high, while the rheumatoid factors and antinuclear antibodies are negative. High serum ferritin levels associated with a low fraction of its glycosylated component are assessed as useful diagnostic and disease activity markers. The clinical course can be divided into three main patterns with different prognoses: self-limited or monophasic, intermittent or polycyclic systemic and chronic articular pattern. Therapy includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs: biological agents have recently been introduced and they seem to be very promising not only for the treatment but also for understanding the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the disease. PMID:20020138

Bagnari, Valentina; Colina, Matteo; Ciancio, Giovanni; Govoni, Marcello; Trotta, Francesco

2010-05-01

6

Hemophagocytic syndrome occurring in an adult liver transplant recipient having Still’s disease  

PubMed Central

Hemophagocytic syndrome is a potentially fatal complication that rarely occurs after liver transplantation. We present a 25-year-old man with a history of Still’s disease who presented with fever, arthralgia, and elevated serum ferritin levels 6 months after undergoing liver transplantation for fulminant hepatic failure due to autoimmune hepatitis potentially triggered by infliximab therapy. Liver biopsy demonstrated features consistent with hemophagocytic syndrome. The patient was successfully treated with a course of high dose steroids and had complete resolution of his symptoms and normalization of liver chemistry test abnormalities. Patients with Still’s disease may rarely complicate with fulminant hepatic failure with infliximab therapy. Hemophagocytic syndrome a rare potentially life threatening condition may occur in such patients following liver transplantation. PMID:21442058

Satapathy, Sanjaya K.; Isabel Fiel, M.; Del Rio Martin, Juan; Aloman, Costica

2010-01-01

7

Hemophagocytic syndrome secondary to adult-onset still’s disease but very similar to lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is a clinicopathologic entity characterized by increased proliferation and activation of benign macrophages with hemophagocytosis throughout the reticuloendothelial system. HPS may be primary, or secondary to malignancy, infections, auto-immune diseases and pharmacotherapy. In patients with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), HPS is a rare but life-threatening complication. Herein, we described a female patient with HPS secondary to AOSD. During the therapy, giant gastric ulcer similar to lymphoma developed after treatment with corticosteroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22670185

Zhang, Xin-Hua; Han, Yong-Mei; Wang, Wen-Wen; Cheng, Hao; Zhu, Ke-Jian

2012-01-01

8

Motor complications in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Management of motor complications in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) can be challenging. The main complications are inadequate dopaminergic tone ("off" time and dose failures) and excess dopaminergic tone (dyskinesia). These motor complications increase as PD progresses. Changing the dose and timing of L-dopa is the main strategy for both scenarios. Reducing "off" time can also be achieved by the addition of adjunctive therapies (dopamine agonists, catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitors, and monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors). Dyskinesia can improve with amantadine and possibly several other medications. Surgical interventions such as lesioning and deep brain stimulation are considered when pharmacological strategies for motor complications are not satisfactory. PMID:22035028

Ondo, William G

2011-01-01

9

Cardiac tamponade in Still disease: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Adult onset Still disease is an unusual multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis. Among its protean manifestations is pericarditis which occurs in approximately 30-40% of patients. Cardiac tamponade is a rare complication of pericarditis occurring in the context of Still disease. We conducted a review of the English literature pertaining to the occurrence of pericardial tamponade in Still disease. We searched relevant journals and the PubMed Medline databases. A total of eighteen reported cases were identified; ten among children and eight in adults. Treatment of pericardial tamponade was medical therapy alone in two cases versus combined modality, medical and surgical drainage in the remainder of the cases. Outcomes were death among four of the ten children and there was no recurrence of tamponade in the remaining child and adult series. This review re-emphasizes the importance of considering Still disease in the differential diagnosis of the life-threatening emergency of pericardial tamponade. PMID:19593288

Parvez, Najma; Carpenter, John L

2009-08-01

10

Treatment of adult-onset Still’s disease: a review  

PubMed Central

Adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder that has been recently classified as a polygenic autoinflammatory disorder. The former classification, based on the disease course, seems to be quite dated. Indeed, there is accumulating evidence that AOSD can be divided into two distinct phenotypes based on cytokine profile, clinical presentation, and outcome, ie, a “systemic” pattern and an “articular” pattern. The first part of this review deals with the treatments that are currently available for AOSD. We then present the different strategies based on the characteristics of the disease according to clinical presentation. To do so, we focus on the two subsets of the disease. Finally, we discuss the management of life-threatening complications of AOSD, along with the therapeutic options during pregnancy. PMID:25653531

Jamilloux, Yvan; Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Henry, Thomas; Sčve, Pascal

2015-01-01

11

Peyronie's Disease: Still a Surgical Disease.  

PubMed

Peyronie's Disease (PD) remains a challenging and clinically significant morbid condition. Since its first description by François Gigot de la Peyronie, much of the treatment for PD remains nonstandardized. PD is characterized by the formation of fibrous plaques at the level of the tunica albuginea. Clinical manifestations include morphologic changes, such as curvatures and hourglass deformities. Here, we review the common surgical techniques for the management of patients with PD. PMID:22956943

Martinez, Daniel; Ercole, Cesar E; Hakky, Tariq S; Kramer, Andrew; Carrion, Rafael

2012-01-01

12

Intestinal complications of Behçet's disease.  

PubMed

We report a case of a young female patient with long-standing oral and genital Behçet's disease (BD), who presented with progressive severe colonic inflammation and perforation, requiring multiple laparotomies. The case had ultimately a favourable outcome despite posing a number of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Intestinal complications, although rare, should be considered as important differential diagnoses in patients with BD presenting with abdominal pain, and is a difficult-to-prove differential diagnosis to Crohn's disease. PMID:23917369

Kovacs, D Botond; Ray, Dipak K; Dasgupta, Kaushik; Borowski, David W

2013-01-01

13

Neurological complications of coeliac disease  

PubMed Central

A variety of neurological disorders have been reported in association with coeliac disease including epilepsy, ataxia, neuropathy, and myelopathy. The nature of this association is unclear and whether a specific neurological complication occurs in coeliac disease remains unproved. Malabsorption may lead to vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Therefore, patients who develop neurological dysfunction should be carefully screened for these. However, malabsorption does not satisfactorily explain the pathophysiology and clinical course of many of the associated neurological disorders. Other mechanisms proposed include altered autoimmunity, heredity, and gluten toxicity. This review attempts to summarise the literature and suggests directions for future research. PMID:12151653

Pengiran, T; Wills, A; Holmes, G

2002-01-01

14

Cutaneous vasculitis complicating coeliac disease.  

PubMed Central

A 38 year old female, with chronic uncontrolled coeliac disease, presented with the rare complication of cutaneous leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Detailed study failed to identify any cause for the vasculitis, other than the underlying coeliac disease. Haematuria and proteinuria with mesangial nephritis were also demonstrated on renal biopsy with electron microscopic study. It is speculated that exogenous or endogenous antigens permeated the abnormal small bowel mucosa leading to formation of circulating immune complexes. Subsequent tissue deposition of these complexes then resulted in vasculitis and nephritis. The skin lesions cleared completely after treatment with a strict gluten free diet. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7461477

Meyers, S; Dikman, S; Spiera, H; Schultz, N; Janowitz, H D

1981-01-01

15

Neurological complications in Fabry disease.  

PubMed

In Fabry disease, deficiency of ?-galactosidase A results in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in body fluids and tissues including corneas, blood vessels, kidneys and also structures of the central and peripheral nervous system. Many patients show cardiovascular and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Cerebrovascular dysfunction is particularly associated with a high risk of strokes and of mortality even at a young age. The prevalence and severity of cerebrovascular complications increase with patients'age. Clinical data as well as histologic and neurophysiologic studies showed predominantly small fiber dysfunction in patients with Fabry disease. We recently performed quantitative sensory testing in patients with Fabry disease and found reduced cold and heat-pain detection thresholds, while nerve conduction velocities were only mildly reduced. From our findings, we concluded that small fiber dysfunction is more prominent than large fiber dysfunction in Fabry patients. Clinically, small fiber dysfunction contributes to recurrent episodes of burning and lancinating pain and paresthesias in the distal extremities. Such episodes can be typically triggered by changes of the environmental temperature, particularly by warming. Moreover, dysfunction of small thinly-myelinated and unmyelianated nerve fibers accounts for altered sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation. Sympathetic dysfunction explains the hypohidrosis and a subsequent poor exercise and heat tolerance. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human ?-galactosidase A is available. We could demonstrate improvement of small fiber neuropathy and neuropathic pain after 18-23 months of ERT, which probably resulted from glycosphingolipid clearing from perineurial cells, axons and Schwann cells or from blood vessels supplying the nerves. PMID:21211673

Dütsch, M; Hilz, M J

2010-12-01

16

Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

17

[Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: a still existing disease].  

PubMed

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare entity with an invariably fatal course that progressively affects the central nervous system. It is caused by persistent infection with the wild-type measles virus. While rare in industrial countries, it is not infrequent in developing countries, where there are still areas of endemic measles infection and immunization is not yet generalized. We describe an eight-year-old Spanish girl who presented rhythmic and symmetric myoclonus. She contracted measles at 13 months and required hospitalization. No cognitive deterioration was found. Neuroimaging and the initial electroencephalogram were normal. Oligoclonal bands and high titers of measles antibodies were found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with oral metisoprinol and intraventricular alpha-interferon (IFN-) and showed no further progression of her symptoms. The importance of including SSPE in the differential diagnosis of patients consulting for school failure, neurological deterioration or movement disorders is highlighted. Special attention should be paid to the immigrant population from countries where the incidence of SSPE is greater than in Spain. PMID:12781117

Lassaletta Atienza, A; Cebrero García, M; Martino Alba, R; González-Santiago, P; García-Frías, E

2003-06-01

18

Iron hypothesis of cardiovascular disease: still controversial.  

PubMed

Iron hypothesis has been a controversial subject for over 30 years as many studies support its role as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, while other studies found no evidence to support it. The conflicting results are accounted for by the non-homogeneity of trial design in terms of population inclusion criteria and different endpoints, non-uniform use of parameters for assessing iron role, and incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action. The nature of iron is dual, being of crucial importance for the human body, but also toxic as "free iron" induces oxidative stress. Under physiological conditions, there are efficient and complex mechanisms against iron-induced oxidative stress, which could be reproduced for creating new, intelligent antioxidants. Iron depletion improves the cardiovascular prognosis only if serum concentration is at the lowest limit of normal ranges. However, low iron levels and the type of dietary iron intake correlate with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, influence the ischemic endpoints in the elderly, and exert negative impact on heart failure prognosis. So far, the causal relation and involved mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Iron overload is a difficult and frequent condition, involving the cardiovascular system by specific pathogenic pathways, therefore determining a particular form of restrictive cardiomyopathy and vaso-occlusive arterial damage. PMID:25581946

Aursulesei, Viviana; Cozma, A; Krasniqi, A

2014-01-01

19

Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... in some cases, 30 days) following an infected tick's bite, the first stage of Lyme disease may begin ... appear until weeks, months, or years after a tick bite, include decreased concentration, irritability, memory and sleep disorders, ...

20

Ocular Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

PubMed Central

Though inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a specific predilection for the intestinal tract, it is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organs, including the eye. Ocular complications directly related to IBD are categorized as primary and secondary. Primary complications are usually temporally associated with IBD exacerbations and tend to resolve with systemic treatment of the intestinal inflammation. These include keratopathy, episcleritis, and scleritis. Secondary complications arise from primary complications. Examples include cataract formation due to treatment with corticosteroids, scleromalacia due to scleritis, and dry eye due to hypovitaminosis A following gut resection. Some ocular manifestations of IBD can lead to significant visual morbidity and temporally associated complications can also be a herald of disease control. Furthermore, ocular manifestations of IBD can occasionally manifest before the usual intestinal manifestations, leading to an earlier diagnosis. Thus, it is important to understand the clinical presentation of possible ocular manifestations in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to help prevent significant visual morbidity.

Mady, Rana; Grover, Will; Butrus, Salim

2015-01-01

21

Complications of chronic liver disease.  

PubMed

Children with chronic liver disease (CLD) need a head to toe approach and an early suspicion of multi organ involvement. Nutritional assessment and management is the cornerstone of management. Consider immune dysfunction in everyday treatment decisions. Consider early heart-lung-brain involvement in transplant evaluation. PMID:22521556

Tsouka, Alexandra; McLin, Valérie A

2012-06-01

22

[Rubella (German measles)--still a major infectious disease].  

PubMed

Rubella viruses are single-stranded ribonucleic acid viruses, which are surrounded by a lipid-containing membrane. From the taxonomic point of view, these serologically uniform viruses belong to the family of Togaviridae, and to the genus Rubivirus. After birth, infection with rubella virus occurs through inhalation of contaminated droplets. In children infected after birth, rubella viruses usually cause uncomplicated diseases that are associated with an unspecific rash (postnatal rubella). Rubella virus infections in adults might be more severe and can be accompanied by complications such as joint pain and inflammation in the joints. Rubella virus infection during pregnancy can lead to the infection of the fetus. In the first and second trimester of pregnancy, fetal rubella infection often lead to severe abnormalities of the newborn, which are summarized as rubella embryopathy or congenital rubella syndrome. One of these disorders, the Gregg syndrome, is associated with serious damage to heart, ears and eyes of the newborn. Therefore, in suspected cases of rubella virus infection during pregnancy, or after contact of a pregnant woman with an infected person, a serological diagnosis must be performed. The diagnosis of an acute rubella virus infection usually consists of the detection of rubella-specific IgM. Critical to avoiding a rubella virus infection is the immune prophylaxis, for which a live attenuated vaccine, usually given as trivalent vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR vaccine), is available. Since the introduction of the rubella vaccination in the 1970s, in many areas of the world the number of rubella diseases has declined dramatically. Nevertheless, rubella is still widespread in some countries, and still occurs in Germany. Postnatal rubella virus infections can be treated symptomatically. A specific (antiviral) therapy is not available. PMID:22332308

Stock, Ingo

2012-01-01

23

Pulmonary hypertension complicating connective tissue disease.  

PubMed

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may complicate connective tissue disease (CTD), particularly systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma), and markedly increases mortality. More than 70% of cases of PH complicating CTD occur in SSc, which is the major focus of this article. Pulmonary complications (i.e., interstitial lung disease [ILD] and PH) are the leading causes of scleroderma-related deaths. "Isolated" PH (i.e., without ILD) complicates SSc in 7.5 to 20% of cases; secondary PH may also occur in patients with SSc-associated ILD. Several clinical markers and specific autoantibody profiles have been associated with PH in SSc. The role of PH-specific therapy is controversial, as prognosis and responsiveness to therapy are worse in SSc-associated PH compared with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We discuss medical therapies for CTD-associated PH and the role of lung transplantation for patients failing medical therapy. PMID:24037627

Lynch, Joseph P; Belperio, John A; Saggar, Rajeev; Fishbein, Michael C; Saggar, Rajan

2013-10-01

24

Why do patients still require surgery for the late complications of Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimTo briefly review and discuss the literature on why patients still require surgery for the late complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR).Methods: Literature review.ResultsThe reasons for incomplete coverage of screening and screening failures can be divided into non-modifiable and potentially modifiable risk factors. The non-modifiable group includes duration of diabetes, age, genetic predisposition, ethnic differences, and the various reasons for

P H Scanlon

2010-01-01

25

Neurologic complications of valvular heart disease.  

PubMed

Valvular heart disease (VHD) is frequently associated with neurologic complications; cerebral embolism is the most common of these since thrombus formation results from the abnormalities in the valvular surfaces or from the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with valve dysfunction, such as atrial or ventricular enlargement, intracardiac thrombi, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Prosthetic heart valves, particularly mechanical valves, are very thrombogenic, which explains the high risk of thromboembolism and the need for anticoagulation for the prevention of embolism. Infective endocarditis is a disease process with protean manifestations that include not only cerebral embolism but also intracranial hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms, and systemic manifestations such as fever and encephalopathy. Other neurologic complications include nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, a process associated with systemic diseases such as cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus. For many of these conditions, anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment to prevent cerebral embolism, therefore it is the potential complications of anticoagulation that can explain other neurologic complications in patients with VHD. The prevention and management of these complications requires an understanding of their natural history in order to balance the risks posed by valvular disease itself against the risks and benefits associated with treatment. PMID:24365289

Cruz-Flores, Salvador

2014-01-01

26

Periodontal infection in adult-onset Still’s disease patient: clinical and haematological considerations  

PubMed Central

In this case report, the authors described the first case of a patient with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) who presents advanced periodontal infection. AOSD is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by spiking fever, usually exceeding 39°C, an evanescent salmon pink rash, arthritis and multiorgan involvement. Periodontal infection is a pathogen-induced oral inflammatory disease affecting the supporting tissues of teeth and is currently considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Several cytokines capable of inducing systemic effects are produced during the course of this infection and the values of serum markers of inflammation, such as C reactive protein (CRP), may significantly decrease after periodontal treatment. Although AOSD can produce elevations in CRP, similar increase may be produced by periodontal infection, suggesting the need for medical and dental diagnosis when evaluating the sources of acute-phase responses in systemic autoimmune disease patients. PMID:22696669

Pessoa, Larissa; Galvăo, Virgilio; Ferreira, Clarissa; Neto, Leopoldo Santos

2011-01-01

27

Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management  

SciTech Connect

In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

1990-01-01

28

[Chronic complications of sickle cell disease].  

PubMed

Chronic complications of sickle cell disease take an increasing role in the management of patients due to their morbidity and mortality impact. The prevalence of chronic organ damages increases as the age of patients followed in France. Few organs seem unaffected by the disease. The natural history of chronic complication is highly variable from one patient to another, and the distribution of those manifestations throughout life, is different depending on their nature and pathophysiology. Thus we can, for example, distinguish SS patients presenting a "hyperhemolytic" phenotype associated with dense red blood cells that have a high risk of vascular complications including kidney disease, pulmonary hypertension, leg ulcers and priapism, from SC patients with high hemoglobin levels, who have a higher risk of retinopathy, osteonecrosis and sensory syndrome, probably related to hyperviscosity. Dependent on the age, we could also oppose cerebral vasculopathy responsible of ischemic stroke since childhood, and kidney damage which effects are visible more gradually with aging. Sickle cell disease is one of the most systemic pathologies contrasting with its monogenic characteristic and its inter- and intra-individual variability. A better understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for those complications is necessary to develop new preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25510140

Bartolucci, Pablo; Lionnet, François

2014-10-01

29

Adult Onset Still’s Disease Presenting with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fevers, and arthralgias. Pulmonary involvement has been reported rarely in AOSD, but acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is extremely rare and potentially fatal and must be recognized as potential manifestation of underlying AOSD. Methods: We present a case of AOSD manifested by ARDS and review the previously reported cases in Medline/Pub med. Results: Including this case, 19 cases of AOSD complicated with ARDS have been reported in the literature. Conclusions: It is important to recognize ARDS as a manifestation of AOSD so that proper diagnostic and therapeutic management can be initiated promptly. PMID:24459537

Dua, Anisha B.; Manadan, Augustine M.; Case, John P.

2013-01-01

30

Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death represent main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Pathogenesis includes close linkage between heart and kidneys and involves traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors. According to a well-established classification of cardiorenal syndrome, cardiovascular involvement in CKD is known as "type-4 cardiorenal syndrome" (chronic renocardiac). The following review makes an overview about epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular complications in CKD patients. PMID:25344016

Di Lullo, Luca; House, Andrew; Gorini, Antonio; Santoboni, Alberto; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

2015-05-01

31

Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease.  

PubMed

Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

2014-09-01

32

Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

Xu, Ren-Shi

2015-01-01

33

Adult Onset Still's Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever  

PubMed Central

Adult Still's Disease was first described in 1971 by Bywaters in fourteen adult female patients who presented with symptoms indistinguishable from that of classic childhood Still's Disease (Bywaters, 1971). George Still in 1896 first recognized this triad of quotidian (daily) fevers, evanescent rash, and arthritis in children with what later became known as juvenile inflammatory arthritis (Still, 1990). Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory condition of unknown etiology characterized by an evanescent rash, quotidian fevers, and arthralgias. Numerous infectious agents have been associated with its presentation. This case is to our knowledge the first presentation of AOSD in the setting of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Although numerous infectious agents have been suggested, the etiology of this disorder remains elusive. Nevertheless, infection may in fact play a role in triggering the onset of symptoms in those with this disorder. Our case presentation is, to our knowledge, the first case of Adult Onset Still's Disease associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). PMID:20811570

Persad, Paul; Patel, Rajendrakumar; Patel, Niki

2010-01-01

34

Gaucher disease: haematological presentations and complications.  

PubMed

Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, required for the degradation of glycosphingolipids. Clinical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, bone disease and a bleeding diathesis, frequently resulting in presentation to haematologists. Historically managed by splenectomy, transfusions and orthopaedic surgery, the development of specific therapy in the form of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy in the 1990s has resulted in dramatic improvements in haematological and visceral disease. Recognition of complications, including multiple myeloma and Parkinson disease, has challenged the traditional macrophage-centric view of the pathophysiology of this disorder. The pathways by which enzyme deficiency results in the clinical manifestations of this disorder are poorly understood; altered inflammatory cytokine profiles, bioactive sphingolipid derivatives and alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment have been implicated. Further elucidating these pathways will serve to advance our understanding not only of GD, but of associated disorders. PMID:24588457

Thomas, Alison S; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A

2014-05-01

35

Use of methotrexate in adult-onset Still's disease.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's disease, a febrile, multisystem rheumatic disease, has variable outcomes. Some patients experience remission after a single or multiple inflammatory episodes, while others progress to a chronic course with substantial joint destruction. Although no controlled clinical trials with immunosuppressive agents in this disease have been reported, a number of small uncontrolled studies and case reports describe the use of methotrexate therapy. Methotrexate has shown efficacy for the control of systemic and articular symptoms and its favourable safety profile appears similar to that seen in other rheumatic diseases, when for this indication. The combination of methotrexate and corticosteroids has, over the years, become the first step in the standard of care in adult-onset Still's disease. If the response to this treatment is incomplete, additional therapies, such as biologic agents may be appropriate. PMID:21044454

Manger, B; Rech, J; Schett, G

2010-01-01

36

An Unusual Presentation of Adult Onset Still's Disease.  

PubMed

Adult onset still's disease usually presents with high grade intermittent fever, polyarthritis, salmon pink evanescent rash and hepatosplenomegaly. Pulmonary involvement in the form of pneumonitis, as a presenting feature is very rare. We report a case of a young lady who presented with fever, cough and respiratory distress. Chest X-ray revealed patchy infiltration in left upper lung zone. She was subsequently diagnosed as Adult onset Still's disease. There was no improvement in clinical condition despite five days of antibiotics. On trans-bronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) proved she had interstitial pneumonitis and responded dramatically to steroid treatment. PMID:23770876

Ghosal, A; Pal, R B; Das, S K; Das, T

2012-10-01

37

Meniere's disease: Still a mystery disease with difficult differential diagnosis.  

PubMed

One hundred and forty-six years after its first description, the differential diagnosis of Meniere's disease remains very challenging. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the new diagnostic methods for Meniere's disease. The importance of accurate diagnosis for primary healthcare systems is also discussed. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline and other available database sources. Information from electronic links and related books were also included. Controlled clinical studies, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, written guidelines, systematic reviews, and books were selected. The typical clinical triad of symptoms from the vestibular and cochlear systems (recurrent vertigo, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) is usually the key for clinical diagnosis. Glycerol dehydration test and electrocochleography are the main diagnostic tests in current practice, while vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may be used in disease staging. Imagine techniques are not specific enough to set alone the diagnosis of Meniere's disease, although they may be necessary to exclude other pathologies. Recently developed 3D MRI protocols can delineate the perilymphatic/endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear and aid diagnosis. Meniere's disease is a continuous problem for the patients and affects their quality of life. Taking into account the frequent nature of the disease in certain countries, efforts for reliable diagnosis, prompt referral, and successful management are undoubtedly cost-effective for healthcare systems. PMID:21633608

Vassiliou, A; Vlastarakos, P V; Maragoudakis, P; Candiloros, D; Nikolopoulos, T P

2011-01-01

38

Postpandemic Influenza A/H1N1pdm09 is still Causing Severe Perinatal Complications  

PubMed Central

Although influenza A/H1N1pdm09 is not causing a pandemic anymore, we recently observed two critically ill pregnant women infected by this virus. We present these cases to illustrate the possible severe complications of an – at that moment – seasonal influenza in pregnancy. We discuss the epidemiological differences between the pandemic and post pandemic phase and try to explain the high virulence of influenza A/H1N1pdm09 -infections in pregnancy by discussing insights in immunology during pregnancy. We conclude that although influenza A/H1N1pdm09 is in the post pandemic phase, infection by this influenza virus still needs to be considered in pregnant women with progressive respiratory dysfunction. PMID:25574366

Bogers, Hein; Bos, Dominique; Schoenmakers, Sam; Duvekot, Johannes J

2015-01-01

39

Adult onset Still's disease and related renal amyloidosis.  

PubMed Central

A 57 year old woman presented with clinical and biological features of adult onset Still's disease. A kidney biopsy was performed at the onset of the condition and was found to be normal. Four years later, in view of a nephrotic syndrome, histopathological examination of a new kidney biopsy specimen was made and showed typical amyloid deposition. Renal amyloidosis was suspected in five previously reported cases but demonstrated by kidney biopsy in only two of them. In the present case renal amyloidosis was recorded after disease of four years' duration. The normality of the first renal biopsy specimen suggests the possibility of a direct relation between amyloidosis and adult onset Still's disease. Images PMID:2029209

Wendling, D; Humbert, P G; Billerey, C; Fest, T; Dupond, J L

1991-01-01

40

Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease  

PubMed Central

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common monogenetic disorder with high associated morbidity and mortality. The pulmonary complications of SCD are of particular importance, as acute chest syndrome and pulmonary hypertension have the highest associated mortality rates within this population. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of clinically significant pulmonary manifestations of SCD, including acute chest syndrome, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension in adult and pediatric patients. Clinicians should be vigilant in screening and treating such comorbidities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:22447965

Miller, Andrew C.

2012-01-01

41

Psychosocial Complications of Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Background: Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death around the world. The coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most common diseases in this category, which can be the trigger to various psychosocial complications. We believe that inadequate attention has been paid to this issue. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to explore the psychosocial complications of CAD from the Iranian patients’ perspective. Patients and Methods: A qualitative design based on the content analysis approach was used to collect the data and analyze the perspective of 18 Iranian patients suffered from CAD, chosen by a purposeful sampling strategy. Semi-structured interviews were held in order to collect the data. Sampling was continued until the data saturation. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis approach by MAXQUDA 2010 software. Results: This study revealed the theme of the patients’ challenges with CAD. This theme consisted of: "primary challenges," including doubting early diagnosis and treatment, and feeling being different from others; "psychological issues," including preoccupation, fear of death and surgical intervention, recurrence stress , anxiety and depression; "problems of life," including financial problems, work-related problems, and family-related problems; and "sociocultural issues," including change in perspective of people towards the patient, and cultural issues. Conclusions: Although the management of physical problems in patients with CAD is important, psychosocial effects of this disease is more important. Thus, health care personnel should pay ample attention to identify and resolve psychosocial problems of these patients. Results of this study can be used to empower these patients. PMID:25068057

Karimi-Moonaghi, Hossein; Mojalli, Mohammad; Khosravan, Shahla

2014-01-01

42

Celiac disease: how complicated can it get?  

PubMed Central

In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. This association can be explained by the fact that gluten peptides can be presented in HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules on antigen presenting cells. Gluten-specific CD4+ T cells in the lamina propria respond to these peptides, and this likely enhances cytotoxicity of intraepithelial lymphocytes against the intestinal epithelium. We propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease, in which the efficiency of gluten presentation to CD4+ T cells determines the likelihood of developing celiac disease and its complications. Key factors that influence the efficiency of gluten presentation include: (1) the level of gluten intake, (2) the enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 which modifies gluten into high affinity binding peptides for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, (3) the HLA-DQ type, as HLA-DQ2 binds a wider range of gluten peptides than HLA-DQ8, (4) the gene dose of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and finally,(5) additional genetic polymorphisms that may influence T cell reactivity. This threshold model might also help to understand the development of refractory celiac disease and lymphoma. PMID:20661732

van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

2010-01-01

43

Onset of adult-onset Still's disease following influenza vaccination.  

PubMed

We describe that case of a 61-year-old woman who developed high spiking fever, sore throat, polyarthralgia, and salmon pink evanescent rash following influenza vaccination. A diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) was made based on clinical and laboratory findings. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone resulted in a favorable outcome. This is the second published case in which a causal relationship between vaccination and onset of AOSD is suggested. Bystander activation would appear to play an important role in inducing the immune reaction. PMID:21327453

Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Fujimoto, Shunsuke; Oba, Hiroko; Minami, Mieko; Aoki, Tetsuya

2011-08-01

44

Thromboembolic complications in inflammatory bowel disease.  

PubMed

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a 1.5-3.5-fold higher risk of thromboembolism when compared to the non-IBD population and the risk is much more prominent at the time of a flare. Arterial thromboembolism (ischemic stroke, focal white matter ischemia, cardiac ischemia, peripheral vascular disease and mesenteric ischemia) and venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, retinal, hepatic, portal and mesenteric vein thromboses) belong to the group of underestimated extraintestinal complications in IBD patients, which are associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate (the overall mortality is as high as 25 % per episode). Thromboembolism occurs in younger patients compared to the non-IBD population and has a high recurrence rate. Multiple risk factors are involved in the etiopathogenesis, but the acquired ones play the key role. Congenital alterations do not occur more frequently in IBD patients when compared to the non-IBD population. Standardized guidelines for the prophylaxis of thromboembolism in IBD patients are urgently needed and these should be respected in clinical practice to avoid preventable morbidity and mortality. PMID:25115840

Kohoutova, Darina; Moravkova, Paula; Kruzliak, Peter; Bures, Jan

2015-05-01

45

Adamantiades-Behcet's disease-complicated gastroenteropathy.  

PubMed

Adamantiades-Behcet's disease (ABD) is a chronic, relapsing, systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. It is more prevalent in populations along the ancient Silk Road from Eastern Asia to the Mediterranean Basin, and most frequently affects young adults between the second and fourth decades of life. ABD-complicated gastroenteropathy is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with abdominal pain as the most common symptom. The ileocecal region is affected predominantly, with ulcerations that may lead to penetration and/or perforation, whereas other parts of the gastrointestinal system including the esophagus and stomach can also be affected. Endoscopy is useful to locate the site and extent of the lesions, and tissue biopsy is often warranted to examine the histopathology that is often suggestive of underlying vasculitis of small veins/venules or, alternatively in some cases, nonspecific inflammation. Bowel wall thickening is the most common finding on computed tomography scan. Treatment is largely empirical since well-controlled studies are difficult to conduct due to the heterogeneity of the disease, and the unpredictable course with exacerbation and remission. Corticosteroids with or without other immunosuppressive drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, sulfasalazine, tumor necrosis factor ? antagonist or thalidomide should be applied before surgery, except in emergency. PMID:22363131

Wu, Qing-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Zhang, Xuan

2012-02-21

46

Elevated Troponin Serum Levels in Adult Onset Still's Disease  

PubMed Central

Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory systemic disease that occasionally may affect myocardium. Diagnosis is based on typical AOSD symptoms after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. In the case of abrupt, recent onset AOSD, it could be particularly difficult to make the differential diagnosis and in particular to early detect the possible heart involvement. This latter event is suggested by the clinical history of the four patients described here, incidentally observed at our emergency room. All cases were referred because of acute illness (high fever, malaise, polyarthralgias, skin rash, and sore throat), successively classified as AOSD, and they presented abnormally high levels of serum troponin without overt symptoms of cardiac involvement. The timely treatment with steroids (3 cases) or ibuprofen (1 case) leads to the remission of clinicoserological manifestations within few weeks. These observations suggest that early myocardial injury might be underestimated or entirely overlooked in patients with AOSD; routine cardiac assessment including troponin evaluation should be mandatory in all patients with suspected AOSD. PMID:25767733

Manzini, Carlo Umberto; Brugioni, Lucio; Colaci, Michele; Tognetti, Maurizio; Spinella, Amelia; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo

2015-01-01

47

Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease  

PubMed Central

Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever. PMID:23213331

Honarmand, Hamidreza

2012-01-01

48

Successful Surgical Treatment of Cardiac Complication of Graves Disease  

PubMed Central

Cardiac complications such as arrhythmia and heart failure are common in Graves disease. Early detection and proper treatment of hyperthyroidism are important because cardiac complications are reported to be reversible if the thyroid function is normalized by medical treatment. We report here a case of cardiac complication of Graves disease that was too late to reverse with medical treatment and required surgical treatment. PMID:25207231

Min, Jooncheol; Kim, Woong-Han; Jang, Woo Sung; Choi, Eun Seok; Cho, Sungkyu; Choi, Kwang Ho

2014-01-01

49

[Radiologic diagnosis of enterosalpingeal fistula complicating Crohn's disease].  

PubMed

Enterosalpingeal fistula is a rare complication of Crohn's disease which is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. We describe a new case of this complication suspected by CT scan and confirmed by hysterosalpingogram and contrast from the ileum. This case is about a 50-year-old woman suffering from ileal Crohn's disease diagnosed two years previously and actually complicated by stenosis and entero-salpingeal fistula. The treatment consisted on resection of the ileocaecal region with salpingectomy. Postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:18337036

Bedioui, H; Nouira, K; Chaker, Y; Chebbi, F; Ksantini, R; Daghfous, A; Rebai, W; Fteriche, F; Ammous, A; Jouini, M; Kacem, M J; BenSafta, Z

2008-02-01

50

[Colonic Crohn's disease complicated with peripheral neuropathy].  

PubMed

The association of Crohn's disease and peripheral neuropathy is a rare event and the pathogenic factors often implicated are vitamin B12 deficiency or metronidazole treatment. We report a case of severe axonal polyneuropathy associated with Crohn's disease and unrelated to vitamin deficiency or metronidazole treatment. This represents a very rare extra-digestive manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:2125951

Chaoui, F; Hellal, H; Balamane, M; Boudhane, M; Mikol, J; Masmoudi, A

1990-01-01

51

Management of a Pregnancy Complicated by Pompe Disease  

PubMed Central

Background. As more women with metabolic muscle diseases reach reproductive age, knowledge of these diseases and their impact on pregnancy is necessary. Case. 23-year-old G1P0 with juvenile-onset Pompe disease (PD) delivered a viable infant by cesarean section at 32 weeks and 6 days. The pregnancy was complicated by worsening maternal pulmonary status, muscular strength, and mobility. Conclusion. The management of pregnancies complicated by Pompe disease requires a multidisciplinary approach, including expertise in neuromuscular disease, maternal-fetal medicine, biochemical genetics, pulmonology, anesthesia, and dietetics. PMID:23304582

Weida, Jennifer; Hainline, B. E.; Bodkin, C.; Williams, M. K.

2012-01-01

52

Motor complications in Parkinson disease: Clinical manifestations and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term dopaminomimetic therapy, not limited to levodopa, is complicated by the emergence of variations of motor response in a majority of Parkinson disease (PD) patients. These variations can occur in different forms, as early wearing off during the initial stage of motor complications, dyskinesias in the intermediate stage, and complex fluctuations in the advanced stage. Considered to be a major

Roongroj Bhidayasiri; Daniel D. Truong

2008-01-01

53

[Role of enterosorbents in treatment of complicated varicose disease].  

PubMed

Results of treatment of 43 patients, suffering varicose disease, complicated by trophic disorders, were analyzed. To the patients a complex was prescribed, including sorpents, angioprotectors, locally - ointments. There were operated 14 patients. PMID:25252553

Biliaieva, O O; Korzhyk, N P; Myronov, O M; Balins'ka, M I; Iemets', V V

2014-06-01

54

Pulmonary hypertension complicating interstitial lung disease and COPD.  

PubMed

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may complicate parenchymal lung disease, specifically interstitial lung diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and uniformly increases the mortality risk. The epidemiology and degree of PH is variable and unique to the underlying lung disease. The clinician should exercise a high index of suspicion for PH complicating parenchymal lung disease especially given the nonspecific symptomatology and the limitations of echocardiography in this patient population. In general, PH-specific therapies in this setting have been poorly studied, with concern for increased shunting and/or ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch and resultant hypoxemia. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying PH related to parenchymal lung disease may lead to novel pharmacological targets to prevent or treat this serious complication. PMID:24037628

Shino, Michael Y; Lynch, Joseph P; Saggar, Rajeev; Abtin, Fereidoun; Belperio, John A; Saggar, Rajan

2013-10-01

55

Extrahepatic complications of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.  

PubMed

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of chronic liver disease, and is strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome. In the last decade, it has become apparent that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity or mortality, and the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients are related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. These findings have fuelled concerns that NAFLD may be a new, and added risk factor for extrahepatic diseases such as CVD, chronic kidney disease (CKD), colorectal cancer, endocrinopathies (including type 2 diabetes mellitus [T2DM] and thyroid dysfunction), and osteoporosis. In this review we critically appraise key studies on NAFLD-associated extrahepatic disease. There was marked heterogeneity between studies in study design (cross-sectional versus prospective; sample size; presence/absence of well-defined controls), population (ethnic diversity; community-based versus hospital-based cohorts), and method of NAFLD diagnosis (liver enzymes versus imaging versus biopsy). Taking this into account, the cumulative evidence to date suggests that individuals with NAFLD (specifically, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) harbor an increased and independent risk of developing CVD, T2DM, CKD, and colorectal neoplasms. We propose future studies are necessary to better understand these risks, and suggest an example of a screening strategy. PMID:24002776

Armstrong, Matthew J; Adams, Leon A; Canbay, Ali; Syn, Wing-Kin

2014-03-01

56

Treatment- and Disease-Related Complications of Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

One of the highlights of the 16th International Prostate Cancer Update was a session on treatment- and disease-related complications of prostate disease. It began with presentation of a challenging case of rising prostate-specific antigen levels after radical prostatectomy, followed by an overview of the use of zoledronic acid in prostate cancer, a review of side effects of complementary medicines, an overview of complications of cryotherapy, an assessment of complications of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy, and a comparison of laparoscopy versus open prostatectomy. PMID:17021643

Simoneau, Anne R

2006-01-01

57

Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease  

PubMed Central

Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician’s tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients’ education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections. PMID:25110408

Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

2014-01-01

58

The Management of Complicated Celiac Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is being defined as persisting or recurring villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in spite of a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) for >12 months or when severe persisting symptoms necessitate intervention independent of the duration of the GFD. RCD may not respond primarily or secondarily to GFD. All other causes of malabsorption

A. Al-toma; W. H. M. Verbeek; C. J. J. Mulder

2007-01-01

59

Cardiovascular complications of collagen vascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Collagen vascular diseases commonly affect the heart; cardiovascular events are the major cause of mortality in people with\\u000a these diseases.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a A striking feature of the cardiac involvement in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis\\u000a is aggressive and accelerated atherosclerosis; women with SLE in the 35-to 44-year-old age group are more than 50 times

Gary E. Sander; Thomas D. Giles

2002-01-01

60

Strategy for adult aortic coarctation complicated by coronary artery disease.  

PubMed

Aortic coarctation in adults is sometimes associated with a fragile aortic wall and may be complicated by coronary artery disease and ascending aortic dilation. Successful management of aortic coarctation in a 45-year-old man with coronary artery disease is described. Tube graft replacement was carried out without cross clamping, under circulatory arrest with axillary artery and graft inflow. PMID:17540981

Fujisawa, Yasuaki; Morishita, Kiyofumi; Fukada, Johji; Hachiro, Yoshikazu; Saito, Tatsuya; Abe, Tomio

2007-06-01

61

The Evaluation of Pain Complicating Primary Disabling Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain syndromes complicate many diseases that cause disability. Not uncom- monly, more than one pain syndrome may follow a disease process: The literature describes somatic incisional pain, neurogenic phantom pain, and neurogenic neu- roma pain following amputation (1). Precisely defined, as well as generalized, pain syndromes exist: For example, thalamic, or central pain syndrome, charac- terized by burning hemibody pain

Donna Marie Bloodworth

62

Complications of coeliac disease: are all patients at risk?  

PubMed Central

Coeliac disease is a common condition that is increasingly being recognised as a result of the development of sensitive and specific serology. The diagnosis of coeliac disease and its subsequent treatment with a gluten?free diet have implications for the patient, not just for symptom control but also for the possible effect on quality of life and risk of complications. Whether the mode of presentation of coeliac disease has an effect on survival or risk of complication is yet unclear. This article reviews the available evidence regarding these issues. PMID:17099088

Goddard, C J R; Gillett, H R

2006-01-01

63

Adult-Onset Still's Disease Masquerading as Sepsis in an Asplenic Active Duty Soldier  

PubMed Central

This is a case of a 26-year-old active duty male with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and surgical asplenia who presented with a one-week history of fevers, myalgias, arthralgias, and rigors. His evaluation upon presentation was significant for a temperature of 103 degrees F, white blood cell count of 36?K with a granulocytic predominance, and elevated transaminases. He was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics with concern for a systemic infection with an encapsulated organism. During his stay, he developed four SIRS criteria and was transferred to the progressive care unit for suspected sepsis. He continued to have twice-daily fevers and a faint, salmon-colored centripetal rash was eventually observed during his febrile episodes. After a nondiagnostic microbiologic and serologic workup, he was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's Disease and started on intravenous methylprednisolone with brisk response. He was discharged on oral prednisone and was started on anakinra. Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare condition that presents with varying severity, and this is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of its diagnosis in an asplenic patient. Its management in the setting of asplenia is complicated by the need for antibiotic therapy with each episode of fever. PMID:23251171

Jaqua, Nathan T.; Finger, David; Hawley, Joshua S.

2012-01-01

64

Adult-onset Still's disease-pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and new treatment options.  

PubMed

Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), a systemic inflammatory disorder, is often considered a part of the spectrum of the better-known systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, with later age onset. The diagnosis is primarily clinical and necessitates the exclusion of a wide range of mimicking disorders. AOSD is a heterogeneous entity, usually presenting with high fever, arthralgia, skin rash, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly accompanied by systemic manifestations. The diagnosis is clinical and empirical, where patients are required to meet inclusion and exclusion criteria with negative immunoserological results. There are no clear-cut diagnostic radiological or laboratory signs. Complications of AOSD include transient pulmonary hypertension, macrophage activation syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and amyloidosis. Common laboratory abnormalities include neutrophilic leukocytosis, abnormal liver function tests, and elevated acute-phase reactants (ESR, CRP, ferritin). Treatment consists of anti-inflammatory medications. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have limited efficacy, and corticosteroid therapy and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are usually required. Recent advances have revealed a pivotal role of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-18 in disease pathogenesis, giving rise to the development of novel targeted therapies aiming at optimal disease control. The review aims to summarize recent advances in pathophysiology and potential therapeutic strategies in AOSD. PMID:25613167

Kadavath, Sabeeda; Efthimiou, Petros

2015-02-01

65

Gallstone ileus – a rare disease and still many discrepancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  BACKGROUND: Gallstone ileus is a rare disease. Definite diagnosis is rarely established before surgery. Optimal treatment strategy, indication to cholecystectomy and management of biliary fistula remains controversial. METHODS: A retrospective study and data analysis of patients operated on for gallstone ileus at the Department of Surgery, Motol University Hospital during the past sixteen years (1st January 1989 – 31st December

J. Šimša; J. Leffler; D. Charvát; P. Grabec; J. Hoch

2006-01-01

66

Spontaneous Duodenal Perforation as a Complication of Kawasaki Disease  

PubMed Central

Kawasaki disease is generally known as a systemic vasculitis that often concerns doctors due to its serious cardiac complications; however, other visceral organs may get involved as well. Surgical manifestations of the intestinal tract in Kawasaki disease are rare. In this report, we describe the case of a 2.5-year-old boy with typical Kawasaki disease who presented with GI bleeding and surgical abdomen. The diagnosis of duodenal perforation was confirmed.

Forouzan, Arash; Saidi, Hossein; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Khavanin, Ali; Bahadoram, Mohammad

2015-01-01

67

Bone and joint complications related to Gaucher disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a broad spectrum of Gaucher disease-related skeletal complications, ranging from asymptomatic osteopenia to osteonecrosis\\u000a (of the shoulders and hips) with secondary degenerative joint disease. Characterization of the pattern and severity of bone\\u000a involvement in the individual patient requires the application of conventional and advanced radiographic techniques. The introduction\\u000a of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for this inborn error of

Gregory M. Pastores; Manan J. Patel; Hossien Firooznia

2000-01-01

68

Cutaneous manifestations associated with adult-onset Still's disease: important diagnostic values.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory condition, characterized by a high spiking fever, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, arthralgia, and skin rash. Typical skin rash is an evanescent, salmon-pink erythema predominantly involving extremities, which is included as one of the diagnostic criteria; however, recent findings show that not only typical evanescent rash but also various skin lesions are associated with AOSD. The representative characteristic skin lesion among the non-classical skin rash is called persistent pruritic papules and plaques, which presents erythematous, slightly scaly papules with linear configuration on the trunk. Interestingly, persistent pruritic papules and plaques show unique histological features such as peculiar, distinctive distribution of dyskeratotic keratinocytes in the cornified layers as well as in the epidermis. Other non-classical skin lesions include urticaria. Current insights suggest that several inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-18, interferon-? (IFN-?) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) play a pathogenic role in AOSD. In particular, IL-18 is suggested to play a crucial role in activating macrophages, favoring Th1 type cytokine production. IL-18 induces IFN-?, IL-17, and TNF-?, which may play an important pathogenic role in AOSD. It is important to recognize the common and/or uncommon skin conditions of AOSD for early correct diagnosis. In this review, various skin lesions are introduced, and the complication with histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi disease) is further discussed. PMID:22198666

Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

2012-08-01

69

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a woman with adult-onset Still's disease: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Adult onset Still's disease is a chronic multisystemic inflammatory disorder characterized by high spiking fever, polyarthralgia and rash. Lymphadenopathy is a prominent feature of adult onset Still's disease and is seen in about 65% of patients. Searching the medical literature using the MEDLINE database from January 1966 through November 2007 we could only find two reported cases of adult

Zaher K Otrock; Hassan A Hatoum; Imad W Uthman; Ali T Taher; Shahrazad Saab; Ali I Shamseddine

2008-01-01

70

Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis complicating Legionnaires' disease: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Legionnaires' disease is recognized as a multi-systemic illness. Afflicted patients may have pulmonary, renal, gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system complications. However, renal insufficiency is uncommon. The spectrum of renal involvement may range from a mild and transient elevation of serum creatinine levels to anuric renal failure requiring dialysis and may be linked to several causes. In our present case report, we would like to draw attention to the importance of the pathological documentation of acute renal failure by reporting a case of a patient with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis complicating Legionnaires' disease. Case presentation A 55-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital for community-acquired pneumonia complicated by acute renal failure. Legionella pneumophila serogroup type 1 was diagnosed. Although the patient's respiratory illness responded to intravenous erythromycin and ofloxacin therapy, his renal failure worsened, he became anuric, and hemodialysis was started. A renal biopsy was performed, which revealed severe tubulointerstitial nephritis. After initiation of steroid therapy, his renal function improved dramatically. Conclusions This case highlights the importance of kidney biopsies in cases where acute renal failure is a complicating factor in Legionnaires' disease. If the presence of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis can be confirmed, it will likely respond favorably to steroidal treatment and thus irreversible renal damage and chronic renal failure will be avoided. PMID:22475340

2012-01-01

71

How I treat renal complications in sickle cell disease.  

PubMed

Renal disease is one of the most frequent and severe complications experienced by patients with sickle cell disease; its prevalence is likely to increase as the patient population ages. We recommend regular monitoring for early signs of renal involvement and a low threshold for the use of hydroxyurea as preventative measures for end-stage renal disease. Once renal complications are detected, a careful assessment of the patient is required to rule out other causes of renal disease. Proteinuria and hypertension should be managed aggressively and the patient referred to a specialist nephrology center when progressive decline in renal function is noted. For the few patients who develop advanced chronic kidney disease, timely planning for dialysis and transplantation can significantly improve outcome, and we recommend an exchange blood transfusion policy for all patients on the transplant waiting list and for those with a functioning graft. Alongside the invasive treatment regimes, it is important to remember that renal failure in conjunction with sickle cell disease does carry a significant burden of morbidity and that focusing on symptom control has to be central to good patient care. PMID:24764565

Sharpe, Claire C; Thein, Swee Lay

2014-06-12

72

Efficacy and Complications of Surgery for Crohn's Disease  

PubMed Central

Patients with Crohn's disease commonly undergo surgery during their lifetime. Indications for surgical intervention include obstruction, intra-abdominal or perianal abscess, enterocutaneous fistulas, and complex perianal disease. As medical therapies continue to improve, it is important that surgical therapies are chosen carefully. This is particularly important in the treatment of perianal fistulas; combined surgical and medical therapy offer the best chance for success. In the treatment of small-bowel disease, bowel preservation is key. For the repair of short strictures, endoscopic dilatation is the preferred method when accessible; strictureplasty has been shown to be safe and effective for increasingly longer segments of disease. Intra-abdominal abscesses should be drained percutaneously, if possible. In the presence of colonic disease, segmental resection is recommended. Unfortunately, refractory disease still frequently requires complete proctectomy and permanent diversion. PMID:21088749

Lewis, Robert T.

2010-01-01

73

Oral and dental complications of sickle cell disease in Nigerians.  

PubMed

A clinical evaluation of the oral and dental complications of sickle cell disease in Nigerians was carried out in 37 consecutive patients with homozygous sickle cell disease Hb-SS (Sicklers) compared to a control group of 24 persons with normal haemoglobin Hb-AA (control group) matched for age and sex. The significant abnormalities found in sicklers included intrinsic opacity of the teeth in 67.5% of sicklers compared to 28.83% in the control group; malocclusion of the teeth with over-jet and over-bite in 35% of sicklers compared to 16.66% in the control group; dental caries is present in 35.13% of sicklers which was less than its occurrence in 54% of the control group due to widespread avoidance of sweets by most local sicklers. Diastemata (gaps between the teeth) was present in approximately equal frequency in sicklers (27%) and control group (25%). In view of the aesthetic and medical implications of these abnormalities, it is recommended that sicklers should receive regular dental check-up with a view to ameliorating or preventing these complications by prophylactic measures including the use of orthodontic appliances such as braces, etc. The above findings are discussed in relation to the other complications of sickler cell disease in other organs of the body. PMID:3767074

Okafor, L A; Nonnoo, D C; Ojehanon, P I; Aikhionbare, O

1986-09-01

74

[Infectious complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].  

PubMed

Despite advances in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease over the past two decades, infection of liver and kidney cysts remains a serious and potentially threatening complication. Kidney cyst infection is the most frequent complication. It is differentiated from hemorrhage by the clinical presentation (mainly the severity and duration of fever), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cells levels, and the density of the suspected cyst on computed tomography. Liver cyst infection occurs more frequently in patients with large cysts volumes. It can be life threatening and has a tendency to recur. In both infections, the best radiological imaging technique is positron emission tomography after intravenous injection of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography. Treatment with a fluoroquinolone should be continued for 6 weeks. Cyst aspiration is necessary only when cysts are very large and/or when infection is resistant to antibiotic treatment. In patients who are candidates to kidney transplantation, a history of recurrent kidney cyst infection justifies pre-transplant nephrectomy, while a past history of recurrent liver cyst infection or angiocholitis leads to consider liver transplantation. Among extrarenal and extrahepatic complications of polycystic disease, colic diverticulosis is reported to be associated with increased risk of infection in patients on hemodialysis and after kidney transplantation. However, this observation needs to be confirmed. PMID:25733396

Pirson, Yves; Kanaan, Nada

2015-04-01

75

Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!  

PubMed Central

Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, weakness, fractures and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of severe osteomalacia. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and iron. This case affirms that chronic untreated celiac disease, can lead to an important bone loss and irreversible complications like skeletal deformities. PMID:25667705

Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

2014-01-01

76

Bone Health and Associated Metabolic Complications in Neuromuscular Diseases  

PubMed Central

Synopsis This article reviews the recent literature regarding bone health as it relates to the patient living with neuromuscular disease (NMD). Poor bone health with related morbidity is a significant problem for patients with NMD. Although the evidence addressing issues of bone health and osteoporosis have increased as a result of the Bone and Joint Decade, studies defining the scope of bone-related disease in NMD are scant. The available evidence is discussed focusing on abnormal calcium metabolism, increased fracture risk, and the prevalence of both scoliosis and hypovitaminosis D in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. These problems appear common. Osteomalacia often complicates disease-related baseline osteoporosis and may reduce fracture risk if treated. Future directions are discussed, including the urgent need for studies to both determine the nature and extent of poor bone health, and to evaluate the therapeutic effect of available osteoporosis treatments in patients with NMD. PMID:23137737

Joyce, Nanette C.; Hache, Lauren P.; Clemens, Paula R.

2014-01-01

77

Extremely high serum ferritin levels as a main diagnostic tool of adult-onset Still's disease.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology characterised by typical symptoms including daily high spiking fever, evanescent salmon-pink rash, sore throat, arthritis/arthralgias and polyserositis. The laboratory findings usually show neutrophilic leucocytosis, seronegativity and raised serum transaminases. We describe six typical cases. All of them had serum ferritin above 5,000 µg/L. Although there are few theories about the origin of the high ferritin level, an extremely high serum ferritin above 5,000 µg/L should be the main diagnostic tool of adult-onset Still's disease. PMID:21359498

Novak, Srdan; Anic, Felina; Luke-Vrbani?, Tea Schnurrerer

2012-04-01

78

[Bacterial lipopolsaccharides in pathogenesis of gynecological diseases and obstetric complications].  

PubMed

Analysis of literature data and author studies on the role of lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) of Gram negative bacteria in women genital tract pathology and obstetric complications is presented. The role of endogenous infection associated with altered microecology of intestinal tract and vaginal biotopes of women in the development of endotoxinemia is discussed. The participation of endotoxin in embryo resorption, delay of intrauterine development and antenatal death of fetus, premature birth, pre-eclampsia, placental dysfunction is examined. The level of endotoxinema and pro-inflammatory cytokines is a marker of chronic endogenous infectious-inflammatory disease of various parts of genital tract with damage of a network of female reproduction system organs. PMID:25286536

Bondarenko, K M; Bondarenko, V M

2014-01-01

79

Transvaginal approach for repair of rectovaginal fistulae complicating Crohn's disease.  

PubMed Central

The management of rectovaginal fistulae complicating Crohn's disease is difficult and often unsatisfactory. Between December 1983 and November 1988, 13 patients with Crohn's disease underwent repair of rectovaginal fistulae via a transvaginal approach. All patients had a diverting intestinal stoma either as part of the initial step in the staged management of intractable perianal disease or concurrent with the repair of the rectovaginal fistula. Each of the patients had low or mid septal fistulae; high fistulae generally are treated transabdominally and are not the focus of this discussion. Fistulae were eradicated in 12 of the 13 women and did not recur during the follow-up period, which averaged 50 months (range, 9 to 68 months). The only treatment failure was a patient who had a markedly diseased colon from the cecum to the rectum and a very low-lying fistula. It is concluded that a modified transvaginal approach is an effective method for repair of rectovaginal fistulae secondary to Crohn's disease. PMID:1992942

Bauer, J J; Sher, M E; Jaffin, H; Present, D; Gelerent, I

1991-01-01

80

Transvaginal approach for repair of rectovaginal fistulae complicating Crohn's disease.  

PubMed

The management of rectovaginal fistulae complicating Crohn's disease is difficult and often unsatisfactory. Between December 1983 and November 1988, 13 patients with Crohn's disease underwent repair of rectovaginal fistulae via a transvaginal approach. All patients had a diverting intestinal stoma either as part of the initial step in the staged management of intractable perianal disease or concurrent with the repair of the rectovaginal fistula. Each of the patients had low or mid septal fistulae; high fistulae generally are treated transabdominally and are not the focus of this discussion. Fistulae were eradicated in 12 of the 13 women and did not recur during the follow-up period, which averaged 50 months (range, 9 to 68 months). The only treatment failure was a patient who had a markedly diseased colon from the cecum to the rectum and a very low-lying fistula. It is concluded that a modified transvaginal approach is an effective method for repair of rectovaginal fistulae secondary to Crohn's disease. PMID:1992942

Bauer, J J; Sher, M E; Jaffin, H; Present, D; Gelerent, I

1991-02-01

81

Continuous dopaminergic delivery to minimize motor complications in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are common sequelae of Parkinson's disease (PD) that may limit function and quality of life. With disease progression, striatal dopamine concentration becomes closely linked to plasma levodopa levels, which vary considerably with standard oral regimens. Exposure of striatal dopamine receptors to wildly fluctuating transmitter levels is thought to contribute to the development of dyskinesias and motor fluctuations. Continuous dopaminergic delivery has been shown to reduce motor complications in advanced PD patients, and has been hypothesized to prevent their incidence when given as early therapy in mild PD. In this article, the authors outline the rationale for continuous dopaminergic delivery and review clinical strategies implementing the concept, including transdermal rotigotine, subcutaneous apomorphine infusion, intraduodenal infusion of levodopa gel and the investigational oral levodopa formulation IPX066. PMID:23739008

Wright, Brenton A; Waters, Cheryl H

2013-06-01

82

Complications in the management of metastatic spinal disease  

PubMed Central

Metastatic spine disease accounts for 10% to 30% of new cancer diagnoses annually. The most frequent presentation is axial spinal pain. No treatment has been proven to increase the life expectancy of patients with spinal metastasis. The goals of therapy are pain control and functional preservation. The most important prognostic indicator for spinal metastases is the initial functional score. Treatment is multidisciplinary, and virtually all treatment is palliative. Management is guided by three key issues; neurologic compromise, spinal instability, and individual patient factors. Site-directed radiation, with or without chemotherapy is the most commonly used treatment modality for those patients presenting with spinal pain, causative by tumours which are not impinging on neural elements. Operative intervention has, until recently been advocated for establishing a tissue diagnosis, mechanical stabilization and for reduction of tumor burden but not for a curative approach. It is treatment of choice patients with diseaseadvancement despite radiotherapy and in those with known radiotherapy-resistant tumors. Vertebral resection and anterior stabilization with methacrylate or hardware (e.g., cages) has been advocated.Surgical decompression and stabilization, however, along with radiotherapy, may provide the most promising treatment. It stabilizes the metastatic deposited areaand allows ambulation with pain relief. In general, patients who are nonambulatory at diagnosis do poorly, as do patients in whom more than one vertebra is involved. Surgical intervention is indicated in patients with radiation-resistant tumors, spinal instability, spinal compression with bone or disk fragments, progressive neurologic deterioration, previous radiation exposure, and uncertain diagnosis that requires tissue diagnosis. The main goal in the management of spinal metastatic deposits is always palliative rather than curative, with the primary aim being pain relief and improved mobility. This however, does not come without complications, regardless of the surgical intervention technique used. These complication range from the general surgical complications of bleeding, infection, damage to surrounding structures and post operative DT/PE to spinal specific complications of persistent neurologic deficit and paralysis. PMID:22919567

Dunning, Eilis Catherine; Butler, Joseph Simon; Morris, Seamus

2012-01-01

83

Salmonella hepatitis: an uncommon complication of a common disease.  

PubMed

Typhoid fever is a very common infectious disease of tropics, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Typhoid fever is often associated with hepatomegaly and mildly deranged liver functions; a clinical picture of acute hepatitis is a rare complication. We report a young patient who presented with fever and jaundice and was found to have acute hepatitis secondary to typhoid fever. Recognition of Salmonella hepatitis is of clinical importance as it can mimic acute viral hepatitis. Early institution of specific therapy can improve the prognosis in these patients. Typhoid fever is a very common infectious disease of tropics, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Typhoid fever is often associated with hepatomegaly and mildly deranged liver functions; a clinical picture of acute hepatitis is a rare complication. We report a young patient who presented with fever and jaundice and was found to have acute hepatitis secondary to typhoid fever. Recognition of Salmonella hepatitis is of clinical importance as it can mimic acute viral hepatitis. Early institution of specific therapy can improve the prognosis in these patients. PMID:24479030

Karoli, Ritu; Fatima, Jalees; Chandra, Ashok; Singh, Gagandeep

2012-07-01

84

Possible macrophage activation syndrome following initiation of adalimumab in a patient with adult-onset still's disease  

PubMed Central

Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) has been rarely reported in the course of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and in the majority of cases, it was triggered by an infection. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first case of MAS occurring after adalimumab treatment initiation and not triggered by an infection. A 26-yearold woman with classical features of AOSD developed persistent fever, severe bicytopenia associated with extreme hyperferritinemia, hyponatremia and abnormal liver function tow months after the initiation of adalimumab treatment. The diagnosis of MAS was made without histological proof. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and her condition improved. During the disease course, extensive studies could not identify any viral infection or other known underlying etiology for the reactive MAS. The adalimumab was incriminated in this complication. Currently, the patient is in remission on tocilizumab and low-dose prednisolone. PMID:25018831

Souabni, Leila; Dridi, Leila; Abdelghani, Kawther Ben; Kassab, Selma; Chekili, Selma; Laater, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

2014-01-01

85

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a woman with adult-onset Still's disease: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Adult onset Still's disease is a chronic multisystemic inflammatory disorder characterized by high spiking fever, polyarthralgia and rash. Lymphadenopathy is a prominent feature of adult onset Still's disease and is seen in about 65% of patients. Searching the medical literature using the MEDLINE database from January 1966 through November 2007 we could only find two reported cases of adult onset Still's disease that had progressed to lymphoma. Case presentation We describe a woman who was diagnosed with adult onset Still's disease and developed lymphoma 10 months after the onset of her symptoms. She initially presented with fever and arthritis of the knees, ankles and shoulders, along with a nonpruritic skin rash, myalgia and weight loss. On physical examination she was found to have several enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes and left posterior auricular lymph nodes all of which were non-tender, immobile and rubbery. Excisional biopsy of the cervical lymph nodes was negative for malignancy. Bone marrow biopsy was also negative for malignancy. She was treated with prednisone. She remained in good health until she presented 10 months later with low back pain, dyspnea and weight loss. Work up revealed malignant lymphoma. She was treated with chemotherapy and was doing well until she presented with abdominal pain. Work up revealed a cirrhotic liver and ascites. She then passed away from hepatorenal syndrome 13 years after the diagnosis of lymphoma. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case of such an occurrence. Conclusion Although the association between adult onset Still's disease and lymphoma has been rarely reported, careful screening for this malignancy in patients suspected to have adult onset Still's disease is warranted. PMID:18325097

Otrock, Zaher K; Hatoum, Hassan A; Uthman, Imad W; Taher, Ali T; Saab, Shahrazad; Shamseddine, Ali I

2008-01-01

86

Orbital complications in children: differential diagnosis of a challenging disease.  

PubMed

Orbital swelling in children presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Most are associated with acute sinusitis with complicating factors possibly including: amaurosis, meningitis, intracranial abscess or even cavernous sinus thrombosis. However not all acute orbital swelling is associated with acute sinusitis. A careful evaluation is critical prior to initiating therapy. Clinical records of 49 children (27 girls, 22 boys, with an average age of 11.8 years) were retrospectively reviewed. Historical data evaluated included all available information from parents and previous treating physicians. All patients underwent intensive pediatric, ophthalmologic, and otorhinolaryngologic examinations. Computed tomography (CT scans) were additionally performed in 40 % of children. The results of any examinations were also evaluated. Eighteen of the 49 patients had an orbital complication due to acute sinusitis. All 18 had elevated body temperature, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) values and white blood cell counts. Endoscopy of the nose revealed pus in the middle meatus in each case. According to Chandlers' classification, ten children presented with a preseptal, and eight children had a postseptal orbital cellulitis. All patients were admitted to the hospital and treated with intravenous antibiotics. CT scans further demonstrated signs of subperiostal abscess in four children. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was required in six children, including all patients with subperiostal abscess. Twenty children experienced orbital swelling unrelated to acute sinusitis, i.e. atheroma, inflammed insect stings, dental related abscess, conjunctivitis, and Herpes simplex associated superinfection. In three children, acute orbital swelling was caused by an orbital tumor. Orbital complications of an acute sinusitis occur often in the pediatric patient group, and most of these patients can be treated conservative with intravenous antibiotics. Indications for FESS include failure to improve or worsening of clinical symptoms during 24 h of therapy, signs for subperiostal abscess in CT scan, and/or vision loss. Patients with infectous orbital complications had fever, elevated CRP and white blood cell counts. This symptom complex is key in making the correct diagnosis. Interestingly, 61 % of patients in this study demonstrated non-sinusitis related diseases leading to acute orbital swelling, which also required prompt recognition and appropriate therapy. PMID:25056021

Welkoborsky, Hans-J; Graß, Sylvia; Deichmüller, Cordula; Bertram, Oliver; Hinni, Michael L

2015-05-01

87

Complete staghorn calculus in polycystic kidney disease: infection is still the cause  

PubMed Central

Background Kidney stones in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are common, regarded as the consequence of the combination of anatomic abnormality and metabolic risk factors. However, complete staghorn calculus is rare in polycystic kidney disease and predicts a gloomy prognosis of kidney. For general population, recent data showed metabolic factors were the dominant causes for staghorn calculus, but for polycystic kidney disease patients, the cause for staghorn calculus remained elusive. Case presentation We report a case of complete staghorm calculus in a polycystic kidney disease patient induced by repeatedly urinary tract infections. This 37-year-old autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease female with positive family history was admitted in this hospital for repeatedly upper urinary tract infection for 3 years. CT scan revealed the existence of a complete staghorn calculus in her right kidney, while there was no kidney stone 3 years before, and the urinary stone component analysis showed the composition of calculus was magnesium ammonium phosphate. Conclusion UTI is an important complication for polycystic kidney disease and will facilitate the formation of staghorn calculi. As staghorn calculi are associated with kidney fibrosis and high long-term renal deterioration rate, prompt control of urinary tract infection in polycystic kidney disease patient will be beneficial in preventing staghorn calculus formation. PMID:24070202

2013-01-01

88

Periodontal infection in adult-onset Still's disease patient: clinical and haematological considerations.  

PubMed

In this case report, the authors described the first case of a patient with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) who presents advanced periodontal infection. AOSD is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by spiking fever, usually exceeding 39°C, an evanescent salmon pink rash, arthritis and multiorgan involvement. Periodontal infection is a pathogen-induced oral inflammatory disease affecting the supporting tissues of teeth and is currently considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Several cytokines capable of inducing systemic effects are produced during the course of this infection and the values of serum markers of inflammation, such as C reactive protein (CRP), may significantly decrease after periodontal treatment. Although AOSD can produce elevations in CRP, similar increase may be produced by periodontal infection, suggesting the need for medical and dental diagnosis when evaluating the sources of acute-phase responses in systemic autoimmune disease patients. PMID:22696669

Pessoa, Larissa; Galvăo, Virgilio; Ferreira, Clarissa; Santos Neto, Leopoldo

2011-01-01

89

Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease  

SciTech Connect

Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Sabharwal, T. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Carrell, T. W. G. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Reidy, J. F. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: John.Reidy@gstt.nhs.uk

2007-09-15

90

Maple Syrup Urine Disease Complicated with Kyphoscoliosis and Myelopathy.  

PubMed

Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive aminoacidopathy secondary to an enzyme defect in the catabolic pathway of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine, and valine). Accumulation of their corresponding keto-acids leads to encephalopathy if not treated in time. A newborn male patient was suspected to have MSUD after tandem mass study when he presented symptoms and signs suggestive neonatal sepsis, anemia, and diarrhea. Food restriction of BCAAs was started; however, acrodermatitis enteropathica-like skin eruptions occurred at age 2 months. The skin rashes resolved after adding BCAAs and adjusting the infant formula. At age 7 months, he suffered from recurrent skin lesions, zinc deficiency, osteoporosis, and kyphosis of the thoracic spine with acute angulation over the T11-T12 level associated with spinal compression and myelopathy. After supplementation of zinc products and pamidronate, skin lesions and osteopenia improved gradually. Direct sequencing of the DBT gene showed a compound heterozygous mutation [4.7 kb deletion and c.650-651insT (L217F or L217fsX223)]. It is unusual that neurodegeneration still developed in this patient despite diet restriction. Additionally, brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging, bone mineral density study, and monitoring of zinc status are suggested in MSUD patients. PMID:24486081

Hou, Jia-Woei

2014-01-29

91

Association Between Genetics of Diabetes, Coronary Artery Disease, and Macrovascular Complications: Exploring a Common Ground Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) are conditions that cause a substantial public health burden. Since both conditions often coexist in the same individual, it has been hypothesized that they have a common effector. Insulin and hyperglycemia are assumed to play critical roles in this scenario. In recent years, many genetic risk factors for both diabetes and CAD have been discovered, mainly through genome-wide association studies. Genetic aspects of diabetes, diabetic macrovascular complications, and CAD are assumed to have intersections leading to the common effector hypothesis. However, only a few genetic risk factors could be identified that modulate the risk for both conditions. Polymorphisms in TCF7L2 and near the CDKN2A/B genes seem to be of great importance in this regard since they appear to modulate both conditions, and they are not necessarily related to insulinism, or hyperglycemia, for CAD development. Other issues related to this hypothesis, such as the problems of phenotype heterogeneity, are also of interest. Recent studies have contributed to a better understanding of the complex genetics of diabetic macrovascular complications. Much effort is still needed to clarify the associations in the genetics of diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. At present, there is little genetic evidence to support a common effector hypothesis, other than insulin or hyperglycemia, for the association between these conditions. PMID:22189546

Sousa, André G.; Selvatici, Lívia; Krieger, José E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

2011-01-01

92

Sublingual pyramidal lobe. Complications of subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease  

SciTech Connect

A potential complication of subtotal thyroidectomy where a large pyramidal lobe is present is described. The pyramidal lobe normally is immobilized inferiorly by its attachment to the thyroidal isthmus. When the isthmus is removed and the pyramidal lobe is left in situ during subtotal thyroidectomy its superior attachments will allow the pyramidal lobe to become situated sublingually. This may produce gagging and nausea. To avoid the complication, it is recommended that the pyramidal lobe be removed during subtotal thyroidectomy. If the patient also is thyrotoxic, I-131 can be used to treat this complication successfully.

Sternberg, J.L.

1986-11-01

93

Juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: still a mystery disease with difficult management.  

PubMed

Juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is the most common benign neoplastic disease of the larynx in children and adolescents and has a significant impact on patients and the health care system with a cost ranging from $60,000 to $470,000 per patient. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on RRP and summarize the recent advances. RRP is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV; mainly by types 6 and 11). Patients suffer from wart-like growths in the aerodigestive tract. The course of the disease is unpredictable. Although spontaneous remission is possible, pulmonary spread and malignant transformation have been reported. Surgical excision, including new methods like the microdebrider, aims to secure an adequate airway and improve and maintain an acceptable voice. Repeated recurrences are common and thus overenthusiastic attempts to eradicate the disease may cause serious complications. When papillomas recur, old and new adjuvant methods may be tried. In addition, recent advances in immune system research may allow us to improve our treatment modalities and prevention strategies. A new vaccine is under trial to prevent HPV infection in women; the strongest risk factor for juvenile RRP is a maternal history of genital warts (transmitted from mother to child during delivery). Better understanding of the etiology of the disease and the knowledge of all available therapies is crucial for the best management of the affected patients. PMID:17022088

Stamataki, Sofia; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Korres, Stavros; Felekis, Dimitrios; Tzangaroulakis, Antonios; Ferekidis, Eleftherios

2007-02-01

94

Complications of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of head and neck disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperbaric oxygen has been advocated in the treatment of many head and neck diseases. Reports of such treatments have described eustachian tube dysfunction as the only complication. A review of patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen for head and neck diseases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center revealed serious complications, which included seizure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. In addition, follow-up study of

J. W. Giebfried; W. Lawson; H. F. Biller

1986-01-01

95

Prevalence of complications in children with chronic kidney disease according to KDOQI  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Kidney Disease Outcome and Quality Initiative (KDOQI) Group recommended guidelines for the monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 2002. These recommendations were based on the prevalence of known complications as seen in adults. In children, the exact prevalence of these complications is unknown. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study of 366 patients with CKD in a

H Wong; K Mylrea; J Feber; A Drukker; G Filler

2006-01-01

96

Adult-onset Still disease with peculiar persistent plaques and papules.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized clinically by high spiking fever, polyarthralgia/arthritis, a salmon-pink evanescent rash, predominantly neutrophilic leucocytosis, lymphadenopathy, liver dysfunction, and splenomegaly. Recently, a nonclassic, nonevanescent skin rash has been reported. We report a 27-year-old woman with AOSD showing persistent pruritic papular lesions. Histologically, dyskeratotic keratinocytes were seen in the upper epidermis. We describe this case in detail and review the previous literature. Nonclassic pruritic eruptions with characteristic dyskeratotic keratinocytes might provide an important clue for the diagnosis of AOSD. PMID:24773396

Yoshifuku, A; Kawai, K; Kanekura, T

2014-06-01

97

Thoracic irradiation in Hodgkin's disease: Disease control and long-term complications  

SciTech Connect

A total of 590 patients with Stage IA-IIIB Hodgkin's disease received mantle irradiation at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy between April 1969 and December 1984 as part of their initial treatment. Recurrence patterns as well as pulmonary, cardiac and thyroid complications were analyzed. Pulmonary recurrence was more frequently seen in patients with large mediastinal adenopathy (LMA); 11% of patients with LMA recurred in the lung in contrast to 3.1% with small or no mediastinal disease, p = 0.003. Hilar involvement, when corrected for size of mediastinal involvement, was not predictive of lung relapse. Patients with LMA also had a high rate of nodal relapse above the diaphragm (40%) following radiation therapy (RT) alone as compared to similarly treated patients with small or no mediastinal adenopathy (6.5%), p less than 0.0001. This risk of nodal recurrence was greatly reduced (4.7%) for LMA patients receiving combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy (CMT), p less than 0.0001. Sixty-seven patients (11%) with hilar or large mediastinal involvement received prophylactic, low dose, whole lung irradiation. No decrease in the frequency of lung recurrence was seen with the use of whole lung irradiation. Radiation pneumonitis was seen in 3% of patients receiving radiation therapy alone. In contrast, the use of whole lung irradiation was associated with a 15% risk of pneumonitis, p = 0.006. The risk of pneumonitis was also significantly increased with the use of chemotherapy (11%), p = 0.0001. Cardiac complications were uncommon with pericarditis being the most common complication (2.2%). Thyroid dysfunction was seen in 25% of patients and appeared to be age-related. These data suggest that the long-term complications of mantle irradiation are uncommon with the use of modern radiotherapeutic techniques.

Tarbell, N.J.; Thompson, L.; Mauch, P. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

1990-02-01

98

Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Treatment and Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... Legionnaires' Disease CSTE Position Statement Epidemiologic Investigation Tools Environmental Specimen Collection & Management Procedures Manual Sampling Protocol Sampling Sites Specimen Procedures ...

99

Epidemiology of adult Still's disease: estimate of the incidence by a retrospective study in west France.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES--To estimate the incidence of adult Still's disease (ASD) and to specify, if possible, associated factors. METHODS--A retrospective study of the populations of the Brittany and Loire regions in west France was made from 1 January 1982 to 31 December 1991. All internal medicine and rheumatology practitioners of these regions were consulted. RESULTS--Sixty-two (62) cases were reported (93% response). The disease incidence calculated over five years was 0.16 per 100,000 inhabitants in the study population. There was no sex bias (sex ratio 1.06 in ASD v 1.05 in the overall population. The mean age of the study population was 36 years, with two peaks of distribution at 15-25 and 36-45 years. A history of allergy was present in 23% of patients (n = 14). In two patients, it was possible to correlate an environmental allergen to exacerbation of ASD. CONCLUSION--The yearly incidence of ASD was estimated to be 0.16 per 100,000 inhabitants. However, it was not possible to incriminate any infectious, toxic, or genetic factors in exacerbation of the disease. PMID:7668903

Magadur-Joly, G; Billaud, E; Barrier, J H; Pennec, Y L; Masson, C; Renou, P; Prost, A

1995-01-01

100

The Genetic Link between Parkinson's Disease and the Kynurenine Pathway Is Still Missing  

PubMed Central

Background. There is substantial evidence that the kynurenine pathway (KP) plays a role in the normal physiology of the brain and is involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Objective. We set out to investigate the potential roles in PD of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from one of the key enzymes of the KP, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). Methods. 105 unrelated, clinically definitive PD patients and 131 healthy controls were enrolled to investigate the possible effects of the different alleles of KMO. Fluorescently labeled TaqMan probes were used for allele discrimination. Results. None of the four investigated SNPs proved to be associated with PD or influenced the age at onset of the disease. Conclusions. The genetic link between the KP and PD is still missing. The investigated SNPs presumably do not appear to influence the function of KMO and probably do not contain binding sites for regulatory proteins of relevance in PD. This is the first study to assess the genetic background behind the biochemical alterations of the kynurenine pathway in PD, directing the attention to this previously unexamined field.

Török, Nóra; Török, Rita; Szolnoki, Zoltán; Somogyvári, Ferenc; Klivényi, Péter; Vécsei, László

2015-01-01

101

Supradiaphragmatic early stage Hodgkin's disease: does mantle radiation therapy still have a role?  

PubMed

Extended field radiation therapy represents the main therapeutic option in early stage Hodgkin's disease with favorable prognostic features. Its role however has recently been criticized, mainly due to the high incidence of late complications in irradiated tissues. Furthermore, surgical staging, which in the opinion of many is mandatory for proper selection of patients for radiotherapy alone, has a well-known morbidity, and splenectomy has been associated with a high risk of secondary leukemias. Lastly, the failure rate after radiotherapy only is not negligible and second-line treatment is not always successful. A review of our experience and of the recent literature has allowed us to refute these objections. The results of radiotherapy, when properly performed, are highly reliable and have been reproducible in many Institutions. Chemotherapy alone cannot yet be regarded as an alternative to radiotherapy in these patients since data reported on this issue are conflicting. Present knowledge regarding the relationship between clinical features and the risk of occult subdiaphragmatic spread allows patients with localized disease to be selected without surgical staging; the results of radiotherapy in clinically staged patients confirm this statement. Concern for the late effects in irradiated tissues is justified, and future efforts should be directed at reducing the toxicity of this treatment. Associating a short chemotherapy course with low-dose radiotherapy to involved sites could help to achieve this goal. PMID:8641642

Frezza, G; Barbieri, E; Zinzani, P L; Babini, L; Tura, S

1996-01-01

102

Reactive hemophagocytic syndrome in adult-onset still disease: clinical features, predictive factors, and prognosis in 21 patients.  

PubMed

Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is a potentially life-threatening complication of systemic inflammatory disorders. Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is one of the systemic autoimmune diseases associated with reactive hemophagocytic syndrome (RHS). This study aimed to evaluate the characteristic findings, predictive factors, and prognosis of RHS in patients with AOSD.We retrospectively evaluated 109 patients diagnosed with AOSD and reviewed their clinical data and laboratory findings, including the biopsy results of 21 AOSD patients with RHS. Moreover, data from 17 hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) patients evaluated during the same period were compared with those from the RHS patients.Twenty-one patients (19.3%) developed RHS during the course of AOSD, and only 7 patients (6.4%) were confirmed by bone marrow, liver, or lymph node biopsy. AOSD patients with RHS showed significantly higher frequencies of splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and lymphadenopathy than did those without RHS. Moreover, patients with RHS showed significantly higher relapse rates than those without RHS (61.9% vs 18.2%, P < 0.001). Possible triggering factors inducing hemophagocytosis were detected in 16 of 21 RHS patients (76.2%): disease flare in 12 patients (75%), infection in 3 patients (18.8%), and drug use in 1 patient (6.3%). AOSD patients with RHS showed higher frequencies of leukopenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoalbuminemia, hypofibrinogenemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperferritinemia, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels than did those without RHS. Multivariate logistic regression with forward selection procedure showed that low platelet count (<121,000/mm), anemia, and hepatomegaly were independent predictors of RHS. Patients with definite RHS and those with probable RHS showed comparable results. Although RHS is a life-threatening complication of AOSD, long-term prognosis was observed to be similar in patients with and those without RHS. Compared to RHS patients, HLH patients had poor prognosis, such as higher death rates (52.9% vs 9.5%, P?=?0.005).RHS can be considered when an AOSD patient shows at least 2 of the following 3 findings: low platelet count, anemia, and hepatomegaly. Diagnostic confirmation by biopsy may not be essential if typical clinical findings of RHS are present. Moreover, prognosis of RHS was better than that of HLH diagnosed by the presence of trilineage cytopenia at admission. PMID:25634183

Bae, Chang-Bum; Jung, Ju-Yang; Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Suh, Chang-Hee

2015-01-01

103

Stevens-Johnson syndrome complicating adalimumab therapy in Crohn's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)a medications demonstrate efficacy in the induction of remission and its maintenance in numerous chronic inflammatory conditions. With the increasing number of patients receiving anti-TNFa agents, however, less common adverse reactions will occur. Cutaneous eruptions complicating treatment with an anti-TNFa agent are not uncommon, occurring in around 20% of patients. Adalimumab, a fully humanized antibody against

Muna Salama; Ian Craig Lawrance

2009-01-01

104

Increased rates of pregnancy complications in women with celiac disease  

PubMed Central

Background Celiac disease is an immune-mediated small bowel disorder that develops in genetically susceptible individuals upon exposure to dietary gluten. Celiac disease could have extra-intestinal manifestations that affect women’s reproductive health. The aim of this study was to investigate fertility and outcomes of pregnancy among women with celiac disease. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed information collected from patients at a tertiary care celiac center and from members of 2 national celiac disease awareness organizations. Women without celiac disease were used as controls. Women completed an anonymous online survey, answering 43 questions about menstrual history, fertility, and outcomes of pregnancy (329 with small bowel biopsy-confirmed celiac disease and 641 controls). Results Of the 970 women included in the study, 733 (75.6%) reported that they had been pregnant at some point; there was no significant difference between women with celiac disease (n=245/329, 74.5%) and controls (488/641, 76.1%; P=0.57). However, fewer women with celiac disease than controls (79.6% vs. 84.8%) gave birth following 1 or more pregnancies (P=0.03). Women with celiac disease had higher percentages of spontaneous abortion than controls (50.6% vs. 40.6%; P=0.01), and of premature delivery (23.6% vs. 15.9% among controls; P=0.02). The mean age at menarche was higher in the celiac disease group (12.7 years) than controls (12.4 years; P=0.01). Conclusions In a retrospective cohort analysis examining reproductive features of women with celiac disease, we associated celiac disease with significant increases in spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, and later age of menarche.

Moleski, Stephanie M.; Lindenmeyer, Christina C.; Veloski, J. Jon; Miller, Robin S.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Kastenberg, David; DiMarino, Anthony J.

2015-01-01

105

Managing complicated Crohn's disease in children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The natural history of Crohn's disease is characterized by recurrent exacerbations. A small, but significant, number of pediatric patients with Crohn's disease are resistant to standard medical therapies. The goal of therapy in pediatric patients is not only to achieve and maintain clinical remission, but also to promote growth, development and improve quality of life. All of this needs to

Matjaz Homan; Petar Mamula; Robert N Baldassano

2005-01-01

106

Mucosal immune defence mechanisms in enterocolitis complicating Hirschsprung's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enterocolitis remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in Hirschsprung's disease. The aetiology of enterocolitis is uncertain-ischaemic and bacterial causes and recently, rotavirus infections, have been suggested. Bowel tissue from 12 patients with Hirschsprung's disease who underwent Swenson's operation (five of whom had clinical evidence of enterocolitis) and colon from six controls subjects were examined to investigate possible immunopathological

A Imamura; P Puri; D S OBriain; D J Reen

1992-01-01

107

Therapy Insight: management of cardiovascular disease in patients with cancer and cardiac complications of cancer therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiac disease in patients with cancer or caused by cancer therapy is a clinical problem of emerging importance. Optimum management of cardiovascular disease can mean that patients with cancer can successfully receive therapies to treat their malignancy and can reduce morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors. The presence of cancer and cancer-related morbidities substantially complicates the

Aarif Y Khakoo; Edward TH Yeh

2008-01-01

108

Complications and concurrent disease associated with diabetic ketoacidosis and other severe forms of diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

The more serious forms of diabetes mellitus such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HNKS) are precipitated commonly by other underlying disease processes. In addition, the treatment of these severe forms of diabetes mellitus are often complicated by therapy. This article discusses common concurrent disorders and therapeutic complications seen in both canine and feline diabetes mellitus. PMID:7660536

Nichols, R; Crenshaw, K L

1995-05-01

109

Cutaneous manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease: a case report and review of literature.  

PubMed

Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis characterized by high spiking fever, arthralgia or arthritis, sore throat, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, serositis, and transient cutaneous manifestations. Although more common in children, cases are seen also in adults. Cutaneous involvement is common and may be suggestive for the diagnosis. A case of AOSD in a 35-year-old man is reported here, presenting with urticarial maculopapular rash of trunk, high spiking fever, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and myopericarditis. Skin biopsy showed interstitial and perivascular mature CD15(+) neutrophils. A comprehensive review of literature showed that cutaneous involvement occurs in about 80 % of patients, with various clinical presentations. The most common skin manifestation is an evanescent salmon pink or erythematous maculopapular exanthema, predominantly on the trunk and proximal limbs, with rare involvement of face and distal limbs. Less common manifestations include persistent erythematous plaques and pustular lesions. A constant histopathologic finding is the presence of interstitial dermal neutrophils aligned between the collagen bundles. This pattern may provide an easy accessible clue for the definitive diagnosis of AOSD and exclude other diagnosis such as drug eruptions or infectious diseases. PMID:24737284

Cozzi, Alessandra; Papagrigoraki, Anastasia; Biasi, Domenico; Colato, Chiara; Girolomoni, Giampiero

2014-04-17

110

Pulmonary Complications Resulting from Genetic Cardiovascular Disease in Two Rat Models  

EPA Science Inventory

Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been considered a risk factor for exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms of variation in susceptibility. Pulmonary complications and altered iron homeost...

111

[Surgical treatment of ophthalmologic complications in Behcet's disease].  

PubMed

Behcet's syndrome is a chronic multisystem disease with recurrent oral and genital ulcerations and recurrent, usually bilateral uveitis. A 31-year-old female patient with uveitis who underwent vitrectomy is presented. PMID:14639865

Cerovski, Branimir; Juki?, Tomislav; Siki?, Jakov; Huljev, Ivan; Senti?, Mirna

2003-01-01

112

Complications of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of head and neck disease  

SciTech Connect

Hyperbaric oxygen has been advocated in the treatment of many head and neck diseases. Reports of such treatments have described eustachian tube dysfunction as the only complication. A review of patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen for head and neck diseases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center revealed serious complications, which included seizure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. In addition, follow-up study of these patients demonstrated that 11 patients treated for radiation-induced necrosis had an undiagnosed recurrence of cancer.

Giebfried, J.W.; Lawson, W.; Biller, H.F.

1986-04-01

113

Pseudomonas spp. complications in patients with HIV disease: An eight-year clinical and microbiological survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two hundred and twenty-four episodes of Pseudomonas spp. complications that occurred in 179 consecutive patients with HIV infection were retrospectively reviewed. Pseudomonas spp. organisms were responsible for 11.6% of 1933 episodes of non-mycobacterial bacterial diseases (5.4% of 1072 episodes of sepsis), observed over an 8-year period; 20.7% of patients experienced disease relapses (45 episodes). These complications mostly involved lower airways

Roberto Manfredi; Anna Nanetti; Morena Ferri; Francesco Chiodo

2000-01-01

114

Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications.  

PubMed

Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on long-term complications and associated conditions, the course of Gaucher disease was modelled. PMID:25056340

van Dussen, Laura; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Dijkgraaf, Marcel Gw; Hollak, Carla Em

2014-01-01

115

POTASSIUM, MAGNESIUM, AND ELECTROLYTE IMBALANCE AND COMPLICATIONS IN DISEASE MANAGEMENT  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Electrolyte balance is a critical issue in managing comorbid conditions in both diseased and elderly patients. Patients with hypertension and diabetes need careful regulation of their calcium and magnesium levels, whereas in patients with congestive heart failure, sodium and potassium levels also ar...

116

Diabetic Nephropathy: An Inherited Disease or Just a Diabetic Complication?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Type 2 diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in western Europe and the United States. Although patients with overt nephropathy generally experience greater cumulative glycemic exposure, the difference in glycemic control between patients developing nephropathy and to those who did not could not be demonstrated. This observation is consistent with the finding that factors other

Mario Berger; Detlev Mönks; Christoph Wanner; Tom H. Lindner

2003-01-01

117

Inflammatory bowel disease: An increased risk factor for neurologic complications  

PubMed Central

Only a very few systematic studies have investigated the frequency of neurologic disorders in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results have been inconsistent and variable, owing to differences in case-finding methods and evaluated outcomes in different studies. The most frequent neurologic manifestations reported in CD and UC populations are cerebrovascular disease (with either arterial or venous events), demyelinating central nervous system disease, and peripheral neuropathy (whether axonal or demyelinating); however, the literature describes numerous nervous system disorders as being associated with IBD. The pathogenesis of nervous system tissue involvement in IBD has yet to be elucidated, although it seems to be related to immune mechanisms or prothrombotic states. The recently-introduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have proven successful in controlling moderate to severe IBD activity. However, severe neurologic disorders associated with TNF inhibitors have been reported, which therefore raises concerns regarding the effect of anti-TNF-? antibodies on the nervous system. Although neurological involvement associated with IBD is rarely reported, gastroenterologists should be aware of the neurologic manifestations of IBD in order to provide early treatment, which is crucial for preventing major neurologic morbidity. PMID:24574797

Morís, Germán

2014-01-01

118

Is routine antenatal venereal disease research laboratory test still justified? Nigerian experience  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the seroreactivity of pregnant women to syphilis in order to justify the need for routine antenatal syphilis screening. Methods A multicenter retrospective analysis of routine antenatal venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test results between 1 September 2010 and 31 August 2012 at three specialist care hospitals in south-east Nigeria was done. A reactive VDRL result is subjected for confirmation using Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay test. Analysis was by Epi Info 2008 version 3.5.1 and Stata/IC version 10. Results Adequate records were available regarding 2,156 patients and were thus reviewed. The mean age of the women was 27.4 years (±3.34), and mean gestational age was 26.4 weeks (±6.36). Only 15 cases (0.70%) were seropositive to VDRL. Confirmatory T. pallidum hemagglutination assay was positive in 4 of the 15 cases, giving an overall prevalence of 0.19% and a false-positive rate of 73.3%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of syphilis in relation to maternal age and parity (P>0.05). Conclusion While the prevalence of syphilis is extremely low in the antenatal care population at the three specialist care hospitals in south-east Nigeria, false-positive rate is high and prevalence did not significantly vary with maternal age or parity. Because syphilis is still a serious but preventable and curable disease, screening with VDRL alone, without confirmatory tests may not be justified. Because of the increase in the demand for evidence-based medicine and litigation encountered in medical practice, we may advocate that confirmatory test for syphilis is introduced in routine antenatal testing to reduce the problem of false positives. The government should increase the health budget that will include free routine antenatal testing including the T. pallidum hemagglutination assay. PMID:25610000

Nwosu, Betrand O; Eleje, George U; Obi-Nwosu, Amaka L; Ahiarakwem, Ita F; Akujobi, Comfort N; Egwuatu, Chukwudi C; Onyiuke, Chukwudumebi O C

2015-01-01

119

Optimal phosphate control: still an unmet need in chronic kidney disease patients.  

PubMed

Reduction of phosphate levels has traditionally been considered a mainstay treatment for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Unfortunately, the treatment of hyperphosphatemia is far from being satisfactory. Available phosphate binders have limited efficacy, forcing the consumption of many tablets in order to achieve mild-to-moderate effect or low tolerability. Moreover, even if calcium-free phosphate binders, such as sevelamer and lanthanum carbonate, decrease serum phosphate levels without affecting serum calcium concentration, they do not significantly reduce circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH). The higher phosphate-binding efficacy of lanthanum carbonate should be balanced with the accumulation in bones and the lack of pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism and inflammation. However, the fact that lanthanum carbonate seems to decrease the rate of development of vascular calcifications more or less similar to sevelamer suggests that phosphate control could actually be the key factor to improve patient outcome. New iron-based phosphate binders are undergoing clinical development. In addition to phosphate binding, they can be useful to treat anemia, and are undergoing Phase II clinical development for this indication. This could be of clinical importance particularly in CKD patients not on dialysis, avoiding the need for extra oral iron administration, and favoring compliance. In conclusion, the control of phosphate retention should still be considered an unmet medical need for CKD patients. PMID:24283572

Locatelli, Francesco; Del Vecchio, Lucia

2014-02-01

120

The modern pre-levodopa era of Parkinson's disease: insights into motor complications from sub-Saharan Africa.  

PubMed

During the past decade, a number of large drug trials suggested that the initiation of levodopa therapy should be delayed to reduce the risk of motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the relative contribution of the cumulative exposure to levodopa and of disease progression to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias is still poorly understood. In this 4-year multicentre study, we investigated a large cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease in a sub-Saharan African country (Ghana), where access to medication is limited and the initiation of levodopa therapy often occurs many years after onset. The primary objective was to investigate whether the occurrence of motor complications is primarily related to the duration of levodopa therapy or to disease-related factors. Study design included a cross-sectional case-control analysis of data collected between December 2008 and November 2012, and a prospective study of patients followed-up for at least 6 months after the initiation of levodopa therapy. Ninety-one patients fulfilled criteria for clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (58 males, mean age at onset 60.6 ± 11.3 years). Demographic data were compared to those of 2282 consecutive Italian patients recruited during the same period, whereas nested matched subgroups were used to compare clinical variables. Demographic features, frequency and severity of motor and non-motor symptoms were comparable between the two populations, with the only exception of more frequent tremor-dominant presentation in Ghana. At baseline, the proportion of Ghanaian patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was 56% and 14%, respectively. Although levodopa therapy was introduced later in Ghana (mean disease duration 4.2 ± 2.8 versus 2.4 ± 2.1 years, P < 0.001), disease duration at the occurrence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was similar in the two populations. In multivariate analysis, disease duration and levodopa daily dose (mg/kg of body weight) were associated with motor complications, while the disease duration at the initiation of levodopa was not. Prospective follow-up for a mean of 2.6 ± 1.3 years of a subgroup of 21 patients who were drug-naďve at baseline [median disease duration 4.5 (interquartile range, 2.3-5) years] revealed that the median time to development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias after initiation of levodopa therapy was 6 months. We conclude that motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are not associated with the duration of levodopa therapy, but rather with longer disease duration and higher levodopa daily dose. Hence, the practice to withhold levodopa therapy with the objective of delaying the occurrence of motor complications is not justified. PMID:25034897

Cilia, Roberto; Akpalu, Albert; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Cham, Momodou; Amboni, Marianna; Cereda, Emanuele; Fabbri, Margherita; Adjei, Patrick; Akassi, John; Bonetti, Alba; Pezzoli, Gianni

2014-10-01

121

Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.  

PubMed

We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

2014-01-01

122

Nephropathic cystinosis: late complications of a multisystemic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder due to impaired transport of cystine out of cellular lysosomes. Its estimated\\u000a incidence is 1 in 100,000 live births. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is the most prominent feature of cystinosis and, along\\u000a with dehydration and electrolyte imbalance due to renal tubular Fanconi syndrome, has accounted for the bulk of deaths from\\u000a this disorder.

Galina Nesterova; William Gahl

2008-01-01

123

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: presentation, complications, and prognosis.  

PubMed

Fifty-three symptomatic adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease were studied retrospectively for a mean follow-up of 12 years (range 10 months to 33 years). Diagnosis was confirmed by either x-ray, ultrasound, laparotomy, or autopsy. Commonest presenting clinical findings were flank pain (30%), hypertension (21%), symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) (19%), gross hematuria (19%), and palpable masses (15%). A total of nine patients (17%) progressed to end-stage renal disease. Change in renal function measured using the reciprocal of plasma creatinine plotted against time was linear for each individual patient with a maximum functional decline of 0.7 mg/dL/yr (slope = -0.07). Past the age of sixty renal failure was uncommon. Easily controlled hypertension developed in 64% attended by mild retinopathy. UTIs were common (53%), often recurrent (61%), precipitated by instrumentation in 6 of 14 patients (43%), leading to death in two (33%). Renal calculi were extremely common (34%) and had no defined metabolic cause. The presence of hematuria (64%), gross or microscopic, bore no relationship to the decline in renal function. Pregnancy was normal in these patients with no increase in fetal or maternal morbidity or mortality. We conclude the following: Renal functional deterioration is linear, less than previously reported, and bears no relationship to hematuria. Hypertension is common, easily treated, and causes minor end-organ damage. Renal calculi are frequent. Urinary tract instrumentation often induces infection with considerable morbidity and mortality and must be avoided. Pregnancy is not contraindicated if renal function is normal. The prognosis for survival in this disease is better than previously reported. PMID:3970015

Delaney, V B; Adler, S; Bruns, F J; Licinia, M; Segel, D P; Fraley, D S

1985-02-01

124

[Surgical therapy of coronary disease: aortocoronary bypass. Risks and complications].  

PubMed

The aorto-coronary bypass surgery is a well established method for treating patients with coronary artery disease. In the last five years at the University Clinic in Innsbruck 417 operations have been performed. The operation letality decreased down to 0.66%, whereby the mean revascularisation rate increased to 2.8. The specific aim of this paper is to show the benefits and the risks of this operation to validate and to verify the benefits in regard to the risks, which could be kept very low. PMID:3878043

Unger, F; Knapp, E; Mühlberger, V; Scharfetter, H; Schistek, R

1985-10-31

125

Outcome of Infective Endocarditis Complicating Rheumatic Heart Disease: The Philippine Heart Center Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheumatic heart disease has been a common clinical entity we frequently encounter in the Philippines. The disease in itself causes several hemodynamic changes on its victim, what more if this is complicated with infective endocarditis, a rapid deterioration is usually an expected outcome. With the advent of antimicrobial therapy and progress of surgical intervention, a better prognosis has highlighted each

Ma. Sylvia; Theresa D. Pido; Adrian C. Pena

126

Clinical variations and complications of Coats disease in 150 cases: the 2000 Sanford Gifford Memorial Lecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: The purpose of this report is to review the clinical variations and natural course of Coats disease, using strict diagnostic guidelines.METHODS: In a retrospective, consecutive series, Coats disease was defined as idiopathic retinal telangiectasia with intraretinal or subretinal exudation without appreciable signs of retinal or vitreal traction. We reviewed our experience with the clinical features, complications, and diagnostic approaches

Jerry A Shields; Carol L Shields; Sontash G Honavar; Hakan Demirci

2001-01-01

127

Treatment of Wilson's disease motor complications with deep brain stimulation.  

PubMed

A considerable proportion of patients with Wilson's disease (WD) experience neurologic symptoms that are functionally disabling. The most common neurologic problems in advanced WD include dystonia and tremor. Medically refractory idiopathic dystonia and essential tremor (ET) have been successfully treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS), functional surgical therapy targeting the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), or the ventral intermediate (Vim) thalamic nucleus. Even though the pathophysiology of tremor is different in WD and ET, available experience supports DBS targeting the Vim for WD patients. Dystonia associated with WD is classified as secondary dystonia and GPi stimulation has yielded mixed results in these patients. The presence of structural changes in the basal ganglia may limit the therapeutic success of DBS for WD dystonia compared with idiopathic dystonia. In spite of these limitations, DBS in WD may be an effective approach to treat medically refractory residual neurologic symptoms in carefully selected patients. PMID:24547944

Hedera, Peter

2014-05-01

128

Pictorial review: Imaging features of unusual patterns and complications of hydatid disease  

PubMed Central

Hydatid disease is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. We demonstrate rare locations and unusual complications of this entity during past 6 years. Rare locations during our observation included lumbar spine, sacral spine, spleen, ovary, abdominal wall, diaphragm, pelvis and right kidney. Unusual complications included formation of bronchopulmonary fistula, complete collapse of left lung secondary to hilar location of Hydatid cyst and hydatiduria. PMID:22470631

Amin, Muhammad Umar; Mahmood, Rabia; Shafique, Mobeen; Khan, Muhammad Shoib; Bilal, Aamir; Siddiqi, Hammad Ahmad

2009-01-01

129

Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management  

PubMed Central

The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG ? GTG) in exon 1 of the ? globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the ? globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

Ballas, Samir K.; Kesen, Muge R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C.; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S.; Malik, Punam

2012-01-01

130

Beyond the definitions of the phenotypic complications of sickle cell disease: an update on management.  

PubMed

The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG ? GTG) in exon 1 of the ? globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the ? globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

Ballas, Samir K; Kesen, Muge R; Goldberg, Morton F; Lutty, Gerard A; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S; Malik, Punam

2012-01-01

131

Haff disease complicated by multiple organ failure after crayfish consumption: a case study.  

PubMed

Haff disease is a syndrome consisting of unexplained rhabdomyolysis. Patients suffering from Haff disease report having eaten fish within 24 hours before the onset of illness. Most patients survive and recover quickly. The present study is the first report of Haff disease complicated by multiple organ failure after crayfish consumption. A 66-year-old Chinese man ate cooked crayfish on the night of June 23, 2013. He arrived at our hospital 2 days later and was admitted to the intensive care unit. After admission, the patient was diagnosed with Haff disease complicated by multiple organ failure. Despite supportive and symptomatic treatments, the condition of the patient deteriorated, and he died due to his illness. Haff disease is a rare clinical syndrome that is sometimes misdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and proper treatment are essential to prevent progression to multiple organ failure. PMID:25607271

Feng, Gang; Luo, Qiancheng; Zhuang, Ping; Guo, Enwei; Yao, Yulan; Gao, Zhongyu

2014-01-01

132

Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma as a complication of silent celiac disease.  

PubMed

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which a genetic predisposition and the ingestion of wheat gluten triggers a deleterious immune response. This response is complex and may lead to manifestations other than enteropathyha: hepatitis, dermatitis and neuropathy. There is higher risk for neoplasia. We observed an atypical case, corresponding to a 69-year old female presenting with complicated celiac disease. The patient was referred following the histological examination of an enterectomy specimen, which unexpectedly revealed an enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma in a background of celiac disease. Patient's previous medical history comprised several abdominal surgical procedures, without other prior symptoms suggestive of celiac disease. Indeed, the patient was obese and no signs of malabsortion were apparent. This case draws our attention to clinically silent celiac disease, which represents a diagnostic challenge. Thus, this should be kept in mind whenever a patient presents with abdominal relapsing complications, otherwise unexplained. PMID:25568762

Brito, Margarida Dantas; Martins, Ângelo; Henrique, Rui; Mariz, José

2014-11-19

133

Enteropathy-Associated T Cell Lymphoma as a Complication of Silent Celiac Disease  

PubMed Central

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which a genetic predisposition and the ingestion of wheat gluten triggers a deleterious immune response. This response is complex and may lead to manifestations other than enteropathyha: hepatitis, dermatitis and neuropathy. There is higher risk for neoplasia. We observed an atypical case, corresponding to a 69-year old female presenting with complicated celiac disease. The patient was referred following the histological examination of an enterectomy specimen, which unexpectedly revealed an enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma in a background of celiac disease. Patient’s previous medical history comprised several abdominal surgical procedures, without other prior symptoms suggestive of celiac disease. Indeed, the patient was obese and no signs of malabsortion were apparent. This case draws our attention to clinically silent celiac disease, which represents a diagnostic challenge. Thus, this should be kept in mind whenever a patient presents with abdominal relapsing complications, otherwise unexplained. PMID:25568762

Brito, Margarida Dantas; Martins, Ângelo; Henrique, Rui; Mariz, José

2014-01-01

134

Haff disease complicated by multiple organ failure after crayfish consumption: a case study  

PubMed Central

Haff disease is a syndrome consisting of unexplained rhabdomyolysis. Patients suffering from Haff disease report having eaten fish within 24 hours before the onset of illness. Most patients survive and recover quickly. The present study is the first report of Haff disease complicated by multiple organ failure after crayfish consumption. A 66-year-old Chinese man ate cooked crayfish on the night of June 23, 2013. He arrived at our hospital 2 days later and was admitted to the intensive care unit. After admission, the patient was diagnosed with Haff disease complicated by multiple organ failure. Despite supportive and symptomatic treatments, the condition of the patient deteriorated, and he died due to his illness. Haff disease is a rare clinical syndrome that is sometimes misdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and proper treatment are essential to prevent progression to multiple organ failure. PMID:25607271

Feng, Gang; Luo, Qiancheng; Zhuang, Ping; Guo, Enwei; Yao, Yulan; Gao, Zhongyu

2014-01-01

135

Adult-onset Still's disease presenting as fever of unknown origin in a patient with HIV infection.  

PubMed

A 43-year-old African American man with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was found to have adult-onset Still's disease manifesting as fever of unknown origin. In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients are preserving their immune status and, thus, must be evaluated in a manner similar to that for the general population. PMID:18199044

DelVecchio, Sally; Skidmore, Peter

2008-02-15

136

With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair  

SciTech Connect

In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

Not Available

1987-09-04

137

Complications of Tumor Necrosis Factor-± Blockade in Chronic Granulomatous Disease—Related Colitis  

PubMed Central

Background. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a genetic disorder of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, which predisposes patients to infections and inflammatory complications, including severe colitis. Management of CGD colitis is a challenge because standard immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in already immunocompromised hosts. Methods. We report the use of infliximab in 5 patients with CGD. Results. Infliximab administration predisposed patients to severe infections with typical CGD pathogens but not mycobacteria, as reported with infliximab in other conditions. In addition to infections, infliximab administration led to successful closure of fistulae, sometimes with other untoward consequences. Infliximab-associated complications were associated with 2 deaths. Conclusions. Infliximab use in the treatment of CGD inflammatory bowel disease requires aggressive antimicrobial prophylaxis, assiduous surveillance for infection, and vigilance for untoward gastrointestinal complications. This experience suggests that infliximab therapy is effective but has untoward consequences in patients with CGD. PMID:21058909

Uzel, Gulbu; Orange, Jordan S.; Poliak, Nina; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Heller, Theo; Holland, Steven M.

2010-01-01

138

Management of a pregnant patient with Graves' disease complicated by propylthiouracil induced agranulocytosis.  

PubMed

Relapse and exacerbation of Graves' disease during pregnancy is rare, and thionamide induced agranulocytosis is an uncommon side effect. We report a case of a pregnant woman in her 24th week of gestation that experienced a relapse of Graves' disease that was complicated by propylthiouracil induced agranulocytosis. Following the discontinuation of propylthiouracil and administration of a broad-spectrum of antibiotics, agranulocytosis subsided within 10 days. A total thyroidectomy to avoid any future relapse was planned and a short course of a beta-adrenergic blocker and Lugol solution were prescribed before the operation. At the 28th week of gestation, a total thyroidectomy was performed without complications and thyroxine replacement therapy was commenced. At the 40th week of gestation, labor was induced and a 3,370 g healthy male infant was born without clinical features of thyrotoxicosis. We report herein on the patient and the treatment options for this rare and complicated case. PMID:16491833

Cho, Yoon-Young; Shon, Ho Sang; Yoon, Hyun Dae

2005-12-01

139

Complement alternative pathway activation in the course of thrombotic microangiopathy associated with adult-onset Still's disease.  

PubMed

Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome is a rare disease associated which genetic or acquired factors those cause defective regulation of the alternative complement pathway. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with thrombotic microangiopathy coinciding with a monocyclic evolution of adult-onset Still's disease. Low C3 with decreased FB concentration, associated with normal C4 was present until the thrombotic microangiopathy's resolution, indicative of an excessive production of alternative C3 convertase. She responded to plasma exchange. This observation reinforces the hypothesis for a common pathway in the pathogenesis for both of the diseases, and suggests alternative complement pathway mediation. PMID:23562215

Carron, Pierre-Louis; Cartier, Jean-Charles; Truche, Anne-Sophie; Brunelle, Charlotte; Cartier, Julien; Malvezzi, Paolo; Ponard, Denise

2013-12-01

140

Knocked-out and still walking: prion protein-deficient cattle are resistant to prion disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are caused by the propagation of a misfolded form (PrP**d) of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP**c. Disruption of PrP**c expression in the mouse results in resistance to PrP-propagation and disease. However, the impa...

141

Pyloric exclusion in the management of complicated duodenal and pancreatic disease.  

PubMed

Pyloric exclusion with gastrojejunostomy has been shown to be an effective adjuvant in the treatment of severe duodenal and pancreatic trauma. The authors have successfully applied this technique to the treatment of two patients with complicated pancreatic pseudocysts drained by cyst duodenostomy. A third patient with malignant duodenocolic fistula was palliated with this modality but eventually succumbed to his advanced disease. PMID:6721288

Cogbill, T H; Moore, E E; Newman, M M; Halgrimson, C G

1984-05-01

142

Neurologic complications in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: increasing relevance in the era of biologics.  

PubMed

Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can involve almost every organ system. Neurologic complications are not infrequent in patients with IBD, but are poorly recognized and underreported. Pathophysiologically, these may represent immune-mediated phenomenon, nonimmunologic complications due to micronutrient deficiencies, thromboembolism, or be medication-induced. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurologic complication of IBD and may be immune-mediated, or caused by therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) therapy or metronidazole. Multiple sclerosis occurs with a greater frequency in patients with IBD. Anti-TNF-? therapy can cause neurologic disease characterized by central demyelination that mimics multiple sclerosis. Hence, patients with a history of demyelinating diseases or with symptoms of polyneuropathy should be carefully evaluated before initiation of anti-TNF-? therapy. Natalizumab has been associated with fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy due to reactivation of JC virus, and occurs with greater frequency in patients with previous JC virus infection. Stroke secondary to venous or arterial thromboembolism can be seen in patients with active Crohn's disease. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the neurologic complications in patients with IBD. Neurologic symptoms in these patients should be promptly evaluated. PMID:22552994

Singh, Siddharth; Kumar, Neeraj; Loftus, Edward V; Kane, Sunanda V

2013-01-01

143

Care of the injured worldwide: trauma still the neglected disease of modern society  

PubMed Central

Traditionally, surgical diseases including emergency and injury care have garnered less attention and support internationally when compared to other medical specialties. Over the past decade however, healthcare professionals have increasingly advocated for the need to address the global burden of non-communicable diseases. Surgical disease, including traumatic injury, is among the top causes of death and disability worldwide and the subsequent economic burden is substantial, falling disproportionately on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The future of global health in these regions depends on a redirection of attention to diseases managed within surgical, anesthesia and emergency specialties. Increasing awareness of these disparities, as well as increasing focus in the realms of policy and advocacy, is crucial. While the barriers to providing quality trauma and emergency care worldwide are not insurmountable, we must work together across disciplines and across boundaries in order to negotiate change and reduce the global burden of surgical disease. PMID:22980446

2012-01-01

144

Management of motor complications in Parkinson disease: current and emerging therapies.  

PubMed

Motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are common motor complications that manifest within the first few years from the initiation of therapy in patients with Parkinson disease. These complications negatively affect the quality of life and represent an important source of disability. A growing number of therapeutic options including treatments aimed at prolonging the efficacy of levodopa (eg, selective monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors and catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors), administration of longer-acting dopamine agonists (eg, rotigotine, sustained-release ropinirole), and continuous administration of intraduodenal levodopa exist or will soon become available. Patients who maintain a good response to levodopa but continue to experience disabling motor complications despite the best medical management may benefit from a regimen of subcutaneous apomorphine, ideally delivered by a subcutaneous pump, or deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or internal portion of the pallidum. Emerging therapies for motor complications are expected to further enhance continuous (physiologic) delivery of dopaminergic drugs and extend the reach of therapies beyond the dopaminergic system to influence not only the motor but also the vast range of nonmotor complications of this multisystemic disease. PMID:20816270

Espay, Alberto J

2010-11-01

145

Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease  

PubMed Central

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

2014-01-01

146

Kidney Diseases Caused by Complement Dysregulation: Acquired, Inherited, and Still More to Come  

PubMed Central

Inherited and acquired dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway plays an important role in multiple renal diseases. In recent years, the identification of disease-causing mutations and genetic variants in complement regulatory proteins has contributed significantly to our knowledge of the pathogenesis of complement associated glomerulopathies. In these diseases defective complement control leading to the deposition of activated complement products plays a key role. Consequently, complement-related glomerulopathies characterized by glomerular complement component 3 (C3) deposition in the absence of local immunoglobulin deposits are now collectively described by the term “C3 glomerulopathies.” Therapeutic strategies for reestablishing complement regulation by either complement blockade with the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody eculizumab or plasma substitution have been successful in several cases of C3 glomerulopathies. However, further elucidation of the underlying defects in the alternative complement pathway is awaited to develop pathogenesis-specific therapies. PMID:23227086

Heeringa, Saskia F.; Cohen, Clemens D.

2012-01-01

147

Adult onset Still's disease as a paraneoplastic syndrome--a case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology and characterized by evanescent salmon pink rash, sore throat, liver dysfunction, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, arthritis, and leukocytosis. It is a diagnosis of exclusion; however, there are case reports in the literature about patients with malignancies and AOSD-like signs and symptoms. Here we report a patient with AOSD seems to be associated with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. This phenomenon is not distinguishable from primary AOSD either in presentation or in treatment; except for the main purpose of the management should be targeted to the underlying malignancy. PMID:24032618

Yilmaz, Sedat; Karakas, Ahmet; Cinar, Muhammet; Coskun, Omer; Simsek, Ismail; Erdem, Hakan; Eyigun, Can Polat; Pay, Salih

2013-01-01

148

Reduction of fatal complications from combined modality therapy in Hodgkin's disease  

SciTech Connect

A total of 464 pathologically staged IA through IIIB Hodgkin's disease patients were evaluated for the risk of developing acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or a fatal infection after treatment with radiation therapy (RT) alone, initial combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy (CMT), or RT with MOPP administered at relapse. Patients received a standard six cycles of MOPP, and additional maintenance chemotherapy was not administered. Patients receiving total nodal irradiation (TNI) and MOPP chemotherapy have an 11. 9% actuarial risk of developing a fatal complication at ten years, as compared to a 0.8% risk for lesser field irradiation and MOPP. The risk with RT alone is 0.6%. Patients 40 years of age or older have a greater risk for complications. These data report a low risk for fatal complication with CMT when less than TNI is administered and when maintenance chemotherapy is not used.

Mauch, P.M.; Canellos, G.P.; Rosenthal, D.S.; Hellman, S.

1985-04-01

149

The modern pre-levodopa era of Parkinson’s disease: insights into motor complications from sub-Saharan Africa  

PubMed Central

During the past decade, a number of large drug trials suggested that the initiation of levodopa therapy should be delayed to reduce the risk of motor complications in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, the relative contribution of the cumulative exposure to levodopa and of disease progression to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias is still poorly understood. In this 4-year multicentre study, we investigated a large cohort of patients with Parkinson’s disease in a sub-Saharan African country (Ghana), where access to medication is limited and the initiation of levodopa therapy often occurs many years after onset. The primary objective was to investigate whether the occurrence of motor complications is primarily related to the duration of levodopa therapy or to disease-related factors. Study design included a cross-sectional case-control analysis of data collected between December 2008 and November 2012, and a prospective study of patients followed-up for at least 6 months after the initiation of levodopa therapy. Ninety-one patients fulfilled criteria for clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (58 males, mean age at onset 60.6 ± 11.3 years). Demographic data were compared to those of 2282 consecutive Italian patients recruited during the same period, whereas nested matched subgroups were used to compare clinical variables. Demographic features, frequency and severity of motor and non-motor symptoms were comparable between the two populations, with the only exception of more frequent tremor-dominant presentation in Ghana. At baseline, the proportion of Ghanaian patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was 56% and 14%, respectively. Although levodopa therapy was introduced later in Ghana (mean disease duration 4.2 ± 2.8 versus 2.4 ± 2.1 years, P < 0.001), disease duration at the occurrence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was similar in the two populations. In multivariate analysis, disease duration and levodopa daily dose (mg/kg of body weight) were associated with motor complications, while the disease duration at the initiation of levodopa was not. Prospective follow-up for a mean of 2.6 ± 1.3 years of a subgroup of 21 patients who were drug-naďve at baseline [median disease duration 4.5 (interquartile range, 2.3–5) years] revealed that the median time to development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias after initiation of levodopa therapy was 6 months. We conclude that motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are not associated with the duration of levodopa therapy, but rather with longer disease duration and higher levodopa daily dose. Hence, the practice to withhold levodopa therapy with the objective of delaying the occurrence of motor complications is not justified. PMID:25034897

Akpalu, Albert; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Cham, Momodou; Amboni, Marianna; Cereda, Emanuele; Fabbri, Margherita; Adjei, Patrick; Akassi, John; Bonetti, Alba; Pezzoli, Gianni

2014-01-01

150

Treatment of Parkinson disease: a 64-year-old man with motor complications of advanced Parkinson disease.  

PubMed

In early stages, Parkinson disease typically begins with asymmetric or unilateral motor symptoms due to combinations of mild bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor. In most cases, with progression, signs of more generalized bradykinesia appear, which include facial masking, reduced voice volume, and slowing of activities of daily living. In more advanced Parkinson disease, other disabling manifestations may follow, such as impaired balance, gait freezing, falls, speech disturbance, and cognitive impairment. Levodopa is the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson disease. However, motor complications uniquely related to levodopa treatment may emerge that may be difficult to manage. These include fluctuating levodopa responses and involuntary movements and postures known as dyskinesia and dystonia. Medication adjustments are usually effective, but in some cases surgical intervention with deep brain stimulation becomes necessary to alleviate motor complications. The case of Mr L, a man with an 11-year history of Parkinson disease, illustrates these emerging motor complications and the manner in which they may be managed both medically and surgically. PMID:22706836

Tarsy, Daniel

2012-06-01

151

Early postoperative complications in patients with Crohn's disease given and not given preoperative total parenteral nutrition  

PubMed Central

Objective The effect of preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on the rate of early (within 30 days) postoperative complications in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease (CD) was examined. Material and methods A series of 15 consecutive patients with CD (mean CD activity index score, 270) given preoperative TPN for 18–90 days (mean, 46 days) and undergoing bowel resection and primary anastomosis was compared with matching controls (105 patients) consecutively selected from all CD patients operated in Stockholm County during a preceding 20-year period without preoperative TPN. Results During the preoperative TPN, all the patients studied displayed clinical remission of CD as reflected in improvement in their general well-being, relief of abdominal pain, and abatement of fever and diarrhea. There was no significant early postoperative complication in the TPN-treated group, whereas there were 29 patients with early postoperative complications in the control group, which means a significantly higher rate of postoperative complications when preoperative TPN was not provided. During the preoperative TPN, some crucial variables increased such as the body weight, the serum concentrations of albumin and triiodothyronine reflecting improved nutritional state, whereas the serum concentration of haptoglobin and the white cell count decreased reflecting decreased inflammatory activity. Conclusions This study shows that preoperative TPN for at least 18 days may be recommended to be given to patients with moderate to severe CD until clinical remission is achieved in order to minimize the risk of early postoperative complications. PMID:22242614

Jacobson, Stefan

2012-01-01

152

Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy  

PubMed Central

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

2014-01-01

153

Optimizing Symptom Relief and Preventing Complications in Adults with Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a chronic illness causing recurrent typical and atypical symptoms. Possible complications include oesophagitis, ulcer, stricture and Barrett’s oesophagus. Evidence suggests that the intraoesophageal pH correlates directly with the degree of mucosal injury. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the first choice of therapy because they are significantly more effective than histamine-2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) in achieving and

Vincenzo Savarino; Pietro Dulbecco

2004-01-01

154

Successful steroid treatment of a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease complicated by sarcoidosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The patient was a 54-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) who developed complicating systemic\\u000a sarcoidosis. Hypercalcemia and an abrupt increase in serum creatinine levels were observed during the clinical course. Steroid\\u000a therapy was initiated and produced a distinct improvement in renal function. A kidney biopsy was not feasible because ADPKD\\u000a is a contraindication for renal needle biopsy.

Yuko Iwasa; Junko Arai; Michihiro Mitobe; Ken Tsuchiya; Kosaku Nitta

2011-01-01

155

Pelvic Fistulas Complicating Pelvic Surgery or Diseases: Spectrum of Imaging Findings  

PubMed Central

Pelvic fistulas may result from obstetric complications, inflammatory bowel disease, pelvic malignancy, pelvic radiation therapy, pelvic surgery, or other traumatic causes, and their symptoms may be distressing. In our experience, various types of pelvic fistulas are identified after pelvic disease or pelvic surgery. Because of its close proximity, the majority of such fistulas occur in the pelvic cavity and include the vesicovaginal, vesicouterine, vesicoenteric, ureterovaginal, ureteroenteric and enterovaginal type. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the spectrum of imaging features of pelvic fistulas. PMID:11752977

Moon, Sung Gyu; Lee, Hak Jong; Moon, Min Hoan; Myung, Jae Sung

2001-01-01

156

Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis  

SciTech Connect

A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

1982-11-01

157

l-selectin gene polymorphisms and complications of sickle cell disease.  

PubMed

We had found high expression of L-selectin and alphaMbeta2 integrin on leukocytes in patients with complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). In non-SCD patients, L-selectin polymorphisms are associated with vasculopathy and nephropathy. Our objective was to determine if L-selectin gene polymorphisms affect leukocyte expression of the protein, or the development of complications in SCD. By polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers incorporating mismatches at the 3'-end, we analysed DNA from 142 HbSS patients and 102 healthy, racially matched, HbAA controls; to detect the F206L, T49S, and P213S L-selectin gene polymorphisms. All patients were assessed for complications of SCD. Steady-state expression of L-selectin on leukocytes was measured by flow cytometry in 44 patients. We excluded HbSS patients on hydroxyurea, with any other disease, pregnancy, or HbF > or = 10%. There were no significant differences in distribution of F206L, T49S or P213S l-selectin gene polymorphisms between patients and controls (chi(2) = 0.1, P > 0.05). There was no association between any of these gene polymorphisms and high expression of L-selectin by leukocytes, or the development of complications in SCD (chi(2) = 2.37, P > 0.05). The findings suggest that these three gene polymorphisms do not predispose to high leukocyte expression of L-selectin, or development of complications in SCD. PMID:18665829

Ugochukwu, C C; Okpala, I; Pantelidis, P; Inusa, B; Ibegbulam, O; Onyekwere, O

2008-08-01

158

The French Gaucher’s disease registry: clinical characteristics, complications and treatment of 562 patients  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical features, complications and treatments of Gaucher’s disease (GD), a rare autosomal–recessive disorder due to a confirmed lysosomal enzyme (glucocerebrosidase) deficiency, are described. Methods All patients with known GD, living in France, with ?1 consultations (1980–2010), were included in the French GD registry, yielding the following 4 groups: the entire cohort, with clinical description; and its subgroups: patients with ?1 follow-up visits, to investigate complications; recently followed (2009–2010) patients; and patients treated during 2009–2010, to examine complications before and during treatment. Data are expressed as medians (range) for continuous variables and numbers (%) for categorical variables. Results Among the 562 registry patients, 265 (49.6%) were females; 454 (85.0%) had type 1, 22 (4.1%) type 2, 37 (6.9%) perinatal–lethal type and 21 (3.9%) type 3. Median ages at first GD symptoms and diagnosis, respectively, were 15 (0–77) and 22 (0–84) years for all types. The first symptom diagnosing GD was splenomegaly and/or thrombocytopenia (37.6% and 26.3%, respectively). Bone-marrow aspiration and/or biopsy yielded the diagnosis for 54.7% of the patients, with enzyme deficiency confirming GD for all patients. Birth incidence rate was estimated at 1/50,000 and prevalence at 1/136,000. For the 378 followed patients, median follow-up was 16.2 (0.1–67.6) years. Major clinical complications were bone events (BE; avascular necrosis, bone infarct or pathological fracture) for 109 patients, splenectomy for 104, and Parkinson’s disease for 14; 38 patients died (neurological complications for 15 type-2 and 3 type-3 patients, GD complications for 11 type-1 and another disease for 9 type-1 patients). Forty-six had monoclonal gammopathy. Among 283 recently followed patients, 36 were untreated and 247 had been treated during 2009–2010; 216 patients received treatment in December 2010 (126 with imiglucerase, 45 velaglucerase, 24 taliglucerase, 21 miglustat). BE occurred before (130 in 67 patients) and under treatment (60 in 41 patients) with respective estimated frequencies (95% CI) of first BE at 10 years of 20.3% (14.1%–26.5%) and 19.8% (13.5%–26.1%). Conclusion This registry enabled the epidemiological description of GD in France and showed that BE occur even during treatment. PMID:23046562

2012-01-01

159

Late Complications of Clinical Clostridium Histolyticum Collagenase Use in Dupuytren's Disease  

PubMed Central

Introduction While Dupuytren's disease can cause disabling contractures requiring open surgery, a less-invasive option using Clostridium Histolyticum collagenase (CHC) via percutaneous injection was recently reported. A recent prospective, randomized trial demonstrated few complications during 90 days follow-up, however did not assess any longer term follow-up for these patients. Long-term outcomes in this setting have not been adequately reported, and the current manuscript aims to identify late complications from the clinical use of percutaneous CHC. Methods The current manuscript reports an extended 12-month follow-up for a cohort of twelve of patients enrolled in the original prospective, randomized trial, treated at a single institution. An analysis of complications requiring surgical intervention was undertaken. Results Two of twelve patients reported debilitating pain and triggering requiring surgical intervention. Extensive deep-tissue scarring and adhesions were identified, providing the first visual and qualitative analysis of the pathologic effects of CHC. Conclusion Late complications from CHC use can and have occurred, outside the follow-up period of the initial phase III trials. Longer term follow-up of such patients is thus essential, and further investigation and characterization of the late effects of CHC use is warranted. PMID:22912868

Rozen, Warren M.; Edirisinghe, Yasith; Crock, John

2012-01-01

160

Otorrhea in Kawasaki disease diagnosis complicated by an EBV infection: coincidental disease or a true association.  

PubMed

The Authors report on two children affected by Kawasaki disease (KD). The diagnosis of KD was made after exclusion of conditions with similar presentation. At admission these children (cases 1 and 2) presented fever, purulent caseous pharyngotonsillitis, and cervical bilateral lymphadenopathy, as well as an erythematous non-vesicular rash over the face and trunk, and a mild bilateral non-exudative conjunctivitis in case 1. After respectively three and two days corticosteroid therapy was started without any significant improvement of the general condition and any diminutions of the fever. Two days later in case 1 the child presented a clear otorrhea, a cutaneous non vesicular rash, and soon after all the remaining signs of Kawasaki disease, in case 2 otorrhea was found after 4 days and then the other signs of the KD. These patients were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (2 g/kg day), with an improvement of their general condition. To our knowledge we report the first cases of otorrhea in the setting of Kawasaki disease. We cannot exclude that the presence of Kawasaki disease in the context of otorrhea in children positive for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is merely coincidental. Besides, recent acquisitions show that KD is due to a new virus that could cross-react with the EBV. The Authors conclude that the presence of EBV infection or similar condition in a febrile child may not exclude Kawasaki disease and a differential diagnosis has to be performed for a timely commencement of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.   PMID:23640449

Pavone, P; Cocuzza, S; Passaniti, E; Longo, M R; Verrotti, A; Serra, A; Romano, C; Nunnari, G; Falsaperla, R

2013-04-01

161

Cardiovascular disease as a late complication of end-stage renal disease in children.  

PubMed

As in older adults, cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in adolescents and young adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) since childhood. This concerns patients on dialysis as well as transplant patients, despite the fact that a long duration of dialysis during childhood is an extra mortality risk factor. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), aortic valve calcification, and increased arterial stiffness, but not increased arterial intima media thickening, are the most frequently observed alterations in young adult survivors with childhood ESRD. In transplanted patients a concentric LVH as a result of chronic hypertension is mostly observed; in dialysis patients a more asymmetric septal LVH is found as a result of chronic volume overload. These results suggest that in children and young adults with ESRD chronic pressure and volume overload, a high calcium-phosphate product, and chronic inflammation, but not dyslipidemia, play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:15549413

Groothoff, Jaap W; Lilien, Marc R; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Wolff, Eric D; Davin, Jean Claude

2005-03-01

162

Sickle Cell Disease in Pregnancy: Maternal Complications in a Medicaid-Enrolled Population  

PubMed Central

Higher frequencies of pregnancy complications have been reported among women with sickle cell disease (SCD) compared with those without SCD; however, past studies are limited by small sample size, narrow geographic area, and use of hospital discharge data. We compared the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women with SCD to those without SCD in a large, geographically diverse sample. Data from the 2004–2010 Truven Health MarketScan® Multi-State Medicaid databases were used to assess the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women 15–44 years of age with and without SCD whose race was reported as black. The comparison group of women without SCD was further divided into those with chronic conditions associated with multi-organ failure and those without chronic conditions. Multivariable log-binomial regression models were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for outcomes for women with SCD compared with women in the two comparison groups. Of the 335,348 black women with a delivery during 2004–2010, 1,526 had a diagnosis of SCD (0.5 %). Compared with women without SCD who had chronic conditions, women with SCD had higher prevalence of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, obstetric shock, pneumonia, sepsis, postpartum infection, and transfusions. SCD was also positively associated with acute renal failure, cerebrovascular disorder, respiratory distress syndrome, eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, preterm birth, and ventilation when compared with women without SCD and chronic conditions. Overall, women with SCD have increased prevalence of pregnancy complications, even when compared with a group of women with similar risk for multi-organ failure. PMID:23315242

Okoroh, Ekwutosi M.; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Grant, Althea; Hooper, W. Craig

2015-01-01

163

Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: maternal complications in a Medicaid-enrolled population.  

PubMed

Higher frequencies of pregnancy complications have been reported among women with sickle cell disease (SCD) compared with those without SCD; however, past studies are limited by small sample size, narrow geographic area, and use of hospital discharge data. We compared the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women with SCD to those without SCD in a large, geographically diverse sample. Data from the 2004-2010 Truven Health MarketScan(®) Multi-State Medicaid databases were used to assess the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women 15-44 years of age with and without SCD whose race was reported as black. The comparison group of women without SCD was further divided into those with chronic conditions associated with multi-organ failure and those without chronic conditions. Multivariable log-binomial regression models were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for outcomes for women with SCD compared with women in the two comparison groups. Of the 335,348 black women with a delivery during 2004-2010, 1,526 had a diagnosis of SCD (0.5 %). Compared with women without SCD who had chronic conditions, women with SCD had higher prevalence of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, obstetric shock, pneumonia, sepsis, postpartum infection, and transfusions. SCD was also positively associated with acute renal failure, cerebrovascular disorder, respiratory distress syndrome, eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, preterm birth, and ventilation when compared with women without SCD and chronic conditions. Overall, women with SCD have increased prevalence of pregnancy complications, even when compared with a group of women with similar risk for multi-organ failure. PMID:23315242

Boulet, Sheree L; Okoroh, Ekwutosi M; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Grant, Althea; Craig Hooper, W

2013-02-01

164

Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.  

PubMed

Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy. PMID:23745038

Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

2013-06-01

165

Proteomic and biomarker studies and neurological complications of pediatric sickle cell disease.  

PubMed

Biomarker analysis and proteomic discovery in pediatric sickle cell disease has the potential to lead to important discoveries and improve care. The aim of this review article is to describe proteomic and biomarker articles involving neurological and developmental complications in this population. A systematic review was conducted to identify relevant research publications. Articles were selected for children under the age of 21 years with the most common subtypes of sickle cell disease. Included articles focused on growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor), intra and extracellular brain proteins (glial fibrillary acidic protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor), and inflammatory and coagulation markers (interleukin-1?, l-selectin, thrombospondin-1, erythrocyte, and platelet-derived microparticles). Positive findings include increases in plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and platelet-derived growth factor with elevated transcranial Dopplers velocities, increases in platelet-derived growth factor isoform AA with overt stroke, and increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein with acute brain injury. These promising potential neuro-biomarkers provide insight into pathophysiologic processes and clinical events, but their clinical utility is yet to be established. Additional proteomics research is needed, including broad-based proteomic discovery of plasma constituents and blood cell proteins, as well as urine and cerebrospinal fluid components, before, during and after neurological and developmental complications. PMID:25290359

Lance, Eboni I; Casella, James F; Everett, Allen D; Barron-Casella, Emily

2014-12-01

166

Purtscher's-like retinopathy as an initial presentation of adult-onset Still's disease: a case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's disease is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology and is characterized by high, spiking fever, arthritis, evanescent maculopapular rash, myalgia, serositis, leukocytosis, and involvement of various organs including the eyes. The ocular manifestations have been described including orbital pseudotumor, ptosis, and diplopia with orbital pain but never Purtscher's-like retinopathy. We describe a 21-year-old male patient with adult-onset Still's disease who developed the Purtscher's-like retinopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported adult-onset Still's disease patient with Purtscher's-like retinopathy as the initial presentation. PMID:16900301

Liu, Feng-Cheng; Chiang, Shang-Yi; Chang, Deh-Ming; Lai, Jenn-Haung; Hou, Tsung-Yun; Chen, Chen-Hung

2007-07-01

167

A case of IgG4-related sclerosing disease complicated by sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis and orbital pseudotumour  

PubMed Central

We present a case of IgG4-related sclerosing disease complicated by sclerosing cholangitis (SC), idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) and orbital pseudotumour (OPT). Clinical, radiographic and pathological findings later suggested that the patient had SC complicated by IRF. The patient’s SC and IRF were well controlled for the first 10 years of the follow-up period; OPT developed in the tenth year. During investigation of the OPT, serum IgG4 level was found to be significantly elevated. The patient was then diagnosed with IgG4-related sclerosing disease complicated by SC, IRF and OPT. This is a rare manifestation of IgG4-related sclerosing disease, which was diagnosed incidentally during OPT work-up. We suggest that this is a variation of the so-called IgG4-related sclerosing disease or hyper-IgG4 disease. PMID:21686984

Nagai, Kazuki; Hosaka, Hiroo; Takahashi, Yutaka; Kubo, Shuichi; Nakamura, Noriko; Andou, Kazuo

2009-01-01

168

Angiogenesis-Related Biomarkers in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease: Their Association with Liver Disease Complications and Outcome  

PubMed Central

Angiogenesis is believed to be implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We aimed to explore the usefulness and accuracy of plasma angiogenic biomarkers for noninvasive evaluation of the severity of liver failure and ALD outcome. One hundred and forty-seven patients with ALD were prospectively enrolled and assessed based on their (1) gender, (2) age, (3) severity of liver dysfunction according to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh and MELD scores, and (4) the presence of ALD complications. Plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) and angiopoietins 1 and 2 (Ang1 and Ang2) were investigated using ELISAs. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Significantly higher concentrations of Ang2 and VEGF-A in ALD patients as compared to controls were found. There was no difference in Ang1 levels in both groups. A positive correlation of Ang2 levels with INR (Rho 0.66; P < 0.0001) and its inverse correlation with plasma albumin levels (Rho –0.62; P < 0.0001) were found. High Ang2 concentrations turned out to be an independent predictor of severe liver dysfunction, as well as hepatic encephalopathy and renal impairment. Ang2 possessed the highest diagnostic and prognostic potential among three studied angiogenesis-related molecules. PMID:24959006

Cichoz-Lach, Halina

2014-01-01

169

Angiogenesis-related biomarkers in patients with alcoholic liver disease: their association with liver disease complications and outcome.  

PubMed

Angiogenesis is believed to be implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We aimed to explore the usefulness and accuracy of plasma angiogenic biomarkers for noninvasive evaluation of the severity of liver failure and ALD outcome. One hundred and forty-seven patients with ALD were prospectively enrolled and assessed based on their (1) gender, (2) age, (3) severity of liver dysfunction according to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh and MELD scores, and (4) the presence of ALD complications. Plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) and angiopoietins 1 and 2 (Ang1 and Ang2) were investigated using ELISAs. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Significantly higher concentrations of Ang2 and VEGF-A in ALD patients as compared to controls were found. There was no difference in Ang1 levels in both groups. A positive correlation of Ang2 levels with INR (Rho 0.66; P < 0.0001) and its inverse correlation with plasma albumin levels (Rho -0.62; P < 0.0001) were found. High Ang2 concentrations turned out to be an independent predictor of severe liver dysfunction, as well as hepatic encephalopathy and renal impairment. Ang2 possessed the highest diagnostic and prognostic potential among three studied angiogenesis-related molecules. PMID:24959006

Kasztelan-Szczerbinska, Beata; Surdacka, Agata; Slomka, Maria; Rolinski, Jacek; Celinski, Krzysztof; Cichoz-Lach, Halina; Madro, Agnieszka; Szczerbinski, Mariusz

2014-01-01

170

[Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx. Part 2: Its role in vascular diseases and in diabetic complications].  

PubMed

Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an essential initial step in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and microangiopathic complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in chronic venous disease. Atherosclerosis risk factors, as hypercholesterolemia (LDL), hyperglycemia, inflammation, salt excess and altered shear stress can damage glycocalyx. This lead to endothelial dysfunction and allows LDL and leukocytes to filtrate to the subendothelial space initiating atheroma plaque formation. Degradation of glycocalyx in diabetes mellitus is mainly due to oxidative stress and enables protein filtration (albuminuria) and endothelial disorder of microangiopathy. Chronic venous hypertension brings to altered shears stress which results in shredded glycocalyx, this allows leukocytes to migrate into venous wall and initiate inflammation leading to morphologic and functional venous changes of the chronic venous disease. Treatment with glycosaminoglycans (sulodexide) prevents or recovers the damaged glycocalyx and several of its consequences. This drug improves chronic venous disease and promotes healing of chronic venous ulcers. It has also been useful in peripheral arterial obstructive disease and in diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria. PMID:24836779

Frati Munari, Alberto C

2014-01-01

171

Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications  

PubMed Central

Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on long-term complications and associated conditions, the course of Gaucher disease was modelled. The cohort consisted of all diagnosed GD patients in the Netherlands. Mutually exclusive disease states were defined as ‘asymptomatic’, ‘signs/symptoms’, ‘recovery’, ‘splenectomy’, ‘bone complication’, ‘multiple complications’ and ‘malignancy’. A natural history (NH) cohort was delineated based upon historical data on Dutch patients before ERT was available. Cumulative incidence curves were composed for progression from each disease state to the next. Two scenarios were applied for the ERT cohort: time to complications was calculated from A. start of ERT; B. entering the previous disease state. Median time for the development of signs and/or symptoms was 30.1 years (N = 73). In the NH cohort (N = 42), 9% had developed a bone complication after 10 years in the signs/symptoms phase, while 21% had undergone a splenectomy. In the ERT cohort (N = 29 (A), N = 28 (B)), 12% (A) or 4% (B) had developed a bone complication after 10 years in this phase and no patient was splenectomized. No patients in the NH cohort recovered, compared to 50% in the ERT cohort after 3.6 years (N = 28 (A)) or 22.4 years (N = 27 (B)) of treatment. Median time from a first to a second complication was 11 years in the NH cohort (N = 31), whereas 16 respectively 14 percent had developed a second complication after 10 years in the ERT cohort (N = 17, scenario A/B). Fourteen percent (scenario A/B) developed an associated malignancy after 10 years in the phase ‘multiple complications’ (N = 23). Associated malignancies occurred almost exclusively in advanced disease stages, therefore it is suggested that ERT reduces their incidence Long-term ERT for GD can reduce the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications. As ERT prevents progression to more advanced stages of GD it will most likely result in a reduction of associated malignancies. PMID:25056340

2014-01-01

172

Use of memantine (akatinol) for the correction of cognitive impairments in Parkinson's disease complicated by dementia.  

PubMed

This study addresses the effects of 52 weeks of treatment with the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist memantine on motor, cognitive, and mental disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease complicated by dementia, as compared with a control group of patients not treated with memantine. Patients of the experimental group (32 subjects) received memantine (20 mg/day), while patients in the control group continued on antiparkinsonism treatment alone. Cognitive, psychiatric, and motor symptoms were assessed before the study and then at the ends of weeks 12, 24, and 52, using clinical assessment, rating scales, and neuropsychological tests. Plasma homocysteine levels were measured by HPLC. Patients treated with memantine had better measures on the MMSE (p < 0.05), ADAS-cog (p < 0.05), clock drawing test (p < 0.05), and FAB (p < 0.01) as compared with the control group by the end of study week 24. Members of the group of patients with high homocysteine levels mounted significantly better responses with memantine treatment, as compared with patients of the control group with high homocysteine levels but not receiving memantine, at the ends of study weeks 24 and 52, in terms of all rating scales (UPDRS, MMSE, ADAS-cog, D-KEFS Verbal Fluency Test, FAB. NPI, and DAD, p < 0.05). By the end of week 52, significant changes in points scores on the NPI-12 scale from baseline were in favor of patients receiving memantine, this applying to the disinhibition (p = 0.006), irritability (p = 0.04), anxiety (p = 0.04), and hallucinations (p = 0.048) subscales. The presence of hyperhomocysteinemia may indicate faster progression of both motor and cognitive impairments in Parkinson's disease. Prolonged memantine treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease complicated by dementia leads to improvements in cognitive functions, stabilization of motor impairments, and decreases in the severity of mental disorders, especially in patients with hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:20033305

Litvinenko, I V; Odinak, M M; Mogil'naya, V I; Perstnev, S V

2010-02-01

173

Should We Still Focus That Much on Cardiovascular Mortality in End Stage Renal Disease Patients? The CONvective TRAnsport STudy  

PubMed Central

Background We studied the distribution of causes of death in the CONTRAST cohort and compared the proportion of cardiovascular deaths with other populations to answer the question whether cardiovascular mortality is still the principal cause of death in end stage renal disease. In addition, we compared patients who died from the three most common death causes. Finally, we aimed to study factors related to dialysis withdrawal. Methods We used data from CONTRAST, a randomized controlled trial in 714 chronic hemodialysis patients comparing the effects of online hemodiafiltration versus low-flux hemodialysis. Causes of death were adjudicated. The distribution of causes of death was compared to that of the Dutch dialysis registry and of the Dutch general population. Results In CONTRAST, 231 patients died on treatment. 32% died from cardiovascular disease, 22% due to infection and 23% because of dialysis withdrawal. These proportions were similar to those in the Dutch dialysis registry and the proportional cardiovascular mortality was similar to that of the Dutch general population. cardiovascular death was more common in patients <60 years. Patients who withdrew were older, had more co-morbidity and a lower mental quality of life at baseline. Patients who withdrew had much co-morbidity. 46% died within 5 days after the last dialysis session. Conclusions Although the absolute risk of death is much higher, the proportion of cardiovascular deaths in a prevalent end stage renal disease population is similar to that of the general population. In older hemodialysis patients cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular death risk are equally important. Particularly the registration of dialysis withdrawal deserves attention. These findings may be partly limited to the Dutch population. PMID:23620729

den Hoedt, Claire H.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grooteman, Muriel P. C.; Mazairac, Albert H. A.; Penne, E. Lars; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; ter Wee, Piet M.; Nubé, Menso J.; Levesque, Renée; Blankestijn, Peter J.; van den Dorpel, Marinus A.

2013-01-01

174

Complicated Whipple’s disease and endocarditis following tumor necrosis factor inhibitors  

PubMed Central

AIM: To test whether treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFI) is associated with complications of Tropheryma whipplei (T. whipplei) infection. METHODS: Because unexplained arthritis is often the first Whipple’s disease (WD) symptom, patients may undergo treatment with TNFI before diagnosis. This may influence the course of infection with T. whipplei, which causes WD, because host immune defects contribute to the pathogenesis of WD. A literature search and cross referencing identified 19 reports of TNFI treatment prior to WD diagnosis. This case-control study compared clinical data in patients receiving TNFI therapy (group?I, n = 41) with patients not receiving TNFI therapy (group II, n = 61). Patients from large reviews served as controls (group III, n = 1059). RESULTS: The rate of endocarditis in patient group?I?was significantly higher than in patient group II (12.2% in group?I vs 1.6% in group II, P < 0.05), and group III (12.2% in group?I?vs 0.16% in group III, P < 0.01). Other, severe systemic or local WD complications such as pericarditis, fever or specific organ manifestations were increased also in group?I?as compared to the other patient groups. However, diarrhea and weight loss were somewhat less frequent in patient group?I. WD is typically diagnosed with duodenal biopsy and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. PAS-stain as standard diagnostic test had a very high percentage of false negative results (diagnostic failure in 63.6% of cases) in group I. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for T. whipplei was more accurate than PAS-stainings (diagnostic accuracy, rate of true positive tests 90.9% for PCR vs 36.4% for PAS, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: TNFI trigger severe WD complications, particularly endocarditis, and lead to false-negative PAS-tests. In case of TNFI treatment failure, infection with T. whipplei should be considered. PMID:25548618

Marth, Thomas

2014-01-01

175

Skeletal Manifestations of Hydatid Disease in Serbia: Demographic Distribution, Site Involvement, Radiological Findings, and Complications  

PubMed Central

Although Serbia is recognized as an endemic country for echinococcosis, no information about precise incidence in humans has been available. The aim of this study was to investigate the skeletal manifestations of hydatid disease in Serbia. This retrospective study was conducted by reviewing the medical database of Institute for Pathology (Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade), a reference institution for bone pathology in Serbia. We reported a total of 41 patients with bone cystic echinococcosis (CE) during the study period. The mean age of 41 patients was 40.9±18.8 years. In 39% of patients, the fracture line was the only visible radiological sign, followed by cyst and tumefaction. The spine was the most commonly involved skeletal site (55.8%), followed by the femur (18.6%), pelvis (13.9%), humerus (7.0%), rib (2.3%), and tibia (2.3%). Pain was the symptom in 41.5% of patients, while some patients demonstrated complications such as paraplegia (22.0%), pathologic fracture (48.8%), and scoliosis (9.8%). The pathological fracture most frequently affected the spine (75.0%) followed by the femur (20.0%) and tibia (5.0%). However, 19.5% of patients didn't develop any complication or symptom. In this study, we showed that bone CE is not uncommon in Serbian population. As reported in the literature, therapy of bone CE is controversial and its results are poor. In order to improve the therapy outcome, early diagnosis, before symptoms and complications occur, can be contributive. PMID:24039289

Bracanovic, Djurdja; Sopta, Jelena; Djonic, Danijela; Lujic, Nenad

2013-01-01

176

[Tactics of surgical treatment of patients with complicated peptic ulcer disease].  

PubMed

Article presents the results of medical treatment after peptic ulcer surgery. I group--59 patients with late complications after peptic ulcer surgery and II group--16 patients with complications of peptic ulcer disease, operated in presence of absolute indications. 13C-UBT and RUT of biopsy material were used to diagnose Hp infection. Hp positive patients received antibacterial treatment. After 1 month from the end of therapy and 1 year after Hp eradication control investigations by 13C-UBT and endoscopy were performed. 77.3% of all and 84.4% of early non treated patients were Hp positive. All patients (of I and II gr.), who followed control testing after antibacterial treatment were finally detected as Hp negative. In I group, control endoscopy revealed epitelization or scarring of ulcer and reduction of inflammatory changes in gastric and duodenal mucosa in all 44 cases of eradication of Hp infection (in 2 patients with peptic ulcer of GEA ulcer relapsed in later). In II group, in 8 patients, who received antibacterial treatment additionally to surgical method, any late complications after surgery were not revealed. In other 6 Hp positive patients: 2--ulcer recurrence and 2--development of chronic gastritis of operated stomach were noted, which required the treatment of Hp infection in future. It is concluded that 1)surgery does not change Hp-status of patients and Hp infection retains in more than 80% of cases; 2) ulcer recurrence, chronic gastritis of operated stomach or its stump are associated with Hp and regress after Hp eradication; 3) progression of gastritis into atrophic remain after surgery, which increases risk of cancer development and there is possibility of its regression after antibacterial treatment of Hp infection. The recommendations were worked out: 1) perforated, bleeding or stenosing ulcer must be treated only by ulceroraphy, suturing or pyloroplasty respectively, added with subsequent Hp eradication therapy for the prevention of late complications after peptic ulcer surgery; 2) vagotomy or partial gastrectomy must be a forced intervention in cases of decompensate pylorostenosis, resistant to treatment ulcers, as ulcers non-healing or recurring after adequate conservative treatment. Subsequent verification and eradication of Hp infection are necessary. PMID:21178196

Girdaladze, A M; Mosidze, B A; Elisabedashvili, G V; Dzhorbenadze, T A

2010-11-01

177

The hypothesis of the genesis of motor complications and continuous dopaminergic stimulation in the treatment of Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The symptoms of Parkinson's disease can become increasingly difficult to control as the disease advances. Levodopa remains the most efficacious therapy for symptomatic treatment. However, with long-term therapy motor and non-motor complications develop.There is now accumulating evidence that several factors – the progressive pathology of Parkinson's disease, the change in drug pharmacodynamics, and the pulsatile manner in which short-acting dopaminergic

Fabrizio Stocchi

2009-01-01

178

Complications after transsphenoidal surgery for patients with Cushing's disease and silent corticotroph adenomas.  

PubMed

OBJECT The purpose of this study was to describe complications associated with the endonasal, transsphenoidal approach for the treatment of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-positive staining tumors (Cushing's disease [CD] and silent corticotroph adenomas [SCAs]) performed by 1 surgeon at a high-volume academic medical center. METHODS Medical records from Brigham and Women's Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Selected for study were 82 patients with CD who during April 2008-April 2014 had consecutively undergone transsphenoidal resection or who had subsequent pathological confirmation of ACTH-positive tumor staining. In addition to demographic, patient, tumor, and surgery characteristics, complications were evaluated. Complications of interest included syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, diabetes insipidus (DI), CSF leakage, carotid artery injury, epistaxis, meningitis, and vision changes. RESULTS Of the 82 patients, 68 (82.9%) had CD and 14 (17.1%) had SCAs; 55 patients were female and 27 were male. Most common (n = 62 patients, 82.7%) were microadenomas, followed by macroadenomas (n = 13, 14.7%). A total of 31 (37.8%) patients underwent reoperation. Median follow-up time was 12.0 months (range 3-69 months). The most common diagnosis was ACTH-secreting (n = 68, 82.9%), followed by silent tumors/adenomas (n = 14, 17.1%). ACTH hyperplasia was found in 8 patients (9.8%). Of the 74 patients who had verified tumors, 12 (16.2%) had tumors with atypical features. The overall (CD and SCA) rate of minor complications was 35.4%; the rate of major complications was 8.5% (n = 7). All permanent morbidity was associated with DI (n = 5, 6.1%). In 16 CD patients (23.5%), transient DI developed. Transient DI was more likely to develop in CD patients who had undergone a second operation (37.9%) than in those who had undergone a first operation only (12.8%, p < 0.05). Permanent DI developed in 4 CD patients (5.9%) and 1 SCA patient (7.1%). For 1 CD patient, intraoperative carotid artery injury required endovascular sacrifice of the injured artery, but the patient remained neurologically intact. For another CD patient, aseptic meningitis developed and was treated effectively with corticosteroids. One CD patient experienced major postoperative epistaxis requiring another operative procedure to achieve hemostasis. For 2 CD patients, development of sinus mucoceles was managed conservatively. For 1 SCA patient, an abdominal wound dehisced at the fat graft site. No patients experienced postoperative CSF leakage, visual impairment, or deep vein thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with CD and other ACTH-positive staining tumors. Recent advances in endoscopic technology and increasing surgeon comfort with this technology are making transsphenoidal procedures safer, faster, and more effective. Serious complications are uncommon and can be managed successfully. PMID:25639314

Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Huang, Kevin T; Nery, Breno; de Moura, Samuel Miranda; Cote, David J; Laws, Edward R

2015-02-01

179

[The role of biologic therapy in the treatment of extraintestinal manifestations and complications of inflammatory bowel disease].  

PubMed

Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about 35% of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Most frequently affected are bones and joints, skin, eyes, liver and biliary ducts. Extraintestinal manifestations of IBD are divided in two groups: reactive manifestations which depend on activity of IBD--peripheral arthritis, erythema nodosum, aphthous stomatitis, episcleritis and other manifestations which are independent on activity of IBD--pyoderma gangrenosum, uveitis, axial arthropathy, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Most affected are bones and joints. Symptoms vary from mild arthralgia to severe arthritis with painful swallowing of joints. They occur in about 5-10% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and in 10-20% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Both peripheral and axial joints can be affected. According to available data, most patients with active IBD and concomitant arthritis have benefit from infliximab therapy. Infliximab is also effective in maintenance of remission in group of patients with spondyloarthropathy. Adalimumab showed similar efficacy in treatment of ankylosing spondylitis, but there are still no data about efficacy of adalimumab in treatment of patients with IBD and concomitant arthritis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis, cholestasis, cholelithiasis and elevation of aminotransferase are also considered to be extraintestinal manifestations of IBD. Most frequent is PSC which affects usually patients with UC (7.5% of patients). Course of liver disease is completely independent on activity of IBD, and destruction of biliary ducts is usually irreversible and refractory on treatment and most of the patients need liver transplantation. Anti-TNF therapy is also ineffective in treatment of PSC and has no impact on disease course and outcome. However, there is no contraindication for anti-TNF therapy of concomitant active IBD in this group of patients. Erythema nodosum (EN) and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) are usual skin manifestations of IBD. Erythema nodosum occurs in about 3-20%, and pyoderma gangrenosum in about 0.5-20% of patients with IBD. Infliximab is proven to be effective in treatment of PG, but there is still not enough evidence on efficacy of anti-TNF drugs in treatment of EN and other rare skin manifestations of IBD. About 2-5% of patients with IBD have also some ophthalmological disorder. Symptoms vary from mild conjunctivitis to severe inflammation of eye membranes--iritis, episcleritis, scleritis and uveitis. It seems that infliximab and adalimumab can diminish uveitis and scleritis in patients with different autoimmune disorders and IBD. According to guidelines of American Gastroenterology Association (AGA), in group of patients with CD, infliximab is indicated in treatment of spondyloarthropathies, arthritis, arthralgia, pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema nodosum, uveitis and other ophthalmological manifestations of IBD except optical neuritis which can worse or be consequence of anti-TNF treatment. Similar indications exist for use of adalimumab except in case of erythema nodosum. In group of patients with extraintestinal manifestations of UC, infliximab is indicated in treatment of spondyloarthropathies and pyoderma gangrenosum. Complications of IBD are fistulas (perianal and non-perianal), stenosis and strictures, abscesses, bowel perforations, gastrointestinal bleeding and development of different malignomas. Anti-TNF drugs are proven to be effective and indicated only for treatment of perianal fistulas in patients with Crohn's disease. In group of patients with UC, there are only few case reports on beneficial effect of infliximab in treating chronic pouchitis and infliximab in treatment of these patients still cannot be recommended. PMID:24471303

Kujundzi?, Milan

2013-04-01

180

Delta Neutrophil Index as an Early Marker for Differential Diagnosis of Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Sepsis  

PubMed Central

Purpose To investigate clinical implications of delta neutrophil index (DNI) to discriminate adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) from sepsis. Materials and Methods We reviewed the medical records of 13 patients with AOSD and 33 gender and age-matched patients with sepsis. In all subjects, microbial tests were performed to exclude or confirm sepsis. All laboratory data were measured two or three times during the first 3 days and represented by their mean levels. DNI was measured automatically by ADVIA 2120 for the first 3 days. Results There were no significant differences in white blood cell counts, neutrophil proportion, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein between two groups. AOSD patients had notably lower DNI than sepsis patients regardless of the presence of bacteremia or not. However, both DNI and ferritin were not significant independent factors for predicting sepsis in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. Meanwhile, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of DNI was slightly higher than that of ferritin. When we set DNI of 2.75% as the cut-off value for predicting sepsis, 11 (84.6%) of AOSD patients had a DNI value below 2.75% and 2 (15.4%) of them had a DNI over 2.75% (relative risk for sepsis 176). Conclusion We suggest that DNI may be a useful marker for differential diagnosis of AOSD from sepsis in the early phase as supplementary to ferritin. PMID:24719144

Park, Hee-Jin; Ha, You-Jung; Pyo, Jung-Yoon; Park, Yong-Beom; Lee, Soo-Kon

2014-01-01

181

CROI 2014: viral hepatitis and complications of HIV disease and antiretroviral therapy.  

PubMed

The remarkable advances in interferon-sparing, all-oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment were a highlight of the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI). The backbone of the nucleotide inhibitor sofosbuvir and the nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor ledipasvir with an additional third agent (HCV protease inhibitor or HCV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor) led to a sustained virologic response (SVR) rate 12 weeks after cessation of treatment of 95% to 100% after only 6 weeks of treatment. These results demonstrate the potential of combination directacting antiviral (DAA) therapy for abbreviated, well-tolerated, and highly effective HCV treatment. Two triple-drug regimens that comprised 12 weeks of an NS5A inhibitor, an HCV protease inhibitor, and a nonnucleoside inhibitor also resulted in SVRs of more than 90% in patients with HCV genotype 1. HIV coinfection does not appear to negatively impact response to DAA-based HCV therapy, as evidenced by similar response rates in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients compared with HCV-monoinfected patients receiving interferonsparing or -containing regimens. There was continued emphasis at CROI 2014 on non-AIDS complications of HIV infection, specifically cardiovascular disease, renal insufficiency, and bone and endocrine disorders that persist among patients with treated HIV disease and contribute to morbidity and mortality. Finally, new data on novel drugs and combinations for treatment of tuberculosis (TB), patient outcomes using new rapid TB diagnostics, and a short-course TB prevention strategy were presented. PMID:24901886

Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Havlir, Diane V; Currier, Judith S

2014-05-01

182

A case of Mikulicz's disease complicated with interstitial nephritis successfully treated by high-dose corticosteroid.  

PubMed

A 40-year-old woman who had bilateral swelling in the eyelids and submandibular region was admitted. Clinical findings suggested she had primary Sjögren's syndrome. Laboratory data showed glucosuria, positive CRP (0.50 mg/dl), liver dysfunction (AST 53 U/l, ALT 101 U/l, gamma-GTP 241 U/l, ALP 914 U/l, LAP 496 U/l), hyperglycemia, hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG 3450 mg/dl, IgA 91 mg/dl, IgM 80 mg/dl), hypocomplementemia (C3 73 mg/dl, C4 2 mg/dl, CH50 < 19.0 U/ml), renal tubular dysfunction (urine N-acetyl-beta-D: -glucosaminidase 8.6 U/l, urine (beta2)-microglobulin 83 microg/l), and urinary concentration defect. Ammonium chloride loading test was normal. Gallium-67 scintigram indicated abnormal uptake in bilateral lacrimal glands, submandibular glands, and kidneys. A diagnosis of Mikulicz's disease and interstitial nephritis was made, since biopsy specimens of her lacrimal gland and minor salivary gland showed diffuse infiltration of lymphocytes. Renal biopsy specimens also showed severe interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. Symptoms and laboratory data normalized in response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy and prednisolone 60 mg/day. This case of Mikulicz's disease complicated with interstitial nephritis was successfully treated by high-dose corticosteroid. PMID:16767558

Shimoyama, Kumiko; Ogawa, Noriyoshi; Sawaki, Toshioki; Karasawa, Hiromi; Masaki, Yasufumi; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Toshihiro; Wano, Yuji; Hirose, Yuko; Umehara, Hisanori

2006-01-01

183

Autologous Graft versus Host Disease: An Emerging Complication in Patients with Multiple Myeloma  

PubMed Central

Autologous graft versus host disease (autoGVHD) is a rare transplant complication with significant morbidity and mortality. It has been hypothesized that patients with multiple myeloma might be predisposed to autoGVHD through dysregulation of the immune response resulting from either their disease, the immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs) used to treat it, or transplant conditioning regimen. Hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) products were available from 8 multiple myeloma patients with biopsy-proven autoGVHD, 16 matched multiple myeloma patients who did not develop autoGVHD, and 7 healthy research donors. The data on number of transplants prior to developing autoGVHD, mobilization regimens, exposure to proteasome inhibitors, use of IMiDs, and class I human leukocyte antigen types (HLA A and B) were collected. The HPC products were analyzed by flow cytometry for expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, CD56, and FoxP3. CD3+ cell number was significantly lower in autoGVHD patients compared to unaffected controls (P = 0.047). On subset analysis of CD3+ cells, CD8+ cells (but not CD4+ cells) were found to be significantly lower in patients with autoGVHD (P = 0.038). HLA-B55 expression was significantly associated with development of autoGVHD (P = 0.032). Lower percentages of CD3+ and CD8+ T-cells and HLA-B55 expression may be predisposing factors for developing autoGVHD in myeloma. PMID:24876970

Batra, Anu; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Harville, Terry; Rhodes-Clark, Bobbie S.; Makhoul, Issam; Nakagawa, Mayumi

2014-01-01

184

Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications: The Role of Adipokines and the Relationship between Obesity, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is closely associated with an increased risk of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure, which leads to an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is now recognized not only as a main site of storage of excess energy derived from food intake but also as an endocrine organ. The expansion of adipose tissue produces a number of bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines or adipokines, which trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and interact with a range of processes in many different organs. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, dysregulated production or secretion of these adipokines caused by excess adipose tissue and adipose tissue dysfunction can contribute to the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of several adipokines associated with obesity and the potential impact on obesity-related metabolic diseases. Multiple lines evidence provides valuable insights into the roles of adipokines in the development of obesity and its metabolic complications. Further research is still required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the metabolic actions of a few newly identified adipokines. PMID:24733068

Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

2014-01-01

185

A practical approach to risk assessment to prevent coronary artery disease and its complications.  

PubMed

The recent focus on emerging cardiovascular risk factors, such as C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL), may give the false impression that the current approach to the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk fails to identify a large section of the high-risk population. On the contrary, the new guidelines of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) propose classifying an enormous number of individuals, including people with any form of atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, and a combination of major risk factors, into the category of high risk (>20% likelihood of a major coronary event or stroke in 10 years). Considering the widespread prevalence of the metabolic syndrome-a high-risk condition characterized by mild hypertension, mild dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and visceral obesity-we may be faced with the challenge of implementing aggressive risk reduction therapies in as much as 30% of the adult US population. From the point of view of risk assessment, a practical approach is to follow the NCEP guidelines (ie, place patients with diabetes and those with atherosclerotic complications in the highest risk category), apply the Framingham calculation to determine risk in people with common risk factors, and initiate early intervention in people who have familial hypercholesterolemia (LDL cholesterol >200 mg/dL) or a family history of early cardiovascular disease. The emerging risk factors may be useful for further stratifying risk in individuals with intermediate risk and the presence of risk factors not included in the Framingham calculation. PMID:12867251

Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

2003-07-01

186

[Articular complications of Kahler's disease. Results of a survey of 1953 cases of plasmocytic myelomas].  

PubMed

The authors confirm the great rarity of joint complications in patients with Kahler's disease. Among the records of 1953 cases the following complications were the only one found: 2 cases of proved articular amylosis, 2 cases of probable articular amylosis, 3 cases of possible articular amylosis, 20 cases of arthropathy that were impossible to classify, 27 cases of compression of the median nerve in the carpan canal, 6 cases of gouty arthritis, and 3 cases of septic arthritis. The data on symptoms obtained in the course of this enquiry are in conformity with the data in the literature. Articular amylosis often takes on the appearance of a polyarthritic syndrome of progressive installation and extension, involving in particular the hands and the wrists, but sometimes involving in a symmetrical bilateral manner the elbows, the shoulders, and the knees. The affected joints are swollen, stiff, and painful. Local signs of inflammation are, however, often absent. The deformations characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis do not develop. The joints do not show radiological signs for most of the time. In addition, it is not possible to detect the rheumatoid factor in the serum. The arthropathies can also assume an oligo-articular topography. Articular discharges are very frequent: they are usually of a mechanical nature. Whatever the clinical appearance, an exact diagnosis can be established only by means of anatomo-pathological examination of the synovial membrane or of certain para-articular amyloid nodules. Myelomas complicated by amyloid articular deposits are often light chain, with only little increase in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, discrete hyperproteinaemia, moderate medullary plasmocytosis, and rare or limited radiological lesions. The carpal canal syndrome is either isolated or included within the framework of a polyarthropathy. Compression of the median nerve is due to amyloid infiltration into the synovial sheath of the tendons of the finger flexors, proof of which is not always easy. Gout is rare despite the frequency of hyperuricacidaemia caused by renal insufficiency. Septic arthritis is often caused by renal insufficiency. Septic arthritis is often caused by pneumococci to which those with a myeloma appear particularly suceptible. PMID:1129574

Villiaumey, J; Larget-Piet, B; Pointud, P

1975-01-01

187

Cardiovascular Complications Secondary to Graves’ Disease: A Prospective Study from Ukraine  

PubMed Central

Background Graves’ disease (GD) is a common cause of hyperthyroidism resulting in development of thyrotoxic heart disease (THD). Objectives to assess cardiovascular disorders and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with THD secondary to GD. Patients and Methods All patients diagnosed with THD secondary to GD between January 2011 and December 2013 were eligible for this study. Clinical assessment was performed at baseline and at the follow-up visit after the restoring of euthyroid state. HRQoL was studied with a questionnaire EQ-5D-5L. Results Follow-up data were available for 61 patients, but only 30 patients with THD secondary to GD were consented to participate in investigation of their HRQoL. The frequency of cardiovascular complications was significantly reduced as compared before and after the antithyroid therapy as follows: resting heart rate (122 vs. 74 bpm), blood pressure: systolic (155 vs. 123 mm Hg), diastolic (83 vs. 66 mm Hg), supraventricular premature contractions (71% vs. 7%), atrial fibrillation (72% vs. 25%), congestive heart failure (69% vs. 20%), thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy (77% vs. 26%), all p<0.01. Anti-TSH receptor antibodies were determined as independent predictor of left ventricular geometry changes, (b-coefficient = 0.04, 95%CI 0.01–0.07, p = 0.02). HRQoL was improved in all domains and self-rated health increased from 43 to 75 units by visual analogue score (p<0.001). Conclusions Restoring of euthyroid state in patients with GD is associated with significant elimination of cardiovascular disorders and improvement of HRQoL. To our knowledge this is the first study evaluating Ukrainian patients with THD secondary to GD with focus on HRQoL. PMID:25803030

Tsymbaliuk, Iryna; Unukovych, Dmytro; Shvets, Nataliia; Dinets, Andrii

2015-01-01

188

[Multiple pulmonary emboli complicating infective endocarditis in a child with congenital heart disease].  

PubMed

Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare condition, associated with high mortality. Clinical presentation is nonspecific. Pulmonary embolism may present initially similar to bacterial endocarditis of the right heart, septic thrombophlebitis, or osteomyelitis. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl who had dyspnea over the four months before consultation, complicated three months later by hemoptysis. She was diagnosed with subacute bacterial endocarditis secondary to group D Streptococcus, developed upon a ventricular septal defect. Two weeks later, the child had sudden chest pain and tachypnea. Lung scintigraphy showed multiple pulmonary embolisms. The therapeutic approach was to continue antibiotics without anticoagulant treatment. The outcome was favorable with apyrexia and stabilization on the respiratory level. Pulmonary embolism is a rare disease in children with an incidence of 3.7%. Classically, it presents with fever, hemoptysis, and nonspecific infiltrates on chest X-ray. These signs were noted in our patient, although the infiltrates on the chest X-ray were hidden by the pulmonary edema associated with heart failure. The persistence of these left basal opacities after antidiuretic treatment suggested an infectious origin. Subsequently, lung scintigraphy showed that it was a pulmonary infarct. The therapy of septic pulmonary embolism is the same as that for infective endocarditis. Antibiotic treatment alone was maintained without anticoagulants because of the high risk of bleeding at the seat of the pulmonary embolism and the insubstantial significant benefit of this therapy. Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare disease, but its incidence is underestimated. Better knowledge on its actual impact and etiologies in children is necessary. Multicenter studies are needed to establish recommendations. PMID:25725970

Ajdakar, S; Elbouderkaoui, M; Rada, N; Drais, G; Bouskraoui, M

2015-04-01

189

Modified activin receptor IIB ligand trap mitigates ineffective erythropoiesis and disease complications in murine ?-thalassemia  

PubMed Central

In ?-thalassemia, unequal production of ?- and ?-globin chains in erythroid precursors causes apoptosis and inhibition of late-stage erythroid differentiation, leading to anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis (IE), and dysregulated iron homeostasis. Here we used a murine model of ?-thalassemia intermedia (Hbbth1/th1 mice) to investigate effects of a modified activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) ligand trap (RAP-536) that inhibits Smad2/3 signaling. In Hbbth1/th1 mice, treatment with RAP-536 reduced overactivation of Smad2/3 in splenic erythroid precursors. In addition, treatment of Hbbth1/th1 mice with RAP-536 reduced ?-globin aggregates in peripheral red cells, decreased the elevated reactive oxygen species present in erythroid precursors and peripheral red cells, and alleviated anemia by promoting differentiation of late-stage erythroid precursors and reducing hemolysis. Notably, RAP-536 treatment mitigated disease complications of IE, including iron overload, splenomegaly, and bone pathology, while reducing erythropoietin levels, improving erythrocyte morphology, and extending erythrocyte life span. These results implicate signaling by the transforming growth factor-? superfamily in late-stage erythropoiesis and reveal potential of a modified ActRIIB ligand trap as a novel therapeutic agent for thalassemia syndrome and other red cell disorders characterized by IE. PMID:24795345

Suragani, Rajasekhar N. V. S.; Cawley, Sharon M.; Li, Robert; Wallner, Samantha; Alexander, Mark J.; Mulivor, Aaron W.; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Grinberg, Asya V.; Pearsall, R. Scott

2014-01-01

190

Evaluating the Efficacy of Primary Treatment for Graves' Disease Complicated by Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis  

PubMed Central

Objective. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a potentially life-threatening complication of Graves' disease (GD). The present study compared the long-term efficacy of antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine (RAI), and surgery in GD/TPP. Methods. Sixteen patients with GD/TPP were followed over a 14-year period. ATD was generally prescribed upfront for 12–18 months before RAI or surgery was considered. Outcomes such as thyrotoxic or TPP relapses were compared between the three modalities. Results. Eight (50.0%) patients had ATD alone, 4 (25.0%) had RAI, and 4 (25.0%) had surgery as primary treatment. Despite being able to withdraw ATD in all 8 patients for 37.5 (22–247) months, all subsequently developed thyrotoxic relapses and 4 (50.0%) had ?1 TPP relapses. Of the four patients who had RAI, two (50%) developed thyrotoxic relapse after 12 and 29 months, respectively, and two (50.0%) became hypothyroid. The median required RAI dose to render hypothyroidism was 550 (350–700) MBq. Of the 4 patients who underwent surgery, none developed relapses but all became hypothyroid. Conclusion. To minimize future relapses, more definitive primary treatment such as RAI or surgery is preferred over ATD alone. If RAI is chosen over surgery, a higher dose (>550?MBq) is recommended. PMID:25147568

Chang, Rita Yuk-Kwan; Lang, Brian Hung-Hin; Chan, Ai Chen; Wong, Kai Pun

2014-01-01

191

Glycemic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between metabolic control, acute and long-term complications, the coexistence of autoimmune diseases, and to assess the different factors that can affect the glycemic control level among children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that included 228 T1DM children and adolescents visiting the pediatric diabetes clinic at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from January 2013 to January 2014. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients was 10.99 years, and the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 8.8%. Acute complications included ketoacidosis in 65.4% of patients, and hypoglycemic attacks in 68.9%. Long-term complications were detected in patients including retinopathy (4.4%), microalbuminuria (16.2%), and dyslipidemia (8.3%). Autoimmune thyroiditis was noted in 14%, and celiac disease was found in 19.7% of patients. A significant difference was found in pubertal and pre-pubertal age groups in terms of glycemic control (p=0.01). Conclusion: The level of HbA1c was found to be higher among the pubertal age group. A relationship between autoimmune diseases and gender was determined. PMID:25630001

Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E.; Alafif, Maram; Abd-Elhameed, Ihab A.

2015-01-01

192

Efficacy of infliximab in refractory pouchitis and Crohn's disease-related complications of the pouch: A Belgian case series  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Up to 25% of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients undergoing surgery with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) will develop chronic pouchitis not responding to antibiotics. In case reports, thiopurine analogs and infliximab (IFX) have been pro- posed as effective therapy in this setting. We analyzed the long-term ef- ficacy of IFX in Belgian patients with refractory pouch complications. Methods:

Marc Ferrante; Geert D'Haens; Olivier Dewit; Filip Baert; Jan Holvoet; Karel Geboes; Gert De Hertogh; Gert Van Assche; Séverine Vermeire; Paul Rutgeerts

2009-01-01

193

A 4-year-old girl with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease complicated by a ruptured intracranial aneurysm  

Microsoft Academic Search

In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), intracranial aneurysms (ICAs) are extrarenal manifestations and may result in serious and potentially fatal outcome following rupture. Although ICAs are a well-known complication of ADPKD, nearly all cases of ICA occurring in the context of ADPKD are adults. Here, we report the case of a Japanese girl with ADPKD who developed

Satomi Kubo; Mitsuru Nakajima; Kazuyoshi Fukuda; Misato Nobayashi; Toshisuke Sakaki; Katsuya Aoki; Yoshihiko Hirao; Akira Yoshioka

2004-01-01

194

[Auto-immune diseases and cancers. Second part: auto-immune diseases complicating cancers and their treatment].  

PubMed

Autoimmune diseases may reveal or occur during the course of a neoplasia or its treatment. Autoimmune cytopenia, especially haemolytic anaemia, is common in lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphoid leukemia. The link between cancer and myositis is well established. Dermatomyositis is associated with an increased relative risk of cancer of 3.4 to 4.4. A combination of detection of antibodies against p155 and TEP-computed tomography may be the best approach to ascertain the presence of occult malignancy in patients with dermatomyositis. A cutaneous or a systemic vascularitis may reveal a cancer, most often a haematological malignancy such as hairy cell leukemia. Paraneoplastic polyarthritis have been described in particular with adenocardinoma of the lungs. Underlying neoplasia should be considered in male smokers patients with new onset polyarthritis and poor health status. The prevalence of autoimmune conditions in myelodysplastic syndromes is 10 to 30%. Vasculitis and relapsing polychondritis are the most commonly reported manifestations. Immune manifestations can also be related to treatment. The most common treatment complications are autoimmune haemolytic anaemia with fludarabine and thyroiditis related to interferon and cervical radiotherapy. PMID:25106665

Pasquet, F; Pavic, M; Ninet, J; Hot, A

2014-10-01

195

Food-borne diseases — The challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease, mainly due to contaminated food and water, as a cause of death will decline worldwide. Evidence for such a

Diane G. Newell; Marion Koopmans; Linda Verhoef; Erwin Duizer; Awa Aidara-Kane; Hein Sprong; Marieke Opsteegh; Merel Langelaar; John Threfall; Flemming Scheutz; Joke van der Giessen; Hilde Kruse

2010-01-01

196

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate the correlation between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS: Data were obtained from 1217 inpatients with T2DM (757 females, 460 males; aged 63.39 ± 12.28 years). NAFLD was diagnosed by hepatic ultrasonography. Diabetic nephropathy (DN), diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and diabetic retinopathy (DR) were diagnosed according to their respective criteria. The prevalence of NAFLD and the independent correlations of clinical characteristics with NAFLD were determined by cross-tabulation and logistic regression, respectively. RESULTS: Approximately 61% of inpatients with T2DM in Qingdao, China had NAFLD, which decreased significantly with increase in age and prolonged course of diabetes. The prevalence of NAFLD in patients presenting with DN, DPN and DR was 49.4%, 57.2% and 54.9%, respectively. These rates were significantly lower than those of patients without DN, DPN and DR (65.9%, 65.6% and 66.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). Participants with NAFLD had greater body weight, waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, ?-glutamyltransferase, blood pressure, as well as triglyceride (TG) levels and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentration than those without NAFLD (P < 0.05). NAFLD was positively correlated with BMI, WC, TG, FBG, diastolic blood pressure, and systolic blood pressure but negatively correlated with the duration of diabetes, DR, DPN, DN, and HDL. CONCLUSION: Despite the benign nature of NAFLD, efforts should be directed toward early diagnosis, intensive blood glucose and blood pressure control, and effective dyslipidemia correction. PMID:23716995

Lv, Wen-Shan; Sun, Rui-Xia; Gao, Yan-Yan; Wen, Jun-Ping; Pan, Rong-Fang; Li, Li; Wang, Jing; Xian, Yu-Xin; Cao, Cai-Xia; Zheng, Ming

2013-01-01

197

Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: an Unusual Complication of Orientia tsutsugamushi Disease (Scrub Typhus)  

PubMed Central

Background Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an uncommon, potentially fatal, hyperinflammatory syndrome that may rarely complicate the clinical course of Orientia tsutsugamushi disease (scrub typhus). Methods Here we describe the clinicopathological features, laboratory parameters, management, and outcome of three adult patients (1 female, 2 males) with scrub typhus associated HLH from a tertiary center. A brief and concise review of international literature on the topic was also added. Results All three patients satisfied the HLH-2004 diagnostic criteria; one had multi-organ dysfunction with very high ferritin level (>30,000 ng/ml), and all had a dramatic recovery following doxycyclin therapy. Literature review from January 1990 to March 2014 revealed that scrub typhus associated HLH were reported in 21 patients, mostly from the scrub endemic countries of the world. These included 11 females and 10 males with a mean age of 35 years (range; 8 months to 81 years). Fifteen of 17 patients (where data were available) had a favorable outcome following early serological diagnosis and initiation of definitive antibiotic therapy with (N=6) or without (N=9) immunosuppressive/immunomodulator therapy. Mutation analysis for primary HLH was performed in one patient only, and HLH-2004 protocol was used in two patients. Conclusion We suggest that HLH should be considered in severe cases of scrub typhus especially if associated with cytopenia (s), liver dysfunction, and coagulation abnormalities. Further studies are required to understand whether an immunosuppressive and/or immunomodulator therapy could be beneficial in those patients who remain unresponsive to definitive antibiotic therapy. PMID:25574367

Basheer, Aneesh; Padhi, Somanath; Boopathy, Vinoth; Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Nair, Shashikala; Varghese, Renu G’Boy; Kanungo, Reba

2015-01-01

198

Tocilizumab in refractory adult-onset Still's disease with aseptic meningitis--efficacy of interleukin-6 blockade and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Adult-onset Still's disease is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by typical spiking fever, evanescent rash, arthralgia, and leucocytosis. Neurologic manifestations are infrequent, seen in 7 to 12% of cases. We present the case of a young male admitted with aseptic meningitis that satisfied the diagnostic criteria of Adult-onset Still's disease. Refractoriness to therapy with corticosteroids and cyclosporine A led to the use of humanized monoclonal anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody "tocilizumab" with dramatic response. The case is reported for the rarity of presentation and the need to consider the diagnosis in related clinical scenarios. Also, current literature on the use of tocilizumab in intractable disease is reviewed. PMID:20621335

Sabnis, Girish R; Gokhale, Yojana A; Kulkarni, Uday P

2011-02-01

199

Risk factors for coronary heart disease in type 1 diabetic patients in Europe : The EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE—The goal of the study was to examine risk factors in the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) and differences in men and women in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Baseline risk factors and CHD at follow-up were assessed in 2,329 type 1 diabetic patients without prior CHD. CHD was defined as physician-diagnosed myocardial infarction, angina pectoris,

S. S. Soedamah-Muthu; N. Chaturvedi; M. Toeller; B. Ferriss; P. Reboldi; G. Michel; C. Manes; J. H. Fuller

2004-01-01

200

Rare association of Hodgkin lymphoma, Graves' disease and myasthenia gravis complicated by post-radiation neurofibrosarcoma: coincidence or genetic susceptibility?  

PubMed

With Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), other (autoimmune) diseases may occasionally occur or associate, whereas as a late treatment-complication, second tumour may develop. In our patient HL was diagnosed in 1996 and consequently received COPP/ABV and mantle irradiation. Due to the residual mediastinal tumour CRu was declared but later on no progression/relapse could be proved by PET. In 2000 Graves's disease, in 2001 myasthenia gravis was diagnosed, which showed resistance for immunosuppressant drugs, thus plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin treatments were applied. In 2005, the residual mediastinal tumour started progressive growth, which leads to thoracotomy in which the tumour was removed, it was malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour. The disease showed progression despite the chemotherapy applied and the patient died in 2007 due to respiratory failure. Not even the postmortem histopathologic examination revealed the relapse of HL. Association of Hodgkin lymphoma, and two antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases, Graves' disease and myasthenia gravis, is rare and has not yet been reported in the literature. The etiologic role of genetic predisposition and immune regulatory disorder must definitely be thought of, as the possibility of mere coincidence is extremely small. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour is a rare complication of irradiation, which underlines the importance of the risk or/and response adapted therapy of HL. PMID:19381762

Simon, Zsófia; Ress, Zsuzsa; Toldi, József; Trauninger, Anita; Miltényi, Zsófia; Illés, Arpád

2009-05-01

201

Circular Abscess Formation of the Inner Preputial Leaf as a Complication of a Penile Mondor's Disease: The First Case Report  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Mondor's disease of the penis is an uncommon condition characterized by thrombosis or thrombophlebitis involving the superficial dorsal veins. An accompanied lymphangitis is discussed. There is typical self-limiting clinical course. Case Presentation. This paper firstly reports a secondary abscess formation of the preputial leaf two weeks after penile Mondor's disease and subcutaneous lymphangitis as complication of excessive sexual intercourse of a 44-year-old man. Sexual transmitted diseases could be excluded. Lesions healed up completely under abscess drainage, antibiotic, and anti-inflammatory medication. Conclusion. Previous reports in the literature include several entities of the penile Mondor's disease. Our patient is very unusual in that he presented with a secondary preputial abscess formation due to superficial thrombophlebitis, subcutaneous lymphangitis, and local bacterial colonisation. Abscess drainage plus antiphlogistic and antibiotic medication is the treatment of choice. PMID:24868480

Wendler, Johann Jakob; Schindele, Daniel; Liehr, Uwe-Bernd; Porsch, Markus; Schostak, Martin

2014-01-01

202

Psychiatric Disorders and Coronary Heart Disease in Women – A Still Neglected Topic: Review of the Literature from 1971 to 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in women aged over 40 years in the United States, for whom it conveys a worse prognosis than for men. Recently, psychosocial factors have been understood to represent significant risk factors for developing CHD, as well as having a worse outcome with established CHD. However, these factors are often

Bettina Bankier; Andrew B. Littman

2002-01-01

203

Association of antibody responses to microbial antigens and complications of small bowel Crohn’s disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: Crohn’s disease patients can be characterized by antibody responses against Crohn’s disease-related bacterial sequence, Escherichia coli outer membrane porin C, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (oligomannan), and neutrophil nuclear antigens. Our aim was to determine whether expression of antibodies against Crohn’s disease-related bacterial sequence and Escherichia coli outer membrane porin C is associated with distinct phenotypic manifestations. Methods: Sera from

William S. Mow; Eric A. Vasiliauskas; Ying-Chao Lin; Phillip R. Fleshner; Konstantinos A. Papadakis; Kent D. Taylor; Carol J. Landers; Maria T. Abreu-Martin; Jerome I. Rotter; Huiying Yang; Stephan R. Targan

2004-01-01

204

LRRK2 and Human Disease: A Complicated Question or a Question of Complexes?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is linked to various diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, cancer, and leprosy. Data from LRRK2 knockout mice has highlighted a possible role for LRRK2 in regulating signaling pathways that are linked to the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease. Here, we examine how LRRK2’s role as a signaling hub in the cell could lead to diverse pathologies.

Patrick A. Lewis (University College London; UCL Institute of Neurology REV)

2012-01-17

205

Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.  

PubMed

The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease, mainly due to contaminated food and water, as a cause of death will decline worldwide. Evidence for such a downward trend is limited. This prediction presumes that improvements in the production and retail of microbiologically safe food will be sustained in the developed world and, moreover, will be rolled out to those countries of the developing world increasingly producing food for a global market. In this review evidence is presented to indicate that the microbiological safety of food remains a dynamic situation heavily influenced by multiple factors along the food chain from farm to fork. Sustaining food safety standards will depend on constant vigilance maintained by monitoring and surveillance but, with the rising importance of other food-related issues, such as food security, obesity and climate change, competition for resources in the future to enable this may be fierce. In addition the pathogen populations relevant to food safety are not static. Food is an excellent vehicle by which many pathogens (bacteria, viruses/prions and parasites) can reach an appropriate colonisation site in a new host. Although food production practices change, the well-recognised food-borne pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli, seem able to evolve to exploit novel opportunities, for example fresh produce, and even generate new public health challenges, for example antimicrobial resistance. In addition, previously unknown food-borne pathogens, many of which are zoonotic, are constantly emerging. Current understanding of the trends in food-borne diseases for bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens has been reviewed. The bacterial pathogens are exemplified by those well-recognized by policy makers; i.e. Salmonella, Campylobacter, E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes. Antimicrobial resistance in several bacterial food-borne pathogens (Salmonella, Campylobacter, Shigella and Vibrio spp., methicillin resistant Staphylcoccus aureas, E. coli and Enterococci) has been discussed as a separate topic because of its relative importance to policy issues. Awareness and surveillance of viral food-borne pathogens is generally poor but emphasis is placed on Norovirus, Hepatitis A, rotaviruses and newly emerging viruses such as SARS. Many food-borne parasitic pathogens are known (for example Ascaris, Cryptosporidia and Trichinella) but few of these are effectively monitored in foods, livestock and wildlife and their epidemiology through the food-chain is poorly understood. The lessons learned and future challenges in each topic are debated. It is clear that one overall challenge is the generation and maintenance of constructive dialogue and collaboration between public health, veterinary and food safety experts, bringing together multidisciplinary skills and multi-pathogen expertise. Such collaboration is essential to monitor changing trends in the well-recognised diseases and detect emerging pathogens. It will also be necessary understand the multiple interactions these pathogens have with their environments during transmission along the food chain in order to develop effective prevention and control strategies. PMID:20153070

Newell, Diane G; Koopmans, Marion; Verhoef, Linda; Duizer, Erwin; Aidara-Kane, Awa; Sprong, Hein; Opsteegh, Marieke; Langelaar, Merel; Threfall, John; Scheutz, Flemming; van der Giessen, Joke; Kruse, Hilde

2010-05-30

206

Prostatic abscess in young males: a rare complication of Crohn's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a rare case of prostatic abscess with Crohn's disease in a 21-year-old male. Computed tomography showed a typical prostatic abscess. Moreover, filling of the abscess cavities with contrast medium was demonstrated after micturition, which represented the rupturing of the abscess into the urethra. Crohn's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of prostatic abscesses even in young

M. Yamaguchi; Y. Kujiraoka; Y. Saida; K. Ikezawa; K. Uchida; Y. Itai

2001-01-01

207

Impact of Preoperative Physiological Risk Profile on Postoperative Morbidity and Mortality After Emergency Operation of Complicated Peptic Ulcer Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim  The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative physiological risk profile for postoperative morbidity and mortality\\u000a after emergency treatment of complicated peptic ulcer disease (PUD).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Operative notes and hospital files of 261 patients—111 female, 150 male; median age 67 years (range 17–100 years)—undergoing\\u000a an emergency operation from 1993 to 2005 were analyzed retrospectively. The physiologic subscore of the

Jan-Hendrik Egberts; Birte Summa; Ulrike Schulz; Clemens Schafmayer; Sebastian Hinz; Juergen Tepel

2007-01-01

208

Giant Nephrothoracic Abscess: A Misleading Disease, a Surgical Challenge, and an Unexpected Complication  

PubMed Central

A rare case of perinephric abscess with unilateral secondary pulmonary involvement that was further complicated by spillover of purulent content into the contralateral lung is reported here. Its diagnosis, treatment, and evolution are described and discussed along with certain features of nephropulmonary fistulas. The diagnosis of these abscesses is difficult, largely because of the paucity of primary symptoms and the frequent presence of misleading secondary symptoms. Deceptive cases like this one highlight the importance of its contemplation in every physician's differential diagnosis. PMID:25089211

Ferreira Coelho, Manuel

2014-01-01

209

Abnormal steroid excretion in gestational trophoblastic disease complicated by ovarian theca-lutein cysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum and urine steroids were examined in two subjects with trophoblastic disease accompanied by large ovarian theca-lutein cysts and compared with those from 10 patients with trophoblastic disease but without palpable cysts. In the patients without cysts normal values were obtained for serum oestradiol, progesterone, 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and androstenedione, and for urinary total oestrogens, pregnanediol, pregnanetriol, and 17-oxosteroids. Nineteen urinary

B R Bevan; M Savvas; J M Jenkins; K Baker; G W Pennington; N F Taylor

1986-01-01

210

Management of lipid exudates in Coats disease by adjuvant intravitreal triamcinolone: effects and complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimTo evaluate the role of intravitreal Triamcinolone (TA) in the early management of Coats disease.MethodsRetrospective, interventional case series.Results15 consecutive cases with Coats disease were managed with 4 mg\\/0.1 ml intravitreal TA injection on presentation and were followed for a minimum of 1 year duration. Additional management strategies including drainage of subretinal fluid through an inferior sclerotomy, peripheral laser ablation and\\/or

Ihab Saad Othman; Magdy Moussa; Manal Bouhaimed

2009-01-01

211

Association of Serum Adiponectin, Leptin, and Resistin Concentrations with the Severity of Liver Dysfunction and the Disease Complications in Alcoholic Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Background and aims. There is growing evidence that white adipose tissue is an important contributor in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We investigated serum concentrations of total adiponectin (Acrp30), leptin, and resistin in patients with chronic alcohol abuse and different grades of liver dysfunction, as well as ALD complications. Materials and Methods. One hundred forty-seven consecutive inpatients with ALD were prospectively recruited. The evaluation of plasma adipokine levels was performed using immunoenzymatic ELISA tests. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Results. Acrp30 and resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with ALD than in controls. Lower leptin levels in females with ALD compared to controls, but no significant differences in leptin concentrations in males, were found. High serum Acrp30 level revealed an independent association with advanced liver dysfunction, as well as the development of ALD complications, that is, ascites and hepatic encephalopathy. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in serum leptin concentrations may influence the ALD course, different in females compared with males. Serum Acrp30 level may serve as a potential prognostic indicator for patients with ALD. PMID:24259947

Surdacka, Agata; Smolen, Agata

2013-01-01

212

Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn’s disease  

PubMed Central

Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn’s disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy. PMID:23745038

Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

2013-01-01

213

Attitudes toward Management of Sickle Cell Disease and Its Complications: A National Survey of Academic Family Physicians  

PubMed Central

Objective. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disease that requires a significant degree of medical intervention, and family physicians are one potential provider of care for patients who do not have access to specialists. The extent to which family physicians are comfortable with the treatment of and concerned about potential complications of SCD among their patients is unclear. Our purpose was to examine family physician's attitudes toward SCD management. Methods. Data was collected as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey in the United States and Canada that targeted family physicians who were members of CERA-affiliated organizations. We examined attitudes regarding management of SCD. Results. Overall, 20.4% of respondents felt comfortable with treatment of SCD. There were significant differences in comfort level for treatment of SCD patients depending on whether or not physicians had patients who had SCD, as well as physicians who had more than 10% African American patients. Physicians also felt that clinical decision support (CDS) tools would be useful for treatment (69.4%) and avoiding complications (72.6%) in managing SCD patients. Conclusions. Family physicians are generally uncomfortable with managing SCD patients and recognize the utility of CDS tools in managing patients.

Mainous, Arch G.; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Harle, Christopher A.; Baker, Richard; Shokar, Navkiran K.; Hulihan, Mary M.

2015-01-01

214

Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol, E-mail: angiointervention@gmail.com; Jae, Hwan Jun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Clinical Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk [Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Clinical Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-15

215

Complication Rate of Percutaneous Liver Biopsies among Persons with Advanced Chronic Liver Disease in the HALT-C Trial  

PubMed Central

Background & Aims Although percutaneous liver biopsy is a standard diagnostic procedure, it has drawbacks, including risk of serious complications. It is not known whether persons with advanced chronic liver disease have a greater risk of complications from liver biopsy than patients with more mild, chronic liver disease. The safety and complications of liver biopsy were examined in patients with hepatitis C-related bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis that were enrolled in the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) Trial. Methods Standard case report forms from 2,740 liver biopsies performed at 10 study sites between 2000 and 2006 were reviewed for serious adverse events, along with information from questionnaires completed by investigators about details of biopsy techniques used at each hospital. Results There were 29 serious adverse events (1.1%); the most common was bleeding (16 cases, 0.6%). There were no biopsy-related deaths. The bleeding rate was higher among patients with platelet counts ?60,000/mm3 and among those with an international normalized ratio (INR) ?1.3, although none of the patients with an INR >1.5 bled. Excluding subjects with a platelet count ?60,000/mm3 would have reduced the bleeding rate by 25% (4/16), eliminating only 2.8% (77/2740) of biopsies. Operator experience, the type of needle used, or the performance of the biopsy under ultrasound guidance did not influence the frequencies of adverse events. Conclusions Approximately 0.5% of persons with hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis experienced potentially serious bleeding after liver biopsy; risk increased significantly in patients with platelet counts ?60,000/mm3.(K2). PMID:20362695

Seeff, Leonard B.; Everson, Gregory T.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Curto, Teresa M.; Lee, William M.; Ghany, Marc G.; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Fontana, Robert J.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Dienstag, Jules L.

2013-01-01

216

Parental Problem-Solving Abilities and the Association of Sickle Cell Disease Complications with Health-related Quality of Life for School-age Children  

PubMed Central

Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The current analysis sought to explore parent problem-solving abilities/skills as a moderator between SCD complications and HRQOL to evaluate applicability to pediatric SCD. At baseline, 83 children ages 6–12 years and their primary caregiver completed measures of the child HRQOL. Primary caregivers also completed a measure of social problem-solving. A SCD complications score was computed from medical record review. Parent problem-solving abilities significantly moderated the association of SCD complications with child self-report psychosocial HRQOL (p = .006). SCD complications had a direct effect on parent proxy physical and psychosocial child HRQOL. Enhancing parent problem-solving abilities may be one approach to improve HRQOL for children with high SCD complications; however, modification of parent perceptions of HRQOL may require direct intervention to improve knowledge and skills involved in disease management. PMID:24222378

Barakat, Lamia P.; Daniel, Lauren C.; Smith, Kelsey; Robinson, M. Renée; Patterson, Chavis A.

2013-01-01

217

Long-term outcome of enzyme-replacement therapy in advanced Fabry disease: evidence for disease progression towards serious complications  

PubMed Central

Objective The long-term effects of enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) in Fabry disease are unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ERT in patients with advanced Fabry disease affects progression towards ‘hard’ clinical end-points in comparison with the natural course of the disease. Methods A total of 40 patients with genetically proven Fabry disease (mean age 40 ± 9 years; n = 9 women) were treated prospectively with ERT for 6 years. In addition, 40 subjects from the Fabry Registry, matched for age, sex, chronic kidney disease stage and previous transient ischaemic attack (TIA), served as a comparison group. The main outcome was a composite of stroke, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Secondary outcomes included changes in myocardial left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and replacement fibrosis, change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), new TIA and change in neuropathic pain. Results During a median follow-up of 6.0 years (bottom and top quartiles: 5.1, 7.2), 15 events occurred in 13 patients (n = 7 deaths, n = 4 cases of ESRD and n = 4 strokes). Sudden death occurred (n = 6) only in patients with documented ventricular tachycardia and myocardial replacement fibrosis. The annual progression of myocardial LV fibrosis in the entire cohort was 0.6 ± 0.7%. As a result, posterior end-diastolic wall thinning was observed (baseline, 13.2 ± 2.0 mm; follow-up, 11.4 ± 2.1 mm; P < 0.01). GFR decreased by 2.3 ± 4.6 mL min?1 per year. Three patients experienced a TIA. The major clinical symptom was neuropathic pain (n = 37), and this symptom improved in 25 patients. The event rate was not different between the ERT group and the untreated (natural history) group of the Fabry Registry. Conclusion Despite ERT, clinically meaningful events including sudden cardiac death continue to develop in patients with advanced Fabry disease. PMID:23586858

Weidemann, F; Niemann, M; Störk, S; Breunig, F; Beer, M; Sommer, C; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Wanner, C

2013-01-01

218

Radiation-induced chondrosarcoma of the clavicle complicating Hodgkin's disease. A case report  

SciTech Connect

Review of the literature reveals that postradiation chondrosarcoma is a rare secondary malignant bone tumor. This case report demonstrates a Grade 1 chondrosarcoma of the proximal right clavicle in a 17-year-old boy, eight years after extensive chemotherapy and radiation therapy for a Stage IIB Hodgkin's disease.

Aprin, H.; Calandra, J.; Mir, R.; Lee, J.Y.

1986-08-01

219

Persistence of endothelial cell damage late after Kawasaki disease in patients without coronary artery complications  

PubMed Central

Background: Recent studies proposed an increased risk of atherosclerosis in patients with a history of Kawasaki disease. This study aimed to investigate the persistence of vascular injury after an acute phase of the Kawasaki disease. Materials and Methods: We determined the number of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) in the peripheral blood of 13 patients with a history of Kawasaki disease within four to ten years, in comparison with 13 healthy relative controls. The CECs were counted as CD146+/CD34 + cells by the standard flow cytometry technique, and the independent t-test was employed to compare the mean number of CECs in the two groups. Results: The mean number of CECs was significantly higher in patients than in controls (12 ± 3.03 vs. 2.38 ± 0.87, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study elucidates the persistence of vascular injury late after Kawasaki disease. This finding suggests that prolonged administration of vascular anti-inflammatory agents might be beneficial for preventing atherosclerosis in the subsequent years, in these patients. PMID:25709990

Mostafavi, Nasser; Haghjooy-Javanmard, Shaghayegh; Presidend, Nahid; Manssori, Nayereh Siyah; Kelishadi, Roya

2015-01-01

220

Recurrent buccal space abscessesA complication of Crohn’s disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oral features of Crohn’s disease include ulcerations, lip fissuring, cobblestone plaques, and mucosal tags. We report the case of a 16-year old male patient with a 3-month history of abdominal pain, diarrhea, and oral ulceration. Clinical examinations revealed established intestinal lesions, a marked cobblestone appearance in the oral cavity, and an unusual pattern of presentation not previously reported in the

O. K. Gagoh; R. M. Qureshi; M. T. Hendrickse

1999-01-01

221

Orbital socket contracture: a complication of inflammatory orbital disease in patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: To describe the clinical characteristics of orbital socket contracture in patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG).Methods: A retrospective cohort study The medical records of 256 patients with WG examined at the National Institutes of Health from 1967 to 2004 were reviewed to identify patients with orbital socket contracture. Details of the orbital disease including Hertel exophthalmometry readings, radiological findings, and

C Talar-Williams; M C Sneller; C A Langford; J A Smith; T A Cox; M R Robinson

2005-01-01

222

Cardiopulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: Role of Nitric Oxide and Hemolytic Anemia  

E-print Network

Medical advances in the management of patients with sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and other hemolytic anemias have led to significant increases in life expectancy. Improved public health, neonatal screen-ing, parental and patient education, advances in red cell transfusion medicine, iron

Speakers Mark; T. Gladwin; Md Richard Lottenberg; Mark C. Walters; Mark T. Gladwin; Gregory J. Kato

223

Hypertension in the elderly: Age and disease-related complications and therapeutic implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective treatment of hypertension in the elderly requires an understanding of both the progressive course of the disease and the impact of aging on the cardiovascular system, including physiological, genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors. Review of the literature that has attempted to define the impact of an “aging process” on cardiovascular structure and function reveals a diversity of findings and

Edward G. Lakatta; Jerome D. Cohen; Jerome L. Fleg; Edward D. Frohlich; Alan H. Gradman

1993-01-01

224

Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome complicated by IgA nephropathy and Graves’ disease: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome is a disorder characterized by a combination of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is defined by the presence of immunoglobulin A deposits in glomerular mesangial areas. In this report, we describe a rare case of tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy and Graves’ disease, which was successfully treated with corticosteroids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such a case has been documented since tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome was first described. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman presented with tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome accompanied by immunoglobulin A nephropathy and Graves’ disease. She had renal dysfunction, proteinuria, and hematuria. Two weeks after her admission, she developed anterior chamber uveitis. She received corticosteroids, resulting in significant clinical improvement. Conclusion Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome is a relatively uncommon cause of tubulointerstitial nephritis. Clinicians should recognize that tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome with immunoglobulin A nephropathy can occur in the presence of Graves’ disease. Additionally, this report may provide important clues in terms of the management of a concomitant case of these diseases. PMID:25216854

2014-01-01

225

Complications of Mumps  

MedlinePLUS

... Answers Disease Description Physical Findings and Complications Case Reporting Exposure and Response Prevention and Control in Healthcare Settings Background Acceptable Presumptive Evidence of ...

226

Small bowel volvulus as a complication of von Recklinghausen’s disease: A case report  

PubMed Central

We report the case of a 25-year-old male with Neurofibromatosis type?I?(NF-1), who presented at the time of admission with clinical findings of an acute abdomen caused by a mechanical obstruction. Computerized tomography showed a volvulus of the terminal ileum with mesenteric swirling as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Consecutive exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis and 70 cm of the small intestine was resected due to an affection of the mesentery by multiple neurofibromas. The gastrointestinal tract is affected in approximately 10% of patients with NF-1, however the mesentery is almost always spared. Here we describe the unique case of a patient with a volvulus caused by mesenteric manifestation of von Recklinghausen’s disease, emphasizing the role of surgery in a team of multidisciplinary specialists to treat this multiorganic disease. PMID:24976735

Werner, Thomas Artur; Kröpil, Feride; Schoppe, Martin Olaf; Kröpil, Patric; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Krieg, Andreas

2014-01-01

227

Factors Associated with Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Patients with Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine the inci- dence of different postoperative pulmonary complica- tions (PIG) and their associated risk factors in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (forced expiratory volume in 1 s lFEV,l ~1.2 L and FEV,\\/forced vital capacity (F'VC) <75%) undergo- ing noncardiothoracic operations. Thirty-nine of 105 patients (37%) had one or more

David H. Wong; Erich C. Weber; Michael J. Schell; Anne B. Wong; Cynthia T. Anderson; Steven J. Barker

1995-01-01

228

TRH Test and the Continuous Dopaminergic Stimulation in Complicated Parkinson’s Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marked, disabling fluctuations in motor performance (on-off phenomena) appear after chronic L-Dopa therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Intravenous infusion of L-Dopa greatly reduces these motor fluctuations, but it is not reliable as a chronic treatment. Therefore, infusion of the potent, water-soluble dopaminergic agonist lisuride has been tested. However, many patients did not respond to infusion of lisuride alone, and no

Laura Lestingi; Vincenzo Bonifati; Fabrizio Stocchi; Italo Antonozzi; Giuseppe Meco

1992-01-01

229

Septicemia caused by salmonella infection: An overlooked complication of sickle cell disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To describe the characteristics of salmonella infections in sickle cell disease and to compare the features of osteomyelitis and those with bacteremia\\/septicemia without obvious bone changes. To search for risk factors for osteomyelitis, and to draw attention to the frequency and significance of salmonella bacteremia\\/septicemia.Study design: A retrospective review of all salmonella isolations from the blood, pus, or aspirates

Jonathan Wright; Peter Thomas; Graham R. Serjeant

1997-01-01

230

Unique Presentation of Urachal Cyst Disease: Incidental Finding to Complicated Infection  

PubMed Central

Urachal remnant disease is uncommon in adults and can present with symptoms ranging from drainage near the umbilicus to a severe abdominal infection. Most cases are referred for treatment once diagnosed either clinically or radiographically with ultrasound or computerized tomography. We present a unique case of an infected urachal cyst visualized on a series of CT scans in an adult patient with abdominal pain over a period of years. PMID:23710411

Lee, Seong K.; Kiffin, Chauniqua; Sanchez, Rafael; Carrillo, Eddy; Rosenthal, Andrew

2013-01-01

231

Second malignant neoplasms complicating Hodgkin's disease: the National Cancer Institute experience  

SciTech Connect

The medical records of all patients treated for Hodgkin's disease during the years 1964-1981 were reviewed. Four hundred seventy-three previously untreated patients were analyzed. Thirty-four subsequent second malignant neoplasms were observed in 33 patients among those treated for Hodgkin's disease. Eight cases of acute nonlymphocyctic leukemia, one case of chronic myeloid leukemia, three cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, three cases of sarcoma, and 19 other tumors were identified. The ten-year estimated risk of leukemia by treatment was the following: radiotherapy only (0), chemotherapy only (0.02), initial combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.06), and salvage combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.09). The ten-year estimated risk of solid tumors was 0.07 overall, with all treatment groups associated with similar risks. Unlike some other reports, a greater risk of leukemia in patients who began treatment for Hodgkin's disease at age 40 or older was not found. However, a positive association was noted between increasing risk of solid tumors and increasing patient age.

Tester, W.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Waller, B.; Makuch, R.W.; Kelley, P.A.; Glatstein, E.; DeVita, V.T.

1984-07-01

232

Georg Friedrich Händel: a case of large vessel disease with complications in the eighteenth century.  

PubMed

Georg Friedrich Händel was not only one of the greatest musical giants ever but also he was probably the first composer who was also the manager and promoter of his own works. Various myths embellish his various biographies. This is also true for his pathography: several articles written by authors from various specialties suggested him having suffered from psychiatric diseases, like cyclothymia or mania, and rheumatologic disorders, like arthritis, while others tended to interpret his recurrent palsies as typical sequelae of ischemic strokes. More recently, reports proposing lead poisoning as the main source of disease in Händel gained the attention of musical and lay press. During his last years of life, Händel was struck with blindness, which in his era had been interpreted as being due to cataracts. This led to three "coucher" operations, all of them without any lasting effect. Although a definite diagnosis cannot be proven from the original sources, the most plausible explanation for Händel's palsies and visual impairment may be based on one single context, i.e., cerebrovascular disease. The possible differential diagnosis will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:25684296

Bäzner, Hansjörg

2015-01-01

233

Systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by Crohn’s disease: a case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Background Although patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may experience various gastrointestinal disorders, SLE and Crohn’s disease (CD) rarely coexist. The diseases may have gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations, laboratory results, and radiographic findings that appear similar and consequently differentiating between GI involvement in CD and in SLE may be difficult. We present the case of a patient with SLE and CD who developed continuous GI bleeding and diarrhea that was initially treated as SLE-related colitis to little effect. Case presentation A 55-year-old Japanese woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed continuous gastrointestinal bleeding and diarrhea since the patient was aged 30 years that was initially treated as SLE-related colitis. Although a longitudinal ulcer and aphthous ulcers in the colon were observed every examination, biopsy showed only mild inflammation and revealed neither granuloma nor crypt abscess. The patient underwent surgery for anal fistulas twice at 50 and 54 years of age and her symptoms were atypical of lupus enteritis. Colonoscopy was performed again when the patient was 55 years of age because we suspected she had some type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cobblestone-like inflammatory polyps and many longitudinal ulcers were detected between the descending colon and the cecum. Macroscopic examination strongly suggested CD. Histopathological examination revealed non-caseating granuloma and no evidence of vasculitis, consistent with CD. Introduction of infliximab dramatically relieved the patient’s melena and abdominal symptoms. Conclusion Diagnostic criteria for CD and SLE overlap, making them difficult to diagnose correctly. It is important to consider CD for patients who have SLE with gastrointestinal manifestations. The pathology of lupus enteritis should be clarified through the accumulation of cases of SLE combined with CD. PMID:23216789

2012-01-01

234

Glutamate-mediated striatal dysregulation and the pathogenesis of motor response complications in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary.  ?Chronically administered levodopa to Parkinson's disease (PD) patients ultimately produces alterations in motor response.\\u000a Similarly, in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats, chronic twice-daily administration of levodopa progressively\\u000a shortens the duration of contralateral turning, an index of, the wearing-off fluctuations that occur in parkinsonian patients.\\u000a The pathogenesis of these response alterations involves, in part, upregulation of corticostriatal glutamatergic synaptic transmission.\\u000a Changes involving

J. D. Oh; T. N. Chase

2002-01-01

235

Cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis complicating sinusitis  

PubMed Central

Background Thrombophlebitis of the cavernous sinus is a rare but serious disease that most often affects young adults and children. It is associated with significant morbidity or mortality and is often related to local infections of the head. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and is confirmed by imaging. Case Report: We report the case of a 17-year-old male with a history of recurrent sinusitis, who presented general signs of infection, orbital symptoms, and meningeal involvement. CT and MRI showed thrombosis of the cavernous sinus associated with cerebral ischemic damage. The therapeutic management included empiric antibiotic therapy, drainage of an orbital collection, and anticoagulation. The patient died later secondary to septic shock. Conclusions: Although thrombophlebitis of the cavernous sinus is increasingly rare, it remains a lethal complication of sinusitis, and mortality is still high. The course of this disease can be dramatic due to infectious or vascular neurological complications. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial. PMID:23826444

Berdai, Adnane Mohamed; Shimi, Abdelkarim; Khatouf, Mohammed

2013-01-01

236

Mondor's disease of the breast as a complication of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy: management and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Mondor's disease is a rare benign and self-limiting condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of the superficial veins of the anterolateral thoracoabdominal wall. We describe a case of Mondor's disease of the breast as a complication of an ultrasound-guided core needle biospy. The patient presented with a palpable cord-like structure in her left breast, associated with severe pain and tenderness. She was treated concervatively and complete resolution was observed after four weeks. We conclude that emergency clinicians and interventional breast radiologists should be aware of Mondor's disease as a potential complication of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of the breast. PMID:24989360

Salemis, Nikolaos S; Vasilara, Georgia; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel

2015-01-01

237

Clinical complications in pregnant women with sickle cell disease: prospective study of factors predicting maternal death or near miss  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate complications in pregnant women with sickle cell disease, especially those leading to maternal death or near miss (severe obstetric complications). Methods A prospective cohort of 104 pregnant women registered in the Blood Center of Belo Horizonte (Hemominas Foundation) was followed up at high-risk prenatal units. They belonged to Group I (51 hemoglobin SS and three hemoglobin S/?0-thalassemia) or Group II (49 hemoglobin SC and one hemoglobin S/?+-thalassemia). Both groups had similar median ages. Predictive factors for ‘near miss’ or maternal death with p-value ? 0.25 in the univariate analysis were included in a multivariate logistic model (significance set for p-value ? 0.05). Results Group I had more frequent episodes of vaso-occlusive crises, more transfusions in the antepartum and postpartum, and higher percentage of preterm deliveries than Group II. Infections and painful crises during the postpartum period were similar in both the groups. The mortality rate was 4.8%: three deaths in Group I and two in Group II. One-third of the women in both the groups experienced near miss. The most frequent event was pneumonia/acute chest syndrome. Alpha-thalassemia co-inheritance and ?-gene haplotypes were not associated with near miss or maternal death. In multivariate analysis predictors of near miss or death were parity above one and baseline red blood cell macrocytosis. In Group I, baseline hypoxemia (saturation < 94%) was also predictive of near miss or death. Conclusion One-third of pregnant women had near miss and 4.8% died. Both hemoglobin SS and SC pregnant women shared the same risk of death or of severe complications, especially pulmonary events. PMID:25031164

Resende Cardoso, Patrícia Santos; Lopes Pessoa de Aguiar, Regina Amélia; Viana, Marcos Borato

2014-01-01

238

What do adult patients with congenital heart disease know about their disease, treatment, and prevention of complications? A call for structured patient education  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To assess how much adults with congenital heart disease understand about their heart defect, its treatment, and the preventive measures necessary to avoid complications.?DESIGN—Descriptive, cross sectional study.?SETTING—Adult congenital heart disease programme in one tertiary care centre in Belgium.?PATIENTS—62 adults with congenital heart disease (47 men; 15 women), median age 23 years.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Patients' knowledge was assessed during an outpatient visit using the Leuven knowledge questionnaire for congenital heart diseases, a 33 item instrument developed for this study.?RESULTS—Patients had adequate knowledge (> 80% correct answers) about their treatment, frequency of follow up, dental practices, occupational choices, appropriateness of oral contraceptives, and the risks of pregnancy. Knowledge about the name and anatomy of the heart defect, the possibility of recurrent episodes of endocarditis during their lifetime, and the appropriateness of different physical activities was moderate (50-80% correct answers). There was poor understanding (< 50% correct answers) about the reasons for follow up, the symptoms of deterioration of the heart disease, the definition, characteristics, and risk factors of endocarditis, the impact of smoking and alcohol on the heart disease, the hereditary nature of the condition, and the suitability of intrauterine devices as contraceptives.?CONCLUSIONS—Adults with congenital heart disease have important gaps in their knowledge about their condition. The results of this study can be used as a basis for developing or optimising structured educational interventions to enhance patients' health behaviour.???Keywords: patient education; congenital heart disease; health behaviour PMID:11410567

Moons, P; De Volder, E; Budts, W; De Geest, S; Elen, J; Waeytens, K; Gewillig, M

2001-01-01

239

Conventional and new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of chest disease and its complications.  

PubMed

Oral anticoagulants block the coagulation cascade either by an indirect mechanism (e.g., vitamin K antagonists) or by a direct one (e.g., the novel oral anticoagulants). Vitamin K antagonists are widely used as treatment of venous thromboembolism and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although low molecular weight heparin remains the first line in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, more recently the novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran (initial dose of 110 mg within 1-4 h after surgery, followed by the full dose of 220 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (dose of 10 mg once daily, with the first dose administered 6-10 h after the surgery), and apixaban (dose of 2.5 mg twice daily, starting 12-24 h after surgery, but available only in Europe) are approved for prophylaxis in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. The period in which thromboembolic risk abates remains uncertain, and trials of extended therapy are still ongoing. After showing at least noninferiority to warfarin in RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, and ARISTOTLE trials, dabigatran (110 or 150 mg twice daily), rivaroxaban (20 or 15 mg once daily), and apixaban (5 mg twice daily), respectively, were approved also for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. While awaiting long-term safety data, the choice among all these available therapies should be based on patient preferences, compliance, and ease of administration, as well as on local factors affecting cost-effectiveness. PMID:23672179

Gallego, Pilar; Roldan, Vanessa; Lip, Gregory Y H

2013-08-15

240

Second malignancies in Hodgkin's disease: a complication of certain forms of treatment.  

PubMed Central

A total of 764 patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with radiotherapy (RT) or chemotherapy or both were reviewed 3-186 months (median 43 months) after initial treatment to assess the incidence of second malignancies. Incidence of solid tumours and acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia (ANLL) were calculated by a life-table method and percentages of patients affected derived from life-table plots. Within 10 years after initial treatment the overall incidence of second solid tumours was 7.3%, and over a comparable period 2.4% of patients developed ANLL. Solid tumours occurred only in patients given RT with or without adjuvant chemotherapy, and ANLL occurred only after treatment with MOPP (mustine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisolone) or modified MOPP regimens. Neither solid tumours nor ANLL occurred in patients given ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine). The highest incidence of leukaemia (5.4%) occurred after treatment with extensive RT plus (5.4%) occurred after treatment with extensive RT plus MOPP; hence the benefits of this approach in Hodgkin's disease must be weighed against its carcinogenic potential. PMID:6775732

Valagussa, P; Santoro, A; Kenda, R; Fossati Bellani, F; Franchi, F; Banfi, A; Rilke, F; Bonadonna, G

1980-01-01

241

A Systematic Review of Xuezhikang, an Extract from Red Yeast Rice, for Coronary Heart Disease Complicated by Dyslipidemia  

PubMed Central

Objective. This systematic review aims to evaluate the benefit and side effect of Xuezhikang for coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by dyslipidemia. Methods. All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with Xuezhikang as a treatment for CHD combined with dyslipidemia were considered for inclusion. Data extraction and analyses and quality assessment were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. Results. We included 22 randomized trials. Xuezhikang showed significant benefit on the incidence of all-cause deaths, CHD deaths, myocardial infarction, and revascularization as compared with placebo based on conventional treatment for CHD. It remarkably lowered total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) as compared with the placebo or inositol nicotinate group, which was similar to statins group. Xuezhikang also raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared to placebo or no intervention, which was similar to Inositol nicotinate and slightly inferior to statins. The incidence of adverse events did not differ between the Xuezhikang and control group. Conclusions. Xuezhikang showed a comprehensive lipid-regulating effect and was safe and effective in reducing cardiovascular events in CHD patients complicated by dyslipidemia. However, more rigorous trials with high quality are needed to give high level of evidence. PMID:22567033

Shang, Qinghua; Liu, Zhaolan; Chen, Keji; Xu, Hao; Liu, Jianping

2012-01-01

242

A fresh look into the pathophysiology of ischemia-induced complications in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis  

PubMed Central

Recent case reports of acute esophageal necrosis in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing hemodialysis encouraged us to look beyond hypoperfusion/ischemia as a sole explanation for this dramatic complication. At least three intriguing pathways, ie, accumulation of protein-bound toxins, endotoxin translocation, and altered mucosal defense mechanisms, have been proposed to explain the inherent susceptibility of CKD patients to developing ischemia-related and cardiovascular events. Interestingly, all the proposed pathways can be potentially antagonized or attenuated. At present, however, it is not known whether one pathway predominates or if any interaction exists between these pathways. More solid experimental and clinical data are warranted to acquire a better insight into the complex pathogenesis of CKD-associated ischemia. PMID:25792850

Honore, Patrick M; Jacobs, Rita; De Waele, Elisabeth; Van Gorp, Viola; De Regt, Jouke; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Boer, Willem; Spapen, Herbert D

2015-01-01

243

Pulmonary hemorrhage complicating Goodpasture's disease in the course of pulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed

A 72-year-old man with ESRD on hemodialysis was referred to the hospital because of hemoptysis. A chest radiograph showed diffuse infiltration in the right lung field. Laboratory data showed hematuria and proteinuria. A kidney biopsy revealed diffuse crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear staining of IgG along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). However, circulating IgG anti-GBM antibodies were not detected. Because the findings of renal biopsy suggested Goodpasture's disease, the patient was treated with plasmapheresis and pulse steroid therapy, which resulted in a rapid resolution of his pulmonary symptoms and chest radiograph abnormalities. However, sputum culture on admission yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis 3 weeks later. Therefore, immuosuppressive agents were discontinued and antituberculous agents were administered. There was no relapse of pulmonary hemorrhage during the next 1-year period of follow-up, but the patient did not regain renal function and remained on hemodialysis. PMID:22826144

Wen, Yao-Ko; Wen, Kai-I

2013-12-01

244

Effect of aggressively driven intravenous iron therapy on infectious complications in end-stage renal disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis.  

PubMed

For treating end-stage renal disease-associated anemia, various strategies to achieve optimal hemoglobin levels with lower erythropoiesis stimulating agent doses are being tried. One of these involves the use of a high dose [transferrin saturation (TSAT) >30%] of intravenous (IV) iron supplementation. However, due to in vitro effects of iron on stimulating bacterial growth, there are concerns of increased risk of infection. The safety of higher iron targets with respect to infectious complications (bacteremias, pneumonias, soft tissue infections, and osteomyelitis) is unknown. This was a retrospective study of patients on maintenance hemodialysis from a single, urban dialysis center to assess the long-term impact of the higher cumulative use of IV iron, on the incidence of clinically important infections. Our iron protocol was modified in June 2010 to aim for TSAT >30% unless serum ferritin levels were >1200 ng/mL. Data from only those patients who had been on dialysis for the whole duration between June 2009 and May 2011 were included. A total of 140 patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis patients were found to be eligible for the study. There was a statistically significant increase in the mean TSAT and mean serum ferritin with the new anemia management protocol with a significant decrease in the mean erythropoiesis stimulating agent dose requirement. There was no statistically significant increase in the incidence of infectious complications. Although in vitro effects of iron are known to stimulate bacterial growth, a higher IV dose of iron may not increase the risk of infection in such patients. PMID:22832501

Bansal, Anip; Sandhu, Gagangeet; Gupta, Isha; Kalahalli, Shriharsha; Nayak, Rushi; Zouain, Eduardo; Chitale, Rohit A; Meisels, Ira; Chan, Germaine

2014-01-01

245

Distribution of enteroviruses in hospitalized children with hand, foot and mouth disease and relationship between pathogens and nervous system complications  

PubMed Central

Background To explore the relationship between enteroviruses and hospitalized children with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) complicated with nervous system disease. 234 hospitalized HFMD patients treated in Shengjing Hospital, Liaoning Province were analyzed retrospectively. Based on the presence and severity of nervous system disease, the patients were grouped as follows: general patients, severely ill patients, critically ill patients and fatal patients. Based on the detected pathogen, the patients were grouped as follows: Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection, coxsackie A16 (CA16) infection and other enterovirus (OE) infection. Results Of the 423 hospitalized patients, most were admitted in July 2010(129/423, 30.5%). Enteroviruses were detected in 177(41.8%). 272/423 patients were male (64.3%), and fatal patients had the greatest proportion of male patients (p < 0.05). EV71 infection was found in 89/423 patients (21%). CA16 infection was detected in 8/423 patients (16.1%). Compared to group CA16, patients in group EV71 were hospitalized earlier, and the duration of hospitalization was longer (p < 0.05). Of the 92 patients with nervous system damage, 65 were infected with EV71 and 19 were infected with CA16. Among these CA16 infected patients, 2 had brainstem encephalitis and 1 had AFP. There were more patients with nervous system dysfunction in group EV71 than in groups CA16 or OE (p < 0.05). The 5 fatalities all occurred in group EV71 patients (p < 0.05). Infection with EV71 was most likely to cause neurogenic pulmonary edema (p < 0.05). Patients in group EV71 had a higher rate of suffering from coma and limb movement disorder than patients in groups CA16 or OE (p < 0.05). Conclusion The disease progresses faster in EV71-infected HFMD patients. These patients are more likely to suffer nervous system damage, neurogenic pulmonary edema, severe sequelae or death. CA16 and other enteroviruses can also cause HFMD with severe nervous system complications. PMID:22230340

2012-01-01

246

Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in a case of adult onset Still's disease with concurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: response to high dose immunoglobulin infusions.  

PubMed

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a multisystem disorder characterized by a pentad consisting of thrombocytopenic, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, renal dysfunction, neurological signs and fever. Coexistence of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is extremely rare. We report a case of 18 year old girl with AOSD who developed TTP. Neuroimaging of brain demonstrated white matter edema consistent with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). Complete recovery occurred with prompt anti-hypertensive treatment and high dose immunoglobulin infusions (IVIg). Plasma exchange is the standard of care and the first line treatment for patient with TTP. We used IVIg alone in our case and this showed a gratifying response. Use of IVIG before considering plasmapharesis is justifiable or not requires randomized control clinical trials. This should determine the optimal therapeutic strategies for TTP. PMID:23767207

Khobragade, A K; Chogle, A R; Ram, R P; Mascarenhas, Joanne; Kothari, Sweta; Kawadkar, Sneha; Deshpande, S S; Nair, Dipti; Makhija, Jhoomar

2012-11-01

247

Role of hydroxycarbamide in prevention of complications in patients with sickle cell disease  

PubMed Central

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetically inherited condition caused by a point mutation in the beta globin gene. This results in the production of the abnormal hemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin (HbS). Hydroxycarbamide, is an antimetabolite/cytotoxic which works by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase, blocking the synthesis of DNA and arresting cells in the S phase. In sickle cell anemia, it promotes fetal hemoglobin (HbF) synthesis, improves red cell hydration, decreases neutrophil and platelet count, modifies red cell endothelial cell interactions and acts as a nitric oxide donor. Trials have shown the clinical benefit of hydroxycarbamide in a subpopulation of adult patients with SCD, with a 44% reduction in the median annual rate of painful crises, a decrease in the incidence of acute chest syndrome and an estimated 40% reduction in overall mortality over a 9-year observational period. Its use in pediatrics has also been well established; trials have shown it is well tolerated and does not impair growth or development. In addition it decreases the number and duration of hospital attendences. A number of emerging uses of hydroxycarbamide currently are being investigated, such as stroke prevention. PMID:19816573

Wiles, NM; Howard, J

2009-01-01

248

Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease: putting together the pieces of a complicated puzzle.  

PubMed

Dietary fatty acids play significant roles in the cause and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils have well-established adverse effects and should be eliminated from the human diet. CVD risk can be modestly reduced by decreasing saturated fatty acids (SFA) and replacing it by a combination of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Although the ideal type of unsaturated fat for this replacement is unclear, the benefits of PUFA appear strongest. Both n-6 and n-3 PUFA are essential and reduce CVD risk. However, additional research is needed to better define the optimal amounts of both and to discern the patients and/or general population that would benefit from supplemental n-3 fatty acid intake. Furthermore, consumption of animal products, per se, is not necessarily associated with increased CVD risk, whereas nut and olive oil intake is associated with reduced CVD risk. In conclusion, the total matrix of a food is more important than just its fatty acid content in predicting the effect of a food on CVD risk, and a healthy diet should be the cornerstone of CVD prevention. PMID:24727233

Michas, George; Micha, Renata; Zampelas, Antonis

2014-06-01

249

The Relationship between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study  

PubMed Central

Background Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P?=?0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Conclusions Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. PMID:24019966

Peters, Kirsten E.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

2013-01-01

250

Cardiovascular and respiratory dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by impaired peripheral oxygenation  

PubMed Central

Background Impaired peripheral oxygenation (IPO)-related variables readily achieved with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) represent cardiovascular dysfunction. These variables include peak oxygen uptake ( (V?O2)<85% predicted, anaerobic threshold <40%V?O2max predicted, V?O2-work rate slope <8.6 mL/watt, oxygen pulse <80% predicted, and ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 at nadir of >31 and >34, respectively. Some of these six variables may be normal while the others are abnormal in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This may result in confusion when using the interpretation algorithm for diagnostic purposes. We therefore hypothesized that patients found to have abnormal values for all six variables would have worse cardiovascular function than patients with abnormal values for none or some of these variables. Methods In this cross-sectional comparative study, 58 COPD patients attending a university teaching hospital underwent symptom-limited CPET with multiple lactate measurements. Patients with abnormal values in all six IPO-related variables were assigned to an IPO group while those who did not meet the requirements for the IPO group were assigned to a non-IPO group. Cardiovascular function was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography and ?lactate/?V?O2, and respiratory dynamics were compared between the two groups. Results Fourteen IPO and 43 non-IPO patients were entered into the study. Both groups were similar with regard to left ventricular ejection fraction and right ventricular morphology (P>0.05 for both). At peak exercise, both groups reached a similar heart rate level and ?lactate/?V?O2. The IPO patients had an unfavorable dead space to tidal volume ratio, mean inspiratory tidal flow, and shallow breathing (P<0.05–P<0.001). Conclusion Our IPO and non-IPO patients with COPD had similar cardiovascular performance at rest and at peak exercise, indicating that IPO variables are non-specific for cardiovascular function in these patients. COPD patients with full IPO variables have more deranged ventilatory function. PMID:25709427

Chuang, Ming-Lung; Huang, Shih-Feng; Su, Chun-Hung

2015-01-01

251

Successful Use of Higher-Dose Etanercept for Multirefractory Systemic Flare of Adult-Onset Still's Disease with Liver Failure with No Response to Tocilizumab Therapy  

PubMed Central

A 21-year-old woman with refractory systemic flare of adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure despite high-dose corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and tocilizumab, was successfully treated with additional use of etanercept. Etanercept at a dose of 50?mg weekly was partially effective but could not reduce the dose of concomitant betamethasone from 5?mg/day. Etanercept at a dose of 75?mg weekly could lead her to clinical remission and enabled successful tapering off the corticosteroids and discontinuation of etanercept. Normalization of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and persistent elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor ? under the treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressants suggest that tumor necrosis factor ? was more deeply involved than at least interleukin 6 in the pathogenesis of refractoriness of the disease in this patient, and these findings might be indicative of potential efficacy for adjunctive use of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor rather than an interleukin 6 inhibitor. PMID:24455384

Tamechika, Shinya; Iwagaitsu, Shiho; Maeda, Shinji; Togawa, Hiroyuki

2013-01-01

252

Radiation therapy: posterior segment complications.  

PubMed

Therapeutic radiation to the posterior segment of the eye is a common option for posterior segment tumors. Such tumors are often malignant, but sometimes, benign neoplasms are treated with ionizing radiation. Also, non-neoplastic intraocular lesions like wet age-related macular degeneration may be treated with radiotherapy. Orbital disease, both neoplastic lesions like optic nerve sheath meningioma and non-neoplastic entities like Graves' ophthalmopathy may be treated with radiotherapy and this may include radiation of the optic nerve and posterior segment of the eye. Occasionally, radiotherapy of extraocular malignant disease, involving, e.g. the paranasal sinuses, may cause significant radiation damage to the eye. Complications after radiation to the posterior segment of the eye are largely related to the radiation dose to the posterior segment. The amount of irradiated volume of normal tissue and fractionation are also important for the development of radiation complications to the posterior segment. Radiation retinopathy is the most common complication of the posterior segment, but radiation optic neuropathy also occurs frequently. Radiation scleral necrosis is less frequent probably due to the radioresistance of the scleral collagen. These complications have the potential to cause blindness (radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy) or enucleation of the eye (scleral necrosis). Although numerous treatments have been advocated, management of radiation-induced damage remains controversial. Efficacy for any treatment still needs to be proven and, if possible, the best option by far is to minimize radiation changes to normal tissue. PMID:23989132

Seregard, Stefan; Pelayes, David E; Singh, Arun D

2013-01-01

253

Role of Innate Immune Response in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Metabolic Complications and Therapeutic Tools  

PubMed Central

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common liver disease worldwide, both in adults and children. It is characterized by an aberrant lipid storage in hepatocytes, named hepatic steatosis. Simple steatosis remains a benign process in most affected patients, while some of them develop superimposed necroinflammatory activity with a non-specific inflammatory infiltrate and a progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with or without fibrosis. Deep similarity and interconnections between innate immune cells and those of liver parenchyma have been highlighted and showed to play a key role in the development of chronic liver disease. The liver can be considered as an “immune organ” because it hosts non-lymphoid cells, such as macrophage Kupffer cells, stellate and dendritic cells, and lymphoid cells. Many of these cells are components of the classic innate immune system, enabling the liver to play a major role in response to pathogens. Although the liver provides a “tolerogenic” environment, aberrant activation of innate immune signaling may trigger “harmful” inflammation that contributes to tissue injury, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Pathogen recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors, are responsible for the recognition of immunogenic signals, and represent the major conduit for sensing hepatic and non-hepatic noxious stimuli. A pivotal role in liver inflammation is also played by cytokines, which can initiate or have a part in immune response, triggering hepatic intracellular signaling pathways. The sum of inflammatory signals and deranged substrate handling induce most of the metabolic alteration traits: insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and their compounded combined effects. In this review, we discuss the relevant role of innate immune cell activation in relation to NAFLD, the metabolic complications associated to this pathology, and the possible pharmacological tools. PMID:24795720

Meli, Rosaria; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Calignano, Antonio

2014-01-01

254

Role of innate immune response in non-alcoholic Fatty liver disease: metabolic complications and therapeutic tools.  

PubMed

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common liver disease worldwide, both in adults and children. It is characterized by an aberrant lipid storage in hepatocytes, named hepatic steatosis. Simple steatosis remains a benign process in most affected patients, while some of them develop superimposed necroinflammatory activity with a non-specific inflammatory infiltrate and a progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with or without fibrosis. Deep similarity and interconnections between innate immune cells and those of liver parenchyma have been highlighted and showed to play a key role in the development of chronic liver disease. The liver can be considered as an "immune organ" because it hosts non-lymphoid cells, such as macrophage Kupffer cells, stellate and dendritic cells, and lymphoid cells. Many of these cells are components of the classic innate immune system, enabling the liver to play a major role in response to pathogens. Although the liver provides a "tolerogenic" environment, aberrant activation of innate immune signaling may trigger "harmful" inflammation that contributes to tissue injury, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Pathogen recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors, are responsible for the recognition of immunogenic signals, and represent the major conduit for sensing hepatic and non-hepatic noxious stimuli. A pivotal role in liver inflammation is also played by cytokines, which can initiate or have a part in immune response, triggering hepatic intracellular signaling pathways. The sum of inflammatory signals and deranged substrate handling induce most of the metabolic alteration traits: insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and their compounded combined effects. In this review, we discuss the relevant role of innate immune cell activation in relation to NAFLD, the metabolic complications associated to this pathology, and the possible pharmacological tools. PMID:24795720

Meli, Rosaria; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Calignano, Antonio

2014-01-01

255

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... were in the uterus, it is called an ectopic or tubal pregnancy. An ectopic pregnancy can rupture the fallopian tube, causing severe ... likely to suffer infertility (20 percent of women), ectopic pregnancy (9 percent), or chronic pelvic pain (18 ...

256

Sudden cardiac death due to coronary artery involvement by IgG4-related disease: a rare, serious complication of a rare disease.  

PubMed

Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disorder characterized by multiorgan fibrosis with IgG4-producing plasma cells, increased IgG4 serum concentration, and responsiveness to steroid therapy. Involvement of the pancreas, salivary glands, orbit, aorta, and other sites has been well documented in the literature; however, there have been limited reports of cases involving the coronary arteries. We report the case of a 53-year-old Hispanic man who was brought to the emergency center and diagnosed with sudden cardiac death. Autopsy was subsequently performed, revealing multiorgan involvement by IgG4-RD, including involvement of the coronary arteries. The inflammation and fibrosis, in combination with concomitant atherosclerotic disease, resulted in severe stenosis of the coronary arteries. Two of the coronary arteries were further occluded by thrombosis. These factors led to cardiac hypoperfusion, myocardial infarction and, ultimately, sudden cardiac death. Fatal involvement of the coronary arteries has not been previously reported, raising a new concern for a severe complication of IgG4-RD. PMID:24878025

Patel, Nimesh R; Anzalone, Mary L; Buja, L Maximilian; Elghetany, M Tarek

2014-06-01

257

Prospective Cohort Study of Gastrointestinal Complications and Vascular Diseases in Patients Taking Aspirin: Rationale and Design of the MAGIC Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Although aspirin has been widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular events, its risk of gastrointestinal complications\\u000a is of great concern. Despite expectations for such, few data are available on the prevalence or incidence of gastrointestinal\\u000a complications in aspirin users in Japan. The Management of Aspirin-induced GastroIntestinal Complications (MAGIC) is the first\\u000a attempt at collaboration among cardiologists, neurologists, and gastroenterologists

Hideki Origasa; Shinya Goto; Kazuyuki Shimada; Shinichiro Uchiyama; Yasushi Okada; Kentaro Sugano; Hideyuki Hiraishi; Naomi Uemura; Yasuo Ikeda

258

Rain Machine (Solar Still)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners work in groups to build simple solar stills filled with salt water. After the stills are complete, learners observe what happens when they place the stills in the sun. Learners taste the water they collect and discuss what has happened in their stills.

Susan Schleith

2012-07-03

259

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Kid-friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

260

Pregnancy Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... Emergency Preparedness and Response Pregnant Women and Flu Pregnancy Complications On this Page Before Pregnancy During Pregnancy ... to decrease the risk of pregnancy complications. Before Pregnancy Make sure to talk to your doctor about ...

261

[Complications in pediatric anesthesia].  

PubMed

As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia. PMID:25004872

Becke, K

2014-07-01

262

Complications in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.  

PubMed

Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is generally considered a safe technique offering the highest stone-free rates after the first treatment as compared to the other minimal invasive lithotripsy techniques. Still, serious complications although rare should be expected following this percutaneous procedure. In this work, the most common and important complications associated with PCNL are being reviewed focusing on the perioperative risk factors, current management, and preventing measures that need to be taken to reduce their incidence. In addition, complication reporting is being criticized given the absence of a universal consensus on PCNL complications description. Complications such as perioperative bleeding, urine leak from nephrocutaneous fistula, pelvicalyceal system injury, and pain are individually graded as complications by various authors and are responsible for a significant variation in the reported overall PCNL complication rate, rendering comparison of morbidity between studies almost impossible. Due to the latter, a universally accepted grading system specialized for the assessment of PCNL-related complications and standardized for each variation of PCNL technique is deemed necessary. PMID:25218854

Kyriazis, Iason; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Ozsoy, Mehmet; Vasilas, Marinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos

2014-09-14

263

MRI characteristics and follow-up findings in patients with neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and clinical and MRI follow-up findings of patients with neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot and mouth disease. Methods: Data were collected from 12 patients who developed neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease during an enterovirus-71 outbreak in Hainan Province, China, from May 2008 to October 2011. Patients were followed up for 2 years. Results: In the six patients with brainstem encephalitis, MRI showed posterior brainstem abnormalities with hyperintense areas on T2-weighted images and hypointense areas on T1-weighted images. In the four patients with acute flaccid paralysis but no brainstem encephalitis, sagittal MRI images showed linear hyperintense areas in the anterior spinal cord, transverse T2-weighted images showed hyperintense areas in the spinal cord, and contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images showed strong enhancement of the anterior horns or nerve roots. In the two patients with aseptic meningitis, MRI showed widening of the subarachnoid space and ventricles. The MRI and clinical signs of aseptic meningitis resolved within 4 weeks in both patients. Patients with isolated pontine abnormalities recovered faster than those with multiple brainstem abnormalities, patients with isolated brainstem encephalitis recovered faster than those with associated acute flaccid paralysis, patients with paralysis of one limb recovered faster than those with paralysis of multiple limbs, and patients with isolated thoracolumbar cord abnormalities recovered faster than those with cervical cord abnormalities. Conclusions: MRI is useful for assessment of the neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease. Patients who develop neurological complications characteristically have MRI abnormalities of the posterior brainstem or bilateral anterior horns of parts of the spinal cord. The MRI findings can help to predict prognosis. PMID:25356127

Chen, Feng; Liu, Tao; Li, Jianjun; Xing, Zengbao; Huang, Shixiong; Wen, Guoqiang

2014-01-01

264

Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive crescentic glomerulonephritis complicating the course of Graves' disease: Report of three adult cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis has been recently recognized in Graves' disease patients treated with propylthiouracil. We have experienced three adult cases of Graves' disease with main features being renal derangements. All three patients, who were between the ages of 22 and 82 years, had been treated with propylthiouracil for 2 to 5 years after a diagnosis of Graves' disease.

Masayuki Tanemoto; Hiroshi Miyakawa; Junichi Hanai; Masako Yago; Masafumi Kitaoka; Shunya Uchida

1995-01-01

265

Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

Townsley, Danielle M.

2013-01-01

266

Neurologic complications of myocardial infarction.  

PubMed

Cardiac disease, in particular coronary artery disease, is the leading cause of mortality in developed nations. Strokes can complicate cardiac disease - either as result of left ventricular dysfunction and associated thrombus formation or of therapy for the cardiac disease. Antiplatelet drugs and anticoagulants routinely used to treat cardiac disease increase the risk for hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:24365291

Haque, Moneera N; Dieter, Robert S

2014-01-01

267

Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

2015-01-01

268

How often is NIDDM complicated with non-diabetic renal disease?An analysis of renal biopsies and the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary   According to extensive autopsy studies, non-diabetic renal disease seems to be rare in diabetes mellitus, but recent publications\\u000a suggest a significant prevalence of non-diabetic renal disease in non-insulin-dependent diabetic (NIDDM) patients, especially\\u000a in the absence of retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of non-diabetic renal disease in NIDDM\\u000a patients in renal biopsies from clinical

S. Olsen; C. E. Mogensen

1996-01-01

269

Pulmonary Complications of Cirrhosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease comprise two distinct clinical entities: hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS—microvascular\\u000a dilatation and angiogenesis) and portopulmonary hypertension (POPH—vasoconstriction and remodeling in resistance vessels).\\u000a These complications occur in similar pathophysiologic environments and may share pathogenic mechanisms. HPS is found in 15%\\u000a to 30% of patients with cirrhosis and its presence increases mortality and the risks of liver transplantation,

Rajan Kochar; Moises I. Nevah Rubin; Michael B. Fallon

2011-01-01

270

Tumor Necrosis Factor -?, Interleukin-10, Intercellular and Vascular Adhesion Molecules Are Possible Biomarkers of Disease Severity in Complicated Plasmodium vivax Isolates from Pakistan  

PubMed Central

Background Cytokine-mediated endothelial activation pathway is a known mechanism of pathogenesis employed by Plasmodium falciparum to induce severe disease symptoms in human host. Though considered benign, complicated cases of Plasmodium vivax are being reported worldwide and from Pakistan. It has been hypothesized that P.vivax utilizes similar mechanism of pathogenesis, as that of P.falciparum for manifestations of severe malaria. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to characterize the role of cytokines and endothelial activation markers in complicated Plasmodium vivax isolates from Pakistan. Methods and Principle Findings A case control study using plasma samples from well-characterized groups suffering from P.vivax infection including uncomplicated cases (n=100), complicated cases (n=82) and healthy controls (n=100) were investigated. Base line levels of Tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), Vascular adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1) and E-selectin were measured by ELISA. Correlation of cytokines and endothelial activation markers was done using Spearman’s correlation analysis. Furthermore, significance of these biomarkers as indicators of disease severity was also analyzed. The results showed that TNF-?, IL-10, ICAM-1and VCAM-1 were 3-fold, 3.7 fold and 2 fold increased between uncomplicated and complicated cases. Comparison of healthy controls with uncomplicated cases showed no significant difference in TNF-? concentrations while IL-6, IL-10, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin were found to be elevated respectively. In addition, significant positive correlation was observed between TNF-? and IL-10/ ICAM-1, IL-6 and IL-10, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1.A Receiver operating curve (ROC) was generated which showed that TNF-?, IL-10, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were the best individual predictors of complicated P.vivax malaria. Conclusion The results suggest that though endothelial adhesion molecules are inducible by pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-?, however, cytokine-mediated endothelial activation pathway is not clearly demonstrated as a mechanism of pathogenesis in complicated P.vivax malaria cases from Pakistan. PMID:24324686

Raza, Afsheen; Ghanchi, Najia K.; Sarwar Zubairi, Ali bin; Raheem, Ahmed; Nizami, Sobia; Beg, Mohammad Asim

2013-01-01

271

[Type 2 diabetes complications].  

PubMed

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

Schlienger, Jean-Louis

2013-05-01

272

Pregnancy Complications  

MedlinePLUS

Home > Pregnancy > You're pregnant: Now what? Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en espańol ) Pregnancy complications Health problems before pregnancy Pregnancy related problems Infections during pregnancy When to call the doctor ...

273

Is Equality Still Inequality?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contends that in the team-taught classroom, "so-called equality for women is still tatamount to inequality." Addresses the implications of the role asymmetry perceived and describes why and how the situation should be improved. (Author/BL)

Orenstein, Gloria Feman

1986-01-01

274

Gaucher disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of bone complications and their response to treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease, which is often managed by enzyme replacement therapy\\u000a (ERT). The bone response to ERT is usually slower than visceral and hematological responses. There is uncertainty as to whether\\u000a an increase in the dosage of ERT has a beneficial effect. The aim of our study was to determine whether or

Siavash Piran; Dominick Amato

2010-01-01

275

Early respiratory complications after liver transplantation  

PubMed Central

The poor clinical conditions associated with end-stage cirrhosis, pre-existing pulmonary abnormalities, and high comorbidity rates in patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores are all well-recognized factors that increase the risk of pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) surgery. Many intraoperative and postoperative events, such as fluid overload, massive transfusion of blood products, hemodynamic instability, unexpected coagulation abnormalities, renal dysfunction, and serious adverse effects of reperfusion syndrome, are other factors that predispose an individual to postoperative respiratory disorders. Despite advances in surgical techniques and anesthesiological management, the lung may still suffer throughout the perioperative period from various types of injury and ventilatory impairment, with different clinical outcomes. Pulmonary complications after OLT can be classified as infectious or non-infectious. Pleural effusion, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia may contribute considerably to early morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. It is of paramount importance to accurately identify lung disorders because infectious pulmonary complications warrant speedy and aggressive treatment to prevent diffuse lung injury and the risk of evolution into multisystem organ failure. This review discusses the most common perioperative factors that predispose an individual to postoperative pulmonary complications and these complications’ early clinical manifestations after OLT and influence on patient outcome. PMID:24409054

Feltracco, Paolo; Carollo, Cristiana; Barbieri, Stefania; Pettenuzzo, Tommaso; Ori, Carlo

2013-01-01

276

Neurological complications of porphyria.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the importance of neurological complications in patients with a confirmed diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical details are presented for a cohort of 14 patients who presented with one of four categories of symptoms: seizures, polyneuropathy, transient sensory-motor symptoms and cognitive or behavioural abnormalities. Ascertainment of porphyria was often incidental and in many patients neurological complications preceded the definitive biochemical diagnosis. Porphyria is a group of diseases whose clinical picture is often complex and heterogeneous, but neurological complications are not uncommon. When indicated, differential diagnosis of neurological signs and symptoms should include porphyria, as the incidence of the disease is probably underestimated. Part of the clinical picture can be transient and it is often initially disregarded. A family history and recurrence of otherwise unexplained neurological symptoms should alert the clinician to a possible diagnosis of porphyria for patients with neurological presentations. PMID:18187328

Solinas, C; Vajda, F J E

2008-03-01

277

Books Still Worth Reading.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 10 major articles in this special journal issue deal with literary works designated by individual educators as "still worth reading." The works discussed are (1) "Madeline" by L. Bemelmans; (2) "The Assistant" by B. Malamud; (3) "The Pitfalls for Readers of Fiction" by H. Sample, the first of the pamphlet publications by the National Council…

McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

1983-01-01

278

Turnaround Momentum Still Fragile  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The federal program providing billions of dollars to help states and districts close or remake some of their worst-performing schools remains a work in progress after two years, with more than 1,200 turnaround efforts under way but still no definitive verdict on its effectiveness. The School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, supercharged by a…

Klein, Alyson

2012-01-01

279

Is Information Still Relevant?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

Ma, Lia

2013-01-01

280

Introduction Complications  

E-print Network

Rapidity Gaps Between Jets Matthew Beckingham DIS 2002, Cracow 30 April ­ 4 May 2002 Contents: . Introduction . Complications and Gap Definition . Models . Dijet Cross sections . Gap Fractions #12; Rapidity Gaps Between Jets, Matthew Beckingham Rapidity Gaps Between Jets Dh t g e e' x p x g w jet jet P

281

A case of rapid growing colonic NK/T cell lymphoma complicated by Crohn’s disease  

PubMed Central

A 37-year-old man developed abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea 11 months before admission. The colonoscopy revealed multifocal ulcers in the colon. Histology showed active chronic inflammation. Although anti-tuberculosis medication was effective, his symptoms repeated 2 months later. The subsequent colonoscopy revealed more extensive irregular ulcers than before, and he was clinically suspected with intestinal malignant lymphoma. He underwent subtotal colectomy and was histologically suggested Crohn’s disease, then 5-aminosalicylic and a combination of prednisone and azathioprine were administered in succession postoperatively, but they achieved minimal relief of symptoms for a period of 7 months. The third colonoscopy showed a large irregular ulcer in the ileocolon stomas, and primary colonic NK/T cell lymphoma was diagnosed through histological and immunophenotypic studies. Malignant lymphoma should be taken into consideration when clinically diagnosed Crohn’s disease was refractory to medication or when its clinical course became aggressive. PMID:23372350

Zheng, Shumei; Xu, Hui; Xue, Linyun; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Dejun

2013-01-01

282

Beneficial Effect of Intravenous Dexamethasone in Children With Mild to Moderately Severe Acute Chest Syndrome Complicating Sickle Cell Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute chest syndrome (ACS) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has historically been managed with oxygen, antibiotics, and blood transfusions. Recently high-dose corti- costeroid therapy was shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization in children with SCD and vaso-occlusive crisis. Therefore, we chose to assess the use of glucocorti- coids in ACS. We conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial

Juan Carlos Bernini; Zora R. Rogers; Eric S. Sandler; Joan S. Reisch; Charles T. Quinn; George R. Buchanan

283

Complicated necrotizing otitis externa.  

PubMed

Necrotizing (malignant) otitis externa (NOE) is a rare and invasive infection originating in the external acoustic meatus seen most commonly in diabetes and other immunocompromised states. After a protracted course, disease can smolder and extend into the mastoid, skull base, dural sinuses, and intracranially. We present a case of NOE complicated by mastoiditis, dural sinus thrombosis, and Bezold's abscess in an uncontrolled diabetic presenting with a prolonged course of facial nerve palsy. We stress the importance of maintaining a high index of clinical suspicion for NOE in diabetic patients and offering timely, aggressive treatment to mitigate its complications. PMID:23927998

Nawas, Mariam T; Daruwalla, Vistasp J; Spirer, David; Micco, Alan G; Nemeth, Alexander J

2013-01-01

284

Joint and distinct risk factors associated with micro- and macrovascular complications in a cohort of type 2 diabetic patients cared through disease management  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analysed the risk factors associated with diabetic complications in the cohort of patients assisted by a type 2 diabetes\\u000a mellitus (T2DM) shared-care program. We analysed registry data from 16,136 T2DM patients. Of them, 4,781 had microangiopathy,\\u000a 3,469 CV events. They were 70.5 ± 17.1 years old, 50% were male, disease duration 13.3 ± 7.8 years, BMI 28.7 ± 4.9 kg\\/m2, HbA1c 7.08 ± 1.23%, FBG 134.7 ± 35.7 mg\\/dl, 2hPPBG 163.9 ± 47.8 mg\\/dl, 12.5% smokers.

Anna V. CiardulloM; M. Monica Daghio; Massimo Bevini; Gaetano Feltri; Doriano Novi; Giuseppe Fattori; Silvana Borsari; Carlo Di Donato

2010-01-01

285

Endometriosis still a challenge  

PubMed Central

Abstract Endometriosis is a debilitating disease with features of chronic inflammation. Endometriosis appears to be one of the most common benign gynecological proliferations in premenopausal women since it is estimated that 10–15% of reproductive aged women suffer from pelvic endometriosis. The biology of endometriosis is unclear. Despite its prevalence, this disease remains poorly understood and current studies prove that there is no relationship between the extent of the disease and its symptomatology. There is no blood test available for the diagnosis of endometriosis. Up to this point, there is no single very successful option for the treatment of endometriosis. Due to the relatively poor efficacy of hormonal therapy for endometriosis, several other experimental therapies are currently undergoing clinical trial. PMID:25408753

Mehedintu, C; Plotogea, MN; Ionescu, S; Antonovici, M

2014-01-01

286

Still Flying Issue 4  

E-print Network

&A with Joss! Listen to a Firefly podcast (internet radio broadcast)! http://www.rhythmicpulsar.com/firefly.htm Jane Espenson?s Finding Serenity - Anti-Heroes, Lost Shepherds and Space Hookers in Joss Whedon's Firefly is now available in stores...) Jayne with cigar. Another podcast - this time an excellent interview with Jewel via Sci-FI talk: http://scifitalk.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=4250 And finally? Not news but still amusing to discover that Adam stared in a 2003 film called...

2005-01-01

287

Life's Still Lifes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The de Bruijn diagram describing those decompositions of the neighborhoods of a one dimensional cellular automaton which conform to predetermined requirements of periodicity and translational symmetry shows how to construct extended configurations satisfying the same requirements. Similar diagrams, formed by stages, describe higher dimensional automata, although they become more laborious to compute with increasing neighborhood size. The procedure is illustrated by computing some still lifes for Conway's game of Life, a widely known two dimensional cellular automaton. This paper is written in September 10, 1988.

McIntosh, Harold V.

288

Still Flying Issue 1  

E-print Network

of an online mailing list. There is a huge amount going on at the Fox bulleting board (almost 600,000 posts in a year) where Adam Baldwin, Nathan Fillion, Mark Sheppard (Badger) and even sometimes Joss hang out. You'd be more than welcome if you ever... http://www.jewel-staite.com/ Still Flying ? Issue 1 - November 2003 Page 11 of 24 Kaylee sat at the mess hall table staring at the small colourful toy in front of her. A huge wave of satisfaction and pleasure rushed over her entire body and she...

2003-01-01

289

Neurological Complications Comparing Endoscopically vs. Open Harvest of the Radial Artery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Complications Due to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

2015-02-28

290

Ulcerative ileitis after proctocolectomy in children: a complication of ulcerative colitis or a disease in itself after ileoanal pullthrough?  

PubMed

Ulcerative ileitis (UI) after restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) and ileoanal pullthrough procedure (IAPP) is a rare condition described as inflammation of the terminal ileum proximal to the anastomosis. It is mostly observed in ulcerative colitis (UC) and is designated as prepouch ileitis; sometimes with pouchitis, but not necessarily all the time. Its incidence in adults is less than 5%, but the information in children is limited. Pathogenesis is unknown, it has been considered as a disease by itself, independently on the underlying disease. It involves additional morbidity and impacts negatively on quality of life because there is no effective treatment so far. This study aims to review the cases of UI in our institution and to summarize their clinical features and management. A descriptive retrospective study of UI patients between 1990 and 2013 was conducted. Children with RPC and IAPP with clinical and pathological diagnosis of UI were included. Sociodemographic and clinical data, diagnostic, and therapeutic procedures were collected through medical records. UI was diagnosed in eight patients (six males) after RCP; four had UC, two had total colonic aganglionosis (TCA), and two had complex anorectal malformations (one cloacal exstrophy and one omphalopagus twin with bladder exstrophy). Different surgical techniques were used in each case: UC patients underwent IAPP, 50% with J-reservoir and 50% without it; posterior sagittal pullthrough was performed in those with anorectal malformations; one Soave and one Swenson procedure in those with TCA. In summary, three patients had reservoir and five did not. The median age at the IAPP and ostomy closure was 6 years (range 2 months-8 years) and 7 years (range 6 months-9 years), respectively. UI was found after a median of 23 months (range 1-48 months), all of them after digestive tract continuity was reestablished. The leading symptom was lower GI or gastrointestinal, both of them bleeding with abdominal pain, followed by abdominopelvic abscesses and malabsorption with weight loss. Pathology showed nonspecific inflammatory changes. Treatment included antibiotics, corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents with variable response, requiring a new ileostomy in five cases. Ileitis disappeared after diversion. In our experience, UI after colectomy is not an exclusive feature of UC as has been previously described. Although it appears with pouchitis, the presence of a reservoir is not a must, suggesting that this is a different entity. No medical treatment has been really effective in our patients and diversion above this level stopped the process. Further studies on its pathogenesis and treatment strategies are necessary. PMID:25144351

Sánchez-Galán, Alba; Andres, Ane M; Fernández-Caamańo, Beatriz; Vilanova, Alejandra; Dominguez, Eva; Ortiz, Ruben; Prieto, Gerardo; Lopez-Santamaria, Manuel; Tovar, J A

2015-02-01

291

Case of Behçet's disease complicated by oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm.  

PubMed

Behçet's disease (BD) is a relapsing systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology involving systemic vasculitis. Vasculitis in BD results from the involvement of arteries, veins and blood vessels of all sizes, which leads to the three major manifestations of this condition: venous occlusion, arterial occlusion and aneurysm formation. Therefore, whole-body vascular involvement should always be considered in BD patients. Here, we describe the first appearance of an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm, resulting in complete oculomotor nerve palsy in a BD patient. A 44-year-old Japanese man suffered from recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum that had presented on the lower extremities for the past 2 years. His condition was diagnosed as an incomplete type of BD based on relapsing oral and genital ulcers, skin eruptions, such as erythema nodosum and folliculitis, a positive pathergy test and systemic arthralgia. Ten years after his initial clinical presentation, he had manifestations of right-sided ptosis and cyclic dull pain in his right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a BD patient has not been reported previously, our report highlights the fact that this abnormal manifestation should be considered in those with vasculo-BD. PMID:25573207

Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

2015-03-01

292

Eczema: Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... atopic dermatitis should not receive the currently licensed smallpox vaccine, even if their disease is in remission, ... caused when the live vaccinia virus in the smallpox vaccine reproduces and spreads throughout the body. Furthermore, ...

293

[Genetics: still a discipline?].  

PubMed

In the institutional sense of the term "discipline" (laboratories, societies, congresses, curricula, etc.), genetics remains a discipline. In the intellectual sense of the term (consensus on a definite array of concepts, methods and theoretical purposes), it is doubtful that genetics is still a discipline. At first, molecular biology seemed to have introduced an unequivocal structural (or molecular) definition of the gene: a definite sequence of nucleotides that code for a protein. In fact, as it appears in retrospect, this was not the case. Even in 1961, when Jacob and Monod proposed their first model of genetic regulation in bacteria, there was no possibility of constructing a non equivocal concept of the gene. More recent developments in molecular genetics have made this situation worse. There is no possible definition of the gene as a general category. The reasons why biologists keep the word are pragmatic rather than theoretical: communication among scientists, economic interests and ideology. PMID:14997449

Gayon, Jean

2004-02-01

294

An unusual complication of a common endemic disease: clinical and laboratory aspects of patients with brucella epididymoorchitis in the north of Iran  

PubMed Central

Background Brucella epididymoorchitis(BEO) is a focal complication of human brucellosis and has been reported in 2-20% of patients with brucellosis. Brucellosis is an endemic disease in Iran. The incidence of the disease in this country is 34 per 100 000 per year. Methods In a retrospective study, we identified 30 cases of Brucella epididymoorchitis in two teaching hospitals in the north of Iran during 1997-2009. Findings Epididymoorchitis occurred in 11.1% of male patients with brucellosis. The average age was 25.5 ± 12.43 years. Pain and scrotal swelling (100%) and fever (96.7%) were the most common symptoms. Different treatment regimens were administered including doxycycline plus rifampin (60%), doxycycline plus rifampin plus aminoglycoside for the first two weeks (36.6%) and doxycycline plus cotrimoxazole(3.4%). Ten percent of the patients did not respond to antibiotic therapy and required surgical drainage or orchiectomy. Conclusions In brucellosis endemic areas, clinicians who encounter patients with epididymoorchitis should consider the likelihood of brucellosis. A careful history and physical examination and an immediate laboratory evaluation help to make a correct diagnosis. Generally, classical therapy of brucellosis is adequate for the treatment of epididymoorchitis. PMID:21834966

2011-01-01

295

A Pkd1-Fbn1 Genetic Interaction Implicates TGF-? Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Vascular Complications in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common cause of renal failure that is due to mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Vascular complications, including aneurysms, are a well recognized feature of ADPKD, and a subgroup of families exhibits traits reminiscent of Marfan syndrome (MFS). MFS is caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1), which encodes an extracellular matrix protein with homology to latent TGF-? binding proteins. It was recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 deficiency is associated with upregulation of TGF-? signaling. We investigated the overlap between ADPKD and MFS by breeding mice with targeted mutations in Pkd1 and Fbn1. Double heterozygotes displayed an exacerbation of the typical Fbn1 heterozygous aortic phenotype. We show that the basis of this genetic interaction results from further upregulation of TGF-? signaling caused by Pkd1 haploinsufficiency. In addition, we demonstrate that loss of PKD1 alone is sufficient to induce a heightened responsiveness to TGF-?. Our data link the interaction of two important diseases to a fundamental signaling pathway. PMID:24071006

Liu, Dongyan; Wang, Connie J.; Judge, Daniel P.; Halushka, Marc K.; Ni, Jie; Habashi, Jennifer P.; Moslehi, Javid; Bedja, Djahida; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Xu, Hangxue; Qian, Feng; Huso, David; Dietz, Harry C.; Germino, Gregory G.

2014-01-01

296

A Pkd1-Fbn1 genetic interaction implicates TGF-? signaling in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common cause of renal failure that is due to mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Vascular complications, including aneurysms, are a well recognized feature of ADPKD, and a subgroup of families exhibits traits reminiscent of Marfan syndrome (MFS). MFS is caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1), which encodes an extracellular matrix protein with homology to latent TGF-? binding proteins. It was recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 deficiency is associated with upregulation of TGF-? signaling. We investigated the overlap between ADPKD and MFS by breeding mice with targeted mutations in Pkd1 and Fbn1. Double heterozygotes displayed an exacerbation of the typical Fbn1 heterozygous aortic phenotype. We show that the basis of this genetic interaction results from further upregulation of TGF-? signaling caused by Pkd1 haploinsufficiency. In addition, we demonstrate that loss of PKD1 alone is sufficient to induce a heightened responsiveness to TGF-?. Our data link the interaction of two important diseases to a fundamental signaling pathway. PMID:24071006

Liu, Dongyan; Wang, Connie J; Judge, Daniel P; Halushka, Marc K; Ni, Jie; Habashi, Jennifer P; Moslehi, Javid; Bedja, Djahida; Gabrielson, Kathleen L; Xu, Hangxue; Qian, Feng; Huso, David; Dietz, Harry C; Germino, Gregory G; Watnick, Terry

2014-01-01

297

[Cyclosporine A as an effective treatment for a patient with acquired hemophilia A complicated with diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease].  

PubMed

Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare coagulation disorder due to the development of an autoantibody against and inhibitor of coagulation factor VIII. It has been reported that immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and vincristine are effective to decrease this inhibitor. When corticosteroids and cytotoxic drugs are ineffective, cyclosporine A (CyA) may be effective as a second-line salvage therapy. Except for postpartum conditions, AHA usually occurs in elderly patients who are often already suffering from diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease and/or hyperlipidemia. However, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic drugs may have adverse effects on these patients. We report on a 66-year-old man who developed AHA after colon cancer resection (factor VIII inhibitor: 61 Bethesda units/ml, aPTT : 97.9 s). Since he already had both diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease, we abandoned treatment with corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide was started, but was switched to CyA because of leukopenia. Within 3 months of starting the CyA treatment, aPTT levels returned to normal and 4 further months were required for complete eradication of the inhibitor. This case revealed that CyA is as effective as corticosteroids for AHA. For patients with AHA who have unfavorable complications due to corticosteroids and cytotoxic drugs, CyA could be a potential first-line drug. PMID:16440770

Wano, Yuji; Kang, Yookija; Masaki, Hirofumi; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Toshihiro; Shimoyama, Kumiko; Satoh, Akiyoshi; Miyairi, Yasuro; Kashiwaba, Mitsutoshi; Hirose, Yuko

2005-10-01

298

Characteristics of autoimmune thyroid disease occurring as a late complication of immune reconstitution in patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.  

PubMed

Experimental evidence from animal models has provided a framework for our current understanding of autoimmune disease pathogenesis and supports the importance of genetic predisposition, molecular mimicry, and immune dysregulation. However, only recently has evidence emerged to support the role of immune dysregulation in human organ-specific autoimmune disease. In the current study of the "late" manifestation of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), we discuss how immune dysregulation and factors associated with the immunopathology of HIV infection fit the current understanding of autoimmunity and provide a plausible basis for our clinical observations. De novo diagnoses of thyroid disease were identified between 1996 and 2002 in 7 HIV treatment centers (5/7 centers completed the study). Patients were diagnosed as clinical case entities and not discovered through thyroid function test screening. Paired plasma specimens were used to demonstrate sequential rise in thyroid antibodies. Seventeen patients were diagnosed with AITD (median age, 38 yr; 65% were of black African or black Caribbean ethnicity; and 82% were female). The median duration of immune reconstitution was 17 months. Graves disease (GD) was diagnosed in 15 of 17 patients. One patient developed hashithyrotoxicosis with atypically raised C-reactive protein, and another developed hypothyroidism. One GD patient had associated secondary hypoadrenalism. The estimated combined prevalence of GD for 4 treatment centers for female patients was 7/234 and for males was 2/1289. The denominator numbers were matched controls, from 4 centers able to provide data, who commenced HAART during the same time (January 1996 to July 2002) and who did not develop clinical AITD. The mean baseline pre-HAART CD4 count was 67 cells/mL, and the mean increase from nadir to AITD presentation was 355 cells/mL. AITD patients were more likely than controls (95% confidence interval, chi-square test) to be severely compromised at baseline (as defined by a CD4 count < 200 cells/mL or the presence of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining diagnosis), and to experience greater CD4 increments following HAART. AITD may be a late manifestation of immune reconstitution in HIV-positive patients taking HAART, and immune dysregulation may be an important factor. PMID:15758839

Chen, Fabian; Day, Sara L; Metcalfe, Russell A; Sethi, Gulshan; Kapembwa, Moses S; Brook, M Gary; Churchill, Duncan; de Ruiter, Annemiek; Robinson, Stephen; Lacey, Charles J; Weetman, Anthony P

2005-03-01

299

Living Well with Lupus: Can I Still Plan a Pregnancy?  

MedlinePLUS

... well with lupus Can I still plan a pregnancy? Pregnancy is no longer considered an impossibility if ... History or presence of antiphospholipid antibodies Planning Your Pregnancy Although many lupus pregnancies will have no complications, ...

300

Sarcoidosis: still a mystery?  

PubMed Central

Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. It has diverse clinical manifestations, most frequently including pulmonary disorders. It is associated with immunological abnormalities, the intricacies of which have yet to be clearly delineated. In the immunologically susceptible individual, genetic, environmental, nutritional, and socioeconomic factors may play a governing role in its development. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion established by clinical manifestations, radiologic findings, and histologic evidence of noncaseating epithelioid-cell granulomas in >1 organ. We will discuss parameters that are helpful in making this diagnosis. PMID:16369580

2001-01-01

301

Neuromuscular complications in HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

HIV affects many organs of the body, including the nervous system. As a result, a series of neurologic complications have\\u000a created challenges for scientists and clinicians alike. Among these, HIV-associated neuropathy and myopathy may occur at all\\u000a stages of the disease process. Of the neuropathies, distal symmetrical polyneuropathy is the most common form. The pathogenesis\\u000a of primary HIV neuropathy is

Susama Verma; Elena Micsa; Lydia Estanislao; David Simpson

2004-01-01

302

Interpretation of Serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Levels for Cardiovascular Disease Risk is Complicated by Race, Pulmonary Disease, Body Mass Index, Gender, and Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective High sensitivity serum C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is used as a marker of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD); however CRP is a non-specific acute phase reactant. We evaluated the association between hsCRP concentrations and the most common form of arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA), and assessed the applicability of hsCRP for CVD risk prediction. Methods Participants (n=662) were selected from the population-based Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, using stratified simple random sampling to achieve balance according to radiographic knee OA status, ethnic group, gender, and age group. The presence and severity of knee and hip OA were determined radiographically. CVD risk was estimated by hsCRP concentration and independently with the Framingham risk algorithm. Results Serum ln hsCRP was higher in African-Americans (p<0.0001) and women (p<0.0001), was higher in participants who had chronic pulmonary disease (p = 0.01), hypertension (p < 0.0001), or used pain medications (p = 0.004), and correlated with BMI (r=0.40, p<0.0001) and waist circumference (r=0.33, p<0.0001), but not with age, CVD, or current smoking. Ln hsCRP was strongly positively associated with all definitions of radiographic OA (p<0.0001), but this association was not independent of BMI. Although 183 participants reported no CVD and were classified as low risk by the Framingham CVD score, 61% of them were classified as moderate or high risk for CVD using hsCRP; this proportion designated high risk for CVD on the basis of hsCRP consisted primarily of women (p<0.05) and individuals with OA (p<0.01). Conclusions The pathogenic significance of hsCRP elevations in this subgroup is unclear. Serum hsCRP for predicting risk of CVD is confounded by obesity, ethnicity, gender and comorbidities. PMID:17395501

Kraus, Virginia B; Stabler, Thomas V; Luta, Gheorghe; Renner, Jordan B; Dragomir, Anca D; Jordan, Joanne M

2009-01-01

303

Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication  

PubMed Central

Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

2013-01-01

304

[Orbital complications of sinusitis].  

PubMed

Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal endoscopic surgery (FEES). In case of superior subperiosteal abscess, combined endonasal and external approach (external orbitotomy) was needed. Combined therapy facilitated quick improvement of local and systematic symptoms. Average time of hospitalisation was 7 days. Early diagnosis and agresive combined therapy prevent loss of vision and life threatening complications. PMID:25640234

Šucha?, M; Hor?ák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kova?, J

2014-12-01

305

Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The oldest isolated pulsar ever detected in X-rays has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This very old and exotic object turns out to be surprisingly active. The pulsar, PSR J0108-1431 (J0108 for short) is about 200 million years old. Among isolated pulsars -- ones that have not been spun-up in a binary system -- it is over 10 times older than the previous record holder with an X-ray detection. At a distance of 770 light years, it is one of the nearest pulsars known. Pulsars are born when stars that are much more massive than the Sun collapse in supernova explosions, leaving behind a small, incredibly weighty core, known as a neutron star. At birth, these neutron stars, which contain the densest material known in the Universe, are spinning rapidly, up to a hundred revolutions per second. As the rotating beams of their radiation are seen as pulses by distant observers, similar to a lighthouse beam, astronomers call them "pulsars". Astronomers observe a gradual slowing of the rotation of the pulsars as they radiate energy away. Radio observations of J0108 show it to be one of the oldest and faintest pulsars known, spinning only slightly faster than one revolution per second. The surprise came when a team of astronomers led by George Pavlov of Penn State University observed J0108 in X-rays with Chandra. They found that it glows much brighter in X-rays than was expected for a pulsar of such advanced years. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Some of the energy that J0108 is losing as it spins more slowly is converted into X-ray radiation. The efficiency of this process for J0108 is found to be higher than for any other known pulsar. "This pulsar is pumping out high-energy radiation much more efficiently than its younger cousins," said Pavlov. "So, although it's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us doing much extra w

2009-02-01

306

Medical management of chronic liver diseases (CLD) in children (part II): focus on the complications of CLD, and CLD that require special considerations.  

PubMed

Treatment of the causes of many chronic liver diseases (CLDs) may not be possible. In this case, complications must be anticipated, prevented or at least controlled by the best available therapeutic modalities. There are three main goals for the management of portal hypertension: (i) prevention of the first episode of variceal bleeding largely by non-selective ?-adrenoceptor antagonists, which is not generally recommended in children; (ii) control of bleeding by using a stepwise approach from the least to most invasive strategies; (iii) and prevention of re-bleeding using bypass operations, with particular enthusiasm for the use of meso-Rex bypass in the pediatric population. Hepatic encephalopathy management also consists of three main aspects: (i) ruling out other causes of encephalopathy; (ii) identifying and treating precipitating factors; and (iii) starting empiric treatment with drugs such as lactulose, rifaximin, sodium benzoate, and flumazenil. Treatment of mild ascites and peripheral edema should begin with the restriction of sodium and water, followed by careful diuresis, then large-volume paracentesis associated with colloid volume expansion in severe cases. Empiric broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy should be used for the treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, bacterial and fungal sepsis, and cholangitis, after taking appropriate cultures, with appropriate changes in therapy after sensitivity testing. Empirical therapies continue to be the standard practice for pruritus; these consist of bile acid binding agents, phenobarbital (phenobarbitone), ursodeoxycholic acid, antihistamines, rifampin (rifampicin), and carbamazepine. Partial external biliary diversion can be used in refractory cases. Once hepatorenal syndrome is suspected, treatment should be initiated early in order to prevent the progression of renal failure; approaches consist of general supportive measures, management of concomitant complications, screening for sepsis, treatment with antibiotics, use of vasopressin analogs (terlipressin), and renal replacement therapy if needed. Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are best managed by liver transplantation. Provision of an adequate caloric supply, nutrition, and vitamin/mineral supplements for the management of growth failure, required vaccinations, and special care for ensuring psychologic well-being should be ensured. Anticoagulation might be attempted in acute portal vein thrombosis. Some CLDs, such as extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA), Crigler-Najjar syndrome, and Indian childhood cirrhosis, require special considerations. For EHBA, Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy is the current standard surgical approach in combination with nutritional therapy and supplemental fat and water soluble vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. In type 1 Crigler-Najjar syndrome, extensive phototherapy is the mainstay of treatment, in association with adjuvant therapy to bind photobilirubin such as calcium phosphate, cholestyramine, or agar, until liver transplantation can be carried out. Treating Indian childhood cirrhosis with penicillamine early in the course of the disease and at doses similar to those used to treat Wilson disease decreases the mortality rate by half. New hopes for the future include extracorporeal liver support devices (the molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS®] and Prometheus®), hepatocyte transplantation, liver-directed gene therapy, genetically engineered enzymes, and therapeutic modalities targeting fibrogenesis. Hepapoietin, a naturally occurring cytokine that promotes hepatocyte growth, is under extensive research. PMID:21999650

El-Shabrawi, Mortada H F; Kamal, Naglaa M

2011-12-01

307

Endocrine and Bone Complications in ?-Thalassemia Intermedia: Current Understanding and Treatment  

PubMed Central

Thalassemia intermedia (TI), also known as nontransfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT), is a type of thalassemia where affected patients do not require lifelong regular transfusions for survival but may require occasional or even frequent transfusions in certain clinical settings and for defined periods of time. NTDT encompasses three distinct clinical forms: ?-thalassemia intermedia (?-TI), Hb E/?-thalassemia, and ?-thalassemia intermedia (Hb H disease). Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular features, pathophysiology, and complications of NTDT particularly ?-TI has increased tremendously but data on optimal treatment of disease and its various complications are still lacking. In this paper, we shall review a group of commonly encountered complications in ?-TI, mainly endocrine and bone complications.

Noureldine, MohammadHassan A.; Abbas, Hussein A.

2015-01-01

308

Pregnancy Complications: Gonorrhea  

MedlinePLUS

... in the community. Home > Pregnancy > Pregnancy Complications > Gonorrhea Pregnancy complications Pregnancy complications may need special medical care. ... the United States. Can gonorrhea cause complications during pregnancy and for your baby? Yes. Gonorrhea can lead ...

309

Management of post-hepatectomy complications  

PubMed Central

Hepatic resection had an impressive growth over time. It has been widely performed for the treatment of various liver diseases, such as malignant tumors, benign tumors, calculi in the intrahepatic ducts, hydatid disease, and abscesses. Management of hepatic resection is challenging. Despite technical advances and high experience of liver resection of specialized centers, it is still burdened by relatively high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Especially, complex resections are being increasingly performed in high risk and older patient population. Operation on the liver is especially challenging because of its unique anatomic architecture and because of its vital functions. Common post-hepatectomy complications include venous catheter-related infection, pleural effusion, incisional infection, pulmonary atelectasis or infection, ascites, subphrenic infection, urinary tract infection, intraperitoneal hemorrhage, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, biliary tract hemorrhage, coagulation disorders, bile leakage, and liver failure. These problems are closely related to surgical manipulations, anesthesia, preoperative evaluation and preparation, and postoperative observation and management. The safety profile of hepatectomy probably can be improved if the surgeons and medical staff involved have comprehensive knowledge of the expected complications and expertise in their management. This review article focuses on the major postoperative issues after hepatic resection and presents the current management. PMID:24307791

Jin, Shan; Fu, Quan; Wuyun, Gerile; Wuyun, Tu

2013-01-01

310

Management and complications of stomas.  

PubMed

Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management. PMID:23177069

Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

2013-02-01

311

Thyroid disease in pregnancy.  

PubMed

Thyroid diseases are common in women of childbearing age and it is well known that untreated thyroid disturbances result in an increased rate of adverse events, particularly miscarriage, preterm birth and gestational hypertension. Furthermore, thyroid autoimmunity per se seems to be associated with complications such as miscarriage and preterm delivery. While strong evidence clearly demonstrates that overt dysfunctions (hyper- or hypothyroidism) have deleterious effects on pregnancy, subclinical disease, namely subclinical hypothyroidism, has still to be conclusively defined as a risk factor for adverse outcomes. Additionally, other conditions, such as isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity in euthyroidism, are still clouded with uncertainty regarding the need for substitutive treatment. PMID:22115167

Negro, Roberto; Mestman, Jorge Hector

2011-12-01

312

[Long-term complications of sulfur mustard exposure: a therapeutic update].  

PubMed

Sulfur mustard (SM) is an alkylating chemical warfare agent with high military significance due to its high toxicity, resistance and availability. SM was widely used in military conflicts, the last being the Iran-Iraq war with more than 100,000 Iranians exposed, one-third of whom are still suffering from late effects. The intensity of the delayed complications correlates to the extent, the area and the route of exposure. The clinical manifestations most commonly involve respiratory, ocular and dermal effects. Respiratory complications include dyspnea, cough and expectorations and various obstructive and restrictive lung diseases. Dermal complications are itching, burning sensation, blisters, dry skin, dermatitis and pigmentary changes. Ocular complications include photophobia, red eye, tearing, corneal ulcers and blindness. Although the picture remains incomplete the major mechanisms responsible for the clinical and pathological effects of SM are: DNA alkylation and cross-linking, protein modification and membrane damage in addition to induction of inflammatory mediators in the target tissues causing extensive necrosis, apoptosis and loss of tissue structure. The current report reviews long-term complications of SM exposure, focusing on new treatments tested in clinical trials conducted on humans. Such treatments include: N-acetyl cysteine, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, Interferon-gamma, furosemide and morphine for the respiratory complications. Ocular complications may entail: Invasive procedures treating corneal complication, limbal ischemia and stem cell deficiency. Treatment for dermatological complications include: anti-depressants, pimercrolimus, Unna's boot, capsaicin, phenol and menthol, Aloe vera and olive oil, curcumin and Interferon-gamma. PMID:24791566

Shiyovich, Arthur; Rosman, Yossi; Krivoy, Amir; Statlender, Liran; Kassirer, Michael; Shrot, Shai

2014-01-01

313

Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation  

E-print Network

1 Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation Preterm Labor Labor that starts and uterine tenderness. Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy induced high blood sugar. Diabetes that begins in pregnancy and goes away after delivery. Preeclampsia (hypertension) Pregnancy induced high blood pressure

Stromswold, Karin

314

MicroRNAs: Potential Mediators and Biomarkers of Diabetic Complications  

PubMed Central

The incidence of diabetes is escalating worldwide and consequently, this has become a major healthcare problem. Moreover, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with significantly accelerated rates of microvascular complications including retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, as well as macrovascular complications such as atherosclerotic cardiovascular and hypertensive diseases. Key factors have been implicated in leading to these complications including hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, advanced glycation end products, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and related increases in cellular oxidant stress (including mitochondrial) and endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the high incidence of diabetic complications, which often progress despite glycemic control, are still not fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that have elicited immense interest in recent years. They repress target gene expression via post-transcriptional mechanisms and have diverse cellular and biological functions. Herein, we have discussed the role of miRNAs in the pathobiology of various diabetic complications, their involvement in oxidant stress, and also the potential use of differentially expressed miRNAs as novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:23770198

Kato, Mitsuo; Castro, Nancy E.; Natarajan, Rama

2013-01-01

315

Oral vitamin D, still a viable treatment option for psoriasis.  

PubMed

Vitamin D as a topical treatment has become one of the mainstays for treatment of psoriasis vulgaris. Oral vitamin D on the other hand has for the most part become a forgotten option. But a review of the literature on oral vitamin D as a treatment for psoriasis reveals that this treatment is efficacious. The main side effect of this therapy is hypercalcemia, which appears to be easily monitored and avoidable with proper dosing and monitoring. The literature also suggests a correlation between low levels of serum vitamin D in this patient population associated with increased severity of disease involvement. In addition, oral vitamin D improves psoriatic arthropathy. Moreover, vitamin D has been proven to have many health benefits such as prevention of cancer, improved cardiovascular health among many others. Psoriatic patients as a population are at increased risk of developing adverse health complications such as cardiovascular disease, and oral vitamin D may prove to be of benefit in this population. Oral vitamin D is inexpensive and easily available. It is still a viable option and should not be forgotten as a possible treatment for psoriasis. PMID:22103655

Kamangar, Faranak; Koo, John; Heller, Misha; Lee, Eric; Bhutani, Tina

2013-08-01

316

Study of Pulmonary Complications in Pediatric Patients With Storage Disorders Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

I Cell Disease; Fucosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Mannosidosis; Niemann-Pick Disease; Pulmonary Complications; Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Wolman Disease

2005-06-23

317

Pregnancy Complications: Syphilis  

MedlinePLUS

... in the community. Home > Pregnancy > Pregnancy Complications > Syphilis Pregnancy complications Pregnancy complications may need special medical care. ... syphilis each year. Can syphilis cause problems during pregnancy and for your baby? Yes. You can pass ...

318

Pregnancy Complications: Chlamydia  

MedlinePLUS

... in the community. Home > Pregnancy > Pregnancy Complications > Chlamydia Pregnancy complications Pregnancy complications may need special medical care. ... younger than 25. Can chlamydia cause problems during pregnancy? Yes. If you get it before or during ...

319

Pregnancy Complications: HELLP Syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... the community. Home > Pregnancy > Pregnancy Complications > HELLP syndrome Pregnancy complications Pregnancy complications may need special medical care. ... to get pregnant again. Are gallstones common during pregnancy? Not common, but they do happen. Elevated hormones ...

320

[Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. ?-klotho/FGF23 system; a new insight into the field of mineral homeostasis and the pathogeneses of aging-associated syndromes and the complications of chronic kidney disease].  

PubMed

?-klotho (?-kl) was first identified as an aging gene and was later shown to be a regulator of mineral homeostasis. ?-kl (- / -) mice display multiple aging related phenotypes including atherosclerosis, cardiovascular/soft tissue calcifications, pulmonary emphysema, osteopenia, and senile atrophy of skin ; such age-related organ pathologies are associated with biochemical changes in blood, including severe hyperphosphatemia, elevated serum FGF23 and1,25 (OH) 2 Vitamin D levels. Of significance, advanced stage patients suffering chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop multiple complications quite resembling phenotypes observed in ?-kl (- / -) mice, and high serum phosphate, the major cause of abnormalities of ?-kl (- / -) mice, has been reported to be closely associated with high levels of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. In addition, the expressions of ?-kl mRNA and ?-Kl protein were severely reduced in these patients. These results suggest the involvement of ?-Kl and FGF23 in the pathogeneses of not only aging-associated syndromes but also the complications of CKD. Here, the unveiling of the molecular functions of ?-Klotho and FGF23 has recently given new insight into the field of mineral homeostasis and the pathogeneses of aging-associated syndromes and the complications of CKD. PMID:24976054

Nabeshima, Yo Ichi

2014-07-01

321

MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice  

E-print Network

MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, there will be some texture and Clavor loss. Discard DAIRY Still contains ice crystals and feels Ice cream, frozen yogurt Discard Discard Cheese (soft and semi-soft) Refreeze. May

Liskiewicz, Maciej

322

[Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].  

PubMed

Plastic surgery covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions in the areas of reconstructive surgery, hand, burn and aesthetic surgery. Besides acquired defects or malformations an increasing number of patients are being treated for surgical or multimodal complications. In a considerable number of patients plastic and reconstructive surgery remains the only therapeutic alternative after other therapy has failed. Therefore complication management in plastic surgery is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. In addition patient expectations in the results of plastic surgery as a discipline of invention and problem solving are steadily increasing. This challenge is reflected in clinical patient management by intensive research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Patients in plastic surgery are recruited from all age groups of either gender, involving traumatic and oncologic as well as congenital and aesthetic disorders. The demographics of aging, multimorbidity and obesity pose new challenges to plastic surgery. Although age over 70 years is not an independent risk factor per se for complications in plastic surgery, e.g. for complex free flap transfer, medical problems are present at a higher rate, which is to be expected in this age group. Risk factors such as alcoholism and coronary heart diseases seem to be independent predictors of perioperative complications. Therefore older patients can also benefit from plastic surgery and recurrent operations by the corresponding risk and complication management. Complication management necessitates careful patient selection, estimation of operative risks and patient-adapted selection of procedures. In addition to expertise in plastic surgery a thorough knowledge of non-surgical and surgical back-up procedures for technical incidents as well as vascular circulatory and wound healing disorders is required to deal successfully with complications in plastic surgery. This article presents these specific aspects of postoperative complication management in plastic surgery. PMID:19669715

Vogt, P M

2009-09-01

323

Complications of Central Venous Catheterisation  

PubMed Central

Central venous catheterisation (CVC) is a common bedside invasive procedure done in medical practice. Even though it is a safe procedure when done with ultrasound guidance, difficulties and complications do occur even in experienced hands. Here, we describe the difficulties encountered in the form of the breakage of the guidewire while inserting a CVC in a patient with sickle cell disease. PMID:22087404

Tawfic, Qutaiba A.; Bhakta, Pradipta; Burad, Jyoti; Mishra, Pragyandipta; Kausalya, Rajini

2011-01-01

324

Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications  

PubMed Central

Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

Kozak, Józef

2014-01-01

325

The impact of mathematical modeling on the understanding of diabetes and related complications  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is a chronic and complex multifactorial disease caused by persistent hyperglycemia and for which underlying pathogenesis is still not completely understood. The mathematical modeling of glucose homeostasis, diabetic condition, and its associated complications is rapidly growing and provides new insights into the underlying mechanisms involved. Here, we discuss contributions to the diabetes modeling field over the past five decades, highlighting the areas where more focused research is required. PMID:23842097

Ajmera, I; Swat, M; Laibe, C; Novčre, N Le; Chelliah, V

2013-01-01

326

Peri-Operative and Complication Management for Adenocarcinoma of the Oesophagus and Oesophagigastric Junction  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Surgical resection of oesophageal cancer still offers the only chance of cure for this disease. Nevertheless, oesophageal\\u000a surgery may be accompanied by relevant mortality and morbidity, the causes of which can be both directly related to surgical\\u000a technique as well as a large spectrum of non-surgical complications. In the last few years, improvements in patient selection\\u000a and technical advances, as

K. Tobias E. Beckurts; E. Beckurts

327

Type 1 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Complications and Sesame (?? Zh? Má)  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is a major concern among medical practitioners, with the annual mortality rate increasing up to 26.9% in a person aged 65 years or older and 11.3% in the adult. There are many serious complications associated with diabetes, particularly cardiovascular complications due to microvascular diseases. A prerequisite to reduce the risk of microvascular and neurologic complications of type 1 diabetes is normoglycemia. Insulin therapy is the most common treatment used nowadays in type 1 diabetes. However, this method still has many disadvantages such as increased episode of severe hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia unawareness, increased weight gain, transient exacerbation of pre-existing retinopathy, etc. Using insulin pump (the insulin pump is a medical device used for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion to manage the insulin level in the treatment of diabetes mellitus), is associated with known disadvantages including increased ketoacidosis, infection at the infusion site, and the treatment being less suitable in young children (less than 7 years of age). Therefore, alternative treatment for diabetes is still in great demand. We took the approach of traditional Chinese medicine to discuss this matter. Sesame (?? Zh? Má), a herb, has been used medicinally for thousands of years in almost all the countries in the world. The beneficial effects of sesame in remediating diabetes, such as hypoglycemic effects, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidemic effects, improving fat metabolism, and reducing cholesterol, have been demonstrated in many studies,. However, reports on the effects of sesame in remediating cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients are limited, which necessitates further studies on the effects of sesame on cardiovascular complications. PMID:24872931

Lin, Yen-Chang; Thůy, Tr?n D??ng; Wang, Shu-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

2014-01-01

328

Solar Still Part II: Juice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment, adapted from a ZOOM television broadcast, cast members repeat an experiment designed to separate fresh water from a liquid solution, this time using colored sugar water in one solar still and orange juice in another. The basic still design they employ traps water vapor that is created when the Sun's heat causes water to evaporate. As the vapor cools, it condenses and trickles down to a collection container. The segment is three minutes fifty-five seconds in length.

329

Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

2011-01-01

330

Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review  

SciTech Connect

The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

Katzen, Barry T. [Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Health Systems, Department of Interventional Radiology, Florida (United States)], E-mail: barryk@baptisthealth.net; MacLean, Alexandra A. [New York Hospital-Queens, Department of Surgery (United States)

2006-12-15

331

Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery  

PubMed Central

Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

1977-01-01

332

Infectious complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: epidemiology and interventional therapy strategies--guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO).  

PubMed

The risk of infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is determined by the underlying disease, the intensity of previous treatments and complications that may have occurred during that time, but above all, the risk of infection is determined by the selected transplantation modality (e.g. HLA-match between the stem cell donor and recipient, T cell depletion of the graft, and others). In comparison with patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation are at a much higher risk of infection even after hematopoietic reconstitution, due to the delayed recovery of T and B cell functions. The rate at which immune function recovers after hematopoietic reconstitution greatly influences the incidence and type of post-transplant infectious complications. Infection-associated mortality, for example, is significantly higher following engraftment than during the short neutropenic period that immediately follows transplantation. PMID:13680165

Einsele, Hermann; Bertz, Hartmut; Beyer, Jörg; Kiehl, Michael G; Runde, Volker; Kolb, Hans-Jochen; Holler, Ernst; Beck, Robert; Schwerdfeger, Rainer; Schumacher, Ulrike; Hebart, Holger; Martin, Hans; Kienast, Joachim; Ullmann, Andrew J; Maschmeyer, Georg; Krüger, William; Niederwieser, Dietger; Link, Hartmut; Schmidt, Christian A; Oettle, Helmut; Klingebiel, Thomas

2003-10-01

333

Computerized assessment of complications after colorectal surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Historically, complication rates after colorectal surgery have been stratified by disease process, type of operation, or anesthesia risk derived after an intensive review of the medical record. Newer computer applications purport to shorten this process and predict the probability of postoperative complications by distinguishing them from comorbidities that are commingled on uniform discharge codes. We analyzed CaduCIS™ software, which

Khawaja Azimuddin; Lester Rosen; James F. Reed III

2001-01-01

334

[Surgical complications in kidney transplantation].  

PubMed

Kidney transplantation has become the treatment of choice for patients with end stage renal disease since it offers an excellent quality of life. Moreover, the economic impact is considerable, particularly beyond the first year. Indeed, the annual cost of a successful renal transplantation is ten fold lower than haemodialysis. But surgical complications remain one of our main concerns. Surgical complications are various. They may be non-specific as haematomas, incision-induced hernias and wound infections. They may also be directly related to the procedure as vascular thrombosis and urinary fistula in the early postoperative period or arterial stenosis and ureteral obstruction in the late post-operative period. The accurate diagnosis and the appropriate management of these complications are the most important tasks for the surgical team. This review is based upon our experience in kidney transplantation and upon the medical published data. PMID:18457318

Karam, G; Maillet, F; Braud, G; Battisti, S; Hétet, J F; Glémain, P; Le Normand, L; Bouchot, O; Rigaud, J

2007-12-01

335

Acute polyradiculoneuropathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.  

PubMed Central

Two elderly patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are presented. Both developed an acute polyradiculoneuropathy which is an unusual complication of this disease. Features of their presentation are discussed. PMID:3714625

Morgan, S. H.; Kennett, R. P.; Dudley, C.; Mackworth-Young, C.; Hull, R.; Hughes, G. R.

1986-01-01

336

A Beautiful Britto Still Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Romero Britto is a wonderful artist for young students to study when learning the building blocks of art and design. Colorful, linear, and full of bold patterns, Britto's work blends a contemporary cubist style and pop art commercial appeal. Themes of this contemporary artist's work include animals, flowers, still life, and people in joyful…

Coy, Mary

2012-01-01

337

Does Horace Mann Still Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author comments on a new book entitled Horace Mann's Vision of the Public Schools: Is It Still Relevant? According to him, the book does succinctly summarize current controversies in education including technology, school finance, and No Child Left Behind, and the writing is informed. However, aside from the first twenty-seven…

Baines, Lawrence

2006-01-01

338

Why Are Chimps Still Chimps?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers may be posed with such questions as, "If we evolved from chimps, why are there still chimps?" We provide teachers with answers to this and related questions in the context of the latest genetic, fossil, and behavioral evidence. We also provide references they can use to further students' understanding of human evolution and evolution in…

Johnson, Norman A.; Smith, James J.; Pobiner, Briana; Schrein, Caitlin

2012-01-01

339

Value-Able Still Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses how she made a major improvement to her fifth-grade lesson plan by providing a hands-on Internet experience before students worked on their own oil pastel still life. It was a success with beautiful finished products and highly motivated, engaged students. Details of this lesson are described in this article.

Gardner, Susan

2005-01-01

340

Complications of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: Frequency and risk factors  

PubMed Central

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an important option in the therapy of primary and secondary hepatic tumors. Surgical resection is still the best treatment option, but only a few of these patients are candidates for surgery: multilobar disease, insufficient liver reserve that will lead to liver failure after resection, extra-hepatic disease, proximity to major bile ducts and vessels, and co-morbidities. RFA has a low mortality and morbidity rate and is considered to be safe. Thus, complications occur and vary widely in the literature. Complications are caused by thermal damage, direct needle injury, infection and the patient’s co-morbidities. Tumor type, type of approach, number of lesions, tumor localization, underlying hepatic disease, the physician’s experience, associated hepatic resection and lesion size have been described as factors significantly associated with complications. The physician in charge should promptly recognize high-risk patients more susceptible to complications, perform a close post procedure follow-up and manage them early and adequately if they occur. We aim to describe complications from RFA of hepatic tumors and their risk factors, as well as a few techniques to avoid them. This way, others can decrease their morbidity rates with better outcomes. PMID:24672640

Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko; Santin, Stephanie; Gomes, Luiz Guilherme Lisboa; Waisberg, Jaques; Ribeiro Jr., Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

2014-01-01

341

Complications of second and third trimester pregnancies.  

PubMed

The second and third trimester of pregnancy is a period of extensive physical growth and maturation of the fetus. Unfortunately, it is also a period that is marked by complications that can be life threatening for both the mother and fetus. The top three complications that affect pregnancy are hemorrhage, infection, and the hypertensive diseases of pregnancy. This article focuses on preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, bleeding in later pregnancy, and the hypertensive diseases of pregnancy. PMID:12962354

Abbrescia, Kelly; Sheridan, Barry

2003-08-01

342

[Psoriasis: development and fatal complications].  

PubMed

In a retrospective study we tried to evaluate the number of severe psoriasis with a lethal outcome observed in France in a 20-year period from 1965 to 1985. Among 992 psoriatic in-patients on care during this period in the Dermatology Clinic of Strasbourg, 7 died of different complications directly related to the skin disease or its therapy; 39 further cases could be gathered through different departments of dermatology of France. Patients who died had generalized psoriasis (13 cases), psoriatic erythroderma (15 cases) and generalized pustular psoriasis (18 cases); 18 (39 p. 100) also had psoriatic polyarthritis. Circumstances leading to death (table I) were metabolic disorders, related to erythroderma in most cases, non-specific complications (infections, amyloidosis) or complications of specific treatments (methotrexate, etretinate, corticosteroids, mechlorethamine). A comprehensive review of the literature over a century showed that only 72 lethal psoriasis cases have been reported: this rather low number may be due to the fact that some rare pathologies, such as visceral amyloidosis (12 cases) (table III) and fatal complications of methotrexate therapy (38 cases) (table V), paradoxically are more often published than non-specific complications occurring in severe psoriasis, such as cardiovascular failure or cachexy in erythrodermic patients. However, the review of the literature shows, as our own inquiry, the poor prognosis of generalized pustular forms and of psoriasis-associated polyarthropathies: among 42 lethal cases where enough data were available, 23 (55 p. 100) had psoriatic polyarthritis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2048897

Roth, P E; Grosshans, E; Bergoend, H

1991-01-01

343

Radiological diagnosis of dialysis-associated complications.  

PubMed

In daily clinical practice, the radiologist in the context of diagnosis often faces dialysis-associated complications. The complications are numerous and range from infections, catheter dysfunctions, haematomas, cardiovascular diseases, digital ischaemia, and pseudoaneurysms to shunt stenosis. In this pictorial essay, we take a close look at the imaging diagnostics of the most common complications in dialysis patients. Teaching Points • The occurrence of venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients is up to 41 %. • Catheters usually have a fibrin sheath that can be rinsed but not aspirated. • The steal phenomenon occurs in 75-90 % of patients with a shunt system. • Arterial pseudoaneurysms can cause a number of complications. PMID:25095722

Zandieh, Shahin; Muin, Dina; Bernt, Reinhard; Krenn-List, Petra; Mirzaei, Siroos; Haller, Joerg

2014-10-01

344

Why Descriptive Science Still Matters  

E-print Network

- finements, of course) that were estab- lished by Carolus Linnaeus in 1758 for biological classifications, by William Smith in 1815 for the geological timescale, and by Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869 for the periodic table of the elements. More recent architects... emotions. His Origin of Species succeeded so well because it assembled and explained vast descriptive evidence. Few people are as insightful as Darwin, Mendeleev, Wegener, Hennig, or William Smith, but we lesser souls can still create enduring science...

Grimaldi, David A.; Engel, Michael S.

2007-09-01

345

Infectious complications in patients with liver cirrhosis.  

PubMed

Liver cirrhosis is the end stage of any chronic liver disease. Complications occurring in patients with liver cirrhosis may be specific to this pathology and to gastroenterology (upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy) or may interfere with other specialties (hepatorenal syndrome, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and other localized infectious complications). Over the past few decades, major efforts have been made to increase survival in patients with cirrhosis, but unfortunately, few therapeutic methods have been proven effective. Bacterial infections are frequent and serious complications of liver cirrhosis, resulting in high morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized patients, despite significant progress in health care for those with advanced liver disease. PMID:25341269

Preda, Sînziana; Trifan, Anca; Gîrleanu, Irina; Stanciu, C; Cojocariu, Camelia

2014-01-01

346

Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

2013-01-01

347

Coronary Heart Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

348

Kidney Disease (Nephropathy)  

MedlinePLUS

... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

349

Aspergillus osteomyelitis of the lumbar spine complicated with orbital apex syndrome: A potential role of the Batson's plexus in disease propagation  

PubMed Central

We report a rare case of orbital apex syndrome following epidural steroid injections of the lumbar spine in an immunocompetent individual with osteomyelitis and discitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. We suspect that the craniospinal venous system, also known as the Batson's plexus, was the main route for steroid-facilitated disease propagation from the spine to intracranial structures. PMID:24371725

Camargo, Jose F.; Seriburi, Vimon; Tenner, Michael; El Khoury, Marc Y.

2012-01-01

350

Paediatric reduced intensity conditioning: analysis of centre strategies on regimens and definitions by the EBMT Paediatric Diseases and Complications and Quality of Life WP.  

PubMed

The aim of this analysis was to explore the diversity of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in paediatric allo-SCT in daily practice across Europe. Data from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Promise database from 1994 to 2008 were supplemented by a survey of EBMT centres performing paediatric allo-SCT on the current policy asking for the underlying diseases and for the drug combinations. Records from 161 centres from 30 countries were analysed and 139 various RIC regimens were reported. More centres applied RIC for malignant rather than for non-malignant diseases. In general, fludarabine (FLU)-based regimens predominated except for BU-based regimens in myeloid malignancies and haemoglobinopathies. Treosulfan (TREO) was mainly applied for unspecified malignant diseases and for haemophagocytic diseases. FLU-based regimens revealed the greatest number of different combinations. Correlating the number of regimens with the number of treating centres revealed the lowest variety in FLU and the highest variety in TBI and TREO. FLU/melphalane and FLU/CY were the most frequent combinations. This extreme heterogeneity in RIC may influence both the efficacy and the safety of the procedures, which requires further investigation. Optimization and standardization of RIC is the final goal to provide a platform for future prospective studies. PMID:25621804

Lawitschka, A; Faraci, M; Yaniv, I; Veys, P; Bader, P; Wachowiak, J; Socie, G; Aljurf, M D; Arat, M; Boelens, J J; Duarte, R; Tichelli, A; Peters, C

2015-04-01

351

Disease burden evaluation of fall-related events in the elderly due to hypoglycemia and other diabetic complications: a clinical review.  

PubMed

A hypoglycemia-induced fall is common in older persons with diabetes. The etiology of falls in this population is usually multifactorial, and includes microvascular and macrovascular complications and age-related comorbidities, with hypoglycemia being one of the major precipitating causes. In this review, we systematically searched the literature that was available up to March 31, 2014 from MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar using the following terms: hypoglycemia; insulin; diabetic complications; and falls in elderly. Hypoglycemia, defined as blood glucose <4.0 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) requiring external assistance, occurs in one-third of elderly diabetics on glucose-lowering therapies. It represents a major barrier to the treatment of diabetes, particularly in the elderly population. Patients who experience hypoglycemia are at a high risk for adverse outcomes, including falls leading to bone fracture, seizures, cognitive dysfunction, and prolonged hospital stays. An increase in mortality has been observed in patients who experience any one of these events. Paradoxically, rational insulin therapy, dosed according to a patient's clinical status and the results of home blood glucose monitoring, so as to achieve and maintain recommended glycemic goals, can be an effective method for the prevention of hypoglycemia and falls in the elderly. Contingencies, such as clinician-directed hypoglycemia treatment protocols that guide the immediate treatment of hypoglycemia, help to limit both the duration and severity of the event. Older diabetic patients with or without underlying renal insufficiency or other severe illnesses represent groups that are at high risk for hypoglycemia-induced falls and, therefore, require lower insulin dosages. In this review, the risk factors of falls associated with hypoglycemia in elderly diabetics were highlighted and management plans were suggested. A target hemoglobin A1c level between 7% and 8% seems to be more appropriate for this population. In addition, the first-choice drugs should have good safety profiles and have the lowest probability of causing hypoglycemia - such as metformin (in the absence of significant renal impairment) and incretin enhancers - while other therapies that may cause more frequent hypoglycemia should be avoided. PMID:25152631

Malabu, Usman H; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Kennedy, Richard Lee

2014-01-01

352

Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD{sub 5} (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD{sub 5}) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended.

Xu ZhiYong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liang Shixiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Zhu Ji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Zhao Jiandong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Lu Haijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Yang Yunli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Chen Long [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Wang Anyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Fu Xiaolong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Jiang Guoliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China) and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)]. E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com

2006-05-01

353

[Complications in acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is discussed from the point of view her complications. The survey of local, organ and system complication is demonstrated, and the Atlanta classification is recalled. The complications are demonstrated at the mild acute pancreatitis and also at the severe acute pancreatitis. The complications are demonstrated on the own group of patients (period 1995-1997). Severe respiratory failure came later, but the letality was high. The renale or hepatorenale failure came formerly and equally as DIC were combined with practically absolutely letality. PMID:10084859

Krska, Z; Pesková, M; Sváb, J; Výborný, J

1998-12-01

354

Managing complications I: leaks, strictures, emptying, reflux, chylothorax  

PubMed Central

Esophagectomy can be used to treat several esophageal diseases; it is most commonly used for treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophagectomy is a major procedure that may result in various complications. This article reviews only the important complications resulting from esophageal resection, which are anastomotic complications after esophageal reconstruction (leakage and stricture), delayed emptying or dumping syndrome, reflux, and chylothorax. PMID:24876942

2014-01-01

355

Managing complications I: leaks, strictures, emptying, reflux, chylothorax.  

PubMed

Esophagectomy can be used to treat several esophageal diseases; it is most commonly used for treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophagectomy is a major procedure that may result in various complications. This article reviews only the important complications resulting from esophageal resection, which are anastomotic complications after esophageal reconstruction (leakage and stricture), delayed emptying or dumping syndrome, reflux, and chylothorax. PMID:24876942

Chen, Ke-Neng

2014-05-01

356

[Cystic fibrosis and associated complications].  

PubMed

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease. The mutation is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. Due to a defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, chloride ion transport is reduced across the cell membrane. As a result, the disease can be described as an exocrinopathy. In all organs with exocrine glands, disorders occur in association with the defective chloride transport. The main impact of this defect is manifested in the lungs. Therefore, the most common cause of death is pulmonary disease with respiratory insufficiency due to recurrent infections. Unfortunately, a cure for the disease is still not available. However, new therapies that may affect the CFTR mutation more specifically give new hope for better therapeutic options in the future. The long-term goal of therapy is to develop a causal therapy for all six different mutation classes and thus for about 2000 mutations. PMID:25693903

Schwarz, C; Staab, D

2015-03-01

357

Still moving toward environmental justice.  

PubMed Central

Three years in the making, the Institute of Medicine report Toward Environmental Justice was funded by a consortium of agencies, including the NIEHS, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The independent review was authored by a 15-member committee that represented academia, public interest, medicine, law, and industry. The committee met with stakeholders, citizens, public officials, and industry representatives around the United States to assess the need for better research, education, and health policy related to environmental justice. The report investigates the situation of groups of individuals suspected of having disproportionately high levels of exposure to environmental stressors such as chemicals, biologics, allergenics, toxicants, light, noise, odors, and particulate matter. The report calls for more research to help identify and verify the environmental etiologies of diseases. It also recommends that citizens be recruited to participate in the design and execution of the research, and that communication during all phases of the research be open and reciprocal. PMID:10339458

Clay, R

1999-01-01

358

Clinical spectrum of levodopa-induced complications.  

PubMed

The first years of Parkinson disease (PD) treatment are marked by good and sustained responses to dopaminergic therapy. With disease progression and longer exposure to levodopa (l-dopa), patients develop a range of l-dopa-induced complications that include motor and non-motor symptoms. Motor complications include motor fluctuations, characterized by periods of reduced benefit from the medication, and l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, characterized by emergence of hyperkinetic involuntary movements. Dyskinesia can occur at peak effect of l-dopa, at the beginning and end of dose, or between doses. These motor complications are often associated with fluctuations in non-motor symptoms, particularly fluctuations in neuropsychiatric, autonomic, and sensory symptoms. Recognizing such complications and understanding their relationship with the timing of l-dopa doses is essential for adequate diagnosis and management. Society. PMID:25488260

Aquino, Camila Catherine; Fox, Susan H

2015-01-01

359

Still Watching, from the Edge of Extinction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today, human behavior drives many extinctions and preserves some species. To help understand such behavior, we published a book in 1999 that viewed selected endangered species through the eyes of those who have watched them decline and, in some cases, vanish from the wild. Here we revisit those stories to document what has happened in the interim 10 years, a period that is very short in evolutionary time but that has proven decisive for some endangered species. One species is now extinct in the wild; others have been devastated or scattered; several are on â??life support.â?ť Some things have not changed: Too many people consume too much, and disagreements among conservationists still impede progress. Some issues have become more prominent, such as emerging diseases and global economic crises. Although there have been some striking successes, it is very clear that more species now depend on human support for their survival than may be sustainable.

Beverly Peterson Stearns (freelance writer; )

2010-02-01

360

Thromboembolic complications in nephrotic syndrome: imaging spectrum.  

PubMed

Thromboembolism is a well-known complication of nephrotic syndrome. Pulmonary embolism, renal vein thrombosis, and deep vein thrombosis are the most common venous thromboembolic diseases in patients with nephrotic syndrome, while arterial thromboembolic complications are observed less frequently. Imaging plays an important role in the detection and follow-up of thromboembolism in these patients. The purpose of this essay is to describe the epidemiology, pathophysiological mechanisms, the imaging diagnosis, and treatment of thromboembolism in patients with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:23081957

Yang, Gui Fen; Schoepf, U Joseph; Zhu, Hong; Lu, Guang Ming; Gray, J Cranston; Zhang, Long Jiang

2012-12-01

361

Complications Detection in Treatment for Bacterial Endocarditis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This study proposes the use of decision trees to detect possible complications in a critical disease called endocarditis.\\u000a The endocarditis illness could produce heart failure, stroke, kidney failure, emboli, immunological disorders and death. The\\u000a aim is to obtained a tree decision classifier based on the symptoms (attributes) of patients (the data instances) observed\\u000a by doctors to predict the possible complications

Leticia Curiel; Bruno Baruque; Carlos Dueńas; Emilio Corchado; Cristina Pérez

362

"Gastric cytoprotection" is still relevant.  

PubMed

Although Andre Robert's historic article on "gastric cytoprotection" in 1979 introduced this new name and concept, gastroprotective drugs (e.g. sofalcone, sucralfate), which prevent and/or accelerate healing of gastric ulcers without inhibiting acid secretion, were known in Japan before or around that time. But since Robert's studies were solely focused on prostaglandins (PG), they became the center of gastrointestinal research for more than 30 years. As endogenous products, PG were implicated in mediating the gastroprotective effect of other drugs such as sofalcone and sucralfate, despite that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin diminished but never abolished gastroprotection by other drugs. Another group of endogenous substances, that is, sulfhydryls (SH), investigated in parallel with PG, also seem to play a mechanistic role in gastroprotection, especially since SH alkylators like N-ethylmaleimide counteract virtually any form of gastroprotection. In Robert's terms of "prevention of chemically induced acute mucosal lesions," so far no single mechanism could explain the beneficial effects of diverse protective agents, but I argue that these two endogenous substances (i.e. PG, SH), in addition to histamine, are the main mechanistic mediators of acute gastroprotection: PG and histamine, because as mediators of acute inflammation, they increase vascular permeability (VP), and SH scavenge free radicals. This is contrary to the search for a single mechanism of action, long focused on enhanced secretion of mucus and/or bicarbonate that may contribute but cannot explain all forms of gastroprotection. Nevertheless, based on research work of the last 30 years, in part from our lab, a new mechanistic explanation of gastroprotection may be formulated: it's a complex but orderly and evolution-based physiologic response of the gastric mucosa under pathologic conditions. Namely, one of the first physiologic defense responses of any organ is inflammation that starts with rapid vascular changes (e.g. increased VP and blood flow), followed by cellular events (e.g. infiltration by acute and chronic inflammatory cells). Thus, PG and histamine, by increasing VP create a perivascular edema that dilutes and delays toxic agents reaching the subepithelial capillaries. Otherwise, damaging chemicals may induce severe early vascular injury resulting in blood flow stasis, hypoxia, and necrosis of surrounding epithelial and mesenchymal cells. In this complex response, increased mucus and/or bicarbonate secretion seem to cause luminal dilution of gastrotoxic chemicals that is further reinforced by a perivascular, histodilutional component. This mechanistic explanation would encompass the protective actions of diverse agents as PG, small doses of histamine, motility stimulants, and dilute irritants (i.e. "adaptive cytoprotection"). Thus, although markedly increased VP is pathologic, slight increase in VP seems to be protective, that is, a key element in the complex pathophysiologic response during acute gastroprotection. Over the years, "gastroprotection" was also applied to accelerated healing of chronic gastroduodenal ulcers without reduction of acid secretion. The likely main mechanism here is the binding of angiogenic growth factors (e.g. basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor) to the heparin-like structures of sucralfate and sofalcone. Thus, despite intensive research of the last 30 years, gastroprotection is incompletely understood, and we are still far away from effectively treating Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers and preventing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-caused erosions and ulcers in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract; hence "gastric cytoprotection" research is still relevant. PMID:25521744

Szabo, Sandor

2014-12-01

363

Anemia and Microvascular Complications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background: Although chronic kidney disease-induced anemia is more prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), anemia is a common finding prior to manifestation of kidney disease. In presence of some risk factors at the time of diagnosing DM, microvascular complications must be considered. The effect of anemia as a risk factor on progression of DM complications is still unclear. Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its association with microvascular complications in patients with type 2 DM. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the outpatient endocrinology clinic at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Study was done from February 2011 to February 2012. Patients with type 2 DM without any obvious symptom or sign of anemia were included in study. Results: A total of 93 patients (30.4%) had anemia including 46 (15.1%) with normochromic normocytic, 44 (14.4%) with hyperchromic microcytic, and 3 (1%) with hyperchromic macrocytic anemias. There was a positive correlation between duration of DM and anemia. Microvascular complications were more frequent with normocytic or microcytic anemias. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was higher in patients without anemia; moreover, nephropathy was less frequent among them. Among patients with anemia, 43% had GFR of more than 90 mL/min and 19.4% had normoalbuminuria. Neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy had strong association with anemia (odds ratio of 1.99, 1.7, and 1.5, respectively). Conclusions: Anemia is a common complication of DM and is associated with duration of disease and microvascular complications. PMID:25695026

Hosseini, Mahboobeh Sadat; Rostami, Zohreh; Saadat, Alireza; Saadatmand, Sayyed Mehdi; Naeimi, Effat

2014-01-01

364

Factors associated with persistence of red blood cell antibodies in woman after pregnancies complicated by fetal alloimmune haemolytic disease treated with intrauterine transfusions.  

PubMed

Red blood cell (RBC) antibodies can persist for decades or decrease quickly to undetectable levels. Antibody persistence has not been systematically studied. Women whose children are treated with intrauterine transfusions (IUT) for haemolytic disease of the fetus (HDFN) often produce additional antibodies, which can be evoked by the intrauterine transfusion or by fetomaternal haemorrhage during the procedure. Factors associated with persistence of both the antibodies responsible for HDFN and additional antibodies were studied in 260 women whose children were treated with IUT between 1988 and 2008. They possessed 499 (205 anti-D and 294 non-D) antibodies after the last IUT. After a median follow-up of 8·7 years, all 260 antibodies primarily responsible for HDFN had persisted. Additional antibodies directed against antigens of the children persisted in 70·6%, and in 32·3% if they were not child-specific (P < 0·001). Antibodies induced by irradiated IUT persisted in only 7·1%. Multivariate analyses showed that non-HDFN antibody persistence was dependent on the antibody titre and specificity. In conclusion, persistence of antibodies mainly depends on antibody strength and specificity. Difference between fetal or non-fetal immunogens suggests maintenance of antigenic stimulation possibly by long-term fetomaternal chimerism. PMID:25244566

Verduin, Esther P; Brand, Anneke; van de Watering, Leo M G; Claas, Frans H J; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Schonewille, Henk

2015-02-01

365

Complications following hepatectomy.  

PubMed

As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications. PMID:25444470

Russell, Maria C

2015-01-01

366

Management of postoperative complications: anemia.  

PubMed

Anemia is extremely common following hip fracture. Consistent data from randomized trials show that transfusion of less blood, with a transfusion threshold around 8 g/dL hemoglobin concentration, is preferable to a traditional threshold of 10 g/dL. Adoption of a lower threshold leads to at least equivalent clinical outcomes, with much less exposure to transfusion costs and risks. The most common complication of transfusion is circulatory overload. Future research may elucidate the optimal transfusion threshold for these elderly patients and address the specific needs of subgroups of patients, including those with acute coronary syndrome or chronic kidney disease. PMID:24721367

Willett, Laura Rees; Carson, Jeffrey L

2014-05-01

367

Complications of Circumcision  

PubMed Central

In the United States, circumcision is a commonly performed procedure. It is a relatively safe procedure with a low overall complication rate. Most complications are minor and can be managed easily. Though uncommon, complications of circumcision do represent a significant percentage of cases seen by pediatric urologists. Often they require surgical correction that results in a significant cost to the health care system. Severe complications are quite rare, but death has been reported as a result in some cases. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation, focusing on bleeding history and birth history, is imperative. Proper selection of patients based on age and anatomic considerations as well as proper sterile surgical technique are critical to prevent future circumcision-related adverse events. PMID:22235177

Krill, Aaron J.; Palmer, Lane S.; Palmer, Jeffrey S.

2011-01-01

368

Intestinal Complications of IBD  

MedlinePLUS

... is chronic (of long duration) LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF ULCERATIVE COLITIS PERFORATION (RUPTURE) OF THE BOWEL Intestinal perforation occurs ... CANCER About 5% to 8% of people with ulcerative colitis will develop colorectal cancer within 20 years after ...

369

[Complicated mesenteric ischaemia].  

PubMed

Acute mesenteric ischaemia is a serious condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is one of the most frequent etiologic factors. This case report presents a patient suffering from acute mesenteric ischaemia complicated by acute lower limb ischaemia and post-ischaemic stenosis of the ileum. Such a patient requires a multidisciplinary, comprehensive, and, in some cases, phased approach to solve complications brought about especially by generalized atherosclerosis. PMID:25472564

Volák, S; Orhalmi, J; Dušek, T; Ferko, A

2014-12-01

370

On complicity theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie\\u000a and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm\\u000a and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper\\u000a examines the Complicity Theory.

A. David Kline

2006-01-01

371

On complicity theory.  

PubMed

The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value. PMID:16609713

Kline, A David

2006-04-01

372

MicroRNAs and Diabetic Complications  

PubMed Central

Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can lead to debilitating microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, as well as macrovascular complications such as cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and hypertension. Diabetic complications have been attributed to several contributing factors such as hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, advanced glycation end products, growth factors and inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. However, current therapies are not fully efficacious and hence there is an imperative need for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying diabetic complications in order to identify newer therapeutic targets. microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that repress target gene expression via post-transcriptional mechanisms. Emerging evidence shows that they have diverse cellular and biological functions and play key roles in several diseases. In this review, we explore the role of miRNAs in the pathology of diabetic complications and also discuss the potential use of miRNAs as novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets for diabetic complications. PMID:22552970

Natarajan, Rama; Putta, Sumanth; Kato, Mitsuo

2012-01-01

373

iSICKLE CELL DISEASE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: DIAGNOSIS, GUIDELINES FOR COMPREHENSIVE CARE, AND PROTOCOLS FOR MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE AND CHRONIC COMPLICATIONS© Mid-Atlantic Sickle Cell Disease Consortium (MASCC) Practice Guidelines Workgroup  

E-print Network

sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Human Genetics Network (MARHGN) This document represents a consensus with regard to standards of and expectations for comprehensive care for infants, children, and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Pediatric hematologists, nurses, and other health care

Terri Armstrong; Rn St; Children Philadelphia; Carlton Dampier; Hospital Children Philadelphia

374

Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.  

PubMed Central

Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

1991-01-01

375

Neurologic complications of craniovertebral dislocation.  

PubMed

Craniovertebral dislocation is uncommon, but its diagnosis is important taking into account the potential severity of the neurologic complications. A number of causes are known; the most common are Down syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Paget's disease, other metabolic bone diseases, and craniocervical trauma. Down's syndrome is a relatively common clinical condition but craniovertebral subluxation is only observed in a small percentage of patients. About half of all cervical spine injuries affect the atlanto-occipital region and C2 vertebra. In rheumatoid arthritis, craniocervical dislocation occurs in up to 40% of patients with severe disease. In Paget's disease, involvement of the craniovertebral region occurs in about 30% of all cases. The clinical neurologic syndrome is characterized by local pain, features of upper spinal cord and medullary compression, positive Lhermitte phenomenon, syncope associated with neck flexion, vertebral artery obstruction or dissection leading to stroke, and asymmetrical lower cranial nerve palsies. Neuroimaging is essential to confirm the clinical diagnosis and to categorize severity. The treatment of this disorder is usually surgical, but traction and external immobilization is relevant in some cases. Specific conditions may require additional treatments such as radiotherapy, antibiotics, or chemotherapy. PMID:24365311

de Carvalho, Mamede; Swash, Michael

2014-01-01

376

Cirrhosis and its complications: Evidence based treatment  

PubMed Central

Cirrhosis results from progressive fibrosis and is the final outcome of all chronic liver disease. It is among the ten leading causes of death in United States. Cirrhosis can result in portal hypertension and/or hepatic dysfunction. Both of these either alone or in combination can lead to many complications, including ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and coagulation disorders. Cirrhosis and its complications not only impair quality of life but also decrease survival. Managing patients with cirrhosis can be a challenge and requires an organized and systematic approach. Increasing physicians’ knowledge about prevention and treatment of these potential complications is important to improve patient outcomes. A literature search of the published data was performed to provide a comprehensive review regarding the management of cirrhosis and its complications. PMID:24833875

Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad S; Fazili, Javid; Madhoun, Mohammad F

2014-01-01

377

Complications of laparoscopic pyeloplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  With the development of new video-endoscopic techniques like endopyelotomy, laparoscopy and retroperitoneoscopy the treatment\\u000a of UPJO has become less invasive. The complications and learning curve of laparoscopic pyeloplasty are presented together\\u000a with recommendations for adequate management.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Based on the personal experience with 189 cases of retroperitoneoscopic pyeloplasty, a literature review (PubMed) was performed\\u000a focussing on complication and success

Jens J. Rassweiler; Dogu Teber; Thomas Frede

2008-01-01

378

Secondary pleural hydatidosis: Complication of intrapulmonary echinococcosis  

PubMed Central

Hydatid disease has a wide geographic distribution around the world. In human, the liver is the most commonly affected organ, followed by the lungs. Intrathoracic extrapulmonary locations are generally the mediastinum, pleura, pericardium and chest wall. Pleural involvement usually follows the rupture of a pulmonary or hepatic cyst inside the pleural space causing secondary pleural hydatidosis. We report four cases of patients who were referred to our hospital for management of pleural hydatid disease as a complication of intrapulmonary echinococcosis. PMID:25125817

Feki, Walid; Ketata, Wajdi; Bahloul, Najla; Msaad, Sameh; Kammoun, Samy

2014-01-01

379

Complications of leprosy.  

PubMed

Leprosy is essentially a systemic disease and is a great "mimicker" of many other diseases. It affects apart from skin and peripheral nerves, haemopoietic, reticulo-endothelial and endocrine systems as well as eyes, bones and muscles. PMID:212642

Karat, A B

1978-07-01

380

Long-term complications of chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with cancer are living longer and, therefore, are not only at risk for recurrence of the disease but also for long-term side effects of treatment. For patients treated with chemotherapy, secondary malignancies are a special concern, with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia being the most common. Although typically associated with alkylating agents, this complication is now being seen with use of

Mark A. Morgan; Stephen C. Rubin

1998-01-01

381

Treatment of complicated grief  

PubMed Central

Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotou?ová, Michaela

2011-01-01

382

Complications of cyclosporin therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cyclosporin (CsA) therapy has improved the outcome of allotransplants. Because of a relatively selective action on T lymphocytes, CsA therapy causes fewer immunosuppressive complications of infection or malignancy compared to previous chemical agents, which were relatively nonspecific in their spectrum of action on lymphoid versus nonlymphoid cells. Gastrointestinal complaints after oral administration and vasomotor reactions after intravenous administration represent pharmacologic

Barry D. Kahan; Stuart M. Flechner; Marc I. Lorber; Chris Jensen; Debbie Golden; Charles T. Van Buren

1986-01-01

383

Pregnancy Complications in PCOS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A higher prevalence of several complications of pregnancy in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), compared with healthy\\u000a mothers with no PCOS, has been described. These include an increased prevalence of spontaneous miscarriage, gestational diabetes,\\u000a pre-eclamptic toxaemia and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and the birth of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) babies.

Roy Homburg

384

Symptomatic Nephrolithiasis Complicating Pregnancy  

E-print Network

Objective: To review our experiences with diagnosis and management of symptomatic nephrolithiasis complicating pregnancy and to ascertain the efficacy of renal sonography for initial diagnosis compared with plain x-rays or singleshot intravenous pyelography. Methods: Perinatal outcomes were evaluated for all pregnant women admitted to Parkland Hospital for nephrolithiasis

385

Neurological Complications of AIDS  

MedlinePLUS

Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information and resources can be found at www.AIDS.gov See a ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

386

Predictors of complicated grief  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether process variables predict an outcome of complicated grief. A turbulent and prolonged grief was predicted to occur after the death of a spouse in subjects who had self-blame, used the deceased for an extension of self, had ambivalence toward the deceased, or overcontrolled emotional responses. Ninety subjects were examined at 6, 14, and 25 months after

Mardi Horowitz; Constance Milbrath; George A. Bonanno; Nigel Field; Charles Stinson; Are Holen

1998-01-01

387

Fetal complications due to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.  

PubMed

Abstract Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is the most common liver disorder of pregnancy. Diagnosis is based on the clinical picture, particularly the presence of pruritus with a deterioration of liver function tests, and typically elevated serum levels of total bile acids. ICP manifests in the second half of pregnancy, predominantly during the third trimester. Symptoms of the disease resolve spontaneously after delivery. Etiology is still not fully understood. Genetic defects in specific transport proteins, elevated levels of sex hormones, and various environmental factors are thought to play a role in the development of this disorder. Although practically benign for the pregnant woman, ICP represents a serious threat to the fetus. It increases the risk of preterm delivery, meconium excretion into the amniotic fluid, respiratory distress syndrome, and sudden intrauterine fetal death. Identifying fetuses at risk of ICP complications remains challenging. The ideal obstetrical management of ICP needs to be definitively determined. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on fetal complications of ICP and describe management options for their prevention. PMID:25153210

Šimják, Patrik; Pa?ízek, Antonín; Vítek, Libor; ?erný, Andrej; Adamcová, Karolína; Koucký, Michal; Hill, Martin; Dušková, Michaela; Stárka, L'uboslav

2015-03-01

388

The imperative to prevent diabetes complications: a broadening spectrum and an increasing burden despite improved outcomes.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus and its complications are common; the complications are, of themselves, a major reason to manage diabetes. Recent data from Australia and similar developed health care systems overseas indicate that morbidity and mortality outcomes relating to diabetes complications are improving. However, these benefits are offset by increasing numbers of people diagnosed with diabetes, resulting in an increased disease burden with significant health care implications. Thus the imperative to prevent diabetes and diabetes complications has never been greater. Furthermore, the recognised spectrum of diabetes complications is broadening, especially complications relating to lipid levels, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Clinicians now need to be aware of both traditional complications (eg, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease) and non-traditional complications (eg, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, some cancers and eating disorders). Complications outcomes could be further improved by decreasing the evidence-treatment gap - for example, by increasing personalisation of care in managing diabetes complications. PMID:25832152

Twigg, Stephen M; Wong, Jencia

2015-04-01

389

Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma  

PubMed Central

Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

Zv??ina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Sk?ivan, Ji?í; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

2014-01-01

390

Drug complications in outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Outpatient drug complications have not been well studied. We sought to assess the incidence and characteristics of outpatient\\u000a drug complications, identify their clinical and nonclinical correlates, and evaluate their impact on patient satisfaction.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Retrospective chart reviews and patient surveys.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Eleven Boston-area ambulatory clinics.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PATIENTS: We randomly selected 2,248 outpatients, 20 to 75 years old.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN

Tejal K. Gandhi; Helen R. Burstin; E. Francis Cook; Ann L. Puopolo; Jennifer S. Haas; Troyen A. Brennan; David W. Bates

2000-01-01

391

Bereavement and Complicated Grief  

PubMed Central

Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

2013-01-01

392

Complications of Robotic Prostatectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Robotic prostatectomy has now become the most common surgical procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer in the United\\u000a States. In 2008, over 70,000 robotic prostatectomies were performed worldwide (Intuitive Surgical). While there are no randomized\\u000a trials that compare outcomes of open and laparoscopic prostatectomy, it is commonly assumed that minimally invasive surgery\\u000a is associated with less morbidity and complications

Akshay Bhandari; Mani Menon

393

Crohn’s Disease: A Surgeon’s Perspective  

PubMed Central

Crohn’s disease (CD) is known for wide anatomic distribution, different presentations, life-threatening complications, and multiple modalities of management. Its multiple implications are still unaddressed. Since all the patients do not show a good response to medical modalities of treatment, a significant percentage of these patients are referred to the surgeon for the palliation of complications or for the ultimate curative treatment. Since most surgeons come across such patients only rarely, it is sometimes difficult for them to choose the appropriate procedure at the time of need. Moreover, the various surgical modalities available for the different presentations and complications of the disease have not been adequately discussed. The aim of this review is to offer insight and a detailed account of the management of CD from a surgical perspective. This review offers an overview of the various surgical options available, their utility in context, and an approach to various scenarios of complicated CD. PMID:21196646

Parray, Fazl Q.; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Bijli, Akram H.; Thakur, Natasha; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-ul-Hassan

2011-01-01

394

Penile Calciphylaxis in End Stage Renal Disease  

PubMed Central

Calciphylaxis, better described as “Calcific uremic arteriolopathy” (CUA), involves about 1–4% of hemodialysis patients all around the world with high mortality rates. We describe a rare clinical case of CUA in peritoneal dialysis patient associated with urological disease. Penile calciphylaxis represents rare clinical complication, and an early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are requested. Pathogenesis is still unclear, and therapeutic approaches need more long-term clinical trials to test their efficacy and safety. PMID:23841013

Di Lullo, Luca; Otranto, Giovanni; Floccari, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Santoboni, Alberto

2013-01-01

395

Fabry disease  

PubMed Central

Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal ?-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual ?-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal ?-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked ?-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human ?-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs, nephroprotection (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptors blockers) and antiarrhythmic agents, whereas dialysis or renal transplantation are available for patients experiencing end-stage renal failure. With age, progressive damage to vital organ systems develops and at some point, organs may start to fail in functioning. End-stage renal disease and life-threatening cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications limit life-expectancy of untreated males and females with reductions of 20 and 10 years, respectively, as compared to the general population. While there is increasing evidence that long-term enzyme therapy can halt disease progression, the importance of adjunctive therapies should be emphasized and the possibility of developing an oral therapy drives research forward into active site specific chaperones. PMID:21092187

2010-01-01

396

Simple control system for automated, multistage stills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Described briefly is a sample, inexpensive system which uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) to sense the water level in the still and to control the rate of heat input to the still heating jackets. A sealed glass float, similar in shape to a hygrometer, contains in its neck blackened sections which interrupt the light emitted from the LED in the

R. A. Uphaus; A. G. Kostka

1982-01-01

397

Still Life with Fruit and Seashell  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Henri Matisse's painting, "Sideboard," opens the door to the author's first-grade students' lesson on still life. This lesson is about the process of designing, the act of making decisions, and the knowledge of one's own preferences. In this article, the author describes how the students made still life with fruit and seashells.

Gojeski, Laura

2011-01-01

398

Apprentice Still Photographic Specialist (AFSC 23132).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for apprentice still photographic specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are general subjects (career ladder progression, security, photographic safety, and photographic laboratory administration); still photographic…

Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

399

Summer 2012 Why are women still underpaid?  

E-print Network

Summer 2012 Why are women still underpaid? #12;CRICOS #00120C | 2012Brandlearn.anu.edu.au "I. Risky business 16 Professor Alison Booth on why women are still underpaid in comparison to men. LearningMichael warns that immediate action is needed to combat human-induced climate change. 30 Language's digital

Botea, Adi

400

Performance of honeycomb double exposure solar still  

Microsoft Academic Search

A honeycomb double exposure solar still has been designed to enhance the productivity throughout the day. Experiments have been carried out to predict the performance of the proposed still in October 2009, Karpagam University, Coimbatore, India. The concept of transparent honeycomb structure with thin walled glass tube of small aspect ratio (H\\/D ? 1.7) in the basin and also planar

Kutty Arshad; Balasundaram Janarthanan; Sengottain Shanmugan

2011-01-01

401

A rare complication: Undeflatable balloon of the stent  

PubMed Central

Percutaneous coronary intervention is an important modality in the treatment of coronary artery disease. These procedures are usually completed successfully, but occasionally serious complications are encountered. In this paper, we present the case of an undeflatable stent balloon, which is an extremely rare complication that has not been described in the literature. PMID:24265889

?atiro?lu, Ömer; Erdo?an, Turan; Durako?lugil, Murtaza Emre; U?urlu, Yavuz

2013-01-01

402

Complicated malaria: A rare presentation of Plasmodium ovale.  

PubMed

Malaria has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. Complications are commonly seen in Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) and Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) infection, but due to Plasmodium ovale (P. ovale) infection is rarely described in literature. Here we report a case of severe disease due to P. ovale infection complicated with jaundice, thrombocytopenia, hypotension and acute renal failure. PMID:25672340

Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Giri, Subhash; Bauddh, Nitesh Kumar; Jhamb, Rajat

2015-04-01

403

Fungal pulmonary complications.  

PubMed

With AIDS has come a new level of T-cell immunosuppression, beyond that previously seen. The impact of the HIV pandemic on the field of fungal infections includes a major increase in the number of serious fungal infections, an increase in the severity of those infections, and even some entirely new manifestations of fungal illness. In this article fungal pulmonary complications of AIDS are discussed. T-cell opportunists including Cryptococcus neoformans and the endemic mycoses are the most important pathogens. Phagocyte opportunists, including Aspergillus species and agents of mucormycosis, are less important. PMID:9016374

Davies, S F; Sarosi, G A

1996-12-01

404

Curcumin: a pleiotropic phytonutrient in diabetic complications.  

PubMed

Curcumin is the major polyphenolic constituent of an indigenous herb, Curcuma longa, found to have a wide range of applications right from its kitchen use as a spicy ingredient to therapeutic and medicinal applications in various diseases. Curcumin has been identified to have a plethora of biologic and pharmacologic properties owing to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This pleiotropic regulation of redox balance of cell and inflammation might be the basis of curcumin's beneficial activities in various pathologic conditions including diabetic complications. This review summarizes various in vitro, in vivo studies done on curcumin and its therapeutic utility in diabetic micro-vascular complications. This review also emphasizes the importance of curcumin in addition to the existing therapeutic modalities in diabetic complications. PMID:25441584

Jeenger, Manish Kumar; Shrivastava, Shweta; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Naidu, V G M; Ramakrishna, Sistla; Kumar, Ashutosh

2015-02-01

405

Infection and Other Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... until the infection subsides. Patients with histories of venous or arterial disease—especially those who are taking anticoagulants—should have an ultrasound to rule out blood clots (deep-venous thrombosis or DVT) before being treated with CDT. ...

406

Complications in periocular rejuvenation.  

PubMed

Thorough preoperative evaluation with meticulous surgical planning to achieve facial aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface is imperative to avoid or decrease potential functional and/or cosmetic complications in cosmetic periocular surgery. Before performing surgery, the physician should be aware of the patient's history of dry eyes, previous facial trauma, previous injection of Botox Cosmetic, history of previous laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and past facial surgery. A full evaluation should be performed on the upper eyelid/brow region to assess for the presence of brow ptosis, brow/eyelid asymmetry, dermatochalasis/pseudodermatochalasis, eyelid ptosis, and deep superior sulcus. On the lower eyelid/cheek examination, special attention should be directed to the diagnosis of underlying negative vector, dry eyes, prominent eyes, lower lid retraction, ectropion, lateral canthal dystopia, lower eyelid laxity, scleral show, and lagophthalmos, with a rejuvenation goal that focuses on obtaining a youthful fullness through repositioning and reinforcing efforts to avoid the negative effects of hollowness. Intraoperative and postoperative medical and surgical management of cosmetic periocular surgery complications focus on decreasing the risk of postoperative ptosis, lagophthalmos, lid retraction, and lid asymmetry, with special attention to limiting the risk of visual loss secondary to orbital hemorrhage. PMID:20659676

Mack, William P

2010-08-01

407

Severe juvenile dermatomyositis: two patients complicated with extra musculocutaneous involvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Here we report two patients with severe juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) complicated with extra musculocutaneous involvement. The first case (a 10-year-old boy) had unusual initial presentation of JDM complicated with interstitial lung disease documented with high-resolution computed tomography. He had a rapidly progressive course and died in 7 weeks after the onset of the disease despite steroid and immunosuppressive treatment. The second

Ay?e Tosun; Gül Serdaro?lu; Mehmet Tayyip Aslan; Muzaffer Polat; Taner Akal?n; Hasan Tekgul; Sarenur Gökben

2006-01-01

408

About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics  

MedlinePLUS

... with Alzheimer's disease? What is dementia? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disease ... devastating disease. What happens to the brain in Alzheimer's disease? Although we still don’t know how the ...

409

Gut microbiota-related complications in cirrhosis  

PubMed Central

Gut microbiota plays an important role in cirrhosis. The liver is constantly challenged with commensal bacteria and their products arriving through the portal vein in the so-called gut-liver axis. Bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen through the intestinal wall and to mesenteric lymph nodes is facilitated by intestinal bacterial overgrowth, impairment in the permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and deficiencies in local host immune defences. Deranged clearance of endogenous bacteria from portal and systemic circulation turns the gut into the major source of bacterial-related complications. Liver function may therefore be affected by alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota and a role for commensal flora has been evidenced in the pathogenesis of several complications arising in end-stage liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy, splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The use of antibiotics is the main therapeutic pipeline in the management of these bacteria-related complications. However, other strategies aimed at preserving intestinal homeostasis through the use of pre-, pro- or symbiotic formulations are being studied in the last years. In this review, the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of the most frequent complications arising in cirrhosis and the different clinical and experimental studies conducted to prevent or improve these complications by modifying the gut microbiota composition are summarized. PMID:25400446

Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

2014-01-01

410

Neurological Complications of Biologic Therapy in Psoriasis  

PubMed Central

Biologic agents have been a significant advancement in the management of psoriasis. Along with significant clinical improvement, there have been concerns for emerging side effects with the use of biologics. Reports have emerged showing the association between efalizumab and the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and other demyelinating disorders. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors have been associated with various demyelinating disorders. As such, it is imperative for dermatologists to be well informed regarding how to notify patients about the risks of biologic treatment. Dermatologists must be able to identify the signs and symptoms of neurological complications and recognize when to refer patients to neurologists for diagnostic workup, disease confirmation, and any necessary treatment. This review is a compilation of evidence showing the association between biologic therapy and neurological complications, as well as an overview of the clinical presentation and diagnosis of such diseases. PMID:20725577

Sanders, Catherine; Bechtel, Ann

2009-01-01

411

The JPEG 2000 Still Image Compression Standard  

E-print Network

The JPEG 2000 Still Image Compression Standard Athanassios Skodras, Charilaos Christopoulos, and Touradj Ebrahimi T he development of standards (emerging and es- tablished) by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the International Tele- communications Union (ITU), and the Inter

Mignotte, Max

412

Drinking Water: Health Hazards Still Not Resolved  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the suggested link between cancer deaths and drinking obtained from the Mississippi River, New Orleans still treats its water supply in the same manner as before the Environmental Defense Fund's epidemiological study. (BT)

Wade, Nicholas

1977-01-01

413

Complicated bile duct stones.  

PubMed

Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

2013-01-01

414

[Diabetic macrovascular complications].  

PubMed

Reactive derivatives from non-enzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions, as well as lipids and nucleic acids exposed to reducing sugars, form a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called "advanced glycation end products(AGEs)". The formation and accumulation of AGEs have been known to progress at an accelerated rate under diabetes. There is accumulating evidence that AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) interaction elicits oxidative stress generation and subsequently evokes inflammatory and thrombogenic reactions, thereby being involved in vascular complications in diabetes. We, along with others, have recently found that pigment epithelium-derived factor(PEDF), a glycoprotein that belongs to the superfamily of serine protease inhibitors, has neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties both in cell culture and animal models. In this review, we discuss the role of AGE-RAGE axis in diabetic macroangiopathy and its therapeutic intervention by PEDF. PMID:25812377

Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

2015-03-01

415

2. Co-morbidities and complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in the understanding of co-morbid conditions and medical complications of stroke. It is part of the chapter on stroke rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article covers co-morbid conditions of stroke patients, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and sleep apnea. It reviews recent

Richard L. Harvey

1999-01-01

416

The Scientific Method: Is It Still Useful?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the scientific method is a logical, orderly way to solve a problem or answer a question, it is not a magical formula that is too complicated for nonscientists to comprehend (Keeton and Gould 1986). The scientific method may include a variety of steps, processes, and definitions. It should not be seen as a single series of steps, with no…

Watson, Scott B.; James, Linda

2004-01-01

417

Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Imaging and Intervention  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to highlight technical challenges and potential pitfalls of diagnostic imaging, intervention, and postintervention follow-up of vascular complications of pancreatitis. Diagnostic and interventional radiology imaging from patients with pancreatitis from 2002 to 2006 was reviewed. We conclude that biphasic CT is the diagnostic modality of choice. Catheter angiography may (still) be required to diagnose small pseudoaneurysms. Endovascular coiling is the treatment of choice for pseudoaneurysms. Close clinical follow-up is required, as patients may rebleed/develop aneurysms elsewhere.

Kirby, John M., E-mail: johnkirby@ireland.com; Vora, Parag; Midia, Mehran; Rawlinson, John [McMaster University Medical Center (Canada)

2008-09-15

418

Neurological complications of progressive facial hemiatrophy  

PubMed Central

Progressive left facial hemiatrophy began in a boy at the age of 5 years. Over the next 20 years, he developed wasting of the left shoulder and arm muscles, ptosis of the eyelids, ophthalmoplegia, convergence nystagmus, pupillary dilatation, hemiparesis, seizures, and dysarthria. A pneumoencephalogram showed cerebellar hemiatrophy. Biopsy of the cerebellum revealed loss of and degenerative changes in Purkinje cells. A deltoid muscle biopsy studied by histochemical and enzymatic procedures was normal. There are many neurological and ophthalmological complications of progressive facial hemiatrophy. Seizures, ophthalmoparesis, and pupillary abnormalities are the most common. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the disease are unknown. The possibility that this is a `slow virus' disease is suggested. Images

Wolf, Sheldon Mark; Verity, M. Anthony

1974-01-01

419

Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

... Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s available to treat IBD ... about CCFA’s mission: to cure Crohn'sdisease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of ...

420

Skin Complications of IBD  

MedlinePLUS

... Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s available to treat IBD ... about CCFA’s mission: to cure Crohn'sdisease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of ...

421

Eye Complications in IBD  

MedlinePLUS

... Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s available to treat IBD ... about CCFA’s mission: to cure Crohn'sdisease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of ...

422

Drugs for Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Levodopa combined with carbidopa is still the most effective treatment for symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agonists, the next most effective class of drugs, can be used alone before the introduction of levodopa or as an adjunct to levodopa.Addition of a peripherally-acting COMT inhibitor or an MAO-B inhibitor to levodopa can reduce motor fluctuations in patients with advanced disease.Amantadine may have mild symptomatic benefit and can decrease levodopa-induced dyskinesias.Anticholinergics are rarely used because of their adverse effects, but can be a useful addition to levodopa for control of tremor and drooling.Subcutaneous apomorphine should be available for rescue use in patients with 'off' episodes. Deep brain stimulation is an option for patients with levodopa-induced motor complications and relatively intact cognition. PMID:24165688

2013-11-01

423

End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)  

MedlinePLUS

Kidney Disease Chronic Kidney Disease Kidney-Friendly Diet & Foods for CKD Polycystic Kidney Disease Kidney Failure End Stage Renal Disease Complication: Anemia Complication: Bone Disease Kidney Failure Treatment Kidney Problems Blood in Your Urine (Hematuria) Protein in Urine Kidney Stones ...

424

Neurological complications of vascular access.  

PubMed

Neurological problems are common in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Over 60% of patients will suffer from symptoms of underlying polyneuropathy due to uraemia or diabetes. Others will have subclinical disease demonstrable by nerve conduction studies.Nerve injury following haemodialysis access surgery is underreported. However, sensory nerve lesions are probably common after most vascular access procedures but are rarely debilitating.Nerve compression syndromes such as carpal tunnel and ulnar compression syndromes are common, especially in patients who have been on dialysis for some years and at least some of these are related to or exacerbated by the access. Recognition is essential as they are eminently treatable by decompression surgery. Tourniquet use appears to be safe for carpal tunnel or ulnar nerve decompression surgery.Ischaemic monomelic neuropathy (IMN) is rare but follows a period of ischaemia during or as a result of access surgery, most commonly to construct a brachial arteriovenous fistula or graft. It is characterised by intense pain, out of proportion to any ischaemia, involves all of the upper limb nerves and may progress to involve the motor nerves eventually resulting in a useless clawed hand. It requires prompt treatment of any residual ischaemia after access creation, if necessary by access ligation, as in the established syndrome, like the even rarer complication of reflex sympathetic dystrophy, it is very difficult to offer any useful treatment other than symptomatic relief and physiotherapy. PMID:25751556

Gibbons, Christopher P

2015-03-01

425

COMPLICATIONS OF TATTOOING  

PubMed Central

Pathologic consequence of tattooing is relatively rare, but in light of the great number of persons in military service, where tattooing seems to be popular, consideration of the complications seems worth while. Four unusual cases of patients with cutaneous lesions in tattoos are reported. One patient had Boeck's sarcoid, in which the cutaneous eruption was limited solely to the tattooed areas on the body and involved all the various colors of the tattoo. The cutaneous eruption was only a single manifestation of generalized sarcoidosis. Another patient had secondary syphilis with the cutaneous lesions involving multi-colored tattoos, including the red areas. These tattoos were applied in Hawaii, and presumably the red dye was not the usual cinnabar (mercuric sulfide). As a general rule, the cutaneous lesions of secondary syphilis do not involve the red areas because of the treponomicidal action of mercuric sulfide. In the third case the characteristic eruption of discoid lupus erythematosus was present. It began over the red areas of a tattoo on the patient's forearm. It has been stated that mercuric sulfide is a photo-sensitizing agent, and it is believed that this explains the localization of the eruption in this case. The fourth patient had eruption, caused by mercury sensitivity, in an area of tattoo. The eruption was noted soon after the tattooing was done, and it persisted for seven years. PMID:14905289

Lubeck, Glenn; Epstein, Ervin

1952-01-01

426

New oral anticoagulants: are coagulation units still required?  

PubMed Central

Chronic antithrombotic therapy involves the use of anticoagulants, antiplatelets given either as monotherapy or in combination for the prevention of thrombotic complications. The most feared and sometimes fatal complication with this therapy is bleeding. It should be considered a “golden rule” that a drug or combination of drugs that maximizes efficiency (decreased thromboembolic risk) will probably be less safe (increased risk of bleeding), and this holds true either for single therapy or during combined therapy. The chances of bleeding indicated by risk tables can be useful but show only a snapshot, and the biological, social, environmental, and drug changes and therapeutic adherence also determine changes in the risk of thrombosis and bleeding. Bleeding is an eventuality that occurs in places of “locus minoris resistentiae,” and the results of careful phase 3 studies thus cannot be completely predictive of outcomes when a medication is introduced on the pharmaceutical market. With the use of warfarin, the International Normalized Ratio (INR) that has been established to indicate adequately balanced therapy is between 2.0 and 3.0. With the new oral anticoagulants, the pharmaceutical companies emphasize that it is not necessary to monitor anticoagulant effects. In studies with different doses of new oral anticoagulants, however, incidence of clinically significant bleeding complications have been directly related to the doses. Therefore, therapeutic excesses can condition bleeding risk and therapeutic limitation can increase thrombotic risk, especially when short-acting drugs such as the new oral anticoagulants are used. Hence, it is imperative to establish an appropriate method for monitoring new oral anticoagulants, setting levels of safety and effectiveness through periodic dosage and monitoring of their anticoagulant effects. Therefore, we still recommend the use of anticoagulation units for monitoring during treatment with the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:24491189

2014-01-01

427

Neurosurgical complications after intranasal ethmoidectomy.  

PubMed Central

Intranasal ethmoidectomy is a common otolaryngological procedure. Despite the potential for serious intracranial complications, there is a paucity of reports describing the neurosurgical complications of the procedure. Two patients with intracranial complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, and the relevant medical literature, are reviewed. The anatomy of the ethmoid air cells and their relation to the intracranial cavity are described. The importance of definitive, emergent repair with attention to the potential for vascular injury is discussed. PMID:1865214

Toselli, R M; dePapp, A; Harbaugh, R E; Saunders, R L

1991-01-01

428

Unusual complications of gallstones.  

PubMed

Extrinsic compression of the bile duct from gallstone disease is associated with bilio-biliary fistulization, requiring biliary-enteric reconstruction. Biliary-enteric fistulas are associated with intestinal obstruction at various levels. The primary goal of therapy is relief of intestinal obstruction; definitive repair is performed for selected patients. Hemobilia from gallstone-related pseudoaneurysms is preferentially controlled by selective arterial embolization. Rapidly increasing jaundice with relatively normal liver enzymes is a diagnostic hallmark of bilhemia. Acquired thoraco-biliary fistulas are primarily treated by percutaneous and endoscopic interventions. PMID:24679427

Luu, Minh B; Deziel, Daniel J

2014-04-01

429

A Nation Still at Risk. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1983 the National Commission on Excellence in Education declared the United States "A Nation at Risk" because of inadequate education. A decade and a half later, the United States is still at risk because U.S. schools are failing children. Dropout rates have declined, and college attendance has risen, but student achievement has remained flat…

Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, Washington, DC.

430

Also Inside: RICK RASHID: STILL BOLDLY GOING  

E-print Network

Also Inside: RICK RASHID: STILL BOLDLY GOING A SURVEY OF MACHINE LEARNING KEEPING UP WITH KEEPON TURING AWARD WINNER ED CLARKE'S RESEARCH EFFORTS ARE RIVALED BY HIS EDUCATIONAL LEGACY News from, students, researchers, staff and interdisciplinary partners. The Link strives to encourage better

Clarke, Edmund M.

431

Humans 'still evolving' John von Radowitz  

E-print Network

has confirmed. Humans are subject to the forces of natural selection just like any other species, say, even among wealthy individuals. Strict adherence to monogamy did not limit the potential for naturalHumans 'still evolving' John von Radowitz Tuesday 01 May 2012 Darwinian "survival

Lummaa, Virpi

432

Drawing Ready-Made Still Lifes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Observational drawing is one of the most important skills art students need; however, it can be difficult to put a new spin on an otherwise old concept. In this article, the author relates how she had used a new approach--ready-made still lifes--to observational drawing in her art class. This approach requires the artist to discover ready-made…

Brisco, Nicole D.

2006-01-01

433

Salient video stills: content and context preserved  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new class of images called salient stills is demonstrated and a software development platform for their creation is discussed. These images do not represent one discrete moment of time, as do a photograph or single video frame. Rather, one image reflects the aggregate of the temporal changes that occur in a moving image sequence with the salient features preserved.

Laura Teodosio; Walter Bender

1993-01-01

434

January 13, 2010 Still Earning Less  

E-print Network

January 13, 2010 Still Earning Less By Mary Ann Mason Consider a few facts: Women are now half higher-paid, fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. Women are diverted from such fields of the few industrialized countries that does not routinely offer paid family leave, there are few workplaces

Kammen, Daniel M.

435

Mathematics from Still and Moving Images  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Digital photos and digital movies offer an excellent way of bringing real world situations into the mathematics classroom. The technologies surveyed here are feasible for everyday classroom use and inexpensive. Examples are drawn from the teaching of Cartesian coordinates, linear functions, ratio and Pythagoras' theorem using still images, and…

Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye; Ball, Lynda

2005-01-01

436

211 / 985 China Universities Never Stand Still  

E-print Network

Beijing University of Chemical Technology Beijing University of Chinese Medicine Beijing University211 / 985 China Universities Never Stand Still NAME OF UNIVERSITY CHINESE NAME 211 985 Anhui University Fuzhou University #12;NAME OF UNIVERSITY CHINESE NAME 211 985 Guangxi University Guizhou

New South Wales, University of

437

32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... (a) Policy and procedures on taking photos by the general public, given in § 705...Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval...photographed. In such cases, all unclassified photos will be returned promptly to the...

2010-07-01

438

Justice for all? Never Stand Still  

E-print Network

review of the ICC JUSTICE FOR ALL? International Criminal Court Conference, 14-15 February 2012, Sydney Theatre Company, UNSW Vice-Chancellor's Office. Justice for all? International Criminal CourtJustice for all? Never Stand Still Sponsors: Australian Attorney-General's Department, Australian

<