Sample records for stills disease complicated

  1. A novel therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension as a complication of adult-onset Still's disease: targeting IL-6.

    PubMed

    Kadavath, Sabeeda; Zapantis, Ekaterini; Zolty, Ronald; Efthimiou, Petros

    2014-03-01

    Adult-onset Still's Disease (AOSD), often though as the adult variant of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), has an incidence of 1-3 cases per 1 million. Cardinal manifestations include fever, arthritis, skin rash, sore throat, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Prolongation in diagnosing this disease results from its similarity to infectious, malignant and rheumatic diseases and lack of biomarkers. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare pulmonary complication of AOSD, and we are aware of only six cases reported in literature to date. Here we present a patient with AOSD who has developed pulmonary hypertension as a complication. We report a case of AOSD complicated by PAH treated successfully with tocilizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to human interleukin (IL)-6 receptor. A Pubmed and Medline search for evidence of pulmonary hypertension in AOSD and use of IL-6 inhibition in management was performed. Data for this study was collected from the patient's chart records. No infectious or neoplastic cause of her disease was identified and after extensive diagnostic workup, the patient was diagnosed with AOSD fulfilling Yamaguchi criteria. After initiation of IL-6 therapy the patient was followed over time to monitor the hemodynamic changes in pulmonary vasculature. Following treatment with Tocilizumab, the patient showed dramatic improvement in her clinical symptoms and remains in remission, through combination of tocilizumab (8 mg/kg), methotrexate and prednisone. Improvement of systemic symptoms, right heart catheterization (RHC) findings and the VECTRA-DA score served as a measure of treatment response. Tocilizumab has been effective in demonstrating marked improvement in both the clinical and laboratory parameters. Tocilizumab is an effective novel treatment for AOSD with PAH. This is the first documented report of successful use of tocilizumab in AOSD patients presenting with PAH. Prospective comparative studies could help validate its efficacy and safety. PMID:24581387

  2. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH), also support research on Lyme disease. NIH Patient Recruitment for Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  3. Cutaneous vasculitis complicating coeliac disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Meyers; S Dikman; H Spiera; N Schultz; H D Janowitz

    1981-01-01

    A 38 year old female, with chronic uncontrolled coeliac disease, presented with the rare complication of cutaneous leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Detailed study failed to identify any cause for the vasculitis, other than the underlying coeliac disease. Haematuria and proteinuria with mesangial nephritis were also demonstrated on renal biopsy with electron microscopic study. It is speculated that exogenous or endogenous antigens permeated

  4. Treatment of adult-onset Still’s disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jamilloux, Yvan; Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Henry, Thomas; Sève, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder that has been recently classified as a polygenic autoinflammatory disorder. The former classification, based on the disease course, seems to be quite dated. Indeed, there is accumulating evidence that AOSD can be divided into two distinct phenotypes based on cytokine profile, clinical presentation, and outcome, ie, a “systemic” pattern and an “articular” pattern. The first part of this review deals with the treatments that are currently available for AOSD. We then present the different strategies based on the characteristics of the disease according to clinical presentation. To do so, we focus on the two subsets of the disease. Finally, we discuss the management of life-threatening complications of AOSD, along with the therapeutic options during pregnancy. PMID:25653531

  5. Treatment of adult-onset Still's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Jamilloux, Yvan; Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Henry, Thomas; Sève, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder that has been recently classified as a polygenic autoinflammatory disorder. The former classification, based on the disease course, seems to be quite dated. Indeed, there is accumulating evidence that AOSD can be divided into two distinct phenotypes based on cytokine profile, clinical presentation, and outcome, ie, a "systemic" pattern and an "articular" pattern. The first part of this review deals with the treatments that are currently available for AOSD. We then present the different strategies based on the characteristics of the disease according to clinical presentation. To do so, we focus on the two subsets of the disease. Finally, we discuss the management of life-threatening complications of AOSD, along with the therapeutic options during pregnancy. PMID:25653531

  6. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  7. Myocarditis as a form of relapse in two patients with adult Still’s disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Alberto Cavallasca; Carlos A. Vigliano; Carlos E. Perandones; Guillermo A. Tate

    2010-01-01

    Still’s disease is a subset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that usually presents with intermittent fever, rash, and\\u000a arthritis. Extra-articular flares can occur several years after disease onset. We report two cases of adult Still’s disease\\u000a with myocarditis after several years of being in remission. A 34-year-old Caucasian man with history of systemic juvenile\\u000a arthritis in remission since age 13

  8. Surgical complications of amyloid disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, D. P.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Bouch, D. C.; Wood, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The case of a man with primary systemic amyloidosis without myelomatosis and long-term survival is described. The patient has had major surgical complications from large amyloid deposits in the colon, dorsal spine and peritoneal cavity. The patient remains well 14 years after diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3684836

  9. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  10. Extraintestinal complications of inflammatory bowel disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ad A. van Bodegraven; Ben A. C. Dijkmans; Paul Lips; Tom J. Stoof; A. Salvador Peña; Stephan G. M. Meuwissen

    2001-01-01

    Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Extraintestinal complications of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are often secondary to the underlying disease. Therefore,\\u000a the first priority is to get active IBD into remission with medications, since surgery for IBD is not indicated for the treatment\\u000a of extraintestinal complications.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Symptoms of extraintestinal complications usually can be treated with simple agents; the treatment of patients with

  11. Ocular Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mady, Rana; Grover, Will; Butrus, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Though inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a specific predilection for the intestinal tract, it is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organs, including the eye. Ocular complications directly related to IBD are categorized as primary and secondary. Primary complications are usually temporally associated with IBD exacerbations and tend to resolve with systemic treatment of the intestinal inflammation. These include keratopathy, episcleritis, and scleritis. Secondary complications arise from primary complications. Examples include cataract formation due to treatment with corticosteroids, scleromalacia due to scleritis, and dry eye due to hypovitaminosis A following gut resection. Some ocular manifestations of IBD can lead to significant visual morbidity and temporally associated complications can also be a herald of disease control. Furthermore, ocular manifestations of IBD can occasionally manifest before the usual intestinal manifestations, leading to an earlier diagnosis. Thus, it is important to understand the clinical presentation of possible ocular manifestations in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to help prevent significant visual morbidity. PMID:25879056

  12. Complications of suppurative otitis media: still a problem in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; El Fiky, Lobna M; El Sharnouby, Mohammed M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of complicated suppurative otitis media in 10 years at a tertiary referral university hospital. During this period, 3,364 patients with suppurative otitis media (acute and chronic) were admitted to the department. The number of patients presenting with complications was 422 (12.54%). The ratio of extracranial to intracranial complications was nearly 1:1. The most frequent extracranial complication was mastoiditis while the most frequent intracranial one was lateral sinus thrombophlebitis. Multiple complications may present in the same patient. The onset of complications was insidious and 96% of the patients were already aware of their disease. There were 6 mortalities (1.42%), and additional morbidity was recorded in 16 patients (3.79%). Changes in the clinical picture should always alert the physician to the onset of a complication. Complications tended to occur in young patients from a lower socioeconomic class and without sex preponderance. Physicians should be aware of the continuing incidence of complications and the subtleness of their onset and investigate patients for the presence of more than one complication. PMID:19145101

  13. Tangier disease: still more questions than answers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-R. Nofer; A. T. Remaley

    2005-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play a central role in transporting cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for elimination from the body. Impairment of HDL-mediated cholesterol transport favors cholesterol deposition in the arterial wall and promotes development of arteriosclerosis. Tangier disease is a severe HDL deficiency syndrome characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol in tissue macrophages and prevalent atherosclerosis. A three-decade

  14. Pulmonary hypertension complicating connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph P; Belperio, John A; Saggar, Rajeev; Fishbein, Michael C; Saggar, Rajan

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may complicate connective tissue disease (CTD), particularly systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma), and markedly increases mortality. More than 70% of cases of PH complicating CTD occur in SSc, which is the major focus of this article. Pulmonary complications (i.e., interstitial lung disease [ILD] and PH) are the leading causes of scleroderma-related deaths. "Isolated" PH (i.e., without ILD) complicates SSc in 7.5 to 20% of cases; secondary PH may also occur in patients with SSc-associated ILD. Several clinical markers and specific autoantibody profiles have been associated with PH in SSc. The role of PH-specific therapy is controversial, as prognosis and responsiveness to therapy are worse in SSc-associated PH compared with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We discuss medical therapies for CTD-associated PH and the role of lung transplantation for patients failing medical therapy. PMID:24037627

  15. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark M. Mitsnefes

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally\\u000a high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular\\u000a complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors,\\u000a mortality and morbidity in children with

  16. Musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disease in children.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Skinner, Joline

    2008-02-01

    A wide variety of neuromuscular diseases affect children, including central nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and spinal cord injury; motor neuron disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy; peripheral nerve disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; neuromuscular junction disorders such as congenital myasthenia gravis; and muscle fiber disorders such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Although the origins and clinical syndromes vary significantly, outcomes related to musculoskeletal complications are often shared. The most frequently encountered musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disorders in children are scoliosis, bony rotational deformities, and hip dysplasia. Management is often challenging to those who work with children who have neuromuscular disorders. PMID:18194756

  17. [Neurological complications of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Pedro Emilio; Burgos, Aurora

    2008-05-10

    Although ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease have traditionally been considered to be inflammatory diseases limited to the gastrointestinal tract, it has been shown that both pathologies are frequently accompanied by various extraintestinal disorders. There is an increasing evidence that they may also manifest in the nervous system, including the peripheral and the central parts. Although some of these neurological complications have been known for a long time, such as cerebrovascular disease, vasculitis and autoinmune processes including neuropathies and cerebral demyelination, others have been recently described. With the exception of some of this complications such as the thromboembolism, evidence for a casual relationship relies merely on single case reports or case series. In this article, we try to review the existing evidence on neurological manifestations of both variants of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:18501131

  18. Onset of adult-onset Still’s disease following influenza vaccination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katsunobu Yoshioka; Shunsuke Fujimoto; Hiroko Oba; Mieko Minami; Tetsuya Aoki

    We describe that case of a 61-year-old woman who developed high spiking fever, sore throat, polyarthralgia, and salmon pink\\u000a evanescent rash following influenza vaccination. A diagnosis of adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) was made based on clinical\\u000a and laboratory findings. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone resulted in a favorable outcome. This\\u000a is the second published case in which a

  19. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  20. Gaucher disease: haematological presentations and complications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alison S; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, required for the degradation of glycosphingolipids. Clinical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, bone disease and a bleeding diathesis, frequently resulting in presentation to haematologists. Historically managed by splenectomy, transfusions and orthopaedic surgery, the development of specific therapy in the form of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy in the 1990s has resulted in dramatic improvements in haematological and visceral disease. Recognition of complications, including multiple myeloma and Parkinson disease, has challenged the traditional macrophage-centric view of the pathophysiology of this disorder. The pathways by which enzyme deficiency results in the clinical manifestations of this disorder are poorly understood; altered inflammatory cytokine profiles, bioactive sphingolipid derivatives and alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment have been implicated. Further elucidating these pathways will serve to advance our understanding not only of GD, but of associated disorders. PMID:24588457

  1. Complications of HIV disease and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Havlir, Diane V; Currier, Judith S

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the efficacy of and drug interactions with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in HCV/ HIV coinfection were a highlight of the 2012 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. The addition of an HCV protease inhibitor (PI) to pegylated interferon alfa/ribavirin increased HCV cure rates by 30% to 35% in HCV genotype 1 treatment-naive HIV-coinfected patients, an increase similar to that observed in HIV-uninfected HCV-infected patients. Drug interactions with antiretrovirals can be complex, and DAAs are recommended for use only with antiretroviral drugs for which pharmacokinetic data are available. Further drug interaction and clinical data are needed to ensure the safe coadminstration of DAAs with antiretroviral therapy. The conference placed continued emphasis on pathogenesis, management, and prevention of the long-term complications of HIV disease and its therapies, including cardiovascular disease, lipodystrophy, renal disease, alterations in bone metabolism, and vitamin D deficiency, along with a growing focus on biomarkers to predict development of end-organ disease. HIV has increasingly been recognized as a disease of accelerated aging, manifested by increased progression of vascular disease, cellular markers of aging, and a heightened risk of certain non-AIDS-defining malignancies. This year's conference also highlighted data on diagnosis, prevention, and complications of tuberculosis coinfection as well as the treatment and prevention of coinfections that are common with HIV, including cryptococcal meningitis, influenza, and varicella zoster. PMID:22710907

  2. Successful treatment of acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia with cyclosporine in adult onset Still’s disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min-Young Her; Tae-Hwan Kim; Hyun-Kyu Chang; Woong-Soo Lee; Dae-Hyun Yoo

    2007-01-01

    Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAT) is a rare disorder, characterized by severe thrombocytopenia and selective,\\u000a marked decrease or absence of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. We describe a 29-year-old female with adult onset Still’s\\u000a disease preceding a diagnosis of AAT and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which was successfully treated with cyclosporine. This\\u000a is the first case of AAT in a patient with

  3. [Special surgical complications in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kroesen, A J

    2015-04-01

    After colorectal and anorectal interventions for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, specific complications can occur.In Crohn's disease these complications mainly occur after proctocolectomy. Pelvic sepsis can be prevented by omentoplasty with fixation inside the pelvis. A persisting sepsis of the sacral cavity can be treated primarily by dissection of the anal sphincter which ensures better drainage. In cases of chronic sacral sepsis, transposition of the gracilis muscle is a further effective option. Early recurrence of a transsphincteric anal fistula should be treated by reinsertion of a silicon seton drainage.Complications after restorative proctocolectomy are frequent and manifold (35%). The main acute complications are anastomotic leakage and pelvic sepsis. Therapy consists of transperineal drainage of the abscess with simultaneous transanal drainage. Late complications due to technical and septic reasons are still a relevant problem even 36 years after introduction of this operative technique. A consistent approach with detailed diagnostic and surgical therapy results in a 75% rescue rate of ileoanal pouches. PMID:25693779

  4. Polyserositis in adult Still's disease with onset during pregnancy [corrected].

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, A; Lembcke, B; Schneider, M; Wigand, R; Mulert-Ernst, R; Caspary, W

    1994-09-01

    We report about a 25-year-old female patient, who met all the criteria of adult-onset Still's disease except for the typical nonpruric rash. The disease exacerbated during pregnancy. Polyserositis was the predominant clinical manifestation. The histological examination of the bone marrow biopsy revealed changes similar to those seen in a myelodysplastic syndrome. The clinical condition improved after therapy with high-dose steroids and cyclophosphamide. PMID:7755716

  5. Cardiovascular complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Schicho, Rudolf; Marsche, Gunther; Storr, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years, a growing number of studies have indicated that patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Both are chronic inflammatory diseases and share certain pathophysiological mechanisms that may influence each other. High levels of cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocysteine in IBD patients may lead to endothelial dysfunction, an early sign of atherosclerosis. IBD patients, in general, do not show the typical risk factors for cardiovascular disease but changes in lipid profiles similar to the ones seen in cardiovascular events have been reported recently. Higher levels of coagulation factors frequently occur in IBD which may predispose to arterial thromboembolic events. Finally, the gut itself may have an impact on atherogenesis during IBD through its microbiota. Microbial products are released from the inflamed mucosa into the circulation through a leaky barrier. The induced rise in proinflammatory cytokines could contribute to endothelial damage, artherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Although large retrospective studies favor a link between IBD and cardiovascular diseases, the mechanisms behind still remain to be determined. PMID:25642719

  6. The Hyperferritinemic Syndrome: macrophage activation syndrome, Still’s disease, septic shock and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last few years, accumulating data have implicated a role for ferritin as a signaling molecule and direct mediator of the immune system. Hyperferritinemia is associated with a multitude of clinical conditions and with worse prognosis in critically ill patients. Discussion There are four uncommon medical conditions characterized by high levels of ferritin, namely the macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD), catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (cAPS) and septic shock, that share a similar clinical and laboratory features, and also respond to similar treatments, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Ferritin is known to be a pro-inflammatory mediator inducing expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, yet it has opposing actions as a pro-inflammatory and as an immunosuppressant. We propose that the exceptionally high ferritin levels observed in these uncommon clinical conditions are not just the product of the inflammation but rather may contribute to the development of a cytokine storm. Summary Here we review and compare four clinical conditions and the role of ferritin as an immunomodulator. We would like to propose including these four conditions under a common syndrome entity termed “Hyperferritinemic Syndrome”. PMID:23968282

  7. [Management of intestinal complications in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Ribière, Sophie; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by the occurrence of gastrointestinal complications. For Crohn's disease (CD), it is mainly strictures, fistulas and abdominal or pelvic abscess in luminal forms and perianal lesions (ulcers, fissures, fistula/abscess) in the perineal forms. For ulcerative colitis (UC), main complications are severe flare up and dysplasia/cancer. In Crohn's disease, stenosis can be treated medically in first line (steroid-immunosupppresseurs or antiTNF) especially when the inflammatory component is predominant or in extensive lesions. In case of limited lesions (< 4 cm) and low inflammatory component, endoscopic dilatation can be propose before surgery, especially in patients previously operated on. Abdomino-pelvic abscess should be drained if the size is greater than 4-5 cm and treated with antibiotics. If obstructive signs are present after the resolution of the abscess, surgery is usually required. In some cases, an antiTNF therapy can be discussed (ongoing trial with the GETAID). Surgery during the MC should be performed laparoscopically, particularly in uncomplicated forms (first ileocecal resection) but also whenever possible for complicated diseases. Anoperineal abscess must be drained by non-tight setons. Medical treatment also involves antibiotics and antiTNF, usually in combotherapy. Biological glue is especially interesting in simple fistulas. Collagen plugs have not demonstrated efficacy in simple or complex perianal Crohn's disease fistulas and may have a deleterious effect. They are therefore not recommended. Severe UC flare up are still conventionally treated with corticosteroids IV for 3-5 days, followed in case of failure of a 2nd line treatment with infliximab or ciclosporin. The place of emergency colectomy had regressed due to the effectiveness of medical treatments. PMID:25638864

  8. Thromboembolic complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kohoutova, Darina; Moravkova, Paula; Kruzliak, Peter; Bures, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a 1.5-3.5-fold higher risk of thromboembolism when compared to the non-IBD population and the risk is much more prominent at the time of a flare. Arterial thromboembolism (ischemic stroke, focal white matter ischemia, cardiac ischemia, peripheral vascular disease and mesenteric ischemia) and venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, retinal, hepatic, portal and mesenteric vein thromboses) belong to the group of underestimated extraintestinal complications in IBD patients, which are associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate (the overall mortality is as high as 25 % per episode). Thromboembolism occurs in younger patients compared to the non-IBD population and has a high recurrence rate. Multiple risk factors are involved in the etiopathogenesis, but the acquired ones play the key role. Congenital alterations do not occur more frequently in IBD patients when compared to the non-IBD population. Standardized guidelines for the prophylaxis of thromboembolism in IBD patients are urgently needed and these should be respected in clinical practice to avoid preventable morbidity and mortality. PMID:25115840

  9. Adamantiades-Behcet's disease-complicated gastroenteropathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Zhang, Xuan

    2012-02-21

    Adamantiades-Behcet's disease (ABD) is a chronic, relapsing, systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. It is more prevalent in populations along the ancient Silk Road from Eastern Asia to the Mediterranean Basin, and most frequently affects young adults between the second and fourth decades of life. ABD-complicated gastroenteropathy is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with abdominal pain as the most common symptom. The ileocecal region is affected predominantly, with ulcerations that may lead to penetration and/or perforation, whereas other parts of the gastrointestinal system including the esophagus and stomach can also be affected. Endoscopy is useful to locate the site and extent of the lesions, and tissue biopsy is often warranted to examine the histopathology that is often suggestive of underlying vasculitis of small veins/venules or, alternatively in some cases, nonspecific inflammation. Bowel wall thickening is the most common finding on computed tomography scan. Treatment is largely empirical since well-controlled studies are difficult to conduct due to the heterogeneity of the disease, and the unpredictable course with exacerbation and remission. Corticosteroids with or without other immunosuppressive drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, sulfasalazine, tumor necrosis factor ? antagonist or thalidomide should be applied before surgery, except in emergency. PMID:22363131

  10. Neurologic complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Akila; Adams, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of genetic blood disorders that vary in severity, but the most severe forms, primarily homozygous sickle cell anemia, are associated with neurologic complications. Over the last 90 years it has become established that some patients will develop severe arterial disease of the intracranial brain arteries and suffer brain infarction. Smaller infarctions and brain atrophy may also be seen and over time there appear to be negative cognitive effects in some patients, with or without abnormal brain imaging. Focal mononeuropathies and pneumococcal meningitis are also more common in these patients. Brain infarction in children can largely be prevented screening children beginning at age 2 years and instituting regular blood transfusion when the Doppler indicates high stroke risk (>200cm/sec). Iron overload and the uncertain duration of transfusion are disadvantages but overall this approach, tested in a randomized clinical trial, reduced first stroke by over 90%. Secondary stroke prevention has not been subjected to a randomized controlled trial except for one recently stopped comparison of regular transfusions compared to hydroxuyrea (results favored transfusion). The usual stroke prevention agents (such as aspirin or warfarin) have not been rigorously tested. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography give evidence of subtle and sometimes overt brain injury due to stroke in many adults, but a preventive strategy for adults with SCD has not been developed. Bone marrow transplantation is the only cure, but some non-neurologic symptoms can be controlled in adults with hydroxuyrea. PMID:24365368

  11. Biologic treatments for adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Homood, Ibrahim A

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder that is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is characterized by high spiking fevers, arthritis or arthralgia, and an evanescent salmon-coloured rash. Many other systemic manifestations and laboratory test abnormalities may occur. Biologic drugs, TNF-? inhibitors, and IL-1 and IL-6 blockers have been used for the treatment of patients with AOSD refractory to conventional treatment or those with life-threatening manifestations aiming for better disease control. Data on biologic treatments in AOSD are limited and consist mainly of case reports, small case series and retrospective studies. Using biologic agents (anti-TNF-?, anti-IL-1 and anti-IL-6) with traditional immunosuppressive drugs resulted in significant improvement of disease outcomes. IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors seem to be more efficient than TNF-? inhibitors. PMID:23864171

  12. Adult-onset Still's disease in a Nigerian woman.

    PubMed

    Akintayo, Richard Oluyinka; Adelowo, Olufemi

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. Although there have been reports and series elsewhere, there have been very few such reports on black Africans. The rarity of the reporting of this disease has been associated with a low index of suspicion and hence delayed diagnosis in patients suffering from it. We report a case of a 28-year-old woman, a teacher, who had been repeatedly treated for malarial fever over a 2-month period. She was also briefly managed elsewhere for systemic lupus erythematosus due to a persistent fever with associated polyarthralgia, sore throat, rash and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate. On presentation to our facility, she fulfilled the Yamaguchi criteria for AOSD and had a markedly elevated serum ferritin level. She was successfully managed with etanercept and methotrexate. This is the first report of AOSD from Nigeria. PMID:26150646

  13. Complications of Suppurative Otitis Media: Still a Problem in the 21st Century

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Badr Eldin Mostafa; Lobna M. El Fiky; Mohammed M. El Sharnouby

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of complicated suppurative otitis media in 10 years at a tertiary referral university hospital. During this period, 3,364 patients with suppurative otitis media (acute and chronic) were admitted to the department. The number of patients presenting with complications was 422 (12.54%). The ratio of extracranial to intracranial complications was nearly

  14. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in a hundred may develop the disease a second time. Parents should know that nothing they could have done would have prevented the disease. Kawasaki Disease Introduction Kawasaki Disease Signs, Symptoms and Diagnosis This content was last reviewed on 03/22/2013.

  15. Elevated Troponin Serum Levels in Adult Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, Carlo Umberto; Brugioni, Lucio; Colaci, Michele; Tognetti, Maurizio; Spinella, Amelia; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2015-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory systemic disease that occasionally may affect myocardium. Diagnosis is based on typical AOSD symptoms after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. In the case of abrupt, recent onset AOSD, it could be particularly difficult to make the differential diagnosis and in particular to early detect the possible heart involvement. This latter event is suggested by the clinical history of the four patients described here, incidentally observed at our emergency room. All cases were referred because of acute illness (high fever, malaise, polyarthralgias, skin rash, and sore throat), successively classified as AOSD, and they presented abnormally high levels of serum troponin without overt symptoms of cardiac involvement. The timely treatment with steroids (3 cases) or ibuprofen (1 case) leads to the remission of clinicoserological manifestations within few weeks. These observations suggest that early myocardial injury might be underestimated or entirely overlooked in patients with AOSD; routine cardiac assessment including troponin evaluation should be mandatory in all patients with suspected AOSD. PMID:25767733

  16. Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever. PMID:23213331

  17. Impact of medical therapies on inflammatory bowel disease complication rate.

    PubMed

    Reenaers, Catherine; Belaiche, Jacques; Louis, Edouard

    2012-08-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are progressive diseases associated with a high risk of complications over time including strictures, fistulae, perianal complications, surgery, and colorectal cancer. Changing the natural history and avoiding evolution to a disabling disease should be the main goal of treatment. In recent studies, mucosal healing has been associated with longer-term remission and fewer complications. Conventional therapies with immunosuppressive drugs are able to induce mucosal healing in a minority of cases but their impact on disease progression appears modest. Higher rates of mucosal healing can be achieved with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies that reduce the risk of relapse, surgery and hospitalization, and are associated with perianal fistulae closure. These drugs might be able to change the natural history of the disease mainly when introduced early in the course of the disease. Treatment strategy in inflammatory bowel diseases should thus be tailored according to the risk that each patient could develop disabling disease. PMID:22876033

  18. Histological healing in inflammatory bowel disease: A still unfulfilled promise

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Geboes, Karel; Casella, Giovanni; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is traditionally based on several drugs, including salicylates, corticosteroids, and antibiotics; in addition, the therapeutic armamentarium has considerably evolved with the advent of newer, effective therapeutic measures (such as the biological agents) that are able to improve in a considerable manner both the clinical and endoscopic variables. Thus, mucosal healing, at least considered from an endoscopic point of view, is today regarded as the ultimate endpoint for treatment of these conditions. However, it is also increasingly clear that endoscopic healing is not necessarily paralleled by histological healing; There are few doubts that the latter should be considered as a true, objective healing and the ultimate goal to reach when treating patients with IBD. Unfortunately, and surprisingly, only a few, incomplete, and somewhat conflicting data exist on this topic, especially because there is still the need to standardize both histological assessment and the severity grading of these disorders; Issues that have not been yet been resolved for clinical practice and therapeutic trials. Hopefully, with the help of an increased awareness on the clinical researchers’ side, and the availability of dedicated pathologists on the other side, this matter will be effectively faced and resolved in the near future. PMID:23467585

  19. Celiac disease: how complicated can it get?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer May-Ling Tjon; Jeroen van Bergen; Frits Koning

    2010-01-01

    In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an\\u000a inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage\\u000a of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial\\u000a lymphocyte population develops into

  20. Treatment- and Disease-Related Complications of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Anne R

    2006-01-01

    One of the highlights of the 16th International Prostate Cancer Update was a session on treatment- and disease-related complications of prostate disease. It began with presentation of a challenging case of rising prostate-specific antigen levels after radical prostatectomy, followed by an overview of the use of zoledronic acid in prostate cancer, a review of side effects of complementary medicines, an overview of complications of cryotherapy, an assessment of complications of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy, and a comparison of laparoscopy versus open prostatectomy. PMID:17021643

  1. The Management of Complicated Celiac Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Al-toma; W. H. M. Verbeek; C. J. J. Mulder

    2007-01-01

    Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is being defined as persisting or recurring villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in spite of a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) for >12 months or when severe persisting symptoms necessitate intervention independent of the duration of the GFD. RCD may not respond primarily or secondarily to GFD. All other causes of malabsorption

  2. Complications of treatment of Hodgkin's disease in children

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, S.S.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1982-04-01

    An analysis of complications of therapy requires long-term and frequent followup. Reported here is a review of 179 consecutive children with Hodgkin's disease from Stanford University Medical Center who were seen, treated, and followed over a 20-year period. Complications of treatment are related to the extent of disease and the aggressiveness of therapy. Severe complications from radiotherapy are associated with high-dose, extended-field treatment in preadolescent children. Severe chemotherapy-associated complications include immunosuppression, sterility, and secondary oncogenesis. As cure rates are increasingly optimistic among children with Hodgkin's disease, successful treatment with minimal morbidity remains our greatest challenge. Therapy programs require continual refinement utilizing assessment of short- and long-term side effects of treatment.

  3. Complications of serogroup B meningococcal disease in survivors: a review.

    PubMed

    Dastouri, Fereshteh; Hosseini, Ahmad Mirmohammad; Haworth, Elizabeth; Khandaker, Gulam; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluates the prevalence of long-term complications of serogroup B meningococcal disease (MD) in light of the recent licensure of a vaccine against meningococcal B disease. Twelve appropriate studies were identified by searching available databases from 1946 to July 2014. The average prevalence of hearing impairment was 4.2% among serogroup B MD survivors; 2.3% suffered amputation and 2.3% developed seizures. When compared with complications due to non-meningococcal B bacterial meningitis, physical impairment and seizures were more common in survivors of meningococcal B disease but hearing impairment had similar prevalence. Few studies quantified less frequent complications such as visual impairment and cognitive dysfunction. Better comprehensive reporting of the complications and costs of serogroup B MD in survivors and their families is needed to inform vaccination policy. PMID:25809622

  4. Hepatobiliary Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Lichtenstein

    Several hepatobiliary abnormalities have been described in association with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including primary\\u000a sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), small duct PSC, chronic hepatitis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, cholangiocarcinoma, and cholelithiasis.\\u000a PSC is the most common biliary condition in patients with IBD, with an incidence ranging from 2.5% to 7.5%. PSC usually progresses\\u000a insidiously and eventually leads to cirrhosis independent of inflammatory bowel

  5. Neurologic Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Vellanki, Kavitha; Bansal, Vinod K

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide and is now being recognized as a global health burden particularly for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. The incidence of stroke increases in the presence of CKD with a 3-fold increased rate reported in ESRD. Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke in CKD. There is conflicting observational evidence regarding benefit of anticoagulation in CKD for prevention of stroke in AF as risk of bleeding is high. Overall, anticoagulant in CKD may be beneficial in appropriate patients with meticulous monitoring of international normalized ratio (INR). Neurological manifestations related to electrolyte disorders, drug toxicity, and uremia are common in CKD. Appropriate drug dosing, awareness of potential side effects of medications, prompt diagnosis, and treatment are essential in preventing long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:26081561

  6. Unusual exocrine complication of pancreatitis in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Akihiko; Komaki, Hirofumi; Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Itagaki, Yusuke; Matsuzaki, Koji; Nakura, Michiaki; Nishino, Ichizo; Goto, Yu-ichi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    No association between mitochondrial disease and pancreatitis has yet been established, although diabetes mellitus and diseases caused by exocrine insufficiency, such as Pearson syndrome, are the commonest pancreatic complications of mitochondrial diseases. Here, we report 2 cases of mitochondrial disease complicated by pancreatitis as an unusual pancreatic exocrine manifestation. One patient was a 10-year-old girl with mild retardation of psychomotor development who had experienced recurrent pancreatitis since the age of 4years. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) due to m.8344A>G mutation was diagnosed when the patient was 10years old. The other patient was a 28-year-old woman who was diagnosed with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) due to m.3243A>G mutation at 10years of age. She had experienced regular recurrent vomiting since the age of 16 and suffered an episode of critical pancreatitis at 23years. In both cases, no possible etiological, morphological, or genetic factors for pancreatitis were identified, including anomalous pancreaticobiliary duct. A combination therapy of the standard treatment for chronic pancreatitis and supportive therapy for mitochondrial energy production may be beneficial to prevent the recurrence of acute pancreatitis complicating mitochondrial diseases. The pathophysiological mechanism of pancreatitis in mitochondrial disease has not been adequately established; however, our observations suggest that pancreatitis should be included in the list of pancreatic complications of mitochondrial disease. PMID:23182449

  7. Spontaneous Duodenal Perforation as a Complication of Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, Arash; Saidi, Hossein; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Khavanin, Ali; Bahadoram, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is generally known as a systemic vasculitis that often concerns doctors due to its serious cardiac complications; however, other visceral organs may get involved as well. Surgical manifestations of the intestinal tract in Kawasaki disease are rare. In this report, we describe the case of a 2.5-year-old boy with typical Kawasaki disease who presented with GI bleeding and surgical abdomen. The diagnosis of duodenal perforation was confirmed. PMID:25883825

  8. [Still's disease--juvenile arthritis with systemic onset].

    PubMed

    Kröger, Liisa; Putto-Laurila, Anne; Vähäsalo, Paula; Malin, Merja; Aalto, Kristiina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a rare form of juvenile arthritis in which, contrary to autoimmune diseases in general, no association with a certain tissue type has been detected. Together with this fact, the lack of autoantibodies and the general symptoms belonging to the diagnostic criteria of the illness such as high fever, rather speak for its classification into autoinflammatory diseases. Treatment is usually started with anti-inflammatory drugs, often requiring combination with a systemic glucocorticoid. Recognition of interleukins 1 and 6 as central mediators in the pathogenesis of the disease has brought new possibilities for its treatment. PMID:25269367

  9. Adult-onset Still's disease-pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kadavath, Sabeeda; Efthimiou, Petros

    2015-02-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), a systemic inflammatory disorder, is often considered a part of the spectrum of the better-known systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, with later age onset. The diagnosis is primarily clinical and necessitates the exclusion of a wide range of mimicking disorders. AOSD is a heterogeneous entity, usually presenting with high fever, arthralgia, skin rash, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly accompanied by systemic manifestations. The diagnosis is clinical and empirical, where patients are required to meet inclusion and exclusion criteria with negative immunoserological results. There are no clear-cut diagnostic radiological or laboratory signs. Complications of AOSD include transient pulmonary hypertension, macrophage activation syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and amyloidosis. Common laboratory abnormalities include neutrophilic leukocytosis, abnormal liver function tests, and elevated acute-phase reactants (ESR, CRP, ferritin). Treatment consists of anti-inflammatory medications. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have limited efficacy, and corticosteroid therapy and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are usually required. Recent advances have revealed a pivotal role of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-18 in disease pathogenesis, giving rise to the development of novel targeted therapies aiming at optimal disease control. The review aims to summarize recent advances in pathophysiology and potential therapeutic strategies in AOSD. PMID:25613167

  10. Adult-Onset Still's Disease Masquerading as Sepsis in an Asplenic Active Duty Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Jaqua, Nathan T.; Finger, David; Hawley, Joshua S.

    2012-01-01

    This is a case of a 26-year-old active duty male with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and surgical asplenia who presented with a one-week history of fevers, myalgias, arthralgias, and rigors. His evaluation upon presentation was significant for a temperature of 103 degrees F, white blood cell count of 36?K with a granulocytic predominance, and elevated transaminases. He was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics with concern for a systemic infection with an encapsulated organism. During his stay, he developed four SIRS criteria and was transferred to the progressive care unit for suspected sepsis. He continued to have twice-daily fevers and a faint, salmon-colored centripetal rash was eventually observed during his febrile episodes. After a nondiagnostic microbiologic and serologic workup, he was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's Disease and started on intravenous methylprednisolone with brisk response. He was discharged on oral prednisone and was started on anakinra. Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare condition that presents with varying severity, and this is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of its diagnosis in an asplenic patient. Its management in the setting of asplenia is complicated by the need for antibiotic therapy with each episode of fever. PMID:23251171

  11. Extraintestinal manifestations and complications in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rothfuss, Katja S; Stange, Eduard F; Herrlinger, Klaus R

    2006-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that often involve organs other than those of the gastrointestinal tract. These nonintestinal affections are termed extraintestinal symptoms. Differentiating the true extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases from secondary extraintestinal complications, caused by malnutrition, chronic inflammation or side effects of therapy, may be difficult. This review concentrates on frequency, clinical presentation and therapeutic implications of extraintestinal symptoms in inflammatory bowel diseases. If possible, extraintestinal manifestations are differentiated from extraintestinal complications. Special attention is given to the more recently described sites of involvement; i.e. thromboembolic events, osteoporosis, pulmonary involvement and affection of the central nervous system. PMID:16937463

  12. Is underweightness still a major problem in Parkinson's disease patients?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Barichella; A Marczewska; A Vairo; M Canesi; G Pezzoli

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the current rate of underweightness amongst Parkinson's disease (PD) patients at an Italian referral centre.Design: Epidemiological study on consecutive patients presenting for the first time in a 16-month period.Setting: Nutritional service of PD referral centre in Milan, Italy.Subjects: Three-hundred and sixty-four PD patients diagnosed according to CAPIT criteria.Methods: Anthropometric assessments: BMI and waist-to-hip ratio; evaluation of therapeutic

  13. Kawasaki disease: a review with emphasis on cardiovascular complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Duarte; Silvia Cisneros; Gabriel Fernandez; Daniel Castellon; Cesar Cattani; Cíntia A Melo; Asier Apocada

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that is currently the leading cause of acquired heart disease in childhood\\u000a in the United States. Cardiovascular complications are the major cause of morbidity, are responsible for virtually all deaths\\u000a from KD and should be evaluated as soon as possible after the acute phase to establish the baseline status, in order to

  14. Immune Mechanisms Involved in Cardiovascular Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andréa E. M. Stinghen; Sergio Bucharles; Miguel C. Riella; R. Pecoits-Filho

    2010-01-01

    A sustained status of chronic inflammation is closely linked to several complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD), such as vascular degeneration, myocardial fibrosis, loss of appetite, insulin resistance, increased muscle catabolism and anemia. These consequences of a chronically activated immune system impact on the acceleration of atherosclerosis, vascular calcification and development of heart dysfunction. Recent evidence suggests that these immune-mediated

  15. Overuse of Computed Tomography in Patients with Complicated Gallstone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Boyd, Casey A.; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND When compared to ultrasound, computed tomography scans (CT) are more expensive, have significant radiation exposure, and have lower sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for patients with gallstone disease. METHODS We reviewed data on patients emergently admitted with complicated gallstone disease between 1/2005 and 5/2010. The use of CT and ultrasound imaging on admission was described. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate factors predicting receipt of CT. RESULTS 562 consecutive patients presented emergently with complicated gallstone disease. The mean age was 45 years. 72% of patients were female, 46% were white, and 41% were Hispanic. 72% of patients had an ultrasound during the initial evaluation and 41% had a CT. Both studies were performed in 25% of patients (n=141), while 16% (n=93) had CT only and 47% (n=259) had ultrasound only. CT was performed first in 67% of those who underwent both studies. Evening imaging (7pm–7am; OR=4.44, 95% CI 2.88–6.85), increased age (OR=1.14 per 5-year increase, 95% CI 1.07–1.21), leukocytosis (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.10–2.53), and hyperamylasemia (OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.16–3.51) predicted receipt of CT. CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates the overuse of CT in the evaluation of complicated gallstone disease. Evening imaging was the biggest predictor of CT use, suggesting that CT is performed not to clarify the diagnosis, but rather a surrogate for the indicated study. Surgeons and emergency physicians should be trained to perform right upper quadrant ultrasounds to avoid receipt of unnecessary studies in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:21862355

  16. Bone Health and Associated Metabolic Complications in Neuromuscular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Nanette C.; Hache, Lauren P.; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews the recent literature regarding bone health as it relates to the patient living with neuromuscular disease (NMD). Poor bone health with related morbidity is a significant problem for patients with NMD. Although the evidence addressing issues of bone health and osteoporosis have increased as a result of the Bone and Joint Decade, studies defining the scope of bone-related disease in NMD are scant. The available evidence is discussed focusing on abnormal calcium metabolism, increased fracture risk, and the prevalence of both scoliosis and hypovitaminosis D in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. These problems appear common. Osteomalacia often complicates disease-related baseline osteoporosis and may reduce fracture risk if treated. Future directions are discussed, including the urgent need for studies to both determine the nature and extent of poor bone health, and to evaluate the therapeutic effect of available osteoporosis treatments in patients with NMD. PMID:23137737

  17. [Anal and perianal complications of Crohn's disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Krieg, H; Brünner, H; Gamstätter, G; Grönniger, J

    1977-02-11

    Anal and perianal lesions in Crohn's disease such as fistulae, fissures, abscesses and proliferative ulcerous proctitis are often misinterpreted and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. They always indicate a florid intestinal attack or a relapse after previous intestinal resection. Out of 153 patients with Crohn's disease in the last 11 years we have had 59 cases (= 38.6%) with a history of anal changes or such changes were demonstrable on admission to hospital. Only after subtle diagnosis in which the nature and extent of these complications and the location of the intestinal disease focus are determined, the most promising therapy, after all possibilities of conservative treatment have been exhausted, is intestinal resection. Local surgical measures which would often endanger continence, are reserved for the individual case. PMID:403440

  18. Reactive macrophage activation syndrome possibly triggered by canakinumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Banse, Christopher; Vittecoq, Olivier; Benhamou, Ygal; Gauthier-Prieur, Maud; Lequerré, Thierry; Lévesque, Hervé

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and serious complication of adult-onset Still's disease. We describe a case in a 49-year-old woman with Still's disease refractory to glucocorticoids, methotrexate, and infliximab. Anakinra provided satisfactory disease control for 1 year, after which escape phenomenon occurred. After four tocilizumab injections, cutaneous melanoma developed. The persistent systemic manifestations prompted treatment with two canakinumab injections. Ten days later, she had a spiking fever, dyspnea, low back pain, abdominal pain, odynophagia, and hepatomegaly. Laboratory tests showed liver cytolysis (180 IU/L; N: 10-35), acute renal failure (creatinine, 407 ?mol/L; N:50-100), thrombocytopenia (60 G/L; N: 150-400), leukocytosis (12,200/mm(3); N: 4000-10,000), hypertriglyceridemia (5070 mmol/L; N: 0.4-1.6), lactate dehydrogenase elevation (4824 IU/L; N: 135-250), and hyperferritinemia (97 761 ?g/L; N:15-150). Examination of a bone marrow biopsy showed phagocytosis. Tests were negative for viruses and other infectious agents. Glucocorticoid therapy (1.5 mg/Kg/d) and intravenous polyvalent immunoglobulins (0.5 g/Kg/d) were given. Her condition improved despite the many factors of adverse prognostic significance (thrombocytopenia, absence of lymphadenopathy, and glucocorticoid therapy at diagnosis). This is the first reported case of MAS after canakinumab therapy in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease. PMID:23751410

  19. Successful treatment of acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia with cyclosporine in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Her, Min-Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Chang, Hyun-Kyu; Lee, Woong-Soo; Yoo, Dae-Hyun

    2007-01-01

    Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAT) is a rare disorder, characterized by severe thrombocytopenia and selective, marked decrease or absence of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. We describe a 29-year-old female with adult onset Still's disease preceding a diagnosis of AAT and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which was successfully treated with cyclosporine. This is the first case of AAT in a patient with adult onset Still's disease. PMID:16957888

  20. Transvaginal approach for repair of rectovaginal fistulae complicating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, J J; Sher, M E; Jaffin, H; Present, D; Gelerent, I

    1991-01-01

    The management of rectovaginal fistulae complicating Crohn's disease is difficult and often unsatisfactory. Between December 1983 and November 1988, 13 patients with Crohn's disease underwent repair of rectovaginal fistulae via a transvaginal approach. All patients had a diverting intestinal stoma either as part of the initial step in the staged management of intractable perianal disease or concurrent with the repair of the rectovaginal fistula. Each of the patients had low or mid septal fistulae; high fistulae generally are treated transabdominally and are not the focus of this discussion. Fistulae were eradicated in 12 of the 13 women and did not recur during the follow-up period, which averaged 50 months (range, 9 to 68 months). The only treatment failure was a patient who had a markedly diseased colon from the cecum to the rectum and a very low-lying fistula. It is concluded that a modified transvaginal approach is an effective method for repair of rectovaginal fistulae secondary to Crohn's disease. PMID:1992942

  1. Complications of a simple procedure: de Quervain's disease revisited.

    PubMed

    Mellor, S J; Ferris, B D

    2000-03-01

    We reviewed the results of 22 operations performed on 21 patients for the relief of de Quervain's disease over the last six years. At a mean follow-up of 34 months (range 4-78 months), 18 of 22 wrists had complete relief of their original symptoms. One patient required reoperation because of inadequate decompression, and two others await further surgery. Most operations (14 out of 22) were performed under local anaesthesia, and 17 out of 22 used a longitudinal incision. The use of a longitudinal incision was associated with a significant risk of complications: four patients had a poor cosmetic result, and six showed evidence of superficial radial nerve injury. Two patients had a wound infection, and one developed reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Although surgical decompression for de Quervain's disease is effective in curing the symptoms in most patients, using a longitudinal incision is associated with poor wound healing and damage to the terminal branches of the radial nerve. PMID:10824360

  2. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  3. Cutaneous ulcer in an immunosuppressed patient with adult onset Still's disease: primary cutaneous histoplasmosis?

    PubMed

    Lise, Michelle Larissa Zini; Godinho, Ronaldo Nunes; Brollo, Flávia Moojen; Staub, Henrique Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum.Primary infection occurs through inhalation of spores from the air. Immunocompetent individuals are usually asymptomatic, but may develop pulmonary disease. Immunocompromised patients tend to present systemic histoplasmosis with cutaneous lesions occurring by secondary invasion. In this case report, we describe a probable primary cutaneous histoplasmosis (PCH) in a patient with adult onset Still's disease under immunosuppression. PMID:24937841

  4. Magnesium and cardiovascular complications of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Massy, Ziad A; Drüeke, Tilman B

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Abundant experimental evidence suggests a physiological role of magnesium in cardiovascular function, and clinical evidence suggests a role of the cation in cardiovascular disease in the general population. The role of magnesium in CKD-mineral and bone disorder, and in particular its impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, is however not well understood. Experimental studies have shown that magnesium inhibits vascular calcification, both by direct effects on the vessel wall and by indirect, systemic effects. Moreover, an increasing number of epidemiologic studies in patients with CKD have shown associations of serum magnesium levels with intermediate and hard outcomes, including vascular calcification, cardiovascular events and mortality. Intervention trials in these patients conducted to date have had small sample sizes and have been limited to the study of surrogate parameters, such as arterial stiffness, vascular calcification and atherosclerosis. Randomized controlled trials are clearly needed to determine the effects of magnesium supplementation on hard outcomes in patients with CKD. PMID:25963594

  5. The Still Divided Academy: How Competing Visions of Power, Politics, and Diversity Complicate the Mission of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Stanley; Kelly-Woessner, April; Woessner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    "The Still Divided Academy" is a wonderful examination of the academic community that shows their inner workings by addressing a broad range of issues including: academic politics, tenure, perceived and real political imbalance, academic freedom, and diversity. Administrators, professors, and students have very different priorities, values, and…

  6. [Dercum's disease: a severe complication in a rare disease. A case report].

    PubMed

    Haddad, D; Athmani, B; Costa, A; Cartier, S

    2005-06-01

    Dercum's disease or adiposis dolorasa is unusual and unknown. Four symptoms are typical. It is characterized by painful subcutaneous fatty tumors in postmenopausal woman. We present this disease through the study of an uncommon clinical case: a sceptic choc following the "steato-cutaneous-necrosis" of a fatty tumor. The disease remains rare. The etiology is to this day unknown and different hypothesis (endocrinous, metabolic, genetics) are put forward. Multiple complications can occur but severe septicemia is rare. The treatment can be medical (loss of weight, corticoids, intravenous lidocaine) or surgical (surgical excision or liposuction). PMID:15963847

  7. An adolescent with sickle cell anaemia experiencing disease-related complications: priapism and leg ulcer – a management challenge

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Alexandra; Prior, Ana Rita; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela

    2012-01-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is a multi-system disease, associated with episodes of acute illness and progressive organ damage. Disease severity shows substantial variation and it is often a burden for adolescents. Complications such as leg ulcer and priapism have a significant impact on quality of life. There are still no definitive treatment guidelines available. Considering the embarrassing nature of priapism and the dire consequences for erectile dysfunction, it is important to inform patients, parents and providers about the relationship of SCA to prolonged painful erections. This article will review the pathophysiology and treatment options of SCA focusing the complications of leg ulcers, priapism, cholelithiasis and retinopathy. The case study of a 14-year-old boy is used to present a management challenge of multiple SCA-related complications. PMID:22605005

  8. Meniere’s disease: Still a mystery disease with difficult differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliou, A.; Vlastarakos, P. V.; Maragoudakis, P.; Candiloros, D.; Nikolopoulos, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six years after its first description, the differential diagnosis of Meniere’s disease remains very challenging. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the new diagnostic methods for Meniere’s disease. The importance of accurate diagnosis for primary healthcare systems is also discussed. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline and other available database sources. Information from electronic links and related books were also included. Controlled clinical studies, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, written guidelines, systematic reviews, and books were selected. The typical clinical triad of symptoms from the vestibular and cochlear systems (recurrent vertigo, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) is usually the key for clinical diagnosis. Glycerol dehydration test and electrocochleography are the main diagnostic tests in current practice, while vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may be used in disease staging. Imagine techniques are not specific enough to set alone the diagnosis of Meniere’s disease, although they may be necessary to exclude other pathologies. Recently developed 3D MRI protocols can delineate the perilymphatic/endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear and aid diagnosis. Meniere’s disease is a continuous problem for the patients and affects their quality of life. Taking into account the frequent nature of the disease in certain countries, efforts for reliable diagnosis, prompt referral, and successful management are undoubtedly cost-effective for healthcare systems. PMID:21633608

  9. Anakinra Hepatotoxicity in a Patient With Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osman; Alsahafi, Majid; Alkhowaiter, Saad; Erb, Sig

    2015-01-01

    We report a 46-year-old white woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) treated with anakinra, a IL-1B receptor antagonist. Within weeks, her liver enzymes deteriorated; subsequent cessation and rechallenge confirmed anakinra-related drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Although AOSD has been associated with liver involvement, little is known about the hepatotoxicity of anakinra. Heightened awareness by gastroenterologists and hepatologists is warranted.

  10. Association Between Genetics of Diabetes, Coronary Artery Disease, and Macrovascular Complications: Exploring a Common Ground Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, André G.; Selvatici, Lívia; Krieger, José E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) are conditions that cause a substantial public health burden. Since both conditions often coexist in the same individual, it has been hypothesized that they have a common effector. Insulin and hyperglycemia are assumed to play critical roles in this scenario. In recent years, many genetic risk factors for both diabetes and CAD have been discovered, mainly through genome-wide association studies. Genetic aspects of diabetes, diabetic macrovascular complications, and CAD are assumed to have intersections leading to the common effector hypothesis. However, only a few genetic risk factors could be identified that modulate the risk for both conditions. Polymorphisms in TCF7L2 and near the CDKN2A/B genes seem to be of great importance in this regard since they appear to modulate both conditions, and they are not necessarily related to insulinism, or hyperglycemia, for CAD development. Other issues related to this hypothesis, such as the problems of phenotype heterogeneity, are also of interest. Recent studies have contributed to a better understanding of the complex genetics of diabetic macrovascular complications. Much effort is still needed to clarify the associations in the genetics of diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. At present, there is little genetic evidence to support a common effector hypothesis, other than insulin or hyperglycemia, for the association between these conditions. PMID:22189546

  11. Endovascular Therapy of Intractable Epistaxis Complicated by Carotid Artery Occlusive Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Ernst; Robert V. Bulas; Mary Gaskill-Shipley; Thomas A. Tomsick

    Summary: Three cases of intractable spontaneous posterior ep- istaxis refractory to nasal packing and complicated by ipsilateral carotid artery occlusive disease were successfully treated with internal maxillary artery occlusion with microcoils. There were no complications and no recurrent episodes of epistaxis at a mean follow-up of 12 months. The presence of ipsilateral carotid artery disease requires modification of standard distal

  12. Ferritin in Adult-Onset Still's Disease: Just a Useful Innocent Bystander?

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bella; Efthimiou, Petros

    2012-01-01

    Background. Adult-Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is an immune-mediated systemic disease with quotidian-spiking fever, rash, and inflammatory arthritis. Hyperferritinemia is a prominent feature, often used for screening. Methods. The key terms “ferritin” and “hyperferritinemia” were used to search PubMed and Medline and were cross-referenced with “Still's Disease.” Results. Hyperferritinemia, although nonspecific, is particularly prevalent in AOSD. While most clinicians associate ferritin with iron metabolism, this is mostly true for the H isoform and not for the L isoform that tends to increase dramatically in hyperferritenemia. In these situations, hyperferritinemia is not associated with iron metabolism and may even mask an underlying iron deficiency. We review, in systematic fashion, the current basic science and clinical literature regarding the regulation of ferritin and its use in the diagnosis and management of AOSD. Conclusion. Serum hyperferritinemia in AOSD has been described for 2 decades, although its mechanism has not yet been completely elucidated. Regulation by proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-6, IL-18, MCSF, and INF-? provides a link to the disease pathogenesis and may explain rapid resolution of hyperferritinemia after targeted treatment and inhibition of key cytokines. PMID:22536541

  13. Hemoglobin and Hematocrit Levels in the Prediction of Complicated Crohn's Disease Behavior – A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Paul, Gisela; Schnoy, Elisabeth; Schleder, Stephan; Wolf, Alexandra; Kamm, Florian; Dirmeier, Andrea; Strauch, Ulrike; Obermeier, Florian; Lopez, Rocio; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Rogler, Gerhard; Klebl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background Markers that predict the occurrence of a complicated disease behavior in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) can permit a more aggressive therapeutic regimen for patients at risk. The aim of this cohort study was to test the blood levels of hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct) for the prediction of complicated CD behavior and CD related surgery in an adult patient population. Methods Blood samples of 62 CD patients of the German Inflammatory Bowel Disease-network “Kompetenznetz CED” were tested for the levels of Hgb and Hct prior to the occurrence of complicated disease behavior or CD related surgery. The relation of these markers and clinical events was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and adjusted COX-proportional hazard regression models. Results The median follow-up time was 55.8 months. Of the 62 CD patients without any previous complication or surgery 34% developed a complication and/or underwent CD related surgery. Low Hgb or Hct levels were independent predictors of a shorter time to occurrence of the first complication or CD related surgery. This was true for early as well as late occurring complications. Stable low Hgb or Hct during serial follow-up measurements had a higher frequency of complications compared to patients with a stable normal Hgb or Hct, respectively. Conclusions Determination of Hgb or Hct in complication and surgery naïve CD patients might serve as an additional tool for the prediction of complicated disease behavior. PMID:25116048

  14. Painful muscle spasms complicating algodystrophy: central or peripheral disease?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Robberecht; J Van Hees; H Adriaensen; H Carton

    1988-01-01

    A 21 year old female patient developed Südeck's atrophy of the right foot secondary to a chronic Achilles tendinitis. The condition was complicated by the occurrence of painful muscle spasms in the right leg and incontinence of urine. The spasms had characteristics of both a tonic ambulatory foot response and a spinal flexor reflex. The movements disappeared during sleep. Regional

  15. Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

    2013-10-21

    The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean = 35.1%, SD ±28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean = 1.3%, SD ±4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 6.2%, SD ±22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean = 23.1%, SD ±15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 51.5%, SD ±22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean = 27.9 GBP, SD ±22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe. PMID:24148185

  16. Updates in adult-onset Still disease: Atypical cutaneous manifestations and associations with delayed malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Natalie Z; Brezinski, Elizabeth A; Berliner, Jacqueline; Haemel, Anna; Connolly, M Kari; Gensler, Lianne; McCalmont, Timothy H; Shinkai, Kanade

    2015-08-01

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder that is clinically characterized by a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms and signs. Though an evanescent eruption is the classic cutaneous finding, recent literature has highlighted atypical rashes associated with Still disease. A second emerging concept in presentations of AOSD is its association with malignancy. This review focuses on these concepts: the clinical spectrum of atypical skin manifestations and AOSD as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. PubMed-MEDLINE was screened for peer-reviewed articles describing atypical presentations of AOSD and cases associated with malignancy. Erythematous, brown or violaceous, persistent papules and plaques were the most common cutaneous finding (28/30 [93%]). Linear configurations were also rarely described. Of these patients, 81% concurrently had the typical evanescent skin eruption. There were 31 patients with associated malignancies, most commonly breast cancer and lymphoma. The diagnosis of malignancy did not precede or immediately follow a clinical presentation otherwise consistent with AOSD in a considerable subset of patients (42%). Understanding the cutaneous spectrum of AOSD and heightened awareness for its delayed association with malignancy may lead to improved recognition of cutaneous variants and reinforce the need for diagnostic evaluation and long-term follow-up for malignancy in patients with this clinical presentation. PMID:26054431

  17. Post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis and Legionnaires' disease in a patient with adult Still's disease during treatment with interleukin 1 receptor antagonist anakinra: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Legionellosis is a systemic disease that primarily affects the lungs. However, dysfunction in many organ systems, including the kidneys, has also been described. There are only a few reported cases of renal dysfunction in patients with legionellosis. Case presentation A 27-year-old Caucasian woman with known adult Still's disease was admitted to our hospital for community-acquired pneumonia, due to Legionella infection, with acute renal failure. Although her respiratory symptoms responded well to antibiotic treatment, her renal function worsened, with severe proteinuria and edema. A renal biopsy showed extracapillary and endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis with accompanying chronic and acute interstitial nephritis. This was consistent with a post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis. After initiation of steroid therapy, her renal function improved. Additionally, therapy with diuretics and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor was initiated because of persistent proteinuria. Under this treatment regimen, her severe edema and proteinuria disappeared. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, there is only a handful of reported cases of post-infection glomerulonephritis with a nephrotic syndrome in a patient with legionellosis. Our findings suggest that, in patients with Legionnaires' disease with renal failure, post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis should be considered and steroid therapy may be an effective modality to treat the renal complication. PMID:21740588

  18. Complications of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of head and neck disease

    SciTech Connect

    Giebfried, J.W.; Lawson, W.; Biller, H.F.

    1986-04-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen has been advocated in the treatment of many head and neck diseases. Reports of such treatments have described eustachian tube dysfunction as the only complication. A review of patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen for head and neck diseases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center revealed serious complications, which included seizure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. In addition, follow-up study of these patients demonstrated that 11 patients treated for radiation-induced necrosis had an undiagnosed recurrence of cancer.

  19. [Hepatopulmonary syndrome: a complication of type 1 Gaucher disease].

    PubMed

    Bouguila, J; Rouatbi, H; Tej, A; Chabchoub, I; Trimech, B; El Ajmi, S; Essoussi, A S; Boughammoura, L

    2012-02-01

    Gaucher's disease is a not exceptional lysosomial disease in Tunisia. Type 1 is by far the most common one. Pulmonary involvement is considered to be rare in type 1 Gaucher's disease. Pulmonary hypertension, infiltration of the lungs with Gaucher cells, and severe hypoxemia due to intrapulmonary arterial-venous shunts, have been described in case reports and small case series. We reported the case of hepatopulmonary syndrome in a 14-year-old boy with type 1 Gaucher disease. The diagnosis of Gaucher disease was established, at 2 years age, by enzyme assay of leucocyte ?-glucosidase. The patient presented dyspnoea, digital clubbing and cyanosis of the lips. The arterial blood gas found severe hypoxaemia with PaO(2) at 56.9 mmHg. The diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome, in our patient, was confirmed by demonstration of the intrapulmonary shunting using contrast-enhanced echocardiography and the technetium-99m-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The patient was treated by symptomatic measure, long term oxygen therapy because the insufficiency of the enzyme replacement therapy. Screening for hypoxemia in children with liver disease should be considered. PMID:22305140

  20. Tocilizumab for the treatment of adult-onset Still's disease: results from a case series.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Paola; Ruscitti, Piero; Carubbi, Francesco; Pantano, Ilenia; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Berardicurti, Onorina; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which commonly affects young adults. Treatment of AOSD patients includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and DMARDs. Interleukin (IL)-6 blockade is an attractive therapeutic option for AOSD because this cytokine contributes to the pathogenesis of major AOSD symptoms. Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody that blocks the effects of IL-6. Preliminary results of TCZ in AOSD have been promising. Here, we reported our experience evaluating both the safety and the efficacy of 12 months therapy with TCZ in 11 patients with AOSD refractory to corticosteroids and MTX therapy, followed for 18 months, including the first 12 months of active treatment and the last 6 months to evaluate the activity of the disease when the treatment was discontinued. The main outcome measures were the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) improvement criteria and improvement of systemic symptoms at the 3, 6, 12, and 18-months follow-up periods. Our patients rapidly responded and experienced a sustained clinical remission over time during active treatment. Disease Activity Score 28 decreased from 5.62 (3.75-8.28) [median (range)] at baseline to 1.61(0.49-3.5) at month 12. EULAR remission was achieved in 81.82 % at 12 months. Tender joint and swollen joint counts displayed a progressive reduction during active therapy study period. During treatment, we observed a resolution of fever in our AOSD patient. In conclusion, TCZ might represent a suitable option for the therapy of refractory AOSD patients. PMID:24005839

  1. Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Mellitus: Complication of the Disease or of Antihyperglycemic Medications.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, C A; Lingvay, I; Vuylsteke, V; Koffarnus, R L; McGuire, D K

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the principal complication and the leading cause of death for patients with diabetes (DM). The efficacy of antihyperglycemic treatments on cardiovascular disease risk remains uncertain. Cardiovascular risk factors are affected by antihyperglycemic medications, as are many intermediate markers of cardiovascular disease. Here we summarize the evidence assessing the cardiovascular effects of antihyperglycemic medications with regard to risk factors, intermediate markers of disease, and clinical outcomes. PMID:25963811

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease: An increased risk factor for neurologic complications

    PubMed Central

    Morís, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Only a very few systematic studies have investigated the frequency of neurologic disorders in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results have been inconsistent and variable, owing to differences in case-finding methods and evaluated outcomes in different studies. The most frequent neurologic manifestations reported in CD and UC populations are cerebrovascular disease (with either arterial or venous events), demyelinating central nervous system disease, and peripheral neuropathy (whether axonal or demyelinating); however, the literature describes numerous nervous system disorders as being associated with IBD. The pathogenesis of nervous system tissue involvement in IBD has yet to be elucidated, although it seems to be related to immune mechanisms or prothrombotic states. The recently-introduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have proven successful in controlling moderate to severe IBD activity. However, severe neurologic disorders associated with TNF inhibitors have been reported, which therefore raises concerns regarding the effect of anti-TNF-? antibodies on the nervous system. Although neurological involvement associated with IBD is rarely reported, gastroenterologists should be aware of the neurologic manifestations of IBD in order to provide early treatment, which is crucial for preventing major neurologic morbidity. PMID:24574797

  3. The modern pre-levodopa era of Parkinson's disease: insights into motor complications from sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Cilia, Roberto; Akpalu, Albert; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Cham, Momodou; Amboni, Marianna; Cereda, Emanuele; Fabbri, Margherita; Adjei, Patrick; Akassi, John; Bonetti, Alba; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2014-10-01

    During the past decade, a number of large drug trials suggested that the initiation of levodopa therapy should be delayed to reduce the risk of motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the relative contribution of the cumulative exposure to levodopa and of disease progression to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias is still poorly understood. In this 4-year multicentre study, we investigated a large cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease in a sub-Saharan African country (Ghana), where access to medication is limited and the initiation of levodopa therapy often occurs many years after onset. The primary objective was to investigate whether the occurrence of motor complications is primarily related to the duration of levodopa therapy or to disease-related factors. Study design included a cross-sectional case-control analysis of data collected between December 2008 and November 2012, and a prospective study of patients followed-up for at least 6 months after the initiation of levodopa therapy. Ninety-one patients fulfilled criteria for clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (58 males, mean age at onset 60.6 ± 11.3 years). Demographic data were compared to those of 2282 consecutive Italian patients recruited during the same period, whereas nested matched subgroups were used to compare clinical variables. Demographic features, frequency and severity of motor and non-motor symptoms were comparable between the two populations, with the only exception of more frequent tremor-dominant presentation in Ghana. At baseline, the proportion of Ghanaian patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was 56% and 14%, respectively. Although levodopa therapy was introduced later in Ghana (mean disease duration 4.2 ± 2.8 versus 2.4 ± 2.1 years, P < 0.001), disease duration at the occurrence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was similar in the two populations. In multivariate analysis, disease duration and levodopa daily dose (mg/kg of body weight) were associated with motor complications, while the disease duration at the initiation of levodopa was not. Prospective follow-up for a mean of 2.6 ± 1.3 years of a subgroup of 21 patients who were drug-naïve at baseline [median disease duration 4.5 (interquartile range, 2.3-5) years] revealed that the median time to development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias after initiation of levodopa therapy was 6 months. We conclude that motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are not associated with the duration of levodopa therapy, but rather with longer disease duration and higher levodopa daily dose. Hence, the practice to withhold levodopa therapy with the objective of delaying the occurrence of motor complications is not justified. PMID:25034897

  4. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  5. Calciphylaxis: a rare complication in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sermijn, E; Strobbe, T; Vandekerckhove, L; Libbrecht, L; Colle, I; Schoonjans, R; Vogelaers, D

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis, or calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is a rare but well described entity in patients with endstage renal disease (ESRD) and/or hyperparathyroidism. CUA is characterized by systemic acute calcification of the small and intermediate dermal vasculature that can lead to epidermal ischemia, ulceration, and necrosis. Cutaneous lesions of calciphylaxis characteristically begin as tender, violaceous, livedoid discolorations. The mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood although abnormal bone and mineral metabolism and hyperparathyroidism can contribute to CUA. Therapeutic strategies are of unproven benefit and mortality remains high. Calciphylaxis has also been extremely rarely reported in patients without ESRD and/or hyperparathyroidism. We report an unusual case of calciphylaxis in a patient with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and normal renal function, without any alteration in the phosphocalcic and parathyroid hormone (PTH) metabolisms. PMID:23967720

  6. Obstetric and gynecological diseases and complications resulting from vaginal dysbacteriosis.

    PubMed

    Kovachev, Stefan Miladinov

    2014-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of the composition and ecology of vaginal microbial environment of a healthy woman is necessary for the understanding of normal flora and how to reduce the risk for diseases. Vagina and its microflora form a balanced ecosystem in which dominated bacteria are vaginal lactobacilli. There are dynamic changes in this ecosystem having structure and composition depending on many factors. The term dysbacteriosis defines any movement outside the normal range for the given biotope of obligate and/or facultative microflora. Such a change in the quantity and quality of the respective microbial balance is fraught with danger and requires correction and recovery. The purpose of this overview is to examine obstetric and gynecological diseases that can cause vaginal impaired microbial balance. Vaginal dysbacteriosis is a cause, predecessor, and often also consequence of vaginal infections. In essence, any vaginal infection can be seen as dysbacteriosis, developed to the most severe extent. Here, there is a dominant microorganism other than lactic acid bacteria in the vagina (clinically manifested or not, respectively), depletion of defense mechanisms of the vagina associated with the shift of lactobacilli from their dominant role in the vaginal balance, decrease in their number and species diversity, and a resulting change in the healthy status of the vagina. Vaginal dysbacteriosis can be found in pathogenetic mechanism, whereby many obstetric and gynecological diseases develop. Most of these diseases lead directly to increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, so it is important to understand the reasons for them and the arrangements for their prevention. PMID:24711012

  7. Clinical variations and complications of Coats disease in 150 cases: the 2000 Sanford Gifford Memorial Lecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry A Shields; Carol L Shields; Sontash G Honavar; Hakan Demirci

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this report is to review the clinical variations and natural course of Coats disease, using strict diagnostic guidelines.METHODS: In a retrospective, consecutive series, Coats disease was defined as idiopathic retinal telangiectasia with intraretinal or subretinal exudation without appreciable signs of retinal or vitreal traction. We reviewed our experience with the clinical features, complications, and diagnostic approaches

  8. Spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog with bronchopulmonary disease complicated by pyothorax and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Simone; Rocchi, Paola M.; Raiano, Vera; Diana, Daniela; Greci, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumopericardium is a rare condition consisting of pericardial gas in the absence of iatrogenic or traumatic causes; it has been described secondary to pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchopulmonary disease. This report describes a case of spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog presenting with dyspnea secondary to pyopneumothorax complicating a bronchopulmonary disease. PMID:25477548

  9. Kawasaki shock syndrome complicating a recurrence of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Tissandier, Côme; Lang, Matthieu; Lusson, Jean René; Bœuf, Benoit; Merlin, Etienne; Dauphin, Claire

    2014-12-01

    We describe a case of recurrent Kawasaki disease (KD) in a non-Asian 6-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with typical KD without cardiac involvement at age 3 years. He was admitted to the PICU 3 years later for heart failure, hypotension, and deterioration of his general condition. Ultrasonography revealed left ventricular dysfunction with a 44% ejection fraction and grade I mitral valve failure without coronary artery involvement. Subsequent observation of hyperemic conjunctiva, bilateral cervical adenopathies with erythematous skin (normal neck ultrasound and computed axial tomography findings), peeling of the fingertips at day 8 of the illness, and occurrence of an inflammatory syndrome led to a diagnosis of incomplete recurrent KD with a clinical picture of Kawasaki shock syndrome (KSS). Clinical improvement was rapidly obtained after intravenous immunoglobulin and intravenous corticosteroid therapy (30 mg/kg per day for 3 subsequent days). Left ventricular function gradually improved, with ultrasound returning to normal after 3 months. Diagnosis was difficult to establish because of the recurrence of the disease and the incomplete clinical picture, with clinical features of KSS. Physicians need to be aware of these pitfalls in the management of patients with clinical signs of KD. PMID:25384485

  10. Optimal phosphate control: still an unmet need in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2014-02-01

    Reduction of phosphate levels has traditionally been considered a mainstay treatment for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Unfortunately, the treatment of hyperphosphatemia is far from being satisfactory. Available phosphate binders have limited efficacy, forcing the consumption of many tablets in order to achieve mild-to-moderate effect or low tolerability. Moreover, even if calcium-free phosphate binders, such as sevelamer and lanthanum carbonate, decrease serum phosphate levels without affecting serum calcium concentration, they do not significantly reduce circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH). The higher phosphate-binding efficacy of lanthanum carbonate should be balanced with the accumulation in bones and the lack of pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism and inflammation. However, the fact that lanthanum carbonate seems to decrease the rate of development of vascular calcifications more or less similar to sevelamer suggests that phosphate control could actually be the key factor to improve patient outcome. New iron-based phosphate binders are undergoing clinical development. In addition to phosphate binding, they can be useful to treat anemia, and are undergoing Phase II clinical development for this indication. This could be of clinical importance particularly in CKD patients not on dialysis, avoiding the need for extra oral iron administration, and favoring compliance. In conclusion, the control of phosphate retention should still be considered an unmet medical need for CKD patients. PMID:24283572

  11. General peritonitis and haemorrhage complicating colonic diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Tagart, R E B

    1974-01-01

    The very varied pathology which underlies peritonitis caused by colonic diverticular disease makes the comparison of various methods of treatment very difficult. The best results are probably achieved by removal of the affected part of the colon from the abdomen as soon as possible. Really aggressive medical treatment is an essential accompaniment to any form of surgery. A two-stoma or Hartmann procedure is generally the safest form of resection. Immediate anastomosis has no particular advantage since it should always be accompanied by a proximal diverting colostomy, making a second operation necessary in any case. In desperate cases proximal colostomy may be the only possible procedure and can be life-saving. The advantage of a skin-bridge colostomy is stressed. In cases of haemorrhage the source of bleeding is usually impossible to locate. Conservative treatment is successful in most cases, but if there is no alternative to surgery subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis is the treatment of choice. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4547577

  12. Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.; Kesen, Muge R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C.; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S.; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG ? GTG) in exon 1 of the ? globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the ? globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

  13. Infiltrative lung diseases: Complications of novel antineoplastic agents in patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Vahid, Bobbak; Marik, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Infiltrative lung disease is a well-known complication of antineoplastic agents in patients with hematological malignancies. Novel agents are constantly being added to available treatments. The present review discusses different pulmonary syndromes, pathogenesis and management of these novel agents. PMID:18551203

  14. Pulmonary complications in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease following transthoracic esophagectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Jie Jiao; Tian-You Wang; Min Gong; Hao Pan; Yan-Bing Liu; Zhi-Hua Liu

    AIM: To investigate the incidence of various types of postoperative pulmonary complications (POPCs) and to evaluate the signifi cance of perioperative arterial blood gases in patients with esophageal cancer accompanied with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after esophagectomy. MEHTODS: Three hundred and fi fty-eight patients were divided into POPC group and COPD group. We performed a retrospective review of the

  15. Central Nervous System Complications of Sickle Cell Disease in Children: An Overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winfred C. Wang

    2007-01-01

    Complications involving the central nervous system are among the most devastating manifestations of sickle cell disease. Although overt stroke occurs in 1 in 10 children with Hemoglobin SS, “silent cerebral infarcts” are even more frequent. Both are associated with significant neuropsychological deficits. The end result of these effects on the CNS often is diminished school performance. The use of transcranial

  16. Complications of Otitis Media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Metin Önerci

    \\u000a The complications of acute or chronic middle ear diseases still carry a very high mortality rate if not treated properly,\\u000a although the incidence of complications has been decreasing significantly after the introduction of antibiotics. The infection\\u000a may spread to neighboring structures either by bone erosion or preformed pathways. Facial nerve paralysis due to chronic otitis\\u000a media with cholesteatoma requires urgent

  17. With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-04

    In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

  18. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  19. Risk factors for complications after bowel surgery in Korean patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Song Soo; Yoon, Yong Sik; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the incidence and factors predictive of early postoperative complications in Korean patients who undergo surgery for Crohn's disease (CD). Methods We retrospectively assessed 350 patients (246 males, 104 females; mean age, 30 ± 9 years) who underwent surgery for primary or recurrent CD at Asan Medical Center between January 1991 and May 2010. The incidence and predictive factors of early postoperative complications were analyzed by both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the 350 patients, 81 patients (23.1%) developed postoperative complications, the most common being septic complications (54 patients), including 19 cases of wound infection. Thirty patients (8.6%) required re-operations, and only one patient died. Multivariate analysis showed that four factors were independently associated with a high risk of early postoperative complications; preoperative moderate to severe anemia (hematocrit concentration <30%; odds ratio [OR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6 to 5.9), hypoalbuminemia (serum albumin level <3.0 g/dL; OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.7), emergency surgery (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.5 to 10.6), and covering stoma (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.4). Correction of preoperative moderate to severe anemia and hypoalbuminemia decreased the incidence of postoperative complications. Mean hospital stay was significantly longer in patients with than without postoperative complications (31.3 ± 27.2 days vs. 10.3 ± 3.8 days, P < 0.001). Conclusion Preoperative anemia, low albumin level, emergency surgery, and covering stoma significantly increased the risk of early postoperative complications in patients with CD. Correcting preoperatively deficient nutritional factors may reduce postoperative morbidities. PMID:22977760

  20. Knocked-out and still walking: prion protein-deficient cattle are resistant to prion disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are caused by the propagation of a misfolded form (PrP**d) of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP**c. Disruption of PrP**c expression in the mouse results in resistance to PrP-propagation and disease. However, the impa...

  1. Care of the injured worldwide: trauma still the neglected disease of modern society

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, surgical diseases including emergency and injury care have garnered less attention and support internationally when compared to other medical specialties. Over the past decade however, healthcare professionals have increasingly advocated for the need to address the global burden of non-communicable diseases. Surgical disease, including traumatic injury, is among the top causes of death and disability worldwide and the subsequent economic burden is substantial, falling disproportionately on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The future of global health in these regions depends on a redirection of attention to diseases managed within surgical, anesthesia and emergency specialties. Increasing awareness of these disparities, as well as increasing focus in the realms of policy and advocacy, is crucial. While the barriers to providing quality trauma and emergency care worldwide are not insurmountable, we must work together across disciplines and across boundaries in order to negotiate change and reduce the global burden of surgical disease. PMID:22980446

  2. The modern pre-levodopa era of Parkinson’s disease: insights into motor complications from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Akpalu, Albert; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Cham, Momodou; Amboni, Marianna; Cereda, Emanuele; Fabbri, Margherita; Adjei, Patrick; Akassi, John; Bonetti, Alba; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, a number of large drug trials suggested that the initiation of levodopa therapy should be delayed to reduce the risk of motor complications in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, the relative contribution of the cumulative exposure to levodopa and of disease progression to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias is still poorly understood. In this 4-year multicentre study, we investigated a large cohort of patients with Parkinson’s disease in a sub-Saharan African country (Ghana), where access to medication is limited and the initiation of levodopa therapy often occurs many years after onset. The primary objective was to investigate whether the occurrence of motor complications is primarily related to the duration of levodopa therapy or to disease-related factors. Study design included a cross-sectional case-control analysis of data collected between December 2008 and November 2012, and a prospective study of patients followed-up for at least 6 months after the initiation of levodopa therapy. Ninety-one patients fulfilled criteria for clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (58 males, mean age at onset 60.6 ± 11.3 years). Demographic data were compared to those of 2282 consecutive Italian patients recruited during the same period, whereas nested matched subgroups were used to compare clinical variables. Demographic features, frequency and severity of motor and non-motor symptoms were comparable between the two populations, with the only exception of more frequent tremor-dominant presentation in Ghana. At baseline, the proportion of Ghanaian patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was 56% and 14%, respectively. Although levodopa therapy was introduced later in Ghana (mean disease duration 4.2 ± 2.8 versus 2.4 ± 2.1 years, P < 0.001), disease duration at the occurrence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was similar in the two populations. In multivariate analysis, disease duration and levodopa daily dose (mg/kg of body weight) were associated with motor complications, while the disease duration at the initiation of levodopa was not. Prospective follow-up for a mean of 2.6 ± 1.3 years of a subgroup of 21 patients who were drug-naïve at baseline [median disease duration 4.5 (interquartile range, 2.3–5) years] revealed that the median time to development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias after initiation of levodopa therapy was 6 months. We conclude that motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are not associated with the duration of levodopa therapy, but rather with longer disease duration and higher levodopa daily dose. Hence, the practice to withhold levodopa therapy with the objective of delaying the occurrence of motor complications is not justified. PMID:25034897

  3. [Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: electromyography is still useful in diagnosis and classification].

    PubMed

    Birouk, N; Maisonobe, T; Le Forestier, N; Gouider, R; Léger, J M; Bouche, P

    1997-12-01

    Genetic heterogeneity was known for a long time in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The recent findings in molecular biology emphasized the distinction in different types of the disease. Nevertheless, electrophysiological examinations are of a great interest to detect asymptomatic patients, to classify the different forms and to make correlations with the clinical and histological features. Current classification is based on genetic and electrophysiologic data. CMT1, or hypertrophic form in which mutations or a duplication were found on chromosome 17 is the most frequent (CMT1A), CMT2 is the neuronal form, CMT3 is termed the Dejerine-Sottas disease, CMT4 recessive forms, CMT5 a form with associated pyramidal features, and CMTX. The electrophysiologic aspects of these different types are reported. PMID:9686263

  4. Strategies for CABG patients with carotid artery disease and perioperative neurological complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshihiro Suematsu; Kiyoharu Nakano; Yoshikado Sasako; Junjirou Kobayashi; Shinichi Takamoto

    2000-01-01

    Postoperative neurological complications not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also prolong hospital stay and elevate\\u000a hospital costs. From 1995, carotid artery duplex scanning (CADS) has been performed in our hospital as screening for cerebrovascular\\u000a disease in patients undergoing nonemergency coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This study was designed to evaluate the\\u000a usefulness of our strategy for preventing stroke during

  5. Fulminant ischaemic colitis with atypical clinical features complicating sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Karim, Anita; Ahmed, S; Rossoff, Leonard J; Siddiqui, R; Fuchs, A; Multz, A S

    2002-06-01

    Clinically significant ischaemic bowel injury is an exceedingly rare complication of sickle cell disease. It manifests as acute surgical abdomen and may respond to conservative treatment. An unusual fatal case of ischaemic colitis with minimal abdominal findings in a young male during a sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain crisis is described. This case demonstrates that an acute surgical abdomen should be considered in such patients who fail to respond to conservative management as untreated this condition may be fatal. PMID:12151697

  6. Risk factors in development of motor complications in Chinese patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wan Fung Kum; Jing Gao; Siva Sundara Kumar Durairajan; Sui Cheung Man; Li Xia Xie; Jia Hong Lu; Wai Leuk Fong; Min Li

    2009-01-01

    Motor complications induced by levodopa (L-dopa) treatment in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are not well documented in patients of Chinese ethnicity. We performed a cross-sectional study to investigate the prevalence of dyskinesias and motor fluctuations, and the factors determining their development, in a population of Chinese patients with PD. Among 137 patients with PD, 98 (71.5%) had received a L-dopa preparation.

  7. Hepatic myelopathy: an unusual neurological complication of chronic liver disease presenting as quadriparesis

    PubMed Central

    Kori, Prakash; Sahu, Ritesh; Jaiswal, Anupam; Shukla, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic myelopathy is a rare neurological complication of chronic liver disease, which is usually seen in adults, presenting as pure motor spastic paraparesis. It is almost always associated with portosystemic shunts and hepatic decompensation. We report a rare case of a young adult man presenting as rapidly progressive spastic quadriparesis because of hepatic myelopathy and associated spontaneous splenorenal shunt and early hepatic decompensation. PMID:23749858

  8. [Scurvy, an old disease still in the news: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Pailhous, S; Lamoureux, S; Caietta, E; Bosdure, E; Chambost, H; Chabrol, B; Bresson, V

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy is the clinical manifestation of a deficiency in vitamin C, which is present in fresh fruits and vegetables. It is historically linked to the era of great maritime expeditions. Manifestations are misleading in children, in contrast with adults: bone disease and hemorrhagic syndrome are the earliest and most frequent manifestations due to a collagen biosynthesis defect. Scurvy is an old, potentially fatal disease but is easily curable with ascorbic acid. It can be prevented with vitamin C treatment in pediatric populations with unusual eating habits. We describe two cases of pediatric scurvy in two 7-year-old boys who had dietary restrictions stemming from developmental disorders. PMID:25455083

  9. Adult-Onset Still's Disease in a Patient Over 80 Years Old Successfully Treated with Low-Dose Methotrexate Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MIWA KURASAWA; K AZUHIKO KOTANI; G OTARO KURASAWA; K OUSUKE SHIDA; S HIGEKI YAMADA; TOSHIHIKO TAGO

    2006-01-01

    We report on an 83-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), with marked hypercytokinemia (serum levels of ferritin (Fer) and interleukin (IL)-18 were markedly high). On seeing older patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO), particularly Asians, AOSD should be considered. Reduced doses of oral prednisolone following intravenous methylprednisolone (mPSL) therapy caused a flare-up of AOSD and led to

  10. Adult-onset Still's disease in a patient over 80 years old successfully treated with low-dose methotrexate therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MIWA KURASAWA; K AZUHIKO KOTANI; G OTARO KURASAWA; K OUSUKE SHIDA; S HIGEKI YAMADA; TOSHIHIKO TAGO

    We report on an 83-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), with marked hypercytokinemia (serum levels of ferritin (Fer) and interleukin (IL)-18 were markedly high). On seeing older patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO), particularly Asians, AOSD should be considered. Reduced doses of oral prednisolone following intravenous methylprednisolone (mPSL) therapy caused a flare-up of AOSD and led to

  11. Decrease of proteinuria in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease and glomerulonephritis after anti-TNFalpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Thonhofer, R; Soleiman, A; Kriessmayr, M; Thonhofer, U; Wipfler, E; Gaugg, M; Eder, S; Erlacher, L

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old man diagnosed with Still's disease. Multiple disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapies failed to induce disease remission or to prevent progressive joint destruction. The man presented with active arthritis and classical Still's rash accompanied by fever. Anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) therapy was planned but during the medical check-up prior to the biological therapy, renal insufficiency with marked proteinuria (PU) was discovered. With PU of 912 mg/24 h a renal biopsy was performed and a histopathological evaluation revealed the diagnosis of a residual mesangio-proliferative immunocomplex-based glomerulonephritis (GN). After excluding contraindications, infliximab therapy was initiated and a good response of the arthritis was documented after 6 weeks. A significant decrease in PU (279 mg/24 h) was noted after the third infliximab infusion. Because of an allergic reaction during the fifth dose, the infliximab was discontinued. During the time frame without anti-TNFalpha therapy, active joint disease reoccurred and the proteinuria increased significantly. Because of the active disease entanercept therapy was initiated. The arthritis diminished and the PU was reduced markedly within 4 weeks. In the follow-up period of 12 months a good response to therapy was sustained. As described by other investigators, the joint disease showed a rapid and sustained response to anti-TNFalpha therapy. The decrease in proteinuria during biological therapy was notable. It was concluded that the significant decrease in PU in this patient was achieved by eliminating the inflammatory activity of the underlying kidney disease. PMID:17343260

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  13. Common and unusual urogenital Crohn's disease complications: spectrum of cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Villa, Chiara; Campari, Alessandro; Ravelli, Anna; Bianco, Roberto; Cornalba, Gianpaolo

    2013-02-01

    Involvement of the urinary tract and genital organs is not uncommon in patients affected with Crohn's disease (CD). Occurring in both sexes, uro-gynecological complications are often clinically unsuspected because of the dominant intestinal or systemic symptoms. Knowledge of their manifestations and cross-sectional imaging appearances is necessary to recognize and report them, since correct medical or surgical treatment choice with appropriate specialist consultation allows to prevent further complications. Besides uncomplicated urinary tract infections that usually do not require imaging, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis represent the most commonly encountered urinary disorders: although very useful, use of computed tomography (CT) should be avoided whenever possible, to limit lifetime radiation exposure. Hydronephrosis due to ureteral inflammatory entrapment and enterovesical fistulization may result from penetrating CD, and require precise imaging assessment with contrast-enhanced CT to ensure correct surgical planning. Representing the majority of genital complication, ano- and rectovaginal fistulas and abscesses frequently complicate perianal inflammatory CD and are comprehensively investigated with high-resolution perianal MRI acquired with phased-array coils, high-resolution T2-weighted sequences and intravenous contrast. Finally, rare gynecological manifestations including internal genital fistulas, vulvar and male genital involvement are discussed. PMID:22456714

  14. Methotrexate: should it still be considered for chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal disease?

    PubMed

    Pascual, Eliseo; Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal arthritis is a clinical consequence of the formation and deposition of these crystals in joints and can result in persistent arthritis. Curative treatment would require the removal of crystals from joints and tissues, but to date all agents tested have proven ineffective. Management of the inflammatory manifestations of chronic calcium pyrophosphate disease includes glucocorticoids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or colchicine, and responses are usually satisfactory. However, in some patients, the response to these agents is poor or they are contraindicated. Methotrexate had been reported as a promising option in small case series; however, in a recent issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy, a clinical trial failed to confirm the anticipated benefits. Here, we discuss some issues that might have influenced the results of the study, before deciding to abandon methotrexate as a therapeutic option for patients with chronic calcium pyrophosphate arthritis. PMID:25885915

  15. Studies on the pathophysiology and treatment of von Willebrand's disease. VI. Variant von Willebrand's disease complicating placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H

    1983-07-15

    The clinical course of a pregnant patient with a variant form of von Willebrand's disease (type IIA) who was complicated with placenta previa totalis, breech presentation and premature delivery is described. Following whole blood transfusion, she underwent a cesarean section without postoperative hemorrhagic complications. Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (FVIII/vWF)-related activities (factor VIII procoagulant activity [VIII:C], factor VIII-related antigen [VIIIR:Ag] and ristocetin cofactor [VIIIR:RCo]), Duke bleeding time and platelet retention to glass beads were monitored during pregnancy, labor and puerperium. Gradual increase in FVIII/vWF-related activities and shortening of bleeding time were found during her gestation. Platelet retention, however, remained low. Qualitative analysis of plasma FVIII/vWF with crossed immunoelectrophoresis and gel filtration on Sepharose 2B demonstrated that the large forms of FVIII/vWF, which is important for primary hemostasis, did not appear in the blood during gestation. Therefore, patients with type IIA von Willebrand's disease seem to be more susceptible to bleeding complications at delivery. PMID:6605595

  16. Vitamin C in human health and disease is still a mystery ? An overview

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, K Akhilender

    2003-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is one of the important water soluble vitamins. It is essential for collagen, carnitine and neurotransmitters biosynthesis. Most plants and animals synthesize ascorbic acid for their own requirement. However, apes and humans can not synthesize ascorbic acid due to lack of an enzyme gulonolactone oxidase. Hence, ascorbic acid has to be supplemented mainly through fruits, vegetables and tablets. The current US recommended daily allowance (RDA) for ascorbic acid ranges between 100–120 mg/per day for adults. Many health benefits have been attributed to ascorbic acid such as antioxidant, anti-atherogenic, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulator and prevents cold etc. However, lately the health benefits of ascorbic acid has been the subject of debate and controversies viz., Danger of mega doses of ascorbic acid? Does ascorbic acid act as a antioxidant or pro-oxidant ? Does ascorbic acid cause cancer or may interfere with cancer therapy? However, the Panel on dietary antioxidants and related compounds stated that the in vivo data do not clearly show a relationship between excess ascorbic acid intake and kidney stone formation, pro-oxidant effects, excess iron absorption. A number of clinical and epidemiological studies on anti-carcinogenic effects of ascorbic acid in humans did not show any conclusive beneficial effects on various types of cancer except gastric cancer. Recently, a few derivatives of ascorbic acid were tested on cancer cells, among them ascorbic acid esters showed promising anticancer activity compared to ascorbic acid. Ascorbyl stearate was found to inhibit proliferation of human cancer cells by interfering with cell cycle progression, induced apoptosis by modulation of signal transduction pathways. However, more mechanistic and human in vivo studies are needed to understand and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-carcinogenic property of ascorbic acid. Thus, though ascorbic acid was discovered in 17th century, the exact role of this vitamin/nutraceutical in human biology and health is still a mystery in view of many beneficial claims and controversies. PMID:14498993

  17. Behçet's disease complicated with thrombosis: a report of 93 Chinese cases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuhua; Li, Guohua; Huang, Xinxiang; Wang, Li; Liu, Wanli; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the clinical features of Behçet's disease (BD) complicated with thrombosis. Medical records of patients with BD at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 1993 to 2013 were reviewed to identify thrombosis. Of the 766 patients with BD, 93 patients (16 female and 77 male) developed thrombosis. The most common thrombosis was extremity vein thrombosis (86.0%), including deep vein thrombosis (n=78) and superficial thrombophlebitis (n=4). The other thrombosis types associated with BD in descending frequency of order were: vena cava thrombosis (30.1%), pulmonary thromboembolism (15.1%), cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) (12.9%), intracardiac thrombosis (8.6%), Budd-Chiari syndrome (7.5%), and renal vein thrombosis (4.3%), etc. Venous thrombosis is more frequent than arterial thrombosis, and most of patients (94.6%) experienced multiple thrombosis. A male predominance of extremity vein thrombosis and positive pathergy test, and a female predominance of CVT and genital ulcers were noted. All of these patients exhibited active disease during the emergence of thrombotic events. After treating with glucocorticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and/or anticoagulants, the thrombosis resolved in 89 patients. Three patients died from aneurysm rupture, myocardial infarction and Budd-Chiari syndrome, respectively. One patient with septic shock discontinued therapy during follow-up. Thrombosis in BD patients is male predominance, mainly multiple and venous thrombosis is more common. Active disease patients are prone to thrombosis, which suggest the key role of immunosuppressive therapy for the complication. PMID:25526452

  18. Laparoscopic splenectomy complicated by pancreatic cyst in the course of Hodgkin's disease: case report

    PubMed Central

    Budzynski, Andrzej; Miodo?ski, Maciej; Seweryn-Serkis, Katarzyna; Janus, Werner

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a case of a patient suffering from Hodgkin's disease and treated by means of minimally invasive surgery: laparoscopic splenectomy. The performance of laparoscopic splenectomy led to a complication in the form of a pancreatic cyst. The cyst was subjected to endoscopic procedures (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, with a shaft to the pancreatic tract) and percutaneous drainage. The application of the above methods allowed for a quick introduction of causative treatment. Because in the case in question open surgery methods would impede the introduction of systemic treatment, minimally invasive surgery techniques (laparoscopy and endoscopy) were applied and are discussed below. PMID:24501607

  19. Laparoscopic splenectomy complicated by pancreatic cyst in the course of Hodgkin's disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Krasowski, Grzegorz; Budzynski, Andrzej; Miodo?ski, Maciej; Seweryn-Serkis, Katarzyna; Janus, Werner

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a case of a patient suffering from Hodgkin's disease and treated by means of minimally invasive surgery: laparoscopic splenectomy. The performance of laparoscopic splenectomy led to a complication in the form of a pancreatic cyst. The cyst was subjected to endoscopic procedures (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, with a shaft to the pancreatic tract) and percutaneous drainage. The application of the above methods allowed for a quick introduction of causative treatment. Because in the case in question open surgery methods would impede the introduction of systemic treatment, minimally invasive surgery techniques (laparoscopy and endoscopy) were applied and are discussed below. PMID:24501607

  20. Development of early neutropenic fever, with or without bacterial infection, is still a significant complication after reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Akiko; Kami, Masahiro; Kim, Sung-Won; Chizuka, Aki; Kojima, Rie; Imataki, Osamu; Sakiyama, Michiyo; Hamaki, Tamae; Onishi, Yasushi; Usubuchi, Noriko; Kishi, Yukiko; Murashige, Naoko; Tajima, Kinuko; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Heike, Yuji; Masuo, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Takaue, Yoichi

    2004-01-01

    Little information is available on the clinical characteristics of infectious complications that occur in the early period after reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST). We retrospectively investigated the clinical features of neutropenic fever and infectious episodes within 30 days after RIST in 76 patients who had received fluoroquinolones as part of their antibacterial prophylaxis. Preparative regimens included cladribine 0.66 mg/kg or fludarabine 180 mg/m2 plus busulfan 8 mg/kg. All but 1 patient survived 30 days after transplantation, and 75 patients (99%) became neutropenic within a median duration of 9 days. Neutropenic fever was observed in 29 patients (38%), and bacterial infection was confirmed in 15 (20%) of these, including bacteremia (n = 13), bacteremia plus pneumonia (n = 1), and urinary tract infection (n = 1). The causative organisms were gram-positive (n = 9) and gram-negative organisms (n = 7), with a mortality rate of 6%. Neither viral nor fungal infection was documented. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of neutropenia at the initiation of preparative regimens was an independent risk factor for subsequent documented bacterial infections (P =.026; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-35.1). We conclude that neutropenic fever and bacteremia remain common complications in RIST. PMID:14752781

  1. Vitamin D receptor polymorphism in chronic kidney disease patients with complicated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Lucisano, Silvia; Gagliostro, Giorgia; Alibrandi, Angela; Benvenga, Salvatore; Ientile, Riccardo; Bellinghieri, Guido; Buemi, Michele; Caccamo, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Several studies indicate a relationship between vitamin D and cardiovascular disease. Pleiotropic actions of vitamin D and its analogs are mediated by vitamin D receptor (VDR). VDRs have been identified in almost all tissues, including vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and endothelial cells. The FokI and BsmI polymorphisms of the VDR gene are regarded as strong markers of disturbed vitamin D signaling pathway. Studies investigating the relationship between VDR genotypes and left ventricular hypertrophy revealed a highly significant association with the BsmI Bb heterozygous genotype. There are conflicting data on the action of vitamin D in left ventricular hypertrophy. Experimental as well as observational studies and small clinical trials have suggested that vitamin D administration may favorably influence left ventricular hypertrophy, whereas large randomized clinical trials have shown negative results. However, a beneficial effect on the left atrial volume index and the duration of hospitalization were observed in patients treated with vitamin D analogs. Larger clinical trials with robust clinical end points are needed to confirm that vitamin D is effective in preventing cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients and in general population. PMID:25499229

  2. Sickle Cell Disease in Pregnancy: Maternal Complications in a Medicaid-Enrolled Population

    PubMed Central

    Okoroh, Ekwutosi M.; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Grant, Althea; Hooper, W. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Higher frequencies of pregnancy complications have been reported among women with sickle cell disease (SCD) compared with those without SCD; however, past studies are limited by small sample size, narrow geographic area, and use of hospital discharge data. We compared the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women with SCD to those without SCD in a large, geographically diverse sample. Data from the 2004–2010 Truven Health MarketScan® Multi-State Medicaid databases were used to assess the prevalence of maternal complications among intrapartum and postpartum women 15–44 years of age with and without SCD whose race was reported as black. The comparison group of women without SCD was further divided into those with chronic conditions associated with multi-organ failure and those without chronic conditions. Multivariable log-binomial regression models were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for outcomes for women with SCD compared with women in the two comparison groups. Of the 335,348 black women with a delivery during 2004–2010, 1,526 had a diagnosis of SCD (0.5 %). Compared with women without SCD who had chronic conditions, women with SCD had higher prevalence of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, obstetric shock, pneumonia, sepsis, postpartum infection, and transfusions. SCD was also positively associated with acute renal failure, cerebrovascular disorder, respiratory distress syndrome, eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, preterm birth, and ventilation when compared with women without SCD and chronic conditions. Overall, women with SCD have increased prevalence of pregnancy complications, even when compared with a group of women with similar risk for multi-organ failure. PMID:23315242

  3. Crohn’s disease complicated by multiple stenoses and internal fistulas clinically mimicking small bowel endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Teke, Zafer; Aytekin, Faruk Onder; Atalay, Ali Ozgur; Demirkan, Nese Calli

    2008-01-01

    We report a 31-year-old woman with Crohn’s disease complicated by multiple stenoses and internal fistulas clinically misdiagnosed as small bowell endometriosis, due to the patient’s perimenstrual symptoms of mechanical subileus for 3 years; at first monthly, but later continuous, and gradually increasing in severity. We performed an exploratory laparotomy for small bowel obstruction, and found multiple ileal strictures and internal enteric fistulas. Because intraoperative findings were thought to indicate Crohn’s disease, a right hemicolectomy and partial distal ileum resection were performed for obstructive Crohn’s ileitis. Histopathology of the resected specimen revealed Crohn’s disease without endometrial tissue. The patient made an uneventful recovery from this procedure and was discharged home 10 d post-operatively. The differential diagnosis of Crohn’s diease with intestinal endometriosis may be difficult pre-operatively. The two entities share many overlapping clinical, radiological and pathological features. Nevertheless, when it is difficult to identify the cause of intestinal obstruction in a woman of child-bearing age with cyclical symptoms suggestive of small bowel endometriosis, Crohn’s disease should be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:18176980

  4. [A Case of Corticobasal Syndrome Complicated with Hypopituitarism and Hashimoto's Disease].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Satoru; Kinbara, Yoshiyuki; Terada, Makoto; Komiya, Tadashi; Ishii, Kenji; Takao, Masaki; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Murayama, Shigeo

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of an individual with corticobasal syndrome (CBS), hypopituitarism due to a post-traumatic leptomeningeal cyst, and Hashimoto's disease. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of cognitive dysfunction and bradykinesia. Following a primary diagnosis of hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism, she was given hormone replacement therapy, and her clinical symptoms appeared to improve. However, some cognitive impairment and extrapyramidal symptoms remained. The results of careful neurological examinations, as well as magnetic resonance, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography images, suggested a diagnosis of CBS-CBD (corticobasal degeneration). Because parkinsonism and cognitive impairment can be caused by endocrinopathy, it was initially difficult to reach the complete diagnosis that included CBS. Thus, it is important to understand that complicated neurological presentations can be caused by several different disorders. (Received September 4, 2014; Accepted October 15, 2014; Published June 1, 2015). PMID:26062591

  5. Acute cytomegalovirus infection is a risk factor in refractory and complicated inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Maher, Maha M; Nassar, Mahmoud I

    2009-11-01

    The role of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is controversial. Although CMV has been specifically associated with refractory disease, the strength and nature of this association have been a subject of debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and outcome of acute cytomegalovirus infection in patients with severe refractory and complicated inflammatory bowel disease. Seventy-two patients with active IBD (both ulcerative colitis [UC] and Crohn's diseases [CD]) were included in this study. Thorough history taking and physical examination of all patients was made with special emphasis on symptoms and signs of CMV disease. Colonoscopic assessment was made for the extent and activity of IBD and collection of specimen. Prevalence of CMV infection was estimated by serology; anti-CMV IgM and IgG antibodies, and pathologic studies of colonic biopsies used conventional haematoxylin and eosin (H & E) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with monoclonal antibodies. Complete blood count and liver function tests were done for all patients. Among 72 patients with active inflammatory bowel disease, 23 (31.9%) were resistant to intravenous steroids. CMV was detected in eight (six with UC and two with CD) of the 23 (34.8%) steroid-resistant patients and in only one (3.2%) patient in the remaining 31 patients under steroid treatment and was not detected in 18 IBD patients not using steroids. Among nine CMV-positive IBD patients, six (66.6%) were female and six had fever; cervical lymphadenopathy was found in five patients and splenomegaly in two, compared to no patients in the CMV-negative group (P = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Leucopenia and thrombocytopenia were predominantly seen in the CMV-positive versus CMV-negative patients (2.1+/-0.3 vs. 5.9+/-3.4 and 98+/-34 vs. 165+/-101, respectively). Pancolitis was found in five of nine CMV-positive IBD patients whereas in only two patients out of 63 in the CMV-negative group (P = 0.005). Acute CMV infection in patients with IBD is not rare and is often underestimated. CMV infection in patients with refractory or complicated IBD should be ruled out before aggressive immunosuppressive therapy. High clinical index of suspicion for the association of CMV infection with IBD should be directed towards female IBD patients presenting with fever, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, leucopenia, and mild hepatitis. CMV IHC is significantly more sensitive than routine H & E stain and should be considered as part of the routine evaluation of IBD patients with severe exacerbation or steroid-refractory disease before proceeding with other medical or surgical therapy that may not be necessary once the CMV is treated. PMID:19093204

  6. CROI 2014: viral hepatitis and complications of HIV disease and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Havlir, Diane V; Currier, Judith S

    2014-05-01

    The remarkable advances in interferon-sparing, all-oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment were a highlight of the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI). The backbone of the nucleotide inhibitor sofosbuvir and the nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor ledipasvir with an additional third agent (HCV protease inhibitor or HCV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor) led to a sustained virologic response (SVR) rate 12 weeks after cessation of treatment of 95% to 100% after only 6 weeks of treatment. These results demonstrate the potential of combination directacting antiviral (DAA) therapy for abbreviated, well-tolerated, and highly effective HCV treatment. Two triple-drug regimens that comprised 12 weeks of an NS5A inhibitor, an HCV protease inhibitor, and a nonnucleoside inhibitor also resulted in SVRs of more than 90% in patients with HCV genotype 1. HIV coinfection does not appear to negatively impact response to DAA-based HCV therapy, as evidenced by similar response rates in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients compared with HCV-monoinfected patients receiving interferonsparing or -containing regimens. There was continued emphasis at CROI 2014 on non-AIDS complications of HIV infection, specifically cardiovascular disease, renal insufficiency, and bone and endocrine disorders that persist among patients with treated HIV disease and contribute to morbidity and mortality. Finally, new data on novel drugs and combinations for treatment of tuberculosis (TB), patient outcomes using new rapid TB diagnostics, and a short-course TB prevention strategy were presented. PMID:24901886

  7. Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications: The Role of Adipokines and the Relationship between Obesity, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is closely associated with an increased risk of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure, which leads to an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is now recognized not only as a main site of storage of excess energy derived from food intake but also as an endocrine organ. The expansion of adipose tissue produces a number of bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines or adipokines, which trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and interact with a range of processes in many different organs. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, dysregulated production or secretion of these adipokines caused by excess adipose tissue and adipose tissue dysfunction can contribute to the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of several adipokines associated with obesity and the potential impact on obesity-related metabolic diseases. Multiple lines evidence provides valuable insights into the roles of adipokines in the development of obesity and its metabolic complications. Further research is still required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the metabolic actions of a few newly identified adipokines. PMID:24733068

  8. Body fat composition assessment using analytic morphomics predicts infectious complications following bowel resection in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Stidham, Ryan W.; Waljee, Akbar K.; Day, Nicholas M.; Bergmans, Carrie L.; Zahn, Katelin M.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Stewart C.; Su, Grace L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Decisions between medical and surgical management of Crohn’s disease (CD) incorporate risk assessments for potential complications of each therapy. Analytic morphomics is a novel method of image analysis providing quantifiable measurements of body tissue composition, characterizing body fat more comprehensively than body mass index (BMI) alone. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors associated with post-operative complications in CD, incorporating fat composition analysis using analytic morphomics. Methods We performed a retrospective review of adults undergoing bowel resection for CD between 2004–2011 at a single center. CT scans within 30 days prior to surgery underwent morphomic analysis of body geometry and fat characterization. Post-operative infectious complications were defined as the need for a post-operative abdominal drain, intravenous antibiotics, or re-operation within 30 days. Bivariate and multivariate analysis using logistic regression were used to generate a prediction model of infectious complications. Results A total of 269 subjects met selection criteria; 27% incurred post-operative infectious complications. Bivariate analysis showed hemoglobin, albumin, surgical urgency, high-dose prednisone use, and subcutaneous-to-visceral fat volume distribution as predictors of complications. BMI, anti-TNF-alpha-therapies, and immunomodulator use were not predictors of complication. Multivariate modeling demonstrated a c-statistic of 0.77 and a NPV of 81.1% with surgical urgency (OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.46–6.02, P=.004), subcutaneous-to-visceral fat distribution (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.20–3.19, P=.006), and hemoglobin (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55–0.85, P =.001) as predictors of infectious complication. Conclusions Fat subtype and distribution are predictive of post-operative infectious complications following bowel resection for Crohn’s disease. Analytic morphomics provides additional body composition detail not captured by BMI. PMID:25822011

  9. High rate of complicated idiopathic gallstone disease in pediatric patients of a North American tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Denise; Bouchard, Guylaine

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess spectrum and etiology of gallstones and biliary sludge in the pediatric population of a North American tertiary care centre. METHODS: Retrospective review of abdominal ultrasounds recorded at Saint Justine Hospital over a period of 24 mo (8/2003 to 8/2005) in patients < 19 years of age. Patients < 2 years of age were analyzed separately. RESULTS: The presence of gallstones was noted in 127 patients. In 107 it was a new diagnosis, in 48/105 (45.7%) patients > 2 years of age idiopathic gallstone disease was found. These 48 patients represent 2.1% of the population who required ultrasound for abdominal pain. Complicated gallstone disease occurred in 28/48 with idiopathic disease, mainly adolescent girls. Patients with hemolytic disorders, cystic fibrosis, oncologic diseases or kidney transplantation and gallstones were asymptomatic and stones were detected during routine abdominal ultrasound. Twenty two patients < 2 years of age not consulting for abdominal pain had gallstone disease of diverse etiology. Biliary sludge was seen in 84 patients, 78.5% on total parenteral nutrition. In 4 patients, sludge progressed to gallstones. CONCLUSION: Idiopathic gallstone disease and its rate of complication are more frequent in our cohort than expected from previous studies. Adolescent girls with abdominal pain and idiopathic gallstones require special attention for complicated disease course. PMID:18330945

  10. [Multiple pulmonary emboli complicating infective endocarditis in a child with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ajdakar, S; Elbouderkaoui, M; Rada, N; Drais, G; Bouskraoui, M

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare condition, associated with high mortality. Clinical presentation is nonspecific. Pulmonary embolism may present initially similar to bacterial endocarditis of the right heart, septic thrombophlebitis, or osteomyelitis. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl who had dyspnea over the four months before consultation, complicated three months later by hemoptysis. She was diagnosed with subacute bacterial endocarditis secondary to group D Streptococcus, developed upon a ventricular septal defect. Two weeks later, the child had sudden chest pain and tachypnea. Lung scintigraphy showed multiple pulmonary embolisms. The therapeutic approach was to continue antibiotics without anticoagulant treatment. The outcome was favorable with apyrexia and stabilization on the respiratory level. Pulmonary embolism is a rare disease in children with an incidence of 3.7%. Classically, it presents with fever, hemoptysis, and nonspecific infiltrates on chest X-ray. These signs were noted in our patient, although the infiltrates on the chest X-ray were hidden by the pulmonary edema associated with heart failure. The persistence of these left basal opacities after antidiuretic treatment suggested an infectious origin. Subsequently, lung scintigraphy showed that it was a pulmonary infarct. The therapy of septic pulmonary embolism is the same as that for infective endocarditis. Antibiotic treatment alone was maintained without anticoagulants because of the high risk of bleeding at the seat of the pulmonary embolism and the insubstantial significant benefit of this therapy. Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare disease, but its incidence is underestimated. Better knowledge on its actual impact and etiologies in children is necessary. Multicenter studies are needed to establish recommendations. PMID:25725970

  11. Cardiovascular Complications Secondary to Graves’ Disease: A Prospective Study from Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Tsymbaliuk, Iryna; Unukovych, Dmytro; Shvets, Nataliia; Dinets, Andrii

    2015-01-01

    Background Graves’ disease (GD) is a common cause of hyperthyroidism resulting in development of thyrotoxic heart disease (THD). Objectives to assess cardiovascular disorders and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with THD secondary to GD. Patients and Methods All patients diagnosed with THD secondary to GD between January 2011 and December 2013 were eligible for this study. Clinical assessment was performed at baseline and at the follow-up visit after the restoring of euthyroid state. HRQoL was studied with a questionnaire EQ-5D-5L. Results Follow-up data were available for 61 patients, but only 30 patients with THD secondary to GD were consented to participate in investigation of their HRQoL. The frequency of cardiovascular complications was significantly reduced as compared before and after the antithyroid therapy as follows: resting heart rate (122 vs. 74 bpm), blood pressure: systolic (155 vs. 123 mm Hg), diastolic (83 vs. 66 mm Hg), supraventricular premature contractions (71% vs. 7%), atrial fibrillation (72% vs. 25%), congestive heart failure (69% vs. 20%), thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy (77% vs. 26%), all p<0.01. Anti-TSH receptor antibodies were determined as independent predictor of left ventricular geometry changes, (b-coefficient = 0.04, 95%CI 0.01–0.07, p = 0.02). HRQoL was improved in all domains and self-rated health increased from 43 to 75 units by visual analogue score (p<0.001). Conclusions Restoring of euthyroid state in patients with GD is associated with significant elimination of cardiovascular disorders and improvement of HRQoL. To our knowledge this is the first study evaluating Ukrainian patients with THD secondary to GD with focus on HRQoL. PMID:25803030

  12. Miliary tuberculosis disease complicated by Pott's abscess in an infant: Seven year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bayhan, Gulsum Iclal; Tanir, Gonul; Gayretli Ayd?n, Zeynep Gokce; Yildiz, Yasemin Tasci

    2015-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy presented with 1-year history of persistent fever, cough, and progressive abdominal distention. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hepatomegaly and multiple calcifications in the liver and spleen. Thoracic computed tomography showed multiple mediastinal lymph nodes and consolidation in both lungs. Additionally, there was a 2-cm thick retroperitoneal soft tissue mass destroying the T7-8 and L1-L2 vertebral bodies. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with miliary tuberculosis (TB) and Pott's disease, and began administering anti-TB treatment consisting of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Acid-resistant bacilli analysis and mycobacterial culture of the biopsy specimen of Pott's abscess were positive. Mycobacterial culture and PCR of gastric aspirate were also positive. The patient's condition progressively improved with anti-TB treatment and he received 12 months of antiTB therapy. At the end of the treatment all of the patient's symptoms were relieved and he was well except for kyphosis. Miliary TB complicated by Pott's abscess is a very rare presentation of childhood TB. The presented case shows that when Pott's abscess is diagnosed and surgically corrected without delay, patients can recover without squeal. PMID:25983412

  13. Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications

    PubMed Central

    Apovian, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in diet and lifestyle have repeatedly been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM and even to reverse early disease. Weight gain, a potential side effect of treatment for patients with T2DM, is also an important concern, and it has been noted that weight increases associated with antidiabetes therapy may blunt cardiovascular risk reductions achieved by decreasing blood glucose. Among older agents, metformin and acarbose have the lowest risk for weight gain, while sulfonylureas, meglitinides, and thiazolidinediones are all associated with weight increases. Clinical trial results have also consistently demonstrated that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylin lowers weight, and that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral in patients with T2DM. Conventional human insulin formulations are known to increase weight in patients with T2DM. However, some insulin analogs, particularly insulin detemir, have lower liability for this adverse event. The use of both pharmacologic and surgical therapies aimed at treating obesity rather than lowering blood glucose have the potential to improve glycemic control and even resolve T2DM in some patients. PMID:22135499

  14. Modified activin receptor IIB ligand trap mitigates ineffective erythropoiesis and disease complications in murine ?-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Suragani, Rajasekhar N. V. S.; Cawley, Sharon M.; Li, Robert; Wallner, Samantha; Alexander, Mark J.; Mulivor, Aaron W.; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Grinberg, Asya V.; Pearsall, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    In ?-thalassemia, unequal production of ?- and ?-globin chains in erythroid precursors causes apoptosis and inhibition of late-stage erythroid differentiation, leading to anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis (IE), and dysregulated iron homeostasis. Here we used a murine model of ?-thalassemia intermedia (Hbbth1/th1 mice) to investigate effects of a modified activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) ligand trap (RAP-536) that inhibits Smad2/3 signaling. In Hbbth1/th1 mice, treatment with RAP-536 reduced overactivation of Smad2/3 in splenic erythroid precursors. In addition, treatment of Hbbth1/th1 mice with RAP-536 reduced ?-globin aggregates in peripheral red cells, decreased the elevated reactive oxygen species present in erythroid precursors and peripheral red cells, and alleviated anemia by promoting differentiation of late-stage erythroid precursors and reducing hemolysis. Notably, RAP-536 treatment mitigated disease complications of IE, including iron overload, splenomegaly, and bone pathology, while reducing erythropoietin levels, improving erythrocyte morphology, and extending erythrocyte life span. These results implicate signaling by the transforming growth factor-? superfamily in late-stage erythropoiesis and reveal potential of a modified ActRIIB ligand trap as a novel therapeutic agent for thalassemia syndrome and other red cell disorders characterized by IE. PMID:24795345

  15. Glycemic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E.; Alafif, Maram; Abd-Elhameed, Ihab A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between metabolic control, acute and long-term complications, the coexistence of autoimmune diseases, and to assess the different factors that can affect the glycemic control level among children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that included 228 T1DM children and adolescents visiting the pediatric diabetes clinic at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from January 2013 to January 2014. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients was 10.99 years, and the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 8.8%. Acute complications included ketoacidosis in 65.4% of patients, and hypoglycemic attacks in 68.9%. Long-term complications were detected in patients including retinopathy (4.4%), microalbuminuria (16.2%), and dyslipidemia (8.3%). Autoimmune thyroiditis was noted in 14%, and celiac disease was found in 19.7% of patients. A significant difference was found in pubertal and pre-pubertal age groups in terms of glycemic control (p=0.01). Conclusion: The level of HbA1c was found to be higher among the pubertal age group. A relationship between autoimmune diseases and gender was determined. PMID:25630001

  16. [Auto-immune diseases and cancers. Second part: auto-immune diseases complicating cancers and their treatment].

    PubMed

    Pasquet, F; Pavic, M; Ninet, J; Hot, A

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune diseases may reveal or occur during the course of a neoplasia or its treatment. Autoimmune cytopenia, especially haemolytic anaemia, is common in lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphoid leukemia. The link between cancer and myositis is well established. Dermatomyositis is associated with an increased relative risk of cancer of 3.4 to 4.4. A combination of detection of antibodies against p155 and TEP-computed tomography may be the best approach to ascertain the presence of occult malignancy in patients with dermatomyositis. A cutaneous or a systemic vascularitis may reveal a cancer, most often a haematological malignancy such as hairy cell leukemia. Paraneoplastic polyarthritis have been described in particular with adenocardinoma of the lungs. Underlying neoplasia should be considered in male smokers patients with new onset polyarthritis and poor health status. The prevalence of autoimmune conditions in myelodysplastic syndromes is 10 to 30%. Vasculitis and relapsing polychondritis are the most commonly reported manifestations. Immune manifestations can also be related to treatment. The most common treatment complications are autoimmune haemolytic anaemia with fludarabine and thyroiditis related to interferon and cervical radiotherapy. PMID:25106665

  17. Prevention of Disease Complications through Diagnostic Models: How to Tackle the Problem of Missing Data?

    PubMed Central

    Baneshi, MR; Faramarzi, H; Marzban, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic models are frequently used to assess the role of risk factors on disease complications, and therefore to avoid them. Missing data is an issue that challenges the model making. The aim of this study was to develop a diagnostic model to predict death in HIV/AIDS patients when missing data exist. Methods: HIV patients (n=1460) referred to Voluntary Consoling and Testing Center (VCT) of Shiraz southern Iran during 2004–2009 were recruited. Univariate association between variables and death was assessed. Only variables which had univariate P< 0.25 were selected to be offered to the Multifactorial models. First, patients with missing data on candidate variables were deleted (C-C model). Then, applying Multivariable Imputation via Chained Equations (MICE), missing data were imputed. Logistic regression was fitted to C-C and imputed data sets (MICE model). Models were compared in terms of number of variables retained in the final model, width of confidence intervals, and discrimination ability. Result: About 22% of data were lost in C-C model. Number of variables retained in the C-C and MICE models was 2 and 6 respectively. Confidence Intervals (C.I.) corresponding to C-C model was wider than that of MICE. The MICE model showed greater discrimination ability than C-C model (70% versus 64%). Conclusion: The C-C analysis resulted to loss of power and wide CI's. Once missing data were imputed, more variables reached significance level and C.I.'s were narrower. Therefore, we do recommend the application of the imputation method for handling missing data. PMID:23113124

  18. Pulmonary nocardiosis in an adolescent patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab: a serious complication of TNF-alpha blockers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rishi; Walia, Ritu; Sondike, Stephen B; Khan, Raheel

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a serious complication of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blockers. With the increasing use of biologics for inflammatory bowel disease, it is to be anticipated that opportunistic infections such as nocardia will be more frequently encountered in children. We present the case of a 16 year old male with Crohn's disease who developed pulmonary nocardiosis during the course of his treatment with infliximab. This case illustrates the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges faced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease infected with opportunistic organisms. Pediatric health care providers need to be aware so that early diagnosis and treatment can be provided thereby preventing disseminated disease and having favorable outcomes. Although TNF blocker therapy must be discontinued in the presence of such infections, biologic therapy may be reintroduced after successful treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to control underlying symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26050296

  19. [The value of quantitative analysis of procalcitonine in diagnostics of septic complications in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapin, S V; Maslianski?, A L; Lazareva, N M; Vasil'eva, E Iu; Totolian, A A

    2013-01-01

    The infections very often complicate the course of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In diagnostic of septic complications in rheumatic patients the new biomarkers of infections can have a decisive importance. The procalciotonine test is one of them. The issue was to evaluate the diagnostic informativity of this test. The sample included 93 patients. The examination was applied to 65 patients with rheumatic diseases. Among them, 13 patients had bacterial infections. The group consisted of 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematous, 6 patients with systemic angiitis, and 15 patients with other rheumatic diseases. The comparative group included 27 patients of cardio-therapeutic profile and 8 of these patients had bacterial infections. The procalcitonine test was applied with quantitative electrochemiluminescent technique. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the mean levels of procalciotonine test consisted 0.10 +/- 0.13 ng/ml; with systemic lupus erythematous--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/ml; with systemic angiitis--0.22 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; with other rheumatic diseases--0.12 +/- 0.15 ng/ml; of cardio-therapeutic profile without infections--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/vl/ With threshold of procalcitonine test higher than 0.5/ml the sensitivity to diagnostic of infections consisted of 58%, specificity--94% in the group with rheumatic diseases. The procalciotonine test in case of no infection process with values higher than 0.5 ng/ml was detected in three patients. The evaluation of dependence of sensitivity and specificity for procalciotonine test and C-reactive protein the area under curve of procalcitonine test was larger in patients with rheumatic diseases (0.85 against 0.79) and in patients of cardio-therapeutic profile (0.92 against 0.90). The quantitative procalcitonine test is the best technique to detect septic complications in rheumatic patients. PMID:23807991

  20. AgNORs in the myocardium in ischaemic heart disease complicated by heart failure: a postmortem study.

    PubMed Central

    Mamaev, N N; Gudkova, A Y; Amineva, K K

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the interphase ribosomal RNA cistron activity of cardiomyocytes in case with ischaemic heart disease complicated by heart failure. METHODS: Nucleoli were investigated in postmortem myocardium samples from 31 cases with ischaemic heart disease (mean (SEM), 57.4 (6.5) years) with or without severe heart failure (18 and 13, respectively) and from eight healthy people who died in accidents (mean (SEM) 25.3 (4.0) years). Myocardium obtained within one hour after death was frozen in liquid nitrogen. Silver staining for nucleolar organiser regions (AgNOR) was performed with a standard procedure and the mean score obtained. On the basis of these data, the average number of AgNORs per nucleus was determined. The Student's t test was used to compare groups. RESULTS: Compared with controls, the mean numbers of AgNORs per nucleus in cardiomyocytes from ischaemic heart disease patients not complicated with severe heart failure were higher (8.0 v 9.9; p < 0.05), but cases with severe heart failure had a progressive decrease in cardiomyocyte AgNORs. A difference in AgNOR numbers between cases with different ischaemic heart disease courses was found when cases with the same New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional stage III of heart failure were studied. CONCLUSIONS: The significant decrease of AgNORs in cardiomyocytes from cases with severe ischaemic heart disease complicated by heart failure seems to be connected with cardiomyocyte adaptation (a variant of hibernation) to a diminished circulation that, hypothetically, may affect the level of ribosomal RNA synthesis. PMID:9713594

  1. Successful treatment of lymphoproliferative disease complicating primary immunodeficiency/immunodysregulatory disorders with reduced-intensity allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan M; Sebire, Neil J; Harvey, Julia; Gaspar, H Bobby; Cathy, Cale; Jones, Alison; Rao, Kanchan; Cubitt, David; Amrolia, Persis J; Davies, E Graham; Veys, Paul

    2007-09-15

    Lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a recognized complication of primary immunodeficiency (PID) and immunodysregulatory syndromes. Historically, it has a very poor outcome. For patients surviving LPD, myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) was the only cure for the underlying PID, with a high risk of developing posttransplantation complications, including recurrent lymphoproliferative disease. We describe 8 patients with a range of PID and immunodysregulatory syndromes complicated by LPD. After initial treatment of the LPD (including the use of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, in 6 of the patients), all patients underwent reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) SCT with prospective monitoring for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia. After transplantation, 3 patients received rituximab, and 3 patients received prophylactic EBV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Only 1 patient developed recurrent LPD posttransplantation, which responded to rituximab. All patients who underwent transplantation survive free of LPD and are cured of their PID at a median follow-up of 4 years (range, 1-7 years). With careful monitoring and pre-emptive therapy, we advocate this RIC SCT approach to patients with PID who have pre-existing EBV-LPD. PMID:17502458

  2. Snippets From the Past: Cohort Analysis of Disease Rates—Another Piece in a Seemingly Still Incomplete Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    For almost a century, epidemiologists have stratified age-specific disease rates by year of birth to better understand the distribution of a disease in a population and its evolution across time. In the present article, I review the contributions of John Brownlee, Kristian Feyer Andvord, and Wade Hampton Frost and, to accentuate the similarities of their approaches, redraw their original graphs of age-specific death rates of tuberculosis organized either by year of death or year of birth. In addition, this article reports on an apparently universally forgotten publication in the American Journal of Hygiene published in 1929, which both upsets the conventional history of the earliest reports of disease rates stratified by birth cohorts and challenges the theory that Frost discovered cohort analysis independently and gave it its name. PMID:24920785

  3. A neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema:A complete recovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi-Jie; Wang, Dong-Xuan; Dai, Chun-Lai; Wu, Hui

    2014-07-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with serious complications and fatal cases have been reported over the last decade worldwide. The authors report a rare case of HFMD in a neonate complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema. She had fever, lethargy, dyspnea. Physical examination revealed shock signs, fine rales on both lungs, absent Moro reflex. The patient had a rapidly progressive course with seizures, coma, no spontaneous breathing, chemosis. There were some vesicles on left sole and red maculopapular rashes on perianal skin. She had a history of exposure to HFMD. Fecal sample was positive for EV71 RNA by real-time PCR. Chest X-rays showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. MRI of the brain showed significant hypointensity in the brainstem on T1WI and hyperintensity on T2WI. She recovered well. This case highlights severe HFMD in neonates is rare. Medical history and physical examination are important in making diagnosis. PMID:25097545

  4. LRRK2 and Human Disease: A Complicated Question or a Question of Complexes?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patrick A. Lewis (University College London; UCL Institute of Neurology REV)

    2012-01-17

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is linked to various diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, cancer, and leprosy. Data from LRRK2 knockout mice has highlighted a possible role for LRRK2 in regulating signaling pathways that are linked to the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease. Here, we examine how LRRK2’s role as a signaling hub in the cell could lead to diverse pathologies.

  5. Pulmonary co-infection with Nocardia and Aspergillus in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease receiving steroids and tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Agarwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Patients on immunosuppression are at risk of unusual infections. We present a man diagnosed to have adult-onset Still's disease who, on high-dose oral steroid and tacrolimus, developed a cavitating pneumonia due to co-infection with Aspergillus flavus and Nocardia. Timely diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy resulted in a favourable clinical outcome. Such co-infection in a patient receiving tacrolimus is rare in the published literature. This case serves to emphasise the need to be vigilant for unusual infections in patients who are immunosuppressed, either due to drugs or underlying disease condition. PMID:25398925

  6. Gastrointestinal Complications of Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Case Report and Literature Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie L. Barton; Sosan L. Moussa; Rodrigo G. Villar; Rebecca L. Hulett

    1998-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited disorder of phagocytic leukocyte function, is characterized by recurrent infections with catalase-positive organisms. Gastrointestinal (GI) tract involvement, present in the majority of affected individuals, may be present initially and recurrently, mimics other entities such as inflammatory bowel disease, and causes substantive morbidity and mortality. Disorders of motility, ulceration, obstruction, and infection (e.g., abscesses) occur

  7. A review of the impact of biologics on surgical complications in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Melissa I; Cohen, Benjamin L; Greenstein, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has revolutionized the treatment of Crohn's disease. Despite the increased use in the past decade and a half, a majority of patients with Crohn's disease with ultimately require operative management of their disease. No clear consensus has been made in the literature regarding the surgical outcomes in patients who have been exposed to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy. This review highlights the most recent and relevant literature regarding the safety and effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor use in the perioperative period. PMID:25811432

  8. Management of lipid exudates in Coats disease by adjuvant intravitreal triamcinolone: effects and complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ihab Saad Othman; Magdy Moussa; Manal Bouhaimed

    2009-01-01

    AimTo evaluate the role of intravitreal Triamcinolone (TA) in the early management of Coats disease.MethodsRetrospective, interventional case series.Results15 consecutive cases with Coats disease were managed with 4 mg\\/0.1 ml intravitreal TA injection on presentation and were followed for a minimum of 1 year duration. Additional management strategies including drainage of subretinal fluid through an inferior sclerotomy, peripheral laser ablation and\\/or

  9. Neonatal Outcomes and Birth Weight in Pregnancies Complicated by Maternal Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Männistö, Tuija; Mendola, Pauline; Reddy, Uma; Laughon, S. Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Maternal hypothyroidism has previously been shown to increase risk for neonatal intensive care treatment, but otherwise the association between thyroid diseases and neonatal morbidity is understudied. The Consortium on Safe Labor, a retrospective cohort (2002–2008), included 223,512 singleton deliveries of which 0.2% had hyperthyroidism, 1.4% primary and 0.1% iatrogenic hypothyroidism, and 1.3% other/unspecified thyroid disease. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations estimated adjusted odds ratios of adverse outcomes. Intensive care treatment was more common for neonates of women with thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism and primary hypothyroidism were associated with sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea, and apnea. Iatrogenic hypothyroidism was associated with sepsis and neonatal anemia. Hyperthyroidism was also associated with rare outcomes (prevalence, <1%) including cardiomyopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and neonatal thyroid diseases. Hyperthyroid non-Hispanic black women had higher odds of term infants that weighed <2,500 g, and hypothyroid non-Hispanic white women had higher odds of large-for-gestational-age infants. These analyses were stratified by race/ethnicity due to interaction. Associations were similar in analyses restricted to term infants. In conclusion, thyroid diseases were associated with increased neonatal morbidity. Although we lacked data on treatment during pregnancy, these nationwide data suggest a need for better thyroid disease management to reduce neonatal morbidity. PMID:23666815

  10. [Treatment and outcome of Crohn's disease without initial complications. Results of a retrospective, multicenter Tunisian study].

    PubMed

    Cheikh, Imed; Ben Ammar, Ahmed; Essid, Mejda; Azzouz, Messadak; Ettahri, Nabil; Krichene, Mohamed; Bouzaidi, Slim; Ennajar, Taoufik

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate and achieve the factors that have an influence on the evolution of the Chron's disease. This study was done in 124 patients reaching the diagnosis of Chron's disease between 1988 and 1997. The evolution of this disease was achieved in 87 patients. The Chron's disease was inactive among 31 patients (35-6%)--with discontinous evolution in 42 patients (48.3%) and active chronic in 14 patients (16-1%). The active chronic form of Chron's disease was twice more frequent among the smokers and the patients with age above 40 years--but this difference has no statistical significance. The indication of surgical treatment was realised in 21 patients and it takes place as result of failure of medical treatment in 16 patients (76-2%)--an abcess in 2 patents (9-5%) and iatrogenic perforation in 1 patient (4-8%). The age-sexe-smoke--the intensity of the initial attack and the nature of the treatment had no influence in the need of the surgical interfference. The Chron's disease showed the less severe evolution in this study--the age above 40 years and the consumption of smoke increased the frequency of active chronic form. PMID:12416354

  11. Soluble HLA-G in pregnancies complicated by autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Beneventi, Fausta; Badulli, Carla; Locatelli, Elena; Caporali, Roberto; Ramoni, Véronique; Cavagnoli, Chiara; Simonetta, Margherita; Garbin, Giulia; Tinelli, Carmine; Alpini, Claudia; Montecucco, CarloMaurizio; Martinetti, Miryam; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases in pregnancies are associated with increased adverse obstetric outcomes. We compared maternal soluble human leucocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G) blood levels in subjects with a rheumatic disease preexisting pregnancy and unaffected controls. Third-trimester blood maternal sHLA-G concentrations were significantly higher in subjects with rheumatic diseases than in controls (mean 93.1ng/ml [SD 42.1] vs 58.1ng/ml [SD 96.3], p=0.003). Cord blood sHLA-G concentrations were significantly higher in rheumatic disease than in those born to control mothers (median 41.2ng/ml [IQR: 3.3-44.0] vs 17.9ng/ml [IQR: 17.2-88.1], p=0.007). A strict positive correlation (r=0.88, p<0.001) was found between the maternal and fetal titers of ANA autoantibodies as well as between maternal and fetal sHLAG circulating levels (r=0.58 and r=0.67, respectively, for controls and cases, p<0.001). Maternal s-HLA-G blood concentrations were significantly higher in subjects with rheumatic disease DEL/DEL homozygous for a polymorphism of the 3' untranslated regulatory region of HLA-G (HLA-G 14bp) than in the corresponding healthy controls (mean values 141.5ng/ml [SD: 166] vs 54.2ng/ml [SD: 35], p=0.009). Increasing maternal and cord blood levels of s-HLA-G concentrations among pregnant subjects with rheumatic diseases compared with controls suggest that autoimmune diseases prompt a maternal and fetal immune response that favors pregnancy immune tolerance. PMID:26042897

  12. Effects of nilvadipine on cytokine-levels and soluble factors in collagen disease complicated with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, H; Nomura, S; Ozaki, Y; Nagahama, M; Fukuhara, S

    1999-10-01

    We examined some immunological parameters, particularly cytokines and soluble factors in collagen diseases complicated with essential hypertension. We also investigated the effects of Nilvadipine on immunological parameters after treatment with this drug for six months. The frequency of helper/inducer T cells (CD4+ CD8- cells, CD4+ CD45RA- cells) decreased in the peripheral blood on a 6 month treatment with nilvadipine. There was a significant decrease of suppressor/inducer T cells (CD4+ 45RA+ cells), and an insignificant decrease of activated T cells (CD3+ HLA-DR+ cells) and memory T cells (CD45RA- CD45RO+ cells) after treatment. Before treatment with Nilvadipine, interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-a, and interleukin-6 levels increased higher in the patients than in healthy volunteers. However, interleukin-1beta and interleukin-6 concentrations tended to decrease after treatment with Nilvadipine. Besides, tumor necrosis factor-alpha decreased significantly after treatment. The soluble interleukin-2 receptor concentrations also showed a decreased tendency after treatment, although high concentrations were found in the patients before treatment. In contrast, soluble human leukocyte antigen-1 and soluble thrombomodulin levels showed no significant change after treatment. These results suggest that Nilvadipine inhibits the generation of cytokines derived from activated T lymphocytes. Nilvadipine, calcium antagonist, may be useful for inhibition of vascular complication in collagen diseases. PMID:10513835

  13. Complication Rate of Percutaneous Liver Biopsies among Persons with Advanced Chronic Liver Disease in the HALT-C Trial

    PubMed Central

    Seeff, Leonard B.; Everson, Gregory T.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Curto, Teresa M.; Lee, William M.; Ghany, Marc G.; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Fontana, Robert J.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Dienstag, Jules L.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Although percutaneous liver biopsy is a standard diagnostic procedure, it has drawbacks, including risk of serious complications. It is not known whether persons with advanced chronic liver disease have a greater risk of complications from liver biopsy than patients with more mild, chronic liver disease. The safety and complications of liver biopsy were examined in patients with hepatitis C-related bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis that were enrolled in the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) Trial. Methods Standard case report forms from 2,740 liver biopsies performed at 10 study sites between 2000 and 2006 were reviewed for serious adverse events, along with information from questionnaires completed by investigators about details of biopsy techniques used at each hospital. Results There were 29 serious adverse events (1.1%); the most common was bleeding (16 cases, 0.6%). There were no biopsy-related deaths. The bleeding rate was higher among patients with platelet counts ?60,000/mm3 and among those with an international normalized ratio (INR) ?1.3, although none of the patients with an INR >1.5 bled. Excluding subjects with a platelet count ?60,000/mm3 would have reduced the bleeding rate by 25% (4/16), eliminating only 2.8% (77/2740) of biopsies. Operator experience, the type of needle used, or the performance of the biopsy under ultrasound guidance did not influence the frequencies of adverse events. Conclusions Approximately 0.5% of persons with hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis experienced potentially serious bleeding after liver biopsy; risk increased significantly in patients with platelet counts ?60,000/mm3.(K2). PMID:20362695

  14. Parental Problem-Solving Abilities and the Association of Sickle Cell Disease Complications with Health-related Quality of Life for School-age Children

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Lamia P.; Daniel, Lauren C.; Smith, Kelsey; Robinson, M. Renée; Patterson, Chavis A.

    2013-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The current analysis sought to explore parent problem-solving abilities/skills as a moderator between SCD complications and HRQOL to evaluate applicability to pediatric SCD. At baseline, 83 children ages 6–12 years and their primary caregiver completed measures of the child HRQOL. Primary caregivers also completed a measure of social problem-solving. A SCD complications score was computed from medical record review. Parent problem-solving abilities significantly moderated the association of SCD complications with child self-report psychosocial HRQOL (p = .006). SCD complications had a direct effect on parent proxy physical and psychosocial child HRQOL. Enhancing parent problem-solving abilities may be one approach to improve HRQOL for children with high SCD complications; however, modification of parent perceptions of HRQOL may require direct intervention to improve knowledge and skills involved in disease management. PMID:24222378

  15. Orbital socket contracture: a complication of inflammatory orbital disease in patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Talar-Williams; M C Sneller; C A Langford; J A Smith; T A Cox; M R Robinson

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To describe the clinical characteristics of orbital socket contracture in patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG).Methods: A retrospective cohort study The medical records of 256 patients with WG examined at the National Institutes of Health from 1967 to 2004 were reviewed to identify patients with orbital socket contracture. Details of the orbital disease including Hertel exophthalmometry readings, radiological findings, and

  16. Pediatric patients with renal disease and cardiovascular complications: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Saburi, Amin; Taheri, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular burden of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in children has recently received more attention, and some authors have recommended that the origins of the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality be found in childhood. In this comprehensive review of the literature, we aim to review the main and most recent studies evaluating cardiovascular risk factors in pediatric kidney disease patients. The literature suggests that ESRD, even in the pediatric population, is associated with a high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and needs serious attention. Unfortunately, there is extreme scarcity of data on the efficacy of preventive strategies on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients with renal disease. Therefore, authors of the current article recommend future studies to be directed to find beneficial and/or potential harmful effects of different interventions conventionally used in this population, including lifestyle modifications and pharmaceutical therapy on cardiovascular indices. Moreover, the effects of these drugs on the renal function of children with minimal kidney disease should be evaluated. PMID:25161680

  17. Persistence of endothelial cell damage late after Kawasaki disease in patients without coronary artery complications

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Nasser; Haghjooy-Javanmard, Shaghayegh; Presidend, Nahid; Manssori, Nayereh Siyah; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies proposed an increased risk of atherosclerosis in patients with a history of Kawasaki disease. This study aimed to investigate the persistence of vascular injury after an acute phase of the Kawasaki disease. Materials and Methods: We determined the number of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) in the peripheral blood of 13 patients with a history of Kawasaki disease within four to ten years, in comparison with 13 healthy relative controls. The CECs were counted as CD146+/CD34 + cells by the standard flow cytometry technique, and the independent t-test was employed to compare the mean number of CECs in the two groups. Results: The mean number of CECs was significantly higher in patients than in controls (12 ± 3.03 vs. 2.38 ± 0.87, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study elucidates the persistence of vascular injury late after Kawasaki disease. This finding suggests that prolonged administration of vascular anti-inflammatory agents might be beneficial for preventing atherosclerosis in the subsequent years, in these patients. PMID:25709990

  18. Recurrent buccal space abscessesA complication of Crohn’s disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. K. Gagoh; R. M. Qureshi; M. T. Hendrickse

    1999-01-01

    Oral features of Crohn’s disease include ulcerations, lip fissuring, cobblestone plaques, and mucosal tags. We report the case of a 16-year old male patient with a 3-month history of abdominal pain, diarrhea, and oral ulceration. Clinical examinations revealed established intestinal lesions, a marked cobblestone appearance in the oral cavity, and an unusual pattern of presentation not previously reported in the

  19. Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome complicated by IgA nephropathy and Graves’ disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome is a disorder characterized by a combination of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is defined by the presence of immunoglobulin A deposits in glomerular mesangial areas. In this report, we describe a rare case of tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy and Graves’ disease, which was successfully treated with corticosteroids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such a case has been documented since tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome was first described. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman presented with tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome accompanied by immunoglobulin A nephropathy and Graves’ disease. She had renal dysfunction, proteinuria, and hematuria. Two weeks after her admission, she developed anterior chamber uveitis. She received corticosteroids, resulting in significant clinical improvement. Conclusion Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome is a relatively uncommon cause of tubulointerstitial nephritis. Clinicians should recognize that tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome with immunoglobulin A nephropathy can occur in the presence of Graves’ disease. Additionally, this report may provide important clues in terms of the management of a concomitant case of these diseases. PMID:25216854

  20. Vitamin D Deficiency and Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Are Common Complications in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fahrleitner, Astrid; Dobnig, Harald; Obernosterer, Andrea; Pilger, Ernst; Leb, Georg; Weber, Kurt; Kudlacek, Stefan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara M

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate via the vitamin D status whether patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) tend to develop vitamin D deficiency that in turn influences their clinical symptoms. DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING University hospital. PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS Three hundred twenty-seven patients were evaluated; subjects with secondary causes of bone disease or bone active medication were excluded. One hundred sixty-one patients with either PAD stage II (n = 84) or stage IV (n = 77) were enrolled and compared to 45 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS All patients underwent determinations of serum chemistry, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D3) intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin and were further stratified according to an individual restriction score into 3 groups: mildly, moderately, or severely restricted in daily life due to the underlying disease. Patients with PAD IV showed significantly lower vitamin D3 (P = .0001), and calcium (P = .0001) values and significantly higher iPTH (P = .0001), osteocalcin (P = .0001) and ALP (P = .02) levels as compared to patients with PAD II. Patients considering themselves as severely restricted due to the underlying disease showed lower vitamin D3 and higher iPTH levels than those who described only a moderate (vitamin D3: P < .001; iPTH: P < .01) or mild (vitamin D3: P < .001; iPTH: P < .001) restriction in daily life. CONCLUSION Patients with PAD IV, especially those who feel severely restricted due to the disease, are at high risk of developing vitamin D deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and ultimately osteomalacia due to immobilization and subsequent lack of exposure to sunlight, all of which in turn lead to further deterioration. Monitoring of vitamin D metabolism and vitamin D replacement therapy could be a simple, inexpensive approach to mitigating clinical symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with advanced PAD. PMID:12220361

  1. Management of extraintestinal manifestations and other complications of inflammatory bowel disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward V. Loftus

    2004-01-01

    The past 18 months have seen many studies of the prevalence, pathogenesis, and treatment of the extraintestinal manifestations\\u000a of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor alpha have shown effectiveness in randomized trials\\u000a for the treatment of spondyloarthropathies and ocular manifestations. Open-label studies suggest that these agents may be\\u000a effective for pyoderma gangrenosum as well. The epidemiology of

  2. Septicemia caused by salmonella infection: An overlooked complication of sickle cell disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Wright; Peter Thomas; Graham R. Serjeant

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the characteristics of salmonella infections in sickle cell disease and to compare the features of osteomyelitis and those with bacteremia\\/septicemia without obvious bone changes. To search for risk factors for osteomyelitis, and to draw attention to the frequency and significance of salmonella bacteremia\\/septicemia.Study design: A retrospective review of all salmonella isolations from the blood, pus, or aspirates

  3. Presentation and diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease: the implications of current and emerging markers in overcoming the diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Colafrancesco, Serena; Priori, Roberta; Valesini, Guido

    2015-06-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a known cause of fever of unknown origin. It is characterized by a triad of symptoms: spiking fever (>39°C), salmon-colored rash and arthritis/arthralgia. On a predisposing genetic background, several conditions may act as trigger for disease and among these, infectious agents are the most important. Nowadays, a dichotomous view of AOSD has been introduced which distinguishes this entity in two subsets according to the clinical features and laboratory aspects: systemic or articular. As AOSD is a diagnosis of exclusion, specific biomarkers able to facilitate differential diagnosis are needed. A number of possible biomarkers have been proposed that will be discussed in detail in this review: ferritin, IL-18, procalcitonin, s100 proteins and sCD163. PMID:25948106

  4. High trochanter location: Natural history or complication following treatment of Perthes' disease?

    PubMed

    Czubak, Jaros?aw; Pietrzak, Szymon; Kraiz, Sulaiman; P?o?czak, Maciej

    2004-01-01

    Background. In Perthes' disease femoral head deformities can be accompanied by high location of the greater trochanter and diminished shaft-neck angle, causing decreased joint stability and diminished hip function. The aim of our study was to compare head-trochanter relationships in hips treated for Perthes' disease using surgical and non-surgical methods. Material and methods. The clinical material consisted of 61 children (68 hips) treated in our hospital from 1990 to 1994; 32 hips were treated conservatively, while 36 hips were operated. The mean observation time was 7.7 years. We re-examined X-rays done at onset, after 3-6 months of treatment, and at final follow-up. The projected shaft-neck angle, ATD (Edgren), and degree of head involvement (Catteral and Herring) were evaluated, while the Stulberg classification was used for outcome evaluation. In clinical examination we looked for Trendelenburg sign, limping, and leg length discrepancy. Results. The value of shaft-neck angle and ATD were correlated with age, sex, degree of head containment, and method of treatment. In boys, comparatively low ATD values were found in both treatment groups. In girls the ATD values were considerably lower in operated hips. High trochanter location and diminished shaft-neck angle had no statistical effect on clinical outcome. Conclusion. The natural course of Perthes' disease causes decreased ATD, regardless of treatment type. In our operative technique, containment may be achieved more by extension (anteflexion) osteotomy of the femur than by pure varisation osteotomy. We found no indication for epiphysiodesis of the greater trochanter combined with anteflexion osteotomy of the femur. PMID:17618190

  5. Electrophysiology of "incisional" reentrant atrial tachycardia complicating surgery for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lesh, M D; Kalman, J M; Saxon, L A; Dorostkar, P C

    1997-08-01

    Intraatrial reentrant tachycardia, which occurs frequently in patients who have undergone corrective surgery for congenital heart disease, presents a challenge to successful management. Because the surgical repair sites are invariably critical to the development and maintenance of reentrant atrial tachycardia, we use the term "incisional reentry" to describe these arrhythmias. An understanding of the electrophysiology of such "incisional reentry," and techniques to identify a critical isthmus, are essential for successful ablation of these circuits. A critical isthmus may be identified by the presence of entrainment with concealed fusion. Confirmation that the site is critical to the tachycardia circuit is obtained by an analysis of the relationship between the postpacing interval and the tachycardia cycle length. Advances in mapping from multiple simultaneous sites, along with the ability to create larger, deeper lesions will be needed in order to cure a larger number of these patients. Ultimately, in some cases one must consider each procedure palliative rather than curative, as the disease progresses and substrate evolves and more tachycardia circuits become active. PMID:9272519

  6. Graves' disease: a review of surgical indications, management, and complications in a cohort of 59 patients.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, P; Gangidi, S; Kotrotsos, G; Cunliffe, D

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of 59 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for the treatment of Graves' disease over a 6-year period was conducted in order to assess the current indications and identify any specific factors that may influence the patient's decision to opt for surgical treatment. A comparison of outcomes between the current study and a similar one from Hong Kong was also attempted. Patient preference was the most common reason for opting for surgery over radioactive iodine in both studies. Other indications for surgery, such as Graves' ophthalmopathy, patient refusal for radioactive iodine, large goitre with pressure symptoms, planning for pregnancy, young age, and intolerance to anti-thyroid drugs, were also similar in the two groups. There were no statistically significant differences in laryngeal nerve palsy between the two groups. The rates of permanent hypoparathyroidism in patients in Hong Kong and in the present study were 5.4% and 5.1%, respectively. No patient in either study had recurrent Graves' disease after total thyroidectomy. Our findings confirmed that patient preference is the leading indication for surgery, implicating a continuous misconception of radioactive substances and increasing confidence in surgical outcomes. In experienced hands, the risks of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and permanent hypoparathyroidism remain minimal. PMID:25726089

  7. A Systematic Review of Xuezhikang, an Extract from Red Yeast Rice, for Coronary Heart Disease Complicated by Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Qinghua; Liu, Zhaolan; Chen, Keji; Xu, Hao; Liu, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aims to evaluate the benefit and side effect of Xuezhikang for coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by dyslipidemia. Methods. All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with Xuezhikang as a treatment for CHD combined with dyslipidemia were considered for inclusion. Data extraction and analyses and quality assessment were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. Results. We included 22 randomized trials. Xuezhikang showed significant benefit on the incidence of all-cause deaths, CHD deaths, myocardial infarction, and revascularization as compared with placebo based on conventional treatment for CHD. It remarkably lowered total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) as compared with the placebo or inositol nicotinate group, which was similar to statins group. Xuezhikang also raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared to placebo or no intervention, which was similar to Inositol nicotinate and slightly inferior to statins. The incidence of adverse events did not differ between the Xuezhikang and control group. Conclusions. Xuezhikang showed a comprehensive lipid-regulating effect and was safe and effective in reducing cardiovascular events in CHD patients complicated by dyslipidemia. However, more rigorous trials with high quality are needed to give high level of evidence. PMID:22567033

  8. Potential influences of complementary therapy on motor and non-motor complications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A; Evatt, Marian L

    2009-10-01

    Nearly two-thirds of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use vitamins or nutritional supplements, and many more may use other complementary therapies, yet <50% of patients have discussed the use of these complementary therapies with a healthcare professional. Physicians should be aware of the complementary therapies their patients with PD are using, and the possible effects of these therapies on motor and non-motor symptoms. Complementary therapies, such as altered diet, dietary supplements, vitamin therapy, herbal supplements, caffeine, nicotine, exercise, physical therapy, massage therapy, melatonin, bright-light therapy and acupuncture, may all influence the symptoms of PD and/or the effectiveness of dopaminergic therapy. Preliminary evidence suggests complementary therapy also may influence non-motor symptoms of PD, such as respiratory disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, mood disorders, sleep and orthostatic hypotension. Whenever possible, clinicians should ensure that complementary therapy is used appropriately in PD patients without reducing the benefits of dopaminergic therapy. PMID:19739693

  9. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD) are generally classified as either local ... is chronic (of long duration) LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF ULCERATIVE COLITIS PERFORATION (RUPTURE) OF THE BOWEL Intestinal perforation occurs ...

  10. An Unusual Case of Darier Disease Complicated With a Parasitic Infestation.

    PubMed

    Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; Cabezas, Fausto; Díaz, Claudia Juliana

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman living in the countryside near Cali, Colombia, presented with exacerbation of papules located on her face and neck and an ulcer located on the left retroauricular area of 2 weeks' duration. She stated that her skin lesions appeared erratically, beginning at 13 years of age and that her father and daughter had similar skin lesions. Physical examination revealed multiple erythematous, hyperkeratotic papules, and yellowish brown crusts that coalesced to plaques located on symmetrical areas of the forehead, neck, and periauricular areas with excoriation and malodor (Figure 1a and 1b). There were flat-topped papules on the dorsal aspect of her hands. The fingernails exhibited subungual hyperkeratotic fragments, V-shaped notches at the free edges of some nails, distal onycholysis, and white longitudinal bands (Figure 1c). We also discovered a foul-smelling left retroauricular cavity, approximately 3 cm in length and 3 cm in depth, with multiple fly larvae inside of it (Figure 2). We made the diagnosis of retroauricular myiasis and obtained skin biopsy specimens from her forehead and scalp, to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of Darier disease. PMID:26137743

  11. Clinical characteristics and lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated with impaired peripheral oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Lin, I-Feng

    2014-09-01

    During exercise testing, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often present with ventilatory limitations and various combinations of impaired peripheral oxygenation (IPO) to the exercising muscles. The entities of IPO include anemia, circulation impairment and deconditioning. COPD-IPO is not widely accepted as being a subgroup of COPD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features of COPD-IPO patients. Forty-seven COPD patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing. COPD-IPO was identified when all IPO variables had abnormal values. The patients who did not meet the COPD-IPO criteria were defined as the NIPO group. The variables with abnormal values included peak oxygen uptake (VO?) <85% predicated, anaerobic threshold <40% VO?max pred, VO?-work rate slope <8.6 ml/watt, oxygen pulse <80%pred, and ventilatory equivalents for O? and CO? at nadir (>31 and >34, respectively). Anthropometrics, biochemistry, and lung function were compared between the groups. Forty-six COPD patients were enrolled after excluding one patient who had technical difficulties in performing the exercise tests. Despite FEV1 and FVC being similarly reduced (p = NS) between the groups, the COPD-IPO (n = 13, 28%) patients had lower body mass index and were taller, and had impaired diffusing capacity and larger total lung capacity and air-trapping (all p < 0.05). We concluded that COPD patients with all six variables having abnormal values are a unique subgroup and that identification of these patients is worthwhile for further investigations and management such as exercise training and nutritional supplements. PMID:24062273

  12. Role of Innate Immune Response in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Metabolic Complications and Therapeutic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Rosaria; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Calignano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common liver disease worldwide, both in adults and children. It is characterized by an aberrant lipid storage in hepatocytes, named hepatic steatosis. Simple steatosis remains a benign process in most affected patients, while some of them develop superimposed necroinflammatory activity with a non-specific inflammatory infiltrate and a progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with or without fibrosis. Deep similarity and interconnections between innate immune cells and those of liver parenchyma have been highlighted and showed to play a key role in the development of chronic liver disease. The liver can be considered as an “immune organ” because it hosts non-lymphoid cells, such as macrophage Kupffer cells, stellate and dendritic cells, and lymphoid cells. Many of these cells are components of the classic innate immune system, enabling the liver to play a major role in response to pathogens. Although the liver provides a “tolerogenic” environment, aberrant activation of innate immune signaling may trigger “harmful” inflammation that contributes to tissue injury, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Pathogen recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors, are responsible for the recognition of immunogenic signals, and represent the major conduit for sensing hepatic and non-hepatic noxious stimuli. A pivotal role in liver inflammation is also played by cytokines, which can initiate or have a part in immune response, triggering hepatic intracellular signaling pathways. The sum of inflammatory signals and deranged substrate handling induce most of the metabolic alteration traits: insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and their compounded combined effects. In this review, we discuss the relevant role of innate immune cell activation in relation to NAFLD, the metabolic complications associated to this pathology, and the possible pharmacological tools. PMID:24795720

  13. Successful Use of Higher-Dose Etanercept for Multirefractory Systemic Flare of Adult-Onset Still's Disease with Liver Failure with No Response to Tocilizumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamechika, Shinya; Iwagaitsu, Shiho; Maeda, Shinji; Togawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with refractory systemic flare of adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure despite high-dose corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and tocilizumab, was successfully treated with additional use of etanercept. Etanercept at a dose of 50?mg weekly was partially effective but could not reduce the dose of concomitant betamethasone from 5?mg/day. Etanercept at a dose of 75?mg weekly could lead her to clinical remission and enabled successful tapering off the corticosteroids and discontinuation of etanercept. Normalization of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and persistent elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor ? under the treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressants suggest that tumor necrosis factor ? was more deeply involved than at least interleukin 6 in the pathogenesis of refractoriness of the disease in this patient, and these findings might be indicative of potential efficacy for adjunctive use of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor rather than an interleukin 6 inhibitor. PMID:24455384

  14. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  15. Beneficial effect of intravenous dexamethasone in children with mild to moderately severe acute chest syndrome complicating sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bernini, J C; Rogers, Z R; Sandler, E S; Reisch, J S; Quinn, C T; Buchanan, G R

    1998-11-01

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has historically been managed with oxygen, antibiotics, and blood transfusions. Recently high-dose corticosteroid therapy was shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization in children with SCD and vaso-occlusive crisis. Therefore, we chose to assess the use of glucocorticoids in ACS. We conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intravenous dexamethasone (0.3 mg/kg every 12 hours x 4 doses) in children with SCD hospitalized with mild to moderately severe ACS. Forty-three evaluable episodes of ACS occurred in 38 children (median age, 6.7 years). Twenty-two patients received dexamethasone and 21 patients received placebo. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic, clinical, or laboratory characteristics between the two groups. Mean hospital stay was shorter in the dexamethasone-treated group (47 hours v 80 hours; P = .005). Dexamethasone therapy prevented clinical deterioration and reduced the need for blood transfusions (P < .001 and = .013, respectively). Mean duration of oxygen and analgesic therapy, number of opioid doses, and the duration of fever was also significantly reduced in the dexamethasone-treated patients. Of seven patients readmitted within 72 hours after discharge (six after dexamethasone; P = .095), only one had respiratory complications (P = 1.00). No side effects clearly related to dexamethasone were observed. In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, gender and previous episodes of ACS were the only variables that appeared to predict response to dexamethasone, as measured by lengh of hospital stay. Intravenous dexamethasone has a beneficial effect in children with SCD hospitalized with mild to moderately severe acute chest syndrome. Further study of this therapeutic modality is indicated. PMID:9787142

  16. Perioperative Fluid Management in Kidney Transplantation: Is Volume Overload Still Mandatory for Graft Function?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. De Gasperi; S. Narcisi; E. Mazza; L. Bettinelli; M. Pavani; L. Perrone; C. Grugni; A. Corti

    2006-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is now recognized as the treatment of choice for patients with chronic renal failure. Despite the extension of indications to patients suffering severe hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and chronic heart failure, the worldwide results are superb. However, perioperative cardiac complications occur in 6% to 10% of transplanted patients. Aggressive intraoperative volume expansion is still recommended to maximize graft

  17. Late corrective arthrodesis in nonplantigrade diabetic charcot midfoot disease is associated with high complication and reoperation rates.

    PubMed

    Eschler, Anica; Gradl, Georg; Wussow, Annekatrin; Mittlmeier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Charcot arthropathy may lead to a loss of osteoligamentous foot architecture and consequently loss of the plantigrade alignment. In this series of patients a technique of internal corrective arthrodesis with maximum fixation strength was provided in order to lower complication rates. Materials/Methods. 21 feet with severe nonplantigrade diabetic Charcot deformity Eichenholtz stages II/III (Sanders/Frykberg II/III/IV) and reconstructive arthrodesis with medial and additional lateral column support were retrospectively enrolled. Follow-up averaged 4.0 years and included a clinical (AOFAS score/PSS), radiological, and complication analysis. Results. A mean of 2.4 complications/foot occurred, of which 1.5/foot had to be solved surgically. 76% of feet suffered from soft tissue complications; 43% suffered hardware-associated complications. Feet with only 2 out of 5 high risk criteria according to Pinzur showed significantly lower complication counts. Radiographs revealed a correct restoration of all foot axes postoperatively with superior fixation strength medially. Conclusion. Late corrective arthrodesis with medial and lateral column stabilization in the nonplantigrade stages of neuroosteoarthropathy can provide reasonable reconstruction of the foot alignment. Nonetheless, overall complication/reoperation rates were high. With separation into low/high risk criteria a helpful guide in treatment choice is provided. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) under number DRKS00007537. PMID:26000309

  18. Late Corrective Arthrodesis in Nonplantigrade Diabetic Charcot Midfoot Disease Is Associated with High Complication and Reoperation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Wussow, Annekatrin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Charcot arthropathy may lead to a loss of osteoligamentous foot architecture and consequently loss of the plantigrade alignment. In this series of patients a technique of internal corrective arthrodesis with maximum fixation strength was provided in order to lower complication rates. Materials/Methods. 21 feet with severe nonplantigrade diabetic Charcot deformity Eichenholtz stages II/III (Sanders/Frykberg II/III/IV) and reconstructive arthrodesis with medial and additional lateral column support were retrospectively enrolled. Follow-up averaged 4.0 years and included a clinical (AOFAS score/PSS), radiological, and complication analysis. Results. A mean of 2.4 complications/foot occurred, of which 1.5/foot had to be solved surgically. 76% of feet suffered from soft tissue complications; 43% suffered hardware-associated complications. Feet with only 2 out of 5 high risk criteria according to Pinzur showed significantly lower complication counts. Radiographs revealed a correct restoration of all foot axes postoperatively with superior fixation strength medially. Conclusion. Late corrective arthrodesis with medial and lateral column stabilization in the nonplantigrade stages of neuroosteoarthropathy can provide reasonable reconstruction of the foot alignment. Nonetheless, overall complication/reoperation rates were high. With separation into low/high risk criteria a helpful guide in treatment choice is provided. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) under number DRKS00007537. PMID:26000309

  19. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  20. [Thrombotic complications of severe forms of varicose disease: modern approach to diagnosis and treatment of hereditary thrombophilia and immunohistochemical peculiarities of vascular wall].

    PubMed

    Chernukha, L M; Shchukin, S P; Archakova, T M

    2014-10-01

    Experience of treatment of 176 patients, suffering thrombotic complications of severe forms of the lower extremities varicose disease (VDLE), was analyzed. In 20 patients, suffering varicothrombophlebitis (VTHPH) in severe forms of VDLE, morphological and immunohistochemical changes in the venous wall and surrounding tissues were studied. There were examined 28 patients, in whom thrombotic complications of the VDLE have had occurred, using diagnostic complex "PLR genetics thrombophilia". Recurrent course of thrombotic complications and coexistence of VTHPH and thrombosis of deep veins have had constitute the main criterion of such patients selection. The groups of patients, suffering severe forms of VDLE, were delineated, depending on thrombotic process localization, differentiated tactics of their surgical treatment was proposed. PMID:25675784

  1. Subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation for early motor complications in Parkinson's disease-the EARLYSTIM trial: early is not always better.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Tiago A; Espay, Alberto J; Marras, Connie; Eckman, Mark H; Pollak, Pierre; Lang, Anthony E

    2014-12-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) has revolutionized the management of disabling motor complications in Parkinson's disease. The EARLYSTIM trial applied this treatment to patients who had been experiencing motor complications for less than three years. STN-DBS significantly improved all primary and secondary outcome measures while best medical therapy failed to provide any improvement at the two-year follow-up time point. On face value these results strongly favor the application of STN-DBS far earlier than is currently applied, when patients are just beginning to experience problems with motor complications. Here we review the application of early DBS and the EARLYSTIM trial from the perspectives of clinical issues, health economics and study design and patient expectation of benefit. We conclude that the most relevant issue is not when to operate but on whom and that early is not always better. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:25227325

  2. MRI characteristics and follow-up findings in patients with neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Tao; Li, Jianjun; Xing, Zengbao; Huang, Shixiong; Wen, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and clinical and MRI follow-up findings of patients with neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot and mouth disease. Methods: Data were collected from 12 patients who developed neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease during an enterovirus-71 outbreak in Hainan Province, China, from May 2008 to October 2011. Patients were followed up for 2 years. Results: In the six patients with brainstem encephalitis, MRI showed posterior brainstem abnormalities with hyperintense areas on T2-weighted images and hypointense areas on T1-weighted images. In the four patients with acute flaccid paralysis but no brainstem encephalitis, sagittal MRI images showed linear hyperintense areas in the anterior spinal cord, transverse T2-weighted images showed hyperintense areas in the spinal cord, and contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images showed strong enhancement of the anterior horns or nerve roots. In the two patients with aseptic meningitis, MRI showed widening of the subarachnoid space and ventricles. The MRI and clinical signs of aseptic meningitis resolved within 4 weeks in both patients. Patients with isolated pontine abnormalities recovered faster than those with multiple brainstem abnormalities, patients with isolated brainstem encephalitis recovered faster than those with associated acute flaccid paralysis, patients with paralysis of one limb recovered faster than those with paralysis of multiple limbs, and patients with isolated thoracolumbar cord abnormalities recovered faster than those with cervical cord abnormalities. Conclusions: MRI is useful for assessment of the neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease. Patients who develop neurological complications characteristically have MRI abnormalities of the posterior brainstem or bilateral anterior horns of parts of the spinal cord. The MRI findings can help to predict prognosis. PMID:25356127

  3. Total parenteral nutrition-related gastroenterological complications.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, F W; Boggio-Bertinet, D; Federico, A; Forte, G B; Guglielmi, A; Loguercio, C; Mazzuoli, S; Merli, M; Palmo, A; Panella, C; Pironi, L; Francavilla, A

    2006-09-01

    Total parenteral nutrition is a life saving therapy for patients with chronic gastrointestinal failure, being an effective method for supplying energy and nutrients when oral or enteral feeding is impossible or contraindicated. Clinical epidemiological data indicate that total parenteral nutrition may be associated with a variety of problems. Herein we reviewed data on the gastroenterological tract regarding: (i) total parenteral nutrition-related hepatobiliary complications; and (ii) total parenteral nutrition-related intestinal complications. In the first group, complications may vary from mildly elevated liver enzyme values to steatosis, steatohepatitis, cholestasis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. In particular, total parenteral nutrition is considered to be an absolute risk factor for the development of biliary sludge and gallstones and is often associated with hepatic steatosis and intrahepatic cholestasis. In general, the incidence of total parenteral nutrition-related hepatobiliary complications has been reported to be very high, ranging from 20 to 75% in adults. All these hepatobiliary complications are more likely to occur after long-term total parenteral nutrition, but they seem to be less frequent, and/or less severe in patients who are also receiving oral feeding. In addition, end-stage liver disease has been described in approximately 15-20% of patients receiving prolonged total parenteral nutrition. Total parenteral nutrition-related intestinal complications have not yet been adequately defined and described. Epidemiological studies intended to define the incidence of these complications, are still ongoing. Recent papers confirm that in both animals and humans, total parenteral nutrition-related intestinal complications are induced by the lack of enteral stimulation and are characterised by changes in the structure and function of the gut. Preventive suggestions and therapies for both these gastroenterological complications are reviewed and reported in the present review. PMID:16766237

  4. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  5. [Complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and how to minimize them].

    PubMed

    Vavrecka, A

    2011-12-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the recent past was one ofthe basic diagnostic and therapeutic methods of several biliary and pancreatic diseases. It was and is still associated with several complications that can lead to exit the patient and is therefore considered invasive methods. The most serious complications include acute pancreatitis and acute cholangitis. Bleeding and perforation may complicate papillosphincterotomy that precedes another performance (extraction of stones, drainage of biliary and pancreatic duct. The incidence of serious complications have led to efforts to reduce the number of ERCP. This allowed in particular the introduction of new diagnostic methods, especially MRCP and EUS, which led to the practical exclusion of diagnostic ERCP. At present, ERCP is considered to be purely therapeutic method. In addition, considerable experience has been published to reduce the incidence of complications in ERCP. Many of them can be applied to our clinic, which has experience of more than 10 000 ERCP performed. PMID:22277041

  6. [Modern methods of diagnosis of thrombophylic states and complex treatment of patients with thrombotic complications of severe forms of varicose disease].

    PubMed

    Shchukin, S P

    2014-11-01

    Actual issues of surgical treatment of patients, suffering complications of severe forms of varicose disease of the lower extremities (VDLE) are discussed. The causes of unsatisfactory results of treatment in patients, suffering varicothrombophlebitis (VTHPH), the main of which--absence of the only one tactics for operative treatment and anticoagulant therapy, were analyzed. The results of patients examination, suffering thrombotic complications of severe forms of VDLE, while its recurrent course, in conjunction of VTHPH and thrombosis of deep veins of the lower extremities, using diagnostic complex "PLR genetics thrombophilia", are adduced. Differential tactics of treatment in patients, suffering severe forms of VDLE, while various localization of thrombotic process, concerning the presence of thrombophilic states, is proposed. PMID:25675742

  7. Risk of neutropenic fever and early infectious complications after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keiko; Aoyama, Masako; Shinagawa, Katsuji; Matsuo, Keitaro; Takenaka, Katsuto; Ikeda, Kazuma; Kojima, Kensuke; Ishimaru, Fumihiko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Niiya, Kenji; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Harada, Mine

    2002-08-01

    Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) has facilitated high-dose chemotherapy for the treatment of various types of malignancy, but the factors affecting the treatment outcome have not been well defined. We evaluated patients who underwent auto-PBSCT (46 patients with hematological malignancies and 39 with solid tumors) to elucidate the risks of background factors, including age, in association with infectious complications. In contrast to former reports, faster engraftment did not influence the incidence of documented infection or neutropenic fever, whereas high age (age > or = 50 years old) and delayed platelet recovery (> or = 18 days) were demonstrated to be positively involved. The odds ratio (OR) for documented infection in elderly patients was 4.94 (95% confidence interval, 1.22-15.8). Another risk factor of infection was the HD-ICE regimen (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide) given to patients with solid tumors (OR, 8.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-39.7). In conclusion, we found that elderly patients and patients on the HD-ICE regimen have a higher risk of infectious complications even after auto-PBSCT. Although the clinical indications for auto-PBSCT can be extended to elderly patients, thorough precautions should be taken against infectious complications during the pre-engraftment phase. PMID:12215019

  8. Predictors of postnatal complications and congenital cardiac diseases in infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Demirpençe, Sava?; Demirpençe, Banu ?nce; Me?e, Timur; Arslano?lu, Sertaç; Tavl?, Vedide; Çalkavur, ?ebnem; Olukman, Özgür; Firuzan, Ali R?za

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the postnatal problems of infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes and the clinical properties of infants who were found to have congenital cardiac disease. Material and Methods: We retrospectively examined the records of 337 newborns who were followed up with a diagnosis of infant of diabetic mother between January 2010 and January 2012 in our Neonatology Unit. The demographic data of the diabetic mothers and their babies, the postnatal problems of the babies of diabetic mothers and congenital heart diseases found on transthoracic echocardiography were examined. Results: The patients were classified as group A, B and C in accordance with the recommendations of The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) according to the type of diabetes. The most common postnatal problems included hyperbilirubinemia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia. The rate of congenital heart disease was found be 17.3% in group A, 50% in group B and 9% in group C. No correlation was found between congenital heart disease and gender, multiple pregnancy, diabetes type, diet treatment, use of oral antidiabetic drugs and drug usage. A positive significant correlation was found between congenital heart disease and genetic disease, murmur, cyanosis and presence of gestational hypertension. It was shown that use of insulin, genetic disease and presence of gestational diabetes increased the risk of congenital heart disease. Conclusions: In our study, the overall incidence of congenital heart disease was found to be 24% in infants of diabetic mothers. It should be kept in mind that it is important to investigate the infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes in terms of the risk of congenital heart disease.

  9. [Hemangioma: complications].

    PubMed

    Casanova, D; Norat, F; Bardot, J; Magalon, G

    2006-01-01

    Hemangioma (HMG) is a benign tumour of the child generally evolving to spontaneous regression. Sometimes this evolution can become complicated in a more or less serious way according to its localization or of its importance. If local complications are, in the most of cases, without gravity, complications of a general nature like thrombopenia or cardiac failure may compromise the vital prognosis. There are in addition serious forms where, according to its localization or its importance, the HMG can compromise the aesthetic, or functional even vital outcome. PMID:16997443

  10. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    Home > Pregnancy > You're pregnant: Now what? Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en español ) Pregnancy complications Health problems before pregnancy Pregnancy related problems Infections during pregnancy When to call the doctor ...

  11. Complications in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, H; Nahrstedt, U; Hollmann, S; Rückert, K

    1995-01-01

    Over the last few years, laparoscopic surgery has gained widespread acceptance in surgical practice. The indications range has expanded extraordinarily in that time. Some of the practiced procedures are already considered the gold standard, while others are still on the way there. The fascinating technique and results notwithstanding, a number of risks, mistakes, and complications are possible in both the initial and the advanced states. We present our experience from 2118 laparoscopic operations performed between February 1991 to March 1995, focusing on the intraoperative complications (Tables 1, 2). PMID:21400429

  12. A global emerging disease of Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: is serotype K1 an important factor for complicated endophthalmitis?

    PubMed Central

    Fung, C-P; Chang, F-Y; Lee, S-C; Hu, B-S; Kuo, B I-T; Liu, C-Y; Ho, M; Siu, L K

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Over the past two decades in Taiwan, pyogenic liver abscess has usually been caused by a single microorganism, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and is frequently associated with the serious complication of endophthalmitis, especially in diabetic patients. However, the relationship between the clinical presentation and bacterial factors remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of patients and the serotype and ribotype of K pneumoniae liver abscess. Methods: From July 1991 to June 1998, a total of 134 cases of K pneumoniae liver abscess with 248 K pneumoniae isolates from the same patients were collected from two large medical centres in northern Taiwan. Clinical data were collected from medical records. Serotyping and ribotyping were performed using the countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis method and automated Riboprinter. Results: Serotyping revealed that the most common serotypes were K1 (63.4%) and K2 (14.2%). K1 isolates occurred at a significantly higher frequency (p<0.01) than all other serotypes. Among 134 patients, 105 (78.4%) had suffered from diabetes mellitus for 3–15 years. Fourteen patients (10.4%) had metastatic infection to the eye causing septic endophthalmitis. Liver aspirates, and blood and vitreous pus cultures yielded the same serotype of K pneumoniae in all patients. Among patients with septic endophthalmitis, 92.3% (13/14) were diabetic, and 85.7% (12/14) of the isolates belonged to serotype K1. For molecular typing, different degrees of genetic polymorphism among isolates with the same K1 serotype suggested no particular prevalence of any one strain in K pneumoniae liver abscess. Conclusion: K pneumoniae serotype K1 was significantly associated with liver abscess and the complication of endophthalmitis, especially in diabetic patients. Physicians should request an immediate report of serotyping and susceptibility test results simultaneously if a diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscess has been made so that early and appropriate management for possible complications will not be delayed. The use of ceftriaxone because of its higher concentration in the aqueous humor is suggested to decrease the chance of septic endophthalmitis. PMID:11839725

  13. Homemaking Still Takes Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lathryn E.

    1969-01-01

    "Families today have many choices about how to use their time and money resources, but, as this study shows, homemaking tasks still demand time despite the many conveniences available. In fact, for women the predicted short work day of the future may still be a distant dream. (Editor)

  14. Inflammatory middle ear disease of the dog: the clinical and pathological features of cholesteatoma, a complication of otitis media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CJ Little; C Gibbs; GR Pearson

    1991-01-01

    During a study of inflammatory middle ear disease in the dog cholesteatoma was found to accompany otitis media in seven of the 62 ears examined (11 per cent). The clinical, radiological and pathological findings in these animals imply that cholesteatoma in the dog is an aggressive lesion which must be differentiated from uncomplicated otitis media.

  15. Inflammatory middle ear disease of the dog: the clinical and pathological features of cholesteatoma, a complication of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Little, C J; Lane, J G; Gibbs, C; Pearson, G R

    1991-04-01

    During a study of inflammatory middle ear disease in the dog cholesteatoma was found to accompany otitis media in seven of the 62 ears examined (11 per cent). The clinical, radiological and pathological findings in these animals imply that cholesteatoma in the dog is an aggressive lesion which must be differentiated from uncomplicated otitis media. PMID:2063523

  16. A Double-masked, Randomized Study to Investigate the Safety and Efficacy of Daclizumab to Treat the Ocular Complications Related to Behçet’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buggage, Ronald R.; Levy-Clarke, Grace; Sen, Hatice N.; Ursea, Roxana; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Suhler, Eric B.; Altemare, Chandra; Velez, Gisela; Ragheb, Jack; Chan, Chi-Chao; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Bamji, Alison T.; Sran, Puspha; Waldmann, Thomas; Thompson, Darby J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the safety and efficacy of daclizumab (Zenapax, humanized anti-Tac, HAT) in controlling the ocular manifestations of Behçet’s disease. Design Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked clinical trial. Participants Seventeen participants with Behçet’s disease experiencing at least two prior ocular attacks and requiring treatment with immunosuppressive agents for the ocular complications of Behçet’s disease. Methods Participants received either intravenous placebo or daclizumab (1 mg/kg) infusions every two weeks for six weeks, then every four weeks while continuing their standard immunosuppressive regimens. If clinically indicated, tapering of the standard immunosuppressive medications was allowed after six months of study enrollment. Complete ocular and physical examinations and an adverse event assessment were performed at baseline and prior to each study infusion. Main Outcome Measures Primary safety endpoints were the development of a life-threatening complication or a severe opportunistic infection. Primary efficacy outcomes were the number of ocular attacks and an assessment of systemic immunosuppressive medications required during the study, including the ability to taper concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Results Nine participants randomized to daclizumab and eight to placebo were followed monthly. Follow-up ranged from one to 34 months, with a median follow-up of 15 months. Two participants randomized to daclizumab discontinued study therapy prior to the end of the study for personal reasons. No participant experienced a safety endpoint, and visual acuity remained stable in all participants during the course of the study. Ten participants (six daclizumab, four placebo) experienced ocular attacks requiring therapy. The median ocular attack rate during the study was greater in the daclizumab arm than the placebo arm (median 1.27 vs. 0.17 attacks/year, respectively). Participants in the placebo arm also experienced a greater reduction in the immunosuppressive medication score compared to participants receiving daclizumab (median ?4.0 vs. ?1.0, respectively). Conclusions The observed results in the placebo group demonstrate that careful follow-up and treatment with standard combination immunosuppressive therapy can be effective for the management of the ocular complications of Behçet’s disease. In our small study, there was no suggestion that daclizumab was beneficial in comparison with placebo. However, the low observed attack rate limited our ability to make a definitive treatment group comparison. PMID:17558830

  17. [Complications of liposuction].

    PubMed

    Sattler, G; Eichner, S

    2013-03-01

    Liposuction is the most frequent aesthetic procedure worldwide for adipose tissue reduction and treatment of lipedema. It is being employed with increasing frequency. In 2010, in the USA more than 200.000 liposuctions were performed. Apart from aesthetic indications, liposuction also is suitable for treatment of benign adipose tissue diseases. This intervention is not a simple procedure but requires extensive knowledge and experience to prevent irreversible medical or aesthetic complications. Severe complications including necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, hemorrhage, perforation of inner organs und pulmonary embolism - some even with lethal outcome - occasionally have been reported. These complications were mostly due to inadequate hygiene measures, inappropriate patient selection, use of excessive local anesthesia during mega-liposuction (tumescent technique) and inadequate post-operative surveillance. The complication rate usually reflects a lack of medical experience as well as technical inadequacies. PMID:23494094

  18. Still around and still dangerous: Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of new infectious agents often overshadows the continuing impact and importance of well-established organisms. In the case of diarrheal disease, Entamoeba histolytica and its complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although it is also present in developing countries, Giardia lamblia is a primary cause of waterborne outbreaks of diarrhea in developed countries. Persons at risk of developing giardiasis in these countries include backpackers and campers who drink untreated stream water or persons who drink improperly treated municipal water containing infective cysts. Investigators have recently identified the mechanisms used by these organisms to colonize the intestinal tract and to cause disease. New methods of identification using immunologic principles have been added to the traditional microscopic methods of identification. PMID:10177206

  19. [Neurological complication of influenza infections].

    PubMed

    Brydak, Lidia B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present neurological complications of influenza infections. Infections caused by influenza viruses can be very serious and may lead even to death resulted from the post-infectious complications. The most often occurring complications are pneumonia, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, myocarditis and otitis media. The other group is neurological post-influenza complications, including dementia, epileptic disorders, cerebrovascular disease, febrile convulsions, toxic encephalopathy, encephalitis, meningitis, subarachnoid hemorrhages, lethargic encephalitis, psychosis or increase in the number of cases of Parkinson's disease. The first way of prevention of influenza is vaccination that results in healthy, social and economic benefits. PMID:12194226

  20. Beneficial Effect of Intravenous Dexamethasone in Children With Mild to Moderately Severe Acute Chest Syndrome Complicating Sickle Cell Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Carlos Bernini; Zora R. Rogers; Eric S. Sandler; Joan S. Reisch; Charles T. Quinn; George R. Buchanan

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has historically been managed with oxygen, antibiotics, and blood transfusions. Recently high-dose corti- costeroid therapy was shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization in children with SCD and vaso-occlusive crisis. Therefore, we chose to assess the use of glucocorti- coids in ACS. We conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial

  1. generalization complicated

    E-print Network

    Hinton, Geoffrey E.

    on big datasets . If we have a big data set that needs a complicated model, the full Bayesian framework generalization. Is preprocessing cheating? . Its cheating if we use a carefully designed set of task­ specific. One set is sufficient. . For planes in 3­D, h=4 even though 4 co­planar points cannot be shattered

  2. Two decades of percutaneous transjejunal biliary intervention for benign biliary disease: a review of the intervention nature and complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duveken B. Y. Fontein; Robert N. Gibson; Neil A. Collier; Gabrielle T. W. Tse; Luke L. K. Wang; Tony G. Speer; Richard Dowling; Amanda Robertson; Benjamin Thomson; Albert de Roos

    Objective  To assess outcomes of percutaneous transjejunal biliary intervention (PTJBI) in terms of success and effectiveness in patients\\u000a with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy for benign biliary strictures and stones.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Clinical and radiographic records of 63 patients with a Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy or hepaticojejunostomy for benign\\u000a disease who underwent at least one PTJBI between 1986 and 2007 were reviewed. Effectiveness was determined by successful

  3. Transrectal Prostate Biopsy-Associated Prophylaxis and Infectious Complications: Report of a Query to the Emerging Infections Network of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Polgreen, Philip M.; Beekmann, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Fluoroquinolone-resistant infections after transrectal prostate biopsy (TRPB) are increasing. Methods.?Members of the Emerging Infections Network, a consortium of adult infectious diseases physicians sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Diseases Society of America, were administered an electronic 9-question survey regarding post-TRPB infections and associated prophylaxis. Results were compared with respondent characteristics. Results.?The overall response rate was 47% (552 of 1180). Of the 552 respondents, 234 (42%) reported that this problem was not applicable to their practice. The remaining 318 (58%) reported that, despite widespread recent changes in prophylactic regimens, fluoroquinolone monotherapy still was most common, but diverse alternate or supplemental oral and parenteral antibiotics (including imipenem) also were used. Reports of culture-guided prophylaxis were rare (9%). The most common duration of prophylaxis was a single prebiopsy antibiotic dose. However, 16%–23% of respondents reported prophylaxis continuing for ?24 hours postbiopsy. Post-TRPB infections were reported as being more frequent now than 4 years ago, with sepsis and genitourinary presentations predominating, but with osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and epidural abscess also occurring. Infection isolates reportedly were usually resistant to the prophylactic regimen. Conclusions.?Emerging Infections Network members perceive post-TRPB infections as increasingly frequent, caused by resistant strains, and involving serious illness. Prophylactic approaches, although in flux, still usually entail ciprofloxacin monotherapy, which often is given for excessive durations. Multiple opportunities exist for infectious diseases specialists to partner with proceduralists in devising, studying, and implementing improved prophylaxis regimens for TRPB.

  4. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Complicated by Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO - Devic's Disease): Clinic-Pathological Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Adawi, Mohammad; Bisharat, Bishara; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is usually a relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis involving three or more contiguous spinal cord segments, and seropositivity for NMO-IgG antibody. NMO is often mistaken for multiple sclerosis and there are relatively sporadic publications about NMO and overlapping systemic or organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We described a unique case of a 25-year-old Arab young woman who was diagnosed with SLE, depending on clinical, laboratory investigations and after she had fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SLE and had presented the following findings: constitutional findings (fatigue, fever, and arthralgia); dermatologic finding (photosensitivity and butterfly rash); chronic renal failure (proteinuria up to 400 mg in 24 hours); hematologic and antinuclear antibodies (positivity for antinuclear factor (ANF), anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, direct Coombs, ANA and anti-DNA, low C4 and C3, aCL by IgG and IgM). Recently, she presented with several episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings especially seropositivity for NMO-IgG were compatible with NMO. Accurate diagnosis is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention. This case illustrates that NMO may be associated with SLE. PMID:24948869

  5. Neurological Complications Comparing Endoscopically vs. Open Harvest of the Radial Artery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-28

    Complications Due to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  6. Ulcerative ileitis after proctocolectomy in children: a complication of ulcerative colitis or a disease in itself after ileoanal pullthrough?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Galán, Alba; Andres, Ane M; Fernández-Caamaño, Beatriz; Vilanova, Alejandra; Dominguez, Eva; Ortiz, Ruben; Prieto, Gerardo; Lopez-Santamaria, Manuel; Tovar, J A

    2015-02-01

    Ulcerative ileitis (UI) after restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) and ileoanal pullthrough procedure (IAPP) is a rare condition described as inflammation of the terminal ileum proximal to the anastomosis. It is mostly observed in ulcerative colitis (UC) and is designated as prepouch ileitis; sometimes with pouchitis, but not necessarily all the time. Its incidence in adults is less than 5%, but the information in children is limited. Pathogenesis is unknown, it has been considered as a disease by itself, independently on the underlying disease. It involves additional morbidity and impacts negatively on quality of life because there is no effective treatment so far. This study aims to review the cases of UI in our institution and to summarize their clinical features and management. A descriptive retrospective study of UI patients between 1990 and 2013 was conducted. Children with RPC and IAPP with clinical and pathological diagnosis of UI were included. Sociodemographic and clinical data, diagnostic, and therapeutic procedures were collected through medical records. UI was diagnosed in eight patients (six males) after RCP; four had UC, two had total colonic aganglionosis (TCA), and two had complex anorectal malformations (one cloacal exstrophy and one omphalopagus twin with bladder exstrophy). Different surgical techniques were used in each case: UC patients underwent IAPP, 50% with J-reservoir and 50% without it; posterior sagittal pullthrough was performed in those with anorectal malformations; one Soave and one Swenson procedure in those with TCA. In summary, three patients had reservoir and five did not. The median age at the IAPP and ostomy closure was 6 years (range 2 months-8 years) and 7 years (range 6 months-9 years), respectively. UI was found after a median of 23 months (range 1-48 months), all of them after digestive tract continuity was reestablished. The leading symptom was lower GI or gastrointestinal, both of them bleeding with abdominal pain, followed by abdominopelvic abscesses and malabsorption with weight loss. Pathology showed nonspecific inflammatory changes. Treatment included antibiotics, corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents with variable response, requiring a new ileostomy in five cases. Ileitis disappeared after diversion. In our experience, UI after colectomy is not an exclusive feature of UC as has been previously described. Although it appears with pouchitis, the presence of a reservoir is not a must, suggesting that this is a different entity. No medical treatment has been really effective in our patients and diversion above this level stopped the process. Further studies on its pathogenesis and treatment strategies are necessary. PMID:25144351

  7. Is Information Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  8. Encaustic Still Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Len

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used in an advanced high school art class where students used the encaustic painting technique by melting wax and combining various pigments. Explains that the students painted a still-life of flowers in the style of Vincent van Gogh. (CMK)

  9. Security and Stand Still

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    . 24/7 safety escort Students and staff can request a Security Officer to escort them to their car, busSecurity and Safety at UNSW Facilities Management Never Stand Still Campus Security O ce gate 2 (excluding UNSW Christmas Shutdown period). The bus route covers Kensington Campus (car parks, colleges

  10. Security and Stand Still

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    that operates via mobile phone SMS/text. Sign up today via MyUNSW. security patrols Security Services operatesSecurity and Safety at UNSW Facilities Management Never Stand Still Campus Security O ce gate 2 Security Services on 9385 6666. For all other security enquiries call 9385 6000. www

  11. Case of Behçet's disease complicated by oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a relapsing systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology involving systemic vasculitis. Vasculitis in BD results from the involvement of arteries, veins and blood vessels of all sizes, which leads to the three major manifestations of this condition: venous occlusion, arterial occlusion and aneurysm formation. Therefore, whole-body vascular involvement should always be considered in BD patients. Here, we describe the first appearance of an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm, resulting in complete oculomotor nerve palsy in a BD patient. A 44-year-old Japanese man suffered from recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum that had presented on the lower extremities for the past 2 years. His condition was diagnosed as an incomplete type of BD based on relapsing oral and genital ulcers, skin eruptions, such as erythema nodosum and folliculitis, a positive pathergy test and systemic arthralgia. Ten years after his initial clinical presentation, he had manifestations of right-sided ptosis and cyclic dull pain in his right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a BD patient has not been reported previously, our report highlights the fact that this abnormal manifestation should be considered in those with vasculo-BD. PMID:25573207

  12. Metabolic Syndrome without Diabetes or Hypertension Still Necessitates Early Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease: Information from a Chinese National Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bixia; Wang, Jinwei; Li, Guisen; Wang, Li; Zhang, Luxia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is prevalent, with an increasing contribution to the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study of the relationship between them is important. The CKD survey, a national cross-sectional study, provided a large database to accomplish this study. The study population were 41 131 adults from this survey between 2008 and 2009. CKD was defined as estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or the presence of albuminuria. MS was diagnosed by National Cholesterol Education Program—Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII), ATPIII-modified or International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Logistic regression model was applied to study the impact of MS or its components on CKD or its components. The age and sex standardized prevalence of MS by ATPIII, ATPIII-modified and IDF criteria was 11.77% (11.13%–12.40%), 21.51% (20.69%–22.34%) and 16.67% (15.92–17.42)% respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that MS and its components were associated with higher CKD prevalence. The risk for CKD and its components increased with the number of MS components. After adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, the odds ratios of MS for CKD decreased, but remained significantly more than 1 between 1.16(95%CI 1.07–1.26) and 1.37 (95% CI 1.25–1.50) across the different models. Similar results were found with albuminuria, while for decreased eGFR, after adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, the odds ratios of MS and MS components (except elevated TG) became insignificant. In conclusion, MS is prevalent and associated with a higher prevalence of CKD. Different MS components are associated with different risks for CKD, even after adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, which may mainly be contributed more by the increased risk for albuminuria than that for decreased eGFR. More attention must be paid to the population with MS, including those with elevated blood pressure and serum glucose. PMID:26161991

  13. Complications in colorectal surgery: risk factors and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backround Open or laparoscopic colorectal surgery comprises of many different types of procedures for various diseases. Depending upon the operation and modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors the intra- and postoperative morbidity and mortality rate vary. In general, surgical complications can be divided into intraoperative and postoperative complications and usually occur while the patient is still in the hospital. Methods A literature search (1980-2009) was carried out, using MEDLINE, PubMed and the Cochrane library. Results This review provides an overview how to identify and minimize intra- and postoperative complications. The improvement of different treatment strategies and technical inventions in the recent decade has been enormous. This is mainly attributable to the increase in the laparoscopic approach, which is now well accepted for many procedures. Training of the surgeon, hospital volume and learning curves are becoming increasingly more important to maximize patient safety, surgeon expertise and cost effectiveness. In addition, standardization of perioperative care is essential to minimize postoperative complications. Conclusion This review summarizes the main perioperative complications of colorectal surgery and influencable and non-influencable risk factors which are important to the general surgeon and the relevant specialist as well. In order to minimize or even avoid complications it is crucial to know these risk factors and strategies to prevent, treat or reduce intra- and postoperative complications. PMID:20338045

  14. Still Flying Fusion Edition

    E-print Network

    2013-11-27

    . ; The Fox Television Broadcasting Company ; 20th Century Fox Ltd. ; Fox Home Entertainment or Universal Pictures All rights are reserved and owned by the copyright holders as appropriate. Welcome to this very special Fusion Edition of Still.... This abridged edition is available only at Fusion, Issue Two will be available soon, complete with an Adam Baldwin interview! If you wish to subscribe (for free) please email stillflying@bitwiser.com with the subject heading "Subscribe" and you...

  15. Eczema: Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases Asthma Food Allergy Immune System Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ???????? Javascript ... atopic dermatitis. Bacterial Infections Scanning electron micrograph of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Credit: NIAID A major health risk ...

  16. Endometriosis still a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mehedintu, C; Plotogea, MN; Ionescu, S; Antonovici, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endometriosis is a debilitating disease with features of chronic inflammation. Endometriosis appears to be one of the most common benign gynecological proliferations in premenopausal women since it is estimated that 10–15% of reproductive aged women suffer from pelvic endometriosis. The biology of endometriosis is unclear. Despite its prevalence, this disease remains poorly understood and current studies prove that there is no relationship between the extent of the disease and its symptomatology. There is no blood test available for the diagnosis of endometriosis. Up to this point, there is no single very successful option for the treatment of endometriosis. Due to the relatively poor efficacy of hormonal therapy for endometriosis, several other experimental therapies are currently undergoing clinical trial. PMID:25408753

  17. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  18. Gulf operations still recovering

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that reports of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew were leveling off last week at the U.S. Minerals Management Service as Gulf of Mexico operators pressed ahead with repairs. The hurricane struck South Florida Aug. 4, churned west into the gulf, then swung north and hit the South Louisiana coast Aug. 5. By the close of business Sept. 8 MMS had received damage reports covering 83 pipeline segments and 193 platforms and satellite installations. MMS last week estimated about 500 MMcfd of gas production had been restored in the gulf and 100,000-150,000 b/d of oil. Production still lost as a result of Andrew was estimated at 2-2.5 bcfd of gas and 90,000-120 b/d of oil. MMS estimates Gulf of Mexico wells before the storm were producing about 12.5-13 bcfd of gas and 750,000 b/d of oil.

  19. [Genetics: still a discipline?].

    PubMed

    Gayon, Jean

    2004-02-01

    In the institutional sense of the term "discipline" (laboratories, societies, congresses, curricula, etc.), genetics remains a discipline. In the intellectual sense of the term (consensus on a definite array of concepts, methods and theoretical purposes), it is doubtful that genetics is still a discipline. At first, molecular biology seemed to have introduced an unequivocal structural (or molecular) definition of the gene: a definite sequence of nucleotides that code for a protein. In fact, as it appears in retrospect, this was not the case. Even in 1961, when Jacob and Monod proposed their first model of genetic regulation in bacteria, there was no possibility of constructing a non equivocal concept of the gene. More recent developments in molecular genetics have made this situation worse. There is no possible definition of the gene as a general category. The reasons why biologists keep the word are pragmatic rather than theoretical: communication among scientists, economic interests and ideology. PMID:14997449

  20. Complete genome sequence of a new recombinant echovirus 25 strain isolated from a neonatal patient with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated by encephalitis in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Meng, Yixing; Pang, Lin; Liang, Jinqiu; Lu, Hongping; Wang, Qi; Liang, Pu; Cao, Jinfeng; Liu, Shun-Ai; Cheng, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Although human echovirus 25 (E-25), a type of the enterovirus B species, is implicated in aseptic meningitis, information on its gene structure, evolution, and virulence are limited. We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel recombinant E-25 strain (E25/2010/CHN/BJ) isolated from a neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated by encephalitis in Beijing, China in 2010. The complete viral genome consists of 7429 nucleotides (nts), including a 6585-nt open reading frame. Phylogenetic dendrogram based on VP1 gene regions revealed that this strain belonged to subgroup D4, which contains the other E-25 strains isolated from China in recent years. The difference in the amino acid sites (P130S, K/T135I) of the VP1 region may affect its immunogenicity. SimPlot and Bootscan analyses suggested that E25/2010/CHN/BJ is a recombination result of E-25 and Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB-3) strains. Our results would facilitate the study of the origin, evolution, and molecular epidemiology of E-25. PMID:25749996

  1. Endocrine and bone complications in ?-thalassemia intermedia: current understanding and treatment.

    PubMed

    Inati, Adlette; Noureldine, MohammadHassan A; Mansour, Anthony; Abbas, Hussein A

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia (TI), also known as nontransfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT), is a type of thalassemia where affected patients do not require lifelong regular transfusions for survival but may require occasional or even frequent transfusions in certain clinical settings and for defined periods of time. NTDT encompasses three distinct clinical forms: ?-thalassemia intermedia (?-TI), Hb E/?-thalassemia, and ?-thalassemia intermedia (Hb H disease). Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular features, pathophysiology, and complications of NTDT particularly ?-TI has increased tremendously but data on optimal treatment of disease and its various complications are still lacking. In this paper, we shall review a group of commonly encountered complications in ?-TI, mainly endocrine and bone complications. PMID:25834825

  2. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  3. Complications of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Settipane, R A

    1999-01-01

    With unfortunate high frequency, clinicians consider allergic rhinitis to be more of a nuisance than an illness. When in fact, allergic rhinitis is not only a very common disease process, affecting up to a cumulative frequency of 42% of the U.S. population by age 40, but can lead to significant short-term and long-term medical complications. Poorly controlled symptoms of allergic rhinitis may contribute to sleep loss, secondary daytime fatigue, learning impairment, decreased overall cognitive functioning, decreased long-term productivity and decreased quality of life. Additionally, poorly controlled allergic rhinitis may also contribute to the development of other related disease processes including acute and chronic sinusitis, recurrence of nasal polyps, otitis media/otitis media with effusion, hearing impairment, abnormal craniofacial development, sleep apnea and related complications, aggravation of underlying asthma, and increased propensity to develop asthma. Treatment of allergic rhinitis with sedating antihistamine therapy may result in negative neuropsychiatric effects that contribute to some of these complications. Sedating antihistamines may also be dangerous to use in certain other settings such as driving or operating potentially dangerous machinery. In contrast nonsedating antihistamines have been demonstrated to result in improved performance in allergic rhinitis. PMID:10476318

  4. Cardiovascular complications of chronic renal failure - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Roy, G C; Sutradhar, S R; Barua, U K; Datta, N C; Debnath, C R; Hoque, M M; Hossain, A S; Haider, M S; Das, M

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is frequently associated with CKD, which is important because individuals with CKD are more likely to die from CVD than to develop kidney failure. CVD in CKD is treatable and potentially preventable and CKD appears to be a risk factor for CVD. In order of incidence and frequency systemic hypertension, left ventricular failure, congestive cardiac failure, ischemic heart disease, anaemic heart failure, rhythm disturbances, pericarditis with or without effusion, cardiac tamponade, uraemic cardiomyopathy are various cardiovascular complications encountered in patients with chronic renal failure. A patient may present with one or more complications of cardiovascular system. The survival rate and prognosis to a great extent depends on proper management of these complications. Use of regular dialysis and renal transplant has changed the death pattern in developed countries but it is still a major problem in developing country. The aim of this article is early detection of CKD and proper management of it thereby preventing the major cardiovascular complications. PMID:22828566

  5. The Effects of Ranitidine and Hydrocortisone on the Complications of Femoral Artery Obstruction Treated by Streptokinase Following Cardiac Catheterization in Pediatric Patients with Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Noormohammad; Miri Aliabad, Ghasem; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Mahjoubifard, Maziar; Jahangiri Fard, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The most important complication following cardiac catheterization required urgent therapeutic management is vessel obstruction and arterial thrombosis. The morbidity following this complication can be decreased by surgery intervention and/or thrombolytic drugs. Objectives: In this study we evaluated the effects of ranitidine and hydrocortisone on pediatric patients with congenital heart diseases who suffered from femoral artery obstruction following cardiac catheterization on decreasing the events after streptokinase administration. Materials and Methods: This semi experimental study was conducted on 47 patients among 600 cases who underwent cardiac catheterization from April 2002 to December 2011.The patients suffered from distal vessel obstruction following cardiac catheterization with no response to surgery intervention, were enrolled and divided in two groups. Streptokinase was administrated in both groups. Patients in group 2 (25 cases), received ranitidine and hydrocortisone before streptokinase administration. In group 1 (22 cases), the loading dose of streptokinase was 2000IU/kg/ in 20-30 minutes/ infusion and thereafter streptokinase was administrated 1000 IU /kg/hour. In group 2, the loading dose was 3000IU/kg in 20-30 minutes /infusion and 1500 IU/kg/hour as maintenance dose. The infusion dose of streptokinase was decreased and then terminated in 2-3 hours by the time arterial pulse was detected by pulse oximetry. Results: There were 13 (59, 1%) male and 9 (40.9%) female patients in group 1. In group 2, there were 15 (60%) male and 10 (40%) female cases (P = 0.949). Patients in both groups were matched well regarding age, body weight, height and the duration of streptokinase infusion (P < 0.05). The incidence of hematoma was higher in group 1 than group 2 (P = 0.032). the patients of Group 1 required more blood transfusion than group 2 because the incidence of bleeding was more in the first group (P = 0.042). 12 patients in group 1 required fresh frozen plasma transfusion versus 4 patients in group 2 (P = 0.049). Local oozing was detected more in group 1 (P = 0.042). Significant bleeding was occurred in 6 cases in group 1; however this event did not occurrin any patients in group 2 (P = 0.007). Although 4 patients in group 1 suffered from anaphylactic shock after streptokinase administration but no patients in group 2 did. (P = 0.041). Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, we concluded that streptokinase was able to remove the vessel thrombosis at the site of cardiac catheterization and ranitidine and hydrocortisone administration before streptokinase may be effective in order to reduce the complications related to thrombolytic drugs; however the experience of the performer is an issue of concern in this matter. PMID:24693416

  6. Management of post-hepatectomy complications

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Fu, Quan; Wuyun, Gerile; Wuyun, Tu

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic resection had an impressive growth over time. It has been widely performed for the treatment of various liver diseases, such as malignant tumors, benign tumors, calculi in the intrahepatic ducts, hydatid disease, and abscesses. Management of hepatic resection is challenging. Despite technical advances and high experience of liver resection of specialized centers, it is still burdened by relatively high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Especially, complex resections are being increasingly performed in high risk and older patient population. Operation on the liver is especially challenging because of its unique anatomic architecture and because of its vital functions. Common post-hepatectomy complications include venous catheter-related infection, pleural effusion, incisional infection, pulmonary atelectasis or infection, ascites, subphrenic infection, urinary tract infection, intraperitoneal hemorrhage, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, biliary tract hemorrhage, coagulation disorders, bile leakage, and liver failure. These problems are closely related to surgical manipulations, anesthesia, preoperative evaluation and preparation, and postoperative observation and management. The safety profile of hepatectomy probably can be improved if the surgeons and medical staff involved have comprehensive knowledge of the expected complications and expertise in their management. This review article focuses on the major postoperative issues after hepatic resection and presents the current management. PMID:24307791

  7. [Long-term complications of sulfur mustard exposure: a therapeutic update].

    PubMed

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Rosman, Yossi; Krivoy, Amir; Statlender, Liran; Kassirer, Michael; Shrot, Shai

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is an alkylating chemical warfare agent with high military significance due to its high toxicity, resistance and availability. SM was widely used in military conflicts, the last being the Iran-Iraq war with more than 100,000 Iranians exposed, one-third of whom are still suffering from late effects. The intensity of the delayed complications correlates to the extent, the area and the route of exposure. The clinical manifestations most commonly involve respiratory, ocular and dermal effects. Respiratory complications include dyspnea, cough and expectorations and various obstructive and restrictive lung diseases. Dermal complications are itching, burning sensation, blisters, dry skin, dermatitis and pigmentary changes. Ocular complications include photophobia, red eye, tearing, corneal ulcers and blindness. Although the picture remains incomplete the major mechanisms responsible for the clinical and pathological effects of SM are: DNA alkylation and cross-linking, protein modification and membrane damage in addition to induction of inflammatory mediators in the target tissues causing extensive necrosis, apoptosis and loss of tissue structure. The current report reviews long-term complications of SM exposure, focusing on new treatments tested in clinical trials conducted on humans. Such treatments include: N-acetyl cysteine, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, Interferon-gamma, furosemide and morphine for the respiratory complications. Ocular complications may entail: Invasive procedures treating corneal complication, limbal ischemia and stem cell deficiency. Treatment for dermatological complications include: anti-depressants, pimercrolimus, Unna's boot, capsaicin, phenol and menthol, Aloe vera and olive oil, curcumin and Interferon-gamma. PMID:24791566

  8. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  9. Pregnancy Complications: Chlamydia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the community. Home > Pregnancy > Pregnancy Complications > Chlamydia Pregnancy complications Pregnancy complications may need special medical care. ... younger than 25. Can chlamydia cause problems during pregnancy? Yes. If you get it before or during ...

  10. Complications of herpes zoster in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trung N; Ray, G Thomas; Horberg, Michael A; Yawn, Barbara P; Castillo, Adrienne L; Saddier, Patricia; Habel, Laurel A

    2014-07-01

    Cancer patients tend to have a higher incidence of herpes zoster (HZ), but little is known about their risk of HZ complications. We conducted a retrospective study of 424 newly diagnosed hematologic (HM, n = 140) and solid tumor malignancy (STM, n = 284) patients who developed HZ between January 2001 and December 2006 to measure the frequency and identify risk factors of HZ complications. Patients were adult members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. HZ diagnosis and complications were confirmed by medical chart review. HM patients with HZ tended to have more HZ complications than STM patients (34% vs 23%, p = 0.02), largely due to more frequent non-pain complications. On multivariate analysis, older age and being male were associated with a higher risk of HZ complications in HM patients; more advanced cancer stage was associated with HZ complications in STM patients. HZ complications are frequent and can present extra disease burden in cancer patients who develop HZ. PMID:24796470

  11. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  12. Type 1 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Complications and Sesame (?? Zh? Má)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Thùy, Tr?n D??ng; Wang, Shu-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major concern among medical practitioners, with the annual mortality rate increasing up to 26.9% in a person aged 65 years or older and 11.3% in the adult. There are many serious complications associated with diabetes, particularly cardiovascular complications due to microvascular diseases. A prerequisite to reduce the risk of microvascular and neurologic complications of type 1 diabetes is normoglycemia. Insulin therapy is the most common treatment used nowadays in type 1 diabetes. However, this method still has many disadvantages such as increased episode of severe hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia unawareness, increased weight gain, transient exacerbation of pre-existing retinopathy, etc. Using insulin pump (the insulin pump is a medical device used for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion to manage the insulin level in the treatment of diabetes mellitus), is associated with known disadvantages including increased ketoacidosis, infection at the infusion site, and the treatment being less suitable in young children (less than 7 years of age). Therefore, alternative treatment for diabetes is still in great demand. We took the approach of traditional Chinese medicine to discuss this matter. Sesame (?? Zh? Má), a herb, has been used medicinally for thousands of years in almost all the countries in the world. The beneficial effects of sesame in remediating diabetes, such as hypoglycemic effects, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidemic effects, improving fat metabolism, and reducing cholesterol, have been demonstrated in many studies,. However, reports on the effects of sesame in remediating cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients are limited, which necessitates further studies on the effects of sesame on cardiovascular complications. PMID:24872931

  13. Type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular complications and sesame ( zh? má).

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Thùy, Tr?n D Ng; Wang, Shu-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major concern among medical practitioners, with the annual mortality rate increasing up to 26.9% in a person aged 65 years or older and 11.3% in the adult. There are many serious complications associated with diabetes, particularly cardiovascular complications due to microvascular diseases. A prerequisite to reduce the risk of microvascular and neurologic complications of type 1 diabetes is normoglycemia. Insulin therapy is the most common treatment used nowadays in type 1 diabetes. However, this method still has many disadvantages such as increased episode of severe hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia unawareness, increased weight gain, transient exacerbation of pre-existing retinopathy, etc. Using insulin pump (the insulin pump is a medical device used for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion to manage the insulin level in the treatment of diabetes mellitus), is associated with known disadvantages including increased ketoacidosis, infection at the infusion site, and the treatment being less suitable in young children (less than 7 years of age). Therefore, alternative treatment for diabetes is still in great demand. We took the approach of traditional Chinese medicine to discuss this matter. Sesame ( Zh? Má), a herb, has been used medicinally for thousands of years in almost all the countries in the world. The beneficial effects of sesame in remediating diabetes, such as hypoglycemic effects, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidemic effects, improving fat metabolism, and reducing cholesterol, have been demonstrated in many studies,. However, reports on the effects of sesame in remediating cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients are limited, which necessitates further studies on the effects of sesame on cardiovascular complications. PMID:24872931

  14. Community-acquired Pneumonia and its Complications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qiang; Shen, Kun-Ling

    2015-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in developing and developed countries, and its incidence is highest among children less than 5-y-old. Over the last five years, several international and local guidelines have been updated with new evidence concerning the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of pediatric CAP, but there are still several major problems that need to be standardised. The aim of this review is to consider the available data concerning the termination, epidemiology, microbiology and pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment, and complications of pediatric CAP. There still are many unanswered questions concerning the management of CAP, including its definition, the difficulty to identify its etiological agents, the emergence of drug, and the lack of introduction of vaccines against respiratory pathogens in developing countries. More research is required in various areas (including therapy of atypical agents), and further efforts are needed to increase vaccination in order to reduce the incidence of the disease. PMID:25976616

  15. MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, there will be some texture and Clavor loss. Discard DAIRY Still contains ice crystals and feels Ice cream, frozen yogurt Discard Discard Cheese (soft and semi-soft) Refreeze. May

  16. [Myocardial infarction as complication of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Asfalou, I; Miftah, F; Kendoussi, M; Raissouni, M; Benyass, A; Moustaghfir, A; Zbir, E; Hda, A; Hamani, A

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pancreatitis complicated by myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries on angiography. This observation presents a double interest. First, it illustrates unusual forms of coronary disease represented by the non-atherosclerotic infarction. On the other hand, it shows that the multiple visceral damage associated with acute pancreatitis can include myocardial infarction which complications aggravate prognosis. PMID:21232905

  17. Major orbital complications of endoscopic sinus surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Rene; G E Rose; R Lenthall; I Moseley

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUNDThe paranasal sinuses are intimately related to the orbit and consequently sinus disease or surgery may cause severe orbital complications. Complications are rare but can result in serious morbidity, the most devastating of which is severe visual loss.METHODSA retrospective review was undertaken of four cases of severe orbital trauma during endoscopic sinus surgery.RESULTSAll the cases suffered medial rectus damage, one

  18. Complications of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: Frequency and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko; Santin, Stephanie; Gomes, Luiz Guilherme Lisboa; Waisberg, Jaques; Ribeiro Jr., Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an important option in the therapy of primary and secondary hepatic tumors. Surgical resection is still the best treatment option, but only a few of these patients are candidates for surgery: multilobar disease, insufficient liver reserve that will lead to liver failure after resection, extra-hepatic disease, proximity to major bile ducts and vessels, and co-morbidities. RFA has a low mortality and morbidity rate and is considered to be safe. Thus, complications occur and vary widely in the literature. Complications are caused by thermal damage, direct needle injury, infection and the patient’s co-morbidities. Tumor type, type of approach, number of lesions, tumor localization, underlying hepatic disease, the physician’s experience, associated hepatic resection and lesion size have been described as factors significantly associated with complications. The physician in charge should promptly recognize high-risk patients more susceptible to complications, perform a close post procedure follow-up and manage them early and adequately if they occur. We aim to describe complications from RFA of hepatic tumors and their risk factors, as well as a few techniques to avoid them. This way, others can decrease their morbidity rates with better outcomes. PMID:24672640

  19. Solar Still Part II: Juice

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this video segment, adapted from a ZOOM television broadcast, cast members repeat an experiment designed to separate fresh water from a liquid solution, this time using colored sugar water in one solar still and orange juice in another. The basic still design they employ traps water vapor that is created when the Sun's heat causes water to evaporate. As the vapor cools, it condenses and trickles down to a collection container. The segment is three minutes fifty-five seconds in length.

  20. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  1. [Complications in the treatment of cholangiolithiasis. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Agostino; Lorusso, Curzio; Merlicco, Domenico; Palazzo, Paola; Nacchiero, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Bile ducts lithiasis is a very common disease all over the world. In Italy prevalence is about 5 millions cases: 11% of the population. Choledocholithiasis concurrent with gallbladder stones frequency is estimated from 4 to 20%. Incidence is even higher in the elderly and in patients affected by chronic liver disease. The treatment of bile ducts lithiasis is still debated; several surgical strategies may be performed: (1) fully laparoscopic procedure; (2) endo-laparoscopic sequential treatment; (3) sequential inverse treatment (endoscopy following video laparoscopic cholecystectomy); (4) combined endo-laparoscopic treatment simultaneously performed; (5) 'open" treatment. The authors refer their experience concerning a series of 172 patients who underwent endo-laparoscopic sequential treatment to amend bile duct and gallbladder lithiasis. Complications are pointed out, pending to demonstrate safeness and effectiveness of this strategy. PMID:16696224

  2. Complications of Tumor Ablation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence Cheung; Tito Livraghi; Luigi Solbiati; Gerald D. Dodd; Eric vanSonnenberg

    Percutaneous and surgical ablation procedures are flourishing, in large part because of the relative paucity and the acceptability\\u000a of complications. However, serious and fatal complications have occurred, albeit rarely, with ablation. This chapter identifies\\u000a those complications, describes their underlying cause, and, when possible, discusses strategies to avoid them.

  3. Gestational vascular complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnon Samueloff

    2003-01-01

    Severe pregnancy complications, primarily severe pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) occur in about 1–5% of gestations. This rate is even higher in special medical situations. These pregnancy complications have been shown to increase maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality considerably. Severe pregnancy complications have also been shown to be associated with deficient uteroplacental

  4. Perioperative fluid management in kidney transplantation: is volume overload still mandatory for graft function?

    PubMed

    De Gasperi, A; Narcisi, S; Mazza, E; Bettinelli, L; Pavani, M; Perrone, L; Grugni, C; Corti, A

    2006-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is now recognized as the treatment of choice for patients with chronic renal failure. Despite the extension of indications to patients suffering severe hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and chronic heart failure, the worldwide results are superb. However, perioperative cardiac complications occur in 6% to 10% of transplanted patients. Aggressive intraoperative volume expansion is still recommended to maximize graft functional recovery (up to 30 mL/kg/h, central venous pressure [CVP] > 15 mm Hg), but patients with preexistent cardiac disease or poor myocardial function are exposed to the risk of fluid overload, acute respiratory failure, and prolonged ventilation. Among the last 90 cases performed at our institution, good functional recovery of the graft was present in 94% of the patients within 2 weeks, despite a much more conservative intraoperative hydration policy (crystalloids 2400 +/- 1000 mL, 15 mL/kg/h, CVP 7-9 mm Hg). Graft failure which occurred in 5 patients was significantly correlated only with donor age, while perioperative cardiovascular complications had been present in 9 cases (10%) who were coronary artery disease patients (55%). Age above 50 years was the only significant risk factor. Supranormal volume loading is probably not always warranted in kidney transplantation. PMID:16647477

  5. Pulmonary complications of inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shelly A; Glassberg, Marilyn K; Ascherman, Dana P

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary complications cause significant morbidity and mortality in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Advances in biomarker discovery have facilitated clinical phenotyping, allowing investigators to better define at-risk patient subsets and to potentially gauge disease activity. This serologic characterization has complemented more traditional assessment tools. Pharmacologic management continues to rely on the use of corticosteroids, often in combination with additional immunosuppressive agents. The rarity of myositis-associated interstitial lung disease and lack of controlled trials have limited analyses of treatment efficacy, mandating the development of standardized outcome measures and improvement of data sharing between disciplines. PMID:25836641

  6. Oral ibandronate reduces the risk of skeletal complications in breast cancer patients with metastatic bone disease: results from two randomised, placebo-controlled phase III studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J J Body; I J Diel; M Lichinitzer; A Lazarev; M Pecherstorfer; R Bell; D Tripathy; B Bergstrom

    2004-01-01

    Although intravenous (i.v.) bisphosphonates are the standard of care for metastatic bone disease, they are less than ideal for many patients due to infusion-related adverse events (AEs), an increased risk of renal toxicity and the inconvenience of regular hospital visits. The use of oral bisphosphonate therapy is limited by concerns over efficacy and gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. There remains a

  7. Paediatric reduced intensity conditioning: analysis of centre strategies on regimens and definitions by the EBMT Paediatric Diseases and Complications and Quality of Life WP.

    PubMed

    Lawitschka, A; Faraci, M; Yaniv, I; Veys, P; Bader, P; Wachowiak, J; Socie, G; Aljurf, M D; Arat, M; Boelens, J J; Duarte, R; Tichelli, A; Peters, C

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this analysis was to explore the diversity of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in paediatric allo-SCT in daily practice across Europe. Data from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Promise database from 1994 to 2008 were supplemented by a survey of EBMT centres performing paediatric allo-SCT on the current policy asking for the underlying diseases and for the drug combinations. Records from 161 centres from 30 countries were analysed and 139 various RIC regimens were reported. More centres applied RIC for malignant rather than for non-malignant diseases. In general, fludarabine (FLU)-based regimens predominated except for BU-based regimens in myeloid malignancies and haemoglobinopathies. Treosulfan (TREO) was mainly applied for unspecified malignant diseases and for haemophagocytic diseases. FLU-based regimens revealed the greatest number of different combinations. Correlating the number of regimens with the number of treating centres revealed the lowest variety in FLU and the highest variety in TBI and TREO. FLU/melphalane and FLU/CY were the most frequent combinations. This extreme heterogeneity in RIC may influence both the efficacy and the safety of the procedures, which requires further investigation. Optimization and standardization of RIC is the final goal to provide a platform for future prospective studies. PMID:25621804

  8. Aspergillus osteomyelitis of the lumbar spine complicated with orbital apex syndrome: A potential role of the Batson's plexus in disease propagation

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Jose F.; Seriburi, Vimon; Tenner, Michael; El Khoury, Marc Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of orbital apex syndrome following epidural steroid injections of the lumbar spine in an immunocompetent individual with osteomyelitis and discitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. We suspect that the craniospinal venous system, also known as the Batson's plexus, was the main route for steroid-facilitated disease propagation from the spine to intracranial structures. PMID:24371725

  9. 1996 Budget picture still clouded

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Carlowicz

    1996-01-01

    Four months and three work stoppages into fiscal 1996, whole departments and agencies of the United States federal government remain in budgetary limbo. Five annual spending bills still await approval, and parts of nine federal departments and several agencies face the possibility of yet another shutdown, as the current continuing resolution for temporary funding expires on March 15.In the wake

  10. Value-Able Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how she made a major improvement to her fifth-grade lesson plan by providing a hands-on Internet experience before students worked on their own oil pastel still life. It was a success with beautiful finished products and highly motivated, engaged students. Details of this lesson are described in this article.

  11. Does Horace Mann Still Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baines, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on a new book entitled Horace Mann's Vision of the Public Schools: Is It Still Relevant? According to him, the book does succinctly summarize current controversies in education including technology, school finance, and No Child Left Behind, and the writing is informed. However, aside from the first twenty-seven…

  12. Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu ZhiYong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liang Shixiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Zhu Ji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Zhao Jiandong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Lu Haijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Yang Yunli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Chen Long [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Wang Anyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning (China); Fu Xiaolong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Jiang Guoliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China) and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)]. E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD{sub 5} (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD{sub 5}) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended.

  13. Possible familial case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome complicated with lung cancer: A possible link between these two disease entities.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Chinatsu; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Torii, Ryo; Kawanami, Yukiko; Kawanami, Toshinori; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Ryo; Takenaka, Masaru; Yamada, Sohusuke; Kasai, Takahiko; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese woman was introduced to our hospital for an examination of multiple pulmonary cystic lesions and a pulmonary nodule in the left lower lobe. She had a smoking history of 25 pack-years, and her two younger brothers had suffered from pneumothorax; one of them additionally had lung cancer with pulmonary multiple cystic lesions. A surgical biopsy specimen obtained from her left lower lobe revealed adenocarcinoma surrounded by a single epithelial layer that was covered with collagen fibers. The pathological features were compatible with the findings of the cystic lesions in the patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS). A diagnosis of BHDS was eventually made according to the detection of a folliculin gene mutation. This is the first report of a possible familial case of BHDS complicated with primary lung cancer. We herein reviewed the previously reported cases of BHDS with lung cancer and other tumors and discussed a potential mechanism of tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis in the lung in the patients with BHDS. PMID:26028485

  14. Perioperative thrombotic complications in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Cillo, Umberto; Zanus, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Ori, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Although the perioperative bleeding complications and the major side effects of blood transfusion have always been the primary concern in liver transplantation (OLT), the possible cohesion of an underestimated intrinsic hypercoagulative state during and after the transplant procedure may pose a major threat to both patient and graft survival. Thromboembolism during OLT is characterized not only by a complex aetiology, but also by unpredictable onset and evolution of the disease. The initiation of a procoagulant process may be triggered by various factors, such as inflammation, venous stasis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, vascular clamping, anatomical and technical abnormalities, genetic factors, deficiency of profibrinolytic activity, and platelet activation. The involvement of the arterial system, intracardiac thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, portal vein thrombosis, and deep vein thrombosis, are among the most serious thrombotic events in the perioperative period. The rapid detection of occlusive vascular events is of paramount importance as it heavily influences the prognosis, particularly when these events occur intraoperatively or early after OLT. Regardless of the lack of studies and guidelines on anticoagulant prophylaxis in this setting, many institutions recommend such an approach especially in the subset of patients at high risk. However, the decision of when, how and in what doses to use the various chemical anticoagulants is still a difficult task, since there is no common consensus, even for high-risk cases. The risk of postoperative thromboembolism causing severe hemodynamic events, or even loss of graft function, must be weighed and compared with the risk of an important bleeding. In this article we briefly review the risk factors and the possible predictors of major thrombotic complications occurring in the perioperative period, as well as their incidence and clinical features. Moreover, the indications to pharmacological prophylaxis and the current treatment strategies are also summarized. PMID:26185371

  15. Topical Review: Neurologic Complications of Immunization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James F. Bale

    2004-01-01

    In the United States and many other developed countries, active immunization of children has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis, measles, rubella, tetanus, and other diseases, such as disease due to Haemophilus influenzae type b. Individual vaccines can produce systemic or neurologic reactions ranging from minor events, such as pain and erythema at the injection site, to major complications, such as seizures, shock,

  16. [Complications of body piercing].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, L; Madrid, C; Odman-Jaques, M; Yersin, B; Carnon, P N

    2014-03-19

    The trend of body piercing has grown in popularity in the past decade within the general population and especially among young adults. Complications of body piercing include local inflammation and infections, but severe complications are also possible and largely underestimated. People are usually not aware of the risks before making a piercing, and their medical history, medication and comorbidities are largely neglected by the people who realise the piercing. This article presents a review of the complications that a primary care physician may observe, for a patient who wishes to make a piercing, or presents complications due to the implementation of such a device. PMID:24734366

  17. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kidney dialysis or transplantation may be required. Drug toxicity This is occasionally responsible for kidney complications, although toxicity issues generally resolve when the drug in question ...

  18. Complications in periorbital surgery.

    PubMed

    Terella, Adam M; Wang, Tom D; Kim, Michael M

    2013-02-01

    Comprehensive rejuvenation of the periorbital region commonly involves management of the brow, as well as the upper and lower eyelids. Browlifting, upper and lower blepharoplasty, fat transfer, and neuromodulators are frequently utilized with excellent results. However, surgery in this region can be fraught with potential complications ranging from a poor cosmetic outcome to orbital hematoma and vision loss. Although avoidance of complications is preferred, it is incumbent on the surgeon to have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these complications. The authors examine the more common complications of periorbital surgery. PMID:23426754

  19. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Complicated by Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO – Devic’s Disease): Clinic-Pathological Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Adawi, Mohammad; Bisharat, Bishara; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is usually a relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis involving three or more contiguous spinal cord segments, and seropositivity for NMO-IgG antibody. NMO is often mistaken for multiple sclerosis and there are relatively sporadic publications about NMO and overlapping systemic or organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We described a unique case of a 25-year-old Arab young woman who was diagnosed with SLE, depending on clinical, laboratory investigations and after she had fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SLE and had presented the following findings: constitutional findings (fatigue, fever, and arthralgia); dermatologic finding (photosensitivity and butterfly rash); chronic renal failure (proteinuria up to 400 mg in 24 hours); hematologic and antinuclear antibodies (positivity for antinuclear factor (ANF), anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, direct Coombs, ANA and anti-DNA, low C4 and C3, aCL by IgG and IgM). Recently, she presented with several episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings especially seropositivity for NMO-IgG were compatible with NMO. Accurate diagnosis is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention. This case illustrates that NMO may be associated with SLE. PMID:24948869

  20. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živkovi?, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  1. [Complications of surgical treatment of hypospadia].

    PubMed

    Romanov, D V; Korol'kova, I A

    2004-01-01

    127 new cases of hypospadia were treated in 1980-2002. A total of 348 operations including urethroplasty by Duplay and Cecil were made. 78 of the operations were followed by complications out of which 26 were corrected in the postoperative period and had no effect on the treatment results. The first stage of surgical correction of hypospadia (89 operations) brought complications in 13.48% cases. Recurrent distortion of the cavernous bodies was most typical complication at this stage. In most cases development of scarry deformation was due to inflammatory changes early after surgery. Derivatives of prednisolone proved effective in the treatment of hypertrophic scars. This complication correlated with skin plastic repair (longitudinal suturing or creation of oncoming triangular flaps) to correct the defect. The second stage of hypospadia surgery was urethroplasty made in 196 cases. It was accompanied with complications in 13.25 patients. Fistulas of newly-created urethra (11.73%) were the most typical and frequent complication. The number of postoperative complications varied greatly depending on the disease form and method of urethral reconstruction. Cecil urethroplasty brought complications in 7.94% cases. Efficacy of neurourethra creation by Duplay varied greatly depending on the length of the created neourethral portion and the number of local skin resources (8-33-83.33% complications). PMID:15199814

  2. Managing complications I: leaks, strictures, emptying, reflux, chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Esophagectomy can be used to treat several esophageal diseases; it is most commonly used for treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophagectomy is a major procedure that may result in various complications. This article reviews only the important complications resulting from esophageal resection, which are anastomotic complications after esophageal reconstruction (leakage and stricture), delayed emptying or dumping syndrome, reflux, and chylothorax. PMID:24876942

  3. Complications of rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Harsha, Brian C

    2009-02-01

    Rhinoplasty presents a unique set of challenges for the cosmetic surgeon. Complications may arise from inadequate diagnosis, errors in surgical technique, or variations in the patient's anatomy or healing response. Complications as a result of overly aggressive surgery may also have functional consequences and be harder to correct. PMID:19185797

  4. Anastomotic Complications after Esophagectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lerut; W. Coosemans; G. Decker; P. De Leyn; P. Nafteux; D. Van Raemdonck

    2002-01-01

    Anastomotic complications after esophagectomy continue to be a burden jeopardizing the quality of life and of swallowing. However, incidence, mortality and morbidity of anastomotic complications have substantially decreased in recent years. It seems that this is not so much related to the use of a particular conduit, approach or route for reconstruction, but rather related to refinement in anastomotic techniques

  5. Complications of endoscopic neurosurgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Teo; Salim Rahman; Frederick A. Boop; Bruce Cherny

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendoscopy is rapidly becoming an essential part of the neurosurgeon's repertoire. Currently, very few studies have identified the complications of this new technique, yet many have warned of the steep learning curve associated with its practice. We have reviewed the last 173 neuroendoscopic procedures performed by one surgeon and identified two distinct groups of complications: those that have clinically significant

  6. [Renal biopsy: procedures, contraindications, complications].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Carmen; Nochy, Dominique; Bariety, Jean

    2009-07-01

    Renal biopsy plays a central role in the investigational approach of the nephrologist. The technique has significantly improved over the past two decades as a result of the introduction of ultrasonography and automated-gun biopsy devices. Percutaneous renal biopsy has become a relatively safe procedure with life-threatening complications occurring in less than 0.1% of biopsies in recent reports. However, percutaneous kidney biopsy is not without risk. Overt complications occurring in up to 13% of the cases, and 6 to 7% of complications were considered major, needing for an intervention such as transfusion of blood product or invasive procedure (radiographic or surgical). Major complications were apparent in more than 90% of patients by 24 hours. In situations in which the potential benefit of obtaining renal histology outweighs the risks of the procedure, transjugular kidney biopsy or surgical biopsy offers an attractive alternative. At present, we have no definite predictive indicators of postbiopsy bleeding complication, with the exception of age, gender, advanced renal insufficiency and the baseline partial thromboplastin time. Bleeding time is not significantly predictive and has been reported to have substantial limitations as a screening test. The use of the PFA-100 may replace the bleeding time and is now considered as a more valuable screening test for prebiopsy identification and management of patients with impaired haemostasis. Four groups of patients benefit from the findings of renal biopsy: those with a nephrotic syndrome, those with a renal disease in a context of systemic disorder, those with acute renal failure and those with a renal transplant. Some patients with non-nephrotic proteinuria, hematuria and chronic renal failure may also benefit from the procedure. PMID:19345174

  7. The effect of febuxostat to prevent a further reduction in renal function of patients with hyperuricemia who have never had gout and are complicated by chronic kidney disease stage 3: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for the onset of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is significantly associated with the progression of CKD. However, there is no sufficient evidence by interventional research supporting a cause-effect relationship. Hyperuricemic patients without gouty arthritis, whose serum urate (SUA) concentration is ?8.0 mg/dL and who have a complication, are treated by pharmacotherapy in addition to lifestyle guidance. Nevertheless, there is no evidence that rationalizes pharmacotherapy for patients with hyperuricemia who have no complication and whose SUA concentration is below 9.0 mg/dL. Methods/Design The FEATHER (FEbuxostat versus placebo rAndomized controlled Trial regarding reduced renal function in patients with Hyperuricemia complicated by chRonic kidney disease stage 3) study is a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of febuxostat—a novel, nonpurine, selective, xanthine oxidase inhibitor. The present study will enroll, at 64 medical institutions in Japan, 400 Japanese patients aged 20 years or older who have hyperuricemia without gouty arthritis, who present CKD stage 3, and whose SUA concentration is 7.1-10.0 mg/dL. Patients are randomly assigned to either the febuxostat or the control group, in which febuxostat tablets and placebo are administered orally, respectively. The dosage of the study drugs should be one 10-mg tablet/day at weeks 1 to 4 after study initiation, increased to one 20-mg tablet/day at weeks 5 to 8, and elevated to one 40-mg tablet/day at week 9 and then maintained until week 108. The primary endpoint is estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. The secondary endpoints include the amount and percent rate of change in eGFR from baseline to week 108, the amount and percent rate of change in SUA concentration from baseline to week 108, the proportion of patients who achieved an SUA concentration ?6.0 mg/dL, and the incidence of renal function deterioration. Discussion The present study aims to examine whether febuxostat prevents a further reduction in renal function as assessed with eGFR in subjects and will (1) provide evidence to indicate the inverse association between a reduction in SUA concentration and an improvement in renal function and (2) rationalize pharmacotherapy for subjects and clarify its clinical relevance. Trial registration UMIN Identifier: UMIN000008343 PMID:24433285

  8. Cervical plate fracture: a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Veli, Citisli; Muhammet, Ibrahimoglu; Serkan, Civlan; Murat, Kocaoglu

    2015-01-01

    In traumatic and degenerative diseases cervical fusion with anterior cervical plate are commonly used. The increase in the use of cervical plate segment level is also increased risk of developing complications. This case report shows that the increase in the use of cervical plate segment level and also the complications in cervical spinal instrumentation, short-segment cervical plate rare case reported to be broken.

  9. Factors associated with persistence of red blood cell antibodies in woman after pregnancies complicated by fetal alloimmune haemolytic disease treated with intrauterine transfusions.

    PubMed

    Verduin, Esther P; Brand, Anneke; van de Watering, Leo M G; Claas, Frans H J; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Schonewille, Henk

    2015-02-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) antibodies can persist for decades or decrease quickly to undetectable levels. Antibody persistence has not been systematically studied. Women whose children are treated with intrauterine transfusions (IUT) for haemolytic disease of the fetus (HDFN) often produce additional antibodies, which can be evoked by the intrauterine transfusion or by fetomaternal haemorrhage during the procedure. Factors associated with persistence of both the antibodies responsible for HDFN and additional antibodies were studied in 260 women whose children were treated with IUT between 1988 and 2008. They possessed 499 (205 anti-D and 294 non-D) antibodies after the last IUT. After a median follow-up of 8·7 years, all 260 antibodies primarily responsible for HDFN had persisted. Additional antibodies directed against antigens of the children persisted in 70·6%, and in 32·3% if they were not child-specific (P < 0·001). Antibodies induced by irradiated IUT persisted in only 7·1%. Multivariate analyses showed that non-HDFN antibody persistence was dependent on the antibody titre and specificity. In conclusion, persistence of antibodies mainly depends on antibody strength and specificity. Difference between fetal or non-fetal immunogens suggests maintenance of antigenic stimulation possibly by long-term fetomaternal chimerism. PMID:25244566

  10. Vaccinia necrosum complicating immunoblastic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Turkel, S B; Overturf, G D

    1977-07-01

    A 59-year-old man is presented who had immunoblastic lymphadenopathy which evolved over a three-year period into immunoblastic sarcoma. His course was complicated by vaccinia necrosum, which necessitated prolonged therapy with Marboran and vaccinia-immune globulin. The persistence of virus was documented at autopsy by positive viral culture and ultra-structural examination. This case illustrates the potential hazards of administration of live viral vaccines to an immune compromised host presumed to be in remission and suggests that the continued activity of viral infection may signal the unsuspected persistence of underlying disease. PMID:880554

  11. [Cardiovascular complications of alpha interferon].

    PubMed

    Le Corguillé, Monika; Pochmalicki, Gilbert; Eugène, Claude

    2007-12-01

    Interferon-alpha is a biological response modifier with antiviral and tumoral effect that is used in the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis. Cardiovascular complications occurred in clinical trials of interferon. The most common presentations of cardio toxicity were cardiac arrhythmia, dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial extrasystole and symptoms of ischemic heart disease, including myocardial infarction and other effects less common and dangerous: low-level conduction impairment or reversible hypertension. The physiopathology of this cardiotoxicity remains unknown, but rigorous cardiological monitoring of all patients receiving this treatment seems necessary. PMID:18176361

  12. New Serological Markers for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Are Associated With Earlier Age at Onset, Complicated Disease Behavior, Risk for Surgery, and NOD2\\/CARD15 Genotype in a Hungarian IBD Cohort

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Papp; Istvan Altorjay; Nir Dotan; Karoly Palatka; Ildiko Foldi; Judit Tumpek; Sandor Sipka; Miklos Udvardy; Tamas Dinya; Laszlo Lakatos; Agota Kovacs; Tamas Molnar; Zsolt Tulassay; Pal Miheller; Gary L. Norman; Tamas Szamosi; Janos Papp; Peter L. Lakatos

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) (ASCA) and porin protein-C of Escherichia coli (anti-OmpC) are associated with disease phenotype and may be of diagnostic importance in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Our aim was to determine whether a panel of new antibodies against bacterial proteins and carbohydrates could help differentiate among the various forms of IBD, and whether they were associated

  13. P253 NEW SEROLOGICAL MARKERS FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE ARE ASSOCIATED WITH EARLIER AGE AT ONSET, COMPLICATED DISEASE BEHAVIOR, RISK FOR SURGERY, AND NOD2\\/CARD15 GENOTYPE IN A HUNGARIAN IBD COHORT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Papp; Istvan Altorjay; Nir Dotan; Karoly Palatka; Ildiko Foldi; Judit Tumpek; Sandor Sipka; M. Udvardy; L. Lakatos; A. Kovacs; T. Molnar; Z. Tulassay; P. Miheller; T. Szamosi; P. L. Lakatos

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) (ASCA) and porin protein-C of Escherichia coli (anti-OmpC) are associated with disease phenotype and may be of diagnostic importance in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Our aim was to determine whether a panel of new antibodies against bacterial proteins and carbohydrates could help differentiate among the various forms of IBD, and whether they were

  14. Amniocentesis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Anandakumar, C; Wong, Y C; Annapoorna, V; Arulkumaran, S; Chia, D; Bongso, A; Ratnam, S S

    1992-05-01

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate whether the performance of an experienced operator had any significant influence in reducing the incidence of complications in amniocentesis; 1,459 women had amniocentesis performed under ultrasound guidance; 1,324 were performed by experienced operators and 135 cases by less experienced operators. Complications like fetal loss, blood-stained amniotic fluid, culture failure, multiple needle puncture, leaking liquor, fetal trauma and error in results were compared in the 2 groups. This study demonstrated that amniocentesis performed by an experienced operator decreased the various complications associated with amniocentesis. PMID:1520214

  15. Complications following hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications. PMID:25444470

  16. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Complications Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Symptoms Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  17. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... complete loss of smell (anosmia) may occur with sinusitis. Causes of decreased and/or loss of sense ... improvement. Mucocele A mucocele is a complication of sinusitis caused by obstruction of drainage of mucous from ...

  18. Complications of TMJ surgery.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David; Puig, Leann

    2015-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery can be divided into 3 types of surgery: Arthroscopy, arthroplasty, and total joint replacement. The complications associated with these procedures increase with complexity. They all include injury to adjacent structures, infections, and bleeding problems. PMID:25483447

  19. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español ( ... Action Coalition's website (www.vaccineinformation.org). Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus ... Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  20. To Study the Level of Awareness About Complications of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) in CSOM Patients

    PubMed Central

    S.H., Chandrashekharayya; M.M., Kavitha; Handi, Prakash; Khavasi, Prabhu; Doddmani, S.S.; Riyas, Mohmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) is one of the most common diseases in clinical practice. It affects large number of people. Disease causes disability and mortality because of its ability to cause complications. Patients develop complications because of lack of awareness about the disease, scarce availability of qualified otologists at peripheral areas and economical constraints. This study was conducted to study the awareness about CSOM and its complications. Materials and Methods: Patients suffering from CSOM attending outpatient department of Ear, Nose and Throat Department were included in this study. After taking proper history and examination to confirm the diagnosis patients were given structured questionnaire to assess their knowledge about CSOM and its complications. Results tabulated and compared with literature. Results: Majority of our patients (77.6%) were from low socio-economic status group. Maximum number of patients was from 3rd and 4th decade of life. Only 29.5% patients understood perforation in Tympanic Membrane (TM) as a cause for continued discharge. 94% patients did not differentiate between safe and unsafe CSOM. 52.2% had knowledge about entry of water in ear as cause for recurrence of discharge in CSOM. 44.7% said CSOM can be cured by surgery. Only 7.4% said infection can spread to brain, 23.3% knew about collection of pus around ear, 11.9% said it can cause vertigo, but none of them recognized facial nerve palsy as complication of CSOM. 38.8% took self medication and 16.4% consulted qualified ear nose throat (ENT) doctor. Conclusion: Although CSOM is a major disease affecting large number of people, awareness regarding disease and its complications is still poor. Mass education programs aimed at educating people about CSOM are need of the hour. PMID:24701483

  1. Neurological complications of Schistosoma infection.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2008-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Currently more than 200 million people worldwide are affected. Neuroschistosomiasis constitutes a severe presentation of the disease. Neurological symptoms result from the inflammatory response of the host to egg deposition in the brain and spinal cord. Neurological complications of cerebral schistosomiasis include delirium, loss of consciousness, seizures, dysphasia, visual field impairment, focal motor deficits and ataxia. Cerebral and cerebellar tumour-like neuroschistosomiasis can present with increased intracranial pressure, headache, nausea and vomiting, and seizures. Myelopathy (acute transverse myelitis and subacute myeloradiculopathy) is the most common neurological complication of Schistosoma mansoni infection. Schistosomal myelopathy tends to occur early after infection and is more likely to be symptomatic than cerebral schistosomiasis. The conus medullaris and cauda equina are the most common sites of involvement. Severe schistosomal myelopathy can provoke a complete flaccid paraplegia with areflexia, sphincter dysfunction and sensory disturbances. Schistosomicidal drugs, steroids and surgery are the currently available treatments for neuroschistosomiasis. Rehabilitation and multidisciplinary team care are needed in severely disabled patients. PMID:17905371

  2. Complicated Gallstones after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sioka, Eleni; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Zachari, Eleni; Katsogridaki, Georgia; Tzovaras, George

    2014-01-01

    Background. The natural history of gallstone formation after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), the incidence of symptomatic gallstones, and timing of cholecystectomy are not well established. Methods. A retrospective review of prospectively collected database of 150 patients that underwent LSG was reviewed. Results. Preoperatively, gallbladder disease was identified in 32 of the patients (23.2%). Postoperatively, eight of 138 patients (5.8%) became symptomatic. Namely, three of 23 patients (13%) who had evident cholelithiasis preoperatively developed complicated cholelithiasis. From the cohort of patients without preoperative cholelithiasis, five of 106 patients (4.7%) experienced complicated gallstones after LSG. Total cumulative incidence of complicated gallstones was 4.7% (95% CI: 1.3–8.1%). The gallbladder disease-free survival rate was 92.2% at 2 years. No patient underwent cholecystectomy earlier than 9 months or later than 23 months indicating the post-LSG effect. Conclusion. A significant proportion of bariatric patients compared to the general population became symptomatic and soon developed complications after LSG, thus early cholecystectomy is warranted. Routine concomitant cholecystectomy could be considered because the proportion of patients who developed complications especially those with potentially significant morbidities is high and the time to develop complications is short and because of the real technical difficulties during subsequent cholecystectomy. PMID:25105023

  3. Study design and rationale of 'Influence of Cilostazol-based triple anti-platelet therapy on ischemic complication after drug-eluting stent implantation (CILON-T)' study: A multicenter randomized trial evaluating the efficacy of Cilostazol on ischemic vascular complications after drug-eluting stent implantation for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend dual anti-platelet therapy, aspirin and clopidogrel, for patients treated with drug-eluting stent for coronary heart disease. In a few small trials, addition of cilostazol on dual anti-platelet therapy (triple anti-platelet therapy) showed better late luminal loss. In the real-world unselected patients with coronary heart disease, however, the effect of cilostazol on platelet reactivity and ischemic vascular events after drug-eluting stent implantation has not been tested. It is also controversial whether there is a significant interaction between lipophilic statin and clopidogrel. Methods/Design CILON-T trial was a prospective, randomized, open-label, multi-center, near-all-comer trial to demonstrate the superiority of triple anti-platelet therapy to dual anti-platelet therapy in reducing 6 months' major adverse cardiovascular/cerebrovascular events, composite of cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularization and ischemic stroke. It also tested whether triple anti-platelet therapy is superior to dual anti-platelet therapy in inhibiting platelet reactivity in patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stent. Total 960 patients were randomized to receive either dual anti-platelet therapy or triple anti-platelet therapy for 6 months and also, randomly stratified to either lipophilic statin (atorvastatin) or non-lipophilic statin (rosuvastatin) indefinitely. Secondary endpoints included all components of major adverse cardiovascular/cerebrovascular events, platelet reactivity as assessed by VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, effect of statin on major adverse cardiovascular/cerebrovascular events, bleeding complications, and albumin-to-creatinine ratio to test the nephroprotective effect of cilostazol. Major adverse cardiovascular/cerebrovascular events will also be checked at 1, 2, and 3 years to test the 'legacy' effect of triple anti-platelet therapy that was prescribed for only 6 months after percutaneous coronary intervention. Discussion CILON-T trial will give powerful insight into whether triple anti-platelet therapy is superior to dual anti-platelet therapy in reducing ischemic events and platelet reactivity in the real-world unselected patients treated with drug-eluting stent for coronary heart disease. Also, it will verify the laboratory and clinical significance of drug interaction between lipophilic statin and clopidogrel. Trial Registration National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier# NCT00776828). PMID:20735821

  4. Neurological complications of beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Nemtsas, P; Arnaoutoglou, M; Perifanis, V; Koutsouraki, E; Orologas, A

    2015-08-01

    The thalassemias are the most common single gene disorder in the world. Over the last years, several reports have demonstrated neurological complications in beta-thalassemia patients. In most cases, these complications remained subclinical and were detected only during neuropsychological, neurophysiological, or neuroimaging evaluation. Cognitive impairment, abnormal findings on evoked potentials, complications due to extramedullary hematopoiesis, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral neuropathy comprise the broad spectrum of neurological involvement. Chronic hypoxia, iron overload, desferrioxamine neurotoxicity, and bone marrow expansion are implicated, but sufficient explanatory evidence is lacking and development of biomarkers is needed. This review summarizes current knowledge of the neurological complications. As life expectancy for beta-thalassemia patients increases, we support the use of neurophysiological, neuropsychological, or neuroimaging monitoring, enabling the evaluation of neural pathway impairment, to achieve appropriate management and as a result a better quality of life for this patient group. PMID:25903043

  5. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1month), early subacute (1-3months), late subacute (3-12months), chronic (1-3years), and long-term (after 3years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology. PMID:26100156

  6. Complications of body piercing.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Donna I

    2005-11-15

    The trend of body piercing at sites other than the earlobe has grown in popularity in the past decade. The tongue, lips, nose, eyebrows, nipples, navel, and genitals may be pierced. Complications of body piercing include local and systemic infections, poor cosmesis, and foreign body rejection. Swelling and tooth fracture are common problems after tongue piercing. Minor infections, allergic contact dermatitis, keloid formation, and traumatic tearing may occur after piercing of the earlobe. "High" ear piercing through the ear cartilage is associated with more serious infections and disfigurement. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are advised for treatment of auricular perichondritis because of their antipseudomonal activity. Many complications from piercing are body-site-specific or related to the piercing technique used. Navel, nipple, and genital piercings often have prolonged healing times. Family physicians should be prepared to address complications of body piercing and provide accurate information to patients. PMID:16342832

  7. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise. PMID:25833626

  8. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Email Print + Share Approximately 10% of people with inflammatory bowel disease experience eye problems. Most of these are treatable ... may resolve on its own as the patient’s inflammatory bowel disease starts to improve. DRY EYES A deficiency in ...

  9. [Recreational drugs: the complication's pleasure?].

    PubMed

    Joye, F; Donzé, N; Frochaux, V; Niquille, M; Selz Amaudruz, F

    2013-08-14

    Steadily increasing since 1990, the use of psychoactive substances was expanded to new designer drugs (bath salts, spice) with so original still unknown pharmacological effects. At the beginning, the pleasure, first feeling, turns sometimes, in acute medical emergency and then, in some cases, in chronic diseases. Side expected or not desired effects, seen in emergency departments could be necrotizing gangrene among consumers Krokodil or dystonic reactions in consumers of Spice. Moreover, adulterants could increase the dangerosity of the substances. Searching a toxidrome helps to find the incrimining substance. PMID:24024389

  10. Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For the last 50 years, levodopa has been the cornerstone of Parkinson’s disease management. However, a majority of patients develop motor complications a few years after therapy onset. Deep brain stimulation has been approved by the FDA as an adjunctive treatment in Parkinson disease, especially aimed at controlling these complications. However, the exact mechanism of action of deep brain stimulation, the best nucleus to target as well as the best timing for surgery are still debatable. We here provide an in-depth and critical review of the current literature on this topic. PMID:24245947

  11. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... materials (aspiration pneumonia) Breathing difficulty, possibly leading to death (10-20% of cases are fatal) Â Top of Page Related Page Symptoms/Complications for Clinicians Related Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination File Formats Help: How do I ...

  12. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  13. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  14. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotou?ová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  15. Fournier's gangrene complicating ulcerative pancolitis.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Ignatiadou, Eleftheria; Sarandi, Maria; Godevenos, Dimitrios; Asproudis, Ioannis; Fatouros, Michael; Tsianos, Epameinondas V

    2010-06-01

    Fournier gangrene is a very rare and a rapidly progressing, polymicrobial necrotizing faciitis or myonecrosis of the perineal, perianal and genital regions, with a high mortality rate. Infection is associated with superficial traum, urological and colorectal diseases and operations. The most commonly found bacteria are Escherichia coli followed by Bacteroides and streptococcal species. Diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, and immunosuppression are perpetuating co-factors. Fournier's gangrene complicating inflammatory bowel disease has been reported in three patients so far, two with Crohn's disease. A 78-year-old man diagnosed with ulcerative pancolitis was referred for fever, and painful perianal and scrotal swelling after perianal surgery for a horseshoe-type perianal abscess. Since bowel disease diagnosis, patient was on mesalazine and achieved long-term remission. Perianal abscess occurred suddenly one week before perianal surgery without any evidence of pre-existing fistula or other abnormalities. Physical examination showed extensive edema and crepitus of perineum and genitalia and patient had symptoms of significant toxicity. The diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene was made and patient underwent emergency surgery with extensive surgical debridement of the scrotal and perianal area and Hartman procedure with a diverting colostomy. In addition, patient started on therapy with mesalazine 3gr, methylprednisolone 16 mg, parenteral nutrition and broad spectrum of antibiotics. Two days after the first operation the patient needed a second operation for perianal debridement. On the fourth day, blood cultures showed E. coli. Patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 34 days of hospitalization. On follow up, disease review is scheduled and colostomy closure is planned. PMID:21122507

  16. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal ?-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual ?-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal ?-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked ?-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human ?-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs, nephroprotection (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptors blockers) and antiarrhythmic agents, whereas dialysis or renal transplantation are available for patients experiencing end-stage renal failure. With age, progressive damage to vital organ systems develops and at some point, organs may start to fail in functioning. End-stage renal disease and life-threatening cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications limit life-expectancy of untreated males and females with reductions of 20 and 10 years, respectively, as compared to the general population. While there is increasing evidence that long-term enzyme therapy can halt disease progression, the importance of adjunctive therapies should be emphasized and the possibility of developing an oral therapy drives research forward into active site specific chaperones. PMID:21092187

  17. [Complications of hypospadias repairs].

    PubMed

    Soave, A; Riechardt, S; Engel, O; Rink, M; Fisch, M

    2014-07-01

    Hypospadias is the most common congenital abnormality of the lower urinary tract affecting one of 300 male newborns. More than 300 different surgical hypospadias repair techniques have been described. Currently, tubularized incised plate and meatal advancement and glansplasty integrated repair are the preferred techniques for distal hypospadias, whereas two-staged procedures are most frequently used in proximal forms. Success rates are high in the hands of dedicated surgeons, although studies on long-term results are sparse. The most frequent complications of hypospadias repairs include urethrocutaneous fistulas, meatal stenosis, and urethral strictures. Urological follow-up into puberty is warranted, as well as further studies with standardized reporting of long-term results and complications. PMID:25023236

  18. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  19. [Complications of rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Grevers, G; Klemens, A

    2002-10-31

    Rhinogenous complications may manifest in the region of the orbits, bone or soft parts of the wall of the frontal sinus, or endocranially. With regard to orbital complications, a differentiation is made between edema, periostitis, subperiosteal abscess and phlegmon--depending on severity and extent. A possible sequela of frontal sinusitis may be osteomyelitis. If the frontal bone is involved, there is a danger that the infection may spread to the endocranium via medullary spaces and blood vessels. The diagnostic basis for deciding appropriate treatment is CT or MRI. While orbital edema and periostitis usually respond to conservative treatment, subperiosteal abscess, orbital phlegmon and abscess of the brain require immediate operative treatment under antibiotic cover. The treatment of choice for osteomyelitis of the frontal bone is the liberal removal of affected bone, also under antibiotic cover. PMID:12494596

  20. Neurologic Complications of Sarcoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Santosh Kesari; Lara J. Kunschner

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that rarely involve the nervous system. Neurologic effects of sarcoma are more\\u000a often due to tumors outside of the central nervous system. However, as long-term survival rates in childhood sarcoma improves,\\u000a reports of late neurologic complications have increased. With recent advances in treating local sarcomas with targeted molecular\\u000a therapies, the incidence of late

  1. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  2. Surgical complications of ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, B

    1991-01-01

    Over the past 25 years (1963-1988), a total of 311 children under 12 years of age were admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Service of the San Vicente de Paúl University Hospital, Medellín, Colombia, with complications resulting from infection with Entamoeba histolytica or Ascaris lumbricoides. In this group, the abdominal complications produced by ascariasis numbered 145, and included intestinal obstruction (n = 107), perforation of the appendix (n = 10), and migration of the parasite to the biliary tree or to the peritoneal cavity (n = 28). Evaluation of the living conditions of a significant subgroup of our patients confirms that intestinal parasitism is an endemic condition prevailing in nations that exhibit deep social and economic imbalance, where large sectors of the population remain deprived of the basic services of education, health, housing, and recreation. Massive infestation in children may give rise to grave complications that demand expert surgical care. Third World surgeons practicing in general hospitals that take care of patients of low economic capacity are usually familiar with the diagnosis and management of this pathology; surgeons who practice in the industrialized nations will only occasionally face such problems. The greater mobility of today's societies and the rather massive migrations that take place in current times have resulted in an increasing incidence of these entities in the hospital populations of the large urban centers of these nations. It is for the surgeons practicing in such centers that the information presented herein may be of greater value. PMID:2031358

  3. Complicated malaria: a rare presentation of Plasmodium ovale.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Giri, Subhash; Bauddh, Nitesh Kumar; Jhamb, Rajat

    2015-04-01

    Malaria has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. Complications are commonly seen in Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) and Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) infection, but due to Plasmodium ovale (P. ovale) infection is rarely described in literature. Here we report a case of severe disease due to P. ovale infection complicated with jaundice, thrombocytopenia, hypotension and acute renal failure. PMID:25672340

  4. An unusual complication of chronic suppurative otitis media: bezold abscess progressing to scapular abscess.

    PubMed

    Pradhananga, Rabindra

    2014-10-01

    Introduction?Suppurative otitis media is still the most common ear disease in developing countries. Otogenic complications of this disease have decreased considerably because of the advent of antibiotics, and few rare complications have been encountered. Objective?To report a case of a patient with scapular abscess and lumber cellulitis that had progressed from Bezold abscess as a complication of squamous-type chronic suppurative otitis media. Resumed Report?A 14-year-old girl presented with foul-smelling, purulent, left ear discharge of 1-year duration and decreased hearing on same ear of 6-month duration. She developed painful swelling in left side of neck with restricted neck movement and high-grade fever of 3-day duration and swelling over the left scapular area of 1-day duration. The examination and investigation diagnosed squamous-type chronic suppurative otitis media with Bezold abscess progressing to scapular abscess and lumber cellulitis. Final Comment?Chronic suppurative otitis media can lead to abscess in any part of body. PMID:25992134

  5. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the lipid storage disorders, although Gaucher and Fabry diseases have highly effective enzyme replacement therapies. There is ... from infection or progressive neurological loss. Children with Fabry disease often die prematurely of complications from heart disease, ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is responsible for the core features, other affected locations contribute to the complicated picture of Parkinson's. Parkinson's disease is both chronic, meaning it lasts for a long time, and progressive, ...

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Uncovering Clues to a Complicated Condition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Autism Spectrum Disorder Uncovering Clues to a Complicated Condition Autism is ... condition. About 1 in 88 children may have autism spectrum disorder, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control ...

  8. Nasal tip complications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Richard E

    2012-06-01

    As cosmetic nasal surgery becomes increasingly more popular worldwide, postoperative nasal tip deformities have also become far more prevalent. Owing to the cosmetic prominence of the nose and to the functional importance of the nasal airway, postsurgical nasal tip deformities often result in debilitating emotional and physiological consequences. However, contemporary principles of cosmetic and functional nasal surgery, when applied expertly, will typically prevent such complications and will simultaneously permit a natural, attractive, and well-functioning nose. This article explores the mechanisms leading to common iatrogenic deformities of the nasal tip and provides alternative techniques for the safe and effective modification of nasal tip contour. PMID:22723230

  9. Diabetes, vascular complications and antiplatelet therapy: open problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Cerbone; N. Macarone-Palmieri; G. Saldalamacchia; A. Coppola; G. Di Minno; A. A. Rivellese

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is commonly associated with both microvascular and macrovascular complications (coronary artery disease,\\u000a cerebrovascular events, severe peripheral vascular disease, nephropathy and retinopathy). There is wide evidence demonstrating\\u000a that platelet degranulation and synthesis of TxA2 are increased in diabetic patients. For this reason, many studies on anti-platelet\\u000a therapy have been made to reduce thrombotic complication of diabetes mellitus. Some diabetic

  10. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... depends on the location and severity of fistulas. SKIN TAGS Skin tags are fairly common in people with Crohn’s disease. ... into small flaps. Fecal matter may attach to skin tags, irritating the skin. Practicing good hygiene will help ...

  11. Gastrointestinal complications of schistosomiasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodore W. Schafer; Braden R. Hale

    2001-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important disease in many parts of the world and has affected the course of human history many times\\u000a over. The parasitic infection is acquired during contact with infected water. A chronic inflammatory response to schistosome\\u000a eggs, mediated by both cellular and humoral mechanisms, is the root of the pathology seen in schistosomiasis. Hepatosplenic\\u000a disease results in intrahepatic

  12. Complications in periocular rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Mack, William P

    2010-08-01

    Thorough preoperative evaluation with meticulous surgical planning to achieve facial aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface is imperative to avoid or decrease potential functional and/or cosmetic complications in cosmetic periocular surgery. Before performing surgery, the physician should be aware of the patient's history of dry eyes, previous facial trauma, previous injection of Botox Cosmetic, history of previous laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and past facial surgery. A full evaluation should be performed on the upper eyelid/brow region to assess for the presence of brow ptosis, brow/eyelid asymmetry, dermatochalasis/pseudodermatochalasis, eyelid ptosis, and deep superior sulcus. On the lower eyelid/cheek examination, special attention should be directed to the diagnosis of underlying negative vector, dry eyes, prominent eyes, lower lid retraction, ectropion, lateral canthal dystopia, lower eyelid laxity, scleral show, and lagophthalmos, with a rejuvenation goal that focuses on obtaining a youthful fullness through repositioning and reinforcing efforts to avoid the negative effects of hollowness. Intraoperative and postoperative medical and surgical management of cosmetic periocular surgery complications focus on decreasing the risk of postoperative ptosis, lagophthalmos, lid retraction, and lid asymmetry, with special attention to limiting the risk of visual loss secondary to orbital hemorrhage. PMID:20659676

  13. Multiple Myeloma: Cast Nephropathy, VTE, and Neurologic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Ellen; Smith, Lisa C.; Falco, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma accounts for approximately 1% of neoplastic diseases and 13% of hematologic cancers. Complications often associated with MM include neurologic and hematologic issues, infections, renal insufficiency, and bone involvement. It is crucial for advanced practice professionals caring for myeloma patients to assess patients accurately, be keenly aware of possible associated complications, and be familiar with appropriate interventions to prevent further injury. This article will provide an overview of MM-related renal insufficiency, with a focus on cast nephropathy, venous thromboembolism, and neurologic complications along with various causes and treatment options; a future article will address additional complications associated with MM. PMID:25031979

  14. Complications associated with equine arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Laurie R; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2008-12-01

    Arthroscopic complications are infrequent but when they occur can cause significant morbidity in the equine patient. This article reviews intraoperative and postoperative complications along with ways to avoid them. Additionally, therapeutic methods of managing these complications also are discussed. PMID:19203702

  15. Les complications des hémangiomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Casanova; F. Norat; J. Bardot; G. Magalon

    2006-01-01

    Hemangioma (HMG) is a benign tumour of the child generally evolving to spontaneous regression. Sometimes this evolution can become complicated in a more or less serious way according to its localization or of its importance. If local complications are, in the most of cases, without gravity, complications of a general nature like thrombopenia or cardiac failure may compromise the vital

  16. Complications of aortic atherosclerosis: Atheroemboli and thromboemboli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theresa A. Molisse; Paul A. Tunick; Itzhak Kronzon

    2007-01-01

    Opinion statement  Patients with severe aortic atherosclerosis are at high risk for stroke and other embolic complications. Therapy to prevent\\u000a emboli from aortic plaque is not yet established. Therefore, patients with atherosclerosis or risk factors for embolic disease\\u000a should be identified and treated aggressively. Aspirin, smoking cessation, and control of blood pressure and glucose are important.\\u000a Retrospective data in patients with

  17. Uses, limitations, and complications of endobronchial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jalil, Bilal A; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Khan, Amir Maqbul

    2015-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) plays a pivotal role in the minimally invasive staging of non-small cell lung cancer. The role of EBUS is progressively expanding to include the evaluation of peribronchial lesions, pulmonary nodules, and other mediastinal abnormalities. Recently, EBUS has assisted in the diagnosis of many other disease entities, including malignancies and various infections such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. This article reviews the indications and contraindications of EBUS, with emphasis on the technique and complications encountered during the procedure. PMID:26130878

  18. Uses, limitations, and complications of endobronchial ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Jalil, Bilal A.; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) plays a pivotal role in the minimally invasive staging of non–small cell lung cancer. The role of EBUS is progressively expanding to include the evaluation of peribronchial lesions, pulmonary nodules, and other mediastinal abnormalities. Recently, EBUS has assisted in the diagnosis of many other disease entities, including malignancies and various infections such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. This article reviews the indications and contraindications of EBUS, with emphasis on the technique and complications encountered during the procedure. PMID:26130878

  19. MEDIA ENCRYPTION FOR STILL VISUAL DATA MEDIA ENCRYPTION FOR STILL VISUAL DATA

    E-print Network

    Uhl, Andreas

    MEDIA ENCRYPTION FOR STILL VISUAL DATA #12;#12;MEDIA ENCRYPTION FOR STILL VISUAL DATA=engel.dominik@gmail.com, c=AT Date: 2008.09.17 09:58:42 +02'00' #12;Dominik Engel: Media Encryption for Still Visual Data for media encryption for still visual data. Two classes of visual data are used in the investigation

  20. Thoracic complications of illicit drug use: an organ system approach.

    PubMed

    Gotway, Michael B; Marder, Shelley R; Hanks, Douglas K; Leung, Jessica W T; Dawn, Samuel K; Gean, Alisa D; Reddy, Gautham P; Araoz, Philip A; Webb, W Richard

    2002-10-01

    Illicit drug use constitutes a major health problem and may be associated with various thoracic complications. These complications vary depending on the specific drug used and the route of administration. Commonly abused drugs that may play a role in causing thoracic disease include cocaine, opiates, and methamphetamine derivatives. Intravenously abused oral medications may contain filler agents that may be responsible for disease. Thoracic complications may be categorized as pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal, cardiovascular, and chest wall complications. Pulmonary complications of drug abuse include pneumonia, cardiogenic edema, acute lung injury, pulmonary hemorrhage, and aspiration pneumonia. Filler agents such as talc may result in panacinar emphysema or high-attenuation upper-lobe conglomerate masses. The primary pleural complication of illicit drug use is pneumothorax. Mediastinal and cardiovascular complications of illicit drug use include pneumomediastinum, cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, and injection-related pseudoaneurysms. Chest wall complications include diskitis and vertebral osteomyelitis, epidural abscess, necrotizing fasciitis, costochondritis, and septic arthritis. Categorization of thoracic complications of illicit drug use may facilitate understanding of these disorders and allow accurate diagnosis. PMID:12376606

  1. Still Life with Fruit and Seashell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gojeski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Henri Matisse's painting, "Sideboard," opens the door to the author's first-grade students' lesson on still life. This lesson is about the process of designing, the act of making decisions, and the knowledge of one's own preferences. In this article, the author describes how the students made still life with fruit and seashells.

  2. Towards sustainable development of still water resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Everard

    1999-01-01

    Evidence suggests a net decline in the quality and quantity of still waters over most of the developed world. A strategy predicated on merely ‘sustaining’ them as isolated resources is ultimately unsustainable. True sustainable development takes account of the ecological, social and economic values of still waters within the context of living catchments. Catchment management has begun to move thinking

  3. Summer 2012 Why are women still underpaid?

    E-print Network

    Botea, Adi

    Summer 2012 Why are women still underpaid? #12;CRICOS #00120C | 2012Brandlearn.anu.edu.au "I. Risky business 16 Professor Alison Booth on why women are still underpaid in comparison to men. LearningMichael warns that immediate action is needed to combat human-induced climate change. 30 Language's digital

  4. In this issue: Stewardship: Still Relevant Today?

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    In this issue: Stewardship: Still Relevant Today? Enhance Timber Profits and Wildlife Habitats Forest Stewards and Tree Farmers Forest Stewardship Workshop Announcements Timber Price Update Events Professionals Volume 17, No. 4 Winter - Spring 2011 Stewardship: Still Relevant Today? By Dr. Michael Andreu

  5. The cancer "fear" in IBD patients: is it still REAL?

    PubMed

    Connelly, T M; Koltun, W A

    2014-01-01

    Increased rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) with high rates of progression from dysplasia to CRC are well documented in the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) population. This increased risk in the presence of currently improving but still inadequate surveillance techniques confirms that the cancer "fear" in IBD patients is still real. The majority of data on the cancer risk in IBD has been gathered from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients as these patients are generally better studied. Thus surveillance and treatment protocols for Crohn's disease (CD) are frequently modeled on UC paradigms. Dysplasia in the IBD cohort frequently is a harbinger of local, distant, or metachronous neoplasia. Therefore, frequent surveillance and referral for surgical intervention when dysplasia is detected are justified in both the CD and UC patient. PMID:24002760

  6. Postoperative pulmonary complications updating.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Carreira, S; le Saché, F; Raux, M

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major contributor to the overall risk of surgery. PPCs affect the length of hospital stay and are associated with a higher in-hospital mortality. PPCs are even the leading cause of death either in cardiothoracic surgery but also in non-cardiothoracic surgery. Thus, reliable PPCs risk stratification tools are the key issue of clinical decision making in the perioperative period. When the risk is clearly identified related to the patient according the ARISCAT score and/or the type of surgery (mainly thoracic and abdominal), low-cost preemptive interventions improve outcomes and new strategies can be developed to prevent this risk. The EuSOS, PERISCOPE and IMPROVE studies demonstrated this care optimization by risk identification first, then risk stratification and new care (multifaceted) strategies implementation allowing a decrease in PPCs mortality by optimizing the clinical path of the patient and the care resources. PMID:25168300

  7. [Diabetic macrovascular complications].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2015-03-01

    Reactive derivatives from non-enzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions, as well as lipids and nucleic acids exposed to reducing sugars, form a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called "advanced glycation end products(AGEs)". The formation and accumulation of AGEs have been known to progress at an accelerated rate under diabetes. There is accumulating evidence that AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) interaction elicits oxidative stress generation and subsequently evokes inflammatory and thrombogenic reactions, thereby being involved in vascular complications in diabetes. We, along with others, have recently found that pigment epithelium-derived factor(PEDF), a glycoprotein that belongs to the superfamily of serine protease inhibitors, has neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties both in cell culture and animal models. In this review, we discuss the role of AGE-RAGE axis in diabetic macroangiopathy and its therapeutic intervention by PEDF. PMID:25812377

  8. Complications of Continuous-Flow Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), more importantly the continuous-flow subclass, have revolutionized the medical field by improving New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class status, quality of life, and survival rates in patients with advanced systolic heart failure. From the first pulsatile device to modern day continuous-flow devices, LVADs have continued to improve, but they are still associated with several complications. These complications include infection, bleeding, thrombosis, hemolysis, aortic valvular dysfunction, right heart failure, and ventricular arrhythmias. In this article, we aim to review these complications to understand the most appropriate approach for their prevention and to discuss the available therapeutic modalities. PMID:26052234

  9. Recognition and prevention of barium enema complications.

    PubMed

    Williams, S M; Harned, R K

    1991-01-01

    The barium enema is a safe and accurate diagnostic study of the colon but, in rare cases, complications may result. Many of these can be prevented by proper equipment and careful attention to technique. When a complication does occur, prompt recognition and management is vital in decreasing morbidity and mortality. Perforation of the bowel is the most frequent serious complication, occurring in approximately 0.02% to 0.04% of patients. Rarely the colon may burst due to excessive transmural pressure alone. However, a colon weakened by iatrogenic trauma or disease is more likely to perforate during an enema than is a normal healthy bowel. Injury to the rectal mucosa or anal canal due to the enema tip or retention balloon is probably the most common traumatic cause of barium enema perforation. Inflation of a retention balloon within a stricture, neoplasm, inflamed rectum, or colostomy stoma is particularly hazardous. Recent deep biopsy or polypectomy with electrocautery makes the bowel more vulnerable to rupture. The tensile strength of the bowel wall is impaired in elderly patients, patients receiving long-term steroid therapy, and in disease states including neoplasm, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and ischemia. Intraperitoneal perforation leads to a severe, acute peritonitis with intravascular volume depletion. The ensuing shock may be rapidly fatal. Prompt fluid replacement and laparotomy are essential. If the patient survives the initial shock and sepsis, later complications caused by dense intraperitoneal adhesions may develop. Extraperitoneal perforation is usually less catastrophic but may result in pain, sepsis, cellulitis, abscess, rectal stricture, or fistula. Intramural extravasation often forms a persistent submucosal barium granuloma which may ulcerate or be mistaken for a neoplasm. The most dramatic complication of barium enema is venous intravasation of barium. Fortunately, this is quite rare as it may be immediately lethal. Most cases have been attributed to trauma from the enema tip or retention balloon, mucosal inflammation, or misplacement of the tip in the vagina. Bacteremia has been found in as many as 23% of patients following barium enema and, in rare cases, may cause symptomatic septicemia. Other less common complications include barium impaction, water intoxication, allergic reactions, and cardiac arrhythmias. Preparatory laxatives and cleansing enemas have been implicated in some instances of dehydration, rectal trauma, water intoxication, and perforation. Careful review of the indications for examination, previous radiographs, and clinical history will identify many of the patients at greater risk for complications so that appropriate precautions may be observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1889235

  10. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Imaging and Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John M., E-mail: johnkirby@ireland.com; Vora, Parag; Midia, Mehran; Rawlinson, John [McMaster University Medical Center (Canada)

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study was to highlight technical challenges and potential pitfalls of diagnostic imaging, intervention, and postintervention follow-up of vascular complications of pancreatitis. Diagnostic and interventional radiology imaging from patients with pancreatitis from 2002 to 2006 was reviewed. We conclude that biphasic CT is the diagnostic modality of choice. Catheter angiography may (still) be required to diagnose small pseudoaneurysms. Endovascular coiling is the treatment of choice for pseudoaneurysms. Close clinical follow-up is required, as patients may rebleed/develop aneurysms elsewhere.

  11. [Neurologic Complications in HPV Vaccination].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    A relatively high incidence of chronic limb pain, frequently complicated by violent, tremulous involuntary movements, has been noted in Japanese girls following human papillomavirus vaccination. The average incubation period after the first dose of the vaccine was 5.47 ± 5.00 months. Frequent manifestations included headaches, general fatigue, coldness of the feet, limb pain, and weakness. The skin temperature of the girls with limb symptoms was slightly lower in the fingers and moderately lower in the toes. Digital plethysmograms revealed a reduced peak of the waves, especially in the toes. Limb symptoms of the affected girls were compatible with the diagnostic criteria for complex regional pain syndrome. The Schellong test identified a significant number of patients with orthostatic hypotension and a few with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Electron-microscopic examinations of the intradermal nerves showed an abnormal pathology in the unmyelinated fibers in two of the three girls examined. The symptoms observed in this study can be explained by abnormal peripheral sympathetic responses. The most common previous diagnosis in the patients was psychosomatic disease. Recently, delayed manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in the post-vaccinated girls has attracted attention. The symptoms include memory loss and difficulty in reading textbooks and/or calculation. PMID:26160812

  12. Postoperative surgical complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, M; Fernández, R; Fieira, E; González, D; Delgado, M; Méndez, L; Borro, J M

    2015-01-01

    This is a review article on the main postoperative complications after lung transplantation: airways complications, vascular complications, pleural complications, surgical wound complications, and abdominal complications. Incidence data, severity, and major management regimens are reported. Postoperative complications after lung transplantation result in a significantly increased morbidity and mortality, with early diagnosis and therapy being extremely important. PMID:25854134

  13. Drinking Water: Health Hazards Still Not Resolved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Nicholas

    1977-01-01

    Despite the suggested link between cancer deaths and drinking obtained from the Mississippi River, New Orleans still treats its water supply in the same manner as before the Environmental Defense Fund's epidemiological study. (BT)

  14. Sudden hearing loss as a first complication of long-standing Type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gawron, W; Pospiech, L; Noczynska, A; Koziorowska, E

    2004-01-01

    The term 'sudden hypoacusis' describes a hearing loss of a rapid onset and unknown origin that can progress to severe deafness. Its pathophysiology is still unknown, the proposed aetiological mechanisms being vascular disease or autoimmune reaction. We present the case of a 19-year-old woman with Type 1 diabetes mellitus who experienced sudden hearing loss on her right side. She had no complications related to diabetes. After being referred to the hospital she was diagnosed with sudden sensorineural right-sided hearing loss accompanied by high frequency tinnitus. After administration of vasoactive drugs, there was partial improvement after 7 days, followed by gradual improvement over the next 4 weeks to 5 months. The tinnitus did not disappear completely. We conclude that hearing organ disturbances can be present in Type 1 diabetes and represent an early complication. PMID:14706062

  15. The Scientific Method: Is It Still Useful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Scott B.; James, Linda

    2004-01-01

    While the scientific method is a logical, orderly way to solve a problem or answer a question, it is not a magical formula that is too complicated for nonscientists to comprehend (Keeton and Gould 1986). The scientific method may include a variety of steps, processes, and definitions. It should not be seen as a single series of steps, with no…

  16. Management of Complications of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, M. Dror; Cotter, Shane E.; Gargollo, Patricio C.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Treatment of men with prostate cancer commonly involves surgical, radiation, or hormone therapy. Most men with prostate cancer live for many years after diagnosis and may never suffer morbidity or mortality attributable to prostate cancer. The short-term and long-term adverse consequences of therapy are, therefore, of great importance. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include immediate postoperative complications and long-term urinary and sexual complications. External beam or interstitial radiation therapy in men with localized prostate cancer may lead to urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual complications. Improvements in surgical and radiation techniques have reduced the incidence of many of these complications. Hormone treatment typically consists of androgen deprivation therapy, and consequences of such therapy may include vasomotor flushing, anemia, and bone density loss. Numerous clinical trials have studied the role of bone antiresorptive therapy for prevention of bone density loss and fractures. Other long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy may include adverse body composition changes and increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Ongoing and planned clinical trials will continue to address strategies to prevent treatment-related side effects and improve quality of life for men with prostate cancer. PMID:18502900

  17. Neuromuscular complications of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Osias, Jules; Manno, Edward

    2014-10-01

    Neuromuscular sequelae are common in the critically ill. Critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy are neuromuscular complications of sepsis or iatrogenic complications of treatments required in intensive care. This article discusses the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of these disorders based on a literature review. This review found that glycemic control, early mobilization, and judicious use of steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents are the primary approaches to reduce the incidence and severity of neuromuscular complications in affected patients. PMID:25257741

  18. NCL diseases - clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Angela; Kohlschütter, Alfried; Mink, Jonathan; Simonati, Alessandro; Williams, Ruth

    2013-11-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are lysosomal storage disorders and together are the most common degenerative brain diseases in childhood. They are a group of disorders linked by the characteristic accumulation of abnormal storage material in neurons and other cell types, and a degenerative disease course. All NCLs are characterized by a combination of dementia, epilepsy, and motor decline. For most childhood NCLs, a progressive visual failure is also a core feature. The characteristics of these symptoms can vary and the age at disease onset ranges from birth to young adulthood. Genetic heterogeneity, with fourteen identified NCL genes and wide phenotypic variability render diagnosis difficult. A new NCL classification system based on the affected gene and the age at disease onset allows a precise and practical delineation of an individual patient's NCL type. A diagnostic algorithm to identify each NCL form is presented here. Precise NCL diagnosis is essential not only for genetic counseling, but also for the optimal delivery of care and information sharing with the family and other caregivers. These aspects are challenging because there are also potential long term complications which are specific to NCL type. Therefore care supported by a specifically experienced team of clinicians is recommended. As the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear for all NCL forms, the development of curative therapies remains difficult. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses or Batten Disease. PMID:23602993

  19. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hospital and Ranson score. Results: There was no statistic difference between the two groups (A: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery < 0.5 year. B: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery > 0.5 year) in pathogenetic condition and length of stay in hospital. All patients were discharged after treatment, a follow-up of 6-18 months found no recurrence of pancreatitis. Conclusion: There is no relevance between the treatment feature and onset interval of biliary and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. The disease is still treated meanly with symptomatic and supportive treatment, while the etiological treatment is also particularly important.

  20. Is this still just sarcoidosis, or should we a-DRESS a different diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Rolls, Sophie; Hyams, Catherine; Sheaff, Michael; O'Shaughnessy, Terence C

    2015-01-01

    An Afro-Caribbean woman presented with worsening breathlessness, weight loss, lethargy and fevers, developing a bilateral florid erythematous rash on her legs. She was recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy was found on thoracic CT imaging. She was tachycardic and investigations revealed pancytopenia, eosinophilia, raised serum ACE, acute kidney injury and deranged liver function tests. Biopsy of the lymphadenopathy revealed mixed lymphoid cells and liver biopsy revealed extramedullary haematopoiesis, with hypercellular marrow found on bone marrow biopsy. Cardiac MRI was normal, excluding cardiac sarcoid. The patient developed status epilepticus and phenytoin was started. She subsequently developed skin desquamation, in keeping with toxic epidermal necrosis. Skin biopsies revealed atypical granulomas and multinucleated giant cells, which subsequently resolved on steroid treatment. This case highlights an overlap syndrome, with an unclear diagnosis between sarcoidosis, drug reaction or rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and/or hypereosinophilic syndrome and Still's disease. Hence varied serological and clinical features can complicate the distinction between diagnoses. PMID:26123453

  1. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and pregnancy complications].

    PubMed

    Sztenc, S?awomir

    2004-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing amino acid produced when methionine is demethylated. The majority of Hcy undergoes transsulfuration to cysteine by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), of which vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is an essential cofactor. The remainder of Hcy is remethylated by methionine synthase (MS), of which vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is an essential cofactor along with methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF). MTHF is generated by the enzyme MTHFR-reductase (MTHFR). High levels of Hcy can result from a variety of aquired factors (deficiency of vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid, high meat diet, smoking and others) or genetic (abnormalities of methionine--homocysteine metabolism). Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with premature atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism; so called "cholesterol of XXI. age". Results of many studies suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia, homozygous state for MTHFR gene mutation, folate deficiency are probably risk factors for recurrent fetal loss, intrauterine fetal death, thrombo-embolic disease in pregnancy, neural tube defects and congenital cardiac malformation at infants and other placental diseases (pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intrauterine growth restriction IUGR). Those irregularities are very interesting and important for obstetricians and gynecologists. The plasma homocysteine values can be modulated by vitamins, vitamin B6 and folic acid in particular. The potential for research and possible prevention in this area is immense. PMID:15181872

  2. Varicella Zoster Complications

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.; Gilden, Don

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With advancing age or immunosuppression, cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines and virus reactivates to cause zoster (shingles), which can occur anywhere on the body. Skin lesions resolve within 1-2 weeks, while complete cessation of pain usually takes 4-6 weeks. Zoster can be followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia), cranial nerve palsies, zoster paresis, meningoencephalitis, cerebellitis, myelopathy, multiple ocular disorders and vasculopathy that can mimic giant cell arteritis. All of the neurological and ocular disorders listed above may also develop without rash. Diagnosis of VZV-induced neurological disease may require examination of CSF, serum and/ or ocular fluids. In the absence of rash in a patient with neurological disease potentially due to VZV, CSF should be examined for VZV DNA by PCR and for anti-VZV IgG and IGM. Detection of VZV IgG antibody in CSF is superior to detection of VZV DNA in CSF to diagnose vasculopathy, recurrent myelopathy, and brainstem encephalitis. Oral antiviral drugs speed healing of rash and shorten acute pain. Immunocompromised patients require intravenous acyclovir. First-line treatments for post-herpetic neuralgia include tricyclic antidepressants gabapentin, pregabalin, and topical lidocaine patches. VZV vasculopathy, meningoencephalitis, and myelitis are all treated with intravenous acyclovir. PMID:23794213

  3. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Leggott, P.J. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  4. [Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality. PMID:24215682

  5. Blind loop: rare but important surgical complication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical complications worldwide are dreaded by both patients and physicians alike. They represent significant and serious morbidity and mortality, and contribute substantially to increased costs of healthcare. Case presentation Our Case Report describes a 65yo Caucasian man with an extensive operative history for Crohn’s disease, including 4 laparotomies with small bowel resections to ameliorate small bowel obstructions. He presented with signs and symptoms of a chronic draining sinus, but was found to have a Blind Loop of bowel. This finding is believed to be the result of a surgical complication. Conclusion While the Case Reports discusses this particular patient presentation, the paper defines, describes and offers treatment strategies for Enterocutaneous Fistulas (ECF). We offer aim to add Blind Loop to the differential diagnosis when presented with a patient with signs and symptoms of ECF. PMID:25176257

  6. Study design and rationale of 'Influence of Cilostazol-based triple anti-platelet therapy on ischemic complication after drug-eluting stent implantation (CILON-T)' study: A multicenter randomized trial evaluating the efficacy of Cilostazol on ischemic vascular complications after drug-eluting stent implantation for coronary heart disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung-Pyo Lee; Jung-Won Suh; Kyung Woo Park; Hae-Young Lee; Hyun-Jae Kang; Bon-Kwon Koo; In-Ho Chae; Dong-Ju Choi; Seung-Woon Rha; Jang-Whan Bae; Myeong-Chan Cho; Taek-Geun Kwon; Jang-Ho Bae; Hyo-Soo Kim

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend dual anti-platelet therapy, aspirin and clopidogrel, for patients treated with drug-eluting stent for coronary heart disease. In a few small trials, addition of cilostazol on dual anti-platelet therapy (triple anti-platelet therapy) showed better late luminal loss. In the real-world unselected patients with coronary heart disease, however, the effect of cilostazol on platelet reactivity and ischemic vascular

  7. Female circumcision and obstetric complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Larsen; F. E. Okonofua

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether complications at delivery are associated with female circumcision. Method: One thousand eight hundred and fifty-one women seeking family planning or antenatal care in three south-west Nigerian hospitals were interviewed and had a medical exam. The prevalence of complications at delivery for uncircumcised women and circumcised women with type 1 (partial or total removal of the clitoris)

  8. Intracranial complications of acute mastoiditis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia Go; Joseph M Bernstein; Andrew L de Jong; Marcelle Sulek; Ellen M Friedman

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Oral antibiotic use may have changed the incidence and microbiology of otitic intracranial complications. We reviewed cases of acute mastoiditis to document: (1) incidence of intracranial complications; (2) risk factors; and (3) identify pathologic organisms. Methods: A retrospective study of children at a tertiary care children's hospital with acute mastoiditis from July, 1986 through June, 1998. Results: 118 children

  9. Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bereavement The grief process Major depression and complicated grief Coping with loss Helping someone who is grieving Grief ... References Previous Topic The grief process Next Topic Coping with loss Major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, ...

  10. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... artery disease may be a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). A TIA is a small ... Major complications of carotid artery disease are: Transient ischemic ... vessel to the brain. It causes the same symptoms as stroke. ...

  11. Septoplasty complications: avoidance and management.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Jason D; Kaplan, Seth E; Bleier, Benjamin S; Goldstein, Stephen A

    2009-06-01

    Nasal obstruction from a deviated septum is one of the more frequent complaints bringing patients into an otolaryngology office. Despite the significant number of septoplasties performed each year, complications after this procedure are relatively uncommon. Most complications result from inadequate surgical planning or poor technique and often can be prevented. Surgeons should discuss these risks with patients before surgery as part of the informed consent process. This article reviews how complications of septoplasty can occur, compromising the functional and aesthetic aspects of a patient's life, and how attention to detail can reduce the risk for these complications. The septoplasty surgeon must be aware of all the possible complications that may arise so as to convey the benefits and risks of surgery effectively to prospective patients. PMID:19486742

  12. Prevention of pelvic radiation disease.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra

    2015-02-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Treatment of patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that frequently includes radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity is a major complication and the transient or long-term problems, ranging from mild to very severe, arising in non-cancerous tissues resulting from radiation treatment to a tumor of pelvic origin, are actually called as pelvic radiation disease. The incidence of pelvic radiation disease changes according to the radiation technique, the length of follow up, the assessment method, the type and stage of cancer and several other variables. Notably, even with the most recent radiation techniques, i.e., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the incidence of radiation-induced GI side effects is overall reduced but still not negligible. In addition, radiation-induced GI side effects can develop even after several decades; therefore, the improvement of patient life expectancy will unavoidably increase the risk of developing radiation-induced complications. Once developed, the management of pelvic radiation disease may be challenging. Therefore, the prevention of radiation-induced toxicity represents a reasonable way to avoid a dramatic drop of the quality of life of these patients. In the current manuscript we provide an updated and practical review on the best available evidences in the field of the prevention of pelvic radiation disease. PMID:25664197

  13. Prevention of pelvic radiation disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Treatment of patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that frequently includes radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity is a major complication and the transient or long-term problems, ranging from mild to very severe, arising in non-cancerous tissues resulting from radiation treatment to a tumor of pelvic origin, are actually called as pelvic radiation disease. The incidence of pelvic radiation disease changes according to the radiation technique, the length of follow up, the assessment method, the type and stage of cancer and several other variables. Notably, even with the most recent radiation techniques, i.e., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the incidence of radiation-induced GI side effects is overall reduced but still not negligible. In addition, radiation-induced GI side effects can develop even after several decades; therefore, the improvement of patient life expectancy will unavoidably increase the risk of developing radiation-induced complications. Once developed, the management of pelvic radiation disease may be challenging. Therefore, the prevention of radiation-induced toxicity represents a reasonable way to avoid a dramatic drop of the quality of life of these patients. In the current manuscript we provide an updated and practical review on the best available evidences in the field of the prevention of pelvic radiation disease. PMID:25664197

  14. STS-94 Pilot Susan Still suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-94 Pilot Susan L. Still waves as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. She is the second woman to fly in this capacity on a Space Shuttle. Still is a lieutenant colonel in the Navy and has more than 2,000 flight hours in 30 different types of aircraft. She also holds a masters degree in aerospace engineering. Still will assist Halsell with all phases of the space flight and will have primary responsibility to take action in the event of an emergency. After Columbia reaches orbit, Still will be busy with the many and varied tasks associated with monitoring and maintaining the orbiter. She and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 1:50 a.m. EDT, July 1. The launch window was opened 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center.

  15. STS-83 Pilot Susan Still suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-83 Pilot Susan L. Still gives a thumbs-up as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and checkout (O&C) Building. She is the second woman to fly in this capacity on a Space Shuttle. Still is a lieutenant colonel in the Navy and has more than 2,000 flight hours in 30 different types of aircraft. She also holds a master's degree in aerospace engineering. Still will assist Halsell with all phases of the space flight and will have primary responsibility to take action in the event of an emergency. After Columbia reaches orbit, Still will be busy with the many and varied tasks associated with monitoring and maintaining the orbiter. She and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:00 p.m. EST, April 4.

  16. States Still Grappling with Multicultural Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    A debate over a New York state commission formed to study how slavery was portrayed in schools showed that after more than a decade of adding multicultural curricula, educators there were still at odds over how the distinctive experiences of racial and ethnic groups should be taught, and who should decide. While some educators and observers in the…

  17. Instructor Gallery. Still Life in Bloom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darst, Diane W.

    1992-01-01

    The article presents ideas for using Van Gogh's painting, "Irises," to teach elementary students about floral still lifes and the use of space, light, and other aspects of composition. It includes a poster of "Irises" along with suggestions and activities for using it to explore the elements of art. (SM)

  18. Why the dirty bomb is still ticking.

    PubMed

    Blair, James D

    2014-01-01

    Many Cesium 137 machines used by hospitals for blood irradiation are still susceptible to theft by terrorists who can convert them to so-called dirty bombs, according to the author, who describes the harm the explosion of one such bomb can do and urges concerned citizens, media, and security professionals to take action before a disaster occurs. PMID:24707763

  19. [An unusual case of "complicated" adrenal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Gallina, M R; Roncati, D; Grassino, E; Tomao, R; Ferrero, F

    2013-08-01

    This case report concerns a newborn with bilateral adrenal massive hemorrhage complicated by inferior cava vein thrombosis, hypertension and encephalopathy to elaborate diagnostic and therapeutic problem of neonatal thromboembolic events. Increasing of risk population (extreme prematurity), improvement of imaging, laboratory and neonatologist care enhanced in recent years the diagnosis of this group of diseases. Even if literature about this subject is poor, we remark the significant effort of neonatologist to revise and update neonatal guidelines and the relevance of the institution of the National Registry of Neonatal Thrombosis (RITI). PMID:24051977

  20. Cardiovascular Complications in CKD Patients: Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanova, Elvira O.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2011-01-01

    Starting with the early stages, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience higher burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, CVD complications are the major cause of mortality in CKD patients as compared with complications from chronic kidney failure. While traditional CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, physical inactivity, may be more prevalent among CKD patients, these factors seem to underestimate the accelerated cardiovascular disease in the CKD population. Search for additional biomarkers that could explain the enhanced CVD risk in CKD patients has gained increasing importance. Although it is unlikely that any single nontraditional risk factor would fully account for the increased CVD risk in individuals with CKD, oxidative stress appears to play a central role in the development and progression of CVD and its complications. We will review the data that support the contribution of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CVD in patients with chronic kidney failure. PMID:21253517

  1. Diabetes and Associated Complications in the South Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arti; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes in South Asians has significant health and economic implications. South Asians are predisposed to the development of diabetes due to biologic and lifestyle factors. Furthermore, they experience significant morbidity and mortality from complications of diabetes, most notably coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology and genetics of diabetes risk factors and its associated complications in South Asians is paramount to curbing the diabetes epidemic. With this understanding, the appropriate screening, preventative and therapeutic strategies can be implemented and further developed. In this review, we discuss in detail the biologic and lifestyle factors that predispose South Asians to diabetes and review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes in South Asians. We also review the ongoing and completed diabetes prevention and management studies in South Asians. PMID:24643902

  2. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, David L; Berger, Miles; Mathew, Joseph P; Graffagnino, Carmelo; Milano, Carmelo A; Newman, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    As increasing numbers of elderly people undergo cardiac surgery, neurologists are frequently called upon to assess patients with neurological complications from the procedure. Some complications mandate acute intervention, whereas others need longer term observation and management. A large amount of published literature exists about these complications and guidance on best practice is constantly changing. Similarly, despite technological advances in surgical intervention and modifications in surgical technique to make cardiac procedures safer, these advances often create new avenues for neurological injury. Accordingly, rapid and precise neurological assessment and therapeutic intervention rests on a solid understanding of the evidence base and procedural variables. PMID:24703207

  3. Instructor: Susanne Still sstill@hawaii.edu

    E-print Network

    Still, Susanna

    Instructor: Susanne Still sstill@hawaii.edu www2.hawaii.edu/~sstill/ ICS 435 Machine Learning Fundamentals Friday 1.30pm-4.10pm. KUY 303. Course website: www2.hawaii.edu/~sstill/ICS435.html From Synapses, applicable to many fields. Auditors and non-ICS majors are welcome! www2.hawaii.edu/~sstill/ICS435.html www2

  4. The JPEG still picture compression standard

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory K. Wallace

    1991-01-01

    For the past few years, a joint ISO\\/CCITT committee known as JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) has been working to establish the first international compression standard for continuous-tone still images, both grayscale and color. JPEG's proposed standard aims to be generic, to support a wide variety of applications for continuous-tone images. To meet the differing needs of many applications, the

  5. [Thyroid surgery (356 cases): risks and complications].

    PubMed

    Benzarti, S; Miled, I; Bassoumi, T; Ben Mrad, B; Akkari, K; Bacha, O; Chebbi, M K

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks and complication rate of thyroid surgery. The authors present a retrospective study of 356 patients surgically treated for thyroid nodules, between 1987 and 1998, at the military hospital of Tunis. The patients were categorised into 3 groups: group I: 238 solitary thyroid nodules (66.8%); group II: 92 multinodular goitres (25.8%) included 12 retrosternal goitres (3.37%) and group III: 26 cases of Basedow's disease (7.4%). Patients benefitted from unilateral surgery in 72% of cases and from bilateral surgery (total or subtotal thyroidectomy) in the remaining 28% of cases. Malignancy was found in 34 cases (9.5%). The complications observed were haemorrhage (0.56% of cases), unilateral post operative recurrent laryngeal palsy (1.12% of cases), and permanent hypoparathyroidism in 0.81% of cases. Experienced surgeons and the use of a meticulous surgical technique can reduce the incidence of post operative complications in thyroid surgery. PMID:12200998

  6. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  7. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-12-15

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  8. Clinical presentation of meningococcal disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, C; Bosis, S; Semino, M; Senatore, L; Principi, N; Esposito, S

    2012-06-01

    Although relatively rare, meningococcal disease represents a global health problem being still the leading infectious cause of death in childhood with an overall mortality around 8%. Meningococcal meningitis is the most commonly recognized presentation, accounting for 80% to 85% of all reported cases of meningococcal disease (in half of these cases sepsis is also present concomitantly). The remaining 15-20% of cases are most commonly bloodstream infections only. Meningococcal serogroups A, B, and C account for most cases of meningococcal disease throughout the world. Recently, serogroups W-135 and X (predominantly in Africa) and group Y (in the United States and European countries) have emerged as important disease-causing isolates. Despite recent advances in medical management, the mortality rate of fulminant meningococcemia ranges from 15% to 30%. However, among survivors, 10-30% could have long term sequelae (i.e. sensoneural hearing loss, seizure, motor problems, hydrocephalus, mental retardation, and cognitive and behavioral problems). Considering the clinical severity of meningococcal disease, prevention represents the first approach for avoiding serious complications and possible deaths. The availability of new vaccines able to cover the emerging serotypes including A and Y as well as the availability on the market of new products that could prevent meningococcal B infection represent a great opportunity for the decrease of the burden of this complicated disease. PMID:23240173

  9. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome complicated by unilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Parren, Lizelotte J M T; Bauer, Boris; Hamm, Henning; Frank, Jorge

    2008-11-01

    Brooke-Spiegler syndrome is an autosomal dominant tumor predisposition disorder. The disease is characterized by the occurrence of multiple skin appendage tumors, including cylindroma, trichoepithelioma, and spiradenoma. In some patients, tumors cover the entire head circumference, thereby causing disfigurement and other complications. Here, we report on a man with multiple cylindroma that were distributed in a turban tumor-like fashion. One of these neoplasms arose in the meatus externus of the right ear leading to unilateral hearing loss, a complication that has been documented only on few occasions in this disease. PMID:18986490

  10. Acute Otomastoiditis and its complications: Role of CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Singleton, E.L.; Valvassori, G.E.; Espinosa, G.A.; Kumar, A.; Aimi, K.

    1985-05-01

    Acute bacterial (suppurative) otomastoiditis responds to antibiotic treatment; radiologic study is required only when there is clinical suggestion of coalescent mastoiditis, intracranial complications, or an underlying chronic disease. Computed tomography (CT) is the method of choice for evaluating otogenic intra- or extracranial complications. CT scans can show stages of disease progression when infection has spread by way of soft tissue, blood, and bone pathways into the dural venous sinuses, meninges, labyrinth, facial nerves, epidural and other intracranial spaces. When there is clinical suggestion of acute coalescent mastoiditis, a CT scan of the temporal bone can confirm the presence of rarefying osteitis, coalescence of the air cells, and subperiosteal abscess.

  11. Biliary Complications of Pancreatic Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Adarsh; Sachdev, Ajay; Negi, Sanjay

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic necrosis has the potential to cause avariety of locoregional complications (1). This isbecause of the propensity of the necrotic tissue tospread far beyond the confines of the pancreas. Theproximity of the biliary tract to the pancreas makesit particularly vulnerable to damage by the inflammatory process, and though likely, there are only isolated case reports of involvement of the biliarytract through the necrotic process (2-5). This papershares our experience in managing six patients withbiliary complications of pancreatic necrosis. PMID:12754382

  12. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  13. Augmentation cystoplasty: Contemporary indications, techniques and complications

    PubMed Central

    Veeratterapillay, Rajan; Thorpe, Andrew C.; Harding, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty (AC) has traditionally been used in the treatment of the low capacity, poorly compliant or refractory overactive bladder (OAB). The use of intravesical botulinum toxin and sacral neuromodulation in detrusor overactivity has reduced the number of AC performed for this indication. However, AC remains important in the pediatric and renal transplant setting and still remains a viable option for refractory OAB. Advances in surgical technique have seen the development of both laparoscopic and robotic augmentation cystoplasty. A variety of intestinal segments can be used although ileocystoplasty remains the most common performed procedure. Early complications include thromboembolism and mortality, whereas long-term problems include metabolic disturbance, bacteriuria, urinary tract stones, incontinence, perforation, the need for intermittent self-catheterization and carcinoma. This article examines the contemporary indications, published results and possible future directions for augmentation cystoplasty. PMID:24235795

  14. Pleural procedural complications: prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Psallidas, Ioannis; Wrightson, John M.; Hallifax, Robert J.; Rahman, Najib M.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural disease is common with a rising case frequency. Many of these patients will be symptomatic and require diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures. Patients with pleural disease present to a number of different medical specialties, and an equally broad range of clinicians are therefore required to have practical knowledge of these procedures. There is often underestimation of the morbidity and mortality associated with pleural interventions, even those regarded as being relatively straightforward, with potentially significant implications for processes relating to patient safety and informed consent. The advent of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has had a major influence on patient safety and the number of physicians with the necessary skill set to perform pleural procedures. As the variety and complexity of pleural interventions increases, there is increasing recognition that early specialist input can reduce the risk of complications and number of procedures a patient requires. This review looks at the means by which complications of pleural procedures arise, along with how they can be managed or ideally prevented.

  15. Imbalance of Angiogenesis in Diabetic Complications: The Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tahergorabi, Zoya; Khazaei, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disease and a chronic health-care problem. Nowadays, because of alteration of lifestyle such as lack of exercise, intake of high fat diet subsequently obesity and aging population, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing quickly in around the world. The international diabetes federation estimated in 2008, that 246 million adults in worldwide suffered from diabetes mellitus and the prevalence of disease is expected to reach to 380 million by 2025. Although, mainly in management of diabetes focused on hyperglycemia, however, it is documented that abnormalities of angiogenesis may contribute in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications. Angiogenesis is the generation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. Normal angiogenesis depends on the intricate balance between angiogenic factors (such as VEGF, FGF2, TGF-?, angiopoietins) and angiostatic factors (angiostatin, endostatin, thrombospondins). Vascular abnormalities in different tissues including retina and kidney can play a role in pathogenesis of micro-vascular complications of diabetes; also vascular impairment contributes in macrovascular complications e.g., diabetic neuropathy and impaired formation of coronary collaterals. Therefore, identifying of different mechanisms of the diabetic complications can give us an opportunity to prevent and/or treat the following complications and improves quality of life for patients and society. In this review, we studied the mechanisms of angiogenesis in micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:23272281

  16. Electronic Still Camera Project on STS-48

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    On behalf of NASA, the Office of Commercial Programs (OCP) has signed a Technical Exchange Agreement (TEA) with Autometric, Inc. (Autometric) of Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of this agreement is to evaluate and analyze a high-resolution Electronic Still Camera (ESC) for potential commercial applications. During the mission, Autometric will provide unique photo analysis and hard-copy production. Once the mission is complete, Autometric will furnish NASA with an analysis of the ESC s capabilities. Electronic still photography is a developing technology providing the means by which a hand held camera electronically captures and produces a digital image with resolution approaching film quality. The digital image, stored on removable hard disks or small optical disks, can be converted to a format suitable for downlink transmission, or it can be enhanced using image processing software. The on-orbit ability to enhance or annotate high-resolution images and then downlink these images in real-time will greatly improve Space Shuttle and Space Station capabilities in Earth observations and on-board photo documentation.

  17. [Infectious complications of severe trauma: achievements and problems].

    PubMed

    Lebedev, V F; Rozhkov, A S

    2001-10-01

    On the base of treatment results obtained in 2000 casualties the pathogenically substantiated classification of infectious complications of the injuries and traumas was proposed. The principles of classification are in conformity with modern ideas connected with the conception of systemic inflammatory response, the theory of general adaptation and the concept of traumatic disease. The classification determines the purposeful diagnostic tactics and provides the preventative therapy of traumas' infectious complications. Selection of special direction in the surgery of injuries in order to solve the problem of traumas' infectious complications in scientific, methodical and practical aspects is substantiated. First of all it is creation of specialized centers that provide the introduction into medical practice of the modern conception of traumas' infectious complications. PMID:11764482

  18. Plants Used in the Management of Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dodda, D.; Ciddi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease, which has assumed vital public health importance because of the complications associated with it. Various mechanisms including polyol pathway along with a complex integrating paradigm have been implicated in glucose-mediated complications. Though polyol pathway was established as a major mechanism, precise pathogenesis of these complications is not yet completely elucidated. Thus research focus was shifted towards key enzyme, aldose reductase in the pathway. Even though various compounds with aldose reductase inhibitory activity were synthesised, a very few compounds are under clinical use. However, studies on these compounds were always under conflicting results and an attempt has been made to review various natural substances with aldose reductase inhibitory activity and their role in management of diabetic complications. PMID:24843182

  19. Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infections in ruminants: still more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Weigand, P; Goethe, R

    1999-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis (Johnes disease), a chronic enteritis in ruminants, which is one of the most widespread bacterial diseases of domestic animals, causing enormous economic losses worldwide. Though the disease was first described more than a century ago, the biology of the infecting organism and the mechanisms of its interactions with the host still remain a mystery. In this review, recent advances made on pathogenesis of paratuberculosis are summarized and future challenges are discussed. PMID:10572316

  20. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  1. [Complications after cosmetic iris implantation].

    PubMed

    Jonsson, N J; Sahlmüller, M C; Ruokonen, P C; Torun, N; Rieck, P

    2011-05-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old patient with ocular complications associated with the implantation of cosmetic iris implants. Implantation of silicone iris implants for the purpose of changing iris colour has been performed since 2004. Diaphragms are implanted in the anterior chamber. Up to now only little information exists about side effects of this method. In the literature severe ocular complications shortly after cosmetic iris implantation are reported in single cases. In our case 5 months after surgery optic nerve damage caused by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) was diagnosed. Nuclear opacity of both lenses and a decreased number of corneal endothelial cells were observed at the first visit. Because of recurrent IOP elevation despite maximum antiglaucoma therapy, explantation of the iris implants was required. Damage to the trabecular meshwork, opacity of the lenses as well as the reduced number of endothelial cells are permanent and will probably lead to further complications like corneal decompensation and progressing glaucoma. PMID:21344246

  2. Smallpox: can we still learn from the journey to eradication?

    PubMed

    Smith, Kendall A

    2013-05-01

    One of the most celebrated achievements of immunology and modern medicine is the eradication of the dreaded plague smallpox. From the introduction of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner, to its popularization by Louis Pasteur, to the eradication effort led by Donald Henderson, this story has many lessons for us today, including the characteristics of the disease and vaccine that permitted its eradication, and the obviousness of the vaccine as a vector for other intractable Infectious diseases. The disease itself, interpreted in the light of modern molecular immunology, is an obvious immunopathological disease, which occurs after a latent interval of 1-2 weeks, and manifests as a systemic cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) syndrome. The vaccine that slayed this dragon was given the name vaccinia, and was thought to have evolved from cowpox virus, but is now known to be most closely related to a poxvirus isolated from a horse. Of interest is the fact that of the various isolates of orthopox viruses, only variola, vaccinia and monkeypox viruses can infect humans. In contrast to the systemic disease of variola, vaccinia only replicates locally at the site of inoculation, and causes a localized DTH response that usually peaks after 7-10 days. This difference in the pathogenicity of variola vs. vaccinia is thought to be due to the capacity of variola to circumvent innate immunity, which allows it to disseminate widely before the adaptive immune response occurs. Thus, the fact that vaccinia virus is attenuated compared to variola, but is still replication competent, makes for its remarkable efficacy as a vaccine, as the localized infection activates all of the cells and molecules of both innate and adaptive immunity. Accordingly vaccinia itself, and not modified replication incompetent vaccina, is the hope for use as a vector in the eradication of additional pathogenic microbes from the globe. PMID:23760373

  3. Smallpox: can we still learn from the journey to eradication?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most celebrated achievements of immunology and modern medicine is the eradication of the dreaded plague smallpox. From the introduction of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner, to its popularization by Louis Pasteur, to the eradication effort led by Donald Henderson, this story has many lessons for us today, including the characteristics of the disease and vaccine that permitted its eradication, and the obviousness of the vaccine as a vector for other intractable Infectious diseases. The disease itself, interpreted in the light of modern molecular immunology, is an obvious immunopathological disease, which occurs after a latent interval of 1-2 weeks, and manifests as a systemic cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) syndrome. The vaccine that slayed this dragon was given the name vaccinia, and was thought to have evolved from cowpox virus, but is now known to be most closely related to a poxvirus isolated from a horse. Of interest is the fact that of the various isolates of orthopox viruses, only variola, vaccinia and monkeypox viruses can infect humans. In contrast to the systemic disease of variola, vaccinia only replicates locally at the site of inoculation, and causes a localized DTH response that usually peaks after 7-10 days. This difference in the pathogenicity of variola vs. vaccinia is thought to be due to the capacity of variola to circumvent innate immunity, which allows it to disseminate widely before the adaptive immune response occurs. Thus, the fact that vaccinia virus is attenuated compared to variola, but is still replication competent, makes for its remarkable efficacy as a vaccine, as the localized infection activates all of the cells and molecules of both innate and adaptive immunity. Accordingly vaccinia itself, and not modified replication incompetent vaccina, is the hope for use as a vector in the eradication of additional pathogenic microbes from the globe. PMID:23760373

  4. [Safe exercises for elderly diabetic patients with chronic complications].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Ling; Chiou, Chou-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Medical complications impair the ability of elderly diabetic patients to exercise independently, which often leads to increased medical costs. Detailed exercise guidance, in addition to encouragement, can help sustain and improve independent exercise abilities in this vulnerable population. Prior to adopting a exercise regimen, diabetic patients should receive a full physical examination and consider possible complications. Disease stage-appropriate exercise information can help patients self-manage their disease and exercise to achieve long-term benefits. This paper is a literature review that focuses on pre-exercise evaluation methodologies, exercise suggestions, and exercises recommended for diabetic patients with chronic complications. This review may serve as a reference for medical professionals responsible to provide exercise advice to elderly diabetic patients. PMID:23212258

  5. Modified radical mastoidectomy and its complications--12 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sardar U; Tewary, Rajesh K; O'Sullivan, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    To find the incidence of complications of modified radical mastoidectomy and to evaluate different parameters that play a role in their causation, we conducted a retrospective study spanning a period of 12 years. Included were 210 patients who underwent primary modified radical mastoidectomies performed by one senior surgeon; of these patients, 163 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The charts were evaluated for patients' age and sex, laterality, intraoperative pathology, and complications. The complications were grouped into nine categories for analysis of their etiology. The results in this study were compared with those from other published reports. Complications were documented in 46 of 163 (28.2%) operated ears; 21 (45.7%) of them were noted in children <15 years of age, and 25 (54.3%) were found in adults. Sex and laterality were of no significance. The most common complication recorded was residual/recurrent cholesteatoma (20 [12.3%]), followed by meatal stenosis (11 [6.7%]). A moist cavity with discharging ear was noted in only 4 (2.5%) patients. No facial nerve palsies or dead ears were observed. Eleven (6.7%) patients had more than one complication. The parameters evaluated were size of the meatus, tympanic membrane appearance, status of the mastoid cavity, height of the facial ridge, and extent of the disease process. Complications can be caused by a number of factors, such as congenital anomalies, disease process, and the surgeon's skill. Each complication must be thoroughly evaluated for immediate management and to learn how to avoid it in the future. PMID:24817239

  6. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes – often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and discusses why some caregivers may struggle with the death of their loved one. Finally, it offers practical suggestions for what professionals can do to help caregivers both before and after the death has occurred. PMID:20463850

  7. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes - often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and discusses why some caregivers may struggle with the death of their loved one. Finally, it offers practical suggestions for what professionals can do to help caregivers both before and after the death has occurred. PMID:20463850

  8. Complicated grief in late life

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a syndrome that affects 10% to 20% of grievers regardless of age, although proportionally more will face the death of loved ones in late life, CG is characterized by preoccupying and disabling symptoms that can persist for decades such as an inability to accept the death, intense yearning or avoidance, frequent reveries, deep sadness, crying, somatic distress, social withdrawal, and suicidal ideation. This syndrome is distinct from major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but CG maybe comorbid with each. This communication will focus on the impact of CG in late life (over age 60) and will include a case vignette for illustrating complicated grief therapy. PMID:22754292

  9. Is this (still) a man's world?

    PubMed

    Metaxa, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    During the past 50 years, the participation of women in medicine has increased dramatically. However, this encouraging influx has not been accompanied by equality for male and female faculty in terms of rank attainment, leadership roles and salaries. There is considerable evidence that women are still under-represented in the higher echelons of academic medicine, either as heads of departments, authors of scientific papers or members of editorial boards. Participation in medical congresses is another important measure of medical achievement; this manuscript comments on the female representation in four of the largest international meetings in the field of intensive care medicine (ICM). It notes the scarcity of female faculty members and proposes several explanations for this phenomenon. The notable under-representation of women in the ICM congresses suggests the existence of a 'glass ceiling' in the field of intensive care medicine, a specialty that, up until today, hasn't been considered as traditionally 'male'. PMID:23360566

  10. Does ageism still exist in nurse education?

    PubMed

    Coleman, Deborah

    2015-05-28

    Worldwide demographic changes mean that older people represent a significant group of patients for nurses everywhere. Ageism is increasingly recognised as an issue among healthcare professionals and evidence suggests that problems with quality of care remain. Nursing curricula have to address the needs of an ageing population in a variety of settings, reflect the importance of therapeutic care and explore nursing students' attitudes, in order to provide them with the appropriate skills to meet the needs of older people. This article debates the main factors influencing gerontological content in nursing curricula and suggests that ageism is still evident in nurse education. A variety of strategies are identified to assist in developing appropriate curriculum content. PMID:26018487

  11. The peroxisome: still a mysterious organelle

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, H. Dariush

    2008-01-01

    More than half a century of research on peroxisomes has revealed unique features of this ubiquitous subcellular organelle, which have often been in disagreement with existing dogmas in cell biology. About 50 peroxisomal enzymes have so far been identified, which contribute to several crucial metabolic processes such as ?-oxidation of fatty acids, biosynthesis of ether phospholipids and metabolism of reactive oxygen species, and render peroxisomes indispensable for human health and development. It became obvious that peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that rapidly assemble, multiply and degrade in response to metabolic needs. However, many aspects of peroxisome biology are still mysterious. This review addresses recent exciting discoveries on the biogenesis, formation and degradation of peroxisomes, on peroxisomal dynamics and division, as well as on the interaction and cross talk of peroxisomes with other subcellular compartments. Furthermore, recent advances on the role of peroxisomes in medicine and in the identification of novel peroxisomal proteins are discussed. PMID:18274771

  12. [Prevention of respiratory complications after abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Rezaiguia, S; Jayr, C

    1996-01-01

    Abdominal surgery, especially upper abdominal surgical procedures are known to adversely affect pulmonary function. Pulmonary complications are the most frequent cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This review article aimed to analyse the incidence and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary morbidity and their prevention. The most important means for preoperative assessment is the clinical examination; pulmonary function tests (spirometry) are not reliably predictive for postoperative pulmonary complications. Age, type of surgical procedure, smoking and nutritional state have all been identified as potential predictors for postoperative complications. However, usually there is not enough preoperative time available to obtain beneficial effects of stopping smoking and improvement of nutritional state. In patients with COPD, a preoperative multidisciplinary evaluation including the primary care physician, pulmonologist/intensivist, anesthesiologist and surgeon is required. Consensus as to preoperative physiologic state, therapeutic preparation, and postoperative management is essential. Simple spirometry and arterial blood gas analysis are indicated in patients exhibiting symptoms of obstructive airway disease. There are no values that contra-indicate an essential surgical procedure. Smoking should stop at least 8 weeks preoperatively. Preoperative therapy for elective surgery with antibiotics, beta2-agonist, or anticholinergic bronchodilator aerosols, as well as training in cough and lung expansion techniques should begin at least 24 to 48 hours preoperatively. Postoperative therapy should be continued for 3 to 5 days. Usually, anaesthesia is responsible for early complications, whereas surgical procedures are often associated with delayed morbidity. Laparoscopic procedures are recommended, as postoperative morbidity and hospital stay seem reduced in patients without COPD. Regional anaesthesia is given as having less adverse effects on pulmonary function than general anaesthesia. However, for unknown reasons these benefits are not associated with a decrease in postoperative respiratory complications. Moreover, the quality or the type of postoperative analgesia does not influence postoperative respiratory morbidity. Postoperatively, oxygen administration increases SaO2, but cannot abolish desaturation due to obstructive apnea. The various techniques of physiotherapy (chest physiotherapy, incentive spirometry, continuous positive airway pressure breathing) seem to be equivalent in efficacy; but intermittent positive pressure breathing has no advantages, compared with the other treatments and could even be deleterious. Chest physiotherapy and incentive spirometry are the most practical methods available for decreasing secretion contents of airways, whereas continuous positive airway pressure breathing is efficient on atelectasis. In stage II or III COPD patients, admission in a intensive therapy unit and prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required. PMID:9033757

  13. Vinyl chloride: still a cause for concern.

    PubMed Central

    Kielhorn, J; Melber, C; Wahnschaffe, U; Aitio, A; Mangelsdorf, I

    2000-01-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is both a known carcinogen and a regulated chemical, and its production capacity has almost doubled over the last 20 years, currently 27 million tons/year worldwide. According to recent reports it is still a cause for concern. VC has been found as a degradation product of chloroethylene solvents (perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene) and in landfill gas and groundwater at concentrations up to 200 mg/m(3) and 10 mg/L, respectively. Worldwide occupational exposure to VC still seems to be high in some countries (e.g., averages of approximately 1,300 mg/m(3) until 1987 in one factory), and exposure may also be high in others where VC is not regulated. By combining the most relevant epidemiologic studies from several countries, we observed a 5-fold excess of liver cancer, primarily because of a 45-fold excess risk from angiosarcoma of the liver (ASL). The number of ASL cases reported up to the end of 1998 was 197 worldwide. The average latency for ASL is 22 years. Some studies show a small excess risk for hepatocellular carcinoma, and others suggest a possible risk of brain tumors among highly exposed workers. Lung cancer, lymphomas, or leukemia do not seem to be related to VC exposure according to recent results. The mutation spectra observed in rat and human liver tumors (ASL and/or hepatocellular carcinoma) that are associated with exposure to VC are clearly distinct from those observed in sporadic liver tumors or hepatic tumors that are associated with other exposures. In rats, the substitution mutations found at A:T base pairs in the ras and p53 genes are consistent with the promutagenic properties of the DNA adduct 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine formed from VC metabolites. Risk assessments derived from animal studies seem to overestimate the actual risk of cancer when comparing estimated and reported cases of ASL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10905993

  14. A Complication in Hypospadias Surgery Due to Anchoring Suture

    PubMed Central

    Gollu, Gulnur; Kucuk, Gonul; Karabulut, Ayse An?l; Yagmurlu, Aydin; Cakmak, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The complication rates are still 1–90% both in proximal and distal hypospadias regardless of the surgeon’s experience and the usage of most developed techniques. The literature survey revealed few complications of glans penis including meatal stenosis, prolapsus and retraction. Despite our literature survey, we could not find any article concerning the permanent scar tissue at the dorsal part of glans following hypospadias surgeries. A new complication can be added to these, concerning glans which is the formation of postoperative scar tissue as a reaction to suture material used in traction, stent anchoring or both. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate four cases which had glanular scar due to traction suture following the surgical procedures for hypospadias repair. PMID:26180503

  15. A Complication in Hypospadias Surgery Due to Anchoring Suture.

    PubMed

    Gollu, Gulnur; Kucuk, Gonul; Karabulut, Ayse An?l; Yagmurlu, Aydin; Cakmak, Murat

    2015-06-01

    The complication rates are still 1-90% both in proximal and distal hypospadias regardless of the surgeon's experience and the usage of most developed techniques. The literature survey revealed few complications of glans penis including meatal stenosis, prolapsus and retraction. Despite our literature survey, we could not find any article concerning the permanent scar tissue at the dorsal part of glans following hypospadias surgeries. A new complication can be added to these, concerning glans which is the formation of postoperative scar tissue as a reaction to suture material used in traction, stent anchoring or both. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate four cases which had glanular scar due to traction suture following the surgical procedures for hypospadias repair. PMID:26180503

  16. Genetics of blood pressure, hypertensive complications, and antihypertensive drug responses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen T Turner; Eric Boerwinkle

    2003-01-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent, treatable risk factor for diseases of the heart, brain and kidneys. In this review, we discuss advances in understanding of the genetics of blood pressure regulation, the development of hypertensive complications and the pharmacodynamics of antihypertensive drug responses. Discovery of single gene mutations that cause hypertension or hypotension in humans suggests that the common final

  17. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Complications after Liver Transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julius Spicak

    2010-01-01

    Biliary complications remain a frequent and significant issue occurring in up to 30% of patients after liver transplantation. Their development and presentation are associated with specific transplant issues such as surgery technique, immunosuppression, rejection, damage of vascular supply, infections and disease recurrence. With the expanding and demanding surgical techniques in reduced, living related and splitting donors, the technical factors play

  18. Mining Diabetes Complication and Treatment Patterns for Clinical Decision Support

    E-print Network

    Mining Diabetes Complication and Treatment Patterns for Clinical Decision Support Lu Liu , Jie Tang to utilize the heterogeneous medical records to aid the clinical treatments of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus, simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases, which is often accompa- nied with many

  19. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: frequent complications by cervical spondylosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masahito Yamada; Yutaka Furukawa; Mie Hirohata

    2003-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is associated with myelopathy and radiculopathy, which sometimes mimic clinical manifestations of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects upper and lower motor neurons. Cervical spondylosis may coexist with ALS because both diseases preferentially affect individuals of middle or old age. We investigated 63 patients with ALS to clarify the complications of cervical spondylosis and

  20. Nutrition in the management of cirrhosis and its neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:25755550

  1. Experimental evidence for curcumin and its analogs for management of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Lozada-García, María Concepción; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious world health problem and one of the most studied diseases; a major concern about its treatment is that ?-cell mass and functionality is hard to restore. In addition, it is frequently associated with severe complications, such as diabetic nephropathy and cardiomyopathy. The anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties of curcumin have made it a promising molecule for the treatment of this pathology; however, its solubility and bioavailability problems are still the subject of multiple studies. To cope with those difficulties, several approaches have been evaluated, such as the development of pharmaceutical formulations and curcumin analogs. This review discusses some of the studied therapeutic targets for curcumin in diabetes as well as the structural characteristics and targets of its analogs. The shortening of the central seven-carbon chain of curcumin has given rise to compounds without glucose-lowering effects but potentially useful for the treatment of diabetes complications; whereas preserving this chain retains the glucose-lowering properties. Most of the analogs discussed here have been recently synthesized and tested in animal models of type 1 diabetes; more studies in models of type 2 diabetes are needed. PMID:25769841

  2. Recent progress in the genetics of diabetic microvascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy are as major causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetes individuals worldwide and current therapies are still unsatisfactory. One of the reasons for failure to develop effective treatment is the lack of fundamental understanding for underlying mechanisms. Genetic studies are powerful tools to dissect disease mechanism. The heritability (h2) was estimated to be 0.3-0.44 for diabetic nephropathy and 0.25-0.50 for diabetic retinopathy respectively. Previous linkage studies for diabetic nephropathy have identified overlapped linkage regions in 1q43-44, 3q21-23, 3q26, 10p12-15, 18q22-23, 19q13, 22q11-12.3 in multiple ethnic groups. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of diabetic nephropathy have been conducted in several populations. However, most of the identified risk loci could not be replicated by independent studies with a few exceptions including those in ELMO1, FRMD3, CARS, MYO16/IRS2, and APOL3-MYH9 genes. Functional studies of these genes revealed the involvement of cytoskeleton reorganization (especially non-muscle type myosin), phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, fibroblast migration, insulin signaling, and epithelial clonal expansion in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Linkage analyses of diabetic retinopathy overlapped only in 1q36 region and current results from GWAS for diabetic retinopathy are inconsistent. Conclusive results from genetic studies for diabetic neuropathy are lacking. For now, small sample sizes, confounding by population stratification, different phenotype definitions between studies, ethnic-specific associations, the influence of environmental factors, and the possible contribution of rare variants may explain the inconsistencies between studies.

  3. Recent progress in the genetics of diabetic microvascular complications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-06-10

    Diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy are as major causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetes individuals worldwide and current therapies are still unsatisfactory. One of the reasons for failure to develop effective treatment is the lack of fundamental understanding for underlying mechanisms. Genetic studies are powerful tools to dissect disease mechanism. The heritability (h (2)) was estimated to be 0.3-0.44 for diabetic nephropathy and 0.25-0.50 for diabetic retinopathy respectively. Previous linkage studies for diabetic nephropathy have identified overlapped linkage regions in 1q43-44, 3q21-23, 3q26, 10p12-15, 18q22-23, 19q13, 22q11-12.3 in multiple ethnic groups. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of diabetic nephropathy have been conducted in several populations. However, most of the identified risk loci could not be replicated by independent studies with a few exceptions including those in ELMO1, FRMD3, CARS, MYO16/IRS2, and APOL3-MYH9 genes. Functional studies of these genes revealed the involvement of cytoskeleton reorganization (especially non-muscle type myosin), phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, fibroblast migration, insulin signaling, and epithelial clonal expansion in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Linkage analyses of diabetic retinopathy overlapped only in 1q36 region and current results from GWAS for diabetic retinopathy are inconsistent. Conclusive results from genetic studies for diabetic neuropathy are lacking. For now, small sample sizes, confounding by population stratification, different phenotype definitions between studies, ethnic-specific associations, the influence of environmental factors, and the possible contribution of rare variants may explain the inconsistencies between studies. PMID:26069720

  4. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathrin Boerner; Richard Schulz

    2009-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes - often referred to as ‘complicated grief’. The article starts with a brief summary of

  5. Constraints complicate centrifugal compressor depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B. (Hoover and Keith Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Colbert, F.L. (Paragon Engineering Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-05-10

    Blowdown of a centrifugal compressor is complicated by process constraints that might require slowing the depressurization rate and by mechanical constraints for which a faster rate might be preferred. The paper describes design constraints such as gas leaks; thrust-bearing overload; system constraints; flare extinguishing; heat levels; and pressure drop.

  6. Caesarean section: techniques and complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Simm; Darly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    One-fifth of deliveries in England and Wales are undertaken by caesarean section. The procedure has changed very little over the years, although evidence-based refinements have resulted in reduced morbidity; research continues in adapting techniques to improve safety further. Preoperative preparation involving anaesthetists and radiologists if complications are anticipated has contributed to improved outcome. Good surgical training is paramount, particularly because

  7. Fetal complications of obstetric cholestasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD REID; K J Ivey; R H Rencoret; B Storey

    1976-01-01

    Among 56 pregnancies complicated by obstetric cholestasis five intrauterine deaths and one neonatal death occurred between 33 and 39 weeks, and a further six infants required urgent delivery for intrapartum asphyxia. Eighteen spontaneous premature deliveries occurred. Five mothers required specific treatment for unexplained postpartum haemorrhage. Cholestasis of pregnancy is therefore not a condition benign to the fetus, and it may

  8. Condoms: still the most popular contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, T

    1997-01-01

    Condoms can be used as a barrier contraceptive and/or to protect against many sexually-transmitted diseases. They are easy to buy and use and free from medical risk. Carefully used, and used in conjunction with a spermicide, condoms have similar reliability to IUDs, progesterone-only pills and the diaphragm. The condom must be put on before the penis touches the vaginal area. The penis should not touch the vaginal area after the condom has been taken off. Oil-based products, eg baby oil, massage oil, lipstick, petroleum jelly, suntan oil, can damage the condom. If a lubricant is required, use one that is water-based. PMID:9348972

  9. Where Does Human Plague Still Persist in Latin America?

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Maria Cristina; Najera, Patricia; Aldighieri, Sylvain; Galan, Deise I.; Bertherat, Eric; Ruiz, Alfonso; Dumit, Elsy; Gabastou, Jean Marc; Espinal, Marcos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Plague is an epidemic-prone disease with a potential impact on public health, international trade, and tourism. It may emerge and re-emerge after decades of epidemiological silence. Today, in Latin America, human cases and foci are present in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Peru. Aims The objective of this study is to identify where cases of human plague still persist in Latin America and map areas that may be at risk for emergence or re-emergence. This analysis will provide evidence-based information for countries to prioritize areas for intervention. Methods Evidence of the presence of plague was demonstrated using existing official information from WHO, PAHO, and Ministries of Health. A geo-referenced database was created to map the historical presence of plague by country between the first registered case in 1899 and 2012. Areas where plague still persists were mapped at the second level of the political/administrative divisions (counties). Selected demographic, socioeconomic, and environmental variables were described. Results Plague was found to be present for one or more years in 14 out of 25 countries in Latin America (1899–2012). Foci persisted in six countries, two of which have no report of current cases. There is evidence that human cases of plague still persist in 18 counties. Demographic and poverty patterns were observed in 11/18 counties. Four types of biomes are most commonly found. 12/18 have an average altitude higher than 1,300 meters above sea level. Discussion Even though human plague cases are very localized, the risk is present, and unexpected outbreaks could occur. Countries need to make the final push to eliminate plague as a public health problem for the Americas. A further disaggregated risk evaluation is recommended, including identification of foci and possible interactions among areas where plague could emerge or re-emerge. A closer geographical approach and environmental characterization are suggested. PMID:24516682

  10. Do we still need the aminoglycosides?

    PubMed

    Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Grammatikos, Alexandros; Utili, Riccardo; Falagas, Matthew E

    2009-03-01

    Since the introduction into clinical practice of the aminoglycoside class of antibiotics, a number of other antimicrobial agents with improved safety profile have entered the market. Studies have failed to demonstrate the superiority of aminoglycoside-containing regimens in a number of infection settings. This has raised doubts regarding the actual clinical utility of aminoglycosides. However, the recent emergence of infections due to Gram-negative bacterial strains with advanced patterns of antimicrobial resistance has prompted physicians to reconsider these 'old' antibacterial agents. This revived interest in the use of aminoglycosides has brought back to light the debate on the two major issues related to these compounds, namely the spectrum of antimicrobial susceptibility and toxicity. Although some of the aminoglycosides retain activity against the majority of Gram-negative clinical bacterial isolates in many parts of the world, the relatively frequent occurrence of nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity during aminoglycoside treatment make physicians reluctant to use these compounds in everyday practice. We believe that recent advances in the understanding of the effect of various dosage schedules of aminoglycosides on toxicity combined with the retained (to a considerable degree) activity against the majority of Gram-negative bacterial isolates make this class of antibiotics still valuable in today's clinical practice. PMID:18976888

  11. The baby killers are still at large.

    PubMed

    Power, J

    1994-08-12

    This newspaper editorial reports that the UN Children's Fund's (UNICEF) executive director and recent US Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient believes that 1.5 million infants would survive annually if breast feeding declines worldwide were reversed. UNICEF adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes in the World Health Assembly in 1981. The code restricts direct advertising, inadequate labels, saleswomen dressed as nurses, and promotion of free samples. The Baby Food Action Network is reported to have released a report which states that baby food companies are still donating free supplies of infant formula to hospitals. The UNICEF position is that provision of free supplies is the most important disincentive to breast feeding. 81 governments adopted the guidelines, but 41 countries have hospitals which accept free samples. 28 of these 41 countries adopted the ban. The Nestle Company, which was cited 20 years age for this practice, won the legal battle and today defies the guidelines in 22 countries, including China, Zimbabwe, and Bangladesh. A US company, Mead Johnson, uses advertising on its label that shows Beatrice Potter's Peter Rabbit being bottle fed. The International Code restricts idealization of bottle feeding. Nutrician, a large conglomerate ownership of US and European infant formula companies, brazenly advertises in the Peruvian daily newspapers with photos of baby milk boxes being donated to hospitals. Dr. Derek Jelliffe, an infant nutritionist, is credited with being the first to publicize the dangers of commercialized malnutrition 21 years ago. PMID:12319575

  12. Volvulus complicating jejunal diverticulosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Igwe, P.O.; Ray-Offor, E.; Allison, A.B.; Alufohai, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diverticular disease is uncommon among Africans though increasing number of cases is now being reported, mainly of colonic diverticulosis. This condition afflicts all parts of the gastrointestinal tract but commonly the colon. Jejunal diverticula are rare, usually asymptomatic but may lead to an acute abdomen. Case presentation A 68 year old female trader, who was referred from a peripheral center with insidious onset of severe colicky, generalized abdominal pain, repeated vomiting of recently ingested meal, no hematemesis. There was constipation and abdominal distension. The working diagnosis was dynamic intestinal obstruction of small bowel origin. She had emergency exploratory laparotomy following resuscitation. The findings were: volvulus of the jejunum and multiple jejunal diverticula. A resection of 80 cm of the jejunum with most of the diverticula involved in the torsion was done with an end-to-end anastomosis of the jejunum. Her out-patient follow-up has been uneventful. Discussion Jejunal diverticular disease is rare in Africa. Our patient presented with small bowel obstruction due to volvulus. Other complications are discussed. Conclusion Intestinal obstruction from diverticular disease is not always of colonic origin. It can occur in the jejunum. PMID:25728670

  13. Steroids: Pharmacology, Complications, and Practice Delivery Issues

    PubMed Central

    Ericson-Neilsen, William; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Since their identification nearly 80 years ago, steroids have played a prominent role in the treatment of many disease states. Many of the clinical roles of steroids are related to their potent antiinflammatory and immune-modulating properties. Methods This review summarizes the basic pharmacology, complications, and practice delivery issues regarding steroids. Results Clinically relevant side effects of steroids are common and problematic. Side effects can occur at a wide range of doses and vary depending on the route of administration. The full spectrum of side effects can be present even in patients taking low doses. Conclusions Practitioners must be aware that these drugs might exacerbate a preexisting condition or present a new medical condition. Knowledge of the clinical implications of prescribing these agents is critical. PMID:24940130

  14. Surgical management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kim C; Hunt, Steven R

    2013-02-01

    Although medical management can control symptoms in a recurring incurable disease, such as Crohn's disease, surgical management is reserved for disease complications or those problems refractory to medical management. In this article, we cover general principles for the surgical management of Crohn's disease, ranging from skin tags, abscesses, fistulae, and stenoses to small bowel and extraintestinal disease. PMID:23177070

  15. Emerging Role of Antioxidants in the Protection of Uveitis Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh C S; Kalariya, Nilesh M; Ramana, Kota V

    2011-01-01

    Current understanding of the role of oxidative stress in ocular inflammatory diseases indicates that antioxidant therapy may be important to optimize the treatment. Recently investigated antioxidant therapies for ocular inflammatory diseases include various vitamins, plant products and reactive oxygen species scavengers. Oxidative stress plays a causative role in both non-infectious and infectious uveitis complications, and novel strategies to diminish tissue damage and dysfunction with antioxidant therapy may ameliorate visual complications. Preclinical studies with experimental animals and cell culture demonstrate significance of anti-inflammatory effects of a number of promising antioxidant agents. Many of these antioxidants are under clinical trial for various inflammatory diseases other than uveitis such as cardiovascular, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. Well planned interventional clinical studies of the ocular inflammation will be necessary to sufficiently investigate the potential medical benefits of antioxidant therapies for uveitis. This review summarizes the recent investigation of novel antioxidant agents for ocular inflammation, with selected studies focused on uveitis. PMID:21182473

  16. Dercum's disease.

    PubMed

    Wortham, Noel C; Tomlinson, Ian Pm

    2005-01-01

    Dercum's disease (adiposis dolorosa, lipomatosis dolorosa morbus Dercum), is a rare disorder resulting in painful fatty deposits around the upper legs, trunk, and upper arms. The portrait painted of Dercum's disease is very complicated, with many other disorders seen associated with the disease. There are no clear pathological mechanisms known, although it is suspected that there is either a metabolic or autoimmune component involved. Here, the authors review the literature to date, including some information from their own studies. In particular, the authors will look at the different strands of evidence pointing to the pathological mechanism of the disorder. PMID:15891252

  17. Complications of acute otitis media in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimmo Leskinen

    2005-01-01

    The clinical picture and the treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and its complications have changed during the past decades.\\u000a The availability of antibiotics has decreased the incidence of complications of AOM significantly. The treatment of complications\\u000a of AOM is conservative in most cases. Mastoidectomy is needed when abscess-forming mastoiditis or intracranial complications\\u000a develop. Although intratemporal and intracranial complications of

  18. Avoiding complications in patellofemoral surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ryan K; Magnussen, Robert A; Flanigan, David C

    2013-06-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of patellofemoral disorders can challenge even the experienced orthopedic surgeon. Differential diagnosis is broad and multiple anatomic abnormalities must be taken into account in order to manage care. The majority of patients with patellofemoral disorders can be treated successfully nonoperatively. When nonoperative management fails, and in the carefully selected patient, a variety of surgical options exist based on the anatomic pathology involved, but each brings its own potential for complication. We discuss several of the surgical treatment options that are available to the orthopedic surgeon for the treatment of patellofemoral disorders, including lateral retinacular release, medial soft-tissue reconstructive procedures, and bony procedures (including trochleoplasty and tibial tubercle osteotomy. We describe potential complications of each procedure and what the orthopedic surgeon can do to avoid them. PMID:23649160

  19. Complications of splenic tissue reimplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Tzoracoleftherakis, E.; Alivizatos, V.; Kalfarentzos, F.; Androulakis, J.

    1991-01-01

    Splenic tissue reimplantation employing the omental implantation technique was applied in 23 patients undergoing splenectomy for traumatic or iatrogenic splenic injury. Four complications were encountered after autotransplantation (17.4%). Two of these consisted of small bowel obstruction due to postoperative adhesions and were successfully managed by lysis of the adhesions. The other two complications were aseptic necrosis of the splenic transplants and were treated with ablation of the autolysed transplants. A case of abnormal splenic tissue reimplantation in a male patient with unsuspected myelofibrosis is also discussed. He underwent an emergency laparotomy for rupture of a subcapsular splenic haematoma. It is concluded that splenic tissue implantation in the greater omentum is associated with important early morbidity and this should be taken into account whenever application of the method is considered. Images Figure 1 PMID:2018325

  20. Spectrum of biliary complications following live donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Simoes, Priya; Kesar, Varun; Ahmad, Jawad

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with advanced liver disease, including decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and acute liver failure. Organ shortage is the main determinant of death on the waiting list and hence living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) assumes importance. Biliary complications are the most common post operative morbidity after LDLT and occur due to anatomical and technical reasons. They include biliary leaks, strictures and cast formation and occur in the recipient as well as the donor. The types of biliary complications after LDLT along with their etiology, presenting features, diagnosis and endoscopic and surgical management are discussed.

  1. Vascular complications of diabetes: mechanisms of injury and protective factors

    PubMed Central

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; King, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In patients with diabetes, atherosclerosis is the main reason for impaired life expectancy, and diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy are the largest contributors to end-stage renal disease and blindness, respectively. An improved therapeutic approach to combat diabetic vascular complications might include blocking mechanisms of injury as well as promoting protective or regenerating factors, for example by enhancing the action of insulin-regulated genes in endothelial cells, promoting gene programs leading to induction of antioxidant or anti-inflammatory factors, or improving the sensitivity to vascular cell survival factors. Such strategies could help prevent complications despite suboptimal metabolic control. PMID:23312281

  2. Complications of Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexei Wedmid; Michael A. Palese

    \\u000a “Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy is a unique surgical procedure due to the fact that the surgeon is operating on a healthy\\u000a individual in order to benefit another patient he or she is unlikely managing, with a potential for complications ensuing\\u000a in both the donor and the recipient patients. Overall surgical technique, anatomic considerations, and perioperative management\\u000a remain important for minimizing the

  3. Eczema herpeticum complicating Parthenium dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Ajith C; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev

    2005-06-01

    Parthenium dermatitis is one of the most common causes of airborne contact dermatitis in India. Eczema herpeticum has been reported in association with various eczematous conditions, including Parthenium dermatitis. We report a case of eczema herpeticum in association with Parthenium dermatitis. Because Parthenium dermatitis is a common condition in this region, one should be aware of this complication so that appropriate treatment is not delayed. PMID:16036117

  4. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  5. Protein intake and urinary albumin excretion rates in the EURODIAB IDDM Complications Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Toeller; A. Buyken; G. Heitkamp; S. Brämswig; J. Mann; R. Milne; F. A. Gries; H. Keen

    1997-01-01

    Summary   For people with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) renal disease represents a life-threatening and costly complication.\\u000a The EURODIAB IDDM Complications Study, a cross-sectional, clinic-based study, was designed to determine the prevalence of\\u000a renal complications and putative risk factors in stratified samples of European individuals with IDDM. The present study examined\\u000a the relationship between dietary protein intake and urinary albumin excretion

  6. Circulating microRNA as a diagnostic marker in populations with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Chien, Hung-Yu; Lee, Tai-Ping; Chen, Chang-Yi; Chiu, Yen-Hui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lee, Lon-Shyong; Li, Wan-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a global health care issue resulting from hyperglycemia-mediated life-threatening complications. Although the use of glucose-lowering agents is routinely practiced, high dependence on medication leads to poor quality of life for DM patients. While it is still not feasible to precisely determine the critical timing when DM is truly established, perhaps the best way to reduce DM-associated mortality is to prevent it. To this end, an exploration of prognostic molecules sensitive enough to detect early physiological alteration at the initiating stage would be required. Recently discovered small noncoding molecules, microRNAs (miRs), in body fluid seem promising to be utilized as a biomarker to monitor DM initiation and progression, as it is believed that expression of circulating miRs reflects disease pathology. Current DM-related miRs were often referred to miRs differentially expressed in insulin target organs (liver, muscle, and adipose tissues) or circulating blood (peripheral blood) in diabetic patients compared to their control counterparts, although these miRs could merely be resultant nucleotides from DM-induced organ impairment instead of the indicators of onset/progression of DM. In the current review, studies showing circulating miRs associated with type 2 DM and its complications are summarized, and future scope of using miRs as biomarkers for disease prognosis/diagnosis is also emphasized. PMID:25529478

  7. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study at 30 Years: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, David M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) was designed to test the glucose hypothesis and determine whether the complications of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) could be prevented or delayed. The Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) observational follow-up determined the durability of the DCCT effects on the more-advanced stages of diabetes complications including cardiovascular disease (CVD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The DCCT (1982–1993) was a controlled clinical trial in 1,441 subjects with T1DM comparing intensive therapy (INT), aimed at achieving levels of glycemia as close to the nondiabetic range as safely possible, with conventional therapy (CON), which aimed to maintain safe asymptomatic glucose control. INT utilized three or more daily insulin injections or insulin pump therapy guided by self-monitored glucose. EDIC (1994–present) is an observational study of the DCCT cohort. RESULTS The DCCT followed >99% of the cohort for a mean of 6.5 years and demonstrated a 35–76% reduction in the early stages of microvascular disease with INT, with a median HbA1c of 7%, compared with CONV, with a median HbA1c of 9%. The major adverse effect of INT was a threefold increased risk of hypoglycemia, which was not associated with a decline in cognitive function or quality of life. EDIC showed a durable effect of initial assigned therapies despite a loss of the glycemic separation (metabolic memory) and demonstrated that the reduction in early-stage complications during the DCCT translated into substantial reductions in severe complications and CVD. CONCLUSIONS DCCT/EDIC has demonstrated the effectiveness of INT in reducing the long-term complications of T1DM and improving the prospects for a healthy life span. PMID:24356592

  8. Fascia Research Congress evidence from the 100 year perspective of Andrew Taylor Still.

    PubMed

    Findley, Thomas W; Shalwala, Mona

    2013-07-01

    More than 100 years ago A.T. Still MD founded osteopathic medicine, and specifically described fascia as a covering, with common origins of layers of the fascial system despite diverse names for individual parts. Fascia assists gliding and fluid flow and is highly innervated. Fascia is intimately involved with respiration and with nourishment of all cells of the body, including those of disease and cancer. This paper reviews information presented at the first three International Fascia Research Congresses in 2007, 2009 and 2012 from the perspective of Dr Still, that fascia is vital for organism's growth and support, and it is where disease is sown. PMID:23768282

  9. Gaucher's disease and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moughabghab, A V; Fenides, A; Hanon, F; Socolovsky, C

    1994-01-01

    For a long time, pregnancy has been discouraged for patients with Gaucher's disease. Because of the scarcity of complications found in the literature, the obstetrical attitude is favorable towards an authorization of pregnancy for patients with Gaucher's disease. We describe the evolution of pregnancy of a woman suffering from Gaucher's disease type I and the anesthesiological support provided. PMID:7847042

  10. [Is intraoperative ICD-testing still necessary?].

    PubMed

    Mewis, C; Neuberger, H-R; Buob, A

    2010-06-01

    Intraoperative ICD-testing is traditionally performed in many hospitals in order to ensure reliable sensing, detection, and defibrillation of induced ventricular fibrillation. The technical progress of defibrillators allows rapid detection and delivery of high energy shocks which defibrillates effectively in the vast majority all patients at implant. This review describes arguments pro and contra of systematic testing of the defibrillation threshold in all patients. Many reasons argue against testing in all patients: experimental considerations, patients' specific and nonspecific factors, e.g., underlying severity of cardiac disease, ischemia, and medication, as well as factors specific to the ICD system, e.g., implanted type and location of electrodes and active cans. Finally, the testing method is very important, since it bears the risk of false negative test results because the a priori probability of a positive test result is >95%. Therefore, data from prospective randomized studies are necessary in order to abandon the tradition of ICD-testing on an evidence-based background. PMID:20521150

  11. Etiology of bicuspid aortic valve disease: Focus on hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Samantha K; Sucosky, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common form of inheritable cardiac defect. Although this abnormality may still achieve normal valvular function, it is often associated with secondary valvular and aortic complications such as calcific aortic valve disease and aortic dilation. The clinical significance and economic burden of BAV disease justify the need for improved clinical guidelines and more robust therapeutic modalities, which address the root-cause of those pathologies. Unfortunately, the etiology of BAV valvulopathy and aortopathy is still a debated issue. While the BAV anatomy and its secondary complications have been linked historically to a common genetic root, recent advances in medical imaging have demonstrated the existence of altered hemodynamics near BAV leaflets prone to calcification and BAV aortic regions vulnerable to dilation. The abnormal mechanical stresses imposed by the BAV on its leaflets and on the aortic wall could be transduced into cell-mediated processes, leading ultimately to valvular calcification and aortic medial degeneration. Despite increasing evidence for this hemodynamic etiology, the demonstration of the involvement of mechanical abnormalities in the pathogenesis of BAV disease requires the investigation of causality between the blood flow environment imposed on the leaflets and the aortic wall and the local biology, which has been lacking to date. This editorial discusses the different hypothetical etiologies of BAV disease with a particular focus on the most recent advances in cardiovascular imaging, flow characterization techniques and tissue culture methodologies that have provided new evidence in support of the hemodynamic theory. PMID:25548612

  12. Influence of Postoperative Complications on Relapse-Free Survival in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Attili, V. Satya Suresh; Bapsy, Poonamalle P.; Ramachandra, Chowdappa; Reddy, C. Obula; Prabhakaran, P.S.; Varma, Pratap P.; Chandra, Veligeti R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A variety of preoperative variables—such as perforation prior to surgery, poor nutritional status, and comorbid conditions such as diabetes—are already known to shorten relapse-free survival in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. However, the significance of postoperative events in gastrointestinal malignancies is still debated and has not been studied in the population of southern India. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, India, from September 2004 to 2006. Patients from a single surgical unit who had undergone surgery with curative intent for gastrointestinal malignancies were evaluated (to maintain uniformity, patients who had undergone palliative surgery were not included in the analysis). We assumed anastomotic leak, delayed wound healing, and postoperative weight loss > 10% as risk factors predictive of poor disease-free survival. These factors were evaluated in all patients, and risk for development of relapse was calculated. Results: A total of 236 patients were evaluated. Baseline parameters were similar in both groups. Compared with patients who developed no postoperative complications, we found that the risk of relapse is 9.8 times greater in patients having anastomotic leak, 8.2 times greater in those with delayed recovery, and 2.3 times greater in those having excessive weight loss. The risk was uniform in all types of gastrointestinal malignancies. Conclusion: The results suggest that anastomotic leak, delayed wound healing, and postoperative weight loss in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies confer poor disease-free survival. The presence of these complications warrants closer follow-up and management as appropriate. PMID:20084159

  13. microRNAs with different functions and roles in disease development and as potential biomarkers of diabetes: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Attila A

    2015-04-21

    Biomarkers provide information on early detection of diseases, in determining individuals at risk of developing complications or subtyping individuals for disease phenotypes. In addition, biomarkers may lead to better treatment strategies, personalized therapy, and improved outcome. A major gap in the field of biomarker development is that we have not identified appropriate (minimally invasive, life-style independent and informative) biomarkers for the underlying disease process(es) that can be measured in readily accessible samples (e.g. serum, plasma, blood, urine). miRNAs function as regulators in wide ranging cellular and physiological functions and also participate in many physiopathological processes and thus have been linked to many diseases including diabetes, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and autoimmunity. Many miRNAs have been shown to have predictive value as potential biomarkers in a variety of diseases including diabetes, which are detectable in some instances many years before the manifestation of disease. Although some technical challenges still remain, due to their availability in the circulation, relative stability, and ease of detection; miRNAs have emerged as a promising new class of biomarkers to provide information on early detection of disease, monitoring disease progression, in determining individual's risk of developing complications or subtyping individuals for disease phenotypes, and to monitor response to therapeutic interventions. As a final note, most of the miRNAs reported in the literature have not yet been validated in sufficiently powered and longitudinal studies for specificity for that particular disease. PMID:25765998

  14. Crohn's disease of the esophagus: treatment of an esophagobronchial fistula with the novel liquid embolic polymer "onyx".

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Hamer, O; Gelbmann, C; Schölmerich, J; Gross, V; Feuerbach, S; Herfarth, H; Rogler, G

    2006-07-01

    Esophageal involvement in Crohn's disease is very rare. In only a small subgroup of these patients -- up to date fourteen cases have been described in the literature -- the course of the illness may be complicated by esophageal fistula formation. The therapy for fistulizing esophageal Crohn's disease so far has been disappointing, recurrence and progression are likely, and surgery still is the primary treatment modality for refractory patients. We here present a case of severe Crohn's disease with an esophagobronchial fistula and the successful closure of the fistula tract with the novel liquid polymer sealant "Onyx". This approach offers a new option for the treatment of this rare complication of Crohn's disease and should be considered if surgery is not possible. PMID:16823701

  15. Atrio-ventricular block requiring pacemaker in patients with late onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, Sabrina; Wahbi, Karim; Theodore, Guillaume; Garcia, Jérémy; Salviati, Leonardo; Bouhour, Françoise; Vial, Christophe; Duboc, Denis; Laforêt, Pascal; Desnuelle, Claude

    2014-07-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy consistently improves cardiac function in infantile and juvenile onset patients with Pompe disease and cardiomyopathy, but is apparently not effective in preventing rhythm disorders, an emerging cardiac phenotype in long term survivors. In patients with late onset Pompe disease cardiomyopathy is an exceptional finding while heart rhythm disorders seem to be more frequent. We retrospectively identified, among a cohort of 131 French late onset Pompe disease patients, four patients with severe atrio-ventricular blocks requiring pacemaker implantation. These patients had no other risk factors for cardiovascular diseases or cardiomyopathy. In one patient the atrioventricular block was discovered while still asymptomatic. Cardiac conduction defects are relatively rare in late onset Pompe disease and may occur even in absence of cardiac symptoms or EKG abnormalities. However because of the possible life-threatening complications associated with these conduction defects, cardiac follow-up in patients with late onset Pompe disease should include periodical Holter-EKG monitoring. PMID:24844452

  16. Iatrogenic Submandibular Duct Rupture Complicating Sialography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharouny, Hadi; Omar, Rahmat Bin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Sialolithiasis is the most common disease of salivary glands. Sialography is particularly important for the assessment of the outflow tract and in diagnosing obstructive salivary gland lesions including calculi. Case Presentation: We report on a 38-year-old female with sialolithiasis whom had Wharton’s duct perforation, complicating the sialography. She was treated conservatively with a course of co-amoxiclav, oral prednisolone for three days and pain-killers. The patient was clinically well on follow-up reassessments at the end of the first week and three weeks post procedure. Conclusions: Perforation of salivary duct complicating the sialography is rare. Awareness of this potential complication and utilizing a good sialography technique need to be advocated amongst radiologists. Response to treatment by conservative management is preferred as illustrated in this case. PMID:25593739

  17. The role of colonoscopy in managing diverticular disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is frequently found on routine colonoscopy, and the incidence of diverticular disease and its complications appears to be increasing. The role of colonoscopy in managing this disease is still controversial. Colonoscopy plays a key role in managing diverticular bleeding. Several techniques have been effectively used in this field, but band ligation seems to be the best in preventing rebleeding. Colonoscopy is also effective in posing a correct differential diagnosis with other forms of chronic colitis involving colon harbouring diverticula (in particular with Crohn's disease or Segmental Colitis Associated with Diverticulosis). The role of colonoscopy to confirm diagnosis of uncomplicated diverticulitis is still under debate, since the risk of advanced colonic neoplasia in patients admitted for acute uncomplicated diverticulitis is not increased as compared to the average-risk population. On the contrary, colonoscopy is mandatory if patients complain of persistent symptoms or after resolution of an episode of complicated diverticulitis. Finally, a recent endoscopic classification, called Diverticular Inflammation and Complications Assessment (DICA), has been developed and validated. This classification seems to be a promising tool for predicting the outcome of the colon harboring diverticula, but further, prospective studies have to confirm its predictive role on the outcome of the disease. PMID:25822438

  18. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that shows the glowing hydrogen gas, were coloured red. Light in the yellow-green part of the spectrum is coloured green, blue light is coloured blue and light that passed through an ultraviolet filter has been coloured purple. The exposure times were about 52 minutes through each filter. This image was processed by ESO using the observational data found by Igor Chekalin (Russia) [1], who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition [2], organised by ESO in October-November 2010, for everyone who enjoys making beautiful images of the night sky using real astronomical data. Notes [1] Igor searched through ESO's archive and identified datasets that he used to compose his image of Messier 42, which was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, out of almost 100 entries. His original work can be seen here. Igor Chekalin was awarded the first prize of the competition for his composition of Messier 78, and he also submitted an image of NGC3169, NGC3166 and SN 2003cg, which was ranked second highest. [2] ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 competition gave amateur astronomers the opportunity to search through ESO's vast archives of astronomical data, hoping to find a well-hidden gem that needed polishing by the entrants. Participants submitted nearly 100 entries and ten skilled people were awarded some extremely attractive prizes, including an all expenses paid trip for the overall winner to ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Cerro Paranal, in Chile, the world's most advanced optical telescope. The ten winners submitted a total of 20 images that were ranked as the highest entries in the competition out of the near 100 images. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 15 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focu

  19. Risks of complication following thyroidectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark R. Burge; Tanja-Maria Zeise; Michael W. Johnsen; Martin J. Conway; Clifford R. Qualls

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because hypoparathyroidism is a serious complication of thyroidectomy, we attempted to elucidate factors determining the\\u000a risk of this postoperative outcome.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Four tertiary care hospitals in Albuquerque, New Mexico.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PATIENTS: A retrospective study of 142 patients who underwent total or subtotal thyroidectomy between 1988 and 1995.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Permanent hypoparathyroidism was defined as hypocalcemic symptoms plus a

  20. Automatic Monitoring Of Complicated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of computer programs developed for expert computer system performing complicated, tedious, and repetitive portions of analysis of telemetry data from spacecraft. Provides nonstop, accurate surveillance of incoming data, also frees operators to concentrate their expertise on unexpected abnormal operating conditions. When unable to explain discrepancies with certainty resulting from data out of synchronization or other falso-alarm conditions, triggers alarm devices to request assistance from designated individuals. Concept useful in such terrestrial systems as production lines, power-distribution networks, chemical processes, large airplanes, and other assemblies of interdependent equipment.

  1. Spinal cord dysfunction complicating meningococcal meningitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Khan; I. Altafullah; M. Ishaq

    1990-01-01

    A 29 year old male developed paraplegia during the acute phase of meningococcal meningitis. Possible mechanisms for this unusual complication are discussed and the literature regarding spinal cord complications of pyogenic meningitis is reviewed.

  2. Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... previous page Related Topics Diabetes Related Documents PDF Living with Diabetes Download PDF Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Managing Complications ...

  3. Neurologic complications following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Kwon, Charles; Klein, Melanie; Corder, Julie; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2014-06-01

    We reviewed neurologic complications after renal transplantation in children over a 20-year period. Neurologic complications were classified as early (within 3 months) and delayed (beyond 3 months). Of 115 children, 10 (8.7%) had complications. Early complications were found in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 4 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to immunosuppressant toxicity, sepsis/presumed meningitis, and indeterminate) and headaches in 1. One patient with seizures received levetiracetam for 6 months and 1 with headaches received amitriptyline prophylaxis. Late complications were noted in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 3 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy), headaches in 2, and tremors in 1. Two patients with seizures were treated with anti-epilepsy medications; 1 with migraine received cyproheptadine prophylaxis. Neurologic complications develop in children after renal transplantation. Seizures due to posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome were the commonest complication. Early detection and appropriate management of these complications is important. PMID:23752071

  4. Smelling Diseases

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Update

    2004-06-14

    We all use our noses to make quick judgments from time to time -- whether it's checking to see if the milk's still good, or if a shirt needs to go in the wash. Now, doctors are developing a kind of sniff test to screen for diseases. Find out more in this Science Update.

  5. Epigenetic phenomena linked to diabetic complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luciano Pirola; Aneta Balcerczyk; Jun Okabe; Assam El-Osta

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) and the complications associated with this condition are an urgent public health problem, as the incidence of diabetes mellitus is steadily increasing. Environmental factors, such as diet and exposure to hyperglycemia, contribute to the etiology of diabetes mellitus and its associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. These vascular complications are the main cause of

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction complicated by pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Bagouri, E; Smith, Jon; Geutjens, G

    2012-11-01

    We report a case of pyoderma gangrenosum as a complication of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease, which was misdiagnosed initially as a post-operative wound infection. An early dermatology opinion and skin biopsy should be considered in cases of suspected infection where thorough surgical debridement and antimicrobial therapy has failed to improve the clinical picture. PMID:23131219

  7. Colovesical Fistula: A Rare Complication of Diverticulitis in Young Male

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mayank; Wagh, Snehjeet

    2015-01-01

    Herniation of colonic mucosa through the circular muscles at the point of penetration of blood vessels results in diverticuli formation. It is seen most commonly in the large bowel in sigmoid colon. Common complications of diverticular disease are inflammation and bleeding per rectum and rarely fistula formation which are seen mostly in elderly patients. A case of colovesical fistula with diverticulitis in young male aged 30 years is reported. PMID:26023598

  8. [Bronchiolitis obliterans: a potential complication after bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Rozewicz, A

    1999-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantations (BMT) are limited by complications connected with infection and non-infection processes. One of them, after allogenic bmt is a graft versus host disease. Bronchiolitis obliterans is observed in patients with GVHD. It seems that bronchiolitis obliterans is not observed after autologic bmt. If this observation is proved, it will mean that GVHD is the main factor of the development bronchiolitis obliterans. PMID:10503046

  9. Colovesical fistula: a rare complication of diverticulitis in young male.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mayank; Wagh, Snehjeet; Balsarkar, Dharmesh J

    2015-04-01

    Herniation of colonic mucosa through the circular muscles at the point of penetration of blood vessels results in diverticuli formation. It is seen most commonly in the large bowel in sigmoid colon. Common complications of diverticular disease are inflammation and bleeding per rectum and rarely fistula formation which are seen mostly in elderly patients. A case of colovesical fistula with diverticulitis in young male aged 30 years is reported. PMID:26023598

  10. "Still at War! From Poison Gas to Drones"

    E-print Network

    Stein, Oliver

    "Still at War! From Poison Gas to Drones" European Cultural Days 2014 Opening Address on Friday, 16 decided on the title of our symposium, "Still at War! From Poison Gas to Drones", one thing was clear

  11. 27 CFR 24.193 - Conversion into still wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Conversion into still wine. 24.193 Section 24.193 Alcohol, Tobacco...TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Effervescent Wine § 24.193 Conversion into still wine....

  12. Pulmonary complications in lead miners

    SciTech Connect

    Masjedi, M.R.; Estineh, N.; Bahadori, M.; Alavi, M.; Sprince, N.L.

    1989-07-01

    We carried out a study to assess the prevalence of respiratory disease in lead miners and to investigate the roles of silica and lead. We used a questionnaire for symptoms and examinations for signs of respiratory disease, chest roentgenograms, and spirometric study in 45 lead miners. Six underwent bronchoscopy and transbronchial lung biopsy (TBB) and five lung lead analysis. Lung lead levels from five patients with no occupational lead exposure were obtained for comparison. Results showed restriction in five of 45 and reticulonodular opacities in 16 of 45 workers. Squamous metaplasia and other histopathologic changes were observed, although silicotic nodules were absent by TBB. Lung lead levels above those of control subjects were observed in four of five lead miners. These findings show that lead miners are at risk for lung disease. Although silica is a likely cause, elevated lung lead content found in these miners merits further investigation.

  13. Sun tracking system for productivity enhancement of solar still

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Abdallah; O. O. Badran

    2008-01-01

    A sun tracking system was deployed for enhancing the solar still productivity. A computerized sun tracking device was used for rotating the solar still with the movement of the sun. A comparison between fixed and sun tracked solar stills showed that the use of sun tracking increased the productivity for around 22%, due to the increase of overall efficiency by

  14. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222... § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  15. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222... § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  16. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52...Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  17. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52...Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  18. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 ...From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram...

  19. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section...Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram...

  20. 27 CFR 24.114 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Application § 24.114 Registry of stills. Any still intended for use in the production of volatile fruit-flavor concentrate will be set up on bonded wine premises. Each still is subject to the provisions of subpart C of part 29 of...

  1. 27 CFR 24.114 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Application § 24.114 Registry of stills. Any still intended for use in the production of volatile fruit-flavor concentrate will be set up on bonded wine premises. Each still is subject to the provisions of subpart C of part 29 of...

  2. 27 CFR 24.114 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Application § 24.114 Registry of stills. Any still intended for use in the production of volatile fruit-flavor concentrate will be set up on bonded wine premises. Each still is subject to the provisions of subpart C of part 29 of...

  3. 27 CFR 24.114 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Application § 24.114 Registry of stills. Any still intended for use in the production of volatile fruit-flavor concentrate will be set up on bonded wine premises. Each still is subject to the provisions of subpart C of part 29 of...

  4. 27 CFR 24.114 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Application § 24.114 Registry of stills. Any still intended for use in the production of volatile fruit-flavor concentrate will be set up on bonded wine premises. Each still is subject to the provisions of subpart C of part 29 of...

  5. Flexible Storage of Still Images with a Perceptual Quality Criterion

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Flexible Storage of Still Images with a Perceptual Quality Criterion Vincent Ricordel, Patrick Le.ricordel@polytech.univ-nantes.fr Abstract. The purpose of the paper is to introduce a new method for flexible storage of still images metric. 1 Introduction In the paper we focus on the problem of digital still image storage. The problem

  6. Portal Hypertension as Immune Mediate Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manti, Sara; Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Filippelli, Martina; Cuppari, Caterina; Gitto, Eloisa; Romano, Claudio; Arrigo, Teresa; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    Context: Portal Hypertension (PH) is a progressive complication due to chronic liver disease. In addition to pathophysiologic changes in the micro-circulation, in PH are established fibrous tissue (periportal fibrous septal) and regenerative hyperplastic nodules (from micro- to macro-nodules) promoting hepatic architectural distortion. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for the major studies published from 1981 to today. The databases searched were: PubMed, EMBASE, Orphanet, Midline and Cochrane Library. We used the keywords: "portal hypertension, children, immune system, endocrine system, liver fibrosis". Results: It is believed that PH results from three “phenotype”: ischemia-reperfusion, involving nervous system (NS); edema and oxidative damage, involving immune system; inflammation and angiogenesis, involving endocrine system. However, its exact cause still underdiagnosed and unknown. Conclusions: PH is a dynamic and potentially reversible process. Researchers have tried to demonstrate mechanisms underlying PH and its related-complications. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, and immune, endocrine-metabolic factors of disease. The strong positive association between immune system and development of PH could be efficient to identify non-invasive markers of disease, to modify prognosis of PH, and to development and application of specific and individual anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:24976841

  7. Minimising complications in abdominoplasty: An approach based on the root cause analysis and focused preventive steps.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Mohan

    2013-05-01

    Significant complications still occur after abdominoplasty, the rate varies widely in different series. This variation suggests that there is a lot of scope for improvement. This paper reviews the various complications and also the technical improvements reported in the last 20 years. The root cause of each complication is analysed and preventive steps are suggested based on the literature and the author's own personal series with very low complication rates. Proper case selection, risk stratified prophylaxis of thromboembolism, initial synchronous liposuction, flap elevation at the Scarpa fascia level, discontinuous incremental flap dissection, vascular preservation and obliteration of the sub-flap space by multiple sutures emerge as the strongest preventive factors. It is proposed that most of the complications of abdominoplasty are preventable and that it is possible to greatly enhance the aesthetic and safety profile of this surgery. PMID:24501473

  8. Diagnosis and management of the postoperative surgical and medical complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Montravers, Philippe; Augustin, Pascal; Zappella, Nathalie; Dufour, Guillaume; Arapis, Konstantinos; Chosidow, Denis; Fournier, Pierre; Ribeiro-Parienti, Lara; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Desmard, Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Perioperative complications following bariatric surgery (BS) have been poorly analysed and their management is not clearly assessed. The associated frequency of ICU admission is difficult to estimate. Among surgical complications, digestive perforations are the most frequent. The most common postoperative complications of sleeve gastrectomy are fistulas, but bleeding on the stapling line is also commonly reported. Complication rates are higher after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, mainly due to anastomotic leaks. Medical complications are mainly thromboembolic or respiratory complications. All these surgical and medical complications are not easily detected; clinical signs can be atypical or insidious, often resulting in delayed management. Respiratory signs can be predominant and lead erroneously to pulmonary or thromboembolic diseases. Diagnostic criteria are based on minor clinical signs, tachycardia being probably the most frequent one. Lately, complications are revealed by haemodynamic instability, respiratory failure or renal dysfunction and radiographic findings. Management decision according to these abnormal signs is based on a combined multidisciplanary approach including surgical and/or endoscopic procedures and medical care, depending on the nature and severity of the surgical complication. Medical management is based on supportive ICU care of organ dysfunctions, curative anticoagulation if required, nutritional support, and appropriate anti-infective therapy. Pharmacological data are limited in morbidly obese patients and the appropriate doses are debated, especially for anti-infective agents. Complicated BS cases have a poor outcome, probably largely related to delayed diagnosis and reoperation. PMID:25829315

  9. [Duodenogastroesophageal reflux disease as a complication of superinvasion opisthorchiasis].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, A I; Krylov, G G; Bychkov, V G

    2004-01-01

    In patients with superinvasion opisthorchiasis of prolonged invasion, 84% develop duodenal hypertension, 94% of the patients are found to have gastric hypertension; duodenogastric reflux with formation of chronic gastritis and reorganization is revealed in 75%. Reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus gives rise to chronic eosophagitis, regurgitation of intestinal contents into the pancreatic duct is a cause of chronic indurative pancreatitis of the head of the gland. In cases of duodenal hypertension, the rates of pancreatic O. felineus invasion are as high as 93.7%. PMID:15484977

  10. [Carrión's disease complicated with severe acute leptospirosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Huerta, Anderson; Salas, Marcia; Yarinsueca, Jorge; Maguiña, Ciro

    2014-04-01

    The case of an adult, 56 year old male is reported, from Sihuas (Ancash) who presented at Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo with fever, jaundice and anemia. In three days of hospitalization, he developed severe anemia (Hb: 11.8 to 6.7 g / dL) and generalized myalgias associated with a sudden worsening jaundice correlated with elevated bilirubin (TB 3.2 to 19.6 mg / dL direct dominance) and general deterioration. Microbiological smear and culture were positive for Bartonella bacilliformis. Subsequent serology (microagglutination) was positive for Lesptospira serovar Pomona. The patient was given specific antibiotic therapy (ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin), transfused two units of packed red blood cells, improved clinically and was discharged. PMID:25123883

  11. Double lumen esophagus: a rare complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Samiullah, Sami; Samad, Fatima; Tang, Ying Margie; Abdullah, Neelofar; Marium, Marium; Shaikh, Zahf; Brelvi, Zamir; Wang, Weizheng

    2014-03-01

    Double lumen esophagus or esophagogastric fistula is a very rare endoscopic finding. Approximately 11 cases have been reported in the past. Formation of an esophagogastric fistula is predisposed by previous esophagogastric surgery, persistent gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal ulcer or esophageal carcinoma. Dysphagia and odynophagia are common symptoms. Endoscopy is the procedure of choice for diagnosis. Symptomatic management is the mainstay of treatment. Early diagnosis andmanagement of gastroesophageal reflux is essential to prevent reflux-related fistulas. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with a history of dysphagia who was found to have esophagogastric fistula on endoscopy. He was treated conservatively with proton pump inhibitors leading to symptomatic improvement. PMID:23461771

  12. Incidence of neurological complications of surgery for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, P; Aparício, J M; Elliott, M J; Kirkham, F J

    1995-01-01

    A total of 523 cardiac surgical discharge summaries were searched for recorded evidence of adverse neurological events occurring between operation and time of discharge. Neurological events were recorded in 31 and included one or more of seizure disorder (n = 16), pyramidal signs (n = 11), extrapyramidal signs (n = 8), coma (n = 6), and neuro-ophthalmic deficits (n = 6). There were significantly more adverse neurological events after repairs for arch anomalies (16.6% of cases). There was also an association with the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and a period of low perfusion pressure either intraoperatively or postoperatively. Of the 19 out of 23 survivors in whom long term outcome data were available, four were normal and six had persisting neurological problems directly related to the perioperative period. In a further nine of the 19 survivors, established preoperative neurodevelopmental abnormality probably contributed to their present neurological status, in addition to perioperative events. In view of the way these data were collected, this study must represent the minimum incidence of neurological events in children undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:7618908

  13. Coronary artery disease and diabetes - Management during Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Idris Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Ramadan is the Islamic holy month of fasting and practiced by all adult Muslims all over the world at the same time simultaneously. Although people who are ill or diabetics with coronary heart disease are exempted from fasting, they still desire to fast and this is a challenge to themselves and the treating physician. We performed a systematic review of the available Medline English literature on the subject from January 1982 to December 2014 so as to help guide physicians in managing these patients. The results revealed that although the metabolic parameters change during Ramadan fasting, but this does not lead to any significant increase in the incidence of acute coronary events. Most adults with stable coronary artery disease can fast without significant complications, but those with unstable disease or recent or pending revascularization procedures should generally refrain from fasting. Regular monitoring by the physician is mandatory along with adjustment of the dosages. PMID:26013792

  14. Pulmonary complications of smoked substance abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, D P

    1990-01-01

    After tobacco, marijuana is the most widely smoked substance in our society. Studies conducted within the past 15 years in animals, isolated tissues, and humans indicate that marijuana smoke can injure the lungs. Habitual smoking of marijuana has been shown to be associated with chronic respiratory tract symptoms, an increased frequency of acute bronchitic episodes, extensive tracheobronchial epithelial disease, and abnormalities in the structure and function of alveolar macrophages, key cells in the lungs' immune defense system. In addition, the available evidence strongly suggests that regularly smoking marijuana may predispose to the development of cancer of the respiratory tract. "Crack" smoking has become increasingly prevalent in our society, especially among habitual smokers of marijuana. New evidence is emerging implicating smoked cocaine as a cause of acute respiratory tract symptoms, lung dysfunction, and, in some cases, serious, life-threatening acute lung injury. A strong physician message to users of marijuana, cocaine, or both concerning the harmful effects of these smoked substances on the lungs and other organs may persuade some of them, especially those with drug-related respiratory complications, to quit smoking. PMID:2190420

  15. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akku?, Selami; U?urlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  16. Diabetic nephropathy - complications and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Andy Kh

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure globally. Much research has been conducted in both basic science and clinical therapeutics, which has enhanced understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and expanded the potential therapies available. This review will examine the current concepts of diabetic nephropathy management in the context of some of the basic science and pathophysiology aspects relevant to the approaches taken in novel, investigative treatment strategies. PMID:25342915

  17. Total thyroidectomy: Complications and technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay K. Harness; Lit Fung; Norman W. Thompson; Richard E. Burney; Michael K. McLeod

    1986-01-01

    During the 27-year period from 1957 to 1984, four hundred thirty patients underwent total thyroidectomies for malignant or benign disease of the thyroid gland at our institutions. Thyroid cancer was found in 83.4% of cases, and 47.2% of these had concomitant lymph node dissections. Transient recurrent laryngeal nerve injury occurred in 6.2% of the entire series. Permanent unilateral vocal cord

  18. Gastrointestinal complications of systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive skin thickening and tightness. Pulmonary interstitial fibrosis and kidney damage are the most important indicators for mortality; however, the gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly damaged system. Virtually all parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can be involved, although the esophagus is the most frequently reported. The mechanisms that cause such extensive damage are generally unclear, but vascular changes, immunological abnormalities, excessive accumulation of collagen in the submucosa, smooth muscle atrophy and neuropathy may participate because these are the most common histological findings in biopsies and autopsies. Most patients with GI tract involvement complain about dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal bloating/distension, and fecal incontinence. These symptoms are generally mild during the early stage of the disease and are likely ignored by physicians. As the disease becomes more advanced, however, patient quality of life is markedly influenced, whereby malnutrition and shortened survival are the usual consequences. The diagnosis for systemic sclerosis is based on manometry measurements and an endoscopy examination. Supportive and symptomatic treatment is the main therapeutic strategy; however, an early diagnosis is critical for successful management. PMID:24222949

  19. Ophthalmological complications of the hypertriglyceridaemias.

    PubMed

    Winder, A F; Dodson, P M; Galton, D J

    1980-04-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia is an inappropriate elevation in plasma of chylomicrons, very low density lipoprotein, or both, functioning in the transport of exogenous and endogenous neutral fat respectively (lewis, 1976; Miller, 1979). The elevation may be due to rare genetically-determined defects or to a specific imbalance between triglyceride production and utilization, either secondary to or accentuated by other metabolic disturbances such as obesity or diabetes mellitus. Various surveys indicate that some degree of hypertriglyceridaemia affects more than 10 per cent of the adult population, with a male preponderance and a reduced expression during childhood (Lewis, 1976). Ophthalmological complications of hypertriglyceridaemia include eruptive and other forms of xanthomata including xanthelasmata, corneal arcus, lipaemia retinalis, effects on retinal blood flow, and lipid emboli affecting vision. The clinical features overlap those of hypercholesterolaemia and these features may lead to initial presentation and diagnosis of either disorder. Recognition of the underlying disorder is important since with treatment the incidence of major cardiovascular and other problems such as pancreatitis may be reduced, and with familial disorders other affected members may then be sought. PMID:6943819

  20. [The pathogenesis of postvaccinal complications].

    PubMed

    Huber, H C

    1981-03-19

    Paraspecific reactions to vaccines are -- induction of autoimmune mechanisms, -- immunosuppression, -- induction of inflammation (i.e. "reactogenicity"). These undesirable side effects of vaccination are important factors in pathogenesis of postvaccinal complications. Using the model of experimental vaccinia virus infection the paraspecific reactions could be demonstrated in several animal species. Cell mediated hypersensitivity to brain tissue antigen and basic encephalitogenic protein occurred following vaccinia infection in guinea pigs. In infected rabbits humoral anti-brain antibodies could be detected. The immune response to sheep erythrocytes in mice was tested by determining the number of plaque forming cells in the spleen after specific immunization. Vaccinia virus injected prior to or simultaneously with immunization strongly reduced the number of plaque forming cells in the spleen. The reactogenicity of bacterial and viral vaccines could be determined by means of a simple hemolytic plaque assay in mice. This assay represents the degree of enzymatic lysosomal activity of macrophages. The methods described might be useful to test the innocuity and tolerance of new vaccines. PMID:6112195

  1. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  2. [Childhood and adolescent obesity--consequences for the locomotor system and treatment options. Musculoskeletal complications of overweight children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Schönau, E

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this article is to present the most relevant musculoskeletal complications known to be associated with being overweight or obese in childhood and adolescence in order to help the clinicians and physiotherapists in the diagnostic and management of these patients. Various musculoskeletal problems like slipped capital femoral epiphysis and Blount disease are well-known complications. More recent studies describe the effects of overweight on musculoskeletal pain and controversial influences on fracture rates. Reduced physical activity is a contributing factor in obesity, but also effects bone mineral accrual. Reduced postural stability and increased falls may be the reason for increased fracture rates. Furthermore these data show relevant changes of locomotion studied by gait analysis. Longitudinal kinematic studies may be needed to understand the entire aspect of gait development in overweight children. Obesity is still a serious health problem and has a relevant impact on the development of a child's musculoskeletal system. Obesity affects the locomotor sytem both functionally and structurally. Future studies are necessary to help us better understand the pathophysiology and development of optimal therapeutic strategies. PMID:23529598

  3. Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Popescu, M; Strambu, V; Sandu, AM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of laparoscopic treatment in abdominal complications following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Methods: We report a retrospective study including 17 patients with abdominal complications secondary to VP shunt for hydrocephalus, laparoscopically treated in our department, between 2000 and 2007. Results: Patients' age ranged from 1 to 72 years old (mean age 25.8 years old). Male: female ratio was 1.4. Abdominal complications encountered were: shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration 47.05% (8/17), infections 23.52% (4/17) such as abscesses and peritonitis, pseudocysts 11.76% (2/17), CSF ascites 5.88% (1/17), inguinal hernia 5.88% (1/17), and shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube 5.88% (1/17). Free–disease interval varies from 1 day to 21 years, depending on the type of complication, short in peritoneal irritation syndrome and abscesses (days) and long in ascites, pseudocysts(months– years). Laparoscopic treatment was: extraction of the foreign body in shunt disconnection with intraperitoneal distal catheter migration, evacuation, debridement, lavage and drainage for pseudocysts, abscess and peritonitis, shortening of the tube in shunt malfunction due to excessive length of intraperitoneal tube a nd hernioraphy. One diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in a peritoneal irritation syndrome, which found only CSF ascites. There were no conversions to open surgery. The overall mortality was of 5.88% and postoperative morbidity was of 11.76%. In 7 patients operated for abscesses, peritonitis, pseudocysts, and CSF ascites the shunting system was converted in to a ventriculocardiac shunt. Conclusions: Abdominal complication following VP shunt can be successfully performed laparoscopically. Abdominal surgery required, in selected cases, the repositioning of the distal catheter, frequently as a ventriculocardiac shunt. There are abdominal complications with no indication of surgery, like peritoneal irritation syndrome and CSF ascites. Free– disease interval varies from days (peritoneal irritation syndrome, abscesses) to month–years (pseudocyst, ascites), according to type of complication. PMID:20108757

  4. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 31,2013 One of the more common long-term complications of diabetes is diabetic renal disease (" ... content was last reviewed on 7/5/2012. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  5. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  6. Extravascular complications following abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Low, G; Jaremko, J L; Lomas, D J

    2015-08-01

    A variety of transplants have been performed in the abdomen including liver, kidney, pancreas and islet, bowel, and multivisceral transplants. Imaging plays an important role in graft surveillance particularly to exclude post-transplant complications. When complications occur, therapeutic image-guided interventions are invaluable as these may be graft-saving and even life-saving. Vascular complications following transplantation have been extensively reported in recent reviews. The focus of this review is to discuss post-transplant complications that are primarily extravascular in location. This includes biliary, urological, intestinal, malignancy, infections, and miscellaneous complications. Familiarity with the imaging appearances of these complications is helpful for radiologists as accurate diagnosis and expedient treatment has an impact on graft and patient survival. PMID:25979853

  7. Complications of arthroscopic surgery of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, A. V.; Bardakos, N. V.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years hip arthroscopic surgery has evolved into one of the most rapidly expanding fields in orthopaedic surgery. Complications are largely transient and incidences between 0.5% and 6.4% have been reported. However, major complications can and do occur. This article analyses the reported complications and makes recommendations based on the literature review and personal experience on how to minimise them. PMID:23610683

  8. Complications associated with transobturator sling procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Hamilton Boyles; Renee Edwards; William Gregory; Amanda Clark

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to determine the complications associated with trans-obturator slings as reported to a national database.\\u000a We required “MAUDE”, a database that collects reports of complications associated with medical devices and which is maintained\\u000a by the Food and Drug Administration. We searched for complications associated with three different, commercially available\\u000a trans-obturator slings. We then tabulated the results by type

  9. A Method of H.264Based Still Stereoscopic Pictures Compression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lei Yang; Xiaowei Song; Chunping Hou; Jufeng Dai

    2006-01-01

    Still stereoscopic pictures compression is an important part of auto-stereoscopic techniques. H.264 is an advanced video compression standard, absorbing the advantages of the previous standards. In this paper, still stereoscopic pictures compression is studied, and H.264 coding tools adopted to achieve this compression are discussed. The still stereoscopic pictures compression schemes based on H.264, MPEG-2 and JPEG are compared by

  10. Frequent Hemodialysis Fistula Infectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Charmaine E.; Sontrop, Jessica M.; Faratro, Rose; Chan, Christopher T.; Zimmerman, Deborah Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined if infectious arteriovenous access complications vary with the cannulation technique and whether this is modified by dialysis frequency. We compared the infection rate between fistulas cannulated using buttonhole versus stepladder techniques for patients treated with short daily (SDH) or nocturnal hemodialysis at home (NHD). We also compared patients receiving conventional intermittent hemodialysis (CIHD) using stepladder cannulation. Methods Data were prospectively collected from 631 patients dialyzed with a fistula from 2001 to 2010 (Toronto and Ottawa, Canada). We compared the person-time incidence rate of bacteremia and local fistula infections using the exact binomial test. Results Forty-six (7.3%) patients received SDH (?5 sessions/week, 2-4 h/session), 128 (20.3%) NHD (?4 sessions/week, ?5 h/session) and 457 (72%) CIHD (3 sessions/week, ?4 h/session). Fifty percent of SDH and 72% of NHD patients used the buttonhole technique. There were 39 buttonhole-related bacteremias (rate: 0.196/1,000 fistula days) and at least 2 local buttonhole site infections. Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 85% of the bacteremias. There were 5 (13%) infection-related hospitalizations and 3 (10%) serious metastatic infections, including fistula loss. In comparison, there was 1 possible fistula-related infection in CIHD during follow-up (rate: 0.002/1,000 fistula days). Conclusions The rate of buttonhole-related infections was high among patients on frequent hemodialysis and more than 50 times greater than that among patients on CIHD with the stepladder technique. Most bacteremias were due to S. aureus – with serious consequences. The risks and benefits of buttonhole cannulation require individual consideration with careful monitoring, prophylaxis and management. PMID:25473405

  11. [Complications of double J ureteral stents].

    PubMed

    el Khader, K

    1996-01-01

    The double J ureteral stents have become an integral part of the urological armentarium. They allow good urinary drainage from kidney to the bladder and usually are safe and well tolerated. However, different complications may occur with short or long-term use of indwelling stents. These complications have varied from minor side effects such as hematuria, dysuria, frequency, flank and suprapubic pain to major complications such as vesico-ureteric reflux, migration, encrustation, urinary infection, stent fracture, necrosis and ureteroarterial fistula. Mostly of complications require removal of the indwelling catheter. PMID:9091568

  12. Management of complications after total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Josef K; Galvin, Joseph W

    2015-03-01

    The outcomes of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) for painful arthritis of the glenohumeral joint are excellent with significant improvement in pain and function. Increased use of total shoulder arthroplasty over the past decade has led to identification of common complications. Although the complication rate is low, accurate and timely diagnosis, appropriate management, and implementation of methods for prevention are critical to a successful long-term outcome. The most common complications include infection, glenoid and humeral component loosening, rotator cuff tear, periprosthetic fracture, and neurologic injury. The purpose of this review is to outline the best practices for diagnosing, managing, and preventing these complications. PMID:25672497

  13. First two cases of living related liver transplantation with complicated anatomy of blood vessels in Beijing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Han Wu; Yuan-Lian Wan; Long Lee; Yin-Mo Yang; Yan-Ting Huang; Chao-Long Chen; Sheung-Tat Fan

    AIM: Living related liver transplantation (LRLT) has been developed in response to the paediatric organ donor shortage. Though it has been succeeded in many centers worldwide, the safety of the donor is still a major concern, especially in donors with anatomy variation. We succeeded in performing the first two cases of living related liver transplantation with complicated anatomy of blood

  14. Chronic granulomatous disease: overview and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Elizabeth M; Marciano, Betty E; DeRavin, SukSee; Zarember, Kol A; Holland, Steven M; Malech, Harry L

    2011-06-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) still causes significant morbidity and mortality. The difficulty in considering high-risk yet curative treatments, such as allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, lies in the unpredictable courses of both CGD and bone marrow transplantation in different patients. Some patients with CGD can have frequent infections, granulomatous or autoimmune disorders necessitating immunosuppressive therapy, or both but also experience long periods of relative good health. However, the risk of death is clearly higher in patients with CGD of all types, and the complications of CGD short of death can still cause significant morbidity. Therefore, with recent developments and improvements, bone marrow transplantation, previously considered an experimental or high-risk procedure, has emerged as an important option for patients with CGD. We will discuss the complications of CGD that result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly the most common infections and autoimmune/inflammatory complications, as well as their typical management. We will then discuss the status of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:21497887

  15. Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Overview and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Elizabeth M; Marciano, Betty E; DeRavin, SukSee; Zarember, Kol; Holland, Steven M; Malech, Harry L

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) still causes significant morbidity and mortality. The difficulty in considering high-risk yet curative treatments, such as allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, lies in the unpredictable courses of both CGD and bone marrow transplantation in different patients. Some CGD patients may have frequent infections and/or suffer from granulomatous or autoimmune disorders necessitating immunosuppressive therapy, but also experience long periods of relative good health. However, the risk of death is clearly higher in CGD of all types, and the complications of CGD short of death can still cause significant morbidity. Therefore, with recent developments and improvements, bone marrow transplantation, previously considered an experimental or high-risk procedure, has emerged as an important option for patients with CGD. We will discuss the complications of CGD that result in significant morbidity and mortality, in particular the most common infections and autoimmune/inflammatory complications as well as their typical management. We will then discuss the status of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:21497887

  16. Gastric Pouch After Simple or Radical Cystectomy for Benign and Malignant Bladder Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamsa, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a controversy regarding the use of gastric pouch for benign and malignant bladder diseases. Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to report our experience, mostly on gastric neobladder (not gastrocystoplasty) for benign and malignant bladder diseases, its complications, outcomes and follow-up results. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective case series, we described our experience on seven gastric pouches (2 gastrocystoplasty and 5 gastric neobladders). Results: Postoperative complications were rare. Continence was defined as bladder capacity over 400 mL. Their follow-up period ranged from five months up to writing the article. One of the studied cases is still alive and awaiting renal transplantation. Conclusions: Gastric pouch is a suitable segment for bladder cystoplasty and neobladder. Continence is mostly related to the capacity of pouch. PMID:25738108

  17. Cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction--a review.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Laxman; Sharma, Sanjib; Gautam, Mani; Gautam, Samir; Guruprasad, Sogunuru; Subramanyam, Gangapatnam

    2011-12-01

    Cardiogenic shock is characterized by inadequate tissue perfusion due to cardiac dysfunction and is the leading cause of death in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction. Mortality from cardiogenic shock still remains high. The development of cardiogenic shock is rarely unexpected; most patients who develop cardiogenic shock do so within 48 hrs of admission, with only 10% shocked on arrival. Mortality rate is exceedingly high and reaches 70-80% in those treated conservatively. Early revascularization is the cornerstone treatment of acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock. According to the guidelines, revascularization is effective up to 36 hours after the onset of cardiogenic shock and performed within 18 hours after the diagnosis of cardiogenic shock. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention is the most efficient therapy to restore coronary flow in the infarct-related artery. However, invasive strategy in a developing country like ours is not only costly but also technically demanding. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction complicated with cardiogenic shock that underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention and also review the incidence, pathophysiology, management and outcome of cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction. PMID:22299378

  18. Skewed Epigenetics: An Alternative Therapeutic Option for Diabetes Complications

    PubMed Central

    Togliatto, Gabriele; Dentelli, Patrizia; Brizzi, Maria Felice

    2015-01-01

    Vascular complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes patients. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a lack of efficient antioxidant machinery, a result of hyperglycaemia, mainly contribute to this problem. Although advances in therapy have significantly reduced both morbidity and mortality in diabetic individuals, diabetes-associated vascular complications are still one of the most challenging health problems worldwide. New healing options are urgently needed as current therapeutics are failing to improve long-term outcomes. Particular effort has recently been devoted to understanding the functional relationship between chromatin structure regulation and the persistent change in gene expression which is driven by hyperglycaemia and which accounts for long-lasting diabetic complications. A detailed investigation into epigenetic chromatin modifications in type 2 diabetes is underway. This will be particularly useful in the design of mechanism-based therapeutics which interfere with long-lasting activating epigenetics and improve patient outcomes. We herein provide an overview of the most relevant mechanisms that account for hyperglycaemia-induced changes in chromatin structure; the most relevant mechanism is called “metabolic memory.”

  19. Onset of complications following cervical manipulation due to malpractice in osteopathic treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cicconi, Michela; Mangiulli, Tatiana; Bolino, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to correlate cervical disc herniation with manipulation performed by a non-physician osteopath on a patient complaining of neck pain. The authors report a case in which a woman - treated with osteopathic spinal manipulation - developed cervical-brachial neuralgia following the cervical disc herniation. The patient then underwent surgery and was followed by physiotherapists. A clinical condition characterized by limitation of neck mobility, with pain and sensory deficit in the right arm and II-III fingers, still persists. The patient consulted the authors to establish whether cervical disc herniation could be attributed to manipulation. Adverse events or side effects of spinal manipulative therapy are relatively common and usually benign. Most of these side effects are mild or moderate, but sometimes they can be severe. Cervical manipulation can provoke complications less often than thoracic or lumbar manipulation. Furthermore, many diseases can be absolutely and relatively contraindicated to osteopathic treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of a patient's clinical conditions is essential before starting a manipulative treatment; otherwise the osteopath could be accused of malpractice. It is the authors' opinion that a cause-effect relationship exists between the manipulative treatment and the development of disc herniation. PMID:24402084

  20. [Endocarditis complicated by an aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Hatim, E G A; Hachimi, M-A; Madani, H; Atmani, N; Moutakillah, Y; Bamous, M; Abdou, A; Drissli, M; Aithoussa, M; Wahid, F-A; Boulahya, A; Haimer, C; Drissi Kamili, N

    2014-07-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a rare, polymorphic disease in children. Mycotic aneurysm is a rare condition that complicates about 2.5 to 10% of cases of endocarditis. It is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality [1,2]. Mycotic aneurysms are often asymptomatic, physical examination is poor, but the diagnosis should be considered with the triad including fever, abdominal pain, and abdominal mass beating. Abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography are the most useful for the identification of the aneurysmal mass. However, angiography is an interesting addition to confirm the diagnosis and implement a treatment procedure [3]. The treatment of SMA aneurysms is largely surgical. IE treatment is based on antibiotic therapy combined with surgical repair. We report the case of a 15-year-old patient, first operated for an SMA aneurysm complicating the course of IE, who secondarily underwent mitral valve repair. We review the epidemiology, diagnosis, and care principles of mycotic aneurysms of the SMA. PMID:24947109