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Sample records for stills disease complicated

  1. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset still's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes. PMID:26834930

  2. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  3. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Lyme Disease - Neurological Complications Table ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial organism ...

  4. Myocarditis in Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Sève, Pascal; Iwaz, Jean; Gagnard, Anne; Broussolle, Christiane; Durieu, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Hot, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study highlights the clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of the rare myocarditis in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Among a case series of 57 patients fulfilling either Yamaguchi or Fautrel AOSD criteria and seen between 1998 and 2010, we identified 4 cases of myocarditis. From a comprehensive literature review, we collected 20 additional cases of myocarditis-complicated AOSD. The characteristics of patients with myocarditis were compared with those of AOSD patients without myocarditis. In these 24 myocarditis-complicated AOSD cases, myocarditis occurred early and was present at AOSD onset in 54% of the cases. Myocarditis was often symptomatic (96% of patients) with nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormalities (79% of patients) and a left ventricle ejection fraction ?50% (67% of patients). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed features consistent with myocarditis in 4 patients and a mononuclear interstitial inflammatory infiltrate in 4 others. Steroids alone were effective in 50% of patients with myocarditis. Intravenous immunoglobulins, methotrexate, and tumor necrosis factor-?-blockers were also prescribed and often found effective. Only 1 patient died from cardiogenic shock. Patients with myocarditis-complicated AOSD were younger and more frequently male than patients with AOSD alone. Pericarditis was more frequent in the myocarditis group; white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear cell count, and serum ferritin levels were also higher. Myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening complication of AOSD but responds positively to steroids and other immunomodulatory drugs. Its prognosis remains good (only 1 death occurred), but the condition requires close monitoring of heart function. PMID:25398063

  5. Economy class syndrome: still a recurrent complication of long journeys.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Bertamini, Francesca; Michieletto, Elisa; Ori, Carlo

    2007-04-01

    Economy class syndrome is a rare but still unavoidable complication of long haul flights, particularly in patients who carry various intrinsic risk factors. The tendency to affect even asymptomatic young people and the greater risk to fragment and propagate to the pulmonary circulation are the main characteristics of deep vein thrombosis of long-flight travelers. We report the clinical history of eight patients admitted to intensive care unit for confirmed or highly suspected economy class syndrome. Seven of them developed the syndrome within 72 h from a long return flight, one suffered from pulmonary embolism after a 12-h car trip. Two out of eight patients died, one because of extremely severe hemodynamic impairment, the other as a consequence of multiple organ failure caused by a concomitant myocardial infarction. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism represent one of the main medical problems of air travel and cause almost 20% of deaths in people with no medical history. Although economy class syndrome occurs mostly in elderly, even the healthy young population can be affected and, in fact, three out of eight patients of our series were under 50 years of age. All our patients but one carried a well recognized risk factor for deep vein thrombosis. Clinical symptoms of deep vein thrombosis can sometimes be aspecific and confusing, so that a certain proportion of post-travel deep vein thrombosis, evolving favorably and not giving rise to pulmonary embolism, might effectively remain undiagnosed. Economy class syndrome is still quite difficult to deal with and controversial in terms of preventive strategies. PMID:17496687

  6. Runaway pacemaker: a still existing complication and therapeutic guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mickley, H; Andersen, C; Nielsen, L H

    1989-07-01

    Runaway pacemaker is a rare, but still existing potential lethal complication in permanent pacemakers. Within 4 1/2 years, we saw two cases of runaway pacemaker in patients with multiprogrammable, VVI pacemakers (Siemens-Elema, Model 668). In both cases a pacemaker-induced ventricular tachycardia (rate 240-260 beats/min) was documented. One patient died. Runaway pacemakers must be exchanged as soon as possible. Until this can be accomplished, different emergency maneuvers should be tried. As documented in the cases presented, placing a magnet over the pacemaker may result in a lower, more physiological pacing rate. Reprogramming the pulse generator to a lower output or the use of external chest wall overdrive stimulation may also be successful, but these procedures require the presence of an adequate escape rhythm. If this is not the case or the former maneuvers have failed, an external pacemaker may be connected to the permanent pacing lead. Thereafter, the lead can be safely cut. As an alternative, a temporary transvenous pacing lead may be established prior to disconnecting the permanent pacing lead. PMID:2743631

  7. Pneumococcal Disease Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... World Health Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis Symptoms and Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... drinking, low alertness, and vomiting. Pneumococcal bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low ...

  8. [Still disease in adults revealed by a digestive manifestation].

    PubMed

    Dominguez, S; Grangé, J D; Amiot, X; Denis, M; Guillevin, L; Bodin, F

    1995-12-01

    Adult Still's disease is characterized by typical spiking fever, oligopolyarthritis, neutrophilic leukocytosis and involvement of various organs. We report a case which illustrated typical digestive features of Still's disease as dysphagia, peritonitis and manifests the hitherto unreported complication of gastric ulcerations. Treatment with prednisone was started in order to control arthritis, resulting in improvement of both gastric ulcerations (partially resistant to omeprazole treatment) and arthralgia. After seven years of follow-up, the patient remains clinically and biochemically stable with steroid and methotrexate treatment. PMID:8729419

  9. Are reactive oxygen species still the basis for diabetic complications?

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Elyse; Jha, Jay C; Sharma, Arpeeta; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A; de Haan, Judy B

    2015-07-01

    Despite the wealth of pre-clinical support for a role for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the aetiology of diabetic complications, enthusiasm for antioxidant therapeutic approaches has been dampened by less favourable outcomes in large clinical trials. This has necessitated a re-evaluation of pre-clinical evidence and a more rational approach to antioxidant therapy. The present review considers current evidence, from both pre-clinical and clinical studies, to address the benefits of antioxidant therapy. The main focus of the present review is on the effects of direct targeting of ROS-producing enzymes, the bolstering of antioxidant defences and mechanisms to improve nitric oxide availability. Current evidence suggests that a more nuanced approach to antioxidant therapy is more likely to yield positive reductions in end-organ injury, with considerations required for the types of ROS/RNS involved, the timing and dosage of antioxidant therapy, and the selective targeting of cell populations. This is likely to influence future strategies to lessen the burden of diabetic complications such as diabetes-associated atherosclerosis, diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25927680

  10. Complications of diverticular disease: surgical laparoscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Anania, G; Vedana, L; Santini, M; Scagliarini, L; Giaccari, S; Resta, G; Cavallesco, G

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease is still debatable. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopic colon resection in patients with diverticulitis and with complications like colon-vescical fistula, peridiverticular abscess, perforation or stricture. All patients underwent laparoscopic colectomy within 8 years period. Main data recorded were age, sex, return of bowel function, operation time, duration of hospital stay, ASA score, body mass index (BMI), early and late complications. During the study period, 33 colon resections were performed for diverticulitis and complications of diverticulitis. We performed 5 associated procedures. We had 2 postoperative complications; 1 of these required a redo operation with laparotomy for anastomotic leak and 3 patients required conversion from laparoscopic to open colectomy. The most common reasons for conversion were related to the inflammatory process with a severe adhesion syndrome. Mean operative time was 229 minutes, and average postoperative hospital stay was 9,8 days. Laparoscopic surgery for complications of diverticular disease is safe, effective and feasible. Laparoscopic colectomy has replaced open resection as standard surgery for recurrent and complicated diverticulitis in our institution. PMID:24979103

  11. Late complications after Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Henry-Amar, M; Joly, F

    1996-01-01

    Hodgkin's disease is considered a curable disease. The use of appropriate staging techniques and treatment methods has resulted in long-term survival rates as high as 90% in early stages, 75% or greater in advanced stages. Long-surviving Hodgkin's disease patients, however, face new problems which have become apparent as greater numbers of successfully treated patients are followed for longer periods of time. They concern mostly chronic medical as well as psychosocial complications which can interfere with survivors quality of life. Hodgkin's disease therapy may result in severe infections, thyroid, cardiovascular, pulmonary, digestive or gonadal dysfunction. It may also result in secondary malignancy which is considered the most serious complication. This review focuses on the variety of medical problems considering subsequent nonmalignant complications, secondary malignancies, long-term patient quality of life and causes of death. Because the vast majority of patients who achieve remission remain symptom-free and enjoy a normal life, an attempt is made to provide estimated risk for individuals based on available data. PMID:8836422

  12. Reviewing Dengue: Still a Neglected Tropical Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a “neglected tropical disease” (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003–2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  13. Acute Severe Hepatitis and Hemophagocytosis in Adult Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sahutoglu, Tuncay; Kara, Elif; Dogan, Ibrahim Oner; Gulluoglu, Mine; Akyuz, Filiz; Besisik, Fatih

    2015-10-01

    We report a 44-year-old male Turkish patient with adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) complicated by acute severe hepatitis and hemophagocytosis. Initial investigations for fever and rapidly progressive elevation of liver function tests were not diagnostic. Routine evaluations of liver and bone marrow biopsies missed the fundamental pathology. Extremely elevated ferritin levels led to a more detailed search, and immunohistochemical staining with CD68 for macrophages revealed extensive hemophagocytosis in both the first and second bone marrow biopsies, as well as in the liver biopsy. Treatment with steroid and cyclosporine A induced complete remission. PMID:26443256

  14. Current management of diverticular disease complications.

    PubMed

    Psarras, K; Symeonidis, N G; Pavlidis, E T; Micha, A; Baltatzis, M E; Lalountas, M A; Sakantamis, A K

    2011-10-01

    Diverticular disease is a common problem in the western population and sometimes leads to serious complications such as hemorrhage, bowel stenosis, obstruction, abscesses, fistulae, bowel perforation, and peritonitis. The severity of these complications can differ, and it is not always clear which procedure is indicated in each case and what measures should be followed before bringing the patient into the operating room. Certain operations have high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in compromised patients. Along with advancements in imaging and minimally invasive techniques, the indications for surgery have currently being adapted to "damage limitation" or "down-staging" protocols, which seem to offer improved results. There are still some questions to be solved in the following years by prospective studies, such as the usefulness of laparoscopic lavage in purulent peritonitis or of Hartmann's procedure in fecal peritonitis. These indications, based on current literature, are systematically discussed in the present review. PMID:21887565

  15. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for High Blood Pressure Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of High Blood Pressure Prevention & Treatment of High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Jul 24,2013 Complications The ...

  16. [Human hantavirus diseases - still neglected zoonoses?].

    PubMed

    Vrbovská, V; Chalupa, P; Straková, P; Hubálek, Z; Rudolf, I

    2015-01-01

    Hantavirus disease is the most common rodent-borne viral infection in the Czech Republic, with a mean annual incidence of 0.02 cases per 100 000 population and specific antibodies detected in 1% of the human population. Four hantaviruses (Puumala, Dobrava-Belgrade, Tula, and Seewis) circulate in this country, of which Puumala virus (responsible for a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome called nephropathia epidemica) and Dobrava-Belgrade virus (causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome) have been proven to cause human disease. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive review of the hantaviruses occurring in the Czech Republic, based on the literature published during the past three decades, including their geographical distribution and clinical symptoms. The recent detection of Tula virus in an immunocompromised person as well as reports of Seoul virus infections in Europe highlight the possible emergence of neglected hantavirus infections in the foreseeable future. PMID:26795222

  17. Iron hypothesis of cardiovascular disease: still controversial.

    PubMed

    Aursulesei, Viviana; Cozma, A; Krasniqi, A

    2014-01-01

    Iron hypothesis has been a controversial subject for over 30 years as many studies support its role as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, while other studies found no evidence to support it. The conflicting results are accounted for by the non-homogeneity of trial design in terms of population inclusion criteria and different endpoints, non-uniform use of parameters for assessing iron role, and incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action. The nature of iron is dual, being of crucial importance for the human body, but also toxic as "free iron" induces oxidative stress. Under physiological conditions, there are efficient and complex mechanisms against iron-induced oxidative stress, which could be reproduced for creating new, intelligent antioxidants. Iron depletion improves the cardiovascular prognosis only if serum concentration is at the lowest limit of normal ranges. However, low iron levels and the type of dietary iron intake correlate with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, influence the ischemic endpoints in the elderly, and exert negative impact on heart failure prognosis. So far, the causal relation and involved mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Iron overload is a difficult and frequent condition, involving the cardiovascular system by specific pathogenic pathways, therefore determining a particular form of restrictive cardiomyopathy and vaso-occlusive arterial damage. PMID:25581946

  18. Piriform sinus carcinoma with a paraneoplastic syndrome misdiagnosed as adult onset Still’s disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Du, Jintao

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PS) occur less commonly in association with otolaryngologic neoplasms than other carcinomas such as those of lung or breast. Piriform sinus carcinoma with PS is extremely rare. We here report a case of piriform sinus carcinoma accompanied by PS that was initially misdiagnosed as adult onset Still’s disease and describe our diagnosis and treatment. One lesson we have drawn from the experience of this misdiagnosis is that PS symptoms may manifest before the primary tumor is evident and complicate the diagnostic process. PMID:26770614

  19. Complications of suppurative otitis media: still a problem in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; El Fiky, Lobna M; El Sharnouby, Mohammed M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of complicated suppurative otitis media in 10 years at a tertiary referral university hospital. During this period, 3,364 patients with suppurative otitis media (acute and chronic) were admitted to the department. The number of patients presenting with complications was 422 (12.54%). The ratio of extracranial to intracranial complications was nearly 1:1. The most frequent extracranial complication was mastoiditis while the most frequent intracranial one was lateral sinus thrombophlebitis. Multiple complications may present in the same patient. The onset of complications was insidious and 96% of the patients were already aware of their disease. There were 6 mortalities (1.42%), and additional morbidity was recorded in 16 patients (3.79%). Changes in the clinical picture should always alert the physician to the onset of a complication. Complications tended to occur in young patients from a lower socioeconomic class and without sex preponderance. Physicians should be aware of the continuing incidence of complications and the subtleness of their onset and investigate patients for the presence of more than one complication. PMID:19145101

  20. [Prevalence of ulcer disease complications].

    PubMed

    Za?tsev, O V; Tarasenko, S V; Kope?kin, A A; Kariukhin, I V; Larionova, A A

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of complications of a peptic ulcer is studied: bleedings, perforations and pylorodudenal stenoses. 1799 patients are included in research that were on hospitalisation in 1995-2009. A frequency of all the complications has declined. Middle age of patients with the complicated ulcer enlarged: in case of an ulcerative bleeding--at the expense of reduction of a share of male at the age of 36-60 years, in case of a perforated ulcer--because of appreciable reduction of a percentage of male at the age of 21-35 years. PMID:22629752

  1. Hepatopulmonary Fistula: a life threatening complication of hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Gulamhussein, Mohamed Amirali; Patrini, Davide; Pararajasingham, Jonathan; Adams, Benjamin; Shukla, Rajeev; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Lawrence, David; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive infection control measures against parasitic diseases, hydatid disease, caused by Echinococcus granulosus, still occurs in a minor group of our population. If the infection is not treated adequately, it goes on to developing life-threatening complications, one of which is hepatopulmonary fistula. These complications usually warrant early surgical intervention, or else may lead to extensive sepsis and ultimately death. We discuss the case of an elderly female suffering from pulmonary hydatid disease, further complicated by a hepatopulmonary fistula and underwent surgical treatment. This case emphasises the importance of early recognition of pulmonary hydatid disease given its atypical nature of presentation before the disease is further exacerbated by this aggressive complication. Furthermore, it is imperative to incorporate radical surgery as the first-line treatment in established hepatopulmonary fistula, in order to prevent further clinical deterioration and curative outcome. PMID:26220789

  2. Surgical complications of amyloid disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, D. P.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Bouch, D. C.; Wood, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The case of a man with primary systemic amyloidosis without myelomatosis and long-term survival is described. The patient has had major surgical complications from large amyloid deposits in the colon, dorsal spine and peritoneal cavity. The patient remains well 14 years after diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3684836

  3. [Adult-onset Still's disease--a diagnostic challenge].

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Sine; Christensen, Birgitte Viebæk

    2011-10-17

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare systemic inflammatory illness. The condition is difficult to diagnose because the illness can resemble sepsis and other well known conditions. This case report concerns a 67 year-old woman with adult-onset Still's disease in two rare manifestations: acute respiratory distress syndrome and neurological manifestation in the form of Gullain Barré syndrome. PMID:22027169

  4. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  5. Coeliac disease: symptoms, complications and patient support.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Susan

    Coeliac disease is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine precipitated by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Simply defined as 'gluten-sensitive enteropathy', it is a lifelong disease, which, if untreated, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and management are important to minimise complications. PMID:20509383

  6. Ocular Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mady, Rana; Grover, Will; Butrus, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Though inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a specific predilection for the intestinal tract, it is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organs, including the eye. Ocular complications directly related to IBD are categorized as primary and secondary. Primary complications are usually temporally associated with IBD exacerbations and tend to resolve with systemic treatment of the intestinal inflammation. These include keratopathy, episcleritis, and scleritis. Secondary complications arise from primary complications. Examples include cataract formation due to treatment with corticosteroids, scleromalacia due to scleritis, and dry eye due to hypovitaminosis A following gut resection. Some ocular manifestations of IBD can lead to significant visual morbidity and temporally associated complications can also be a herald of disease control. Furthermore, ocular manifestations of IBD can occasionally manifest before the usual intestinal manifestations, leading to an earlier diagnosis. Thus, it is important to understand the clinical presentation of possible ocular manifestations in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to help prevent significant visual morbidity. PMID:25879056

  7. Still's disease associated with Coxsackie infection and haemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, D C; Moller, P W

    1985-01-01

    At the onset of Still's disease (systemic-onset juvenile arthritis) in a 12-year-old girl, serological evidence of Coxsackie B virus infection was found. Two weeks later she developed a haemophagocytic syndrome which was then treated with cytotoxic therapy. Her arthritis is still active six years later. PMID:2988465

  8. Neurologic complications of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is frequently associated with neurologic complications; cerebral embolism is the most common of these since thrombus formation results from the abnormalities in the valvular surfaces or from the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with valve dysfunction, such as atrial or ventricular enlargement, intracardiac thrombi, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Prosthetic heart valves, particularly mechanical valves, are very thrombogenic, which explains the high risk of thromboembolism and the need for anticoagulation for the prevention of embolism. Infective endocarditis is a disease process with protean manifestations that include not only cerebral embolism but also intracranial hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms, and systemic manifestations such as fever and encephalopathy. Other neurologic complications include nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, a process associated with systemic diseases such as cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus. For many of these conditions, anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment to prevent cerebral embolism, therefore it is the potential complications of anticoagulation that can explain other neurologic complications in patients with VHD. The prevention and management of these complications requires an understanding of their natural history in order to balance the risks posed by valvular disease itself against the risks and benefits associated with treatment. PMID:24365289

  9. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  10. [Tracheal intubation in a case of Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Carlot, A; Gallo, F; Alberti, A; Fongaro, A; Valenti, S

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the case of a patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (Still's disease) who underwent laparotomic hysterectomy under general anesthesia. Tracheal intubation was performed with the aid of a fibroscope, as recommended in the literature, given that impairment of the cervical spine and the temporo-mandibular joint made it extremely unlikely that direct laryngoscopy could be performed. The authors also report the methods recommended by other authors in order to guarantee a sufficiently deep anesthetic plane together with patency of the airways in patients suffering from Still's disease. PMID:7675258

  11. Adult-Onset Still's Disease: From Pathophysiology to Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mavragani, Clio P.; Spyridakis, Evangelos G.; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting primarily young individuals. The diagnosis is primarily clinical and necessitates the exclusion of a wide range of mimicking disorders. Given the lack of solid data in regard to the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms, treatment of AOSD has been for years largely empirical. Recent advances have revealed a pivotal role of several proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-18 (IL-18) in disease pathogenesis, giving rise to the development of new targeted therapies aiming at optimal disease control. PMID:22792508

  12. The Hyperferritinemic Syndrome: macrophage activation syndrome, Still’s disease, septic shock and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last few years, accumulating data have implicated a role for ferritin as a signaling molecule and direct mediator of the immune system. Hyperferritinemia is associated with a multitude of clinical conditions and with worse prognosis in critically ill patients. Discussion There are four uncommon medical conditions characterized by high levels of ferritin, namely the macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD), catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (cAPS) and septic shock, that share a similar clinical and laboratory features, and also respond to similar treatments, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Ferritin is known to be a pro-inflammatory mediator inducing expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, yet it has opposing actions as a pro-inflammatory and as an immunosuppressant. We propose that the exceptionally high ferritin levels observed in these uncommon clinical conditions are not just the product of the inflammation but rather may contribute to the development of a cytokine storm. Summary Here we review and compare four clinical conditions and the role of ferritin as an immunomodulator. We would like to propose including these four conditions under a common syndrome entity termed “Hyperferritinemic Syndrome”. PMID:23968282

  13. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  14. Gaucher disease: haematological presentations and complications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alison S; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, required for the degradation of glycosphingolipids. Clinical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, bone disease and a bleeding diathesis, frequently resulting in presentation to haematologists. Historically managed by splenectomy, transfusions and orthopaedic surgery, the development of specific therapy in the form of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy in the 1990s has resulted in dramatic improvements in haematological and visceral disease. Recognition of complications, including multiple myeloma and Parkinson disease, has challenged the traditional macrophage-centric view of the pathophysiology of this disorder. The pathways by which enzyme deficiency results in the clinical manifestations of this disorder are poorly understood; altered inflammatory cytokine profiles, bioactive sphingolipid derivatives and alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment have been implicated. Further elucidating these pathways will serve to advance our understanding not only of GD, but of associated disorders. PMID:24588457

  15. [Surgical therapy of complicated inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Ruf, G

    2005-10-26

    The etiology of chronic inflammatoric bowel disease is unknown, conservative treatment will be reduced to the management of immunologic and inflammatoric reaction. The large majority of patients affected with Crohn's disease and also nearly 50% of patients with ulcerous colitis require surgery during their clinical history. The indication for surgery is a balance between the severity and the complications of the disease and the potential disadvantages of surgery. For surgical therapy the differentiation of Crohn's disease and ulcerous colitis is essential because of the differentiated character of both diseases. In Crohn's disease surgical therapy will be performed by the management of Crohn's specific complications like stenosis, fistula, and abscess by bowel preserveration. Limited resection and/or strictureplasty do not influence morbidity and rate and also time of recurrence. Ulcerous colitis can be cured when the colorectal mucosa will be removed totally by radical surgery, i.e. restorative proctocolectomy. The satisfactory outcome in 70 to 90% of patients with a cumulative failure rate of 10 to 15% over a 10-year-period improves the quality of life. PMID:16276763

  16. [Special surgical complications in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kroesen, A J

    2015-04-01

    After colorectal and anorectal interventions for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, specific complications can occur.In Crohn's disease these complications mainly occur after proctocolectomy. Pelvic sepsis can be prevented by omentoplasty with fixation inside the pelvis. A persisting sepsis of the sacral cavity can be treated primarily by dissection of the anal sphincter which ensures better drainage. In cases of chronic sacral sepsis, transposition of the gracilis muscle is a further effective option. Early recurrence of a transsphincteric anal fistula should be treated by reinsertion of a silicon seton drainage.Complications after restorative proctocolectomy are frequent and manifold (35%). The main acute complications are anastomotic leakage and pelvic sepsis. Therapy consists of transperineal drainage of the abscess with simultaneous transanal drainage. Late complications due to technical and septic reasons are still a relevant problem even 36 years after introduction of this operative technique. A consistent approach with detailed diagnostic and surgical therapy results in a 75% rescue rate of ileoanal pouches. PMID:25693779

  17. Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common monogenetic disorder with high associated morbidity and mortality. The pulmonary complications of SCD are of particular importance, as acute chest syndrome and pulmonary hypertension have the highest associated mortality rates within this population. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of clinically significant pulmonary manifestations of SCD, including acute chest syndrome, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension in adult and pediatric patients. Clinicians should be vigilant in screening and treating such comorbidities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:22447965

  18. Celiac disease: how complicated can it get?

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2010-01-01

    In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. This association can be explained by the fact that gluten peptides can be presented in HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules on antigen presenting cells. Gluten-specific CD4+ T cells in the lamina propria respond to these peptides, and this likely enhances cytotoxicity of intraepithelial lymphocytes against the intestinal epithelium. We propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease, in which the efficiency of gluten presentation to CD4+ T cells determines the likelihood of developing celiac disease and its complications. Key factors that influence the efficiency of gluten presentation include: (1) the level of gluten intake, (2) the enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 which modifies gluten into high affinity binding peptides for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, (3) the HLA-DQ type, as HLA-DQ2 binds a wider range of gluten peptides than HLA-DQ8, (4) the gene dose of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and finally,(5) additional genetic polymorphisms that may influence T cell reactivity. This threshold model might also help to understand the development of refractory celiac disease and lymphoma. PMID:20661732

  19. Cardiovascular complications in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Schicho, Rudolf; Marsche, Gunther; Storr, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years, a growing number of studies have indicated that patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Both are chronic inflammatory diseases and share certain pathophysiological mechanisms that may influence each other. High levels of cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocysteine in IBD patients may lead to endothelial dysfunction, an early sign of atherosclerosis. IBD patients, in general, do not show the typical risk factors for cardiovascular disease but changes in lipid profiles similar to the ones seen in cardiovascular events have been reported recently. Higher levels of coagulation factors frequently occur in IBD which may predispose to arterial thromboembolic events. Finally, the gut itself may have an impact on atherogenesis during IBD through its microbiota. Microbial products are released from the inflamed mucosa into the circulation through a leaky barrier. The induced rise in proinflammatory cytokines could contribute to endothelial damage, artherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Although large retrospective studies favor a link between IBD and cardiovascular diseases the mechanisms behind still remain to be determined. PMID:25642719

  20. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Adult Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nataraja, Champa; Griffiths, Hedley

    2016-01-01

    Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD), an adult variant of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. The rarity of this disease is associated with low index of suspicion and delayed diagnosis in patients suffering from it and in the presence of atypical features the diagnosis can be further challenging. This is a case report on a 24-year-old woman, who was a diagnostic dilemma for 2 years due to the nonspecific symptoms of recurrent fever, generalized maculopapular persistent pruritic and tender rash, and polyarthralgia. She was initially diagnosed as leukocytoclastic vasculitis on a skin biopsy and was managed by a dermatologist with various medications including NSAIDs, hydroxychloroquine, dapsone, colchicine, cyclosporine, and high doses of oral steroids with minimal response. Subsequently, she has had multiple admissions with similar symptoms with raised inflammatory markers and negative septic workup. On one occasion, her iron study revealed hyperferritinaemia which led to the suspicion of AOSD. Once the rheumatic fever and infectious, malignant, autoimmune, and lymphoproliferative disorders were excluded, she was diagnosed as probable AOSD and managed successfully with IL-1 (interleukin-1) receptor antagonist, Anakinra, with remarkable and lasting response both clinically and biochemically. PMID:26981304

  1. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Adult Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nataraja, Champa; Griffiths, Hedley

    2016-01-01

    Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD), an adult variant of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. The rarity of this disease is associated with low index of suspicion and delayed diagnosis in patients suffering from it and in the presence of atypical features the diagnosis can be further challenging. This is a case report on a 24-year-old woman, who was a diagnostic dilemma for 2 years due to the nonspecific symptoms of recurrent fever, generalized maculopapular persistent pruritic and tender rash, and polyarthralgia. She was initially diagnosed as leukocytoclastic vasculitis on a skin biopsy and was managed by a dermatologist with various medications including NSAIDs, hydroxychloroquine, dapsone, colchicine, cyclosporine, and high doses of oral steroids with minimal response. Subsequently, she has had multiple admissions with similar symptoms with raised inflammatory markers and negative septic workup. On one occasion, her iron study revealed hyperferritinaemia which led to the suspicion of AOSD. Once the rheumatic fever and infectious, malignant, autoimmune, and lymphoproliferative disorders were excluded, she was diagnosed as probable AOSD and managed successfully with IL-1 (interleukin-1) receptor antagonist, Anakinra, with remarkable and lasting response both clinically and biochemically. PMID:26981304

  2. Q Fever: an old but still a poorly understood disease.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever. PMID:23213331

  3. Adamantiades-Behcet's disease-complicated gastroenteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Zhang, Xuan

    2012-01-01

    Adamantiades-Behcet’s disease (ABD) is a chronic, relapsing, systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. It is more prevalent in populations along the ancient Silk Road from Eastern Asia to the Mediterranean Basin, and most frequently affects young adults between the second and fourth decades of life. ABD-complicated gastroenteropathy is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with abdominal pain as the most common symptom. The ileocecal region is affected predominantly, with ulcerations that may lead to penetration and/or perforation, whereas other parts of the gastrointestinal system including the esophagus and stomach can also be affected. Endoscopy is useful to locate the site and extent of the lesions, and tissue biopsy is often warranted to examine the histopathology that is often suggestive of underlying vasculitis of small veins/venules or, alternatively in some cases, nonspecific inflammation. Bowel wall thickening is the most common finding on computed tomography scan. Treatment is largely empirical since well-controlled studies are difficult to conduct due to the heterogeneity of the disease, and the unpredictable course with exacerbation and remission. Corticosteroids with or without other immunosuppressive drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, sulfasalazine, tumor necrosis factor ? antagonist or thalidomide should be applied before surgery, except in emergency. PMID:22363131

  4. Neurologic complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Akila; Adams, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of genetic blood disorders that vary in severity, but the most severe forms, primarily homozygous sickle cell anemia, are associated with neurologic complications. Over the last 90 years it has become established that some patients will develop severe arterial disease of the intracranial brain arteries and suffer brain infarction. Smaller infarctions and brain atrophy may also be seen and over time there appear to be negative cognitive effects in some patients, with or without abnormal brain imaging. Focal mononeuropathies and pneumococcal meningitis are also more common in these patients. Brain infarction in children can largely be prevented screening children beginning at age 2 years and instituting regular blood transfusion when the Doppler indicates high stroke risk (>200cm/sec). Iron overload and the uncertain duration of transfusion are disadvantages but overall this approach, tested in a randomized clinical trial, reduced first stroke by over 90%. Secondary stroke prevention has not been subjected to a randomized controlled trial except for one recently stopped comparison of regular transfusions compared to hydroxuyrea (results favored transfusion). The usual stroke prevention agents (such as aspirin or warfarin) have not been rigorously tested. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography give evidence of subtle and sometimes overt brain injury due to stroke in many adults, but a preventive strategy for adults with SCD has not been developed. Bone marrow transplantation is the only cure, but some non-neurologic symptoms can be controlled in adults with hydroxuyrea. PMID:24365368

  5. Histological healing in inflammatory bowel disease: A still unfulfilled promise

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Geboes, Karel; Casella, Giovanni; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is traditionally based on several drugs, including salicylates, corticosteroids, and antibiotics; in addition, the therapeutic armamentarium has considerably evolved with the advent of newer, effective therapeutic measures (such as the biological agents) that are able to improve in a considerable manner both the clinical and endoscopic variables. Thus, mucosal healing, at least considered from an endoscopic point of view, is today regarded as the ultimate endpoint for treatment of these conditions. However, it is also increasingly clear that endoscopic healing is not necessarily paralleled by histological healing; There are few doubts that the latter should be considered as a true, objective healing and the ultimate goal to reach when treating patients with IBD. Unfortunately, and surprisingly, only a few, incomplete, and somewhat conflicting data exist on this topic, especially because there is still the need to standardize both histological assessment and the severity grading of these disorders; Issues that have not been yet been resolved for clinical practice and therapeutic trials. Hopefully, with the help of an increased awareness on the clinical researchers’ side, and the availability of dedicated pathologists on the other side, this matter will be effectively faced and resolved in the near future. PMID:23467585

  6. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26?women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4?±?14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n?=?8), mild leukopenia (n?=?3), myopathy (n?=?1), and infections (n?=?5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  7. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the risk of the development of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease. We searched electronic databases from their inception until February 2015. We included all cohort studies that reported the incidence of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease compared with women without celiac disease (ie, control group). Studies without a control group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was defined a priori and was the incidence of a composite of obstetric complications that included intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight, preeclampsia and preterm birth. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, preeclampsia, small for gestational age, and low birthweight. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015017263) before data extraction. All authors were contacted to obtain the original databases and perform individual participant data metaanalysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the aggregate data analysis and in the individual participant data metaanalysis. We included 10 cohort studies (4,844,555 women) in this metaanalysis. Four authors provided the entire databases for the individual participant data analysis. Because none of the included studies stratified data for the primary outcome (ie, composite outcome), the assessment of this outcome for the aggregate analysis was not feasible. Aggregate data analysis showed that, compared with women in the control group, women with celiac disease (both treated and untreated) had a significantly higher risk of the development of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.66), intrauterine growth restriction (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.67), stillbirth (odds ratio, 4.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-21.75), low birthweight (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.51), and small for gestational age (odds ratio, 4.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-20.08); no statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of preeclampsia (odds ratio, 2.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-6.70). The risk of preterm birth was still significantly higher both in the subgroup analysis of only women with diagnosed and treated celiac disease (odds ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.48) and in the subgroup analysis of only women with undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval; 1.06-5.87). Women with diagnosed and treated celiac disease had a significantly lower risk of the development of preterm birth, compared with undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.99). The individual participant data metaanalysis showed that women with celiac disease had a significantly higher risk of composite obstetric complications compared with control subjects (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.94). Our individual participant data concurs with the aggregate analysis for all the secondary outcomes. In summary, women with celiac disease had a significantly higher risk of the development of obstetric complications that included preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, low birthweight, and small for gestational age. Since the treatment with gluten-free diet leads to a significant decrease of preterm delivery, physicians should warn these women about the importance of a strict diet to improve obstetric outcomes. Future studies calculating cost-effectiveness of screening for celiac disease during pregnancy, which could be easily performed, economically and noninvasively, are needed. In addition, further studies are required to determine whether women with adverse pregnancy outcomes should be screened for celiac disease, particularly in countries where the prevalence is high. PMID:26432464

  8. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Most ... Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  9. [Prevention of complications of colonic diverticular disease in outpatient practice].

    PubMed

    Levchenko, S V; Komissarenko, I A; Lazebnik, L B

    2016-01-01

    The literature review gives an update on the frequency and risk factors of complications of colonic diverticular disease, the results of recent investigations, which suggest the success and safety of outpatient treatment for uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. It evaluates the efficacy of pharmacological agents from different groups in preventing complications of colonic diverticular disease. PMID:27014782

  10. Outcome measures in neuromuscular disease: is the world still flat?

    PubMed

    Lunn, Michael P; Van den Bergh, Peter Y K

    2015-09-01

    Valid, responsive, and meaningful outcome measures for the measurement of the impairment, activity limitations, and quality of life in patients with neuromuscular disease are crucial to identify the natural history of disease and benefits of therapy in clinical practice and trials. Although understanding of many aspects of neuromuscular diseases has advanced dramatically, the development of outcome measures has received less attention. The scales developed from Rasch theory by the PeriNomS Group represent the biggest significant shift in thought in neuromuscular outcome measures for decades. There remain problems with many of them, and further developments are required. However, incorporating them into our outcome sets for daily use and in clinical trials will lead to the more efficient capture of meaningful change and will result in better assessment of individuals and groups of patients in both clinical trials and neurological practice. PMID:26114965

  11. Adult-Onset Still's Disease Masquerading as Sepsis in an Asplenic Active Duty Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Jaqua, Nathan T.; Finger, David; Hawley, Joshua S.

    2012-01-01

    This is a case of a 26-year-old active duty male with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and surgical asplenia who presented with a one-week history of fevers, myalgias, arthralgias, and rigors. His evaluation upon presentation was significant for a temperature of 103 degrees F, white blood cell count of 36?K with a granulocytic predominance, and elevated transaminases. He was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics with concern for a systemic infection with an encapsulated organism. During his stay, he developed four SIRS criteria and was transferred to the progressive care unit for suspected sepsis. He continued to have twice-daily fevers and a faint, salmon-colored centripetal rash was eventually observed during his febrile episodes. After a nondiagnostic microbiologic and serologic workup, he was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's Disease and started on intravenous methylprednisolone with brisk response. He was discharged on oral prednisone and was started on anakinra. Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare condition that presents with varying severity, and this is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of its diagnosis in an asplenic patient. Its management in the setting of asplenia is complicated by the need for antibiotic therapy with each episode of fever. PMID:23251171

  12. A complicated disease: what can be done to manage thalassemia major more effectively?

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Baldan, Alessandro; Marsella, Maria; Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina

    2015-12-01

    Patients with thalassemia major suffer from many complications, but in the last two decades their lives have improved both in length and quality. We report herein the most common complications and the recent advances that have changed the course of this disease. Also, we report in detail some of the new therapeutic strategies already introduced in practice and briefly some that are still being developed. PMID:26470003

  13. Cardiac catheter complications related to left main stem disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, J. D.; de Bono, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac catheter complications related to left main coronary artery disease or damage using the CECCC (Confidential Enquiry into Cardiac Catheter Complications) database. SETTING: Coordinating centre for national database. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of reports to a national multicentre database for cardiac catheter complications. Complications involving the left main coronary artery were flagged at entry. Where necessary additional information was sought from participating centres. 112,921 procedures were registered, 12,849 of which were coronary angioplasties and the remainder diagnostic studies. RESULTS: The total number of cases for which complications were recorded was 993 (0.88%). In 61 (6.14%) of the 993 cases complications were associated with left main coronary disease or damage. In 57 (93%) of these 61 cases complications were major, necessitating resuscitation or immediate coronary bypass grafting. Ten patients (16%) died in the catheter laboratory, a further 9 (15%) within 24 hours, and a total of 23 patients (38%) died within one month of the procedure. Left main stem related complications account for 17% of total mortality in the CECCC database. Urgent coronary bypass grafting was attempted in 42 patients, of whom 31 were alive at one month. In all of the six reported PTCA-related complications the cause was traumatic damage to the left main coronary artery. Operators of all grades of seniority experienced complications in similar proportions. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of a complication relating to the left main stem is relatively low, but when such complications occur they tend to be life-threatening and contribute a fifth of total catheter-related mortality. In the absence of a widely available non-invasive investigation with good predictive value for left main stem disease, the best safeguard is careful technique. Patients who do develop complications should have emergency coronary bypass grafting. PMID:8774333

  14. Management of a Pregnancy Complicated by Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weida, Jennifer; Hainline, B. E.; Bodkin, C.; Williams, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background. As more women with metabolic muscle diseases reach reproductive age, knowledge of these diseases and their impact on pregnancy is necessary. Case. 23-year-old G1P0 with juvenile-onset Pompe disease (PD) delivered a viable infant by cesarean section at 32 weeks and 6 days. The pregnancy was complicated by worsening maternal pulmonary status, muscular strength, and mobility. Conclusion. The management of pregnancies complicated by Pompe disease requires a multidisciplinary approach, including expertise in neuromuscular disease, maternal-fetal medicine, biochemical genetics, pulmonology, anesthesia, and dietetics. PMID:23304582

  15. Anorectal Complications During Neutropenic Period in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Korur, Aslı; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Asma, Süheyl; Büyükkurt, Nurhilal; Kasar, Mutlu; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoğlu, İlknur; Boğa, Can; Ozdoğu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutropenic patients are susceptible to any anorectal disease, and symptomatic anorectal disease afflicts 2–32% of oncology patients. Perianal infections are the most feared complication, considering the lack of natural defense against infectious microorganisms. When septic complications develop, the anorectal disease is potentially fatal, especially in neutropenic patients in whom mortality rates range between 11–57%. Although anorectal diseases are a frequent complication with potentially fatal outcomes among patients with hematologic diseases, sufficient data are not available in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anorectal complications developing during the neutropenic period in patients with hematologic diseases. Methods A total of 79 patients whose neutropenic period (absolute neutrophil count <500/mcL) continued for 7 days, or longer were included in the study. Results A total of 34 patients out of 79 (43%) were detected to develop anorectal complications, of them 6 (7.6%) developed an anorectal infection. The patients were characterized according to the hematological disease and its status (active or not), the type of treatment and the presence of a history of an anorectal pathology before the onset of the hematologic disease. Nineteen (24.1%) patients had the history of anorectal disturbances before diagnosis of the hematologic disease, and recurrence of an anorectal pathology was found in 14 out of 19 patients(73.7%). In addition, the overall mortality rate was higher among the patients who developed anorectal complications compared to another group (41.2% vs. 22.2%, p=0.059). Conclusion Anorectal pathology is a common complication with high recurrence rate in neutropenic patients. Perianal infections are important as they can cause life-threatening outcomes although they are relatively rare among all anorectal complications. Therefore perianal signs and symptoms should be meticulously evaluated concerning early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26977278

  16. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician's tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients' education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections. PMID:25110408

  17. Treatment- and Disease-Related Complications of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Anne R

    2006-01-01

    One of the highlights of the 16th International Prostate Cancer Update was a session on treatment- and disease-related complications of prostate disease. It began with presentation of a challenging case of rising prostate-specific antigen levels after radical prostatectomy, followed by an overview of the use of zoledronic acid in prostate cancer, a review of side effects of complementary medicines, an overview of complications of cryotherapy, an assessment of complications of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy, and a comparison of laparoscopy versus open prostatectomy. PMID:17021643

  18. Mycobacterial Lung Disease Complicating HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michelle K; Daley, Charles L

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterial infections have caused enormous morbidity and mortality in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Of these, the most devastating has been tuberculosis (TB), the leading cause of death among HIV-positive persons globally. TB has killed more people living with HIV than any other infection. Diagnosis of latent TB infection (LTBI) is critical as treatment can prevent emergence of TB disease. Bacteriologic confirmation of TB disease should be sought whenever possible as well as drug susceptibility testing. When detected early, drug susceptible TB is curable. Similar to TB, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can also produce pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections including disseminated disease that can be fatal. Diagnosis through accurate identification of the pathogenic organism will greatly inform treatment. Depending on the NTM identified, treatment may not be curable. Ultimately, preventive strategies such as initiation of antiretroviral drugs and treatment of LTBI are interventions expected to have significant impacts on control of TB and NTM in the setting of HIV. This chapter will review the impact of pulmonary mycobacterial infections on HIV-positive individuals. PMID:26974300

  19. A patient with adult Still's disease with an increased Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody titer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Ling, Motofumi; Ochi, Masaru; Watanabe, Keitarou

    2002-09-01

    Adult Still's disease is an important differential diagnosis of pyretic disease and it does not necessarily appear to be a distinct disease entity. The etiology of adult Still's disease is not yet known. However, it has been considered that adult Still's disease may be triggered by certain infections, such as the Coxsackie, parvo B19, rubella, mumps, Epstein-Barr, and cytomegalo virus, as well as mycoplasma, toxoplasma, and so on. Recently, we experienced a patient with adult Still's disease with an increased Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody titer. The titer decreased slowly after the beginning of steroid therapy, associated with improvement of clinical symptoms. In this report we mention the relationship between the pathogenesis of adult Still's disease and a high titer of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody. PMID:12373492

  20. Bartonella endocarditis complicating congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Nawwar; Ruimy, Raymond; Baron, Franck; Hvass, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    The present report describes a case of Bartonella henselae endocarditis affecting an adolescent with congenital heart disease. A teenager from Eastern Europe was referred to for surgical treatment of aortic endocarditis. She admitted close contact with cats. Blood culture was negative. Diagnosis of B henselae was established on direct PCR amplification and 16SrRNA gene sequencing of the aortic valve tissue and confirmed after 4 weeks by valve culture isolate. The patient underwent extended root replacement (the Ross–Konno operation) with a favourable outcome. PMID:21686936

  1. Complications of treatment of Hodgkin's disease in children

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, S.S.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1982-04-01

    An analysis of complications of therapy requires long-term and frequent followup. Reported here is a review of 179 consecutive children with Hodgkin's disease from Stanford University Medical Center who were seen, treated, and followed over a 20-year period. Complications of treatment are related to the extent of disease and the aggressiveness of therapy. Severe complications from radiotherapy are associated with high-dose, extended-field treatment in preadolescent children. Severe chemotherapy-associated complications include immunosuppression, sterility, and secondary oncogenesis. As cure rates are increasingly optimistic among children with Hodgkin's disease, successful treatment with minimal morbidity remains our greatest challenge. Therapy programs require continual refinement utilizing assessment of short- and long-term side effects of treatment.

  2. Hematological manifestations and complications of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a multisystemic metabolic disorder due to a genetic deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation within the lysosomes of macrophages of its natural substrate, glucosylceramide and its deacylated product glucosylsphingosine. The most prevalent form of the disease is the so-called non-neuronopathic form (type 1) characterized by anemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities. Etiology of anemia and thrombocytopenia may be multifactorial and not necessarily predicted by the degree of splenomegaly. Bleeding diathesis may not always be related to absolute platelet count but may be influenced by abnormal platelet function or coagulation factor deficiencies. A significant increased risk of severe hematological co-morbidities, including multiple myeloma and B-cell lymphoma, has been reported. Accumulation of glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosyne in macrophages and the resulting chronic inflammation with the secretion of cytokines leading to polyclonal and monoclonal B cell proliferation up to multiple myeloma, as a continuum clonal expansion, is a key pathophysiological mechanism. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucosylceramide storage burden and the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation, including hematological manifestations. PMID:26565753

  3. [Natural history, complications, safety and pregnancy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Chaparro, María

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies were presented in Digestive Disease Week 2015 (DDW 2015) on the natural history, complications, and safety of treatments in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as novel findings on fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. The present article reviews presentations on the natural history of IBD, the risk of complications and their prevention, treatment safety, aspects related to fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding, as well as the risk of cancer and its association with IBD and with drugs used in its treatment. In the next few years, more data will become available on treatment safety and the possible complications that can develop in IBD patients due to the disease itself and the drugs employed in its treatment, which will allow measures to be adopted to improve prognosis. PMID:26520193

  4. [Bone complications in chronic liver disease(hepatic osteodystrophy)].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hisanori

    2015-11-01

    Bone complication occurs in patients with alcoholic hepatitis, chronic hepatitis C, primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC)or post liver transplant. Prevalence of osteoporosis and fracture risk is high in these diseases. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD)and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH)is increasing in prevalence. Relation of NAFLD/NASH with osteoporosis, however, is not well known, and further investigation is needed. PMID:26503865

  5. Chronic suppurative otitis media: complicated versus uncomplicated disease.

    PubMed

    Rupa, V; Raman, R

    1991-01-01

    To determine prognostic factors in patients with chronic otitis media who develop suppurative complications, we performed a retrospective study of all patients with chronic suppurative otitis media who underwent mastoid surgery between the years 1981 and 1989. Patients who developed complications were compared with those who did not with respect to six prognostic variables. The results indicated that patients with complications were younger (p less than 0.001), had shorter duration of ear discharge (p less than 0.001), were more likely to have pars tensa perforations (p less than 0.05), and had a higher degree of mastoid sclerosis in the operated and contralateral ears (p less than 0.001). The presence of cholesteatoma and the sex of the patient were of no prognostic value. Bacteriology of CSF and pus specimens from patients who developed intracranial complications mostly revealed mixed flora (62.9%). Proteus species was the most frequent isolate (34%) and anaerobes were present in 21.3% of specimens. Mastoid abscess occurred in more than half the patients in the complicated group. Brain abscess (57.4%) was the most frequent intracranial complication. On the basis of our findings we recommend that risk factors in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media be identified early to enable effective measures to be taken to eradicate the disease. PMID:1887779

  6. Complications of Cardiac Catheterization in Structural Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ko Eun; Seo, Yeon Jeong; An, Hyo Soon; Song, Young Hwan; Kwon, Bo Sang; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cardiac catheterization is used to diagnose structural heart disease (SHD) and perform transcatheter treatment. This study aimed to evaluate complications of cardiac catheterization and the associated risk factors in a tertiary center over 10 years. Subjects and Methods Total 2071 cardiac catheterizations performed at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital from January 2004 to December 2013 were included in this retrospective study. Results The overall complication, severe complication, and mortality rates were 16.2%, 1.15%, and 0.19%, respectively. The factors that significantly increased the risk of overall and severe complications were anticoagulant use before procedure (odds ratio [OR] 1.83, p=0.012 and OR 6.45, p<0.001, respectively), prothrombin time (OR 2.30, p<0.001 and OR 5.99, p<0.001, respectively), general anesthesia use during procedure (OR 1.84, p=0.014 and OR 5.31, p=0.015, respectively), and total procedure time (OR 1.01, p<0.001 and OR 1.02, p<0.001, respectively). Low body weight (OR 0.99, p=0.003), severe SHD (OR 1.37, p=0.012), repetitive procedures (OR 1.7, p=0.009), and total fluoroscopy time (OR 1.01, p=0.005) significantly increased the overall complication risk. High activated partial thromboplastin time (OR 1.04, p=0.001), intensive care unit admission state (OR 14.03, p<0.001), and concomitant electrophysiological study during procedure (OR 3.41, p=0.016) significantly increased severe complication risk. Conclusion Currently, the use of cardiac catheterization in SHD is increasing and becoming more complex; this could cause complications despite the preventive efforts. Careful patient selection for therapeutic catheterization and improved technique and management during the peri-procedural period are required to reduce complications. PMID:27014356

  7. Vasculature and Kidney Complications in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Katusic, Zvonimir S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell disease include the concept of a vasculopathic state and the classification of sickle cell disease into a hemolysis-endothelial dysfunction phenotype or a viscosity-vasoocclusion phenotype. The hemolysis-endothelial dysfunction phenotype largely reflects deficiency of or resistance to nitric oxide. In addition to discussing these areas, we suggest that the hemolysis-endothelial dysfunction phenotype also reflects the instability of sickle hemoglobin, the release of heme, and the induction of heme oxygenase-1. From these perspectives the renal complications of sickle cell disease are discussed and classified. PMID:22440903

  8. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  9. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Case Report with a Rare Clinical Manifestation and Pathophysiological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Katerina M.; Margaritopoulos, George A.; Giannarakis, Ioannis; Choulaki, Christianna; Fountoulakis, Nikos; Siafakas, Nikos M.; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is an inflammatory multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Pleuritis is the most common pulmonary manifestation and pleural effusions are usually exudates with a predominance of neutrophils. We report a case of an eosinophilic pleural effusion as a novel and hitherto unrecognized manifestation of active adult-onset Still's disease. We also observed a marked NLRP3 inflammasome activation with increased production of IL-1? which coincided with the development and resolved upon remission of the pleural effusion suggesting a possible novel pathogenetic pathway for the development of pleural effusions in the context of the auto-inflammatory disorders. PMID:23424598

  10. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Case Report with a Rare Clinical Manifestation and Pathophysiological Correlations.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Katerina M; Margaritopoulos, George A; Giannarakis, Ioannis; Choulaki, Christianna; Fountoulakis, Nikos; Siafakas, Nikos M; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is an inflammatory multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Pleuritis is the most common pulmonary manifestation and pleural effusions are usually exudates with a predominance of neutrophils. We report a case of an eosinophilic pleural effusion as a novel and hitherto unrecognized manifestation of active adult-onset Still's disease. We also observed a marked NLRP3 inflammasome activation with increased production of IL-1? which coincided with the development and resolved upon remission of the pleural effusion suggesting a possible novel pathogenetic pathway for the development of pleural effusions in the context of the auto-inflammatory disorders. PMID:23424598

  11. Efficacy and Complications of Surgery for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Crohn's disease commonly undergo surgery during their lifetime. Indications for surgical intervention include obstruction, intra-abdominal or perianal abscess, enterocutaneous fistulas, and complex perianal disease. As medical therapies continue to improve, it is important that surgical therapies are chosen carefully. This is particularly important in the treatment of perianal fistulas; combined surgical and medical therapy offer the best chance for success. In the treatment of small-bowel disease, bowel preservation is key. For the repair of short strictures, endoscopic dilatation is the preferred method when accessible; strictureplasty has been shown to be safe and effective for increasingly longer segments of disease. Intra-abdominal abscesses should be drained percutaneously, if possible. In the presence of colonic disease, segmental resection is recommended. Unfortunately, refractory disease still frequently requires complete proctectomy and permanent diversion. PMID:21088749

  12. Melioidosis mycotic aneurysm: An uncommon complication of an uncommon disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Philip H.; Chau, Chi Hung; Wong, Poon Chuen

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is often considered an exotic and uncommon disease in most parts of the world. However it is an endemic disease in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia with an expanding distribution. Melioidosis can involve almost any organ and can deteriorate rapidly. In this report, we describe a rapidly fatal case of a mycotic aneurysm associated with melioidosis despite aggressive antibiotic therapy. The morbidity and mortality of this uncommon complication remains high despite prompt diagnosis and treatment. Especially when treating persistent/recurrent melioidosis, the physician's caution to the development of mycotic aneurysms is imperative so that early treatment and surgical intervention may be considered. PMID:26029577

  13. The end of the BSE saga: do we still need surveillance for human prion diseases?

    PubMed

    Budka, Herbert; Will, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The epidemics of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) related to BSE-infected food are coming to an end. The decline in concern about these diseases may invite complacency and questions whether surveillance for human prion diseases is still necessary. This article reviews the main points of surveillance and why it is still needed: animal sources for human prion infection other than BSE cannot be excluded; the potentially increasing circulation of prions between humans by blood, blood products and medical procedures; the prevalence of vCJD prion carriers in the UK; and the scientific study of prion diseases as paradigm for other neurodegenerative diseases with "prion-like" spread of pathological proteins. We conclude that continuation of detailed surveillance of human prion disorders would be prudent in view of all these points that deserve clarification. PMID:26715203

  14. Complications of chronic renal insufficiency: beyond cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zabetakis, P M; Nissenson, A R

    2000-12-01

    The less rigorous attention to the management of the complications of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) and its comorbid conditions has potentially tragic consequences. In fact, with early recognition and intervention, many of the complications of CRI and its comorbid conditions can be ameliorated or prevented. We review here the most prevalent, troublesome, and potentially preventable complications and comorbidities of CRI with a view toward developing high-quality, cost-effective strategies for delivering early interventional care. Complications of CRI include malnutrition, anemia, disorders of divalent ion metabolism and osteodystrophy, metabolic acidosis, and dyslipidemia. Important comorbid conditions of CRI are hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. Clinical intuition suggests that early intervention will avert morbidity related to the hypoalbuminemia and other nutritional disorders of CRI, the metabolic acidosis, and the dyslipidemias, but prospective data are lacking at present. Correction of anemia, usually with recombinant human erythropoietin, may be key to the prevention of cardiac disease and other comorbidities of CRI. Incipient disorders of bone and mineral metabolism are managed prospectively using such measures as protein restriction to reduce phosphorus intake, phosphate binders, calcium supplementation, and vitamin D analogues. Hypertension, whatever its original etiology, is clearly an important risk factor for the progression of kidney failure and for the development of diffuse vascular disease; appropriate and aggressive treatment is essential. In patients with diabetic nephropathy, the principles of both primary and secondary prevention have been validated in several large trials of glycemic and blood pressure control. The seeds of these insidious, challenging, and costly comorbid conditions are sown very early in CRI, at a time when they are-in theory-most amenable to intervention. We therefore must be as proactive as possible in the timely implementation of relatively simple therapies that have the potential to prevent some of these adverse outcomes of CRI. PMID:11118156

  15. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1?year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  16. [Infectious complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Pirson, Yves; Kanaan, Nada

    2015-04-01

    Despite advances in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease over the past two decades, infection of liver and kidney cysts remains a serious and potentially threatening complication. Kidney cyst infection is the most frequent complication. It is differentiated from hemorrhage by the clinical presentation (mainly the severity and duration of fever), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cells levels, and the density of the suspected cyst on computed tomography. Liver cyst infection occurs more frequently in patients with large cysts volumes. It can be life threatening and has a tendency to recur. In both infections, the best radiological imaging technique is positron emission tomography after intravenous injection of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography. Treatment with a fluoroquinolone should be continued for 6 weeks. Cyst aspiration is necessary only when cysts are very large and/or when infection is resistant to antibiotic treatment. In patients who are candidates to kidney transplantation, a history of recurrent kidney cyst infection justifies pre-transplant nephrectomy, while a past history of recurrent liver cyst infection or angiocholitis leads to consider liver transplantation. Among extrarenal and extrahepatic complications of polycystic disease, colic diverticulosis is reported to be associated with increased risk of infection in patients on hemodialysis and after kidney transplantation. However, this observation needs to be confirmed. PMID:25733396

  17. Supratentorial Ependymoma: Disease Control, Complications, and Functional Outcomes After Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Efrat; Boop, Frederick A.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Ependymoma is less commonly found in the supratentorial brain and has known clinical and molecular features that are unique. Our single-institution series provides valuable information about disease control for supratentorial ependymoma and the complications of supratentorial irradiation in children. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 children with newly diagnosed supratentorial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT); conformal methods were used in 36 after 1996. The median age at RT was 6.5 years (range, 1-18.9 years). The entire group was characterized according to sex (girls 27), race (white 43), extent of resection (gross-total 46), and tumor grade (anaplastic 28). The conformal RT group was prospectively evaluated for neurologic, endocrine, and cognitive effects. Results: With a median follow-up time of 9.1 years from the start of RT for survivors (range, 0.2-23.2 years), the 10-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% + 7% and 76% + 6%, respectively. None of the evaluated factors was prognostic for disease control. Local and distant failures were evenly divided among the 16 patients who experienced progression. Eleven patients died of disease, and 1 of central nervous system necrosis. Seizure disorders were present in 17 patients, and 4 were considered to be clinically disabled. Clinically significant cognitive effects were limited to children with difficult-to-control seizures. The average values for intelligence quotient and academic achievement (reading, spelling, and math) were within the range of normal through 10 years of follow-up. Central hypothyroidism was the most commonly treated endocrinopathy. Conclusion: RT may be administered with acceptable risks for complications in children with supratentorial ependymoma. These results suggest that outcomes for these children are improving and that complications may be limited by use of focal irradiation methods.

  18. Supratentorial Ependymoma: Disease Control, Complications and Functional Outcomes after Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Efrat; Boop, Frederick A.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ependymoma is less commonly found in the supratentorial brain and has known clinical and molecular features that are unique. Our single institution series provides valuable information about disease control for supratentorial ependymoma and the complications of supratentorial irradiation in children. Methods and Materials A total of 50 children with newly diagnosed supratentorial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT); 36 were using conformal methods after 1996. The median age at RT was 6.5 years (range, 1–18.9). The entire group was characterized according to sex (girls = 27), race (Caucasian = 43), extent of resection (gross-total = 46), and tumor grade (anaplastic = 28). The conformal RT group was prospectively evaluated for neurological, endocrine and cognitive effects. Results With a median follow-up of 9.1 years from the start of RT for survivors (range 0.2–23.2), the 10-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% + 7% and 76% + 6%, respectively. None of the evaluated factors was prognostic for disease control. Local and distant failures were evenly divided among the 16 patients who experienced progression. Eleven patients died from disease and one from CNS necrosis. Seizure disorders were present in 17 patients and 4 were considered to be clinically disabled. Clinically significant cognitive effects were limited to children with difficult to control seizures. Average values for IQ and academic achievement (reading, spelling, and math) were within the range of normal through 10 years of follow-up. Central hypothyroidism was the most commonly treated endocrinopathy. Conclusion RT may be administered with acceptable risks for complications in children with supratentorial ependymoma. These results suggest that outcomes for these children are improving and that complications may be limited by use of focal irradiation methods. PMID:23245280

  19. Central nervous system complications and management in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Kirkham, Fenella J

    2016-02-18

    With advances in brain imaging and completion of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for primary and secondary stroke prevention, the natural history of central nervous system (CNS) complications in sickle cell disease (SCD) is evolving. In order of current prevalence, the primary CNS complications include silent cerebral infarcts (39% by 18 years), headache (both acute and chronic: 36% in children with sickle cell anemia [SCA]), ischemic stroke (as low as 1% in children with SCA with effective screening and prophylaxis, but ?11% in children with SCA without screening), and hemorrhagic stroke in children and adults with SCA (3% and 10%, respectively). In high-income countries, RCTs (Stroke Prevention in Sickle Cell Anemia [STOP], STOP II) have demonstrated that regular blood transfusion therapy (typically monthly) achieves primary stroke prevention in children with SCA and high transcranial Doppler (TCD) velocities; after at least a year, hydroxycarbamide may be substituted (TCD With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea [TWiTCH]). Also in high-income countries, RCTs have demonstrated that regular blood transfusion is the optimal current therapy for secondary prevention of infarcts for children with SCA and strokes (Stroke With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea [SWiTCH]) or silent cerebral infarcts (Silent Infarct Transfusion [SIT] Trial). For adults with SCD, CNS complications continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality, with no evidence-based strategy for prevention. PMID:26758917

  20. Complications in the management of metastatic spinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Eilis Catherine; Butler, Joseph Simon; Morris, Seamus

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic spine disease accounts for 10% to 30% of new cancer diagnoses annually. The most frequent presentation is axial spinal pain. No treatment has been proven to increase the life expectancy of patients with spinal metastasis. The goals of therapy are pain control and functional preservation. The most important prognostic indicator for spinal metastases is the initial functional score. Treatment is multidisciplinary, and virtually all treatment is palliative. Management is guided by three key issues; neurologic compromise, spinal instability, and individual patient factors. Site-directed radiation, with or without chemotherapy is the most commonly used treatment modality for those patients presenting with spinal pain, causative by tumours which are not impinging on neural elements. Operative intervention has, until recently been advocated for establishing a tissue diagnosis, mechanical stabilization and for reduction of tumor burden but not for a curative approach. It is treatment of choice patients with diseaseadvancement despite radiotherapy and in those with known radiotherapy-resistant tumors. Vertebral resection and anterior stabilization with methacrylate or hardware (e.g., cages) has been advocated.Surgical decompression and stabilization, however, along with radiotherapy, may provide the most promising treatment. It stabilizes the metastatic deposited areaand allows ambulation with pain relief. In general, patients who are nonambulatory at diagnosis do poorly, as do patients in whom more than one vertebra is involved. Surgical intervention is indicated in patients with radiation-resistant tumors, spinal instability, spinal compression with bone or disk fragments, progressive neurologic deterioration, previous radiation exposure, and uncertain diagnosis that requires tissue diagnosis. The main goal in the management of spinal metastatic deposits is always palliative rather than curative, with the primary aim being pain relief and improved mobility. This however, does not come without complications, regardless of the surgical intervention technique used. These complication range from the general surgical complications of bleeding, infection, damage to surrounding structures and post operative DT/PE to spinal specific complications of persistent neurologic deficit and paralysis. PMID:22919567

  1. Cocket syndrome: thrombotic-septic disease post-appendicectomy complication.

    PubMed

    Luque Mialdea, R; Diez, R; Casanova, A; Guglieri, C; Cerda, J; Diez Delgado, J; Concejo, J; Delgado, J; Aguilar, F

    1995-02-01

    The incidence of complications following treatment of acute appendicitis in childhood is lower than 5%, while thromboembolic disease at that age is exceptional. The case of a 13-year-old male who was operated on in our pediatric surgery department for acute gangrenous appendicitis is presented. His condition improved until the sixth day after the operation when he suffered thrombosis in both the left iliac vein and the inferior cava. Ultrasonography, plethysmography and computer tomography (CT) studies were carried out and a diagnosis of venous thrombosis was made with an underlying congenital vascular malformation where the iliac vein was compressed by the overlying iliac artery; known as the Cocket syndrome. The etiology diagnosis and treatment of this rare disease in childhood is reviewed. PMID:7756239

  2. Diagnosis and management of bile stone disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Anneline; Arvanitakis, Marianna

    2016-03-01

    Bile stone disease is one of the most prevalent gastroenterological diseases with a considerable geographical and ethnic variation. Bile stones can be classified according their origin, their localization and their biochemical structure. Development and clinical expression depend on a complex interaction between congenital and acquired risk factors. Indeed, bile stones can be either asymptomatic, or cause biliary colic or complications such as acute cholecystitis, jaundice, cholangitis and acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features, laboratory findings and imaging techniques and correct identification of symptomatic gallstone patients is essential before cholecystectomy. Transabdominal ultrasonography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of gallstones. However, endoscopic ultrasonography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and intraoperative cholangiography may also play a role in the diagnosis of bile stones. Management includes prevention measures against modifiable risk factors. Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are common indications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, while endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stone extraction is the gold standard for the treatment of common bile duct (CBD) stones. Timing of ERCP and cholecystectomy are of critical importance in the management. Lithotripsy modalities are generally reserved for patients with technically difficult CBD stone removal. Percutaneous access combined with lithotripsy may be helpful for complicated intrahepatic stones. PMID:26771377

  3. Neurologic Complications of HIV Disease and Their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Scott L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Everall, Ivan; Ances, Beau; Bharti, Ajay; McCutchan, J. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Substantial work on the peripheral and central nervous system complications of HIV was presented at the 16th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Six studies of more than 4500 volunteers identified that distal sensory polyneuropathy remains common, ranging from 19% to 66%, with variation based on disease stage, type of antiretroviral therapy, age, and height. Eight studies of more than 2500 volunteers identified that neurocognitive disorders are also common, ranging from 25% to 69%, with variation based on stage of disease, antiretroviral use, diabetes mellitus, and coinfection with hepatitis viruses. Therapy-focused studies identified that resistance testing of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-derived HIV may improve management of people with HIV-associated neurologic complications, that poorly penetrating antiretroviral therapy is associated with persistent low-level HIV RNA in CSF, and that efavirenz concentrations in CSF are low but in the therapeutic range in most individuals. Neuroimaging reports identified that people living with HIV had abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging (gray matter atrophy, abnormal white matter), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (lower neuronal metabolites), and blood-oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (lower cerebral blood flow). Other important findings on the basic neuroscience of HIV and diagnosis and management of neurologic opportunistic infections are discussed. PMID:19401607

  4. Complete staghorn calculus in polycystic kidney disease: infection is still the cause

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney stones in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are common, regarded as the consequence of the combination of anatomic abnormality and metabolic risk factors. However, complete staghorn calculus is rare in polycystic kidney disease and predicts a gloomy prognosis of kidney. For general population, recent data showed metabolic factors were the dominant causes for staghorn calculus, but for polycystic kidney disease patients, the cause for staghorn calculus remained elusive. Case presentation We report a case of complete staghorm calculus in a polycystic kidney disease patient induced by repeatedly urinary tract infections. This 37-year-old autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease female with positive family history was admitted in this hospital for repeatedly upper urinary tract infection for 3 years. CT scan revealed the existence of a complete staghorn calculus in her right kidney, while there was no kidney stone 3 years before, and the urinary stone component analysis showed the composition of calculus was magnesium ammonium phosphate. Conclusion UTI is an important complication for polycystic kidney disease and will facilitate the formation of staghorn calculi. As staghorn calculi are associated with kidney fibrosis and high long-term renal deterioration rate, prompt control of urinary tract infection in polycystic kidney disease patient will be beneficial in preventing staghorn calculus formation. PMID:24070202

  5. Inflammatory bowel diseases: A disease (s) of modern times? Is incidence still increasing?

    PubMed Central

    Gismera, Cristina Saro; Aladrén, Beatriz Sicilia

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are a heterogeneous group of diseases, not always easy to diagnose, even more difficult to classify, and diagnostic criteria are not always uniform. Well done population-based studies are not abundant, and so comparisons among different geographical areas or populations are not always very reliable. In this article, we have reviewed epidemiological studies available on the world’s population while making a critical review of published data. PMID:18810764

  6. Meniere’s disease: Still a mystery disease with difficult differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliou, A.; Vlastarakos, P. V.; Maragoudakis, P.; Candiloros, D.; Nikolopoulos, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six years after its first description, the differential diagnosis of Meniere’s disease remains very challenging. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the new diagnostic methods for Meniere’s disease. The importance of accurate diagnosis for primary healthcare systems is also discussed. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline and other available database sources. Information from electronic links and related books were also included. Controlled clinical studies, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, written guidelines, systematic reviews, and books were selected. The typical clinical triad of symptoms from the vestibular and cochlear systems (recurrent vertigo, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) is usually the key for clinical diagnosis. Glycerol dehydration test and electrocochleography are the main diagnostic tests in current practice, while vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may be used in disease staging. Imagine techniques are not specific enough to set alone the diagnosis of Meniere’s disease, although they may be necessary to exclude other pathologies. Recently developed 3D MRI protocols can delineate the perilymphatic/endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear and aid diagnosis. Meniere’s disease is a continuous problem for the patients and affects their quality of life. Taking into account the frequent nature of the disease in certain countries, efforts for reliable diagnosis, prompt referral, and successful management are undoubtedly cost-effective for healthcare systems. PMID:21633608

  7. Successful tocilizumab therapy in seven patients with refractory adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Bannai, Ei; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Shunta; Ueda, Yo; Ozaki, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Takahashi, Yuko; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kano, Toshikazu; Mimori, Akio

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of tocilizumab (TCZ) on adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), we reviewed medical records of seven patients with refractory AOSD treated with TCZ at our institution. TCZ therapy might allow rapid corticosteroid tapering and help maintain remission status, that is, resolution of clinical symptoms and normalization of biomarkers such as CRP and ferritin. Patients, however, should be monitored for the development of macrophage activation syndrome when TCZ is administered for active AOSD. PMID:24697199

  8. The role of statin treatment in valvular heart disease: is the jury still out?

    PubMed

    Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Mateescu, Anca D; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Ginghină, Carmen; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Cosyns, Bernard; Popescu, Bogdan A

    2013-08-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) represents a significant burden within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, there has been a great interest in finding medical treatments able to slow the progression ofVHD. The negative results of several large randomized trials failing to demonstrate a benefit of such therapies, has led to a decrease of interest in this field. However, finding a medical treatment capable of preventing VHD progression is still a hot topic, due to the important clinical implications. We believe that the jury is still out on the debate about the role of statin therapy in VHD, considering also recently published studies providing new information with future implications for the treatment of this disease process. This article gives an overview of the published evidence about the role of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitors on delaying progressive valve dysfunction. A preventive therapy, which could influence not only the haemodynamic progression of valve disease, but also the cardiovascular outcome, is warranted. Large, prospective, randomized trials are needed to properly evaluate the role of statins in the early stages of valvular heart disease. PMID:24187767

  9. Laparoscopic treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Ronald; Barouki, Elie; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of acute colonic diverticulitis may necessitate a surgical intervention. Although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, Hartmann’s procedure (HP) has been considered for many years to be the gold standard for the treatment of generalized peritonitis. To reduce the burden of surgery in these situations and as driven by the accumulated experience in colorectal and minimally-invasive surgery, laparoscopy has been increasingly adopted in the management of abdominal emergencies. Multiple case series and retrospective comparative studies confirmed that with experienced hands, the laparoscopic approach provided better outcomes than the open surgery. This technique applies to all interventions related to complicated diverticular disease, such as HP, sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (RPA) and reversal of HP. The laparoscopic approach also provided new therapeutic possibilities with the emergence of the laparoscopic lavage drainage (LLD), particularly interesting in the context of purulent peritonitis of diverticular origin. At this stage, however, most of our knowledge in these fields relies on studies of low-level evidence. More than ever, well-built large randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer present interrogations such as the exact place of LLD or the most appropriate sigmoid resection procedure (laparoscopic HP or RPA), as well as to confirm the advantages of laparoscopy in chronic complications of diverticulitis or HP reversal. PMID:26981187

  10. Laparoscopic treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Daher, Ronald; Barouki, Elie; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-02-27

    Up to 10% of acute colonic diverticulitis may necessitate a surgical intervention. Although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, Hartmann's procedure (HP) has been considered for many years to be the gold standard for the treatment of generalized peritonitis. To reduce the burden of surgery in these situations and as driven by the accumulated experience in colorectal and minimally-invasive surgery, laparoscopy has been increasingly adopted in the management of abdominal emergencies. Multiple case series and retrospective comparative studies confirmed that with experienced hands, the laparoscopic approach provided better outcomes than the open surgery. This technique applies to all interventions related to complicated diverticular disease, such as HP, sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (RPA) and reversal of HP. The laparoscopic approach also provided new therapeutic possibilities with the emergence of the laparoscopic lavage drainage (LLD), particularly interesting in the context of purulent peritonitis of diverticular origin. At this stage, however, most of our knowledge in these fields relies on studies of low-level evidence. More than ever, well-built large randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer present interrogations such as the exact place of LLD or the most appropriate sigmoid resection procedure (laparoscopic HP or RPA), as well as to confirm the advantages of laparoscopy in chronic complications of diverticulitis or HP reversal. PMID:26981187

  11. [Management of acute complications in sickle cell disease ].

    PubMed

    Gellen-Dautremer, Justine; Brousse, Valentine; Arlet, Jean-Benoît

    2014-10-01

    Acute complications in sickle cell disease are a major and life-long cause for hospital referral. The most frequent events are painful acute vaso-occlusive crisis involving the limbs and back, and acute chest syndrome. Acute vaso-occlusive crisis is a therapeutic emergency because of the very high level of pain. Acute chest syndrome may be potentially fatal and must be adequately searched for and treated. Sickle cell patients are susceptible to pneumococcal infections notably, but any infection may favour vaso-occlusive crisis. Triggers of sickle cell vase occlusion must be tracked and corrected, if possible. Moderate crisis can be managed at home, but referral is necessary as soon as opiates are needed and/or if acute chest syndrome is suspected. Additional treatments besides opiates include co analgesics, oxygen, hydration, physiotherapy. Blood transfusion may be required but is not systematic. Acute spleen sequestration occurs in young children and requires immediate hospital referral for transfusion. PMID:25510139

  12. Efficacy of Tocilizumab in a Patient with Adult-onset Still's Disease and Elevated Coxsackie B Viral Titers

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare, inflammatory disorder characterized by arthralgia, evanescent, salmon-colored rash, daily fevers, lymphadenopathy, pharyngitis, and hepatosplenomegaly. Frequently seen laboratory abnormalities include leukocytosis, transaminitis, elevated ferritin and acute phase reactant levels, and aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The inciting etiology of this syndrome is unknown, and both viruses and bacteria have been isolated in patients with AOSD leading to the hypothesis that infection triggers an autoimmune response. Treatment is empirical and includes symptom control with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids, as well as disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDS) and biologic agents. While biologic agents such as TNFa-blockers and IL-1 inhibitors have established efficacy in treating AOSD, emerging literature suggests that IL-6 inhibitors, which are generally used for rheumatoid arthritis, can be used in cases refractory to first-line treatment. We present the case of a 32 year old male with elevated coxsackie viral titers and AOSD refractory to numerous immunomodulating agents who experienced disease remission with Tocilizumab, thus suggesting a possible subset of patients in whom this less established regimen may have efficacy. Case A 32 year old previously healthy male presented with febrile illness, lymphadenopathy, pharyngitis, macular rash, red eye syndrome, and myalgias. Labs were notable for elevated CRP to 32, ESR greater than 100, negative ANA/RF, leukocytosis, transaminitis, ferritin of 1300, and a elevated Coxsackie B viral titers. The concern initially was for a viral illness versus AOSD, and the patient's symptoms initially responded to high dose prednisone. However, the patient's fever and myalgia returned, and his course was complicated by recurrent fevers and arthralgias refractory to various combinations of plaquenil, colchicine, methotrexate, etanercept, adalimumab, and repeated doses of steroids, with disease relapse seen upon steroid taper. Anakinra, an IL-1 inhibitor was tried with marginal success, though the patient continued to have elevated inflammatory markers and large joint arthritis. The patient was finally tried on Tocilizumab in combination with methotrexate, and has experienced an extended disease remission which has persisted for eight months despite complete steroid taper. Discussion Adult Onset Still's Disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology often thought to be secondary to interaction between infectious antigens and host genetic factors and autoimmune mechanisms which ultimately lead to the disease state. We present a case of a patient with four major and four minor criteria of AOSD with elevated coxsackie viral titers who was refractory to conventional treatment yet experienced complete disease remission upon treatment with Tocilizumab, thus suggesting a possible subset of patients in whom this emerging second line treatment may prove beneficial.

  13. Multiple systemic diseases complicated by bisphosphonate osteonecrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Barbano, Lorena; Saggese, Vito; Monai, Dario; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aims this work aims at demonstrating that multiple systemic conditions, in association with the development of bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), increase the risk of complications and may lead to hospitalization. For this reason the dental approach to patients with multisystem disease should be carefully managed by a team of specialists. Case report a case of mandibular necrosis associated with intake of oral bisphosphonates in a complex systemic context is described. Results and discussion many different diseases and systemic conditions may draw the line at oral surgery. Multiple treatments (e.g. antithrombotic, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, antibiotics and bisphosphonates) can alter the normal physiological response to tissue healing. Conclusions patients taking bisphosphonates for more than three years (i.e. the term over which the risk of ONJ increases according to the literature, in presence of complex systemic situations, need to be carefully managed during the pre-operative, peri-operative and postoperative phases through a synergistic collaboration among different kind of specialists. PMID:23285320

  14. Magnesium and cardiovascular complications of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Massy, Ziad A; Drüeke, Tilman B

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Abundant experimental evidence suggests a physiological role of magnesium in cardiovascular function, and clinical evidence suggests a role of the cation in cardiovascular disease in the general population. The role of magnesium in CKD-mineral and bone disorder, and in particular its impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, is however not well understood. Experimental studies have shown that magnesium inhibits vascular calcification, both by direct effects on the vessel wall and by indirect, systemic effects. Moreover, an increasing number of epidemiologic studies in patients with CKD have shown associations of serum magnesium levels with intermediate and hard outcomes, including vascular calcification, cardiovascular events and mortality. Intervention trials in these patients conducted to date have had small sample sizes and have been limited to the study of surrogate parameters, such as arterial stiffness, vascular calcification and atherosclerosis. Randomized controlled trials are clearly needed to determine the effects of magnesium supplementation on hard outcomes in patients with CKD. PMID:25963594

  15. [Complications and risks of abdominal diseases in old surgical patients (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mlynek, H J; Hartig, W; Schenker, U; Winiecki, P; Breitfeld, P; Bulling, J; Gabriel, H P; Teucher, A

    1977-01-01

    732 patients older than 70 years suffering from abdominal diseases were studied regarding postoperative complications and mortality. The rate of complications in connection with surgical procedures corresponds to that of younger patients. But complication depending on organs and organ systems impaired by age and pre-existing diseases were found in higher percentage. PMID:68638

  16. [Still a small problem with the mad cow disease? Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other prion diseases: current status].

    PubMed

    Lundberg, P O

    2001-01-10

    This review is based on recent published research on the BSE/CJD/vCJD problem mainly from UK, Germany and France. The situation in Sweden seems to be fortunate for several reasons. The use of meat and bonemeal as animal fodder was forbidden in this country 13 years ago. Sweden has not had any sheep with scrapie for many years. No animals with BSE have so far been found in our country. The incidence of sporadic CJD in this country followed retrospectively from 1985 to 1996 and prospectively from 1997 to 1999 has been around 1.2 per million per year with no significant increase. Only few cases of familial CJD are known. No patient with iatrogenic CJD has ever been found. The use of growth hormone derived from human pituitary glands was abandoned in 1985 when recombinant human growth hormone became available. So far there is no indication that any of the CJD cases diagnosed in Sweden has been of the vCJD type, the one linked to BSE. However, as the incubation period for prion diseases is very long and the Swedes are frequent travellers there is a risk that people from our country could have contracted vCJD through consuming meat products in countries with BSE. As a precaution the consumption of brain, spinal cord, lymphatic tissue, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract should be avoided. Human pituitary derived growth hormone is still available in some countries and might be illegally imported into Sweden. PMID:11213704

  17. Successful Treatment with Intravenous Cyclophosphamide for Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Yoshika; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Adachi, Anna; Tsunozaki, Kinuyo; Izumi, Yasumori; Moriwaki, Yuji; Kurohama, Kazuhiro; Ito, Masahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old female case of intractable adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD). Initial high-dose steroid therapy combined with cyclosporin A was ineffective against macrophage-activation syndrome (MAS), which was accompanied by the systemic type of AOSD. Treatment for MAS with intravenous cyclophosphamide resulted in remission of AOSD and a reduction in the high doses of steroids. Efficacy of biologics against MAS in AOSD is unclear. Cyclophosphamide, a conventional cytotoxic agent, should be considered as one of the therapeutic options for refractory types of AOSD with MAS. PMID:26798538

  18. [Hemophagocytic syndrome in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease: diagnostic problems].

    PubMed

    Zakharova, A Yu; Mutovina, Z Yu; Gordeev, A V; Shestakova, I N

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is a rare life-threatening condition caused by massive cytokine release from activated macrophages and lymphocytes. The paper depicts the development of HPS in different infections, malignancies, and autoimmune diseases. It describes a clinical case of hemophagocytic syndrome in a 63-year-old female patient with adult-onset Still's disease and high fever accompanied by neutrophil leukocytosis and a drastic left leukocyte count shift, high procalcitonin levels, hepatosplenomegaly, edematous syndrome, and progressive multiple organ dysfunction with the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation and adult respiratory distress syndrome. The diagnosis of HPS was established according to the diagnostic criteria and verified by autopsy: phagocytes in liver and lung tissues. PMID:26155624

  19. Peyronie’s disease after urethral swab, an unusual complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Paulis, Gianni; Barletta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Urethral swabs are still currently used as a diagnostic tool when urethritis or prostatitis are suspected. Urologists are certainly aware that Peyronie’s disease may occur after traumatic urethral instrumentation (catheterization, urethrocystoscopy, etc), but onset of Peyronie’s disease after urethral swab for diagnostic purposes has never been reported in the literature. This paper presents the case of a patient who developed Peyronie’s disease after a clumsy urethral swab insertion. It is an unusual, and to date unreported, complication which we would like to call attention to. In the case of our patient, the swab had been inserted to a greater depth than normally required and strong pressure had also been applied. During the procedure, the patient experienced severe urethral and penile pain, which was followed by urethrorrhagia, and later penile curvature. The patient was treated conservatively with good results, partly because the disease was still in its active stage and not yet stable. In the light of what we report, when ordering a urethral swab, physicians should always recommend that it be performed at testing centers that follow accurate, rigorous standards. Patients should also be informed that the test they are to undergo consists of a swab being inserted into the urethra for a short distance, not more than 2–3 cm. PMID:26605209

  20. [Endoscopic gastrostomy in patients with complicated heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Cukier, C; Magnoni, C D; Poletti, P; Tacla, M

    2000-01-01

    Complicated cardiologic patients with brain ischemia and heart failure need long term enteral nutrition. Long term nasoenteral tube feeding may cause complications that could be avoided with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and its main complications. Twelve patients were submitted to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (eight male) with main age of 62.42 +/- 22.10 years old. Brain ischemia was the main indication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and occurred after 35.58 +/- 26.79 days, after initiated enteral nutrition. There were no complications during procedure. On late post operatory period there were local infection in one cases, treated with local care. In conclusion, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a secure technique with low incidence of complications and its indication should be earlier. PMID:11460600

  1. Supradiaphragmatic early stage Hodgkin's disease: does mantle radiation therapy still have a role?

    PubMed

    Frezza, G; Barbieri, E; Zinzani, P L; Babini, L; Tura, S

    1996-01-01

    Extended field radiation therapy represents the main therapeutic option in early stage Hodgkin's disease with favorable prognostic features. Its role however has recently been criticized, mainly due to the high incidence of late complications in irradiated tissues. Furthermore, surgical staging, which in the opinion of many is mandatory for proper selection of patients for radiotherapy alone, has a well-known morbidity, and splenectomy has been associated with a high risk of secondary leukemias. Lastly, the failure rate after radiotherapy only is not negligible and second-line treatment is not always successful. A review of our experience and of the recent literature has allowed us to refute these objections. The results of radiotherapy, when properly performed, are highly reliable and have been reproducible in many Institutions. Chemotherapy alone cannot yet be regarded as an alternative to radiotherapy in these patients since data reported on this issue are conflicting. Present knowledge regarding the relationship between clinical features and the risk of occult subdiaphragmatic spread allows patients with localized disease to be selected without surgical staging; the results of radiotherapy in clinically staged patients confirm this statement. Concern for the late effects in irradiated tissues is justified, and future efforts should be directed at reducing the toxicity of this treatment. Associating a short chemotherapy course with low-dose radiotherapy to involved sites could help to achieve this goal. PMID:8641642

  2. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  3. The Genetic Link between Parkinson's Disease and the Kynurenine Pathway Is Still Missing

    PubMed Central

    Török, Nóra; Török, Rita; Szolnoki, Zoltán; Somogyvári, Ferenc; Klivényi, Péter; Vécsei, László

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is substantial evidence that the kynurenine pathway (KP) plays a role in the normal physiology of the brain and is involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Objective. We set out to investigate the potential roles in PD of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from one of the key enzymes of the KP, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). Methods. 105 unrelated, clinically definitive PD patients and 131 healthy controls were enrolled to investigate the possible effects of the different alleles of KMO. Fluorescently labeled TaqMan probes were used for allele discrimination. Results. None of the four investigated SNPs proved to be associated with PD or influenced the age at onset of the disease. Conclusions. The genetic link between the KP and PD is still missing. The investigated SNPs presumably do not appear to influence the function of KMO and probably do not contain binding sites for regulatory proteins of relevance in PD. This is the first study to assess the genetic background behind the biochemical alterations of the kynurenine pathway in PD, directing the attention to this previously unexamined field. PMID:25785227

  4. Sublingual pyramidal lobe. Complications of subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    A potential complication of subtotal thyroidectomy where a large pyramidal lobe is present is described. The pyramidal lobe normally is immobilized inferiorly by its attachment to the thyroidal isthmus. When the isthmus is removed and the pyramidal lobe is left in situ during subtotal thyroidectomy its superior attachments will allow the pyramidal lobe to become situated sublingually. This may produce gagging and nausea. To avoid the complication, it is recommended that the pyramidal lobe be removed during subtotal thyroidectomy. If the patient also is thyrotoxic, I-131 can be used to treat this complication successfully.

  5. Association Between Genetics of Diabetes, Coronary Artery Disease, and Macrovascular Complications: Exploring a Common Ground Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, André G.; Selvatici, Lívia; Krieger, José E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) are conditions that cause a substantial public health burden. Since both conditions often coexist in the same individual, it has been hypothesized that they have a common effector. Insulin and hyperglycemia are assumed to play critical roles in this scenario. In recent years, many genetic risk factors for both diabetes and CAD have been discovered, mainly through genome-wide association studies. Genetic aspects of diabetes, diabetic macrovascular complications, and CAD are assumed to have intersections leading to the common effector hypothesis. However, only a few genetic risk factors could be identified that modulate the risk for both conditions. Polymorphisms in TCF7L2 and near the CDKN2A/B genes seem to be of great importance in this regard since they appear to modulate both conditions, and they are not necessarily related to insulinism, or hyperglycemia, for CAD development. Other issues related to this hypothesis, such as the problems of phenotype heterogeneity, are also of interest. Recent studies have contributed to a better understanding of the complex genetics of diabetic macrovascular complications. Much effort is still needed to clarify the associations in the genetics of diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. At present, there is little genetic evidence to support a common effector hypothesis, other than insulin or hyperglycemia, for the association between these conditions. PMID:22189546

  6. Dengue is still an imported disease in China: a case study in Guangzhou.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shaowei; Chen, Bin; Wu, Haixia; Yang, Zhicong; Di, Biao; Wang, Lihua; Tao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiaobo; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-06-01

    Dengue virus and its four serotypes (DENV 1-4) infect approximately 390 million people worldwide each year, with most cases in tropical and subtropical regions. Because of repeated introduction of DENV from epidemic regions and suitable weather conditions, many regions have shifted from hypo-endemicity to hyper-endemicity over recent decades. Since the first dengue outbreak in 1978, it is crucial to understand the current situation in China over nearly 40 years. The purpose of the study was to examine whether dengue in China was endemic or not, which is essential for relevant dengue control and prevention strategy implementation in China. The study, combining epidemiological characteristics of dengue from the disease notification system, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses, showed that all four serotypes had been detected in Guangzhou, China, which was dominated by DENV 1-2. The Maximum Likelihood tree analytic results showed that the virus detected in Guangzhou localized in different clades, except of virus of 2002 and 2003 clustered together. There existed the mutual introductions between Guangzhou and Southeast Asia. Most of the viruses were imported from Southeast Asia and the sources of outbreaks in Guangzhou mainly originated from Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The study indicates that dengue in China still remains as an imported disease, with the possibility of localization. PMID:25772205

  7. GB Virus C/Hepatitis G Virus (GBV-C/HGV): still looking for a disease

    PubMed Central

    Sathar, M A; Soni, P N; York, D

    2000-01-01

    GB Virus C and Hepatitis G Virus (GBV-C/HGV) are positive, single-stranded flaviviruses. GBV-C and HGV are independent isolates of the same virus. Transmission via the blood-borne route is the commonest mode, although vertical and sexual transmission is well documented. GBV-C/HGV is distributed globally; its prevalence in the general population is 10 fold higher in African countries than in non-African countries. High prevalences of GBV-C/HGV have been found in subjects with frequent parenteral exposure and in groups at high risk of exposure to blood and blood products. The clinical significance of human infection with GBV-C/HGV is currently unclear. The virus can establish both acute and chronic infection and appears to be sensitive to interferon. Only some 12–15% of chronic Non-A, B, C hepatitis cases are infected with GBV-C/HGV. A direct association with liver pathology is still lacking and it is not yet clear as to whether GBV-C/HGV is indeed a hepatotropic virus. Current evidence suggests that the spectrum of association of GBV-C/HGV infection with extrahepatic diseases ranges from haematalogical diseases, aplastic anaemia, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive idiopathic thrombocytopenia and thalassemia, through to common variable immune deficiency and cryoglobunemia. PMID:11168678

  8. A pruritic linear urticarial rash, fever, and systemic inflammatory disease in five adolescents: adult-onset still disease or systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis sine arthritis?

    PubMed

    Prendiville, Julie S; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Crawford, Richard I

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic rash of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a transient erythematous eruption associated with a quotidian spiking fever. Usually asymptomatic, it can be pruritic, with dermatographism at sites of scratching or pressure. An illness similar to this entity in adults is designated adult-onset Still disease. The relationship between the pediatric and adult disease is uncertain and differences in case definition have evolved. Specifically, a sustained arthritis for at least 6 weeks is required for a diagnosis of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whereas transient arthritis and arthralgia are accepted criteria in adult-onset Still disease. We describe five patients less than 16 years of age who presented with an acute illness characterized by fever and a distinctive skin eruption. Intense pruritus and linear erythematous lesions flared with a spiking fever, usually in the late afternoon and evening. Periorbital edema/erythema and nonlinear urticarial lesions were also seen. Two children had splinter hemorrhages of the nail beds and one girl developed a fixed, scaling, pigmented, linear eruption. Severe malaise, myalgia, arthralgia, and leukocytosis were present in every patient. Other systemic manifestations included sore throat, transient arthritis, abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, hyperferritinemia, and hepatic dysfunction. No patient had a sustained arthritis. The course of the disease was variable. One patient, diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome, recovered on oral naproxen. Two patients responded to systemic corticosteroid therapy. One girl developed status epilepticus and died from aspiration and asphyxia. A boy with severe hepatitis developed renal failure and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and was treated with plasmapheresis, dialysis, and systemic corticosteroids; he had recurrent episodes of rash and fever into adult life. These children did not fulfill the case definition of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis because they lacked a persistent arthritis. Adolescent and adult patients with the same clinical and laboratory findings are described under the rubric of adult-onset Still disease. Recognition of the distinctive urticarial skin eruption and spiking fever is important in the diagnosis of a disease with severe morbidity and potentially life-threatening complications. PMID:15461768

  9. Post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis and Legionnaires' disease in a patient with adult Still's disease during treatment with interleukin 1 receptor antagonist anakinra: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Legionellosis is a systemic disease that primarily affects the lungs. However, dysfunction in many organ systems, including the kidneys, has also been described. There are only a few reported cases of renal dysfunction in patients with legionellosis. Case presentation A 27-year-old Caucasian woman with known adult Still's disease was admitted to our hospital for community-acquired pneumonia, due to Legionella infection, with acute renal failure. Although her respiratory symptoms responded well to antibiotic treatment, her renal function worsened, with severe proteinuria and edema. A renal biopsy showed extracapillary and endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis with accompanying chronic and acute interstitial nephritis. This was consistent with a post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis. After initiation of steroid therapy, her renal function improved. Additionally, therapy with diuretics and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor was initiated because of persistent proteinuria. Under this treatment regimen, her severe edema and proteinuria disappeared. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, there is only a handful of reported cases of post-infection glomerulonephritis with a nephrotic syndrome in a patient with legionellosis. Our findings suggest that, in patients with Legionnaires' disease with renal failure, post-infection immunocomplex glomerulonephritis should be considered and steroid therapy may be an effective modality to treat the renal complication. PMID:21740588

  10. Is routine antenatal venereal disease research laboratory test still justified? Nigerian experience

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Betrand O; Eleje, George U; Obi-Nwosu, Amaka L; Ahiarakwem, Ita F; Akujobi, Comfort N; Egwuatu, Chukwudi C; Onyiuke, Chukwudumebi O C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the seroreactivity of pregnant women to syphilis in order to justify the need for routine antenatal syphilis screening. Methods A multicenter retrospective analysis of routine antenatal venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test results between 1 September 2010 and 31 August 2012 at three specialist care hospitals in south-east Nigeria was done. A reactive VDRL result is subjected for confirmation using Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay test. Analysis was by Epi Info 2008 version 3.5.1 and Stata/IC version 10. Results Adequate records were available regarding 2,156 patients and were thus reviewed. The mean age of the women was 27.4 years (±3.34), and mean gestational age was 26.4 weeks (±6.36). Only 15 cases (0.70%) were seropositive to VDRL. Confirmatory T. pallidum hemagglutination assay was positive in 4 of the 15 cases, giving an overall prevalence of 0.19% and a false-positive rate of 73.3%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of syphilis in relation to maternal age and parity (P>0.05). Conclusion While the prevalence of syphilis is extremely low in the antenatal care population at the three specialist care hospitals in south-east Nigeria, false-positive rate is high and prevalence did not significantly vary with maternal age or parity. Because syphilis is still a serious but preventable and curable disease, screening with VDRL alone, without confirmatory tests may not be justified. Because of the increase in the demand for evidence-based medicine and litigation encountered in medical practice, we may advocate that confirmatory test for syphilis is introduced in routine antenatal testing to reduce the problem of false positives. The government should increase the health budget that will include free routine antenatal testing including the T. pallidum hemagglutination assay. PMID:25610000

  11. Persistent pruritic papules and plaques associated with adult-onset Still's disease: report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Nobuyuki; Satoh, Masataka; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    Typical skin rash, which appears and disappears along with respective rise and fall of fever, is well-known, and included as one of the major criteria of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) (Yamaguchi's criteria). In addition, various skin lesions are occasionally observed in association with AOSD. Persistent pruritic eruptions present with some clinical features, such as urticarial erythema, flagellate erythema, erythematous, slightly scaly or crusted papules, and/or plaques on the trunk and extremities. These lesions show unique histological features such as dyskeratosis with a peculiar, distinctive distribution in the upper epidermis and cornified layers with focal hyperkeratosis. We describe herein six cases of AOSD, which presented with skin lesions of persistent pruritic papules and plaques. All six cases were female, and three of them were elderly women. The patients presented with linear erythematous streaks, scaly erythema, keratotic papules, infiltrative plaques and irregular coalesced erythemas. By contrast, histological features were characteristic, and dyskeratotic cells were found in the horny layers as well as in the upper layers of the epidermis. Persistent pruritic eruption is an important cutaneous sign for the diagnosis of AOSD. PMID:24628100

  12. Fever of unknown origin: a review of 20 patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mert, A; Ozaras, R; Tabak, F; Bilir, M; Ozturk, R; Ozdogan, H; Aktuglu, Y

    2003-05-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the findings in patients with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) admitted with fever of unknown origin (FUO) during the last 18 years in our unit, in order to discover the ratio of such patients to all patients with FUO during the same period, and to determine the clinical features of AOSD in FUO. The number and the aetiologies of the patients with FUO diagnosed between 1984 and 2001, and the clinical features of those with AOSD, were taken from the patient files. The diagnosis of AOSD was reanalysed according to the diagnostic criteria of Cush et al. [11]. The presumed diagnoses before a diagnosis of AOSD was established were also noted. The chi(2) and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. We studied 130 patients with a diagnosis of FUO, 36 (28%) of whom had collagen vascular diseases. Of these 36 patients, 20 (56%, 12 female, 8 male, mean age 34 years, range 16-65) had AOSD. Clinical and laboratory findings were as follows: fever (100%), arthralgia (90%), rash (85%), sore throat (75%), arthritis (65%), myalgia (60%), splenomegaly (40%), hepatomegaly (25%), lymphadenopathy (15%), anaemia (65%), neutrophilic leukocytosis (90%), increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (100%), elevated transaminase levels (65%), a negative RF (100%), and a negative FANA (80%). Antibiotics had been prescribed in 18 (90%) of cases. The presumed infectious diagnoses were streptococcal tonsillitis/pharyngitis (50%), infective endocarditis (four patients), sepsis (two patients) and acute bacterial meningitis (two patients). The presumed non-infectious diagnoses were acute rheumatic fever (three patients), seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (two patients) and polymyositis (two patients). Sixteen patients were followed for a mean duration of 30 months (range 2-59). A remission was obtained with indomethacin in three cases (19%), and with prednisolone in the remainder. Relapse was detected in three cases (19%). AOSD is one of the most frequent aetiologies of FUO. During the diagnostic course of a patient with FUO, a maculopapular rash and/or arthralgia and/or sore throat should raise the suspicion of AOSD. Because the disease has heterogeneous clinical findings, certain bacterial infections (e.g. streptococcal pharyngitis and sepsis) are generally considered and the prescribing of antibiotics is common. PMID:12740670

  13. Thoracic irradiation in Hodgkin's disease: Disease control and long-term complications

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, N.J.; Thompson, L.; Mauch, P. )

    1990-02-01

    A total of 590 patients with Stage IA-IIIB Hodgkin's disease received mantle irradiation at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy between April 1969 and December 1984 as part of their initial treatment. Recurrence patterns as well as pulmonary, cardiac and thyroid complications were analyzed. Pulmonary recurrence was more frequently seen in patients with large mediastinal adenopathy (LMA); 11% of patients with LMA recurred in the lung in contrast to 3.1% with small or no mediastinal disease, p = 0.003. Hilar involvement, when corrected for size of mediastinal involvement, was not predictive of lung relapse. Patients with LMA also had a high rate of nodal relapse above the diaphragm (40%) following radiation therapy (RT) alone as compared to similarly treated patients with small or no mediastinal adenopathy (6.5%), p less than 0.0001. This risk of nodal recurrence was greatly reduced (4.7%) for LMA patients receiving combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy (CMT), p less than 0.0001. Sixty-seven patients (11%) with hilar or large mediastinal involvement received prophylactic, low dose, whole lung irradiation. No decrease in the frequency of lung recurrence was seen with the use of whole lung irradiation. Radiation pneumonitis was seen in 3% of patients receiving radiation therapy alone. In contrast, the use of whole lung irradiation was associated with a 15% risk of pneumonitis, p = 0.006. The risk of pneumonitis was also significantly increased with the use of chemotherapy (11%), p = 0.0001. Cardiac complications were uncommon with pericarditis being the most common complication (2.2%). Thyroid dysfunction was seen in 25% of patients and appeared to be age-related. These data suggest that the long-term complications of mantle irradiation are uncommon with the use of modern radiotherapeutic techniques.

  14. Painful muscle spasms complicating algodystrophy: central or peripheral disease?

    PubMed Central

    Robberecht, W; Van Hees, J; Adriaensen, H; Carton, H

    1988-01-01

    A 21 year old female patient developed Südeck's atrophy of the right foot secondary to a chronic Achilles tendinitis. The condition was complicated by the occurrence of painful muscle spasms in the right leg and incontinence of urine. The spasms had characteristics of both a tonic ambulatory foot response and a spinal flexor reflex. The movements disappeared during sleep. Regional anaesthesia of the right leg made the spasms disappear both in and outside the region of anaesthesia. Backaveraging of the EEG showed the involuntary spasms to be preceded by a cortical potential similar to a readiness potential, indicating a cortical potential similar to a readiness potential, indicating a cortical component in the pathophysiology of the muscle spasms complicating Südeck's atrophy. PMID:3379430

  15. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications associated with primary immunodeficiency diseases

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sayna; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Mamishi, Setareh; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a group of inherited disorders, characterized by defects of the immune system predisposing individuals to variety of manifestations, including recurrent infections and unusual vaccine complications. There are a number of PIDs prone to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications. This review presents an update on our understanding about the BCGosis-susceptible PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. PMID:22430715

  16. Management of Complications of End-Stage Liver Disease in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    DellaVolpe, Jeffrey D; Garavaglia, Jeffrey M; Huang, David T

    2016-02-01

    The management of critically ill patients with end-stage liver disease can be challenging due to the vulnerability of this population and the wide-ranging complications of the disease. This review proposes an approach based on the major organ systems affected, to provide a framework for managing the most common complications. Although considerable practice variation exists, a focus on the evidence behind the most common practices will ensure the development of the optimal skillset to appropriately manage this disease. PMID:25223828

  17. Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean = 35.1%, SD ±28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean = 1.3%, SD ±4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 6.2%, SD ±22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean = 23.1%, SD ±15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 51.5%, SD ±22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean = 27.9 GBP, SD ±22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe. PMID:24148185

  18. Colitis complicating chronic granulomatous disease. A clinicopathological case report.

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, J M; Cameron, C H; Maxwell, R J; McCluskey, D R; Collins, J S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--This report concerns a female patient now aged 24 years, diagnosed at the age of 7 years as suffering from chronic granulomatous disease. At age 20 she developed diarrhoea accompanied by rectal bleeding. Endoscopy showed extensive colitis. She failed to respond to medical treatment and underwent total colectomy two years later. AIMS--To discuss the histological changes in the colon in chronic granulomatous disease. RESULTS--There was extensive mucosal inflammation throughout colon and rectum resembling ulcerative colitis. In addition characteristic large pigmented macrophages were distributed in the basal mucosa and superficial submucosa. Similar cells accompanied by granulomata were present in mesenteric lymph nodes. CONCLUSIONS--Colitis is an unusual clinical manifestation of chronic granulomatous disease but the presence and characteristic distribution of such pigmented macrophages in colonic biopsy in children and young adults may suggest the diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8707099

  19. Pulmonary Complications Resulting from Genetic Cardiovascular Disease in Two Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been considered a risk factor for exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms of variation in susceptibility. Pulmonary complications and altered iron homeost...

  20. Bone health and associated metabolic complications in neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Nanette C; Hache, Lauren P; Clemens, Paula R

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews the recent literature regarding bone health as it relates to the patient living with neuromuscular disease (NMD). Studies defining the scope of bone-related disease in NMD are scant. The available evidence is discussed, focusing on abnormal calcium metabolism, increased fracture risk, and the prevalence of both scoliosis and hypovitaminosis D in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. Future directions are discussed, including the urgent need for studies both to determine the nature and extent of poor bone health, and to evaluate the therapeutic effect of available osteoporosis treatments in patients with NMD. PMID:23137737

  1. Complications of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of head and neck disease

    SciTech Connect

    Giebfried, J.W.; Lawson, W.; Biller, H.F.

    1986-04-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen has been advocated in the treatment of many head and neck diseases. Reports of such treatments have described eustachian tube dysfunction as the only complication. A review of patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen for head and neck diseases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center revealed serious complications, which included seizure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. In addition, follow-up study of these patients demonstrated that 11 patients treated for radiation-induced necrosis had an undiagnosed recurrence of cancer.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease: An increased risk factor for neurologic complications

    PubMed Central

    Morís, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Only a very few systematic studies have investigated the frequency of neurologic disorders in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results have been inconsistent and variable, owing to differences in case-finding methods and evaluated outcomes in different studies. The most frequent neurologic manifestations reported in CD and UC populations are cerebrovascular disease (with either arterial or venous events), demyelinating central nervous system disease, and peripheral neuropathy (whether axonal or demyelinating); however, the literature describes numerous nervous system disorders as being associated with IBD. The pathogenesis of nervous system tissue involvement in IBD has yet to be elucidated, although it seems to be related to immune mechanisms or prothrombotic states. The recently-introduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have proven successful in controlling moderate to severe IBD activity. However, severe neurologic disorders associated with TNF inhibitors have been reported, which therefore raises concerns regarding the effect of anti-TNF-? antibodies on the nervous system. Although neurological involvement associated with IBD is rarely reported, gastroenterologists should be aware of the neurologic manifestations of IBD in order to provide early treatment, which is crucial for preventing major neurologic morbidity. PMID:24574797

  3. [Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, as a rare complications of coeliac disease].

    PubMed

    Lomb, Zoltán; Bajor, Judit; Garamszegi, Mária; Grexa, Erzsébet; Bogner, Barna; Tóvári, László; Beró, Tamás

    2005-02-20

    Intestinal pneumatosis cystoides is rarely diagnosed clinical entity characterized by multiple gas containing cysts inside the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Primary (15%) and secondary (85%) forms are known. In the more frequent secondary forms small intestine and the right side of the colon are mainly affected, and the underlying pathology can be gastrointestinal, pulmonary or immunological. The 64 year old male patient reported by the authors showed clinical signs of severe malabsorption (his body weight: 47,5 kg, height: 178 cm, BMI: 15). The intestinal pneumatosis was diagnosed by exploration performed because of suspected perforation (pneumoperitoneum). Due to severe malabsorption the patient was admitted to Gastroenterological Department. Duodenoscopy and small bowel biopsy was performed. Small intestinal histology and presence of anti-gliadin and anti-endomysium antibody confirmed the suspected diagnosis of coeliakia. Parenteral nutrition, special gliadin free diet, hyperbaric oxygen inhalation, steroid, and metronidazole treatment resulted in a gradual improvement in the nutritional and general condition of the patient. After one year the patient is without complaints, he gained 24,5 kg body weight BMI: 22,5). The author's case points to a rare serious complication of non-treated coeliakia. Recognition of intestinal pneumatosis in time could have prevented surgical intervention in the high risk patient. PMID:15803888

  4. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  5. Dent's disease complicated by an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Caroline; Jadresic, Lyda; Dudley, Jan; Hartley, Jane L

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young boy with Dent's disease, identified as having a mutation in the kidney-specific chloride-proton antitransporter CLCN5 during investigation for nephrotic-range proteinuria. He went on to develop growth hormone deficiency and was treated with recombinant growth hormone. He later presented acutely with hepatorenal failure and thrombotic occlusion of the middle and right hepatic veins consistent with a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome, which required a prolonged period of intensive care. The diagnosis of Dent's disease should be considered early in boys with nephrotic-range proteinuria in the absence of clinical oedema and hypoalbuminaemia to allow for the timely introduction of strategies, such as a high-citrate diet, to preserve renal function. The measurement of urinary ?-2 microglobulin has been shown by this case to be a more reliable and specific marker of tubular dysfunction than the urinary retinol-binding protein. PMID:24398869

  6. Kidney disease and related findings in the diabetes control and complications trial/epidemiology of diabetes interventions and complications study.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Kidney disease manifests clinically as elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or both, and is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study tested whether intensive diabetes therapy (INT) aimed at lowering glucose concentrations as close as safely possible to the normal range reduces the risks of kidney disease and other diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the DCCT, 1,441 participants with T1D were randomly assigned to INT or conventional diabetes therapy (CON) for a mean duration of 6.5 years. Subsequently, participants have been followed for 18 years in the ongoing observational EDIC. Standardized longitudinal measurements of AER, estimated GFR, and blood pressure were made throughout the DCCT/EDIC. RESULTS During the DCCT, INT reduced the risks of incident microalbuminuria (AER ≥40 mg/24 h) and macroalbuminuria (AER ≥300 mg/24 h) by 39% (95% CI 21-52%) and 54% (29-74%), respectively. During EDIC years 1-8, participants previously assigned to DCCT INT continued to experience lower rates of incident microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, with risk reductions of 59% (39-73%) and 84% (67-92%), respectively. Beneficial effects of INT on the development of impaired GFR (sustained estimated GFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and hypertension became evident during combined DCCT/EDIC follow-up, with risk reductions of 50% (18-69%) and 20% (6-21%), respectively, compared with CON. CONCLUSIONS In the DCCT/EDIC, INT resulted in clinically important, durable reductions in the risks of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, impaired GFR, and hypertension. PMID:24356594

  7. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ellen C; Nagar, Michael; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of the beta-globin chain of hemoglobin (Hb), resulting in poorly deformable sickled cells that cause microvascular occlusion and hemolytic anemia. The spleen is almost always affected by SCD, with microinfarcts within the first 36 months of life resulting in splenic atrophy. Acute liver disorders causing right-sided abdominal pain include acute vaso-occlusive crisis, liver infarction, and acute hepatic crisis. Chronic liver disease might be due to hemosiderosis and hepatitis and possibly to SCD itself if small, clinically silent microvascular occlusions occur chronically. Black pigment gallstones caused by elevated bilirubin excretion are common. Their small size permits them to travel into the common bile duct but cause only low-grade obstruction, so hyperbilirubinemia rather than bile duct dilatation is typical. Whether cholecystectomy should be done in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The most common laboratory abnormality is an elevation of unconjugated bilirubin level. Bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels correlate with one another, suggesting that chronic hemolysis and ineffective erythropoiesis, rather than liver disease, are the sources of hyperbilirubinemia. Abdominal pain is very common in SCD and is usually due to sickling, which resolves with supportive care. Computed tomography scans might be ordered for severe or unremitting pain. The liver typically shows sickled erythrocytes and Kupffer cell enlargement acutely and hemosiderosis chronically. The safety of liver biopsies has been questioned, particularly during acute sickling crisis. Treatments include blood transfusions, exchange transfusions, iron-chelating agents, hydroxyurea, and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. PMID:20215064

  8. With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-04

    In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

  9. Benign duodenocolic fistula as a complication of peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Fereshteh; Abrishami, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old man with upper abdominal pain, diarrhea and 25 kg weight loss since 3 months ago was admitted. He had a history of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease 4 months before admission. Gastroduodenal endoscopy and upper gastrointestinal series with barium study were done. Biopsies and CT-scan ruled out malignancies. Endoscopy and radiology studies revealed a duodenocolic fistula. He underwent right hemicolectomy, fistula en bloc excision, and distal gastrectomy surgery with gastrojejunostomy and ileocolic anastomosis. Radiologic modalities are necessary before surgery. Surgery is the only curative treatment in benign cases and reconstruction method is dependent on patient's situation. PMID:25436101

  10. Dementia in MS complicated by coexistent Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Eoin P.; Knopman, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Distinguishing dementia due to multiple sclerosis (MS) from that of an accompanying neurodegenerative dementia coexisting with MS has been difficult. The recent introduction of Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers of amyloid-? and neuronal degeneration has improved diagnosis of AD premortem. We describe 3 patients with MS with coexisting AD, 1 diagnosed at autopsy before AD biomarkers were available and 2 diagnosed premortem by decreased CSF amyloid-?1-42/tau index, MRI, and 18F-flourodeoxyglucose-PET patterns. AD biomarkers may be of diagnostic value in selected patients with severe dementia and MS. PMID:25110620

  11. Knocked-out and still walking: prion protein-deficient cattle are resistant to prion disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are caused by the propagation of a misfolded form (PrP**d) of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP**c. Disruption of PrP**c expression in the mouse results in resistance to PrP-propagation and disease. However, the impa...

  12. Vascular complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Ronald D; Malek, Adel M; Watnick, Terry

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. Relentless cyst growth substantially enlarges both kidneys and culminates in renal failure. Patients with ADPKD also have vascular abnormalities; intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are found in ?10% of asymptomatic patients during screening and in up to 25% of those with a family history of IA or subarachnoid haemorrhage. As the genes responsible for ADPKD—PKD1 and PKD2—have complex integrative roles in mechanotransduction and intracellular calcium signalling, the molecular basis of IA formation might involve focal haemodynamic conditions exacerbated by hypertension and altered flow sensing. IA rupture results in substantial mortality, morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. In this Review, we focus mainly on strategies for screening, diagnosis and treatment of IAs in patients with ADPKD. Other vascular aneurysms and anomalies—including aneurysms of the aorta and coronary arteries, cervicocephalic and thoracic aortic dissections, aortic root dilatation and cerebral dolichoectasia—are less common in this population, and the available data are insufficient to recommend screening strategies. Treatment decisions should be made with expert consultation and be based on a risk-benefit analysis that takes into account aneurysm location and morphology as well as patient age and comorbidities. PMID:26260542

  13. Care of the injured worldwide: trauma still the neglected disease of modern society

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, surgical diseases including emergency and injury care have garnered less attention and support internationally when compared to other medical specialties. Over the past decade however, healthcare professionals have increasingly advocated for the need to address the global burden of non-communicable diseases. Surgical disease, including traumatic injury, is among the top causes of death and disability worldwide and the subsequent economic burden is substantial, falling disproportionately on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The future of global health in these regions depends on a redirection of attention to diseases managed within surgical, anesthesia and emergency specialties. Increasing awareness of these disparities, as well as increasing focus in the realms of policy and advocacy, is crucial. While the barriers to providing quality trauma and emergency care worldwide are not insurmountable, we must work together across disciplines and across boundaries in order to negotiate change and reduce the global burden of surgical disease. PMID:22980446

  14. Atypical and complicated Kawasaki disease in infants. Do we need criteria?

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, A; Kabani, A; Jadavji, T

    1995-01-01

    Case reports suggest that infants with Kawasaki disease have atypical presentations and a high complication rate, likely related to delayed diagnosis and treatment. To date, no study of consecutive cases has compared infants with older children who have both atypical and typical Kawasaki disease. We retrospectively reviewed 44 cases of Kawasaki disease treated at our hospital from March 1980 to 1990: 11 (25%) were infants; 9 (20%) had atypical Kawasaki disease, of which 5 (56%) were infants; the male to female ratio was 1.7:1. Infants had a higher incidence of atypical Kawasaki disease (5 [45%] versus 4 [12%]; P = .007) and of coronary artery complications (7 [64%] versus 3 [9%]; P = .002), and coronary artery complications developed in all of the infants with atypical Kawasaki disease (5 [100%] versus 0 [0%]; P < .01). Yet, the other manifestations and laboratory changes were at least as common as in the older children. Coronary artery complications did not develop in any patient who received early intravenous immune globulin therapy. We suggest that in infants with Kawasaki disease, accepted criteria are too restrictive to allow early diagnosis and effective treatment. Until a definitive test is available, clinical judgment is required in the diagnosis of atypical Kawasaki disease. Intravenous immune globulin is known to be safe, and its early use in patients with suspected atypical Kawasaki disease is appropriate. PMID:7747497

  15. [Allergic rhinitis. Coexistent diseases and complications. A review and analysis].

    PubMed

    Sacre Hazouri, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is rarely found in isolation and needs to be considered in the context of systemic allergic disease associated with numerous comorbid disorders, including asthma, chronic middle ear effusions, sinusitis, and lymphoid hypertrophy with obstructive sleep apnea, disordered sleep, and consequent behavioral and educational effects. The coexistence of allergic rhinitis and asthma is complex. First, the diagnosis of asthma may be confused by symptoms of cough caused by rhinitis and postnasal drip. This may lead to either inaccurate diagnosis of asthma or inappropriate assessment of asthma severity with over treatment of the patient. The term "cough variant rhinitis" is therefore proposed to describe rhinitis that manifest itself primarily as cough that results from postnasal drip. Allergic rhinitis, however, has also a causal role in asthma; it appears both to be responsible for exacerbating asthma and to have a role in its pathogenesis. Postnasal drip with nasopharyngeal inflammation leads to a number of other conditions. Thus sinusitis is a frequent extension of rhinitis and is one of the most frequently missed diagnoses. Allergen exposure in the nasopharynx with release of histamine and other mediators can cause Eustachian tube obstruction possibly leading to middle ear effusions. Chronic allergic inflammation of the upper airway causes lymphoid hypertrophy with prominence of adenoidal and tonsillar tissue. This may be associated with poor appetite, poor growth, obstructive sleep apnea, mouth breathing, pharyngeal irritation and dental abnormalities. Allergic rhinitis is therefore part of a spectrum of allergic disorders that can profoundly affect the well being and quality of life of a child. Prospective cohort studies are required to assess the disease burden caused by allergic rhinitis in childhood, its consequences due to delay in diagnosis and treatment, and to further assess the potential educational impairment that may result. Because allergic rhinitis is part of a systemic disease process, its diagnosis and management require a coordinated approach by the specialist in allergy-immunology-rhinology rather than a fragmented, organ based approach. There are other clinical presentations such as recurrent infections of the upper respiratory tract, as well as pharyngeal and laryngeal disorders. PMID:16634358

  16. The effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease.

    PubMed

    Lönnerfors, Celine; Reynisson, Petur; Geppert, Barbara; Persson, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The study objective was to assess the effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease. This is a retrospective cohort study. It is a Canadian Task Force classification II-2 study conducted at the University Hospital, Sweden. The patients were 949 women planned for robotic hysterectomy for malignant (75 %) and benign (25 %) gynecological disease between October 2005 and December 2013. They were continuously evaluated for the rate of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to 1-year post-surgery, the latter according to Clavien-Dindo classification following the introduction of robotic surgery with special awareness of complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors, the description of refinement of practice and assessment of the effect of these measures. The rate of intraoperative complications, the overall rate of complications and the rate of ?grade 3 complications decreased from the first to the last time period (4.8 vs 2.6 %, p = 0.037, 34 vs 19 %, p = 0.003 and 13.5 vs 3.2 %, p = 0.0003, respectively). The rate of intraoperative complications and the rate of postoperative complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors was reduced from the first to the last time period (3.8 vs 0.6 %, p = 0.028 and 7.7 vs 1.5 %, p = 0.003, respectively). In patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease intraoperative and postoperative complications and complications possibly related to the robotic approach diminish with training, experience and refinement of practice. PMID:26530844

  17. Spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog with bronchopulmonary disease complicated by pyothorax and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Simone; Rocchi, Paola M.; Raiano, Vera; Diana, Daniela; Greci, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumopericardium is a rare condition consisting of pericardial gas in the absence of iatrogenic or traumatic causes; it has been described secondary to pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchopulmonary disease. This report describes a case of spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog presenting with dyspnea secondary to pyopneumothorax complicating a bronchopulmonary disease. PMID:25477548

  18. Spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog with bronchopulmonary disease complicated by pyothorax and pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Simone; Rocchi, Paola M; Raiano, Vera; Diana, Daniela; Greci, Valentina

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous pneumopericardium is a rare condition consisting of pericardial gas in the absence of iatrogenic or traumatic causes; it has been described secondary to pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchopulmonary disease. This report describes a case of spontaneous pneumopericardium in a dog presenting with dyspnea secondary to pyopneumothorax complicating a bronchopulmonary disease. PMID:25477548

  19. Can we still miss tetrachloroethylene-induced lung disease? The emperor returns in new clothes.

    PubMed

    Tanios, Maged A; El Gamal, Hesham; Rosenberg, Beth J; Hassoun, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a complex syndrome of varying intensity and clinical presentation, and has been described in association with numerous exposures. Early diagnosis is essential to limit irreversible lung damage. We describe a case of HP in a 42-year-old dry cleaner following occupational exposure to tetrachloroethylene (TCE). The diagnosis was suspected based on clinical presentation and radiographic studies, and confirmed by lung biopsy. A review of the literature reveals that HP has not been reported previously as an occupational lung disease in dry cleaners. We conclude that HP should be suspected in dry cleaners presenting with pulmonary complaints, and TCE should be considered as a potential trigger of disease. The spectrum of TCE-related occupational diseases and the diagnosis of HP are reviewed. PMID:15627878

  20. [Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: electromyography is still useful in diagnosis and classification].

    PubMed

    Birouk, N; Maisonobe, T; Le Forestier, N; Gouider, R; Léger, J M; Bouche, P

    1997-12-01

    Genetic heterogeneity was known for a long time in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The recent findings in molecular biology emphasized the distinction in different types of the disease. Nevertheless, electrophysiological examinations are of a great interest to detect asymptomatic patients, to classify the different forms and to make correlations with the clinical and histological features. Current classification is based on genetic and electrophysiologic data. CMT1, or hypertrophic form in which mutations or a duplication were found on chromosome 17 is the most frequent (CMT1A), CMT2 is the neuronal form, CMT3 is termed the Dejerine-Sottas disease, CMT4 recessive forms, CMT5 a form with associated pyramidal features, and CMTX. The electrophysiologic aspects of these different types are reported. PMID:9686263

  1. [Scurvy, an old disease still in the news: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Pailhous, S; Lamoureux, S; Caietta, E; Bosdure, E; Chambost, H; Chabrol, B; Bresson, V

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy is the clinical manifestation of a deficiency in vitamin C, which is present in fresh fruits and vegetables. It is historically linked to the era of great maritime expeditions. Manifestations are misleading in children, in contrast with adults: bone disease and hemorrhagic syndrome are the earliest and most frequent manifestations due to a collagen biosynthesis defect. Scurvy is an old, potentially fatal disease but is easily curable with ascorbic acid. It can be prevented with vitamin C treatment in pediatric populations with unusual eating habits. We describe two cases of pediatric scurvy in two 7-year-old boys who had dietary restrictions stemming from developmental disorders. PMID:25455083

  2. Coronary heart disease in sub-Saharan Africa: still rare, misdiagnosed or underdiagnosed?

    PubMed Central

    Luchuo, Engelbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries, but it has generally been considered to be rare in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). SSA is undergoing rapid epidemiological transition with an increasing prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors and consequential cardiovascular diseases such as stroke. However, CHD including myocardial infarction has generally been considered to be rare despite this deterioration in the risk factors profile. There is an urgent need to raise awareness about CHD both in the general population and healthcare professionals while making available simple, inexpensive screening and diagnostic tools in sub-Saharan African countries. PMID:26885493

  3. Crohn's disease phenotype, prognosis, and long-term complications: what to expect?

    PubMed

    Cosnes, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    According to Montreal classification, different phenotypes of Crohn's disease are defined taking into account age at diagnosis, localization of digestive lesions at first surgery, and cumulative anatomical behaviour. This classification is supported by the increased severity of the disease when diagnosed in childhood, the relative stability of disease localization over time, and the clinical importance of intestinal complications as stricture and abscess or fistula formation. However, type and delay of complications are dependent on disease localization (they develop early in small bowel disease and late in colitis), every patient will develop complications one day, and perianal disease may be an important problem observed in up to half the patients. The percentage of patients with active disease every year remains stable, about 40%, after the 3 first years, and only a few patients have long periods of remission. Intestinal resections are required in the majority of patients during life, and many are operated on several times. Prognosis is hampered by iterative surgery, cancer and side-effects of treatment. Standardized mortality ratio is 1.50. Although occurrence of complications, need for surgery and mortality did not change significantly through the years 1950-2000, there are some signals suggesting that new therapetic strategies (immunosuppressants earlier in high risk patients) and biologics will modify natural history and improve the long-term prognosis. PMID:19198576

  4. Pictorial review: Imaging features of unusual patterns and complications of hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhammad Umar; Mahmood, Rabia; Shafique, Mobeen; Khan, Muhammad Shoib; Bilal, Aamir; Siddiqi, Hammad Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. We demonstrate rare locations and unusual complications of this entity during past 6 years. Rare locations during our observation included lumbar spine, sacral spine, spleen, ovary, abdominal wall, diaphragm, pelvis and right kidney. Unusual complications included formation of bronchopulmonary fistula, complete collapse of left lung secondary to hilar location of Hydatid cyst and hydatiduria. PMID:22470631

  5. Impact of GOLD groups of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Choi, Sun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased postoperative complications. Recently, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classified COPD patients into four groups based on spirometry results and the severity of symptoms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of GOLD groups on postoperative complications. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of COPD patients who underwent preoperative spirometry between April and August 2013 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. We divided the patients into GOLD groups according to the results of spirometry and self-administered questionnaires that assessed the symptom severity and exacerbation history. GOLD groups, demographic characteristics, and operative conditions were analyzed. Results Among a total of 405 COPD patients, 70 (17.3%) patients experienced various postoperative complications, including infection, wound, or pulmonary complications. Thoracic surgery, upper abdominal surgery, general anesthesia, large estimated blood loss during surgery, and longer anesthesia time were significant risk factors for postoperative complications. Patients in high-risk group (GOLD groups C or D) had an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those in low-risk group (GOLD groups A or B). Conclusion COPD patients in GOLD groups representing a high exacerbation risk have an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those with low risk. PMID:26929613

  6. Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.; Kesen, Muge R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C.; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S.; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG → GTG) in exon 1 of the β globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the β globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  8. Investigating emotions in Parkinson's disease: what we know and what we still don't know.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Igor; Rusconi, Maria L

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increasing attention to the role played by emotional processes in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, most of what is known in this area is based on research conducted in laboratory or clinical settings. In this article, the authors underline the need to expand our current knowledge of the psychological correlates of PD by investigating patients' everyday emotions in natural contexts. Specifically, the authors illustrate new research avenues based on the implementation of experience sampling methods. It is argued that these methods could permit future researchers to ecologically assess the frequency and intensity with which parkinsonian patients experience specific emotions (either negative or positive) during their everyday life, providing at the same time precious information on what are the most typical situations in which these emotions occur and on how patients behave in these circumstances. Potential practical implications associated with investigating these issues are discussed. PMID:23772218

  9. Methotrexate: should it still be considered for chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal disease?

    PubMed

    Pascual, Eliseo; Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal arthritis is a clinical consequence of the formation and deposition of these crystals in joints and can result in persistent arthritis. Curative treatment would require the removal of crystals from joints and tissues, but to date all agents tested have proven ineffective. Management of the inflammatory manifestations of chronic calcium pyrophosphate disease includes glucocorticoids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or colchicine, and responses are usually satisfactory. However, in some patients, the response to these agents is poor or they are contraindicated. Methotrexate had been reported as a promising option in small case series; however, in a recent issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy, a clinical trial failed to confirm the anticipated benefits. Here, we discuss some issues that might have influenced the results of the study, before deciding to abandon methotrexate as a therapeutic option for patients with chronic calcium pyrophosphate arthritis. PMID:25885915

  10. Body Fat Composition Assessment Using Analytic Morphomics Predicts Infectious Complications After Bowel Resection in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Akbar K.; Day, Nicholas M.; Bergmans, Carrie L.; Zahn, Katelin M.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Stewart C.; Su, Grace L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decisions between medical and surgical management of Crohn's disease (CD) incorporate risk assessments for potential complications of each therapy. Analytic morphomics is a novel method of image analysis providing quantifiable measurements of body tissue composition, characterizing body fat more comprehensively than body mass index alone. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with postoperative complications in CD, incorporating fat composition analysis using analytic morphomics. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of adults undergoing bowel resection for CD between 2004 and 2011 at a single center. Computed tomography obtained within 30 days prior to surgery underwent morphomic analysis for fat characterization. Postoperative infectious complications were defined as the need for a postoperative abdominal drain, intravenous antibiotics, or reoperation within 30 days. Bivariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression were used to generate a prediction model of infectious complications. Results: A total of 269 subjects met selection criteria; 27% incurred postoperative infectious complications. Bivariate analysis showed hemoglobin, albumin, surgical urgency, high-dose prednisone use, and subcutaneous-to-visceral fat volume distribution as predictors of complications. Body mass index, anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapies, and immunomodulator use were not predictors of complication. Multivariate modeling demonstrated a c-statistic of 0.77 and a negative predictive value of 81.1% with surgical urgency (odds ratio = 2.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.46–6.02; P = 0.004), subcutaneous-to-visceral fat distribution (odds ratio = 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–3.19; P = 0.006), and hemoglobin (odds ratio = 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.55–0.85; P = 0.001) as predictors of infectious complication. Conclusions: Fat subtype and distribution are predictive of postoperative infectious complications after bowel resection for CD. Analytic morphomics provides additional body composition detail not captured by body mass index. PMID:25822011

  11. Severe hyperferritinemia-a clue for severe hepatitis in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Rema; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Dagan, Amir; Toledano, Kohava; Saadi, Tarek; Sabo, Edmond; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2014-11-22

    A 19-year old previously healthy man developed the adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) with high ferritin levels. Corticosteroids induced clinical remission with resolution of fever, arthritis, and rash. While tapering corticosteroids, the patient developed severe liver enzymes elevation, very high ferritin levels and, subsequently, acute liver failure. After other causes of liver disease (infections, metabolic, autoimmune hepatitis, lymphoma, and hemophagocytosis) were excluded, severe hepatitis was attributed to AOSD itself. Cyclosporine induced rapid normalization of liver enzymes and reduction in ferritin levels. Severe hepatitis and very high ferritin levels could be the only manifestation of disease activity in AOSD; therefore, monitoring of liver enzymes and ferritin levels is recommended even after resolution of the clinical symptoms of AOSD. Prompt initiation of cyclosporine can improve liver function and prevent progression to liver failure. PMID:25413736

  12. A RARE COMPLICATION OF A RARE DISEASE; STROKE DUE TO RELAPSING POLYCHONDRITIS.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Eda Kiliç; Xanmemmedov, Elmir; Çolak, Melek; Soysal, Aysun

    2015-11-30

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an episodic and progressive inflammatory disease of cartilaginous structures. Its diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features such as laboratory parameters, biopsy. Neurological complications occur in 3% of the cases and are classified as an important cause of death. The cranial nerve disorders are most common but hemiplegia, ataxia, myelitis, polyneuritis, seizures, confusion, hallucination and headache can also happen. The aetiology of central nervous system involvement is still unknown. Moreover stroke has rarely reported in these patients. The diagnosis of stroke is challenging because of its rarity among these patients. Perhaps vasculitis is the common underlying mechanism. Also meningitis and encephalitis can occur during the course of RP. A 44 year-old woman was admitted with uncontemplated left hemiparesis, redness, swelling, and tenderness of the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the right hand and the cartilaginous portion. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate were elevated. Vasculitis biomarkers were normal in our patient. Carotid and vertebral artery doppler ultrasonography, cranial and cervical MR Angiography were normal. Echocardiography showed a mild mitral valve prolapse and regurgitation. Our patient had the history of auricular polychondritis but she had not been diagnosed. Hemiparesis was her first neurological manifestation that led her to doctors for diagnosis. Our patient fulfilled the criteria of RP so no biopsy was needed. She was treated with oral prednisolone (80 mg/day) and aspirin (300 mg/day) and now she is on 10 mg prednisolone and 150 mg azathioprine. Two months later her physical and neurological symptoms returned to normal. PMID:26821518

  13. The clinical impact of MTHFR polymorphism on the vascular complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira Neto, F; Lourenço, D M; Noguti, M A E; Morelli, V M; Gil, I C P; Beltrão, A C S; Figueiredo, M S

    2006-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common inherited diseases in the world and the patients present notorious clinical heterogeneity. It is known that patients with SCD present activation of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, especially during vaso-occlusive crises, but also during the steady state of the disease. We determined if the presence of the factor V gene G1691A mutation (factor V Leiden), the prothrombin gene G20210A variant, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism may be risk factors for vascular complications in individuals with SCD. We studied 53 patients with SCD (60% being women), 29 with SS (sickle cell anemia; 28 years, range: 13-52 years) and 24 with SC (sickle-hemoglobin C disease; 38.5 years, range: 17-72 years) hemoglobinopathy. Factor V Leiden, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, and prothrombin G20210A variant were identified by PCR followed by further digestion of the PCR product with specific endonucleases. The following vascular complications were recorded: stroke, retinopathy, acute thoracic syndrome, and X-ray-documented avascular necrosis. Only one patient was heterozygous for factor V Leiden (1.8%) and there was no prothrombin G20210A variant. MTHFR 677TT polymorphism was detected in 1 patient (1.8%) and the heterozygous form 677TC was observed in 18 patients (34%, 9 with SS and 9 with SC disease), a prevalence similar to that reported by others. No association was detected between the presence of the MTHFR 677T allele and other genetic modulation factors, such as alpha-thalassemia, beta-globin gene haplotype and fetal hemoglobin. The presence of the MTHFR 677T allele was associated with the occurrence of vascular complications in SCD, although this association was not significant when each complication was considered separately. In conclusion, MTHFR C677T polymorphism might be a risk factor for vascular complications in SCD. PMID:16906320

  14. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  15. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-02-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  16. A Case of Pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii Disease Complicated with Tension Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Ki Yung

    2015-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an extremely rare complication of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection. A 52-year-old man presenting with difficulty breathing and chest pain was admitted to our hospital. A right-sided pneumothorax was observed on chest radiography and chest computed tomography showed multiple cavitating and non-cavitating nodules with consolidation in the upper to middle lung zones bilaterally. Serial sputum cultures were positive for Mycobacterium kansasii, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. kansasii disease complicated by tension pneumothorax. After initiation of treatment including decortications and pleurodesis, the patient made a full recovery. We herein describe this patient's course in detail and review the current relevant literature. PMID:26508923

  17. A Case of Pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii Disease Complicated with Tension Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Boo, Ki Yung; Lee, Jong Hoo

    2015-10-01

    Pneumothorax is an extremely rare complication of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection. A 52-year-old man presenting with difficulty breathing and chest pain was admitted to our hospital. A right-sided pneumothorax was observed on chest radiography and chest computed tomography showed multiple cavitating and non-cavitating nodules with consolidation in the upper to middle lung zones bilaterally. Serial sputum cultures were positive for Mycobacterium kansasii, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. kansasii disease complicated by tension pneumothorax. After initiation of treatment including decortications and pleurodesis, the patient made a full recovery. We herein describe this patient's course in detail and review the current relevant literature. PMID:26508923

  18. [Increased risk of tromboembolic complication in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Jussila, Airi; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Collin, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    Tromboembolic complications are 2-4-fold more likely in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in healthy individuals; active IBD may increase the relative risk even 15-fold. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are the most common involvements, but also atypical forms occur. We describe such uncommon thrombotic manifestations in two IBD patients: one had mesenterial vein and the other cavernoid sinus thrombosis. The risk of thrombotic complications should be estimated individually, and prophylactic management with low molecular weight heparin should be considered in hospitalized IBD patients. PMID:23155754

  19. Role of Adipokines in Atherosclerosis: Interferences with Cardiovascular Complications in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Gómez, Rodolfo; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; González, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez-Reino, Juan J.; Gualillo, Oreste

    2012-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of mortality by cardiovascular events. In fact, several rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatic patients, these alterations do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Obesity and its pathologic alteration of fat mass and dysfunction, due to an altered pattern of secretion of proinflammatory adipokines, could be one of the links between cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases. Indeed, the incidence of CVDs is augmented in obese individuals with rheumatic disorders. Thus, in this paper we explore in detail the relationships among adipokines, rheumatic diseases, and cardiovascular complications by giving to the reader a holistic vision and several suggestions for future perspectives and potential clinical implications. PMID:22910888

  20. Hyperferritinemic syndrome: Still's disease and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome triggered by fulminant Chikungunya infection: a case report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Juan-Felipe; Navarro, Erika-Paola; Echeverry, Alex; Moncada, Pablo A; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    There are four medical conditions characterized by high levels of ferritin, the macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), adult onset Still' s disease (AOSD), catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), and septic shock, that share similar clinical and laboratory features, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. This common syndrome entity is termed "the hyperferritinemic syndrome." Here, we describe two different cases of hyperferritinemic syndrome triggered by Chikungunya fever virus infection: a 21-year-old female with SLE and a 32-year-old male patient who developed AOSD after the coinfection of dengue and Chikungunya viruses. PMID:26233722

  1. Risk of Fecal Diversion in Complicated Perianal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Geis, M.; Glatzle, J.; Kasparek, M.; Meile, T.; Jehle, E. C.; Kreis, M. E.; Zittel, T. T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the overall risk of a permanent stoma in patients with complicated perianal Crohn’s disease, and to identify risk factors predicting stoma carriage. A total of 102 consecutive patients presented with the first manifestation of complicated perianal Crohn’s disease in our outpatient department between 1992 and 1995. Ninety-seven patients (95%) could be followed up at a median of 16 years after first diagnosis of Crohn’s disease. Patients were sent a standardized questionnaire and patient charts were reviewed with respect to the recurrence of perianal abscesses or fistulas and surgical treatment, including fecal diversion. Factors predictive of permanent stoma carriage were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Thirty of 97 patients (31%) with complicated perianal Crohn’s disease eventually required a permanent stoma. The median time from first diagnosis of Crohn’s disease to permanent fecal diversion was 8.5 years (range 0–23 years). Temporary fecal diversion became necessary in 51 of 97 patients (53%), but could be successfully removed in 24 of 51 patients (47%). Increased rates of permanent fecal diversion were observed in 54% of patients with complex perianal fistulas and in 54% of patients with rectovaginal fistulas, as well as in patients that had undergone subtotal colon resection (60%), left-sided colon resection (83%), or rectal resection (92%). An increased risk for permanent stoma carriage was identified by multivariate analysis for complex perianal fistulas (odds ratio [OR] 5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2–18), temporary fecal diversion (OR 8; 95% CI 2–35), fecal incontinence (OR 21, 95% CI 3–165), or rectal resection (OR 30; 95% CI 3–179). Local drainage, setons, and temporary stoma for deep and complicated fistulas in Crohn’s disease, followed by a rectal advancement flap, may result in closing of the stoma in 47% of the time. The risk of permanent fecal diversion was substantial in patients with complicated perianal Crohn’s disease, with patients requiring a colorectal resection or suffering from fecal incontinence carrying a particularly high risk for permanent fecal diversion. In contrast, patients with perianal Crohn’s disease who required surgery for small bowel disease or a segmental colon resection carried no risk of a permanent stoma. PMID:17436140

  2. Hemoglobin sickle cell disease complications: a clinical study of 179 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lionnet, François; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Stojanovic, Katia Stankovic; Avellino, Virginie; Grateau, Gilles; Girot, Robert; Haymann, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin sickle cell disease is one of the most frequent hemoglobinopathies. Surprisingly, few studies have been dedicated to this disease, currently considered to be a mild variant of homozygous sickle cell disease. The aim of this study was to update our knowledge about hemoglobin sickle cell disease. Design and Methods The study involved a single center series of 179 patients. Clinical and biological data were collected with special attention to the assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and nephropathy. Results Hemoglobin sickle cell diagnosis was delayed and performed in adulthood in 29% of cases. Prevalence of hospitalized painful vasoocclusive crisis, acute chest syndrome and priapism was 36%, 20% and 20%, respectively. The most common chronic organ complications were retinopathy and sensorineural otological disorders in 70% and 29% of cases. Indeed, prevalence of complications reported in homozygous sickle cell disease, such as nephropathy, suspicion of pulmonary hypertension, strokes and leg ulcers was rather low (13%, 4% and 1%, respectively). Phlebotomy performed in 36% of this population (baseline hemoglobin 11.5 g/dL) prevented recurrence of acute events in 71% of cases. Conclusions Our data suggest that hemoglobin sickle cell disease should not be considered as a mild form of sickle cell anemia but as a separate disease with a special emphasis on viscosity-associated otological and ophthalmological disorders, and with a low prevalence of vasculopathy (strokes, pulmonary hypertension, ulcers and nephropathy). Phlebotomy was useful in reducing acute events and a wider use of this procedure should be further investigated. PMID:22315500

  3. Reduction of fatal complications from combined modality therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mauch, P.M.; Canellos, G.P.; Rosenthal, D.S.; Hellman, S.

    1985-04-01

    A total of 464 pathologically staged IA through IIIB Hodgkin's disease patients were evaluated for the risk of developing acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or a fatal infection after treatment with radiation therapy (RT) alone, initial combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy (CMT), or RT with MOPP administered at relapse. Patients received a standard six cycles of MOPP, and additional maintenance chemotherapy was not administered. Patients receiving total nodal irradiation (TNI) and MOPP chemotherapy have an 11. 9% actuarial risk of developing a fatal complication at ten years, as compared to a 0.8% risk for lesser field irradiation and MOPP. The risk with RT alone is 0.6%. Patients 40 years of age or older have a greater risk for complications. These data report a low risk for fatal complication with CMT when less than TNI is administered and when maintenance chemotherapy is not used.

  4. [Histological diagnosis and complications of celiac disease. Update according to the new S2k guidelines].

    PubMed

    Aust, D E; Bläker, H

    2015-03-01

    Celiac disease is a relatively common immunological systemic disease triggered by the protein gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Classical symptoms like chronic diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss and growth retardation are nowadays relatively uncommon. Diagnostic workup includes serological tests for IgA antibodies against tissue transglutaminase 2 (anti-TG2-IgA) and total IgA and histology of duodenal biopsies. Histomorphological classification should be done according to the modified Marsh-Oberhuber classification. Diagnosis of celiac disease should be based on serological, clinical, and histological findings. The only treatment is a life-long gluten-free diet. Unchanged or recurrent symptoms under gluten-free diet may indicate refractory celiac disease. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine are known complications of celiac disease. PMID:25820446

  5. Treatment of Parkinson disease: a 64-year-old man with motor complications of advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    In early stages, Parkinson disease typically begins with asymmetric or unilateral motor symptoms due to combinations of mild bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor. In most cases, with progression, signs of more generalized bradykinesia appear, which include facial masking, reduced voice volume, and slowing of activities of daily living. In more advanced Parkinson disease, other disabling manifestations may follow, such as impaired balance, gait freezing, falls, speech disturbance, and cognitive impairment. Levodopa is the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson disease. However, motor complications uniquely related to levodopa treatment may emerge that may be difficult to manage. These include fluctuating levodopa responses and involuntary movements and postures known as dyskinesia and dystonia. Medication adjustments are usually effective, but in some cases surgical intervention with deep brain stimulation becomes necessary to alleviate motor complications. The case of Mr L, a man with an 11-year history of Parkinson disease, illustrates these emerging motor complications and the manner in which they may be managed both medically and surgically. PMID:22706836

  6. The modern pre-levodopa era of Parkinson’s disease: insights into motor complications from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Akpalu, Albert; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Cham, Momodou; Amboni, Marianna; Cereda, Emanuele; Fabbri, Margherita; Adjei, Patrick; Akassi, John; Bonetti, Alba; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, a number of large drug trials suggested that the initiation of levodopa therapy should be delayed to reduce the risk of motor complications in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, the relative contribution of the cumulative exposure to levodopa and of disease progression to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias is still poorly understood. In this 4-year multicentre study, we investigated a large cohort of patients with Parkinson’s disease in a sub-Saharan African country (Ghana), where access to medication is limited and the initiation of levodopa therapy often occurs many years after onset. The primary objective was to investigate whether the occurrence of motor complications is primarily related to the duration of levodopa therapy or to disease-related factors. Study design included a cross-sectional case-control analysis of data collected between December 2008 and November 2012, and a prospective study of patients followed-up for at least 6 months after the initiation of levodopa therapy. Ninety-one patients fulfilled criteria for clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (58 males, mean age at onset 60.6 ± 11.3 years). Demographic data were compared to those of 2282 consecutive Italian patients recruited during the same period, whereas nested matched subgroups were used to compare clinical variables. Demographic features, frequency and severity of motor and non-motor symptoms were comparable between the two populations, with the only exception of more frequent tremor-dominant presentation in Ghana. At baseline, the proportion of Ghanaian patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was 56% and 14%, respectively. Although levodopa therapy was introduced later in Ghana (mean disease duration 4.2 ± 2.8 versus 2.4 ± 2.1 years, P < 0.001), disease duration at the occurrence of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias was similar in the two populations. In multivariate analysis, disease duration and levodopa daily dose (mg/kg of body weight) were associated with motor complications, while the disease duration at the initiation of levodopa was not. Prospective follow-up for a mean of 2.6 ± 1.3 years of a subgroup of 21 patients who were drug-naïve at baseline [median disease duration 4.5 (interquartile range, 2.3–5) years] revealed that the median time to development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias after initiation of levodopa therapy was 6 months. We conclude that motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are not associated with the duration of levodopa therapy, but rather with longer disease duration and higher levodopa daily dose. Hence, the practice to withhold levodopa therapy with the objective of delaying the occurrence of motor complications is not justified. PMID:25034897

  7. Risk factors and implications of anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Kristen T; Messaris, Evangelos

    2015-10-27

    Anastomotic complications occur more frequently in patients with Crohn's disease leading to postoperative intra-abdominal septic complications (IASC). Patients with IASC often require re-operation or drainage to control the sepsis and have an increased frequency of disease recurrence. The aim of this article was to examine the factors affecting postoperative IASC in Crohn's disease after anastomoses, since some risk factors remain controversial. Studies investigating IASC in Crohn's operations were included, and all risk factors associated with IASC were evaluated: nutritional status, presence of abdominal sepsis, medication use, Crohn's disease type, duration of disease, prior operations for Crohn's, anastomotic technique, extent of resection, operative timing, operative length, and perioperative bleeding. In this review, the factors associated with an increased risk of IASC are preoperative weight loss, abdominal abscess present at time of surgery, prior operation, and steroid use. To prevent IASC in Crohn's patients, preoperative optimization with nutritional supplementation or drainage of abscess should be performed, or a diverting stoma should be considered for patients with multiple risk factors. PMID:26523211

  8. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  9. The French Gaucher’s disease registry: clinical characteristics, complications and treatment of 562 patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical features, complications and treatments of Gaucher’s disease (GD), a rare autosomal–recessive disorder due to a confirmed lysosomal enzyme (glucocerebrosidase) deficiency, are described. Methods All patients with known GD, living in France, with ≥1 consultations (1980–2010), were included in the French GD registry, yielding the following 4 groups: the entire cohort, with clinical description; and its subgroups: patients with ≥1 follow-up visits, to investigate complications; recently followed (2009–2010) patients; and patients treated during 2009–2010, to examine complications before and during treatment. Data are expressed as medians (range) for continuous variables and numbers (%) for categorical variables. Results Among the 562 registry patients, 265 (49.6%) were females; 454 (85.0%) had type 1, 22 (4.1%) type 2, 37 (6.9%) perinatal–lethal type and 21 (3.9%) type 3. Median ages at first GD symptoms and diagnosis, respectively, were 15 (0–77) and 22 (0–84) years for all types. The first symptom diagnosing GD was splenomegaly and/or thrombocytopenia (37.6% and 26.3%, respectively). Bone-marrow aspiration and/or biopsy yielded the diagnosis for 54.7% of the patients, with enzyme deficiency confirming GD for all patients. Birth incidence rate was estimated at 1/50,000 and prevalence at 1/136,000. For the 378 followed patients, median follow-up was 16.2 (0.1–67.6) years. Major clinical complications were bone events (BE; avascular necrosis, bone infarct or pathological fracture) for 109 patients, splenectomy for 104, and Parkinson’s disease for 14; 38 patients died (neurological complications for 15 type-2 and 3 type-3 patients, GD complications for 11 type-1 and another disease for 9 type-1 patients). Forty-six had monoclonal gammopathy. Among 283 recently followed patients, 36 were untreated and 247 had been treated during 2009–2010; 216 patients received treatment in December 2010 (126 with imiglucerase, 45 velaglucerase, 24 taliglucerase, 21 miglustat). BE occurred before (130 in 67 patients) and under treatment (60 in 41 patients) with respective estimated frequencies (95% CI) of first BE at 10 years of 20.3% (14.1%–26.5%) and 19.8% (13.5%–26.1%). Conclusion This registry enabled the epidemiological description of GD in France and showed that BE occur even during treatment. PMID:23046562

  10. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Hwan; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor ? antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  11. Inherited DNA mutations contributing to thrombotic complications in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, S A; Ware, R E

    1998-12-01

    Thrombosis may play an important role in the pathophysiology of certain complications of sickle cell disease (SCD), including stroke and avascular necrosis (AVN). Currently there is no laboratory or clinical parameter that can identify patients who are at highest risk of developing these thrombotic complications. We hypothesized that some patients with SCD have an inherited hypercoagulable state that results in an increased risk of developing stroke or AVN. We examined the role of two common inherited thrombophilic mutations that, in other populations, have been associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and are amenable to screening with DNA restriction enzyme analysis. The C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and the C1565T mutation in the platelet glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) gene were evaluated. We analyzed genomic DNA from 86 children and adults with SCD, including 16 patients with a history of a clinical stroke and 14 patients with AVN, for the presence of these mutations. The C677T MTHFR mutation was found in 19% of patients with stroke, 14% of patients with AVN, and 14% of patients with neither complication (P = NS). The C1565T GPIIIa mutation was found in 25% of patients with stroke, 14% of patients with AVN, and 18% of patients with neither complication (P = NS). Although each of these mutations is relatively common in patients with SCD, neither is independently associated with an increased risk of developing stroke or AVN. PMID:9840906

  12. Late Complications of Clinical Clostridium Histolyticum Collagenase Use in Dupuytren's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, Warren M.; Edirisinghe, Yasith; Crock, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While Dupuytren's disease can cause disabling contractures requiring open surgery, a less-invasive option using Clostridium Histolyticum collagenase (CHC) via percutaneous injection was recently reported. A recent prospective, randomized trial demonstrated few complications during 90 days follow-up, however did not assess any longer term follow-up for these patients. Long-term outcomes in this setting have not been adequately reported, and the current manuscript aims to identify late complications from the clinical use of percutaneous CHC. Methods The current manuscript reports an extended 12-month follow-up for a cohort of twelve of patients enrolled in the original prospective, randomized trial, treated at a single institution. An analysis of complications requiring surgical intervention was undertaken. Results Two of twelve patients reported debilitating pain and triggering requiring surgical intervention. Extensive deep-tissue scarring and adhesions were identified, providing the first visual and qualitative analysis of the pathologic effects of CHC. Conclusion Late complications from CHC use can and have occurred, outside the follow-up period of the initial phase III trials. Longer term follow-up of such patients is thus essential, and further investigation and characterization of the late effects of CHC use is warranted. PMID:22912868

  13. Small bowel transplantation complicated by cytomegalovirus tissue invasive disease without viremia.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Yesim; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kabar, Iyad; Wolters, Heiner; Anthoni, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H J; Beckebaum, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    We report on a small bowel transplant patient, donor/recipient seropositive (D+/R+) for cytomegalovirus (CMV), with a clinical course complicated by CMV disease. Anti-CMV prophylaxis was given for 100 days. Immunosuppression consisted of alemtuzumab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Five months posttransplant, CMV tissue invasive disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract was evident without the presence of viremia, tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Complete viral load suppression was achieved with intravenous ganciclovir, followed by valganciclovir for secondary prophylaxis. Mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone were discontinued. Shortly thereafter the patient presented with recurrent CMV and candida esophagitis. While on ganciclovir and caspofungin, the patient developed CMV tissue invasive disease of the ileal graft, with persistent absence of viremia. Foscarnet and CMV immunoglobulin were added. Viral load declined to undetectable levels; however, clinical improvement did not occur due to occurrence of graft rejection. Despite infliximab and high dose prednisolone, graft rejection was progressive, requiring surgical explantation of the graft. This case highlights the importance of additional diagnostic tools such as endoscopy including PCR analysis of tissue samples. Extension of primary antiviral prophylaxis interval up to 6 months and prolonged retreatment for recurrent CMV disease may be useful to avoid severe CMV-related complications. PMID:24703746

  14. Nutrition therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and related nutritional complications.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Amanda Carla; Bezerra, Olívia Maria de Paula Alves

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible airway obstruction. The innumerable complications that occur during the progression of the disease can affect the nutritional state of patients suffering from this illness. The objective of this study was to present a brief review of the literature regarding the nutrition therapy used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To that end, we performed a bibliographic search for related articles published within the last 18 years and indexed for the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and Medline databases. Malnutrition is associated with a poor prognosis for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, since it predisposes such patients to infections, as well as reducing respiratory muscle force, exercise tolerance and quality of life. Despite the fact that such malnutrition is extremely common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, it should be recognized as an independent risk factor, since it can be modified through appropriate and efficacious diet therapy and monitoring. For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nutrition therapy is initiated after the evaluation of the nutritional state of the patient, which identifies nutritional risk, thereby allowing the proper level of treatment to be established. In this evaluation, anthropometric and biochemical markers, as well as indicators of dietary consumption and body composition, should be used. The prescribed diet should contain appropriate proportions of macronutrients, micronutrients and immunonutrients in order to regain or maintain the proper nutritional state and to avoid complications. The physical characteristics of the diet should be tailored to the individual needs and tolerances of each patient. In the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, individualized nutrition therapy is extremely important and has been shown to be fundamental to improving quality of life. PMID:17268751

  15. 1H NMR metabonomics approach to the disease continuum of diabetic complications and premature death

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Soininen, Pasi; Forsblom, Carol; Parkkonen, Maija; Ingman, Petri; Kaski, Kimmo; Groop, Per-Henrik; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2008-01-01

    Subtle metabolic changes precede and accompany chronic vascular complications, which are the primary causes of premature death in diabetes. To obtain a multimetabolite characterization of these high-risk individuals, we measured proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) data from the serum of 613 patients with type I diabetes and a diverse spread of complications. We developed a new metabonomics framework to visualize and interpret the data and to link the metabolic profiles to the underlying diagnostic and biochemical variables. Our results indicate complex interactions between diabetic kidney disease, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We illustrate how a single 1H NMR protocol is able to identify the polydiagnostic metabolite manifold of type I diabetes and how its alterations translate to clinical phenotypes, clustering of micro- and macrovascular complications, and mortality during several years of follow-up. This work demonstrates the diffuse nature of complex vascular diseases and the limitations of single diagnostic biomarkers. However, it also promises cost-effective solutions through high-throughput analytics and advanced computational methods, as applied here in a case that is representative of the real clinical situation. PMID:18277383

  16. [Incidence of severe local complications in ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Schneider, W; Rosahl, W

    1986-10-01

    At the example of the severe and foudroyant courses of the ulcerous colitis in patients who died or underwent a resection (n = 93) the severe local complications are demonstrated. 70 patients with resection of the intestine, 21 patients with diagnostic laparotomy as well as 32 deceased patients with Crohn's disease were compared with them. Transmigration peritonitides (3.3% of 458 patients with ulcerous colitis except haemorrhagic proctitis), perforation peritonitides (2.0%) as well as the toxic megacolon (3.3%) alone or in combination are the most frequent severe complications. Therapy-resistant intestinal haemorrhages (1.1%) are infrequent. In 0.9% of the cases colorectal carcinomata appear. The acute or chronic mechanical ileus is the most frequent complication in Crohn's disease (21.1% of 171 patients altogether). Intraabdominal abscesses are found in 11.7%. In participation of the colon fistulae are nearly twice as frequent as in localisation of the small intestine. Free perforations of the small intestine (3.8%) are more frequently observed than perforations of the colon (2.2%). PMID:3492827

  17. Host defense molecule polymorphisms influence the risk for immune-mediated complications in chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, C B; Lehrnbecher, T; Mol, F; Steinberg, S M; Venzon, D J; Walsh, T J; Noack, D; Rae, J; Winkelstein, J A; Curnutte, J T; Chanock, S J

    1998-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of phagocyte function in which defective superoxide production results in deficient microbicidal activity. CGD patients suffer from recurrent, life-threatening infections, and nearly half develop chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications (colitis, gastric outlet obstruction, or perirectal abscess) and/or autoimmune/rheumatologic disorders (AIDs). To identify genetic modifiers of disease severity, we studied a cohort of 129 CGD patients, in whom seven candidate genes (myeloperoxidase [MPO], mannose binding lectin [MBL], Fcgamma receptors IIa, IIIa, IIIb, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 receptor antagonist), each containing a physiologically relevant polymorphism predicted to influence the host inflammatory response, were selected for analysis. Genotypes of MPO (P = 0.003) and FcgammaRIIIb (P = 0.007) were strongly associated with an increased risk for GI complications, while an FcgammaRIIa (P = 0.05) genotype was suggestive for an association. Patients with all three associated genotypes had the highest risk for GI complications (P < 0.0001). The risk of AIDs was strongly associated with variant alleles of MBL (P = 0.01) and weakly associated with an FcgammaRIIa genotype (P = 0.04). Patients with variant forms of both MBL and FcgammaRIIa had the highest risk of developing an AID (P = 0.003). PMID:9854050

  18. Treatment of hepatic hydatid disease complications using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures

    PubMed Central

    Akaydin, Murat; Erozgen, Fazilet; Ersoy, Yeliz E.; Birol, Selim; Kaplan, Rafet

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver hydatidosis may lead to serious morbidity due to biliary complications, the management for which endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) and biliary drainage are very efficient. We evaluated the effectiveness of endoscopic treatment for complications of hepatic hydatid disease. Methods We retrospectively reviewed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures performed between January 2000 and December 2009 and compared laboratory findings, localization of the lesions and ERCP procedures applied between patients with and without jaundice. Results In all, 70 ERCP procedures were performed in 54 patients (24 men, 30 women). Of the 70 procedures, 24 were performed to treat jaundice. All patients with biliary fistulas and jaundice were managed with endoscopic procedures. The 70 ERCP procedures included sphincterotomy only (n = 40); sphincterotomy and stent placement (n = 7); stent placement only (n = 4); sphincterotomy and membrane extraction (n = 9); sphincterotomy, membrane extraction and pus drainage (n = 5); and sphincterotomy and pus drainage (n = 5). Laboratory results improved in 3–7 days, and bile leakage ceased in 2–21 days. Conclusion Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a safe and effective way to manage biliary complications of hepatic echinococcal disease. In most patients, ES is the most efficient treatment of postoperative external biliary fistulas, jaundice and accompanying cholangitis, as it enables clearing the bile ducts of hydatid remnants; ES should be performed since it accelerates the healing process by decreasing pressure in the choledochus. PMID:22617539

  19. Laparoscopic treatment of colovesical fistulas due to complicated colonic diverticular disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cirocchi, R; Cochetti, G; Randolph, J; Listorti, C; Castellani, E; Renzi, C; Mearini, E; Fingerhut, A

    2014-10-01

    Colovesical fistulas originating from complicated sigmoid diverticular disease are rare. The primary aim of this review was to evaluate the role of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of this complication. The secondary aim was to determine the best surgical treatment for this disease. A systematic search was conducted for studies published between 1992 and 2012 in PubMed, the Cochrane Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, Scopus, and Publish or Perish. Studies enrolling adults undergoing fully laparoscopic, laparoscopic-assisted, or hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery for colovesical fistula secondary to complicated sigmoid diverticular disease were considered. Data extracted concerned the surgical technique, intraoperative outcomes, and postoperative outcomes based on the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group's template. Descriptive statistics were reported according to the PRISMA statement. In all, 202 patients from 25 studies were included in this review. The standard treatment was laparoscopic colonic resection and primary anastomosis or temporary colostomy with or without resection of the bladder wall. Operative time ranged from 150 to 321 min. It was not possible to evaluate the conversion rate to open surgery because colovesical fistulas were not distinguished from other types of enteric fistulas in most of the studies. One anastomotic leak after bowel anastomosis was reported. There was zero mortality. Few studies conducted follow-up longer than 12 months. One patient required two reoperations. Laparoscopic treatment of colovesical fistulas secondary to sigmoid diverticular disease appears to be a feasible and safe approach. However, further studies are needed to establish whether laparoscopy is preferable to other surgical approaches. PMID:24848529

  20. A Case of Orf Disease Complicated with Erythema Multiforme and Bullous Pemphigoid-Like Eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Shahriar; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Arabsheybani, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Parapoxvirus infection in sheep and goats is usually referred to as contagious pustular dermatitis/ecthyma, or orf, and the corresponding human infection is referred to as orf. In humans, after a brief incubation period of 3 to 5 days, lesions begin as pruritic erythematous macules and then rise to form papules, often with a target appearance. Lesions become nodular or vesicular, and orf lesions often ulcerate after 14 to 21 days. Erythema multiforme and bullous pemphigoid have been associated with parapoxvirus infections and they are rare complications of orf disease. In this case report, we presented a 36-year-old woman with history of contact with sheep, developing a typical orf lesion that is complicated with erythema multiforme and bullous pemphigoid-like eruptions. PMID:26294986

  1. Should We Still Focus That Much on Cardiovascular Mortality in End Stage Renal Disease Patients? The CONvective TRAnsport STudy

    PubMed Central

    den Hoedt, Claire H.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grooteman, Muriel P. C.; Mazairac, Albert H. A.; Penne, E. Lars; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; ter Wee, Piet M.; Nubé, Menso J.; Levesque, Renée; Blankestijn, Peter J.; van den Dorpel, Marinus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied the distribution of causes of death in the CONTRAST cohort and compared the proportion of cardiovascular deaths with other populations to answer the question whether cardiovascular mortality is still the principal cause of death in end stage renal disease. In addition, we compared patients who died from the three most common death causes. Finally, we aimed to study factors related to dialysis withdrawal. Methods We used data from CONTRAST, a randomized controlled trial in 714 chronic hemodialysis patients comparing the effects of online hemodiafiltration versus low-flux hemodialysis. Causes of death were adjudicated. The distribution of causes of death was compared to that of the Dutch dialysis registry and of the Dutch general population. Results In CONTRAST, 231 patients died on treatment. 32% died from cardiovascular disease, 22% due to infection and 23% because of dialysis withdrawal. These proportions were similar to those in the Dutch dialysis registry and the proportional cardiovascular mortality was similar to that of the Dutch general population. cardiovascular death was more common in patients <60 years. Patients who withdrew were older, had more co-morbidity and a lower mental quality of life at baseline. Patients who withdrew had much co-morbidity. 46% died within 5 days after the last dialysis session. Conclusions Although the absolute risk of death is much higher, the proportion of cardiovascular deaths in a prevalent end stage renal disease population is similar to that of the general population. In older hemodialysis patients cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular death risk are equally important. Particularly the registration of dialysis withdrawal deserves attention. These findings may be partly limited to the Dutch population. PMID:23620729

  2. Prolonged remission state of refractory adult onset Still's disease following CD34-selected autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Dominici, M; Govoni, M; Moretti, S; Campioni, D; Corte, R L; Latorraca, A; Tieghi, A; Castagnari, B; Trotta, F; Castoldi, G

    2000-06-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient affected by refractory adult onset Still's disease who achieved a prolonged remission following CD34-selected ABMT. The conditioning regimen was based on the use of CY and anti-thymocyte globulin. A 3.0 and 2.0 log reduction of T (CD3+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes, respectively, was obtained using a Ceprate device to select CD34+ cells from PBSC. In the pre-transplant period (1994-1998) the patient had a chronic persistent disease course with frequent and recurrent systemic articular flares and loss of some functional abilities, despite daily prednisone, pulses of CY and immunosuppressive therapy (CYA or MTX). At the time of ABMT the patient had become non-ambulatory. Within 3 weeks of ABMT the patient showed a marked decrease in joint swelling, and morning stiffness. Joint pain and systemic symptoms disappeared, the patient was able to walk and run and gained general well being. ESR, C-reactive protein and WBC count were significantly decreased, while Hb level increased. This partial remission persisted for at least 1 year after ABMT, although at 15 months of follow-up a reappearance of moderate synovitis in the knees and wrists was noted. Our data further showed that both patient BM microenvironment and stem-progenitor cell function (as assessed by LTC-IC assay) were damaged even 1 year after CD34-selected ABMT, suggesting that the persistence of these alterations could have facilitated the favorable outcome of the disease following ABMT. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 1307-1310. PMID:10871738

  3. Regional variations in cholecystectomy rates in Sweden: impact on complications of gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Noel, Rozh; Arnelo, Urban; Enochsson, Lars; Lundell, Lars; Nilsson, Magnus; Sandblom, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Objective There are considerable variations in cholecystectomy rates between countries, but it remains unsettled whether high cholecystectomy rates prevent future gallstone complications by reducing the gallstone prevalence. The aims of this study were to investigate the regional differences in cholecystectomy rates and their relation to the incidence of gallstone complications. Material and methods Nation-wide registry-based study of the total number of cholecystectomies in Sweden between 1998 and 2013. Data were obtained from the Swedish Inpatient Registry covering the entire population and subdivided for by the 21 different counties. Indications for the procedure were prospectively collected during the years 2006-2013 in the National Registry for Gallstone Surgery and ERCP. The detailed demography of the total number of patients undergoing cholecystectomy and its relation to the respective indications were analysed by linear regression. Results The annual rates of cholecystectomy in the Swedish counties ranged from 100 to 207 per 100,000 inhabitants, with a mean of 157 (95% CI 145-169). The majority of cholecystectomies were done in females based on the indication biliary colic, with a peak incidence in younger ages. Cholecystectomies performed due to gallstone complications, pancreatitis and cholecystitis, were mainly carried out in the older age groups. No significant relationship could be demonstrated between cholecystectomy rates in the different regions and the respective incidences of gallstone complications. Conclusions There are wide regional variations in cholecystectomy rates in Sweden. The present study does not give support that frequent use of cholecystectomy in uncomplicated gallstone disease prevents future gallstone complications. PMID:26784974

  4. Interleukin 1 inhibition with anakinra in adult-onset Still disease: a meta-analysis of its efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhihai; Han, Shuyin; Liang, Xingguang; Ma, Kuifen; Zhang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Anakinra is the first interleukin-1 inhibitor to be used in clinical practice, and recent evidence showed that interleukin-1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of adult-onset Still disease (AoSD). However, data concerning efficacy with anakinra use in different clinical trials has not been evaluated, and the overall remission of AoSD with anakinra treatment has not been well defined. Methods We conducted a search on Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the overall remission rates, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI), by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity. Results Of the 273 articles that were identified, 265 were excluded. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion. The overall remission rate and complete remission rate of anakinra in AoSD patients were 81.66% (95% CI: 69.51%–89.69%) and 66.75% (95% CI: 59.94%–75.3%), respectively. Compared with the controls, the use of anakinra was associated with a significant remission in AoSD, with an OR of 0.16 (95% CI: 0.06–0.44, P=0.0005). There were also significant reductions of the dosage of corticosteroid (mean difference =21.19) (95% CI: 13.2–29.18, P<0.0001) from anakinra onset to the latest follow up time. Clinical and laboratory parameters were all improved, and anakinra was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion Our study has shown that anakinra is effective in remitting the manifestations of AoSD, with reduction of the dose of corticosteroid in patients with AoSD. Further, anakinra therapy was not associated with increased risk of adverse events, and it was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. Further research is still recommended to investigate these findings. PMID:25473268

  5. [Laparoscopic lavage and drainage in the surgical treatment of diverticular disease complicated by peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lippi, Carlo Ettore; Beatini, Luca; Cervia, Silvio; Fabbricotti, Alaido; Miaruelli, Piero Antonio; Spessa, Elisabetta; Sturlese, Ivarco; Braini, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of peritonitis complicating diverticular disease of the colon is yet to be universally regarded as established practice and major differences in management are to be noted in the various surgical institutions. In the emergency setting, the minimally invasive approach is used by few surgeons and the most frequent therapeutic options are sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (with or without a diverting stoma) and Hartmann's procedure. The Authors report their preliminary experience (13 cases) with laparoscopic lavage and drainage without colonic resection in diverticulitis complicated by peritonitis and describe the technical details of the surgical procedure. They conduct a systematic review of the literature and, on the basis of their latest experience, compare the results of the traditional resective operations (resection with primary anastomosis and Hartmann's procedure) with those of laparoscopic conservative and non-resective treatment. Laparoscopic non-resective procedures reduce the frequency and severity of the surgical complications, as well as the hospital stay and costs of treatment. In conclusion, laparoscopic lavage and drainage can be used in the majority of patients, with excellent prospects of recovery, without disabling stomas, in a single operative stage. PMID:19845268

  6. [The spectrum of cystic kidney disease in adulthood: differential diagnosis and complications].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Costero, O

    2003-01-01

    Simple renal cysts are the most common renal masses, accounting for roughly 65 to 70% of cases. They most often occur in patients over the age of 50 as determined from post-mortem examination or renal ultrasonography. The major concern with simple renal cysts is differentiating them from more serious disorders, such as polycystic kidney disease and solid masses such as a renal carcinoma or abscess. Renal arteriovenous malformations may present with ultrasound picture mimicking simple parapelvic cyst. Ultrasound, doppler ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively. Arteriography may be useful to characterise vascular lesion. We report here the spectrum of cystic kidney disease in adulthood in a group of patient with different disorders. The differential diagnosis, complications and associated process are discussed. PMID:12891942

  7. Infective Endocarditis and Chronic Kidney Disease: How to Deal with Complications.

    PubMed

    Habib Khan, Yusra; Sarriff, Azmi; Hayat Khan, Amer; Azreen Syazril, Adnan; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is the one of the most important causes of increased mortality and morbidity among haemodialysis patients. The reason for this increasing prevalence of infection among these patients is the use of haemodialysis catheters during dialysis, as these patients are highly susceptible to infections that are easily transmitted via blood access points. The present case was a geriatric end stage renal disease (ESRD) patient who was readmitted to the hospital two days after her scheduled haemodialysis session with symptoms of nosocomial endocarditis. Her concurrent medical complications were hypertension, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Based on her previous medical history and current examination, the patient was suspected to have IE due to catheter related infection. The goal of therapy is to manage the comorbidities and infection by provision of appropriate treatment based on close monitoring of the patient condition. PMID:26715911

  8. Infective Endocarditis and Chronic Kidney Disease: How to Deal with Complications

    PubMed Central

    HABIB KHAN, Yusra; SARRIFF, Azmi; HAYAT KHAN, Amer; Azreen Syazril, ADNAN; MALLHI, Tauqeer Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is the one of the most important causes of increased mortality and morbidity among haemodialysis patients. The reason for this increasing prevalence of infection among these patients is the use of haemodialysis catheters during dialysis, as these patients are highly susceptible to infections that are easily transmitted via blood access points. The present case was a geriatric end stage renal disease (ESRD) patient who was readmitted to the hospital two days after her scheduled haemodialysis session with symptoms of nosocomial endocarditis. Her concurrent medical complications were hypertension, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Based on her previous medical history and current examination, the patient was suspected to have IE due to catheter related infection. The goal of therapy is to manage the comorbidities and infection by provision of appropriate treatment based on close monitoring of the patient condition. PMID:26715911

  9. Proteomic and Biomarker Studies and Neurological Complications of Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lance, Eboni I.; Casella, James F.; Everett, Allen D.; Barron-Casella, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Biomarker analysis and proteomic discovery in pediatric sickle cell disease has the potential to lead to important discoveries and improve care. The aim of this review article is to describe proteomic and biomarker articles involving neurological and developmental complications in this population. A systematic review was conducted to identify relevant research publications. Articles were selected for children under the age of 21 years with the most common subtypes of sickle cell disease. Included articles were focused on growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor), intra and extracellular brain proteins (glial fibrillary acidic protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor), and inflammatory and coagulation markers (interleukin-1?, L-selectin, thrombospondin-1, erythrocyte and platelet-derived microparticles). Positive findings include increases in plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and platelet-derived growth factor with elevated transcranial Dopplers velocities, increases in platelet-derived growth factor isoform AA with overt stroke, and increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein with acute brain injury. These promising potential neuro-biomarkers provide insight into pathophysiologic processes and clinical events, but their clinical utility is yet to be established. Additional proteomics research is needed, including broad-based proteomic discovery of plasma constituents and blood cell proteins, as well as urine and cerebrospinal fluid components, before, during and after neurological and developmental complications. PMID:25290359

  10. A multicentre case control study on complicated coeliac disease: two different patterns of natural history, two different prognoses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease is a common enteropathy characterized by an increased mortality mainly due to its complications. The natural history of complicated coeliac disease is characterised by two different types of course: patients with a new diagnosis of coeliac disease that do not improve despite a strict gluten-free diet (type A cases) and previously diagnosed coeliac patients that initially improved on a gluten-free diet but then relapsed despite a strict diet (type B cases). Our aim was to study the prognosis and survival of A and B cases. Methods Clinical and laboratory data from coeliac patients who later developed complications (A and B cases) and sex- and age-matched coeliac patients who normally responded to a gluten-free diet (controls) were collected among 11 Italian centres. Results 87 cases and 136 controls were enrolled. Complications tended to occur rapidly after the diagnosis of coeliac disease and cumulative survival dropped in the first months after diagnosis of complicated coeliac disease. Thirty-seven cases died (30/59 in group A, 7/28 in group B). Type B cases presented an increased survival rate compared to A cases. Conclusions Complicated coeliac disease is an extremely serious condition with a high mortality and a short survival. Survival depends on the type of natural history. PMID:25103857

  11. Postoperative Complications After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have shown that patients with COPD have a higher risk of mortality than those without COPD after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, most of the previous studies were small, single-center studies with limited case numbers (or their only focus was mortality). The aim of our study was to focus on readmission, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute respiratory failure (ARF), cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism rates after CABG in an Asian COPD population. We conducted a nationwide case–control study in Taiwan using the claims database of hospitalization between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Patients with COPD before CABG were defined as the case groups. Each case was propensity score-matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease, with 2 controls selected from CABG patients without COPD. The outcomes of interest were mortality, wound infection, and the readmission rate over 30 days for the following diseases: AMI, pneumonia, ARF, cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism. There were 14,858 patients without COPD and 758 patients with COPD who underwent CABG. After propensity score matching, the 30-day mortality and 30-day readmission rates and AMI were higher in the non-COPD group. The incidences of pneumonia and ARF after CABG were higher in the COPD group. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease does not necessarily lead to mortality, readmission, or AMI after CABG, and the major respiratory complications associated with CABG in patients with COPD were pneumonia and ARF. PMID:26937939

  12. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression. PMID:25617977

  13. [Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx. Part 2: Its role in vascular diseases and in diabetic complications].

    PubMed

    Frati Munari, Alberto C

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an essential initial step in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and microangiopathic complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in chronic venous disease. Atherosclerosis risk factors, as hypercholesterolemia (LDL), hyperglycemia, inflammation, salt excess and altered shear stress can damage glycocalyx. This lead to endothelial dysfunction and allows LDL and leukocytes to filtrate to the subendothelial space initiating atheroma plaque formation. Degradation of glycocalyx in diabetes mellitus is mainly due to oxidative stress and enables protein filtration (albuminuria) and endothelial disorder of microangiopathy. Chronic venous hypertension brings to altered shears stress which results in shredded glycocalyx, this allows leukocytes to migrate into venous wall and initiate inflammation leading to morphologic and functional venous changes of the chronic venous disease. Treatment with glycosaminoglycans (sulodexide) prevents or recovers the damaged glycocalyx and several of its consequences. This drug improves chronic venous disease and promotes healing of chronic venous ulcers. It has also been useful in peripheral arterial obstructive disease and in diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria. PMID:24836779

  14. Crohn’s disease complicated by multiple stenoses and internal fistulas clinically mimicking small bowel endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Teke, Zafer; Aytekin, Faruk Onder; Atalay, Ali Ozgur; Demirkan, Nese Calli

    2008-01-01

    We report a 31-year-old woman with Crohn’s disease complicated by multiple stenoses and internal fistulas clinically misdiagnosed as small bowell endometriosis, due to the patient’s perimenstrual symptoms of mechanical subileus for 3 years; at first monthly, but later continuous, and gradually increasing in severity. We performed an exploratory laparotomy for small bowel obstruction, and found multiple ileal strictures and internal enteric fistulas. Because intraoperative findings were thought to indicate Crohn’s disease, a right hemicolectomy and partial distal ileum resection were performed for obstructive Crohn’s ileitis. Histopathology of the resected specimen revealed Crohn’s disease without endometrial tissue. The patient made an uneventful recovery from this procedure and was discharged home 10 d post-operatively. The differential diagnosis of Crohn’s diease with intestinal endometriosis may be difficult pre-operatively. The two entities share many overlapping clinical, radiological and pathological features. Nevertheless, when it is difficult to identify the cause of intestinal obstruction in a woman of child-bearing age with cyclical symptoms suggestive of small bowel endometriosis, Crohn’s disease should be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:18176980

  15. The Pathologic Findings of Skin, Lymph Node, Liver, and Bone Marrow in Patients With Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Kwon, Jee Eun; Yim, Hyunee; Suh, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ju-Yang; Han, Jae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is characterized by fever, skin rash, and lymphadenopathy with leukocytosis and anemia as common laboratory findings. We investigated the characteristic pathologic findings of skin, lymph node, liver, and bone marrow to assist in proper diagnosis of AOSD. Forty AOSD patients were included in the study. The skin (26 patients), lymph node (8 patients), liver (8 patients), or bone marrow biopsies (22 patients) between 1998 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. AOSD patients were diagnosed according to the Yamaguchi criteria after excluding common infections, hematological and autoimmune diseases. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Epstein–Barr virus–encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization were performed. Most skin biopsies revealed mild lymphocytic or histiocytic infiltration in the upper dermis. Nuclear debris was frequently found in the dermis in 14 cases (53.8%). More than half of the cases (n?=?14, 53.8%) showed interstitial mucin deposition. Some cases showed interface dermatitis with keratinocyte necrosis or basal vacuolization (n?=?10; 38.5%). The lymph node biopsies showed a paracortical or diffuse hyperplasia pattern with immunoblastic and vascular proliferation. The liver biopsies showed sparse portal and sinusoidal inflammatory cell infiltration. All cases showed various degrees of Kupffer cell hyperplasia. The cellularity of bone marrow varied from 20% to 80%. Myeloid cell hyperplasia was found in 14 out of the 22 cases (63.6%). On immunohistochemistry, the number of CD8-positive lymphocytes was greater than that of CD4-positive lymphocytes in the skin, liver, and bone marrow, but the number of CD4-positive lymphocytes was greater than that of CD8-positive lymphocytes in the lymph nodes. The relatively specific findings with respect to the cutaneous manifestation of AOSD were mild inflammatory cell infiltration in the upper dermis, basal vacuolization, keratinocyte necrosis, presence of karyorrhexis, and mucin in the dermis. In all cases, pathologic findings in the lymph nodes included paracortical hyperplasia with vascular and immunoblastic proliferation. Skin and lymph node pathology in addition to clinical findings can aid in the diagnosis of AOSD. PMID:25929927

  16. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on long-term complications and associated conditions, the course of Gaucher disease was modelled. The cohort consisted of all diagnosed GD patients in the Netherlands. Mutually exclusive disease states were defined as ‘asymptomatic’, ‘signs/symptoms’, ‘recovery’, ‘splenectomy’, ‘bone complication’, ‘multiple complications’ and ‘malignancy’. A natural history (NH) cohort was delineated based upon historical data on Dutch patients before ERT was available. Cumulative incidence curves were composed for progression from each disease state to the next. Two scenarios were applied for the ERT cohort: time to complications was calculated from A. start of ERT; B. entering the previous disease state. Median time for the development of signs and/or symptoms was 30.1 years (N = 73). In the NH cohort (N = 42), 9% had developed a bone complication after 10 years in the signs/symptoms phase, while 21% had undergone a splenectomy. In the ERT cohort (N = 29 (A), N = 28 (B)), 12% (A) or 4% (B) had developed a bone complication after 10 years in this phase and no patient was splenectomized. No patients in the NH cohort recovered, compared to 50% in the ERT cohort after 3.6 years (N = 28 (A)) or 22.4 years (N = 27 (B)) of treatment. Median time from a first to a second complication was 11 years in the NH cohort (N = 31), whereas 16 respectively 14 percent had developed a second complication after 10 years in the ERT cohort (N = 17, scenario A/B). Fourteen percent (scenario A/B) developed an associated malignancy after 10 years in the phase ‘multiple complications’ (N = 23). Associated malignancies occurred almost exclusively in advanced disease stages, therefore it is suggested that ERT reduces their incidence Long-term ERT for GD can reduce the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications. As ERT prevents progression to more advanced stages of GD it will most likely result in a reduction of associated malignancies. PMID:25056340

  17. Complicated Whipple’s disease and endocarditis following tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFI) is associated with complications of Tropheryma whipplei (T. whipplei) infection. METHODS: Because unexplained arthritis is often the first Whipple’s disease (WD) symptom, patients may undergo treatment with TNFI before diagnosis. This may influence the course of infection with T. whipplei, which causes WD, because host immune defects contribute to the pathogenesis of WD. A literature search and cross referencing identified 19 reports of TNFI treatment prior to WD diagnosis. This case-control study compared clinical data in patients receiving TNFI therapy (group?I, n = 41) with patients not receiving TNFI therapy (group II, n = 61). Patients from large reviews served as controls (group III, n = 1059). RESULTS: The rate of endocarditis in patient group?I?was significantly higher than in patient group II (12.2% in group?I vs 1.6% in group II, P < 0.05), and group III (12.2% in group?I?vs 0.16% in group III, P < 0.01). Other, severe systemic or local WD complications such as pericarditis, fever or specific organ manifestations were increased also in group?I?as compared to the other patient groups. However, diarrhea and weight loss were somewhat less frequent in patient group?I. WD is typically diagnosed with duodenal biopsy and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. PAS-stain as standard diagnostic test had a very high percentage of false negative results (diagnostic failure in 63.6% of cases) in group I. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for T. whipplei was more accurate than PAS-stainings (diagnostic accuracy, rate of true positive tests 90.9% for PCR vs 36.4% for PAS, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: TNFI trigger severe WD complications, particularly endocarditis, and lead to false-negative PAS-tests. In case of TNFI treatment failure, infection with T. whipplei should be considered. PMID:25548618

  18. Skeletal Manifestations of Hydatid Disease in Serbia: Demographic Distribution, Site Involvement, Radiological Findings, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Bracanovic, Djurdja; Sopta, Jelena; Djonic, Danijela; Lujic, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Although Serbia is recognized as an endemic country for echinococcosis, no information about precise incidence in humans has been available. The aim of this study was to investigate the skeletal manifestations of hydatid disease in Serbia. This retrospective study was conducted by reviewing the medical database of Institute for Pathology (Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade), a reference institution for bone pathology in Serbia. We reported a total of 41 patients with bone cystic echinococcosis (CE) during the study period. The mean age of 41 patients was 40.9±18.8 years. In 39% of patients, the fracture line was the only visible radiological sign, followed by cyst and tumefaction. The spine was the most commonly involved skeletal site (55.8%), followed by the femur (18.6%), pelvis (13.9%), humerus (7.0%), rib (2.3%), and tibia (2.3%). Pain was the symptom in 41.5% of patients, while some patients demonstrated complications such as paraplegia (22.0%), pathologic fracture (48.8%), and scoliosis (9.8%). The pathological fracture most frequently affected the spine (75.0%) followed by the femur (20.0%) and tibia (5.0%). However, 19.5% of patients didn't develop any complication or symptom. In this study, we showed that bone CE is not uncommon in Serbian population. As reported in the literature, therapy of bone CE is controversial and its results are poor. In order to improve the therapy outcome, early diagnosis, before symptoms and complications occur, can be contributive. PMID:24039289

  19. Endocrine and bone metabolic complications in chronic liver disease and after liver transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Högler, Wolfgang; Baumann, Ulrich; Kelly, Deirdre

    2012-03-01

    With improved survival of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in children, prevention and treatment of pre- and posttransplant complications have become a major focus of care. End-stage liver failure can cause endocrine complications such as growth failure and hepatic osteodystrophy, and, like other chronic illnesses, also pubertal delay, relative adrenal insufficiency, and the sick euthyroid syndrome. Drug-induced diabetes mellitus post-OLT affects approximately 10% of children. Growth failure is found in 60% of children assessed for OLT. Despite optimisation of nutrition, rarely can further stunting of growth before OLT be prevented. Catch-up growth is usually observed after steroid weaning from 18 months post-OLT. Whether growth hormone treatment would benefit the 20% of children who fail to catch up in height requires testing in randomised controlled trials. Hepatic osteodystrophy in children comprises vitamin D deficiency rickets, low bone mass, and fractures caused by malnutrition and malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency requires aggressive treatment with ergocalciferol (D2) or cholecalciferol (D3). The active vitamin D metabolites alphacalcidol or calcitriol increase gut calcium absorption but do not replace vitamin D stores. Prevalence of fractures is increased both before OLT (10%-28% of children) and after OLT (12%-38%). Most fractures are vertebral, are associated with low spine bone mineral density, and frequently occur asymptomatically, but they may also cause chronic pain. Fracture prediction in these children is limited. OLT in children is also associated with a greater risk of developing avascular bone necrosis (4%) and scoliosis (13%-38%). This article reviews the literature on endocrine and skeletal complications of liver disease and presents preventive screening recommendations and therapeutic strategies. PMID:22064631

  20. Solar still

    SciTech Connect

    Gruntman, L.R.

    1980-08-26

    A solar still adapted to float on a body of water has a toroidal evaporating chamber with sunlight admitting and absorbing, respectively, top and bottom walls for vaporizing water from the body admitted to overlie the bottom wall. A surrounding inner float ring and underlying toroidal inflatable float support the chamber. A condenser depends from and communicates with the evaporating chamber through elongate coaxial vapor outlet and air return tubes, and in turn supplies distillate to a pendent holding tank. A rotatable shaft extending coaxially down through the evaporating chamber carries a fan to propel vapor from the evaporating chamber into the condenser due to rotation of a windmill atop the chamber. A curved reflector is rotatably driven atop the inner ring to direct additional sunlight on the evaporating chamber as the sun moves overhead. An outer float ring loosely coaxially surrounds the inner float ring. The annular water surface between the float rings, covered by a transparent film, forms an oxygen production zone occupiable by oxygen producing phytoplankton fed by nutrients in water brought up from beneath the thermocline by thermosiphon flow between the warm condenser and a surrounding heat skirt. Pump units mounted on the outer float ring remove distilled water and any oxygen produced, the latter for example to a device for dissolving the oxygen below the thermocline in the body of water.

  1. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D’Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial “fingerprint”, characterized by the reduced ratio of “good” to “potentially pathogenic” bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease. PMID:26604640

  2. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D'Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-11-21

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial "fingerprint", characterized by the reduced ratio of "good" to "potentially pathogenic" bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease. PMID:26604640

  3. [A Case of Corticobasal Syndrome Complicated with Hypopituitarism and Hashimoto's Disease].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Satoru; Kinbara, Yoshiyuki; Terada, Makoto; Komiya, Tadashi; Ishii, Kenji; Takao, Masaki; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Murayama, Shigeo

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of an individual with corticobasal syndrome (CBS), hypopituitarism due to a post-traumatic leptomeningeal cyst, and Hashimoto's disease. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of cognitive dysfunction and bradykinesia. Following a primary diagnosis of hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism, she was given hormone replacement therapy, and her clinical symptoms appeared to improve. However, some cognitive impairment and extrapyramidal symptoms remained. The results of careful neurological examinations, as well as magnetic resonance, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography images, suggested a diagnosis of CBS-CBD (corticobasal degeneration). Because parkinsonism and cognitive impairment can be caused by endocrinopathy, it was initially difficult to reach the complete diagnosis that included CBS. Thus, it is important to understand that complicated neurological presentations can be caused by several different disorders. PMID:26062591

  4. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Complicated With Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Dong Sik; Lee, Sang Hun; Cho, Hee Mun

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is the most common adult muscular dystrophy characterized by multi-systemic clinical manifestations involving the brain, smooth muscle, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. However, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is an uncommon presentation of MD type 1 (DM1), which has not been reported in recent literature. A 53-year-old female, previously confirmed as DM1, presented with vague claudication of both lower limbs. The diagnosis of PAOD based on results of ankle-brachial index, ultrasonography, and abdominal computed tomography angiography studies was followed by aortobifemoral artery bypass surgery. Although the arterial patency was restored after the operation, she did not recover from post-operative respiratory complications. Screening of PAOD is necessary for DM1 with general risk factors of occlusive arteriopathy. However, surgery should be reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:26361604

  5. [Immune thrombocytopenia as a complication of acute infectious diseases - case reports].

    PubMed

    Smíšková, Dita; Blechová, Zuzana; Polanecká, Libuše; Zítová, Jitka; Podojilová, Marie; Smíšek, Petr

    2013-03-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, ITP) is an acquired autoimmune disease, mediated by antibodies against platelet glycoproteins. ITP can develop in the context of other disorders (secondary ITP), including acute and chronic infections (HIV, H. pylori, HCV, HBV, CMV, EBV, VZV, parvovirus B19, rubella, etc.). The case reports present two children and one adult with ITP complicating VZV, EBV and HAV infections. Corticosteroids are usually initial drugs, but they are controversial in case of ITP during acute infections. Intravenous immunoglobulins are preferred, especially in children, because of their smaller suppression of inflammatory response. Two of the patients were successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulins. In the remaining patient, corticosteroid therapy had good but delayed effects as compared to immunoglobulins. PMID:23945832

  6. Infectious complications after surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Cypriano Petrus; Fonseca, Patricia Belintani Blum; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of infectious complications in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) after surgical splenectomy for acute splenic sequestration crisis. METHODS: Retrospective cohort of children with SCD who were born after 2002 and were regularly monitored until July 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: cases (children with SCD who underwent surgical splenectomy after an episode of splenic sequestration) and controls (children with SCD who did not have splenic sequestration and surgical procedures), in order to compare the frequency of invasive infections (sepsis, meningitis, bacteremia with positive blood cultures, acute chest syndrome and/or pneumonia) by data collected from medical records. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: 44 patients were included in the case group. The mean age at the time of splenectomy was 2.6 years (1-6.9 years) and the mean postoperative length of follow-up was 6.1 years (3.8-9.9 years). The control group consisted of 69 patients with a mean age at the initial follow-up visit of 5.6 months (1-49 months) and a mean length of follow-up of 7.2 years (4-10.3 years).All children received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. No significant difference was observed between groups in relation to infections during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease that had splenic sequestration did not affect the frequency of infectious complications during 6 years of clinical follow-up. PMID:25913493

  7. Common long-term complications of adult congenital heart disease: avoid falling in a H.E.A.P.

    PubMed

    Ministeri, M; Alonso-Gonzalez, R; Swan, L; Dimopoulos, K

    2016-04-01

    Advances in cardiology and cardiac surgery have transformed the outlook for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) so that currently 85% of neonates with CHD survive into adult life. Although early surgery has transformed the outcome of these patients, it has not been curative. Heart failure, endocarditis, arrhythmias and pulmonary hypertension are the most common long term complications of adults with CHD. Adults with CHD benefit from tertiary expert care and early recognition of long-term complications and timely management are essential. However, it is as important that primary care physicians and general adult cardiologists are able to recognise the signs and symptoms of such complications, raise the alarm, referring patients early to specialist adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) care, and provide initial care. In this paper, we provide an overview of the most commonly encountered long-term complications in ACHD and describe current state of the art management as provided in tertiary specialist centres. PMID:26678842

  8. Direct and indirect revascularization for moyamoya disease surgical techniques and peri-operative complications.

    PubMed

    Houkin, K; Ishikawa, T; Yoshimoto, T; Abe, H

    1997-10-01

    We have performed surgical treatment for Moyamoya disease using the superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis and encephalo-duro-arterio-myo-synangiosis (EDAMS). In this paper, the surgical technique of combined revascularization for Moyamoya disease as well as peri-operative complications are discussed. Craniotomy and dural opening were extensively carried out to expose the brain surface as widely as possible. Dissection of the STA, which is the most powerful resource of direct revascularization, should be carefully carried out using a surgical microscope. The temporal muscle and middle meningeal artery, which have the most potential as sources of indirect revascularization, must be preserved. STA-MCA anastomosis to the frontal branch of the middle cerebral artery is indispensable for improving cerebral circulation of the frontal lobe. A small arachnoid membrane opening and water-tight closure are also important to avoid post-operative subdural and subcutaneous fluid collection. Ischemic events disappeared immediately after surgery in most cases. However, in several cases, transient ischemic attacks recurred for several months after the surgery. Chronic subdural hematoma was seen in two cases. PMID:9409425

  9. Interstitial Lung Disease in Systemic Scleroderma, Complicated with Bilateral Pulmonary Aspergilloma: An Unusual Association.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Saumen; Santra, Avradip; Ghoshal, Loknath; Kundu, Soumya

    2015-12-01

    Aspergilloma or mycetoma is a saprophytic fungal infection that colonizes pre-existing excavated lung lesion. However, its association with systemic sclerosis related interstitial lung disease is unusual and scarcely found in literature. We report a middle aged female with long standing systemic sclerosis, who was on immunosuppressive therapy for many years, presented with repeated haemoptysis. Although provisionally pulmonary tuberculosis was suspected, imaging investigations showed presence of bilateral masses inside bullous air spaces along with air-crescent sign suggestive of fungal ball. Subsequent Computed tomography guided needle aspiration from lung mass confirmed Aspergillus fumigatus as aetiologic agent on fungal culture. Patient was treated conservatively for haemoptysis and with oral antifungal drug as surgical removal of fungal ball was not an option due to poor pulmonary reserve. Although she had been treated with itraconazole for more than three years, she had recurrent haemoptysis during this period without any significant regression of size of the aspergilloma. Management of aspergilloma in a background of extensive interstitial lung disease remains poorly defined and complicated. Thereby, overall prognosis is unfavourable and depends on evolution of both underlying scleroderma as well as aspergilloma. PMID:26816937

  10. Interstitial Lung Disease in Systemic Scleroderma, Complicated with Bilateral Pulmonary Aspergilloma: An Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Saumen; Ghoshal, Loknath; Kundu, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Aspergilloma or mycetoma is a saprophytic fungal infection that colonizes pre-existing excavated lung lesion. However, its association with systemic sclerosis related interstitial lung disease is unusual and scarcely found in literature. We report a middle aged female with long standing systemic sclerosis, who was on immunosuppressive therapy for many years, presented with repeated haemoptysis. Although provisionally pulmonary tuberculosis was suspected, imaging investigations showed presence of bilateral masses inside bullous air spaces along with air-crescent sign suggestive of fungal ball. Subsequent Computed tomography guided needle aspiration from lung mass confirmed Aspergillus fumigatus as aetiologic agent on fungal culture. Patient was treated conservatively for haemoptysis and with oral antifungal drug as surgical removal of fungal ball was not an option due to poor pulmonary reserve. Although she had been treated with itraconazole for more than three years, she had recurrent haemoptysis during this period without any significant regression of size of the aspergilloma. Management of aspergilloma in a background of extensive interstitial lung disease remains poorly defined and complicated. Thereby, overall prognosis is unfavourable and depends on evolution of both underlying scleroderma as well as aspergilloma. PMID:26816937

  11. Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications: The Role of Adipokines and the Relationship between Obesity, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is closely associated with an increased risk of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure, which leads to an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is now recognized not only as a main site of storage of excess energy derived from food intake but also as an endocrine organ. The expansion of adipose tissue produces a number of bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines or adipokines, which trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and interact with a range of processes in many different organs. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, dysregulated production or secretion of these adipokines caused by excess adipose tissue and adipose tissue dysfunction can contribute to the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of several adipokines associated with obesity and the potential impact on obesity-related metabolic diseases. Multiple lines evidence provides valuable insights into the roles of adipokines in the development of obesity and its metabolic complications. Further research is still required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the metabolic actions of a few newly identified adipokines. PMID:24733068

  12. [Multiple pulmonary emboli complicating infective endocarditis in a child with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ajdakar, S; Elbouderkaoui, M; Rada, N; Drais, G; Bouskraoui, M

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare condition, associated with high mortality. Clinical presentation is nonspecific. Pulmonary embolism may present initially similar to bacterial endocarditis of the right heart, septic thrombophlebitis, or osteomyelitis. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl who had dyspnea over the four months before consultation, complicated three months later by hemoptysis. She was diagnosed with subacute bacterial endocarditis secondary to group D Streptococcus, developed upon a ventricular septal defect. Two weeks later, the child had sudden chest pain and tachypnea. Lung scintigraphy showed multiple pulmonary embolisms. The therapeutic approach was to continue antibiotics without anticoagulant treatment. The outcome was favorable with apyrexia and stabilization on the respiratory level. Pulmonary embolism is a rare disease in children with an incidence of 3.7%. Classically, it presents with fever, hemoptysis, and nonspecific infiltrates on chest X-ray. These signs were noted in our patient, although the infiltrates on the chest X-ray were hidden by the pulmonary edema associated with heart failure. The persistence of these left basal opacities after antidiuretic treatment suggested an infectious origin. Subsequently, lung scintigraphy showed that it was a pulmonary infarct. The therapy of septic pulmonary embolism is the same as that for infective endocarditis. Antibiotic treatment alone was maintained without anticoagulants because of the high risk of bleeding at the seat of the pulmonary embolism and the insubstantial significant benefit of this therapy. Pulmonary embolism in children is a rare disease, but its incidence is underestimated. Better knowledge on its actual impact and etiologies in children is necessary. Multicenter studies are needed to establish recommendations. PMID:25725970

  13. Cardiovascular Complications Secondary to Graves’ Disease: A Prospective Study from Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Tsymbaliuk, Iryna; Unukovych, Dmytro; Shvets, Nataliia; Dinets, Andrii

    2015-01-01

    Background Graves’ disease (GD) is a common cause of hyperthyroidism resulting in development of thyrotoxic heart disease (THD). Objectives to assess cardiovascular disorders and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with THD secondary to GD. Patients and Methods All patients diagnosed with THD secondary to GD between January 2011 and December 2013 were eligible for this study. Clinical assessment was performed at baseline and at the follow-up visit after the restoring of euthyroid state. HRQoL was studied with a questionnaire EQ-5D-5L. Results Follow-up data were available for 61 patients, but only 30 patients with THD secondary to GD were consented to participate in investigation of their HRQoL. The frequency of cardiovascular complications was significantly reduced as compared before and after the antithyroid therapy as follows: resting heart rate (122 vs. 74 bpm), blood pressure: systolic (155 vs. 123 mm Hg), diastolic (83 vs. 66 mm Hg), supraventricular premature contractions (71% vs. 7%), atrial fibrillation (72% vs. 25%), congestive heart failure (69% vs. 20%), thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy (77% vs. 26%), all p<0.01. Anti-TSH receptor antibodies were determined as independent predictor of left ventricular geometry changes, (b-coefficient = 0.04, 95%CI 0.01–0.07, p = 0.02). HRQoL was improved in all domains and self-rated health increased from 43 to 75 units by visual analogue score (p<0.001). Conclusions Restoring of euthyroid state in patients with GD is associated with significant elimination of cardiovascular disorders and improvement of HRQoL. To our knowledge this is the first study evaluating Ukrainian patients with THD secondary to GD with focus on HRQoL. PMID:25803030

  14. Miliary tuberculosis disease complicated by Pott's abscess in an infant: Seven year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bayhan, Gulsum Iclal; Tanir, Gonul; Gayretli Ayd?n, Zeynep Gokce; Yildiz, Yasemin Tasci

    2015-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy presented with 1-year history of persistent fever, cough, and progressive abdominal distention. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hepatomegaly and multiple calcifications in the liver and spleen. Thoracic computed tomography showed multiple mediastinal lymph nodes and consolidation in both lungs. Additionally, there was a 2-cm thick retroperitoneal soft tissue mass destroying the T7-8 and L1-L2 vertebral bodies. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with miliary tuberculosis (TB) and Pott's disease, and began administering anti-TB treatment consisting of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Acid-resistant bacilli analysis and mycobacterial culture of the biopsy specimen of Pott's abscess were positive. Mycobacterial culture and PCR of gastric aspirate were also positive. The patient's condition progressively improved with anti-TB treatment and he received 12 months of antiTB therapy. At the end of the treatment all of the patient's symptoms were relieved and he was well except for kyphosis. Miliary TB complicated by Pott's abscess is a very rare presentation of childhood TB. The presented case shows that when Pott's abscess is diagnosed and surgically corrected without delay, patients can recover without squeal. PMID:25983412

  15. Miliary tuberculosis disease complicated by Pott's abscess in an infant: Seven year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bayhan, Gulsum Iclal; Tanir, Gonul; Gayretli Aydın, Zeynep Gokce; Yildiz, Yasemin Tasci

    2015-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy presented with 1-year history of persistent fever, cough, and progressive abdominal distention. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hepatomegaly and multiple calcifications in the liver and spleen. Thoracic computed tomography showed multiple mediastinal lymph nodes and consolidation in both lungs. Additionally, there was a 2-cm thick retroperitoneal soft tissue mass destroying the T7-8 and L1-L2 vertebral bodies. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with miliary tuberculosis (TB) and Pott's disease, and began administering anti-TB treatment consisting of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Acid-resistant bacilli analysis and mycobacterial culture of the biopsy specimen of Pott's abscess were positive. Mycobacterial culture and PCR of gastric aspirate were also positive. The patient's condition progressively improved with anti-TB treatment and he received 12 months of antiTB therapy. At the end of the treatment all of the patient's symptoms were relieved and he was well except for kyphosis. Miliary TB complicated by Pott's abscess is a very rare presentation of childhood TB. The presented case shows that when Pott's abscess is diagnosed and surgically corrected without delay, patients can recover without squeal. PMID:25983412

  16. Modified activin receptor IIB ligand trap mitigates ineffective erythropoiesis and disease complications in murine ?-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Suragani, Rajasekhar N. V. S.; Cawley, Sharon M.; Li, Robert; Wallner, Samantha; Alexander, Mark J.; Mulivor, Aaron W.; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Grinberg, Asya V.; Pearsall, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    In ?-thalassemia, unequal production of ?- and ?-globin chains in erythroid precursors causes apoptosis and inhibition of late-stage erythroid differentiation, leading to anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis (IE), and dysregulated iron homeostasis. Here we used a murine model of ?-thalassemia intermedia (Hbbth1/th1 mice) to investigate effects of a modified activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) ligand trap (RAP-536) that inhibits Smad2/3 signaling. In Hbbth1/th1 mice, treatment with RAP-536 reduced overactivation of Smad2/3 in splenic erythroid precursors. In addition, treatment of Hbbth1/th1 mice with RAP-536 reduced ?-globin aggregates in peripheral red cells, decreased the elevated reactive oxygen species present in erythroid precursors and peripheral red cells, and alleviated anemia by promoting differentiation of late-stage erythroid precursors and reducing hemolysis. Notably, RAP-536 treatment mitigated disease complications of IE, including iron overload, splenomegaly, and bone pathology, while reducing erythropoietin levels, improving erythrocyte morphology, and extending erythrocyte life span. These results implicate signaling by the transforming growth factor-? superfamily in late-stage erythropoiesis and reveal potential of a modified ActRIIB ligand trap as a novel therapeutic agent for thalassemia syndrome and other red cell disorders characterized by IE. PMID:24795345

  17. Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications

    PubMed Central

    Apovian, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in diet and lifestyle have repeatedly been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM and even to reverse early disease. Weight gain, a potential side effect of treatment for patients with T2DM, is also an important concern, and it has been noted that weight increases associated with antidiabetes therapy may blunt cardiovascular risk reductions achieved by decreasing blood glucose. Among older agents, metformin and acarbose have the lowest risk for weight gain, while sulfonylureas, meglitinides, and thiazolidinediones are all associated with weight increases. Clinical trial results have also consistently demonstrated that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylin lowers weight, and that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral in patients with T2DM. Conventional human insulin formulations are known to increase weight in patients with T2DM. However, some insulin analogs, particularly insulin detemir, have lower liability for this adverse event. The use of both pharmacologic and surgical therapies aimed at treating obesity rather than lowering blood glucose have the potential to improve glycemic control and even resolve T2DM in some patients. PMID:22135499

  18. Snippets From the Past: Cohort Analysis of Disease Rates—Another Piece in a Seemingly Still Incomplete Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    For almost a century, epidemiologists have stratified age-specific disease rates by year of birth to better understand the distribution of a disease in a population and its evolution across time. In the present article, I review the contributions of John Brownlee, Kristian Feyer Andvord, and Wade Hampton Frost and, to accentuate the similarities of their approaches, redraw their original graphs of age-specific death rates of tuberculosis organized either by year of death or year of birth. In addition, this article reports on an apparently universally forgotten publication in the American Journal of Hygiene published in 1929, which both upsets the conventional history of the earliest reports of disease rates stratified by birth cohorts and challenges the theory that Frost discovered cohort analysis independently and gave it its name. PMID:24920785

  19. Snippets from the past: cohort analysis of disease rates-another piece in a seemingly still incomplete puzzle.

    PubMed

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-07-15

    For almost a century, epidemiologists have stratified age-specific disease rates by year of birth to better understand the distribution of a disease in a population and its evolution across time. In the present article, I review the contributions of John Brownlee, Kristian Feyer Andvord, and Wade Hampton Frost and, to accentuate the similarities of their approaches, redraw their original graphs of age-specific death rates of tuberculosis organized either by year of death or year of birth. In addition, this article reports on an apparently universally forgotten publication in the American Journal of Hygiene published in 1929, which both upsets the conventional history of the earliest reports of disease rates stratified by birth cohorts and challenges the theory that Frost discovered cohort analysis independently and gave it its name. PMID:24920785

  20. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-22

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications. PMID:26891794

  1. Glycemic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E.; Alafif, Maram; Abd-Elhameed, Ihab A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between metabolic control, acute and long-term complications, the coexistence of autoimmune diseases, and to assess the different factors that can affect the glycemic control level among children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that included 228 T1DM children and adolescents visiting the pediatric diabetes clinic at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from January 2013 to January 2014. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients was 10.99 years, and the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 8.8%. Acute complications included ketoacidosis in 65.4% of patients, and hypoglycemic attacks in 68.9%. Long-term complications were detected in patients including retinopathy (4.4%), microalbuminuria (16.2%), and dyslipidemia (8.3%). Autoimmune thyroiditis was noted in 14%, and celiac disease was found in 19.7% of patients. A significant difference was found in pubertal and pre-pubertal age groups in terms of glycemic control (p=0.01). Conclusion: The level of HbA1c was found to be higher among the pubertal age group. A relationship between autoimmune diseases and gender was determined. PMID:25630001

  2. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: an Unusual Complication of Orientia tsutsugamushi Disease (Scrub Typhus)

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Aneesh; Padhi, Somanath; Boopathy, Vinoth; Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Nair, Shashikala; Varghese, Renu G’Boy; Kanungo, Reba

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an uncommon, potentially fatal, hyperinflammatory syndrome that may rarely complicate the clinical course of Orientia tsutsugamushi disease (scrub typhus). Methods Here we describe the clinicopathological features, laboratory parameters, management, and outcome of three adult patients (1 female, 2 males) with scrub typhus associated HLH from a tertiary center. A brief and concise review of international literature on the topic was also added. Results All three patients satisfied the HLH-2004 diagnostic criteria; one had multi-organ dysfunction with very high ferritin level (>30,000 ng/ml), and all had a dramatic recovery following doxycyclin therapy. Literature review from January 1990 to March 2014 revealed that scrub typhus associated HLH were reported in 21 patients, mostly from the scrub endemic countries of the world. These included 11 females and 10 males with a mean age of 35 years (range; 8 months to 81 years). Fifteen of 17 patients (where data were available) had a favorable outcome following early serological diagnosis and initiation of definitive antibiotic therapy with (N=6) or without (N=9) immunosuppressive/immunomodulator therapy. Mutation analysis for primary HLH was performed in one patient only, and HLH-2004 protocol was used in two patients. Conclusion We suggest that HLH should be considered in severe cases of scrub typhus especially if associated with cytopenia (s), liver dysfunction, and coagulation abnormalities. Further studies are required to understand whether an immunosuppressive and/or immunomodulator therapy could be beneficial in those patients who remain unresponsive to definitive antibiotic therapy. PMID:25574367

  3. [Is obesity an adverse prognostic factor for pulmonary manifestations of influenza? Lesson from complicated disease course H1N1].

    PubMed

    Zoubková, Renata; Máca, Jan; Handlos, Petr; Rudinská, Lenka; Nytra, Ivana; Chýlek, Václav; Vavrošová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics that occur at different times in both the northern and southern hemisphere. In cases of seasonal influenza these are usually mild forms of the disease, which rarely lead to death of the patient. Vulnerable groups include the elderly, the young or those with comorbidities, where the virus affects tens of thousands of victims around the world. Occasionally, however, large epidemics appear caused by a dangerous variant of a new virus, which is usually characterized by high contagiousness and pathogenicity (virulence). Consequently, it is often accompanied by a complicated disease course and associated with high mortality. In 2009, a viral pandemic disease marked pH1N1 2009 Influenza A appeared. Even though the initial predictions were far worse, the course of influenza caused by this virus was often complicated by acute respiratory failure in the form of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This formed part of the wider multiple organ failure syndrome (MODS). This type of virus often infects younger age groups and is more contagious compared to the seasonal flu. In order to illustrate the complicated forms of viral infections pH1N1 2009 Influenza A we present three case studies which demonstrate complicated pulmonary manifestation, which take the primary form of ARDS. PMID:25561242

  4. Typical evanescent and atypical persistent polymorphic cutaneous rash in an adult Brazilian with Still's disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Despina; Shin, Junghee; Forde, Inga; Gopalratnam, Kavitha; Cohen, Paul; DeGirolamo, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic auto-inflammatory condition of unknown etiology, characterized by high fever, an evanescent, salmon-pink maculopapular skin rash, arthralgia or arthritis and leukocytosis. AOSD can also present with atypical cutaneous manifestations, such as persistent pruritic coalescent papules or plaques and linear lesions that have highly distinctive pathological features and are usually associated with severe disease. Herein, we present a 31-year-old Brazilian man with both typical Still's rash and atypical persistent polymorphic cutaneous manifestations associated with severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Eosinophils that are consistently lacking in the AOSD-associated skin lesions were evident in the skin biopsy of the persistent atypical cutaneous manifestations and were either drug-related or AOSD-associated. PMID:26423534

  5. Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.

    PubMed

    Newell, Diane G; Koopmans, Marion; Verhoef, Linda; Duizer, Erwin; Aidara-Kane, Awa; Sprong, Hein; Opsteegh, Marieke; Langelaar, Merel; Threfall, John; Scheutz, Flemming; van der Giessen, Joke; Kruse, Hilde

    2010-05-30

    The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease, mainly due to contaminated food and water, as a cause of death will decline worldwide. Evidence for such a downward trend is limited. This prediction presumes that improvements in the production and retail of microbiologically safe food will be sustained in the developed world and, moreover, will be rolled out to those countries of the developing world increasingly producing food for a global market. In this review evidence is presented to indicate that the microbiological safety of food remains a dynamic situation heavily influenced by multiple factors along the food chain from farm to fork. Sustaining food safety standards will depend on constant vigilance maintained by monitoring and surveillance but, with the rising importance of other food-related issues, such as food security, obesity and climate change, competition for resources in the future to enable this may be fierce. In addition the pathogen populations relevant to food safety are not static. Food is an excellent vehicle by which many pathogens (bacteria, viruses/prions and parasites) can reach an appropriate colonisation site in a new host. Although food production practices change, the well-recognised food-borne pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli, seem able to evolve to exploit novel opportunities, for example fresh produce, and even generate new public health challenges, for example antimicrobial resistance. In addition, previously unknown food-borne pathogens, many of which are zoonotic, are constantly emerging. Current understanding of the trends in food-borne diseases for bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens has been reviewed. The bacterial pathogens are exemplified by those well-recognized by policy makers; i.e. Salmonella, Campylobacter, E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes. Antimicrobial resistance in several bacterial food-borne pathogens (Salmonella, Campylobacter, Shigella and Vibrio spp., methicillin resistant Staphylcoccus aureas, E. coli and Enterococci) has been discussed as a separate topic because of its relative importance to policy issues. Awareness and surveillance of viral food-borne pathogens is generally poor but emphasis is placed on Norovirus, Hepatitis A, rotaviruses and newly emerging viruses such as SARS. Many food-borne parasitic pathogens are known (for example Ascaris, Cryptosporidia and Trichinella) but few of these are effectively monitored in foods, livestock and wildlife and their epidemiology through the food-chain is poorly understood. The lessons learned and future challenges in each topic are debated. It is clear that one overall challenge is the generation and maintenance of constructive dialogue and collaboration between public health, veterinary and food safety experts, bringing together multidisciplinary skills and multi-pathogen expertise. Such collaboration is essential to monitor changing trends in the well-recognised diseases and detect emerging pathogens. It will also be necessary understand the multiple interactions these pathogens have with their environments during transmission along the food chain in order to develop effective prevention and control strategies. PMID:20153070

  6. Diabetes Care, Glycemic Control, Complications, and Concomitant Autoimmune Diseases in Children with Type 1 Diabetes in Turkey: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    ?im?ek, Damla Gök?en; Aycan, Zehra; Özen, Samim; Çetinkaya, Semra; Kara, Cengiz; Abal?, Sayg?n; Demir, Korcan; Tunç, Özgül; Uçaktürk, Ahmet; Asar, Gülgün; Ba?, Firdevs; Çetinkaya, Ergun; Ayd?n, Murat; Karagüzel, Gülay; Orbak, Zerrin; Orbak, Zerrin; ??klar, Zeynep; Alt?nc?k, Ayça; Ökten, Ay?enur; Özkan, Behzat; Öçal, Gönül; Semiz, Serap; Arslano?lu, ?lknur; Evliyao?lu, Olcay; Bundak, Rüveyde; Darcan, ?ükran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiologic and clinical features of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may show substantial differences among countries. The primary goal in the management of T1DM is to prevent micro- and macrovascular complications by achieving good glycemic control. The present study aimed to assess metabolic control, presence of concomitant autoimmune diseases, and of acute and long-term complications in patients diagnosed with T1DM during childhood and adolescence. The study also aimed to be a first step in the development of a national registry system for T1DM, in Turkey. Methods: Based on hospital records, this cross-sectional, multicenter study included 1 032 patients with T1DM from 12 different centers in Turkey, in whom the diagnosis was established during childhood. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, diabetes care, complications, and concomitant autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: Mean age, diabetes duration, and hemoglobin A1c level were 12.5±4.1 years, 4.7±3.2 years, and 8.5±1.6%, respectively. Acute complications noted in the past year included ketoacidosis in 5.2% of the patients and severe hypoglycemia in 4.9%. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis was noted in 12%, Graves’ disease in 0.1%, and celiac disease in 4.3% of the patients. Chronic complications including neuropathy, retinopathy, and persistent microalbuminuria were present in 2.6%, 1.4%, and 5.4% of the patients, respectively. Diabetic nephropathy was not present in any of the patients. Mean diabetes duration and age of patients with neuropathy, retinopathy and microalbuminuria were significantly different from the patients without these long-term complications (p<0.01). A significant difference was found between pubertal and prepubertal children in terms of persistent microalbuminuria and neuropathy (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Of the patients, 4.4% (n:38) were obese and 5% had short stature; 17.4% of the patients had dyslipidemia, and 14% of the dyslipidemic patients were obese. Conclusions: Although the majority of the patients in the present study were using insulin analogues, poor glycemic control was common, and chronic complications were encountered. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419424

  7. Compensatory stepping in Parkinson's disease is still a problem after deep brain stimulation randomized to STN or GPi.

    PubMed

    St George, R J; Carlson-Kuhta, P; King, L A; Burchiel, K J; Horak, F B

    2015-09-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on balance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established. This study examined whether DBS randomized to the subthalamic nucleus (STN; n = 11) or globus pallidus interna (GPi; n = 10) improved compensatory stepping to recover balance after a perturbation. The standing surface translated backward, forcing subjects to take compensatory steps forward. Kinematic and kinetic responses were recorded. PD-DBS subjects were tested off and on their levodopa medication before bilateral DBS surgery and retested 6 mo later off and on DBS, combined with off and on levodopa medication. Responses were compared with PD-control subjects (n = 8) tested over the same timescale and 17 healthy control subjects. Neither DBS nor levodopa improved the stepping response. Compensatory stepping in the best-treated state after surgery (DBS+DOPA) was similar to the best-treated state before surgery (DOPA) for the PD-GPi group and the PD-control group. For the PD-STN group, there were more lateral weight shifts, a delayed foot-off, and a greater number of steps required to recover balance in DBS+DOPA after surgery compared with DOPA before surgery. Within the STN group five subjects who did not fall during the experiment before surgery fell at least once after surgery, whereas the number of falls in the GPi and PD-control groups were unchanged. DBS did not improve the compensatory step response needed to recover from balance perturbations in the GPi group and caused delays in the preparation phase of the step in the STN group. PMID:26108960

  8. Successful Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair for Complicated Type B Aortic Dissection Developed in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chan Sung; Park, Byoung-Won; Bang, Duk Won; Jang, Won Ho; Kim, Hyo Shik; Oh, Ji Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PCKD) is rarely associated with aortic dissection (AD), which is a life-threatening disease. Although endovascular stent-graft repair tends to show better outcomes than conventional therapies in complicated type B AD (TBAD), successful endovascular intervention of TBAD with malperfusion in a patient with PCKD has not been reported. This case shows a 37-year-old male who had sudden onset of sharply stabbing epigastric pain with severe hypertension, who was diagnosed with TBAD and PCKD by a computed tomography and initially underwent medical treatment. Four days after discharge, he was rehospitalized with left leg pain and paresthesia due to left lower leg malperfusion. Thoracic endovascular stent-graft repair covering the primary tear site of dissection was performed successfully, leading to a decrease in false lumen and improvement of symptoms. We report the case of complicated TBAD in a patient with PCKD treated with endovascular stent-graft repair. PMID:26217646

  9. [The value of quantitative analysis of procalcitonine in diagnostics of septic complications in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapin, S V; Maslianski?, A L; Lazareva, N M; Vasil'eva, E Iu; Totolian, A A

    2013-01-01

    The infections very often complicate the course of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In diagnostic of septic complications in rheumatic patients the new biomarkers of infections can have a decisive importance. The procalciotonine test is one of them. The issue was to evaluate the diagnostic informativity of this test. The sample included 93 patients. The examination was applied to 65 patients with rheumatic diseases. Among them, 13 patients had bacterial infections. The group consisted of 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematous, 6 patients with systemic angiitis, and 15 patients with other rheumatic diseases. The comparative group included 27 patients of cardio-therapeutic profile and 8 of these patients had bacterial infections. The procalcitonine test was applied with quantitative electrochemiluminescent technique. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the mean levels of procalciotonine test consisted 0.10 +/- 0.13 ng/ml; with systemic lupus erythematous--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/ml; with systemic angiitis--0.22 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; with other rheumatic diseases--0.12 +/- 0.15 ng/ml; of cardio-therapeutic profile without infections--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/vl/ With threshold of procalcitonine test higher than 0.5/ml the sensitivity to diagnostic of infections consisted of 58%, specificity--94% in the group with rheumatic diseases. The procalciotonine test in case of no infection process with values higher than 0.5 ng/ml was detected in three patients. The evaluation of dependence of sensitivity and specificity for procalciotonine test and C-reactive protein the area under curve of procalcitonine test was larger in patients with rheumatic diseases (0.85 against 0.79) and in patients of cardio-therapeutic profile (0.92 against 0.90). The quantitative procalcitonine test is the best technique to detect septic complications in rheumatic patients. PMID:23807991

  10. MTHFR polymorphic variant C677T is associated to vascular complications in sickle-cell disease.

    PubMed

    Hatzlhofer, Betânia L D; Bezerra, Marcos André C; Santos, Magnun N N; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Freitas, Elizabete M; Costa, Fernando F; Araújo, Aderson S; Muniz, Maria Tereza C

    2012-09-01

    Vaso-occlusion is a determinant for most signs and symptoms of sickle-cell anemia (SCA). The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in SCA remain unclear. It is known that genetic polymorphisms associated with thrombophilia may be potential modifiers of clinical features of SCA. The genetic polymorphisms C677T and A1298C relating to the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a clotting Factor V Leiden mutation (1691G?A substitution of Factor V Leiden), and the mutant prothrombin 20210A allele were analyzed in this study. The aim was to find possible correlations with vascular complications and thrombophilia markers in a group of SCA patients in Pernambuco, Brazil. The study included 277 SCA patients, divided into two groups: one consisting of 177 nonconsanguineous SCA patients who presented vascular manifestations of stroke, avascular necrosis, leg ulcers, priapism, and acute chest syndrome (group 1); and the other consisting of 100 SCA patients without any reported vascular complication (group 2). Molecular tests were done using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism or allele-specific PCR techniques. Comparisons between the groups were made using the ?(2) test. The 677 CT and TT genotypes showed a significant risk of vascular complications (p=0.015). No significant associations between the groups were found when samples were analyzed for the MTHFR A1298C allele (p=0.913), Factor V G1691 (p=0.555), or prothrombin G20210A mutation (p=1.000). The polymorphism MTHFR C677T seemed to be possibly predictive for the development of some vascular complications in SCA patients among this population. PMID:22924497

  11. Cardiac complications of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alkhouli, Mohamad; Sandhu, Paul; Boobes, Khlaed; Hatahet, Kamel; Raza, Farhan; Boobes, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of the death in dialysis patients. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are associated with lower mortality and are viewed as the desired access option in most patients with advanced kidney disease needing dialysis. However, AVFs have significant and potentially deleterious effects on cardiac functions particularly in the setting of preexisting heart disease. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review to what is known about the impact of AVFs on: congestive heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dysfunction, coronary artery disease and valvular heart disease. PMID:26299166

  12. Cohort Study: Central Venous Catheter-Related Complications in Children with Hematologic Diseases at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Pekta?, Ayhan; Kara, Ate?; Gurgey, Aytemiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to document and analyze the central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications in children with hematological diseases who were treated within a single institution. Materials and Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 106 pediatric patients in whom 203 CVCs were inserted. A total of 175 catheter-related complications occurred in 5 years. Results: The rates of clinical catheter infections, local catheter infections, venous thromboembolism, bleeding, and mechanical complications were 2.6, 1.1, 0.2, 0.2, and 0.2 per 1000 catheter days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant infectious organism in blood and catheter cultures. The children with leukemia had a significantly higher frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.046). The children who underwent bone marrow transplantation had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.043) and higher frequency of local catheter infections (p=0.003). The children with implanted catheters had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.048). The children with thrombocytopenia had significantly fewer local catheter infections and significantly more clinical catheter infections and catheter-related bleeding (respectively p=0.001, p=0.042, and p=0.024). Conclusion: Leukemia, bone marrow transplantation, and thrombocytopenia are risk factors for CVC-associated complications. The relatively higher number of interventions performed via permanent catheters may be responsible for the significantly increased incidence of systemic infections and mechanical injury. PMID:26316482

  13. Post-operative abdominal complications in Crohn’s disease in the biological era: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waterland, Peter; Athanasiou, Thanos; Patel, Heena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on post-operative complications after surgery for Crohn’s disease (CD) comparing biological with no therapy. METHODS: PubMed, Medline and Embase databases were searched to identify studies comparing post-operative outcomes in CD patients receiving biological therapy and those who did not. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for each outcome measure of interest. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies were included for meta-analysis, comprising a total of 5425 patients with CD 1024 (biological treatment, 4401 control group). After biological therapy there was an increased risk of total infectious complications (OR = 1.52; 95%CI: 1.14-2.03, 8 studies) and wound infection (OR = 1.73; 95%CI: 1.12-2.67; P = 0.01, 7 studies). There was no increased risk for other complications including anastomotic leak (OR = 1.19; 95%CI: 0.82-1.71; P = 0.26), abdominal sepsis (OR = 1.22; 95%CI: 0.87-1.72; P = 0.25) and re-operation (OR = 1.12; 95%CI: 0.81-1.54; P = 0.46) in patients receiving biological therapy. CONCLUSION: Pre-operative use of anti-TNF-α therapy may increase risk of post-operative infectious complications after surgery for CD and in particular wound related infections.

  14. Complications after video-assisted thoracic surgery in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who underwent preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Akira; Murase, Kazuma; Yamada, Katsuo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation are effective in preventing postoperative complications in patients with cardiopulmonary disease. The present study aims to elucidate the presence of postoperative pneumonia and atelectasis in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who underwent lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who had undergone lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were enrolled in this study. The presence of postoperative pneumonia and atelectasis was evaluated, and preoperative and postoperative pulmonary functions were compared. [Results] Postoperative pneumonia and postoperative atelectasis were not observed. Decreases of pulmonary function were 5.9% (standard deviation, 8.5) in forced vital capacity (percent predicted) and 9.6% (standard deviation, 11.1) in forced expiratory volume in 1?s (percent predicted). [Conclusion] The present study indicates that the combination of lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease may be effective in preventing postoperative complications. PMID:26357436

  15. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Renal Failure Complicating a Systemic Genetic Disease: Diagnostic Dilemma. Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Benmoussa, Leila; Renoux, Marion; Radoï, Loredana

    2015-11-01

    Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, owing mainly to secondary hyperparathyroidism complicating this disease. However, any systemic disease responsible for kidney failure can produce oral manifestations, which can be misdiagnosed. This report describes the case of a 40-year-old male patient referred for oral assessment before kidney and liver transplantation. He had primary hyperoxaluria complicated by end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Panoramic radiography indicated not only external root resorption, but also maxillary and mandibular radiolucencies consistent with brown tumors. Unexpectedly, histologic study of the bone biopsy specimen led to the diagnosis of jaws oxalosis. Primary hyperoxaluria is a systemic genetic disease. The affected genes are involved in glyoxylate metabolism and their deficiency results in overproduction of oxalates. Inability of the kidney to excrete oxalates leads to deposition of these crystals in almost all tissues (oxalosis) and to multiple-organ failure. Several oral findings have been described in patients with oxalosis, such as periodontal disease and root resorptions, but radiolucencies in the jaws have rarely been described. This case report is of particular interest because of the unusual location of oxalate crystal deposition in the jaws, which could be misdiagnosed in a patient with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26071361

  16. Primary cytomegalovirus ileitis complicated by massive gastrointestinal haemorrhage in a patient with steroid refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Le, S T T; Lee, S S K; Prideaux, L; Block, A A; Moore, G T C

    2010-11-01

    A young man with known steroid refractory terminal ileal Crohn's disease developed torrential gastrointestinal bleeding necessitating an emergency ileal resection. Serology was indicative of primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and this was confirmed with histopathology of the resected ileum. We highlight the difficulty in clinical practice of distinguishing between CMV infection and CMV disease as well as the different investigations available to aid in the diagnosis of pathogenic CMV disease. PMID:21155157

  17. A Review of the Impact of Biologics on Surgical Complications in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melissa I.; Cohen, Benjamin L.; Greenstein, Alexander J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Anti–tumor necrosis factor therapy has revolutionized the treatment of Crohn's disease. Despite the increased use in the past decade and a half, a majority of patients with Crohn's disease with ultimately require operative management of their disease. No clear consensus has been made in the literature regarding the surgical outcomes in patients who have been exposed to anti–tumor necrosis factor therapy. This review highlights the most recent and relevant literature regarding the safety and effects of anti–tumor necrosis factor use in the perioperative period. PMID:25811432

  18. Secondary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a complication of inherited renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bockenhauer, D; van’t Hoff, W; Dattani, M.; Lehnhardt, A; Subtirelu, M; Hildebrandt, F; Bichet, DG

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a serious condition with large water losses in the urine and risk of hypernatremic dehydration. Unrecognised, repeated episodes of hypernatremic dehydration can lead to permanent brain damage. Primary NDI is due to mutations in either AVPR2 or AQP2. NDI can also occur as a secondary complication, most commonly from obstructive uropathy or chronic lithium therapy. We observed NDI in patients with inherited tubulopathies and aimed to define the clinical and molecular phenotype. Methods We reviewed medical notes of four patients with clinical NDI and an underlying molecularly confirmed diagnosis of nephropathic cystinosis, Bartter syndrome, nephronophthisis and apparent mineralocorticoid excess, respectively. Results The patients all failed to concentrate their urine after DDAVP. None had an identifiable mutation in AVPR2 or AQP2, consistent with secondary NDI. Patients experienced repeated episodes of hypernatraemic dehydration and in two cases NDI was initially thought to be the primary diagnosis, delaying recognition of the underlying problem. Conclusion The recognition of this potential complication is important as it has direct implications for the clinical management. The occurrence of NDI in these conditions provides clues for the etiology of aquaporin deficiency. PMID:20733335

  19. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  20. [Treatment and outcome of Crohn's disease without initial complications. Results of a retrospective, multicenter Tunisian study].

    PubMed

    Cheikh, Imed; Ben Ammar, Ahmed; Essid, Mejda; Azzouz, Messadak; Ettahri, Nabil; Krichene, Mohamed; Bouzaidi, Slim; Ennajar, Taoufik

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate and achieve the factors that have an influence on the evolution of the Chron's disease. This study was done in 124 patients reaching the diagnosis of Chron's disease between 1988 and 1997. The evolution of this disease was achieved in 87 patients. The Chron's disease was inactive among 31 patients (35-6%)--with discontinous evolution in 42 patients (48.3%) and active chronic in 14 patients (16-1%). The active chronic form of Chron's disease was twice more frequent among the smokers and the patients with age above 40 years--but this difference has no statistical significance. The indication of surgical treatment was realised in 21 patients and it takes place as result of failure of medical treatment in 16 patients (76-2%)--an abcess in 2 patents (9-5%) and iatrogenic perforation in 1 patient (4-8%). The age-sexe-smoke--the intensity of the initial attack and the nature of the treatment had no influence in the need of the surgical interfference. The Chron's disease showed the less severe evolution in this study--the age above 40 years and the consumption of smoke increased the frequency of active chronic form. PMID:12416354

  1. Regulatory T cell dysfunction in subjects with common variable immunodeficiency complicated by autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Grace P; Chiang, David; Song, Steven J; Hoyte, Elisabeth G; Huang, Jennifer; Vanishsarn, Christopher; Nadeau, Kari C

    2009-05-01

    Approximately 25% of subjects with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) develop autoimmune disease. We analyzed T cell subsets, specifically regulatory T cells along with B cell subsets to determine whether there were changes in regulatory T cells which would correlate with the autoimmune disease clinical phenotype in CVID subjects. We hypothesized that regulatory T cell (CD4+CD25hiCD127lo) suppressive function would be impaired in CVID subjects with autoimmune disease. Using purified, sorted Treg from CVID subjects (n=14) and from healthy controls (HC, n=5) in standard suppression assays, we found the suppressive function of Treg from CVID subjects with autoimmune disease (CVID w/ AI, n=8) to be significantly attenuated compared to CVID subjects with no autoimmune disease (CVID w/o AI, n=6) and to HC (n=5). A number of proteins associated with Treg function were decreased in expression as detected through immunofluorescent antibody via flow cytometry (mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of FoxP3, Granzyme A, XCL1, pSTAT5, and GITR in Treg was significantly lower (by up to 3 fold) in CVID w/ AI compared to CVID w/o AI and HC. Furthermore, a statistically significant correlation was found between intracellular MFI of FoxP3, Granzyme A, and pSTAT5 in Treg and the degree of Treg dysfunction. These results suggest that attenuation of Treg function is associated with autoimmune disease in CVID subjects and may contribute to autoimmune pathogenesis. PMID:19162554

  2. Soluble HLA-G in pregnancies complicated by autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Beneventi, Fausta; Badulli, Carla; Locatelli, Elena; Caporali, Roberto; Ramoni, Véronique; Cavagnoli, Chiara; Simonetta, Margherita; Garbin, Giulia; Tinelli, Carmine; Alpini, Claudia; Montecucco, CarloMaurizio; Martinetti, Miryam; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases in pregnancies are associated with increased adverse obstetric outcomes. We compared maternal soluble human leucocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G) blood levels in subjects with a rheumatic disease preexisting pregnancy and unaffected controls. Third-trimester blood maternal sHLA-G concentrations were significantly higher in subjects with rheumatic diseases than in controls (mean 93.1ng/ml [SD 42.1] vs 58.1ng/ml [SD 96.3], p=0.003). Cord blood sHLA-G concentrations were significantly higher in rheumatic disease than in those born to control mothers (median 41.2ng/ml [IQR: 3.3-44.0] vs 17.9ng/ml [IQR: 17.2-88.1], p=0.007). A strict positive correlation (r=0.88, p<0.001) was found between the maternal and fetal titers of ANA autoantibodies as well as between maternal and fetal sHLAG circulating levels (r=0.58 and r=0.67, respectively, for controls and cases, p<0.001). Maternal s-HLA-G blood concentrations were significantly higher in subjects with rheumatic disease DEL/DEL homozygous for a polymorphism of the 3' untranslated regulatory region of HLA-G (HLA-G 14bp) than in the corresponding healthy controls (mean values 141.5ng/ml [SD: 166] vs 54.2ng/ml [SD: 35], p=0.009). Increasing maternal and cord blood levels of s-HLA-G concentrations among pregnant subjects with rheumatic diseases compared with controls suggest that autoimmune diseases prompt a maternal and fetal immune response that favors pregnancy immune tolerance. PMID:26042897

  3. Infectious complications in patients receiving autologous CD34-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kohno, K; Nagafuji, K; Tsukamoto, H; Horiuchi, T; Takase, K; Aoki, K; Henzan, H; Kamezaki, K; Takenaka, K; Miyamoto, T; Teshima, T; Harada, M; Akashi, K

    2009-08-01

    Long-term analysis of infectious complication after high-dose immunosuppressive therapy with CD34-selected autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (AD) was performed. Theoretically, CD34 selection can reduce the risk of reinfusion of autoreactive lymphocytes. However, it is also associated with a significant reduction in T cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes, which in turn may compromise immune reconstitution, thereby increasing the risk of infection. Moreover, AD compromises host immunity and causes organ damage resulting in dysfunction of the cutaneous or mucosal barrier. In this study, the incidence rate of infections is reported in 14 patients who underwent high-dose (200 mg/kg) cyclophosphamide therapy followed by reinfusion of CD34-selected autologous peripheral blood stem cells. Bacterial complication occurred in 3 of 14 (21%) patients. Cytomegalovirus reactivation and adenovirus hemorrhagic cystitis were observed in 9 (64%) and 2 (14%) patients, respectively. As for late infectious complications, 7 patients (50%) developed dermatomal varicella zoster virus infection. No infection-related mortality was seen in this case series. Because the risk for infections approaches that seen in allogeneic transplant recipients, infection surveillance, diagnostic workup, and prophylactic strategies similar to those applicable to allogeneic recipients are warranted. PMID:19453993

  4. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  5. Neurological complications and risk factors of cardiopulmonary failure of EV-A71-related hand, foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Xiao, Zhenghui; Hu, Shixiong; Luo, Ruping; Wang, Hua; Lu, Xiulan; Xu, Zhiyue; Yao, Xu; Zhou, Luo; Long, Hongyu; Gong, Jiaoe; Song, Yanmin; Zhao, Li; Luo, Kaiwei; Zhang, Mengqi; Feng, Li; Yang, Liming; Sheng, Xiaoqi; Fan, Xuegong; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012, large outbreaks of EV-A71-related- hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred annually in China. Some cases had neurological complications and were closely associated with fatal cardiopulmonary collapse, but not all children with central nervous system (CNS) involvement demonstrated a poor prognosis. To identify which patients and which neurological complications are more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure, we retrospectively studied 1,125 paediatric inpatients diagnosed with EV-A71-related HFMD in Hunan province, including 1,017 cases with CNS involvement. These patients were divided into cardiopulmonary failure (976 people) group and group without cardiopulmonary failure (149 people). A logistic regression analysis was used to compare the clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and neurological complications between these two groups. The most significant risk factors included young age, fever duration ≥3 days, coma, limb weakness, drowsiness and ANS involvement. Patients with brainstem encephalitis and more CNS-involved regions were more likely to progress to cardiopulmonary failure. These findings can help front-line clinicians rapidly and accurately determine patient prognosis, thus rationally distributing the limited medical resources and implementing interventions as early as possible. PMID:27001010

  6. Maternal obesity in females born small: Pregnancy complications and offspring disease risk.

    PubMed

    Mahizir, Dayana; Briffa, Jessica F; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wadley, Glenn D; Moritz, Karen M; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health crisis, with 1.6 billion adults worldwide being classified as overweight or obese in 2014. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number of women who are overweight or obese at the time of conception is increasing. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with the development of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis proposes that perturbations during critical stages of development can result in adverse fetal changes that leads to an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Of particular concern, children born to obese mothers are at a greater risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. One subset of the population who are predisposed to developing obesity are children born small for gestational age, which occurs in 10% of pregnancies worldwide. Epidemiological studies report that these growth-restricted children have an increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Importantly during pregnancy, growth-restricted females have a higher risk of developing cardiometabolic disease, indicating that they may have an exacerbated phenotype if they are also overweight or obese. Thus, the development of early pregnancy interventions targeted to obese mothers may prevent their children from developing cardiometabolic disease in adulthood. PMID:26173914

  7. Long-Term Complications of Treatment and Causes of Mortality After Hodgkin's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hancock; Hoppe

    1996-07-01

    The majority of newly diagnosed patients are expected to survive Hodgkin's disease because of effective therapies established during past 30 years. Long-term observations from large populations of treated patients have disclosed a variety of late effects of the disease and its therapy have contributed morbidity and excess mortality to Hodgkin's disease survivors. Secondary cancers have continued to accrue, and the risk relative to the general population has increased to 6.4 (95% confidence intervals: 5.5 to 7.3) in updated experience at Stanford University. Risks are significantly elevated for leukemia (primarily after chemotherapy regimens containing alkylating agents); non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and tumors of the lung, breast, soft tissues, bone, stomach, pancreas, salivary gland, thyroid, and cutaneous melanoma. Early cardiovascular disease has also been observed and numerically exceeds second cancers as a cause of death in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease (49 v 47 cases). Pulmonary dysfunction, thyroid dysfunction, infertility, psychosocial changes, gastrointestinal problems, soft-tissue changes, alterations in immunity, and risks for infection have also affected some treated patients. As these problems have been recognized, treatment approaches have been modified over the last 10 to 15 years, and early data suggest a decrease in some treatment sequellae. PMID:10717180

  8. Carcinoma of the small intestine and colon as a complication of Crohn disease: radiologic manifestation

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, G.W.; Frank, P.H.

    1984-03-01

    Barium examinations of the large and small bowel were analyzed in six of seven patients who had adenocarcinoma in areas of the intestine affected with Crohn disease; radiographic changes were correlated with clinical, surgical, and pathologic findings. Radiographic examinations were available in five of these patients at the time of diagnosis of tumor. Two of the five patients demonstrated classic radiographic changes associated with carcinoma. In the other three cases, the radiographic changes were atypical for carcinoma and demonstrated progression of disease over time to include more portions of the bowel and presence of fistulas, strictures, and obstruction. The most frequent clinical presentation of adenocarcinoma in these patients was a recrudescence of symptoms after a long quiescent period. In patients with long-standing Crohn disease plus these clinical features and the above radiographic findings, the diagnosis of a coexisting carcinoma should be considered.

  9. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Dyslipidemia, Risk for Cardiovascular Complications, and Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Qing; Lu, Lun-Gen

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with several metabolic disorders and diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. In NAFLD, dyslipidemia is manifested as increased serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, all of which are key risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is a leading cause of mortality in NAFLD patients. Thus, implementation of an aggressive therapeutic strategy for dyslipidemia with hypolipidemic agents may mitigate the risk for CVD among NAFLD patients. Here, we provide a current review of literature regarding NAFLD, with particular emphasis on dyslipidemia and available treatment options. PMID:26357637

  10. [Stress fracture of the femur: a rare complication of sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Bahebeck, J; Ngowe Ngowe, M; Monny Lobe, M; Sosso, M; Hoffmeyer, P

    2002-12-01

    A 24-year-old patient with homozygous sickle cell disease developed a stress fracture of the femur. Successive x-rays demonstrated defective ossification and a spontaneous unicortical fracture with no notion of trauma or stressful activities (e.g. sports) followed six months later by a bicortical fracture with displacement and periosteal reaction leading to the diagnosis of stress fracture. This type of fracture has not been reported previously in sickle cell disease. The patient was treated with centromedullary nailing. The follow-up was uneventful. Bone healing was achieved at three months. The patient was pain free and could walk without crutches. Stress fracture is a potential diagnosis in homozygous sickle cell disease patients with defective ossification who present spontaneous pain even when plain x-rays do not visualize an overt fracture. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be performed when available. Conventional treatment with nailing provides successful cure with good functional outcome. PMID:12503024

  11. CMV disease complicating induction immunosuppressive treatment for ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Tollitt, James; O'Riordan, Edmond; Poulikakos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 71-year-old woman who initially presented with renal-limited antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Following standard therapy with cyclophosphamide, steroids and plasma exchange, her renal function began to improve. However, despite appropriate treatment, her renal function subsequently deteriorated and she suffered haemoptysis. Owing to diagnostic uncertainty, bronchoscopy and a repeat renal biopsy were performed. The bronchoscopy washings demonstrated positivity for cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA, and in combination with a positive serum CMV PCR, immunosuppression was withheld. Treatment with ganciclovir was started. Repeat renal biopsy demonstrated active vasculitis and, following successful treatment of CMV disease, immunosuppression was re-started alongside prophylactic valganciclovir. This resulted in a successful outcome for the patient. Pulmonary CMV disease may mimic pulmonary disease associated with vasculitis, posing a diagnostic challenge to clinicians. We recommend a low threshold when testing for CMV in these patients. PMID:26907821

  12. Radiation-induced chondrosarcoma of the clavicle complicating Hodgkin's disease. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Aprin, H.; Calandra, J.; Mir, R.; Lee, J.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Review of the literature reveals that postradiation chondrosarcoma is a rare secondary malignant bone tumor. This case report demonstrates a Grade 1 chondrosarcoma of the proximal right clavicle in a 17-year-old boy, eight years after extensive chemotherapy and radiation therapy for a Stage IIB Hodgkin's disease.

  13. Association of Serum Adiponectin, Leptin, and Resistin Concentrations with the Severity of Liver Dysfunction and the Disease Complications in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Surdacka, Agata; Smolen, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. There is growing evidence that white adipose tissue is an important contributor in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We investigated serum concentrations of total adiponectin (Acrp30), leptin, and resistin in patients with chronic alcohol abuse and different grades of liver dysfunction, as well as ALD complications. Materials and Methods. One hundred forty-seven consecutive inpatients with ALD were prospectively recruited. The evaluation of plasma adipokine levels was performed using immunoenzymatic ELISA tests. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Results. Acrp30 and resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with ALD than in controls. Lower leptin levels in females with ALD compared to controls, but no significant differences in leptin concentrations in males, were found. High serum Acrp30 level revealed an independent association with advanced liver dysfunction, as well as the development of ALD complications, that is, ascites and hepatic encephalopathy. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in serum leptin concentrations may influence the ALD course, different in females compared with males. Serum Acrp30 level may serve as a potential prognostic indicator for patients with ALD. PMID:24259947

  14. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  15. The role of trophoblast nutrient and ion transporters in the development of pregnancy complications and adult disease.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Thomas; Myatt, Leslie; Powell, Theresa L

    2009-10-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal overgrowth occur in 15% of all pregnancies and lead to the delivery of a baby with an abnormally low or high birth weight, respectively. Both these conditions of pathological fetal growth increase the risk for perinatal complications and predispose the baby for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in childhood and later in life. Fetal growth is closely related to the capacity of the placenta to transport nutrients and ions, which is dependent of the expression and activity of specific transporter proteins in the plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast, the transporting epithelium of the human placenta. In human IUGR, some trophoblast nutrient and ion transporters are down regulated, whereas fetal overgrowth is associated with an up-regulation of transporters for amino acids and glucose in the placental barrier. Experimental studies have provided evidence to suggest that these changes in placental transport capacity constitute a direct cause of altered fetal growth. Therefore, regulation of placental nutrient transporters play a critical role in determining fetal growth and development, as well as the future health of the baby. This review is focused on the human and (i) summarizes the evidence that changes in the activity and expression of trophoblast nutrient and ion transporters play a central role in determining fetal growth, (ii) discusses the molecular mechanisms regulating trophoblast transporters, and (iii) highlights the implications of these findings for the development of pregnancy complications and fetal programming of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. PMID:19485888

  16. Appendiceal tie syndrome: A very rare complication of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Awale, Laligen; Joshi, Brikh Raj; Rajbanshi, Saroj; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2015-04-27

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency that we encounter. Adynamic Intestinal obstruction due to appendicitis or its complication may be seen time and often. Mechanical obstruction because of appendicitis is uncommon and even rarer for a closed loop obstruction to occur. Although it was described as early as 1901, very few cases have been reported. We report the case of a 20 years male who presented with generalized colicky pain abdomen, abdominal distension, vomiting and obstipation for three to four days. Vital signs were stable. His abdomen was distended and peritonitic, especially in the right iliac fossa. Rest of the physical examination was unremarkable. Blood tests were normal except for leucocytosis with neutrophilia. An abdominal X-ray finding was indicating a small bowel obstruction. A midline laparotomy was performed. On intraoperative examination, distended loops of small bowel from the jejunum to the distal ileum was observed, and a constricting ring around the terminal ileum created by a phlegmonous appendicitis with its tip adherent to the root of mesentery was found, obstructing an edematous loop of small bowel without signs of ischemia. As the bowel was viable simple appendectomy was done. Postoperatively, he had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 3 d. PMID:25914785

  17. Appendiceal tie syndrome: A very rare complication of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Awale, Laligen; Joshi, Brikh Raj; Rajbanshi, Saroj; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency that we encounter. Adynamic Intestinal obstruction due to appendicitis or its complication may be seen time and often. Mechanical obstruction because of appendicitis is uncommon and even rarer for a closed loop obstruction to occur. Although it was described as early as 1901, very few cases have been reported. We report the case of a 20 years male who presented with generalized colicky pain abdomen, abdominal distension, vomiting and obstipation for three to four days. Vital signs were stable. His abdomen was distended and peritonitic, especially in the right iliac fossa. Rest of the physical examination was unremarkable. Blood tests were normal except for leucocytosis with neutrophilia. An abdominal X-ray finding was indicating a small bowel obstruction. A midline laparotomy was performed. On intraoperative examination, distended loops of small bowel from the jejunum to the distal ileum was observed, and a constricting ring around the terminal ileum created by a phlegmonous appendicitis with its tip adherent to the root of mesentery was found, obstructing an edematous loop of small bowel without signs of ischemia. As the bowel was viable simple appendectomy was done. Postoperatively, he had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 3 d. PMID:25914785

  18. Small bowel volvulus as a complication of von Recklinghausen’s disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Thomas Artur; Kröpil, Feride; Schoppe, Martin Olaf; Kröpil, Patric; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Krieg, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old male with Neurofibromatosis type?I?(NF-1), who presented at the time of admission with clinical findings of an acute abdomen caused by a mechanical obstruction. Computerized tomography showed a volvulus of the terminal ileum with mesenteric swirling as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Consecutive exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis and 70 cm of the small intestine was resected due to an affection of the mesentery by multiple neurofibromas. The gastrointestinal tract is affected in approximately 10% of patients with NF-1, however the mesentery is almost always spared. Here we describe the unique case of a patient with a volvulus caused by mesenteric manifestation of von Recklinghausen’s disease, emphasizing the role of surgery in a team of multidisciplinary specialists to treat this multiorganic disease. PMID:24976735

  19. Humeral Lateral Epicondylitis Complicated by Hydroxyapatite Dihydrite Deposition Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Andrée-Anne; O’Shaughnessy, Julie; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this case report is to differentiate the recovery timeline expected for patients with simple lateral epicondylitis from an abnormal recovery period, in which case an underlying condition should be suspected. Clinical features A 49-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with posterolateral right elbow pain. The history included chronic recurrent lateral elbow pain, followed by a traumatic event leading to sustained pain and disability. Intervention and outcomes Following a trial of conservative therapy including activity restrictions, soft tissue therapy, joint mobilizations, and therapeutic ultrasonography that led to no significant improvement, the patient was referred for diagnostic imaging that revealed hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease. Conclusion This report describes a case for which lateral epicondylitis symptoms failed to resolve because of an underlying condition (hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease). This case emphasizes that primary care practitioners treating lateral epicondylitis should consider referral for further investigations when positive results are not achieved. PMID:24711788

  20. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  1. Infectious complications with anti-TNFalpha therapy in rheumatic diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Toussirot, Eric; Streit, Gérald; Wendling, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    TNFalpha plays a pivotal role not only in the inflammatory process but also in the normal response against pathogens and therefore, interfering with this cytokine may increase the risk of infection. TNFalpha antagonists are commonly used in daily clinical practice for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis since the beginning of 2000. The spectrum of pathogens giving infectious disease in patients under anti-TNFalpha therapies ranges from common bacteria to more opportunistic organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infections which were described with TNFalpha inhibitors may have a benign course or may be a serious, life threatening disease, and may be localized or disseminated. These TNFalpha inhibitors related infections were described in the randomized clinical trials, and were then declared to post-marketing surveillance systems and special registries. Tuberculosis (TB) is the most frequent opportunistic infection which has been reported with TNFalpha antagonists and the highest risk appears to be associated with infliximab, and at a lesser extent with etanercept. Currently available data and recent patents on the risk of TB with adalimumab are not sufficient to conclude, but TB cases were also reported with this agent. The description of TB infections with TNFalpha inhibitors led to the establishment of new guidelines for screening patients at high risk of developing TB. These data highlight the importance of post-marketing surveillance and special registries for accurately evaluating the safety profile and particularly the infectious risk of this very effective class of drug in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:19075965

  2. Predictive factors for skeletal complications in hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Berruti, A; Tucci, M; Mosca, A; Tarabuzzi, R; Gorzegno, G; Terrone, C; Vana, F; Lamanna, G; Tampellini, M; Porpiglia, F; Angeli, A; Scarpa, R M; Dogliotti, L

    2005-01-01

    Factors predictive of skeletal-related events (SREs) in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease were investigated. We evaluated the frequency of SREs in 200 hormone-refractory patients consecutively observed at our Institution and followed until death or the last follow-up. Baseline parameters were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analysis as potential predictive factors of SREs. Skeletal-related events were observed in 86 patients (43.0%), 10 of which (5.0%) occurred before the onset of hormone-refractory disease. In univariate analysis, patient performance status (P=0.002), disease extent (DE) in bone (P=0.0001), bone pain (P=0.0001), serum alkaline phosphatase (P=0.0001) and urinary N-telopeptide of type one collagen (P=0.0001) directly correlated with a greater risk to develop SREs, whereas Gleason score at diagnosis, serum PSA, Hb, serum albumin, serum calcium, types of bone lesions and duration of androgen deprivation therapy did not. Both DE in bone (hazard ratio (HR): 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07–1.25, P=0.000) and pain score (HR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06–1.20, P=0.000) were independent variables predicting for the onset of SREs in multivariate analysis. In patients with heavy tumour load in bone and great bone pain, the percentage of SREs was almost twice as high as (26 vs 52%, P<0.02) and occurred significantly earlier (P=0.000) than SREs in patients with limited DE in bone and low pain. Bone pain and DE in bone independently predict the occurrence of SREs in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease. These findings could help physicians in tailoring the skeletal follow-up most appropriate to individual patients and may prove useful for stratifying patients enrolled in bisphosphonate clinical trials. PMID:16222309

  3. Intrapulmonary haematoma complicating mechanical ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bonmarchand, G; Lefebvre, E; Lerebours-Pigeonnière, G; Genevois, A; Massari, P; Leroy, J

    1988-01-01

    Intrapulmonary haematomas occurred during mechanical ventilation of two patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bullous dystrophy. In both cases, the haematomas were revealed by blood-stained aspirates, a fall in haemoglobin level, and the appearance of radiological opacities. Haematoma occurrence in the area of a bulla which recently has rapidly increased in size, suggests that the haematoma is due to the rupture of stretched vessels embedded in the wall of the bulla. PMID:3379188

  4. Successful Use of Higher-Dose Etanercept for Multirefractory Systemic Flare of Adult-Onset Still's Disease with Liver Failure with No Response to Tocilizumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamechika, Shinya; Iwagaitsu, Shiho; Maeda, Shinji; Togawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with refractory systemic flare of adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure despite high-dose corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and tocilizumab, was successfully treated with additional use of etanercept. Etanercept at a dose of 50 mg weekly was partially effective but could not reduce the dose of concomitant betamethasone from 5 mg/day. Etanercept at a dose of 75 mg weekly could lead her to clinical remission and enabled successful tapering off the corticosteroids and discontinuation of etanercept. Normalization of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and persistent elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor α under the treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressants suggest that tumor necrosis factor α was more deeply involved than at least interleukin 6 in the pathogenesis of refractoriness of the disease in this patient, and these findings might be indicative of potential efficacy for adjunctive use of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor rather than an interleukin 6 inhibitor. PMID:24455384

  5. Second malignant neoplasms complicating Hodgkin's disease: the National Cancer Institute experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, W.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Waller, B.; Makuch, R.W.; Kelley, P.A.; Glatstein, E.; DeVita, V.T.

    1984-07-01

    The medical records of all patients treated for Hodgkin's disease during the years 1964-1981 were reviewed. Four hundred seventy-three previously untreated patients were analyzed. Thirty-four subsequent second malignant neoplasms were observed in 33 patients among those treated for Hodgkin's disease. Eight cases of acute nonlymphocyctic leukemia, one case of chronic myeloid leukemia, three cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, three cases of sarcoma, and 19 other tumors were identified. The ten-year estimated risk of leukemia by treatment was the following: radiotherapy only (0), chemotherapy only (0.02), initial combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.06), and salvage combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.09). The ten-year estimated risk of solid tumors was 0.07 overall, with all treatment groups associated with similar risks. Unlike some other reports, a greater risk of leukemia in patients who began treatment for Hodgkin's disease at age 40 or older was not found. However, a positive association was noted between increasing risk of solid tumors and increasing patient age.

  6. Budd-Chiari syndrome, a rare complication of multicentric Castleman disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SONG, KUI; LI, MIN

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old female presented to The First Affiliated Hospital of Jishou University (Jishou, Hunan) with a fever of unknown origin and progressive abdominal distension. Physical examination revealed generalized lymphadenopathy, multiple non-tender cutaneous nodules, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and abdominal edema. An axillary lymph node biopsy indicated hyaline vascular type Castleman disease, and color Doppler and computed tomography scans suggested Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Based on the abdominal distension and impairments of the liver and kidneys, an inferior vena cavography and balloon dilatation were performed, confirming the diagnosis of BCS and leading to symptomatic improvement. The patient commenced a combination chemotherapy regimen of cyclophosphamide (0.4 g; days 1–3), vindesine (4 mg; day 1) and prednisolone (100 mg; days 1–5), with no melioration of symptoms. Theprubicin was added to suppress the aggravation of the disease on day six of the chemotherapy cycle. The patient exhibited symptomatic remission for one week, however, she subsequently succumbed to intracranial hemorrhage and infections of the lung and intestine due to long-term myelosuppression following chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of BCS in a patient with multicentric Castleman disease without human immunodeficiency virus infection. PMID:26137030

  7. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF72 gene. Our findings seem to support the hypothesis that the hexanucleotide expansions of C9ORF72 gene with intermediate repetitions between 20 and 29 repetitions could be associated with typical PD with psychosis or dementia and atypical parkinsonisms with dementia (non-classical atypical parkinsonism with dementia FTD-like) or without dementia (non-classical atypical parkinsonism upper MND-like), although the causal relationship is still unclear. In these latter patients, parkinsonism, more or less levodopa responsive, constituted the symptomatological central core at onset. PMID:26275564

  8. Correlation between congenital heart disease complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension and circulating endothelial cells as well as endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Qiu, Jun; Pan, Min; Zheng, Dongdong; Su, Yamin; Wei, Meifang; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei; Zhu, Jiahua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in the level of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in peripheral venous blood of the patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), and research on their effects in the onset and progress of CHD complicated with PAH. Methods: A case-control study including 30 cases of healthy controls, 15 cases of left-to-right shunt CHD without PAH, 26 cases of CHD complicated with mild PAH, and 17 cases of CHD complicated with moderate-severe PAH was performed. We used flow cytometry to measure the percentage of CECs accounting for nucleated cells in whole blood, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the level of ET-1 in serum. The differences of above-mentioned biomarkers between different groups were compared. Results: (1) The level of CECs and ET-1in the group of moderate-severe PAH was significantly higher than those in the group of mild PAH and the group of CHD without PAH. Significantly difference was also observed between the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of mild PAH and those in the group of CHD without PAH and the control group. Meanwhile, the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of large shunt was significantly higher than those in the group few shunt and few-medium shunt. (2) Strong positive correlations were observed between pulmonary artery systolic pressure and percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. Mean pulmonary artery pressure also positively correlated with percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. (3) Arterial partial pressure of oxygen as well as arterial oxygen saturation negatively correlated with the level of CECs, whereas the volume of left-to-right shunt positively correlated with the level of ET-1. (4) The level of CECs and ET-1 were positively correlated as well in CHD patients. Conclusions: CHD complicated with PAH is associated with increased CEC counts and ET-1 production. This study suggests that CECs and ET-1 could be used as clinical biomarkers to define medical strategies for control of PAH. PMID:26617785

  9. Severe conduction disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias complicating mediastinal irradiation for Hodgkin's disease: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Mary-Rabine, L.; Waleffe, A.; Kulbertus, H.E.

    1980-09-01

    A 27-year-old male had undergone mediastinal and retroperitoneal irradiation for stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease at age 19. When he was admitted to the hospital, because of lightheadedness and syncope, trifascicular bundle branch block was noted and the patient underwent a clinical electrophysiological investigation. AH and HV intervals were prolonged and ventricular fibrillation was induced during programmed right ventricular stimulation. Serial electrophysiological studies allowed us to prescribe effective antiarrhythmic drug therapy with no recurrence of symptoms during a follow-up period of 12 months.

  10. Bilateral popliteal aneurysms complicating adult polycystic kidney disease in a patient with a marfanoid habitus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, W; Goldsmith, D

    2003-01-01

    In 1994 he had noticed a painful swelling behind his left knee. Computed tomography with contrast showed a large popliteal aneurysm. This was replaced with a vein graft. The right popliteal artery showed milder changes, and this was repaired in 1999. Popliteal aneurysms develop most often in older vasculopaths with multiple risk factors; connective tissue disorders have rarely been associated with their presence in younger patients. Polycystic kidney disease has been associated with several aneurysms, most notably cerebral, but not popliteal. The patient's marfanoid habitus also may have played a part. This case emphasises the mixed aetiology of popliteal aneurysms. PMID:12954963

  11. Jejunal overexpression of peptide YY in celiac disease complicated with pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gurrado, Angela; Giungato, Simone; Catacchio, Ivana; Piscitelli, Domenico; Arborea, Graziana; Piccinni, Giuseppe; Testini, Mario; Vacca, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year old man with coeliac disease and chronic lack of appetite, malabsorption and weight loss, despite the gluten-free diet, was operated because of a sub-diaphragmatic free air due to a small-bowel pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI). The jejunum showed granulomatous lesions with a honeycombed appearance of air cysts in the submucosa/subserosa. We found overexpression of peptide YY (PYY) into only the jejunum with PCI, while the expression was very weak or absent in the tissue without cysts. One year after surgery, he had no abdominal pain or PCI recurrence. The above chronic symptoms were plausibly attributable to the PYY. PMID:25291987

  12. Impact of glucocerebrosidase mutations on motor and nonmotor complications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oeda, Tomoko; Umemura, Atsushi; Mori, Yuko; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Inoue, Kimiko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    Homozygous mutations of the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) cause Gaucher disease (GD), and heterozygous mutations of GBA are a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examined the impact of GBA mutations on the longitudinal clinical course of PD patients by retrospective cohort design. GBA-coding regions were fully sequenced in 215 PD patients and GD-associated GBA mutations were identified in 19 (8.8%) PD patients. In a retrospective cohort study, time to develop dementia, psychosis, wearing-off, and dyskinesia were examined. Survival time analysis followed a maximum 12-year observation (median 6.0 years), revealing that PD patients with GD-associated mutations developed dementia and psychosis significantly earlier than those without mutations (p < 0.001 and p = 0.017, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios of GBA mutations were 8.3 for dementia (p < 0.001) and 3.1 for psychosis (p = 0.002). No statistically significant differences were observed for wearing-off and dyskinesia between the groups. N-isopropyl-p[(123)I] iodoamphetamine single-photon emission tomography pixel-by-pixel analysis revealed that regional cerebral blood flow was reduced in the bilateral parietal cortex, including the precuneus of GD-associated mutant PD patients, compared with matched PD controls without mutations. PMID:26422360

  13. Bacterial pneumonia. Managing a deadly complication of influenza in older adults with comorbid disease.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjay

    2002-03-01

    In patients with Influenza, the risk of death from pneumonia is closely associated with age and chronic conditions. Mortality from influenza and pneumonia in Americans age > or = 65 has been increasing since 1980. Pneumonia following influenza is usually caused by a secondary bacterial infection. Pathogens most commonly implicated are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae. Prompt empiric therapy effective against the suspected pathogen is indicated, whether the patient is being treated as an outpatient or requires inpatient observation or hospitalization for i.v. administration. Influenza vaccination of older patients living in the community has been shown to decrease hospitalizations for influenza and pneumonia by 52% and mortality by 70% in those with chronic lung disease. Protective rates are similar for residents of long-term care facilities. PMID:11899549

  14. Management of oral complications of disease-modifying drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E H; Plant, M J; Hassell, A B; Shadforth, M F; Fisher, J; Clarke, S; Hothersall, T E; Dawes, P T

    1997-04-01

    Stomatitis is a troublesome adverse effect of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This review presents data to examine the incidence, clinical features and consequences of DMARD-related stomatitis, and suggests an algorithm for its clinical management. The specific objectives of the two studies presented here were to determine the incidence of DMARD-related stomatitis and its effect on DMARD continuation, and secondly to identify the clinical and laboratory risk factors. We investigated two cohorts of patients: (i) a retrospective survey of data collected from drug monitoring clinics run for patients on DMARDs from 1987 to 1994 involving 1539 patients and 2394 drug exposures; (ii) a prospective study of 25 consecutive RA patients presenting with DMARD-related stomatitis compared to 29 RA controls with no history of DMARD stomatitis. The retrospective survey showed that 2% of DMARD patients stopped therapy because of stomatitis, but 55% of these were able to resume the same therapy. In the case control study. 24% of patients discontinued temporarily and 8% permanently. Cases of DMARD-related stomatitis differed from controls in that they had a higher incidence of previous mouth ulcers (40% vs 14%), they smoked less (8% vs 31%) and Schirmer's test was more often abnormal (44% vs 21%). There were no differences in RA severity, disease activity or oral hygiene. Haematinic deficiencies were equally common in cases and controls: 30% for iron, 8% for vitamin B12 and 24% for folic acid. Herpes simplex virus was involved in a minority (8%) of cases. In conclusion, the occurrence of stomatitis in RA patients on DMARD should not lead to cessation of drug therapy, but to a careful evaluation so that patients may be maintained on effective treatment. PMID:9159543

  15. A systematic review of xuezhikang, an extract from red yeast rice, for coronary heart disease complicated by dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qinghua; Liu, Zhaolan; Chen, Keji; Xu, Hao; Liu, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aims to evaluate the benefit and side effect of Xuezhikang for coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by dyslipidemia. Methods. All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with Xuezhikang as a treatment for CHD combined with dyslipidemia were considered for inclusion. Data extraction and analyses and quality assessment were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. Results. We included 22 randomized trials. Xuezhikang showed significant benefit on the incidence of all-cause deaths, CHD deaths, myocardial infarction, and revascularization as compared with placebo based on conventional treatment for CHD. It remarkably lowered total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) as compared with the placebo or inositol nicotinate group, which was similar to statins group. Xuezhikang also raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared to placebo or no intervention, which was similar to Inositol nicotinate and slightly inferior to statins. The incidence of adverse events did not differ between the Xuezhikang and control group. Conclusions. Xuezhikang showed a comprehensive lipid-regulating effect and was safe and effective in reducing cardiovascular events in CHD patients complicated by dyslipidemia. However, more rigorous trials with high quality are needed to give high level of evidence. PMID:22567033

  16. The impact of a regular erythrocytapheresis programme on the acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Kalff, Anna; Dowsing, Claire; Grigg, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    Thirteen adult patients aged 22-63 (median 30) years with sickle cell disease (SCD) were enrolled in a regular erythrocytapheresis (ECP) programme at a single institution between December 1998 and November 2008. The indications for enrolment were recurrent painful crises (PC), acute chest syndrome (ACS), silent cortical ischaemia, pulmonary hypertension, multi-organ crises and pregnancy. Endpoints retrospectively evaluated included the incidence of SCD-related acute events requiring hospitalization following and prior to regular ECP, the development of new and progression of pre-existing related end-organ damage, the effectiveness in reducing HbS levels acutely and prior to the next exchange and the transfusion-related complications. Sixteen acute sickle-related events occurred in five patients in 846 months of patient follow-up. In all patients with reliable data available pre-ECP, the frequency of such events was reduced following commencing regular ECP. No patient experienced stroke, multi-organ crises or developed new and/or progression of end-organ dysfunction. Regular ECP reduced HbS levels to the target of <30% immediately post-exchange. Alloimmunization rates were comparable to the literature and ECP was effective in preventing progressive iron overload. Regular ECP was demonstrated to be an effective, well-tolerated therapy for both acute and chronic complications of SCD in adults. PMID:20346014

  17. Complications of Long-Term Prostaglandin E1 Use in Newborns With Ductal-Dependent Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Alhussin, Walid; Verklan, M Terese

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) has been used for decades in the medical treatment of ductal dependent critical congenital heart disease in neonates. The article is a report of a retrospective evaluation of the long-term effects of PGE1 in a neonatal intensive care unit in Saudi Arabia. There were 22 subjects with a wide spectrum of cardiac defects maintained on PGE1 for a mean of 38 days (range: 6-200 days). The majority of the complications included hypokalemia, hypotension, and apnea/bradycardia. Pseudo-Barett syndrome and gastric outlet obstruction were also found. While long-term administration of PGE1 is rare in North America, it is important to be aware of possible adverse effects of fluid and electrolyte imbalance, gastric outlet obstruction, and feeding difficulties. PMID:26813395

  18. Severe Legionnaires' Disease Complicated by Rhabdomyolysis and Clinically Resistant to Moxifloxacin in a Splenectomised Patient: Too Much of a Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Koufakis, Theocharis; Gabranis, Ioannis; Chatzopoulou, Marianneta; Margaritis, Anastasios; Tsiakalou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We here report a case of Legionnaires' disease in a splenectomised patient, complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure and characterized by a poor clinical response to moxifloxacin. Splenectomy is not included among the factors, typically associated with higher risk or mortality in patients with Legionellosis. However, our report is consistent with previous case reports describing severe Legionella infections in asplenic subjects. The possibility that functional or anatomic asplenia may be a factor predisposing to severe clinical course or poor response to therapy in patients with Legionella infection cannot be excluded, deserving further investigation in the future. More studies are required in order to clarify the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that connect asplenia, immunological response to Legionella, and pathogen's resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26682076

  19. [Infectious complications in patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Bogomolova, N S; Vishnevskaia, G A; Bol'shakov, L V; Oreshkina, T D; Kuznetsova, S M; Cherny?, S S

    2010-01-01

    Methods for microbiological monitoring could analyze the microflora isolated in 372 patients with iatrogenic diseases of the trachea and esophagus, who were treated at the Department for Surgery of the Lung and Mediastinum, Acad. B. V. Petrovsky Russian Research Center of Surgery, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, in 2003 to 2009. Major groups of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree in patients who had undergone long-term resuscitation, injuries, surgery, etc. and in those who had admitted to the department from other clinics are identified. The main clinically significant microorganisms isolated during the pathological process in this area were Staphylococcus epidermadis (3.9-13.3%), St. aureus (12.4-21.1%), Pseudomonas eruginosa (9.2-17.5%), and Candida fungi (7.8-12.2%). This indicates the greater importance of the fungal microflora and its representatives' resistance to the most commonly used drugs. Rational antibacterial therapy regimens are proposed in relation to the type of microorganisms colonizing the tracheobronchial tree. PMID:21395146

  20. An unusual case of Darier disease complicated with a parasitic infestation.

    PubMed

    Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; Cabezas, Fausto; Díaz, Claudia Juliana

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman living in the countryside near Cali, Colombia, presented with exacerbation of papules located on her face and neck and an ulcer located on the left retroauricular area of 2 weeks' duration. She stated that her skin lesions appeared erratically, beginning at 13 years of age and that her father and daughter had similar skin lesions. Physical examination revealed multiple erythematous, hyperkeratotic papules, and yellowish brown crusts that coalesced to plaques located on symmetrical areas of the forehead, neck, and periauricular areas with excoriation and malodor (Figure 1a and 1b). There were flat-topped papules on the dorsal aspect of her hands. The fingernails exhibited subungual hyperkeratotic fragments, V-shaped notches at the free edges of some nails, distal onycholysis, and white longitudinal bands (Figure 1c). We also discovered a foul-smelling left retroauricular cavity, approximately 3 cm in length and 3 cm in depth, with multiple fly larvae inside of it (Figure 2). We made the diagnosis of retroauricular myiasis and obtained skin biopsy specimens from her forehead and scalp, to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of Darier disease. PMID:26137743

  1. Role of hydroxycarbamide in prevention of complications in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, NM; Howard, J

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetically inherited condition caused by a point mutation in the beta globin gene. This results in the production of the abnormal hemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin (HbS). Hydroxycarbamide, is an antimetabolite/cytotoxic which works by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase, blocking the synthesis of DNA and arresting cells in the S phase. In sickle cell anemia, it promotes fetal hemoglobin (HbF) synthesis, improves red cell hydration, decreases neutrophil and platelet count, modifies red cell endothelial cell interactions and acts as a nitric oxide donor. Trials have shown the clinical benefit of hydroxycarbamide in a subpopulation of adult patients with SCD, with a 44% reduction in the median annual rate of painful crises, a decrease in the incidence of acute chest syndrome and an estimated 40% reduction in overall mortality over a 9-year observational period. Its use in pediatrics has also been well established; trials have shown it is well tolerated and does not impair growth or development. In addition it decreases the number and duration of hospital attendences. A number of emerging uses of hydroxycarbamide currently are being investigated, such as stroke prevention. PMID:19816573

  2. Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease: putting together the pieces of a complicated puzzle.

    PubMed

    Michas, George; Micha, Renata; Zampelas, Antonis

    2014-06-01

    Dietary fatty acids play significant roles in the cause and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils have well-established adverse effects and should be eliminated from the human diet. CVD risk can be modestly reduced by decreasing saturated fatty acids (SFA) and replacing it by a combination of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Although the ideal type of unsaturated fat for this replacement is unclear, the benefits of PUFA appear strongest. Both n-6 and n-3 PUFA are essential and reduce CVD risk. However, additional research is needed to better define the optimal amounts of both and to discern the patients and/or general population that would benefit from supplemental n-3 fatty acid intake. Furthermore, consumption of animal products, per se, is not necessarily associated with increased CVD risk, whereas nut and olive oil intake is associated with reduced CVD risk. In conclusion, the total matrix of a food is more important than just its fatty acid content in predicting the effect of a food on CVD risk, and a healthy diet should be the cornerstone of CVD prevention. PMID:24727233

  3. Cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis complicating sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Adnane Mohamed; Shimi, Abdelkarim; Khatouf, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombophlebitis of the cavernous sinus is a rare but serious disease that most often affects young adults and children. It is associated with significant morbidity or mortality and is often related to local infections of the head. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and is confirmed by imaging. Case Report: We report the case of a 17-year-old male with a history of recurrent sinusitis, who presented general signs of infection, orbital symptoms, and meningeal involvement. CT and MRI showed thrombosis of the cavernous sinus associated with cerebral ischemic damage. The therapeutic management included empiric antibiotic therapy, drainage of an orbital collection, and anticoagulation. The patient died later secondary to septic shock. Conclusions: Although thrombophlebitis of the cavernous sinus is increasingly rare, it remains a lethal complication of sinusitis, and mortality is still high. The course of this disease can be dramatic due to infectious or vascular neurological complications. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial. PMID:23826444

  4. Atrial Fibrillation Increases the Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease With Relative Complications and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Yen-Ting; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF), an increasing prevalent cardiac arrhythmia due to aging general population, has many common risk factors with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). However, it is unclear whether AF is associated with a risk of PAD. We investigated the prevalence of AF and PAD in the general population and the risk of PAD among the AF population. This longitudinal, nationwide, population-based cohort study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database recorded during 2000 to 2011. In total, 3814 and 15,364 patients were included in the AF and non-AF cohorts, respectively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for examining the effects of AF on the risk of outcomes. The average follow-up periods of PAD were 4.96 ± 3.28 and 5.29 ± 3.35 years for the AF and non-AF cohorts, respectively. Overall, the risk of PAD showed a significantly higher risk in the AF cohort (adjusted HR=1.31, 95% CI=1.19–1.45) compared with the non-AF cohort. Similar results were observed for heart failure and stroke, where the AF cohort had a 1.83-fold and 2.53-fold higher risk of developing heart failure and stroke. The AF cohort also had a significant increased risk for mortality (adjusted HR=1.66, 95% CI=1.49–1.84). The present study indicated that the incidence of PAD, heart failure, stroke, and overall mortality is higher in patients with AF than in those without it. PMID:26945422

  5. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  6. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  7. Cardiovascular and respiratory dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by impaired peripheral oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Huang, Shih-Feng; Su, Chun-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired peripheral oxygenation (IPO)-related variables readily achieved with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) represent cardiovascular dysfunction. These variables include peak oxygen uptake ( (V?O2)<85% predicted, anaerobic threshold <40%V?O2max predicted, V?O2-work rate slope <8.6 mL/watt, oxygen pulse <80% predicted, and ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 at nadir of >31 and >34, respectively. Some of these six variables may be normal while the others are abnormal in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This may result in confusion when using the interpretation algorithm for diagnostic purposes. We therefore hypothesized that patients found to have abnormal values for all six variables would have worse cardiovascular function than patients with abnormal values for none or some of these variables. Methods In this cross-sectional comparative study, 58 COPD patients attending a university teaching hospital underwent symptom-limited CPET with multiple lactate measurements. Patients with abnormal values in all six IPO-related variables were assigned to an IPO group while those who did not meet the requirements for the IPO group were assigned to a non-IPO group. Cardiovascular function was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography and ?lactate/?V?O2, and respiratory dynamics were compared between the two groups. Results Fourteen IPO and 43 non-IPO patients were entered into the study. Both groups were similar with regard to left ventricular ejection fraction and right ventricular morphology (P>0.05 for both). At peak exercise, both groups reached a similar heart rate level and ?lactate/?V?O2. The IPO patients had an unfavorable dead space to tidal volume ratio, mean inspiratory tidal flow, and shallow breathing (P<0.05–P<0.001). Conclusion Our IPO and non-IPO patients with COPD had similar cardiovascular performance at rest and at peak exercise, indicating that IPO variables are non-specific for cardiovascular function in these patients. COPD patients with full IPO variables have more deranged ventilatory function. PMID:25709427

  8. The Relationship between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kirsten E.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P?=?0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Conclusions Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. PMID:24019966

  9. Prevalence and predictors of aortic dilation as a novel cardiovascular complication in children with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Uthup, Susan; Madueme, Peace; O’Rourke, Matthew; Hooper, David K.; Taylor, Michael D.; Colan, Steven D.; Jefferies, John L.; Rao, Marepalli B.; Goebel, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Isolated aortic dilation (AD) is rare in children. We aimed to determine the prevalence and the risk factors for AD in children with ESRD. Methods and study design: We reviewed records of all ESRD patients followed at our institution from January 2007 to October 2012. AD was defined as Z-score > 2 in the dimension of at least one of the following echocardiographic aortic parameters: annulus, root at the sinus, sino-tubular junction, ,or ascending aorta. Results: The records of 78 patients on dialysis and 19 kidney transplant recipients were available. 30 patients (30.9%) had AD. Multivariate analysis revealed independent associations of AD with body mass index (BMI) Z-score (OR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.35 – 0.78) and ESRD secondary to glomerular disease (OR = 4.58, 95% CI: 1.45 – 14.46). We developed a classification and regression tree (CART) model to identify patients at low vs. high AD risk. Our model classified 62 patients of the cohort (64%) to be high- or low-risk, with a positive predictive value of 89% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusion: Our data suggest that AD, as a possible marker of aortopathy and early aneurysm formation, is a novel and prevalent cardiovascular complication in ESRD children. Glomerular disease and low BMI Z-score appear to be potent predictors. CART modeling helps identify high-risk children, potentially guiding decisions regarding targeted echocardiographic evaluations. PMID:25816808

  10. Role of Innate Immune Response in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Metabolic Complications and Therapeutic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Rosaria; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Calignano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common liver disease worldwide, both in adults and children. It is characterized by an aberrant lipid storage in hepatocytes, named hepatic steatosis. Simple steatosis remains a benign process in most affected patients, while some of them develop superimposed necroinflammatory activity with a non-specific inflammatory infiltrate and a progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with or without fibrosis. Deep similarity and interconnections between innate immune cells and those of liver parenchyma have been highlighted and showed to play a key role in the development of chronic liver disease. The liver can be considered as an “immune organ” because it hosts non-lymphoid cells, such as macrophage Kupffer cells, stellate and dendritic cells, and lymphoid cells. Many of these cells are components of the classic innate immune system, enabling the liver to play a major role in response to pathogens. Although the liver provides a “tolerogenic” environment, aberrant activation of innate immune signaling may trigger “harmful” inflammation that contributes to tissue injury, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Pathogen recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors, are responsible for the recognition of immunogenic signals, and represent the major conduit for sensing hepatic and non-hepatic noxious stimuli. A pivotal role in liver inflammation is also played by cytokines, which can initiate or have a part in immune response, triggering hepatic intracellular signaling pathways. The sum of inflammatory signals and deranged substrate handling induce most of the metabolic alteration traits: insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and their compounded combined effects. In this review, we discuss the relevant role of innate immune cell activation in relation to NAFLD, the metabolic complications associated to this pathology, and the possible pharmacological tools. PMID:24795720

  11. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Materials Publications Related Links World Health Organization (WHO) Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) Diphtheria and the Alaskan Iditarod Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Complications from ...

  12. Complications of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2011-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  13. Ocular complications of Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Bullen, C L; Liesegang, T J; McDonald, T J; DeRemee, R A

    1983-03-01

    140 patients with biopsy-proven Wegener's granulomatosis were examined during a 16-year period at the Mayo Clinic. Forty patients had diverse and explosive ophthalmic involvement, including conjunctivitis, episcleritis, scleritis, corneal ulceration, uveitis, retinal vasculitis, optic neuropathy, orbital mass, orbital cellulitis, and obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. The multiple ophthalmic and systemic complications in these 40 patients and the importance of establishing the pathologic diagnosis are discussed. Treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents has dramatically improved the prognosis, although substantial mortality (four patients died of Wegener's granulomatosis) and ocular morbidity (three eyes were enucleated) are still associated with this disease. PMID:6602963

  14. Transcutaenous electrical nerve stimulation to manage a lower extremity wound complicated by peripheral arterial disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yarboro, Douglas D; Smith, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is used to alleviate muscle pain, and there is some evidence it may affect healing in chronic wounds. An 80-year-old male patient with a chronic left lower extremity wound and a history of peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer presented for treatment. Previous protocols of care, mainly consisting of sharp debridement and daily dressing changes, had not resulted in a decrease in wound size. The patient had right and left iliac artery stenosis - not amenable to surgical intervention - and an ankle brachial index (ABI) of 0.63 on the left and 0.59 on the right lower extremities. On presentation, the wound measured 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm with a depth of 0.3 cm and a 0.5-cm tract at the 5 o'clock position. Treatment was changed to application of an ionic silver-containing Hydrofiber™ dressing and low-frequency TENS. Electrodes were applied 2 cm superior and inferior to the wound margin at a frequency of 2 Hz with a pulse width of 250 microseconds and amplitude of 33 mA. Treatment time was 45 minutes, twice daily, for 3 months, performed at home by the patient and his caregiver. After 4 weeks, wound dimensions decreased by 1.51% per day, and the wound was completely healed (100% epithelialized) after 12 weeks. At that time, the ABI of the left (treated) leg had increased to 0.71. Research is needed to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of low-frequency TENS to help clinicians provide evidenced-based treatment for wounds complicated by decreased blood flow. PMID:25019248

  15. Different patterns of obstetric complications in myotonic dystrophy in relation to the disease status of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Nicholson, G A; Morgan, G; Röhrig, D; Zerres, K

    1998-12-01

    The obstetric histories of 26 women with myotonic dystrophy (DM), who had a total of 67 gestations, were reviewed retrospectively comparing gestations with affected (DM-fetuses) and unaffected fetuses (UA-fetuses). Second, the influence of gestation on the disease course and the personal attitude towards family planning in DM was assessed. Miscarriages and terminations occurred in 11 pregnancies. Of the 56 infants carried to term, 29 had or most likely had inherited the gene for DM from their affected mothers at the time of investigation; 18 (61%) in this series were affected by the congenital form of DM. Perinatal loss rate was 11% and associated with congenital DM. The rate of obstetric complications was significantly increased in all women. However, preterm labor was a major problem in gestations with DM-fetuses (55 vs. 20%), as was polyhydramnios (21% vs. none). While forceps deliveries or vacuum extractions were required in 21% of deliveries with DM-fetuses and only 5% of UA-fetuses, the frequency of Cesarean sections was similar in both groups (24 and 25%). Obstetric problems were inversely correlated with age at onset of maternal DM, while no effect of age at delivery or birth order on gestational outcome was seen. DNA analysis confirmed the diagnosis in 19 patients by the presence of enlarged CTG repeats (EcoRI-expansions) on chromosome 19. Of the 17 patients whose CTG repeat length was known, 59% were classified as E2 (corresponding to 500-1000 repeats), 24% as E1 (<500 repeats), while larger expansions (E3; 1000-1500 repeats, or E4; >1500 repeats) were seen in three patients (17%). Obstetric complications or congenitally affected children occurred in all maternal phenotypes and CTG repeat classes. Eight (31%) patients experienced a worsening of symptoms that was temporary, weight related in three cases, and persistent in five. With the exception of three patients, most new mothers were able to care for their families. To conclude, pregnant women with DM need constant obstetric monitoring and should be advised to deliver in centres with perinatal facilities. PMID:9856556

  16. Sudden cardiac death due to coronary artery involvement by IgG4-related disease: a rare, serious complication of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimesh R; Anzalone, Mary L; Buja, L Maximilian; Elghetany, M Tarek

    2014-06-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disorder characterized by multiorgan fibrosis with IgG4-producing plasma cells, increased IgG4 serum concentration, and responsiveness to steroid therapy. Involvement of the pancreas, salivary glands, orbit, aorta, and other sites has been well documented in the literature; however, there have been limited reports of cases involving the coronary arteries. We report the case of a 53-year-old Hispanic man who was brought to the emergency center and diagnosed with sudden cardiac death. Autopsy was subsequently performed, revealing multiorgan involvement by IgG4-RD, including involvement of the coronary arteries. The inflammation and fibrosis, in combination with concomitant atherosclerotic disease, resulted in severe stenosis of the coronary arteries. Two of the coronary arteries were further occluded by thrombosis. These factors led to cardiac hypoperfusion, myocardial infarction and, ultimately, sudden cardiac death. Fatal involvement of the coronary arteries has not been previously reported, raising a new concern for a severe complication of IgG4-RD. PMID:24878025

  17. Late Corrective Arthrodesis in Nonplantigrade Diabetic Charcot Midfoot Disease Is Associated with High Complication and Reoperation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Wussow, Annekatrin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Charcot arthropathy may lead to a loss of osteoligamentous foot architecture and consequently loss of the plantigrade alignment. In this series of patients a technique of internal corrective arthrodesis with maximum fixation strength was provided in order to lower complication rates. Materials/Methods. 21 feet with severe nonplantigrade diabetic Charcot deformity Eichenholtz stages II/III (Sanders/Frykberg II/III/IV) and reconstructive arthrodesis with medial and additional lateral column support were retrospectively enrolled. Follow-up averaged 4.0 years and included a clinical (AOFAS score/PSS), radiological, and complication analysis. Results. A mean of 2.4 complications/foot occurred, of which 1.5/foot had to be solved surgically. 76% of feet suffered from soft tissue complications; 43% suffered hardware-associated complications. Feet with only 2 out of 5 high risk criteria according to Pinzur showed significantly lower complication counts. Radiographs revealed a correct restoration of all foot axes postoperatively with superior fixation strength medially. Conclusion. Late corrective arthrodesis with medial and lateral column stabilization in the nonplantigrade stages of neuroosteoarthropathy can provide reasonable reconstruction of the foot alignment. Nonetheless, overall complication/reoperation rates were high. With separation into low/high risk criteria a helpful guide in treatment choice is provided. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) under number DRKS00007537. PMID:26000309

  18. Foot Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Complications > Foot Complications Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Foot Complications People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Even ordinary problems can get worse and ...

  19. [Prevention of diabetes mellitus complications and improvement of early diagnosis at a population level, through the implementation of integrated disease management in the Modena region].

    PubMed

    Caroli, Giuseppe; Paganelli, Angela; Fattori, Giuseppe; Daghio, Maria Monica; Guidetti, Patrizia; Borsari, Silvana; Guerzoni, Andrea; Petropulacos, Kyriakoula; Daya, Ghassan; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of diabetes mellitus disease management, implemented in Modena province since ten years, on the prevention of complications and early diagnoses at a population level. Time trends show that diabetic patients had significantly decreasing values over time of age, diabetes duration, and glycated haemoglobin; and increasing percentage over time of new-onset diabetes and optimal glycaemic control. That indicates an improved ability of early diagnosis and care of diabetes mellitus. It indicates at a population level that the Local Health Unit, as health system, promoted diabetes prevention and its complications. PMID:18595633

  20. Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease Combined with IgA Nephropathy Complicated with Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome: An Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ya-ting; Liao, Jin-lan; Liang, Wei; Xiong, Zu-ying

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 24 Final Diagnosis: Crescentic glomerulonephritis (type I) with IgA nephropathy Symptoms: Headache • gross hematuria • nocturia • seizures Medication: Cyclophosphamide Clinical Procedure: Dignosis to treatment Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (anti-GBM disease) is an autoimmune glomerulonephritis disease that is characterized by IgG linear deposition along the non-collagen domain of α3 chains of type IV collagen on the GBM. Although anti-GBM disease accompanied with IgA linear deposition along GBMs was discussed previously in some papers, anti-GBM disease combined with IgA granular deposition in the mesangial area, especially complicated with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), was rarely reported. RPLS is usually caused by hypertensive encephalopathy, renal decompensation, fluid retention, and adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Case Report: A male patient with the chief complaints of headache, gross hematuria, and nocturia was referred to our hospital. Based on renal biopsy, the diagnosis was finally confirmed as anti-GBM disease combined with IgA nephropathy and, the patient received comprehensive treatment, including cyclophosphamide (CTX), which led to symptom improvement. Two days after the third impulse CTX was given, he suddenly experienced headache and dizziness, which eventually developed into a tonic-clonic seizure. RPLS was identified by cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with reversible neuroimaging. After diazepam and antihypertension management, seizures were controlled. RPLS, a neurological complication, was found in anti-GBM disease with IgA nephropathy during our immunosuppressants therapy for the first time. Conclusions: It is worth paying more attention to patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), as they might be complicated with RPLS during intravenous administration of CTX and methylprednisolone. We suggest the neuroimaging be examined as soon as the seizure happens. PMID:26621456

  1. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1 ± 17.7 vs 25.3 ± 18.3, p = 0.02). However, there was no difference in the change scores in ODI and absolute scores across all other PROs between the 2 groups. In multivariable linear regression analysis, after controlling for an array of preoperative variables, the occurrence of a major complication was not associated with worsening ODI scores 12 months after surgery. There was no difference in the percentage of patients achieving the MCID for disability (66% vs 64%), back pain (55% vs 56%), leg pain (62% vs 59%), or quality of life (19% vs 14%) or in patient satisfaction rates (82% vs 80%) between those without and with major complications. CONCLUSIONS Major complications within 90 days following lumbar spine surgery have significant impact on the short-term PROs. Patients with complications, however, do eventually achieve clinically meaningful outcomes and report satisfaction equivalent to those without major complications. This information allows a physician to counsel patients on the fact that a complication creates frustration, cost, and inconvenience; however, it does not appear to adversely affect clinically meaningful long-term outcomes and satisfaction. PMID:26621422

  2. They can't bury you while you're still moving: A review of the European Respiratory Society statement on physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; ZuWallack, Richard

    2015-10-28

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are interrelated but separate concepts. PA refers to bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure. Exercise is a subset of PA, in which generally higher levels of muscular activity are performed for a purpose, such as achieving physical fitness or winning a sporting contest. Higher exercise capacity is considered to be permissive of greater PA in the home and community settings. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are physically inactive when compared with healthy age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, physical inactivity is independently associated with adverse outcome in patients with COPD, including more rapid disease progression, impaired health status, and increased health care utilization and mortality risk. While there are several methods to objectively measure PA, recent scientific studies have commonly utilized questionnaires and activity monitors. The latter include simple pedometers and complex accelerometers, which can measure and record movement in up to 3 planes. In COPD, multiple patient characteristics and disease severity markers are related to activity level, including pulmonary physiological abnormalities such as airway obstruction and hyperinflation; exercise capacity such as the 6-minute walking distance; exacerbations of respiratory disease; and comorbid conditions. Clinical trials of bronchodilators, supplemental oxygen therapy, exercise training or pulmonary rehabilitation, or PA counseling have provided inconsistent results in demonstrating increased PA from the interaction. This is probably because the phenomenon of physical inactivity is complex, resulting not only from physiological impairments, but symptoms, cultural, motivational, and environmental factors. PMID:26307102

  3. Encaustic Still Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Len

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used in an advanced high school art class where students used the encaustic painting technique by melting wax and combining various pigments. Explains that the students painted a still-life of flowers in the style of Vincent van Gogh. (CMK)

  4. Teddy Bear Still Lifes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art activity for first-grade students in which the students draw their own still-life pictures, using teddy bears and balls as the subject matter. Explains that the students must include three objects, a line for the table, and overlap the shapes. (CMK)

  5. Books Still Worth Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 10 major articles in this special journal issue deal with literary works designated by individual educators as "still worth reading." The works discussed are (1) "Madeline" by L. Bemelmans; (2) "The Assistant" by B. Malamud; (3) "The Pitfalls for Readers of Fiction" by H. Sample, the first of the pamphlet publications by the National Council…

  6. Bluetooth digital still camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Gaetano; Cucchi, Andrea; Guarnera, Mirko; Binachessi, Marco

    2003-05-01

    The Bluetooth specifications currently include many application profiles that define the requirements for some usage cases. In this paper the attention is focused on the 'Basic Imaging Profile' BIP. The BIP could add important features to classic Digital Still Cameras, such as the possibility to send images to a Bluetooth Printer, or to send the image on Internet with a Bluetooth cellular phone.

  7. Is Information Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  8. Turnaround Momentum Still Fragile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    The federal program providing billions of dollars to help states and districts close or remake some of their worst-performing schools remains a work in progress after two years, with more than 1,200 turnaround efforts under way but still no definitive verdict on its effectiveness. The School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, supercharged by a…

  9. Books Still Worth Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 10 major articles in this special journal issue deal with literary works designated by individual educators as "still worth reading." The works discussed are (1) "Madeline" by L. Bemelmans; (2) "The Assistant" by B. Malamud; (3) "The Pitfalls for Readers of Fiction" by H. Sample, the first of the pamphlet publications by the National Council…

  10. Turnaround Momentum Still Fragile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    The federal program providing billions of dollars to help states and districts close or remake some of their worst-performing schools remains a work in progress after two years, with more than 1,200 turnaround efforts under way but still no definitive verdict on its effectiveness. The School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, supercharged by a…

  11. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  12. MRI characteristics and follow-up findings in patients with neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Tao; Li, Jianjun; Xing, Zengbao; Huang, Shixiong; Wen, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and clinical and MRI follow-up findings of patients with neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot and mouth disease. Methods: Data were collected from 12 patients who developed neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease during an enterovirus-71 outbreak in Hainan Province, China, from May 2008 to October 2011. Patients were followed up for 2 years. Results: In the six patients with brainstem encephalitis, MRI showed posterior brainstem abnormalities with hyperintense areas on T2-weighted images and hypointense areas on T1-weighted images. In the four patients with acute flaccid paralysis but no brainstem encephalitis, sagittal MRI images showed linear hyperintense areas in the anterior spinal cord, transverse T2-weighted images showed hyperintense areas in the spinal cord, and contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images showed strong enhancement of the anterior horns or nerve roots. In the two patients with aseptic meningitis, MRI showed widening of the subarachnoid space and ventricles. The MRI and clinical signs of aseptic meningitis resolved within 4 weeks in both patients. Patients with isolated pontine abnormalities recovered faster than those with multiple brainstem abnormalities, patients with isolated brainstem encephalitis recovered faster than those with associated acute flaccid paralysis, patients with paralysis of one limb recovered faster than those with paralysis of multiple limbs, and patients with isolated thoracolumbar cord abnormalities recovered faster than those with cervical cord abnormalities. Conclusions: MRI is useful for assessment of the neurological complications of enterovirus 71-related hand, foot, and mouth disease. Patients who develop neurological complications characteristically have MRI abnormalities of the posterior brainstem or bilateral anterior horns of parts of the spinal cord. The MRI findings can help to predict prognosis. PMID:25356127

  13. Hematologic complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Danielle M

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This review discusses specifically the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations; however, care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist, and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets), or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy, and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  14. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  15. Digital Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D.; Yeates, Herbert D.

    1993-01-01

    Digital electronic still camera part of electronic recording, processing, tansmitting, and displaying system. Removable hard-disk drive in camera serves as digital electronic equivalent of photographic film. Images viewed, analyzed, or transmitted quickly. Camera takes images of nearly photographic quality and stores them in digital form. Portable, hand-held, battery-powered unit designed for scientific use. Camera used in conjunction with playback unit also serving as transmitting unit if images sent to remote station. Remote station equipped to store, process, and display images. Digital image data encoded with error-correcting code at playback/transmitting unit for error-free transmission to remote station.

  16. Complicated diverticular disease of the colon, do we need to change the classical approach, a retrospective study of 110 patients in southeast England

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abdulzahra; Mahmood, Hind; Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; EL-Hasani, Shamsi

    2008-01-01

    Background Complicated diverticular disease of the colon imposes a serious risk to patient's life, challenge to surgeons and has cost implications for health authority. The aim of this study is to evaluate the management outcome of complicated colonic diverticular disease in a district hospital and to explore the current strategies of treatment. Methods This is a retrospective study of all patients who were admitted to the surgical ward between May 2002 and November 2006 with a diagnosis of complicated diverticular disease. A proforma of patients' details, admission date, ITU admission, management outcomes and the follow up were recorded from the patients case notes and analyzed. The mean follow-up was 34 months (range 6–60 months) Results The mean age of patients was 72.7 years (range 39–87 years). Thirty-one men (28.18 %) and Seventy-nine women (71.81%) were included in this study. Male: female ratio was 1:2.5. Sixty-eight percent of patients had one or more co-morbidities. Forty-one patients (37.27%) had two or more episodes of diverticulitis while 41.8% of them had no history of diverticular disease. Eighty-six percent of patients presented with acute abdominal pain while bleeding per rectum was the main presentation in 14%. Constipation and erratic bowel habit were the commonest chronic symptoms in patients with history of diverticular disease. Generalized tenderness was reported in 64.28% while 35.71% have left iliac fossa tenderness. Leukocytosis was reported in 58 patients (52.72%). The mean time from the admission until the start of operative intervention was 20.57 hours (range 4–96 hours). Perforation was confirmed in 59.52%. Mortality was 10.90%. Another 4 (3.63%) died during follow up for other reasons. Conclusion Complicated diverticular disease carries significant morbidity and mortality. These influenced by patient-related factors. Because of high mortality and morbidities, we suggest the need to target a specific group of patients for prophylactic resection. PMID:18218109

  17. Endometriosis still a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mehedintu, C; Plotogea, MN; Ionescu, S; Antonovici, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endometriosis is a debilitating disease with features of chronic inflammation. Endometriosis appears to be one of the most common benign gynecological proliferations in premenopausal women since it is estimated that 10–15% of reproductive aged women suffer from pelvic endometriosis. The biology of endometriosis is unclear. Despite its prevalence, this disease remains poorly understood and current studies prove that there is no relationship between the extent of the disease and its symptomatology. There is no blood test available for the diagnosis of endometriosis. Up to this point, there is no single very successful option for the treatment of endometriosis. Due to the relatively poor efficacy of hormonal therapy for endometriosis, several other experimental therapies are currently undergoing clinical trial. PMID:25408753

  18. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of— Preeclampsia. Early delivery. Cesarean birth . Having a big baby, which can complicate delivery. Having a baby ... health prevention with improved sources of maternal health data, and methods for measuring and studying the data. ...

  19. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  20. Cardiovascular complications of radiation therapy for thoracic malignancies: the role for non-invasive imaging for detection of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Groarke, John D.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Nohria, Anju; Ferrari, Roberto; Cheng, Susan; Moslehi, Javid

    2014-01-01

    Radiation exposure to the thorax is associated with substantial risk for the subsequent development of cardiovascular disease. Thus, the increasing role of radiation therapy in the contemporary treatment of cancer, combined with improving survival rates of patients undergoing this therapy, contributes to a growing population at risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Associated cardiovascular injuries include pericardial disease, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, conduction disease, cardiomyopathy, and medium and large vessel vasculopathy—any of which can occur at varying intervals following irradiation. Higher radiation doses, younger age at the time of irradiation, longer intervals from the time of radiation, and coexisting cardiovascular risk factors all predispose to these injuries. The true incidence of radiation-related cardiovascular disease remains uncertain due to lack of large multicentre studies with a sufficient duration of cardiovascular follow-up. There are currently no consensus guidelines available to inform the optimal approach to cardiovascular surveillance of recipients of thoracic radiation. Therefore, we review the cardiovascular consequences of radiation therapy and focus on the potential role of non-invasive cardiovascular imaging in the assessment and management of radiation-related cardiovascular disease. In doing so, we highlight characteristics that can be used to identify individuals at risk for developing post-radiation cardiovascular disease and propose an imaging-based algorithm for their clinical surveillance. PMID:23666251

  1. Gulf operations still recovering

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that reports of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew were leveling off last week at the U.S. Minerals Management Service as Gulf of Mexico operators pressed ahead with repairs. The hurricane struck South Florida Aug. 4, churned west into the gulf, then swung north and hit the South Louisiana coast Aug. 5. By the close of business Sept. 8 MMS had received damage reports covering 83 pipeline segments and 193 platforms and satellite installations. MMS last week estimated about 500 MMcfd of gas production had been restored in the gulf and 100,000-150,000 b/d of oil. Production still lost as a result of Andrew was estimated at 2-2.5 bcfd of gas and 90,000-120 b/d of oil. MMS estimates Gulf of Mexico wells before the storm were producing about 12.5-13 bcfd of gas and 750,000 b/d of oil.

  2. Metabolic Syndrome without Diabetes or Hypertension Still Necessitates Early Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease: Information from a Chinese National Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bixia; Wang, Jinwei; Li, Guisen; Wang, Li; Zhang, Luxia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is prevalent, with an increasing contribution to the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study of the relationship between them is important. The CKD survey, a national cross-sectional study, provided a large database to accomplish this study. The study population were 41 131 adults from this survey between 2008 and 2009. CKD was defined as estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or the presence of albuminuria. MS was diagnosed by National Cholesterol Education Program—Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII), ATPIII-modified or International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Logistic regression model was applied to study the impact of MS or its components on CKD or its components. The age and sex standardized prevalence of MS by ATPIII, ATPIII-modified and IDF criteria was 11.77% (11.13%–12.40%), 21.51% (20.69%–22.34%) and 16.67% (15.92–17.42)% respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that MS and its components were associated with higher CKD prevalence. The risk for CKD and its components increased with the number of MS components. After adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, the odds ratios of MS for CKD decreased, but remained significantly more than 1 between 1.16(95%CI 1.07–1.26) and 1.37 (95% CI 1.25–1.50) across the different models. Similar results were found with albuminuria, while for decreased eGFR, after adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, the odds ratios of MS and MS components (except elevated TG) became insignificant. In conclusion, MS is prevalent and associated with a higher prevalence of CKD. Different MS components are associated with different risks for CKD, even after adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, which may mainly be contributed more by the increased risk for albuminuria than that for decreased eGFR. More attention must be paid to the population with MS, including those with elevated blood pressure and serum glucose. PMID:26161991

  3. Effect of Perioperative β-Blockers on Pulmonary Complications among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Undergoing Lung Resection Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, A.; Stover, D. E.; Hemdan, A.; Belinskaya, I.; Steingart, R. M.; Taur, Y.; Feinstein, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if COPD patients undergoing lung resection with perioperative β-blocker use are more likely to suffer postoperative COPD exacerbations than those that did not receive perioperative β-blockers. Methods. A historical cohort study of COPD patients, undergoing lung resection surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 2002 and 2006. Primary outcomes were the rate of postoperative COPD exacerbations, defined as any initiation or increase of glucocorticoids for documented bronchospasm. Results. 520 patients with COPD were identified who underwent lung resection. Of these, 205 (39%) received perioperative β-blockers and 315 (61%) did not. COPD was mild among 361 patients (69% of all patients), moderate in 117 patients (23%), and severe in 42 patients (8%). COPD exacerbations occurred among 11 (5.4%) patients who received perioperative β-blockers and among 20 (6.3%) patients who did not. Secondary outcomes, which included respiratory failure, 30-day mortality, and the presence or absence of any cardiovascular complication, ICU transfer, cardiovascular complication, or readmission within 30 days, did not differ in prevalence between the two groups. Conclusions. This study implies that perioperative β-blockers use among COPD patients undergoing lung resection surgery does not impact the rate of exacerbations. PMID:26421192

  4. [Effect of metabolic therapy on the course of heart failure in patients after myocarditis complicated with systemic connecting tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuriata, A V; Karavanskaia, I L; Pavlichenko, N A

    2010-01-01

    In the course of observation over 40 patients after an old myocarditis against general systemic diseases of connective tissue who had been given a pharmacotherapy regarding main disease and a chronic heart failure, additionally Vazonat (campaign of "Olajnfarm", Latvia), preparation of the myocardial cytoprotection was prescribed in a therapeutic dose of 500 mg per day. Vazonat inclusion in basic therapy during 1 month was accompanied by improvement of a clinical condition of the patients, reduction of heart failure signs, and improvement of life quality. PMID:21488376

  5. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events. PMID:26948356

  6. Management of medical complications.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Carolin I; Reding, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Medical comorbidities and complications are expected following stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. The neurorehabilitation physician's role is to manage these comorbidities, prevent complications, and serve as a medical and neurologic resource for the patient, family, and neurorehabilitation team. The most common comorbidities are similar to those found in the general population, namely hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Frequent complications encountered in the neurorehabilitation unit relate to medication side effects, medical comorbidities, and the direct effect of the neurologic injury. They include orthostatic hypotension; syncope or presyncope; cardiac arrhythmia; bowel and bladder dysfunction; seizures; pressure sores; dysphagia-related pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; venous thromboembolism; falls; and sexual dysfunction. This article discusses strategies for managing comorbidities and avoiding complications. PMID:22810865

  7. Neurologic complications of immunization.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F

    2004-06-01

    In the United States and many other developed countries, active immunization of children has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis, measles, rubella, tetanus, and other diseases, such as disease due to Haemophilus influenzae type b. Individual vaccines can produce systemic or neurologic reactions ranging from minor events, such as pain and erythema at the injection site, to major complications, such as seizures, shock, encephalopathy, or death. Immunization programs have also generated considerable controversy, as witnessed by recent concerns regarding the relationship between vaccines or their constituents and autism or multiple sclerosis. This review summarizes current information regarding vaccines, the diseases that they prevent, and the potential relationships between vaccines and neurologic disease. PMID:15446387

  8. Benorylate in management of Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Powell, R H; Ansell, B M

    1974-01-26

    The present recommended dose of benorylate is not satisfactory for the management of children suffering from inflammatory polyarthritis. A starting dose of 200 mg/kg/day should be used, and the salicylate level checked at seven days and the dosage adjusted to give an anti-inflammatory effect-that is, a blood salicylate level of between 25 and 30 mg/100 ml. Once a satisfactory level has been achieved, this dosage should be maintained with occasional monitoring of the salicylate level. The paracetamol level does not need to be estimated as it tends to follow the salicylate level, provided that liver function is normal; thus it is quite safe to monitor only the salicylate level. Given in an adequate dosage, benorylate seems to be an acceptable salicylate preparation for use in juveniles suffering from chronic polyarthritis. PMID:4812408

  9. Benorylate in Management of Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Richard H.; Ansell, Barbara M.

    1974-01-01

    The present recommended dose of benorylate is not satisfactory for the management of children suffering from inflammatory polyarthritis. A starting dose of 200 mg/kg/day should be used, and the salicylate level checked at seven days and the dosage adjusted to give an anti-inflammatory effect—that is, a blood salicylate level of between 25 and 30 mg/100 ml. Once a satisfactory level has been achieved, this dosage should be maintained with occasional monitoring of the salicylate level. The paracetamol level does not need to be estimated as it tends to follow the salicylate level, provided that liver function is normal; thus it is quite safe to monitor only the salicylate level. Given in an adequate dosage, benorylate seems to be an acceptable salicylate preparation for use in juveniles suffering from chronic polyarthritis. PMID:4812408

  10. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  11. [A Case of Wilson's Disease with Psoriasis Vulgaris, Complicated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Successfully Treated with Sorafenib].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tamotsu; Chubachi, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    A 55-year-old man had been diagnosed with Wilson's disease and was treated with D-penicillamine 36 years earlier. He also had a 20-year history of psoriasis vulgaris and cyclosporine treatment. In 2012, a he presented with a hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)that was removed via partial hepatic resection. In 2014, multiple HCC and a portal vein tumor thrombus were found in his posterior lobe. Sorafenib treatment was initiated. Cyclosporine treatment was continued. Three months later, abdominal enhanced CT revealed marked tumor reduction and shrinkage of the portal vein tumor thrombus. The therapeutic effect of sorafenib continued for 6 months. We did not observe deterioration in his psoriasis vulgaris and Wilson's disease for 9 months after sorafenib initiation. PMID:26469170

  12. Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome complicated with multiple cerebral infarction: a rare case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Yao, Fang; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Cui, Quan-Cai

    2015-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare hematological disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy and skin changes. Castleman disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that can be present in POEMS patients, which can be defined as Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome. Herein, we described a 24-year-old male patient diagnosed with this syndrome and also suffered from multiple cerebral infarctions. This patient showed no evidence of monoclonal gammopathy and failed to have electromyography examined. The final diagnosis was established with the help of the axillary lymph node biopsy. As a rare case of POEMS syndrome without evidence fulfilling the major mandatory diagnostic criteria and with cerebrovascular involvement, its characteristics was discussed with a brief literature review in order to facilitate further understanding of the POEMS syndrome. PMID:26722578

  13. Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome complicated with multiple cerebral infarction: a rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hang; Yao, Fang; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Cui, Quan-Cai

    2015-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare hematological disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy and skin changes. Castleman disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that can be present in POEMS patients, which can be defined as Castleman disease variant of POEMS syndrome. Herein, we described a 24-year-old male patient diagnosed with this syndrome and also suffered from multiple cerebral infarctions. This patient showed no evidence of monoclonal gammopathy and failed to have electromyography examined. The final diagnosis was established with the help of the axillary lymph node biopsy. As a rare case of POEMS syndrome without evidence fulfilling the major mandatory diagnostic criteria and with cerebrovascular involvement, its characteristics was discussed with a brief literature review in order to facilitate further understanding of the POEMS syndrome. PMID:26722578

  14. Georg Friedrich Händel: a case of large vessel disease with complications in the eighteenth century.

    PubMed

    Bäzner, Hansjörg

    2015-01-01

    Georg Friedrich Händel was not only one of the greatest musical giants ever but also he was probably the first composer who was also the manager and promoter of his own works. Various myths embellish his various biographies. This is also true for his pathography: several articles written by authors from various specialties suggested him having suffered from psychiatric diseases, like cyclothymia or mania, and rheumatologic disorders, like arthritis, while others tended to interpret his recurrent palsies as typical sequelae of ischemic strokes. More recently, reports proposing lead poisoning as the main source of disease in Händel gained the attention of musical and lay press. During his last years of life, Händel was struck with blindness, which in his era had been interpreted as being due to cataracts. This led to three "coucher" operations, all of them without any lasting effect. Although a definite diagnosis cannot be proven from the original sources, the most plausible explanation for Händel's palsies and visual impairment may be based on one single context, i.e., cerebrovascular disease. The possible differential diagnosis will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:25684296

  15. [Esophageal stenting complications].

    PubMed

    Smoliar, A N; Radchenko, Iu A; Nefedova, G A; Abakumov, M M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze esophageal stenting complications in case of cancer and benign diseases. It was investigated complications in 8 patients in terms from 7 days to 1 year after intervention. In 4 patients esophageal stenting was performed for constrictive esophageal cancer and compression with pulmonary cancer metastases into mediastinal lymphatic nodes. 2 patients had esophageal stenting for post-tracheostomy tracheo-esophageal fistula, 1 patient - for spontaneous esophageal rupture, 1 patient - for post-burn scar narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach. Severe patients' condition with tumor was determined by intensive esophageal bleeding in 2 cases, bilateral abscessed aspiration pneumonia, tumor bleeding, blood aspiration (1 case), posterior mediastinitis (1 case). Severe patients' condition with benign disease was associated with decompensated esophageal narrowing about proximal part of stent (1 case), increase of tracheo-esophageal fistula size complicated by aspiration pneumonia (1 case), stent migration into stomach with recurrence of esophago-mediastino-pleural fistula and pleural empyema (1 case), decompensated narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach (1 case). Patients with cancer died. And patients with benign diseases underwent multi-stage surgical treatment and recovered. Stenting is palliative method for patients with esophageal cancer. Patients after stenting should be under outpatient observation for early diagnosis of possible complications. Esophageal stenting in patients with benign diseases should be performed only by life-saving indications, in case of inability of other treatment and for the minimum necessary period. PMID:25589315

  16. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    The oldest isolated pulsar ever detected in X-rays has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This very old and exotic object turns out to be surprisingly active. The pulsar, PSR J0108-1431 (J0108 for short) is about 200 million years old. Among isolated pulsars -- ones that have not been spun-up in a binary system -- it is over 10 times older than the previous record holder with an X-ray detection. At a distance of 770 light years, it is one of the nearest pulsars known. Pulsars are born when stars that are much more massive than the Sun collapse in supernova explosions, leaving behind a small, incredibly weighty core, known as a neutron star. At birth, these neutron stars, which contain the densest material known in the Universe, are spinning rapidly, up to a hundred revolutions per second. As the rotating beams of their radiation are seen as pulses by distant observers, similar to a lighthouse beam, astronomers call them "pulsars". Astronomers observe a gradual slowing of the rotation of the pulsars as they radiate energy away. Radio observations of J0108 show it to be one of the oldest and faintest pulsars known, spinning only slightly faster than one revolution per second. The surprise came when a team of astronomers led by George Pavlov of Penn State University observed J0108 in X-rays with Chandra. They found that it glows much brighter in X-rays than was expected for a pulsar of such advanced years. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Some of the energy that J0108 is losing as it spins more slowly is converted into X-ray radiation. The efficiency of this process for J0108 is found to be higher than for any other known pulsar. "This pulsar is pumping out high-energy radiation much more efficiently than its younger cousins," said Pavlov. "So, although it's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us doing much extra work." PSR J0108-1431 Chandra X-ray Image of PSR J0108-1431 The position of the pulsar seen by Chandra in X-rays in early 2007 is slightly different from the radio position observed in early 2001. This implies that the pulsar is moving at a velocity of about 440,000 miles per hour, close to a typical value for pulsars. Currently the pulsar is moving south from the plane of the Milky Way galaxy, but because it is moving more slowly than the escape velocity of the Galaxy, it will eventually curve back towards the plane of the Galaxy in the opposite direction. The detection of this motion has allowed Roberto Mignani of University College London, in collaboration with Pavlov and Kargaltsev, to possibly detect J0108 in optical light, using estimates of where it should be found in an image taken in 2000. Such a multi-wavelength study of old pulsars is critical for understanding the long-term evolution of neutron stars, such as how they cool with time, and how their powerful magnetic fields evolve. The team of astronomers that worked with Pavlov also included Gordon Garmire and Jared Wong at Penn State. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra's science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass.

  17. Digestive system fistula: a problem still relevant today.

    PubMed

    G?uszek, Stanis?aw; Korczak, Maria; Kot, Marta; Matykiewicz, Jaros?aw; Kozie?, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    Digestive system fistula originates most frequently as a complication after surgical procedures, less often occurs in the course of inflammatory diseases, but it can also result from neoplasm and injuries. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was to analyze the causes and retrospectively assess the perioperative procedures as well as the results of digestive system fistula treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Own experience in digestive system fistula treatment was presented. The subject group consisted of 32 patients treated at the General Surgery, Oncology and Endocrinology Clinical Department between 01.05.2005 and 30.04.2010 due to different digestive tract diseases. The causes of the occurrence of digestive system fistula, methods and results of treatment were analyzed. RESULTS. The analysis covered 32 patients with digestive system fistula, among them 15 men and 17 women. Average age for men was 57 years (20-78), and for women 61 years (24-88). In 11 patients idiopathic fistula causally connected with primary inflammatory disease (7 cases) and with neoplasm (4 cases) was diagnosed, in 19 patients fistula was the result of complications after surgery, in 2 - after abdominal cavity injury. Recovery from fistula was achieved in 23 patients (72%) with the use of individually planned conservative therapy (TPN, EN, antibiotics, drainage, and others) and surgery, depending on the needs of individual patient. 5 patients (16%) died, whereas in 4 left (12%) recovery wasn't achieved (fistula in palliative patients, with advanced stages of neoplasm - bronchoesophageal fistula, the recurrence of uterine carcinoma). CONCLUSIONS. Recently the results of digestive system fistula treatment showed an improvement which manifests itself in mortality decrease and shortening of fistula healing time. Yet, digestive system fistula as a serious complication still poses a very difficult surgical problem. PMID:22166240

  18. Pulmonary complications of HIV disease: 10 year retrospective evaluation of yields from bronchoalveolar lavage, 1983-93.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, I. K.; Coker, R. J.; Clarke, J.; Moss, F. M.; Nieman, R.; Evans, D. J.; Veale, D.; Shaw, R. J.; Robinson, D. S.; Mitchell, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pulmonary disease is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection and AIDS. The aim of this study was to describe bronchoscopic findings and the spectrum of pulmonary pathogens in HIV seropositive patients undergoing investigation of respiratory disease over a 10 year period in a major UK referral centre. METHODS--Recruitment was procedure based with data being captured when bronchoscopy was clinically indicated. Data were evaluated from 580 HIV seropositive patients (559 men, age 13-65 years) over a 10 year period from June 1983 to March 1993. RESULTS--A total of 947 bronchoscopies was performed. The most frequent pulmonary pathogen isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in 44% of all bronchoscopies was Pneumocystis carinii. Of all patients studied, 324 (55%) had at least one cytologically confirmed episode of P carinii pneumonia; this was AIDS defining in 219 (38%) of patients who underwent bronchoscopy. Between 1987 and 1993 the overall diagnostic yield from BAL fluid was 76%; 25% of all bronchoscopies yielded positive microbiological results, the most frequent isolates being Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp, and Haemophilus influenzae. Mycobacteria were identified in 8% of patients; M tuberculosis was the most common being identified in 3% of lavage samples and in 4% of patients. No drug-resistant M tuberculosis was found. Viral isolates (mainly cytomegalovirus) were identified in up to 31% of BAL fluid samples. Endobronchial Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 15% of patients at bronchoscopy. CONCLUSIONS--Of the 1956 newly diagnosed HIV seropositive patients receiving clinical care at St Mary's Hospital over this period, approximately 30% underwent bronchoscopy. Diagnostic rates for P carinii pneumonia, endobronchial Kaposi's sarcoma, and bacterial and mycobacterial infection have remained largely constant since 1989. Bronchoalveolar lavage produces high diagnostic yields generally, and P carinii pneumonia remains a common cause of pulmonary disease in these patients. PMID:8553294

  19. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  20. Gastrointestinal Complications and Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3–87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  1. Transrectal Prostate Biopsy-Associated Prophylaxis and Infectious Complications: Report of a Query to the Emerging Infections Network of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Polgreen, Philip M.; Beekmann, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Fluoroquinolone-resistant infections after transrectal prostate biopsy (TRPB) are increasing. Methods.?Members of the Emerging Infections Network, a consortium of adult infectious diseases physicians sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Diseases Society of America, were administered an electronic 9-question survey regarding post-TRPB infections and associated prophylaxis. Results were compared with respondent characteristics. Results.?The overall response rate was 47% (552 of 1180). Of the 552 respondents, 234 (42%) reported that this problem was not applicable to their practice. The remaining 318 (58%) reported that, despite widespread recent changes in prophylactic regimens, fluoroquinolone monotherapy still was most common, but diverse alternate or supplemental oral and parenteral antibiotics (including imipenem) also were used. Reports of culture-guided prophylaxis were rare (9%). The most common duration of prophylaxis was a single prebiopsy antibiotic dose. However, 16%–23% of respondents reported prophylaxis continuing for ?24 hours postbiopsy. Post-TRPB infections were reported as being more frequent now than 4 years ago, with sepsis and genitourinary presentations predominating, but with osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and epidural abscess also occurring. Infection isolates reportedly were usually resistant to the prophylactic regimen. Conclusions.?Emerging Infections Network members perceive post-TRPB infections as increasingly frequent, caused by resistant strains, and involving serious illness. Prophylactic approaches, although in flux, still usually entail ciprofloxacin monotherapy, which often is given for excessive durations. Multiple opportunities exist for infectious diseases specialists to partner with proceduralists in devising, studying, and implementing improved prophylaxis regimens for TRPB. PMID:26034753

  2. Colostomy closure: still a hazardous procedure.

    PubMed

    Hubens, G; Minten, L; Hubens, A; Willems, G

    1987-01-01

    Seventy nine patients with closure of a loop (51 patients) or a terminal (28 patients) colostomy were reviewed retrospectively. Operative mortality was 2.5%. Wound infection in 19% and anastomotic breakdown in 7.7% were the most important postoperative complications. Restoring continuity after a Hartmann intervention, closure of left sided colostomies and early closure (before 12 weeks) all accounted for a statistically significant higher complication rate, while age and sex, the underlying disease, bowel preparation and the method of closure had no influence on the operative outcome. PMID:3310475

  3. The impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on the incidence of cardiovascular events and complications in peripheral arterial disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with peripheral arterial disease are at higher risk for cardiovascular events than the general population. While supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has been shown to improve vascular function, it remains unclear if supplementation decreases serious clinical outcomes. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine whether omega-3 PUFA supplementation reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events and complications in adults with peripheral arterial disease. Methods We searched five electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform) from inception to 6 December 2013 to identify randomized trials of omega-3 PUFA supplementation (from fish or plant oils) that lasted ?12 weeks in adults with peripheral arterial disease. No language filters were applied. Data on trial design, population characteristics, and health outcomes were extracted. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events; secondary outcomes included myocardial infarction, cardiovascular death, stroke, angina, amputation, revascularization procedures, maximum and pain-free walking distance, adverse effects of the intervention, and quality of life. Trial quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results Of 741 citations reviewed, we included five trials enrolling 396 individuals. All included trials were of unclear or high risk of bias. There was no evidence of a protective association of omega-3 PUFA supplementation against major adverse cardiac events (pooled risk ratio 0.73, 95% CI 0.22 to 2.41, I 2 75%, 2 trials, 288 individuals) or other serious clinical outcomes. Adverse events and compliance were poorly reported. Conclusions Our results showed that insufficient evidence exists to suggest a beneficial effect of omega-3 PUFA supplementation in adults with peripheral arterial disease with regard to cardiovascular events and other serious clinical outcomes. PMID:24885361

  4. Early respiratory complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Carollo, Cristiana; Barbieri, Stefania; Pettenuzzo, Tommaso; Ori, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The poor clinical conditions associated with end-stage cirrhosis, pre-existing pulmonary abnormalities, and high comorbidity rates in patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores are all well-recognized factors that increase the risk of pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) surgery. Many intraoperative and postoperative events, such as fluid overload, massive transfusion of blood products, hemodynamic instability, unexpected coagulation abnormalities, renal dysfunction, and serious adverse effects of reperfusion syndrome, are other factors that predispose an individual to postoperative respiratory disorders. Despite advances in surgical techniques and anesthesiological management, the lung may still suffer throughout the perioperative period from various types of injury and ventilatory impairment, with different clinical outcomes. Pulmonary complications after OLT can be classified as infectious or non-infectious. Pleural effusion, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia may contribute considerably to early morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. It is of paramount importance to accurately identify lung disorders because infectious pulmonary complications warrant speedy and aggressive treatment to prevent diffuse lung injury and the risk of evolution into multisystem organ failure. This review discusses the most common perioperative factors that predispose an individual to postoperative pulmonary complications and these complications’ early clinical manifestations after OLT and influence on patient outcome. PMID:24409054

  5. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  6. A Pkd1-Fbn1 genetic interaction implicates TGF-? signaling in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyan; Wang, Connie J; Judge, Daniel P; Halushka, Marc K; Ni, Jie; Habashi, Jennifer P; Moslehi, Javid; Bedja, Djahida; Gabrielson, Kathleen L; Xu, Hangxue; Qian, Feng; Huso, David; Dietz, Harry C; Germino, Gregory G; Watnick, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common cause of renal failure that is due to mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Vascular complications, including aneurysms, are a well recognized feature of ADPKD, and a subgroup of families exhibits traits reminiscent of Marfan syndrome (MFS). MFS is caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1), which encodes an extracellular matrix protein with homology to latent TGF-? binding proteins. It was recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 deficiency is associated with upregulation of TGF-? signaling. We investigated the overlap between ADPKD and MFS by breeding mice with targeted mutations in Pkd1 and Fbn1. Double heterozygotes displayed an exacerbation of the typical Fbn1 heterozygous aortic phenotype. We show that the basis of this genetic interaction results from further upregulation of TGF-? signaling caused by Pkd1 haploinsufficiency. In addition, we demonstrate that loss of PKD1 alone is sufficient to induce a heightened responsiveness to TGF-?. Our data link the interaction of two important diseases to a fundamental signaling pathway. PMID:24071006

  7. A Pkd1-Fbn1 Genetic Interaction Implicates TGF-β Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Vascular Complications in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongyan; Wang, Connie J.; Judge, Daniel P.; Halushka, Marc K.; Ni, Jie; Habashi, Jennifer P.; Moslehi, Javid; Bedja, Djahida; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Xu, Hangxue; Qian, Feng; Huso, David; Dietz, Harry C.; Germino, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common cause of renal failure that is due to mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Vascular complications, including aneurysms, are a well recognized feature of ADPKD, and a subgroup of families exhibits traits reminiscent of Marfan syndrome (MFS). MFS is caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1), which encodes an extracellular matrix protein with homology to latent TGF-β binding proteins. It was recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 deficiency is associated with upregulation of TGF-β signaling. We investigated the overlap between ADPKD and MFS by breeding mice with targeted mutations in Pkd1 and Fbn1. Double heterozygotes displayed an exacerbation of the typical Fbn1 heterozygous aortic phenotype. We show that the basis of this genetic interaction results from further upregulation of TGF-β signaling caused by Pkd1 haploinsufficiency. In addition, we demonstrate that loss of PKD1 alone is sufficient to induce a heightened responsiveness to TGF-β. Our data link the interaction of two important diseases to a fundamental signaling pathway. PMID:24071006

  8. Evaluation of tissue accumulation levels of advanced glycation end products by skin autofluorescence: A novel marker of vascular complications in high-risk patients for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Fukami, Kei; Matsui, Takanori

    2015-04-15

    A non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and the amino groups of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids is known as the "Maillard reaction". The reactions have progressed in a normal aging process and at an accelerated rate under hyperglycemic, inflammatory, and/or oxidative stress conditions, thus leading to the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Cross-linking modification of organic matrix proteins such as collagen by AGEs not only leads to an increase in vascular and myocardial stiffness, but also deteriorates structural integrity and physiological function of multiple organ systems. Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence that interaction of AGEs with a cell surface receptor RAGE elicits oxidative stress generation and subsequently evokes inflammatory, thrombogenic and fibrotic reactions, thereby being involved in the development and progression of various age- or diabetes-related disorders, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer's disease, osteoporosis, cancer growth and metastasis. Skin AGE levels measured in biopsy specimens are associated with the development and progression of diabetic microangiopathy. Recently, accumulation levels of AGEs in the skin can be measured non-invasively by autofluorescence. Accumulating evidence has suggested that skin autofluorescence (SAF) is correlated with the presence and severity of vascular complications of diabetes and could predict future cardiovascular events and death in patients with diabetes. This review summarizes the pathophysiological role of tissue accumulation levels of AGEs in vascular damage in high-risk patients, especially focusing on the association between SAF and cardiorenal disorder. PMID:25814214

  9. Orbital Complications of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Radovani, Pjerin; Vasili, Dritan; Xhelili, Mirela; Dervishi, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the modern antibiotherapies applied in the practice of otorhinolaryngology, the orbital complications of sinusitis are still considered a serious threat to essential functions of the eye, including loss of vision, and at worst, life threatening symptoms. Aims: The goal of this study is to consider and analyse patients who were treated for these complications in the last decade in our hospital, which is the only tertiary hospital in our country. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of cases. Methods: In our practice, cases treated in the hospital are rhinosinusitis cases where surgical intervention is necessary, or those with a suspicion of complications. Between the years 1999 and 2009 there were 177 cases, the clinical charts of which were reviewed. The cases that are omitted from this study are those involving soft tissues, bone, and intracranial complications. The diagnoses were determined based on anamnesis, anterior rhinoscopy, x-rays of the sinuses with the Water’s projection or where there was a suspicion of a complication, and CT scans with coronal and axial projections. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of cefalosporines, aminoglycosides and Proetz manoeuvre. When an improvement in the conditions did not occur within 24–48 hours, we intervened with a surgical procedure, preferably the Lynch-Patterson external frontoethmoidectomy. Results: In our study, we encountered 35 cases (19.8%) of orbital complications with an average age of 25 (range: 3–75); Palpebral inflammatory oedema (15), orbital cellulitis (10), subperiosteal abscess (6), orbital abscess (3), and cavernous sinus thrombosis (1 patient). The average time that patients remained in hospital was 4.6 days; for those with orbital complications this was 7 days. Conclusion: Orbital complications of sinusitis are considered to be severe pathologies. The appearance of oedema in the corner of the eye should be evaluated immediately and the means to exclude acute sinusitis should be taken under serious consideration. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are key to the reduction of these unwanted manifestations. PMID:25207092

  10. Comparative Histological Study on the Therapeutic Effect of Green Tea and Stem Cells in Alzheimer’s Disease Complicating Experimentally Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bassiony, Hend Shafik; Zickri, Maha Baligh; Metwally, Hala Gabr; Elsherif, Hala Ahmed; Alghandour, Sarah Mohammed; Sakr, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Increasing evidence implicates diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor for AD. Green tea (GT) has several beneficial effects attributed to its anti-oxidant phenolic compounds. Adipose tissue is a rich source of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs). This study was designed to evaluate and compare the possible therapeutic effect of green tea extract (GTE) and ADSCs on AD complicating induced DM in male rat. Methods 31 adult male albino rats were divided into 5 groups. Group I (Control), Group II received GTE, 50 mg/kg daily orally for 4 weeks, Group III received a single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin (STZ), 50 mg/kg, Group IV: received STZ followed by GTE and Group V: received STZ followed by human ADSCs (hADSCs) intravenously. Results Multiple acidophilic masses, deformed neurons, Congo red +ve masses and Caspase 3 +ve neurons were seen in group III, became few in group IV and occasional in group V. Multiple Prussian blue +ve cells were detected in group V. Some CD44 +ve cells were noticed in group III, became multiple in groups IV and V. The mean area of neurons exhibiting acidophilic cytoplasm, mean area of amyloid plaques and mean area % of Caspase 3 +ve cells indicated a significant increase in group III. The mean area % of CD44 +ve cells recorded a significant increase in group IV. Conclusions hADSCs exerted a more marked therapeutic effect on the neurodegenerative changes complicating DM and corresponding to AD. PMID:26634066

  11. Increased Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis Associated with Cardiovascular Complications – A National Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien-Hsun; Chen, Hung-An; Yeh, Chia-Lun; Chiu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Chun; Cheng, Yu-Pin; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives There have been few large population-based studies of the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and glomerulonephritis. This nationwide cohort study investigated the risks of developing CKD and glomerulonephritis in patients with RA, and the associated risks for cardiovascular complications. Methods From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified a study cohort of 12,579 patients with RA and randomly selected 37,737 subjects without RA as a control cohort. Each subject was individually followed for up for 5 years, and the risk of CKD was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results During the follow-up period, after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors RA was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of CKD (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–1.40) and glomerulonephritis (aHR 1.55; 95% CI 1.37–1.76). Increased risk of CKD was also associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclosporine, glucocorticoids, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclophosphamide. Patients with comorbidities had even greater increased risk of CKD. Moreover, RA patients with concurrent CKD had significantly higher likelihood of developing ischemic heart disease and stroke. Conclusions RA patients had higher risk of developing CKD and glomerulonephritis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Their increased risk of CKD may be attributed to glomerulonephritis, chronic inflammation, comorbidities, and renal toxicity of antirheumatic drugs. Careful monitoring of renal function in RA patients and tight control of their comorbid diseases and cardiovascular risk factors are warranted. PMID:26406879

  12. Complications in colorectal surgery: risk factors and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backround Open or laparoscopic colorectal surgery comprises of many different types of procedures for various diseases. Depending upon the operation and modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors the intra- and postoperative morbidity and mortality rate vary. In general, surgical complications can be divided into intraoperative and postoperative complications and usually occur while the patient is still in the hospital. Methods A literature search (1980-2009) was carried out, using MEDLINE, PubMed and the Cochrane library. Results This review provides an overview how to identify and minimize intra- and postoperative complications. The improvement of different treatment strategies and technical inventions in the recent decade has been enormous. This is mainly attributable to the increase in the laparoscopic approach, which is now well accepted for many procedures. Training of the surgeon, hospital volume and learning curves are becoming increasingly more important to maximize patient safety, surgeon expertise and cost effectiveness. In addition, standardization of perioperative care is essential to minimize postoperative complications. Conclusion This review summarizes the main perioperative complications of colorectal surgery and influencable and non-influencable risk factors which are important to the general surgeon and the relevant specialist as well. In order to minimize or even avoid complications it is crucial to know these risk factors and strategies to prevent, treat or reduce intra- and postoperative complications. PMID:20338045

  13. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vessel problems, as well as other diabetes complications. Gum Disease People with diabetes are more likely than others to develop gum disease (also called periodontal disease) because they may ...

  14. Stilling the waters: Stilling basin design for stepped chutes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy dissipation is a desired feature of stepped chute design because it may lead to a shorter length of stilling basin than that of a traditional smooth chute design. Design parameters for stilling basins include Froude number, clear water flow depth, the sequent flow depth, and tailwater. Rese...

  15. [Neurologic complications following liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Shibolet, Oren; Safadi, Rifaat; Ashur, Yaffa; Eid, Ahmed; Ilan, Yaron

    2002-01-01

    Neurologic complications are very common following liver transplantation and appear in 30%-90% of the patients. These complications represent a wide array of etiologies, often presenting complicated diagnostic options. The primary liver disease for which the patient underwent the transplantation can cause neurologic complications, or they can be a presentation of a metabolic or vascular derangement. The medications given to liver transplanted patients can cause neurologic complication either directly via drug side effects or indirectly via immune-suppression and secondary opportunistic infections of the nervous system. We present two cases of liver transplanted patients, one suffering from a complex neurologic syndrome attributed to her primary Wilsons disease and the second with recurrent encephalopathy following transplantation attributed to a porto-systemic shunt. We review the current literature on the subject. PMID:11851103

  16. Pneumocephalus and meningitis as a complication of acute otitis media: case report

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, A; Berto, A; Borgonzoni, M; Grasso, DL; Martini, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Otogenic pneumocephalus is a rare condition. The case is described of pneumocephalus and meningitis secondary to acute otitis media. Although the rate of intracranial complications related to middle ear disease is only 0.5 to 4%, mortality still ranges between 5 and 15%. PMID:17608137

  17. Neurological Complications Comparing Endoscopically vs. Open Harvest of the Radial Artery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-28

    Complications Due to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  18. Oral complications of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Leao, Jair C; Ribeiro, Camila M B; Carvalho, Alessandra A T; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  19. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  20. Wild Beasts of Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a project with a transformative approach to color theory and still life. Students' use of an arbitrary color scheme can open their eyes, push their creativity and produce exciting paintings. Ordinary still-life objects will be transformed into dramatic, vibrant visuals. The Fauve style of painting is a great art history…

  1. Higher Still in European Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffe, David

    1997-01-01

    In 1999, Scotland's "Higher Still" will incorporate all upper-secondary academic and vocational courses in a unified curriculum and assessment system for postcompulsory education. Higher Still's objectives, strategies, and "system architecture" are compared to those of Austria, England, Finland, France, Germany, Norway, and Sweden, studied by the…

  2. Wild Beasts of Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a project with a transformative approach to color theory and still life. Students' use of an arbitrary color scheme can open their eyes, push their creativity and produce exciting paintings. Ordinary still-life objects will be transformed into dramatic, vibrant visuals. The Fauve style of painting is a great art history…

  3. Complications of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lambertenghi Deliliers, G; Annaloro, C; Lambertenghi Deliliers, D

    2000-01-01

    Myeloablative therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a therapeutic option proposed for a variety of hematological and non-hematological diseases. However, although mortality due to this procedure is steadily decreasing, patients are still exposed to the risk of a number of complications negatively affecting their expectancy or quality of life. Adverse events due to HSC harvesting are rare and generally reversible. The early post-transplant complications include infections, mucositis, hepatic veno-occlusive disease and various acute organ toxicities. Immune derangement is a leading cause of most late events, such as viral or fungal infections, auto-immune manifestations and secondary neoplasms, of which secondary AML/MDS are the most commonly reported. In line with the favoured pathogenetic explanation, neoplastic clones previously established during conventional treatment are harvested and reinfused at the time of autografting. Other late effects are single organ dysfunction due to the underlying disease and treatment toxicities combined with infectious and post-infectious phenomena. The lungs, heart, CNS and reproductive system are the most investigated targets, but no clinical patterns have been identified as specific for autografting. PMID:11204025

  4. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  5. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  6. Minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies in the management of complications of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Kang, Kyungmin; Fan, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of disorders from simple steatosis to inflammation leading to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. With the progressive epidemics of obesity and diabetes, major risk factors in the development and pathogenesis of NAFLD, the prevalence of NAFLD and its associated complications including liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma is expected to increase by 2030 with an enormous health and economic impact. We present a patient who developed Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) cirrhosis. Due to morbid obesity, she was not an optimal transplant candidate and was not initially listed. After attempts for lifestyle modifications failed to lead to weight reduction, a transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery was performed. This is the sixth such procedure in humans in literature. Subsequently she had a meaningful drop in BMI from 42 to 36 over the following 6 months ultimately leading to her being listed for transplant. During this time, the left hepatic HCC was treated with chemoembolization without evidence of recurrence. In this article, we wish to highlight the use of minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in the comprehensive management of the NAFLD spectrum and percutaneous transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery (LGA), a novel method, for the management of obesity. PMID:26629307

  7. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šucha?, M; Hor?ák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kova?, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal endoscopic surgery (FEES). In case of superior subperiosteal abscess, combined endonasal and external approach (external orbitotomy) was needed. Combined therapy facilitated quick improvement of local and systematic symptoms. Average time of hospitalisation was 7 days. Early diagnosis and agresive combined therapy prevent loss of vision and life threatening complications. PMID:25640234

  8. Medical management of chronic liver diseases (CLD) in children (part II): focus on the complications of CLD, and CLD that require special considerations.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H F; Kamal, Naglaa M

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of the causes of many chronic liver diseases (CLDs) may not be possible. In this case, complications must be anticipated, prevented or at least controlled by the best available therapeutic modalities. There are three main goals for the management of portal hypertension: (i) prevention of the first episode of variceal bleeding largely by non-selective ?-adrenoceptor antagonists, which is not generally recommended in children; (ii) control of bleeding by using a stepwise approach from the least to most invasive strategies; (iii) and prevention of re-bleeding using bypass operations, with particular enthusiasm for the use of meso-Rex bypass in the pediatric population. Hepatic encephalopathy management also consists of three main aspects: (i) ruling out other causes of encephalopathy; (ii) identifying and treating precipitating factors; and (iii) starting empiric treatment with drugs such as lactulose, rifaximin, sodium benzoate, and flumazenil. Treatment of mild ascites and peripheral edema should begin with the restriction of sodium and water, followed by careful diuresis, then large-volume paracentesis associated with colloid volume expansion in severe cases. Empiric broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy should be used for the treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, bacterial and fungal sepsis, and cholangitis, after taking appropriate cultures, with appropriate changes in therapy after sensitivity testing. Empirical therapies continue to be the standard practice for pruritus; these consist of bile acid binding agents, phenobarbital (phenobarbitone), ursodeoxycholic acid, antihistamines, rifampin (rifampicin), and carbamazepine. Partial external biliary diversion can be used in refractory cases. Once hepatorenal syndrome is suspected, treatment should be initiated early in order to prevent the progression of renal failure; approaches consist of general supportive measures, management of concomitant complications, screening for sepsis, treatment with antibiotics, use of vasopressin analogs (terlipressin), and renal replacement therapy if needed. Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are best managed by liver transplantation. Provision of an adequate caloric supply, nutrition, and vitamin/mineral supplements for the management of growth failure, required vaccinations, and special care for ensuring psychologic well-being should be ensured. Anticoagulation might be attempted in acute portal vein thrombosis. Some CLDs, such as extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA), Crigler-Najjar syndrome, and Indian childhood cirrhosis, require special considerations. For EHBA, Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy is the current standard surgical approach in combination with nutritional therapy and supplemental fat and water soluble vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. In type 1 Crigler-Najjar syndrome, extensive phototherapy is the mainstay of treatment, in association with adjuvant therapy to bind photobilirubin such as calcium phosphate, cholestyramine, or agar, until liver transplantation can be carried out. Treating Indian childhood cirrhosis with penicillamine early in the course of the disease and at doses similar to those used to treat Wilson disease decreases the mortality rate by half. New hopes for the future include extracorporeal liver support devices (the molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS®] and Prometheus®), hepatocyte transplantation, liver-directed gene therapy, genetically engineered enzymes, and therapeutic modalities targeting fibrogenesis. Hepapoietin, a naturally occurring cytokine that promotes hepatocyte growth, is under extensive research. PMID:21999650

  9. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits. PMID:25825086

  10. Vascular access complications in endovascular procedures with large sheaths.

    PubMed

    Lejay, Anne; Caspar, Thibault; Ohana, Mickaël; Delay, Charline; Girsowicz, Elie; Ohlmann, P; Thaveau, Fabien; Geny, Bernard; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular procedures, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), and endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) have been established as promising less invasive therapeutic options. However, despite continuous advances and device improvements, the use of large-sheaths still remains an important challenge, since significant coexisting arterial disease may be encountered in patients undergoing such procedures. Identification of coexisting arterial diseases by optimal preoperative imaging assessment is essential to anticipate these difficulties and avoid the complications by using adequate access options. Should a vascular complication such as iliac rupture occur, vascular interventionists must be aware of salvage procedures to control and treat major complications, such as maintaining wire access across the rupture for occlusion balloon placement and vessel control, while disruption is addressed either through an endovascular or an open approach. The aims of this review are to describe how to prevent vascular complications by optimal preoperative imaging assessment, to detail intraoperative options available for addressing difficult access issues and to discuss how to manage intraoperative major vascular complications. PMID:26603161

  11. Body Mass Index Is a Marker of Nutrition Preparation Sufficiency Before Surgery for Crohn's Disease From the Perspective of Intra-Abdominal Septic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhi, Min; Chen, Huangwei; Tang, Jian; Su, Minli; Yao, Jiayin; Yang, Qingfan; Chen, Junrong; Hu, Pinjin; Liu, Huanliang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Poor preoperative nutritional status for individuals with Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with intra-abdominal septic complications (IASCs). The present study aimed to investigate the association of the common nutrition indices serum albumin and body mass index (BMI) with IASCs. Sixty-four CD patients who had received elective intestinal operations were retrospectively investigated. Among these patients, 32 had received individualized fortified nutrition support. IASCs occurred in 7 patients (10.9%). Compared with non-IASC patients, IASC patients had a lower BMI (17.6?±?2.7 vs 15.6?±?1.3?kg/m2, P?=?0.048). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve according to the BMI-based IASC prediction was 0.772 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.601–0.944; P?=?0.020) with an optimum diagnostic cutoff value of 16.2?kg/m2. A BMI?

  12. Stoma complications: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Wang, Yi-Zarn; Weintraub, Sharon L; Boyle, Michael; Hunt, John P

    2002-11-01

    Construction of a gastrointestinal stoma is a frequently performed surgical procedure. We sought to analyze a large cohort to document the frequency and types of ostomy complications and the risk factors associated with them. The charts of patients undergoing a procedure which resulted in ostomy during a 3-year period were reviewed. Demographics, indication, ostomy type/location, perioperative risk factors, and complications were recorded. Case-control methodology was used to determine crude odds ratios and multiple logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. An ostomy was constructed in 204 patients and records were available for 164. Forty-one patients (25.0%) had ostomy complications. Sixteen of these complications (39.0%) occurred within one month of the procedure. Complications included prolapse in nine (22%), necrosis in nine (22%), stenosis in seven (17%), irritation in seven (17%), infection in six (15%), bleeding in two (5%), and retraction in two (5%). Gender, cancer, trauma, diverticulitis, emergency surgery, ileostomy, and ostomy location/type were not associated with a stoma complication. Significant predictors of ostomy malfunction are presented as odds ratios (ORs) with 95 per cent confidence intervals (CIs) and include inflammatory bowel disease (OR = 4.49; 95% CI = 1.16-17.36) and obesity (OR = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.15-6.16). The care of an enterostomal nurse was found to prevent complications (OR = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.03-0.69). We conclude that ostomies have a high risk of complication, which is not related to stoma location or type. Obesity and inflammatory bowel disease predispose to complications. Enterostomal nursing may be instrumental in preventing complications. PMID:12455788

  13. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  14. Endocrine and Bone Complications in ?-Thalassemia Intermedia: Current Understanding and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, MohammadHassan A.; Abbas, Hussein A.

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia (TI), also known as nontransfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT), is a type of thalassemia where affected patients do not require lifelong regular transfusions for survival but may require occasional or even frequent transfusions in certain clinical settings and for defined periods of time. NTDT encompasses three distinct clinical forms: ?-thalassemia intermedia (?-TI), Hb E/?-thalassemia, and ?-thalassemia intermedia (Hb H disease). Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular features, pathophysiology, and complications of NTDT particularly ?-TI has increased tremendously but data on optimal treatment of disease and its various complications are still lacking. In this paper, we shall review a group of commonly encountered complications in ?-TI, mainly endocrine and bone complications. PMID:25834825

  15. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  16. A Beautiful Britto Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Romero Britto is a wonderful artist for young students to study when learning the building blocks of art and design. Colorful, linear, and full of bold patterns, Britto's work blends a contemporary cubist style and pop art commercial appeal. Themes of this contemporary artist's work include animals, flowers, still life, and people in joyful…

  17. Why Are Chimps Still Chimps?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Norman A.; Smith, James J.; Pobiner, Briana; Schrein, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may be posed with such questions as, "If we evolved from chimps, why are there still chimps?" We provide teachers with answers to this and related questions in the context of the latest genetic, fossil, and behavioral evidence. We also provide references they can use to further students' understanding of human evolution and evolution in…

  18. Why Are Chimps Still Chimps?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Norman A.; Smith, James J.; Pobiner, Briana; Schrein, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may be posed with such questions as, "If we evolved from chimps, why are there still chimps?" We provide teachers with answers to this and related questions in the context of the latest genetic, fossil, and behavioral evidence. We also provide references they can use to further students' understanding of human evolution and evolution in…

  19. Value-Able Still Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how she made a major improvement to her fifth-grade lesson plan by providing a hands-on Internet experience before students worked on their own oil pastel still life. It was a success with beautiful finished products and highly motivated, engaged students. Details of this lesson are described in this article.

  20. Noncoding RNAs in diabetes vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Cristina; Angelini, Timothy G; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder and is recognised as a dominant health threat of our time. Diabetes induces a widespread damage of the macro- and microvasculature in different organs and tissues and disrupts the endogenous vascular repair mechanisms, thus causing diffuse and severe complications. Moreover, diabetic patients respond poorly to surgical interventions aiming to "revascularise" (i.e., to restore blood flow supply) the ischemic myocardium or lower limbs. The molecular causes underpinning diabetes vascular complications are still underappreciated and druggable molecular targets for therapeutic interventions have not yet clearly emerged. Moreover, diabetes itself and diabetes complications are often silent killers, requiring new prognostic, diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for use in the clinical practice. Noncoding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) have opened the field capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focuses at the ncRNA roles in diabetes vascular complications. Furthermore, we discuss the potential value of ncRNAs as clinical biomarkers, and we examine the possibilities for therapeutic intervention targeting ncRNs in diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25536178

  1. Maternal complications in diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Gillian

    2011-02-01

    Pregnant women with diabetes have to manage both the effect of pregnancy on glucose control and its effect on pre-existing diabetic complications. Most women experience hypoglycaemia as a consequence of tightened glycaemic control and this impacts on daily living. Less commonly, diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious metabolic decompensation of diabetic control and a medical emergency, can cause foetal and maternal mortality. Microvascular complications of diabetes include retinopathy and nephropathy. Retinopathy can deteriorate during pregnancy; hence, regular routine examination is required and, if indicated, ophthalmological input. Diabetic nephropathy significantly increases the risk of obstetric complications and impacts on foetal outcomes. Pregnancy outcome is closely related to pre-pregnancy renal function. Diabetic pregnancy is contraindicated if the maternal complications of ischaemic heart disease or diabetic gastropathy are known to be present before pregnancy as there is a significant maternal mortality associated with both of these conditions. PMID:21130689

  2. MicroRNAs: potential mediators and biomarkers of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mitsuo; Castro, Nancy E; Natarajan, Rama

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is escalating worldwide and, consequently, this has become a major health care problem. Moreover, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with significantly accelerated rates of microvascular complications, including retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, as well as macrovascular complications such as atherosclerotic cardiovascular and hypertensive diseases. Key factors have been implicated in leading to these complications, including hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, advanced glycation end products, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and related increases in cellular oxidant stress (including mitochondrial) and endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the high incidence of diabetic complications, which often progress despite glycemic control, are still not fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that have elicited immense interest in recent years. They repress target gene expression via posttranscriptional mechanisms and have diverse cellular and biological functions. Herein, we discuss the role of miRNAs in the pathobiology of various diabetic complications, their involvement in oxidant stress, and also the potential use of differentially expressed miRNAs as novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:23770198

  3. Complications of intraocular lenses. A historical and histopathological review.

    PubMed

    Apple, D J; Mamalis, N; Loftfield, K; Googe, J M; Novak, L C; Kavka-Van Norman, D; Brady, S E; Olson, R J

    1984-01-01

    Recent improvements in intraocular lens (IOL) design, manufacturing techniques, and surgical techniques have greatly reduced the incidence of complications following implantation, and many authors now consider IOL implantation to be among the most safe and effective major surgical procedures. However, adverse reactions are still seen--some as late sequelae of earlier IOL designs and implantation techniques and some as sequelae of more recent implantations using "state-of-the-art" lenses and surgical techniques. Complications may be due to various factors, including surgical technique, IOL design, or the inability of some eyes with preexisting disease to tolerate an implant. The authors trace the evolution of IOLs since Ridley's first implant, summarizing the modifications in lenses and surgical techniques that were made as complications were recognized. They then review the clinical and histopathological features of selected cases from more than 200 IOLs and/or globes removed due to IOL-related complications and studied in the University of Utah Ocular Pathology Laboratory. It is hoped that this review will provide insights into the pathogenesis of IOL complications, enhancing the current success of implant procedures and stimulating further basic and clinical research in this area. PMID:6390763

  4. Solar stills for agricultural purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.; Tran, V. V.

    1975-01-01

    Basic concepts of using desalinated water for agricultural purposes are outlined. A mathematical model describing heat and mass transfer in a system combining a solar still with a greenhouse, its solution, and test results of a small-scale unit built at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, are discussed. The unit was employed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the system. Further development and modifications are necessary for larger-scale operations. The basis of an optimization study which is underway at the Brace Research Institute of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, aimed at finding the best combination of design and operation parameters is also presented.

  5. [Archaeons--still unknown microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Efenberger, Magdalena; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa; Wódz, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    Archaea is a group of microorganisms described by Carl Woese in 1977. Although Archaea have a similar cellular organization to bacteria, their cell wall and cell membrane are quite unique. Archaeal cell wall lacks peptidoglican and cell membrane is composed of ether-lipids which are far more stable than bacteria-specific esther-lipids. Besides, Archaea have some specific external structures, like: archaella, pili, hami and cannulae but their exact functions are still unclear. Most of Archaea obtain energy via anaerobic processes of simple inorganic or organic compounds, however some of these organisms are also able to generate methane in the process known as methanogesis. They reproduce by cell division or budding-like process and some studies demonstrated the mechanisms of genetic transfer such as conjugation, transduction and natural transformation for the Archaea. They are capable of forming biofilms also in interaction with bacteria. Some archaeons, such as Haloferax mediterranei and Sulfolobus islandicus can synthesize antimicrobial agents which are called archaeocins. In recent years huge progress has been made in understanding of Archaea but many aspects of their biology remain still unknown. In this review, we present recent advances in Archaea biology focusing mainly on archaeal morphology, metabolism and reproduction. PMID:25531709

  6. [The complications of pulmonary resection treatment of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Pereszlenyi, A; Harustiak, S; Benej, R; Bohucky, S

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the complications of the pulmonary resection treatment in lung cancer. A significant decrease in incidence of cardiovascular and respiratory complications has already been achieved during the last decades. However, infectious complications, mainly pneumonias and postpneumonectomy empyemas still remain and belong among treacherous complications which are often associated with significant mortality. This article devotes special attention to the possibilities of influencing and decreasing the incidence of these complications. PMID:11725397

  7. Umbilical Cord Haematoma Causing Still Birth- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Swati; Gupta, Mayank; Benjamin, Santosh Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Still birth continues to be one of the many challenges that an obstetrician has to face. Still births that occur in the antenatal period are more difficult to explain than that which occurs intrapartum. The latter is most often due to intrapartum asphyxia, medical complications or infections; however a cause for antenatal still birth is difficult to ascertain. A thorough examination of the case along with necessary investigations might not necessarily reveal any cause and this leads to considerable anxiety for both the mother and the treating obstetrician. In the investigation of a case of still birth a detailed examination of the placenta and cord has to be emphasised as a considerable number of still births that are thought to be unexplained may be attributable to placental or cord pathologies. Here we present one such case where an umbilical cord haematoma resulted in intrauterine foetal death. PMID:26816950

  8. Complications Following Anorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, Hiroko; Poylin, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Anorectal surgery is well tolerated. Rates of minor complications are relatively high, but major postoperative complications are uncommon. Prompt identification of postoperative complications is necessary to avoid significant patient morbidity. The most common acute complications include bleeding, infection, and urinary retention. Pelvic sepsis, while may result in dramatic morbidity and even mortality, is relatively rare. The most feared long-term complications include fecal incontinence, anal stenosis, and chronic pelvic pain. PMID:26929747

  9. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  10. Surgery for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, John M; Varma, Madhulika G

    2008-01-01

    Despite the new and ever expanding array of medications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are still clear indications for operative management of IBD and its complications. We present an overview of indications, procedures, considerations, and controversies in the surgical therapy of IBD. PMID:18461653

  11. [Orthostatic tremor: unsteadiness while standing still].

    PubMed

    Wiendels, Natalie J; Tromp, Selma C

    2012-01-01

    We present three patients with histories of the typical unsteady feeling in the legs while standing still which disappears when walking or sitting down. An orthostatic tremor is a disorder that is difficult to recognise because patients describe balance disturbances rather than tremors. Clinical findings include a fine tremor in the legs which may be invisible but can be heard on auscultation and felt on palpation of the leg muscles. The diagnosis is confirmed by EMG which reveals a pathognomonic tremor of 13-18 Hz while the patient is standing upright. Its pathophysiology is unknown but a disorder related to proprioceptive feedback has been suggested. The tremor can be associated with Parkinson's disease, Graves' disease, and cerebellar or pontine lesions which should be excluded by laboratory investigations and MRI. There is little evidence available on effective treatments, but clonazepam seems to be the first drug of choice, followed by gabapentin. Levodopa can be tried in patients with parkinsonism. PMID:22617068

  12. 1996 Budget picture still clouded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Four months and three work stoppages into fiscal 1996, whole departments and agencies of the United States federal government remain in budgetary limbo. Five annual spending bills still await approval, and parts of nine federal departments and several agencies face the possibility of yet another shutdown, as the current continuing resolution for temporary funding expires on March 15.In the wake of the recent three-week shutdown of the federal government, congressional leaders worked in January to ease future political pain by funding a list of “essential services” for the remainder of the fiscal year. Deemed essential were government programs with the most immediate and conspicuous public impact, such as the National Parks Service and the Passport Services Office. Included on that list of essential services was the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which not only received full funding for the entire fiscal year but also got a 5.7% increase over its 1995 budget.

  13. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off. PMID:26610152

  14. Early Detection Still Key to Breast Cancer Survival

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_154995.html Early Detection Still Key to Breast Cancer Survival: Study Despite advances in treatment, finding smaller ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even with recent strides in breast cancer treatment, a woman's chances of surviving the disease ...

  15. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient’s history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Method: We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients’ data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Result: Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Conclusion: The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan. PMID:26862251

  16. Study of Pulmonary Complications in Pediatric Patients With Storage Disorders Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    I Cell Disease; Fucosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Mannosidosis; Niemann-Pick Disease; Pulmonary Complications; Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Wolman Disease

  17. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 1: Musculoskeletal and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, D. K.; Teasell, R.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged bed rest and immobilization inevitably lead to complications. Such complications are much easier to prevent than to treat. Musculoskeletal complications include loss of muscle strength and endurance, contractures and soft tissue changes, disuse osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease. Cardiovascular complications include an increased heart rate, decreased cardiac reserve, orthostatic hypotension, and venous thromboembolism. Images Figures 1-2 Figures 3-4 PMID:8324411

  18. Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

    1977-01-01

    Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

  19. Type 1 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Complications and Sesame (?? Zh? Má)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Thùy, Tr?n D??ng; Wang, Shu-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major concern among medical practitioners, with the annual mortality rate increasing up to 26.9% in a person aged 65 years or older and 11.3% in the adult. There are many serious complications associated with diabetes, particularly cardiovascular complications due to microvascular diseases. A prerequisite to reduce the risk of microvascular and neurologic complications of type 1 diabetes is normoglycemia. Insulin therapy is the most common treatment used nowadays in type 1 diabetes. However, this method still has many disadvantages such as increased episode of severe hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia unawareness, increased weight gain, transient exacerbation of pre-existing retinopathy, etc. Using insulin pump (the insulin pump is a medical device used for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion to manage the insulin level in the treatment of diabetes mellitus), is associated with known disadvantages including increased ketoacidosis, infection at the infusion site, and the treatment being less suitable in young children (less than 7 years of age). Therefore, alternative treatment for diabetes is still in great demand. We took the approach of traditional Chinese medicine to discuss this matter. Sesame (?? Zh? Má), a herb, has been used medicinally for thousands of years in almost all the countries in the world. The beneficial effects of sesame in remediating diabetes, such as hypoglycemic effects, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidemic effects, improving fat metabolism, and reducing cholesterol, have been demonstrated in many studies,. However, reports on the effects of sesame in remediating cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients are limited, which necessitates further studies on the effects of sesame on cardiovascular complications. PMID:24872931

  20. Community-acquired Pneumonia and its Complications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qiang; Shen, Kun-ling

    2015-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in developing and developed countries, and its incidence is highest among children less than 5-y-old. Over the last five years, several international and local guidelines have been updated with new evidence concerning the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of pediatric CAP, but there are still several major problems that need to be standardised. The aim of this review is to consider the available data concerning the termination, epidemiology, microbiology and pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment, and complications of pediatric CAP. There still are many unanswered questions concerning the management of CAP, including its definition, the difficulty to identify its etiological agents, the emergence of drug, and the lack of introduction of vaccines against respiratory pathogens in developing countries. More research is required in various areas (including therapy of atypical agents), and further efforts are needed to increase vaccination in order to reduce the incidence of the disease. PMID:25976616

  1. Still moving toward environmental justice.

    PubMed

    Clay, R

    1999-06-01

    Three years in the making, the Institute of Medicine report Toward Environmental Justice was funded by a consortium of agencies, including the NIEHS, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The independent review was authored by a 15-member committee that represented academia, public interest, medicine, law, and industry. The committee met with stakeholders, citizens, public officials, and industry representatives around the United States to assess the need for better research, education, and health policy related to environmental justice. The report investigates the situation of groups of individuals suspected of having disproportionately high levels of exposure to environmental stressors such as chemicals, biologics, allergenics, toxicants, light, noise, odors, and particulate matter. The report calls for more research to help identify and verify the environmental etiologies of diseases. It also recommends that citizens be recruited to participate in the design and execution of the research, and that communication during all phases of the research be open and reciprocal. PMID:10339458

  2. Still moving toward environmental justice.

    PubMed Central

    Clay, R

    1999-01-01

    Three years in the making, the Institute of Medicine report Toward Environmental Justice was funded by a consortium of agencies, including the NIEHS, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The independent review was authored by a 15-member committee that represented academia, public interest, medicine, law, and industry. The committee met with stakeholders, citizens, public officials, and industry representatives around the United States to assess the need for better research, education, and health policy related to environmental justice. The report investigates the situation of groups of individuals suspected of having disproportionately high levels of exposure to environmental stressors such as chemicals, biologics, allergenics, toxicants, light, noise, odors, and particulate matter. The report calls for more research to help identify and verify the environmental etiologies of diseases. It also recommends that citizens be recruited to participate in the design and execution of the research, and that communication during all phases of the research be open and reciprocal. PMID:10339458

  3. Surgical Management of Complicated Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kong, Steven; Lisle, David

    2015-12-01

    The management of complicated colon cancer (locally invasive, obstructed, or perforated cancers) can pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to surgical management. Adherence to traditional surgical oncologic principles must often be balanced with the patients' clinical presentation and other parameters. While the goal of an R0 (no residual microscopic disease) resection must always be kept in mind, situations sometimes arise which can make this difficult to achieve. Recognition of complicated disease and availability of varied therapeutic modalities is important to ensure favorable patient outcomes. This review will discuss the surgical management of complicated colon cancer, with special focus on locally advanced disease. PMID:26648793

  4. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  5. "Gastric cytoprotection" is still relevant.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Sandor

    2014-12-01

    Although Andre Robert's historic article on "gastric cytoprotection" in 1979 introduced this new name and concept, gastroprotective drugs (e.g. sofalcone, sucralfate), which prevent and/or accelerate healing of gastric ulcers without inhibiting acid secretion, were known in Japan before or around that time. But since Robert's studies were solely focused on prostaglandins (PG), they became the center of gastrointestinal research for more than 30 years. As endogenous products, PG were implicated in mediating the gastroprotective effect of other drugs such as sofalcone and sucralfate, despite that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin diminished but never abolished gastroprotection by other drugs. Another group of endogenous substances, that is, sulfhydryls (SH), investigated in parallel with PG, also seem to play a mechanistic role in gastroprotection, especially since SH alkylators like N-ethylmaleimide counteract virtually any form of gastroprotection. In Robert's terms of "prevention of chemically induced acute mucosal lesions," so far no single mechanism could explain the beneficial effects of diverse protective agents, but I argue that these two endogenous substances (i.e. PG, SH), in addition to histamine, are the main mechanistic mediators of acute gastroprotection: PG and histamine, because as mediators of acute inflammation, they increase vascular permeability (VP), and SH scavenge free radicals. This is contrary to the search for a single mechanism of action, long focused on enhanced secretion of mucus and/or bicarbonate that may contribute but cannot explain all forms of gastroprotection. Nevertheless, based on research work of the last 30 years, in part from our lab, a new mechanistic explanation of gastroprotection may be formulated: it's a complex but orderly and evolution-based physiologic response of the gastric mucosa under pathologic conditions. Namely, one of the first physiologic defense responses of any organ is inflammation that starts with rapid vascular changes (e.g. increased VP and blood flow), followed by cellular events (e.g. infiltration by acute and chronic inflammatory cells). Thus, PG and histamine, by increasing VP create a perivascular edema that dilutes and delays toxic agents reaching the subepithelial capillaries. Otherwise, damaging chemicals may induce severe early vascular injury resulting in blood flow stasis, hypoxia, and necrosis of surrounding epithelial and mesenchymal cells. In this complex response, increased mucus and/or bicarbonate secretion seem to cause luminal dilution of gastrotoxic chemicals that is further reinforced by a perivascular, histodilutional component. This mechanistic explanation would encompass the protective actions of diverse agents as PG, small doses of histamine, motility stimulants, and dilute irritants (i.e. "adaptive cytoprotection"). Thus, although markedly increased VP is pathologic, slight increase in VP seems to be protective, that is, a key element in the complex pathophysiologic response during acute gastroprotection. Over the years, "gastroprotection" was also applied to accelerated healing of chronic gastroduodenal ulcers without reduction of acid secretion. The likely main mechanism here is the binding of angiogenic growth factors (e.g. basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor) to the heparin-like structures of sucralfate and sofalcone. Thus, despite intensive research of the last 30 years, gastroprotection is incompletely understood, and we are still far away from effectively treating Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers and preventing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-caused erosions and ulcers in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract; hence "gastric cytoprotection" research is still relevant. PMID:25521744

  6. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  7. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... to help prevent problems like these. Can preexisting diabetes cause problems during pregnancy? Yes. If it’s not ...

  8. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Information Page Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of AIDS? AIDS is primarily an immune system disorder caused ...

  9. Pregnancy Complications: Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Genital herpes and pregnancy Genital herpes and pregnancy Now playing: E-mail to a ... the United States has genital herpes. Can genital herpes cause complications during pregnancy? Yes. Genital herpes can ...

  10. The impact of mathematical modeling on the understanding of diabetes and related complications

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, I; Swat, M; Laibe, C; Novère, N Le; Chelliah, V

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic and complex multifactorial disease caused by persistent hyperglycemia and for which underlying pathogenesis is still not completely understood. The mathematical modeling of glucose homeostasis, diabetic condition, and its associated complications is rapidly growing and provides new insights into the underlying mechanisms involved. Here, we discuss contributions to the diabetes modeling field over the past five decades, highlighting the areas where more focused research is required. PMID:23842097

  11. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  12. The CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells colonize the lymph nodes of the patients with adult onset Still's disease and are associated with increased extracellular level of H-ferritin in the same tissue: correlation with disease severity and implication for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruscitti, P; Ciccia, F; Cipriani, P; Guggino, G; Di Benedetto, P; Rizzo, A; Liakouli, V; Berardicurti, O; Carubbi, F; Triolo, G; Giacomelli, R

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we aimed to evaluate the levels of ferritin enriched in H subunits (H-ferritin) and ferritin enriched in L subunits (L-ferritin) and the cells expressing these two molecules in the lymph node (LN) biopsies obtained from adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients, and the possible correlation among these data and the severity of the disease. Ten patients with AOSD underwent LN biopsy. All the samples were stained by immunofluorescence. A statistical analysis was performed to estimate the possible correlation among both H-ferritin and L-ferritin tissue expression and the clinical picture of the disease. Furthermore, the same analysis was performed to evaluate the possible correlation among the number of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) or CD68(+) /L-ferritin(+) cells and the clinical picture. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated an increased tissue H-ferritin expression in the LNs of AOSD patients. This increased expression correlated with the severity of the disease. An increased number of CD68 macrophages expressing H-ferritin was observed in the LN samples of our patients. Furthermore, we observed that the number of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells correlated significantly with the severity of the clinical picture. Our data showed an imbalance between the levels of H- and L-ferritin in LNs of AOSD patients and the evidence of an increased number of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells in the same organs. Furthermore, a correlation among both the tissue H-ferritin levels and the CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells and the clinical picture was observed. PMID:26540556

  13. New treatments for levodopa-induced motor complications.

    PubMed

    Rascol, Olivier; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2015-09-15

    Levodopa (l-dopa)-induced motor complications, including motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, affect almost all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) at some point during the disease course, with relevant implications in global health status. Various dopaminergic and nondopaminergic pharmacological approaches as well as more invasive strategies including devices and functional surgery are available to manage such complications. In spite of undisputable improvements during the last decades, many patients remain significantly disabled, and a fully satisfying management of l-dopa-induced motor complications is still an important unmet need of PD therapy. This article reviews the recent trial results published from 2013 to April 2015 about pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat motor complications. Randomized controlled trials conducted in patients suffering from already established complications showed that new levodopa (l-dopa) formulations such as intrajejunal l-dopa-carbidopa infusion and bilayered extended-release l-dopa-carbidopa (IPX066) can improve motor fluctuations. Positive results were also obtained with a new monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor (safinamide) and a catechol-O-methyltransferase COMT inhibitor (opicapone). Pilot data suggest that new formulations of dopamine agonists (inhaled apomorphine) are also of potential interest. The development of novel nondopaminergic adenosine A2A antagonists (istradefylline, preladenant, and tozadenant) to treat motor fluctuations showed conflicting results in phase 2 and phase 3 trials. For dyskinesia, trials with new amantadine extended-release formulations confirmed the interest of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist approach. Positive pilot antidyskinetic effects were also recently reported using serotonin agents such as eltoprazine and glutamate mGluR5 modulators such as mavoglurant. However, the translation to clinical practice of such innovative concepts remains challenging, because subsequent phase 2 trials conducted to confirm the antidyskynetic effects of mavoglurant failed, leading to the interruption of the development of this compound for this indication. PMID:26293004

  14. A 20-year-old female with Hirayama disease complicated with dysplasia of the cervical vertebrae and degeneration of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masaya; Yoshioka, Masayuki; Sakimoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female patient was presented with a 1-year history of progressive weakness of the left hand. Examination on admission showed atrophy of the muscles of the left forearm, cold paralysis and minipolymyoclonus. MR images of the cervical cord showed anterior transfer of the cervical cord on anterior flexion and cervical cord compression at the site of cervical kyphosis, confirming the diagnosis of Hirayama disease. Many features of the present case are unusual: the patient is a female (who are rarely afflicted by this disease), with cervical kyphosis and a history of exercise involving cervical vertebral loading, suggesting a potential involvement of the latter two factors in the disease onset. The findings suggest that cervical vertebral dysplasia and intervertebral disc degeneration may influence cervical kyphosis, and be involved in the onset of Hirayama disease. PMID:23144342

  15. Transoesophageal Echocardiography Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, S K; Singh, Pooja

    2009-01-01

    Summary The application of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been continuously increasing over past several decades. It is usually considered a very safe diagnostic and monitoring device. Though the complications are rare, but these complications must be known to the operators performing TEE. The goal of this article is to encapsulate the potential complications associated with TEE. The complications are primarily related to gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems along with some miscellaneous problems related to probe insertion, drugs and inexperience of the operator. Strategies for the prevention of these complications are also analyzed in order to avoid the risk. PMID:20640107

  16. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  17. Management of chronic pancreatitis complicated with a bleeding pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Chen, Tsung-Hsing; Hsu, Jun-Te

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing disease characterized by persistent inflammation of pancreatic tissues. With disease progression, patients with chronic pancreatitis may develop troublesome complications in addition to exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functional loss. Among them, a pseudoaneurysm, mainly induced by digestive enzyme erosion of vessels in proximity to the pancreas, is a rare and life-threatening complication if bleeding of the pseudoaneurysm occurs. At present, no prospective randomized trials have investigated the therapeutic strategy for this rare but critical situation. The role of arterial embolization, the timing of surgical intervention and even surgical procedures are still controversial. In this review, we suggest that dynamic abdominal computed tomography and angiography should be performed first to localize the bleeders and to evaluate the associated complications such as pseudocyst formation, followed by arterial embolization to stop the bleeding and to achieve early stabilization of the patient’s condition. With advances and improvements in endoscopic devices and techniques, therapeutic endoscopy for pancreatic pseudocysts is technically feasible, safe and effective. Surgical intervention is recommended for a bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis who are in an unstable condition, for those in whom arterial embolization of the bleeding pseudoaneurysm fails, and when endoscopic management of the pseudocyst is unsuccessful. If a bleeding pseudoaneurysm is located over the tail of the pancreas, resection is a preferential procedure, whereas if the lesion is situated over the head or body of the pancreas, relatively conservative surgical procedures are recommended. PMID:25473165

  18. A case of left main coronary artery disease in an octogenarian treated surgically and complicated by myocardial infarction: decisions, techniques, rescue and final outcome.

    PubMed

    Kossaify, Antoine; Grollier, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    We report on an octogenarian patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome due to significant left main coronary artery disease and severe ostial stenosis of the left anterior descending artery disease. Emergent bypass graft performed with "beating heart" consisted of left internal mammary graft to the mid left anterior descending artery with an "over-stent" anastomosis. The immediate post-operative phase was simple, however the patient presented on post-operative day 8 with extensive anterior myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. Emergent coronary angiogram showed subocclusive anastomotic stenosis. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed on left main, proximal left anterior descending, and proximal circumflex arteries. Subsequently, the patient restored a satisfactory hemodynamic condition. A focus on the importance of decision for management of left main disease especially in octogenarian is presented, along with a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:23641159

  19. Clinical indications for the albumin use: still a controversial issue.

    PubMed

    Caraceni, Paolo; Domenicali, Marco; Tovoli, Alessandra; Napoli, Lucia; Ricci, Carmen Serena; Tufoni, Manuel; Bernardi, Mauro

    2013-12-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant circulating protein and accounts for about 70% of the plasma colloid osmotic pressure. Beside the well known capacity to act as plasma-expander, HSA is provided of many other properties which are unrelated to the regulation of fluid compartmentalization, including binding and transport of many endogenous and exogenous substances, antioxidant function, immuno-modulation, anti-inflammatory activity, and endothelial stabilization. Treatment (hepatorenal syndrome) or prevention (renal failure after spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and post-paracentesis circulatory dysfunction after large volume paracentesis) of severe clinical complications in patients with cirrhosis and fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients, when crystalloids and non-proteic colloids are not effective or contra-indicated, represents the major evidence-based clinical indications for HSA administration. However, a large proportion of HSA prescription is inappropriate. Despite the existence of solid data against a real benefit, HSA is still given for nutritional interventions or for correcting hypoalbuminemia per se (without hypovolemia). Other clinical uses for HSA administration not supported by definitive scientific evidence are long-term treatment of ascites, nephrotic syndrome, pancreatitis, abdominal surgery, acute distress respiratory syndrome, cerebral ischemia, and enteric diseases. HSA prescription should be not uncritically restricted. Enforcement of clinical practice recommendations has been shown to allow a more liberal use for indications supported by strong scientific data and to avoid the futile administration in settings where there is a lack of clinical evidence of efficacy. As a result, a more appropriate HSA use can be achieved maintaining the health care expenditure under control. PMID:23790570

  20. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  1. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  2. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  3. Complications of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: Frequency and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko; Santin, Stephanie; Gomes, Luiz Guilherme Lisboa; Waisberg, Jaques; Ribeiro Jr., Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an important option in the therapy of primary and secondary hepatic tumors. Surgical resection is still the best treatment option, but only a few of these patients are candidates for surgery: multilobar disease, insufficient liver reserve that will lead to liver failure after resection, extra-hepatic disease, proximity to major bile ducts and vessels, and co-morbidities. RFA has a low mortality and morbidity rate and is considered to be safe. Thus, complications occur and vary widely in the literature. Complications are caused by thermal damage, direct needle injury, infection and the patient’s co-morbidities. Tumor type, type of approach, number of lesions, tumor localization, underlying hepatic disease, the physician’s experience, associated hepatic resection and lesion size have been described as factors significantly associated with complications. The physician in charge should promptly recognize high-risk patients more susceptible to complications, perform a close post procedure follow-up and manage them early and adequately if they occur. We aim to describe complications from RFA of hepatic tumors and their risk factors, as well as a few techniques to avoid them. This way, others can decrease their morbidity rates with better outcomes. PMID:24672640

  4. Feline infectious peritonitis: still an enigma?

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; Meli, M L

    2014-03-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is one of the most important fatal infectious diseases of cats, the pathogenesis of which has not yet been fully revealed. The present review focuses on the biology of feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection and the pathogenesis and pathological features of FIP. Recent studies have revealed functions of many viral proteins, differing receptor specificity for type I and type II FCoV, and genomic differences between feline enteric coronaviruses (FECVs) and FIP viruses (FIPVs). FECV and FIP also exhibit functional differences, since FECVs replicate mainly in intestinal epithelium and are shed in feces, and FIPVs replicate efficiently in monocytes and induce systemic disease. Thus, key events in the pathogenesis of FIP are systemic infection with FIPV, effective and sustainable viral replication in monocytes, and activation of infected monocytes. The host's genetics and immune system also play important roles. It is the activation of monocytes and macrophages that directly leads to the pathologic features of FIP, including vasculitis, body cavity effusions, and fibrinous and granulomatous inflammatory lesions. Advances have been made in the clinical diagnosis of FIP, based on the clinical pathologic findings, serologic testing, and detection of virus using molecular (polymerase chain reaction) or antibody-based methods. Nevertheless, the clinical diagnosis remains challenging in particular in the dry form of FIP, which is partly due to the incomplete understanding of infection biology and pathogenesis in FIP. So, while much progress has been made, many aspects of FIP pathogenesis still remain an enigma. PMID:24569616

  5. [The surgical treatment of toxic goiter and the prevention of its complications in light of current concepts of the pathogenesis of the diseases].

    PubMed

    Cheren'ko, M P; IgnatovskiÄ­, Iu V; Cheren'ko, S M; Tokman, P A

    1991-01-01

    The authors have established in patients with toxic goiter the rough disorders in immune status retaining after surgical treatment. Immunocorrection on the background of surgical treatment is pathogenetically substantiated and contributes to decrease in incidence of the development of postoperative hypothyrosis and disease recurrence. PMID:1798241

  6. Paediatric reduced intensity conditioning: analysis of centre strategies on regimens and definitions by the EBMT Paediatric Diseases and Complications and Quality of Life WP.

    PubMed

    Lawitschka, A; Faraci, M; Yaniv, I; Veys, P; Bader, P; Wachowiak, J; Socie, G; Aljurf, M D; Arat, M; Boelens, J J; Duarte, R; Tichelli, A; Peters, C

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this analysis was to explore the diversity of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in paediatric allo-SCT in daily practice across Europe. Data from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Promise database from 1994 to 2008 were supplemented by a survey of EBMT centres performing paediatric allo-SCT on the current policy asking for the underlying diseases and for the drug combinations. Records from 161 centres from 30 countries were analysed and 139 various RIC regimens were reported. More centres applied RIC for malignant rather than for non-malignant diseases. In general, fludarabine (FLU)-based regimens predominated except for BU-based regimens in myeloid malignancies and haemoglobinopathies. Treosulfan (TREO) was mainly applied for unspecified malignant diseases and for haemophagocytic diseases. FLU-based regimens revealed the greatest number of different combinations. Correlating the number of regimens with the number of treating centres revealed the lowest variety in FLU and the highest variety in TBI and TREO. FLU/melphalane and FLU/CY were the most frequent combinations. This extreme heterogeneity in RIC may influence both the efficacy and the safety of the procedures, which requires further investigation. Optimization and standardization of RIC is the final goal to provide a platform for future prospective studies. PMID:25621804

  7. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  8. Complications of Elbow Trauma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emilie V; Sarkissian, Eric J

    2015-11-01

    The elbow is a highly congruent trochoginglymoid joint allowing motion in both flexion-extension and pronosupination across 3 articulations. Therefore, treatment of fractures of the elbow can be technically challenging to manage, even after initial surgery. The posttraumatic elbow is prone to complications such as stiffness associated with heterotopic ossification, instability or subluxation (posterolateral rotatory instability and varus posteromedial instability patterns), and wound complications. This article discusses the pathoanatomy, prevention, and treatment of these complications. PMID:26498555

  9. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. PMID:26600443

  10. Gaining insight into the health effects of soy but a long way still to go: commentary on the fourth International Symposium on the Role of Soy in Preventing and Treating Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Messina, Mark; Gardner, Christoper; Barnes, Stephen

    2002-03-01

    Research into the health effects of soyfoods and soybean constituents has increased at a phenomenal pace over the past decade. This research includes a wide range of areas, such as cancer, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, cognitive function, menopausal symptoms and renal function. Importantly, there are an increasing number of clinical studies being conducted in this field, which was quite evident from the findings presented at the Fourth International Symposium on the Role of Soy in Preventing and Treating Chronic Disease, November 4-7, 2001, in San Diego, California. There is no doubt that progress in understanding the health effects of soy is being made, but much of the data are frustratingly inconsistent. For example, there were conflicting results presented at the symposium on the role of isoflavones in bone health. Similarly, presentations painted an unclear picture of the role of isoflavones in cholesterol reduction. The relatively short duration and small sample size of many of the human studies in this field likely contribute to the inconsistent results. Although there are some controversies regarding the safety of soy for certain subsets of the population, special sessions at the symposium on breast cancer and cognitive function did much to alleviate concerns that soy could have detrimental effects in these areas. Furthermore, published data and new research presented at this meeting suggest that the consumption of even 10 g (typical of Asian intake) of isoflavone-rich soy protein per day may be associated with health benefits. If this modest amount of soy protein were to be incorporated in the American diet, it would represent only approximately 15% of total U. S. protein intake. PMID:11880591

  11. Management of gallstones and its related complications.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, P; Di Ciaula, A; de Bari, O; Garruti, G; Palmieri, V O; Wang, Dq-H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of gallstone patients remain asymptomatic; however, interest toward the gallstone disease is continuing because of the high worldwide prevalence and management costs and the development of gallstone symptoms and complications. For cholesterol gallstone disease, moreover, a strong link exists between this disease and highly prevalent metabolic disorders such as obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and the metabolic syndrome. Information on the natural history as well as the diagnostic, surgical (mainly laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and medical tools available to facilitate adequate management of cholelithiasis and its complications are, therefore, crucial to prevent the negative outcomes of gallstone disease. Moreover, some risk factors for gallstone disease are modifiable and some preventive strategies have become necessary to reduce the onset and the severity of complications. PMID:26560258

  12. Craniotomy for cerebellar hemangioblastoma excision in a patient with von Hippel–Lindau disease complicated by uncontrolled hypertension due to pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Kageji, Teruyoshi; Tadashi, Yamaguchi; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This report describes a patient with Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) syndrome and uncontrolled hypertension due to pheochromocytoma who underwent craniotomy for the excision of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma combined with a laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Case report A 31-year-old man presented with severe headache. MRI showed areas of abnormal enhancement in the left cerebellum that were determined to be hemangioblastoma with mass effect and obstructive hydrocephalus. His blood pressure rose abruptly and could not be controlled. CT of the abdomen revealed bilateral suprarenal tumors, and the patient was diagnosed as having VHL syndrome.On the third day, he presented with increasing headache, a decreased level of consciousness, and hemiparesis. We were not able to perform an craniotomy because abdominal compression in the prone or sitting position resulted in severe hypertension. We performed ventricular drainage to control his ICP. On the fifth day, we first performed a bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy to control ICP and then moved the patient to the prone position before performing a craniotomy to remove the left cerebellar hemangioblastoma. Discu ssion & conclusion In patients with pheochromocytoma, the effects of catecholamine oversecretion can cause significant perioperative morbidity and mortality, but these can be prevented by appropriate preoperative medical management. When carrying out an excision of cerebellar hemangioblastomas in patients with intracranial hypertension complicated by abnormal hypertension due to pheochromocytoma whose blood pressure is not sufficiently controlled, tumor resection of the pheochromocytoma prior to cerebellar hemangioblastoma excision in the same surgery may prevent increased ICP and reduce perioperative risk. PMID:26595895

  13. Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu ZhiYong; Liang Shixiong; Zhu Ji; Zhu Xiaodong; Zhao Jiandong; Lu Haijie; Yang Yunli; Chen Long; Wang Anyu; Fu Xiaolong; Jiang Guoliang . E-mail: jianggl@21cn.com

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD{sub 5} (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD{sub 5}) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended.

  14. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the limb girth and weight, and the prevention of infection. Intertrigo is caused by friction between skin surfaces, combined with moisture and warmth, resulting in infection. This infection, most commonly candidiasis, is best treated with topical antifungal agents; systemic antifungal therapy may be required in some patients. Excess load on the feet can result in morphological changes that require careful diagnosis; insoles may offer some symptom relief while control of obesity is achieved. Obesity-related dermatoses associated with hospitalization, such as pressure ulcers, diminished wound healing, dermatoses secondary to respiratory conditions, and incontinence, must all be carefully managed with an emphasis on prevention where possible. Recognition and control of the dermatological complications of obesity play an important role in diminishing the morbidity of obesity. PMID:12180897

  15. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živkovi?, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  16. Perioperative thrombotic complications in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Cillo, Umberto; Zanus, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Ori, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Although the perioperative bleeding complications and the major side effects of blood transfusion have always been the primary concern in liver transplantation (OLT), the possible cohesion of an underestimated intrinsic hypercoagulative state during and after the transplant procedure may pose a major threat to both patient and graft survival. Thromboembolism during OLT is characterized not only by a complex aetiology, but also by unpredictable onset and evolution of the disease. The initiation of a procoagulant process may be triggered by various factors, such as inflammation, venous stasis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, vascular clamping, anatomical and technical abnormalities, genetic factors, deficiency of profibrinolytic activity, and platelet activation. The involvement of the arterial system, intracardiac thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, portal vein thrombosis, and deep vein thrombosis, are among the most serious thrombotic events in the perioperative period. The rapid detection of occlusive vascular events is of paramount importance as it heavily influences the prognosis, particularly when these events occur intraoperatively or early after OLT. Regardless of the lack of studies and guidelines on anticoagulant prophylaxis in this setting, many institutions recommend such an approach especially in the subset of patients at high risk. However, the decision of when, how and in what doses to use the various chemical anticoagulants is still a difficult task, since there is no common consensus, even for high-risk cases. The risk of postoperative thromboembolism causing severe hemodynamic events, or even loss of graft function, must be weighed and compared with the risk of an important bleeding. In this article we briefly review the risk factors and the possible predictors of major thrombotic complications occurring in the perioperative period, as well as their incidence and clinical features. Moreover, the indications to pharmacological prophylaxis and the current treatment strategies are also summarized. PMID:26185371

  17. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample.

  18. Enhanced formation and impaired degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps in dermatomyositis and polymyositis: a potential contributor to interstitial lung disease complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Shu, X; Tian, X; Chen, F; Lu, X; Wang, G

    2014-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyosits (PM) are systemic autoimmune diseases whose pathogeneses remain unclear. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are reputed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. This study tests the hypothesis that NETs may be pathogenic in DM/PM. Plasma samples from 97 DM/PM patients (72 DM, 25 PM) and 54 healthy controls were tested for the capacities to induce and degrade NETs. Plasma DNase I activity was tested to further explore possible reasons for the incomplete degradation of NETs. Results from 35 DM patients and seven PM patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) were compared with results from DM/PM patients without ILD. Compared with control subjects, DM/PM patients exhibited a significantly enhanced capacity for inducing NETs, which was supported by elevated levels of plasma LL-37 and circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in DM/PM. NETs degradation and DNase I activity were also decreased significantly in DM/PM patients and were correlated positively. Moreover, DM/PM patients with ILD exhibited the lowest NETs degradation in vitro due to the decrease in DNase I activity. DNase I activity in patients with anti-Jo-1 antibodies was significantly lower than in patients without. Glucocorticoid therapy seems to improve DNase I activity. Our findings demonstrate that excessively formed NETs cannot be degraded completely because of decreased DNase I activity in DM/PM patients, especially in patients with ILD, suggesting that abnormal regulation of NETs may be involved in the pathogenesis of DM/PM and could be one of the factors that initiate and aggravate ILD. PMID:24611519

  19. Neuromuscular complications of statins.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung C

    2008-02-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methlglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are commonly prescribed for patients who have hyperlipidemia. Statins were first approved in 1987. Statin therapy is well documented to reduce serum low-density lipoprotein levels, incidence of cardiovascular events, and mortality. Although statin therapy is well tolerated, serious adverse affects have been reported, including neuromuscular and hepatic complications. Myopathy is particularly concerning because of the potential for rhabdomyolysis and death. Recently, peripheral neuropathy also has been identified as a possible complication. The incidence of neuromuscular complications is expected to increase with the increased number of people using statin therapy. Clinicians should be aware of the potential neuromuscular complications. This article reviews epidemiology, possible mechanisms, risk factors, and management of statin-associated neuromuscular complications. PMID:18194749

  20. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Complicated by Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO – Devic’s Disease): Clinic-Pathological Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Adawi, Mohammad; Bisharat, Bishara; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is usually a relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis involving three or more contiguous spinal cord segments, and seropositivity for NMO-IgG antibody. NMO is often mistaken for multiple sclerosis and there are relatively sporadic publications about NMO and overlapping systemic or organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We described a unique case of a 25-year-old Arab young woman who was diagnosed with SLE, depending on clinical, laboratory investigations and after she had fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SLE and had presented the following findings: constitutional findings (fatigue, fever, and arthralgia); dermatologic finding (photosensitivity and butterfly rash); chronic renal failure (proteinuria up to 400 mg in 24 hours); hematologic and antinuclear antibodies (positivity for antinuclear factor (ANF), anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, direct Coombs, ANA and anti-DNA, low C4 and C3, aCL by IgG and IgM). Recently, she presented with several episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings especially seropositivity for NMO-IgG were compatible with NMO. Accurate diagnosis is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention. This case illustrates that NMO may be associated with SLE. PMID:24948869

  1. Early Urinary Markers of Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Nested Case-Control Study From the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Elizabeth O; Erhard, Penny; Sun, Wanjie; Genuth, Saul; Weiss, Miriam F

    2010-01-01

    Background Urinary markers were tested as predictors of macroalbuminuria or microalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes. Study Design Nested case:control of participants in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) Setting & Participants Eighty-seven cases of microalbuminuria were matched to 174 controls in a 1:2 ratio, while 4 cases were matched to 4 controls in a 1:1 ratio, resulting in 91 cases and 178 controls for microalbuminuria. Fifty-five cases of macroalbuminuria were matched to 110 controls in a 1:2 ratio. Controls were free of micro/macroalbuminuria when their matching case first developed micro/macroalbuminuria. Predictors Urinary N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase, pentosidine, AGE fluorescence, albumin excretion rate (AER) Outcomes Incident microalbuminuria (two consecutive annual AER > 40 but <= 300 mg/day), or macroalbuminuria (AER > 300 mg/day) Measurements Stored urine samples from DCCT entry, and 1–9 years later when macroalbuminuria or microalbuminuria occurred, were measured for the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase, and the advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs) pentosidine and AGE-fluorescence. AER and adjustor variables were obtained from the DCCT. Results Sub-microalbuminuric levels of AER at baseline independently predicted microalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.83; p<.001) and macroalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.82; p<.001). Baseline N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase independently predicted macroalbuminuria (adjusted OR 2.26; p<.001), and microalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.86; p<.001). Baseline pentosidine predicted macroalbuminuria (adjusted OR 6.89; p=.002). Baseline AGE fluorescence predicted microalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.68; p=.02). However, adjusted for N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase, pentosidine and AGE-fluorescence lost predictive association with macroalbuminuria and microalbuminuria, respectively. Limitations Use of angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitors was not directly ascertained, although their use was proscribed during the DCCT. Conclusions Early in type 1 diabetes, repeated measurements of AER and urinary NAG may identify individuals susceptible to future diabetic nephropathy. Combining the two markers may yield a better predictive model than either one alone. Renal tubule stress may be more severe, reflecting abnormal renal tubule processing of AGE-modified proteins, among individuals susceptible to diabetic nephropathy. PMID:20138413

  2. 32 CFR 705.10 - Still photography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Still photography. 705.10 Section 705.10... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.10 Still photography. (a) Policy and procedures...) Basic policy and procedures for still photos are set forth in the Manual of Naval Photography,...

  3. Measles: Still a Significant Health Threat.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Claire; Lanzi, Maria; Lindberg, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Measles (Rubeola), although considered eradicated in the United States, still causes periodic outbreaks. Vaccine refusal leads to vulnerable pockets of individuals who may become infected once the virus is imported from countries where it is endemic. In turn, these individuals may spread the virus to young infants and to other vulnerable individuals. Many healthcare providers are not familiar with this disease or with the factors that contribute to the risk of spread. Measles causes a serious febrile illness that may lead to pneumonia, blindness, deafness, neurological disorders, and even death. Patients with measles need supportive care and administration of oral vitamin A. The measles vaccine is highly effective and considered extremely safe, but misinformation about the safety of this and other vaccines has decreased immunization coverage in some areas of the country. Mandatory immunization laws exist in every state and have been upheld by courts including the United States Supreme Court, but laws and exemptions vary among states. Nurses can play a strong role in care of patients with measles, case identification, and prevention of transmission. Most importantly, because nurses hold positions of trust in their communities, they should be tireless frontline advocates for immunization. The purpose of this article is to provide information on measles, its transmission, signs and symptoms, treatment, prevention, and relevant laws and regulations. PMID:26110575

  4. Pediatric Masked Mastoiditis Associated with Multiple Intracranial Complications

    PubMed Central

    Voudouris, Charalampos; Psarommatis, Ioannis; Nikas, Ioannis; Kafouris, Dimitrios; Chrysouli, Konstantina

    2015-01-01

    Masked mastoiditis is a distinct form of mastoiditis with little or no symptomatology, characterized by its potential to generate severe otogenic complications. Therefore, suspected masked mastoiditis should be diagnosed and treated without delay. This study reports a rare case of masked mastoiditis, manifested by multiple intracranial complications in an immunocompetent girl. The child exhibited headache and neurological symptomatology. Imaging studies revealed an epidural and a large cerebellar abscess and the patient was immediately treated with a triple antibiotic therapy. Mastoid surgery and drainage of the epidural abscess took place after the stabilization of the patient's neurologic status, on the 3rd hospitalization day. The cerebellar abscess was treated by craniectomy and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration in the 3rd week of hospitalization. The girl was finally discharged in excellent condition. Two years later, she is still in good health, without otological or neurological sequelae. Masked mastoiditis is an insidious disease which requires increased clinical awareness and adequate imaging. Should clinical and/or radiological findings be positive, mastoidectomy must follow in order to prevent severe otogenic complications that can be triggered by masked mastoiditis. PMID:26221557

  5. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  6. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  7. [Cystic fibrosis and associated complications].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, C; Staab, D

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease. The mutation is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. Due to a defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, chloride ion transport is reduced across the cell membrane. As a result, the disease can be described as an exocrinopathy. In all organs with exocrine glands, disorders occur in association with the defective chloride transport. The main impact of this defect is manifested in the lungs. Therefore, the most common cause of death is pulmonary disease with respiratory insufficiency due to recurrent infections. Unfortunately, a cure for the disease is still not available. However, new therapies that may affect the CFTR mutation more specifically give new hope for better therapeutic options in the future. The long-term goal of therapy is to develop a causal therapy for all six different mutation classes and thus for about 2000 mutations. PMID:25693903

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  9. Evaluation of Percutaneous Liver Biopsy Complications in Patients with Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Sukran; Ersan, Gursel; Tatar, Bengu; Adar, Pelin; Sengel, Buket Erturk

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Liver biopsy is still the gold standard for the determination of liver fibrosis and necroinflammatory activity. It is an invasive method and may lead to severe complications. The aim of this study was to determine the evaluation of percutaneous liver biopsy complications in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Materials and Methods: 1165 patients, who were followed with the diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis and who were applied percutaneous liver biopsy between January 2000 and February 2013 at the out-patient clinic of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, were included in the study. Results: Of 1165 patients who underwent liver biopsy, 196 (86 male, 110 female) were diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C, 969 (559 male, 410 female) were diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B. The mean age was 43.3 and 55.4% were male. 11% of the patients were diagnosed with chronic renal failure and underwent haemodialysis. Minor complication rate was about 20% (severe pain required usage of analgesic drugs in 19.8%, abdominal pain in 22.6%) whereas major complication rate was 1.15% (pneumothorax in 0.17%, heamobilia in 0.08%, hematoma in 0.9%). We did not observe severe complications such as fever, abscess, anaphylaxis, bacteraemia, organ perforations, sepsis or death. Conclusion: Despite being an invasive procedure, percutaneous liver biopsy can be considered a safe method because of the low rates of severe complications observed in our patients. PMID:26644763

  10. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the. PMID:25995086

  11. Repeated Contrast Administration Is Associated With Low Risk of Postcontrast Acute Kidney Injury and Long-Term Complications in Patients With Severe Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Winther, S; Svensson, M; Jørgensen, H S; Birn, H; Bøtker, H E; Ivarsen, P; Bøttcher, M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) frequently require radiographic examinations. We investigated the impact of repeated contrast administrations on short- and long-term kidney function and mortality in kidney transplantation candidates. In a prospective study, 81 predialysis transplantation candidates underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as part of a pretransplant cardiovascular evaluation. Postcontrast plasma creatinine (P-creatinine) changes were compared with a precontrast control period. We identified postcontrast acute kidney injury (AKI) in 10 patients (13%) after CTA and in two patients (3%) after ICA. Compared with the control period, relative changes in P-creatinine were significantly higher after CTA (p < 0.001) and ICA (p < 0.01). Diabetic kidney failure (p < 0.05) and contrast dose >0.8 mL/kg (p < 0.001) were associated with increases in P-creatinine. All cases of postcontrast AKI were reversible, and we found no differences between the progression rates of the kidney failure during 12 months before and after contrast exposure (p = 0.56). In a Cox regression analysis, creatinine changes after CTA or ICA were not associated with increased need for dialysis treatment or mortality. Contrast exposure and transient postcontrast AKI did not increase the risk of accelerated CKD progression or the time to initiation of dialysis or death. PMID:26663699

  12. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  13. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. PMID:26589696

  14. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... most commonly encountered kidney complications of IBD—particularly oxalate stones. Kidney stones are more common in Crohn's ... of fat malabsorption. Fat binds to calcium, leaving oxalate (a type of salt) free to be absorbed ...

  15. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  16. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Chickenpox (Varicella) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chickenpox Home About Chickenpox Overview Signs & Symptoms Complications Transmission ...

  17. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  18. Emergency complications of labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Gianopoulos, J G

    1994-02-01

    The care of the pregnant patient presenting to the emergency department with labor or delivery complications requires an understanding of signs and symptoms of disease for the maternal and fetal patient. This article reviews management of common labor and delivery complications that may occur in the emergency department. The management of premature labor, premature rupture of the membranes, emergency delivery procedure, resolution of shoulder dystocia, prolapsed umbilical cord, and perimortem cesarean section are discussed. PMID:8306932

  19. Cervical plate fracture: a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Veli, Citisli; Muhammet, Ibrahimoglu; Serkan, Civlan; Murat, Kocaoglu

    2015-01-01

    In traumatic and degenerative diseases cervical fusion with anterior cervical plate are commonly used. The increase in the use of cervical plate segment level is also increased risk of developing complications. This case report shows that the increase in the use of cervical plate segment level and also the complications in cervical spinal instrumentation, short-segment cervical plate rare case reported to be broken. PMID:26161189

  20. Pleural space complications associated with lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Andrew; Boffa, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents a life-saving option for some end-stage lung diseases. Despite the magnitude of anatomic manipulation and the fragility of the patient population, the procedures have become progressively safer. Perioperative morbidity, however, remains high. Pleural space complications are particularly common. This article discusses hemothorax, chylothorax, air leak or pneumothorax, recurrent effusion, empyema, trapped lung, and chronic pleural complications. PMID:25430432

  1. Thermal performance of a solar still

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, M. S.; Nayak, J. K.; Tiwari, G. N.; Singh, U.

    1981-12-01

    A simple periodic analysis of a basin-type solar still (both single as well as double), mounted on a stand, has been presented. The effect of dye injected into the water of a single-basin still has been explained. Numerical calculations have been carried out using parameters corresponding to stills with which experiments have been carried out at the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. It is found that the present theory quite satisfactorily explains the thermal performance of basin-type solar stills.

  2. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient’s age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management. PMID:24255744

  3. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  4. What We Can Learn from Still Photography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, James

    Still photography is useful as a teaching aid for demonstrating the technical aspects of photocomposition. In analyzing still photographs of his own making or from magazines and books, the student learns to move beyond simple expression which may not interest others to a point where he thinks in terms of communication combined with the intent to…

  5. Still Life with Fruit and Seashell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gojeski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Henri Matisse's painting, "Sideboard," opens the door to the author's first-grade students' lesson on still life. This lesson is about the process of designing, the act of making decisions, and the knowledge of one's own preferences. In this article, the author describes how the students made still life with fruit and seashells.

  6. Importing Video Stills into Computer Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Martie; Miller, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Notes that students at Dr. N. H. Jones Elementary School in Ocala, Florida use capture freeze-frame (still) photographs from videotapes and import them into computer documents. Outlines equipment needed and procedures for importing video stills for Macintosh users and PC users. (AEF)

  7. Apprentice Still Photographic Specialist (AFSC 23132).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for apprentice still photographic specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are general subjects (career ladder progression, security, photographic safety, and photographic laboratory administration); still photographic…

  8. [Complication of reservoir hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy and additional treatments].

    PubMed

    Niinobu, T; Shibata, T; Shibata, N; Takada, T; Kitada, M; Tsukahara, Y; Iihara, K; Ikeda, K; Ogawa, M; Hayashi, N; Takami, M; Ishida, T

    1997-09-01

    In 54 patients who underwent hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy for hepatic tumors at our hospital between January 1990 and December 1996, we investigated the complications of this therapy and the therapeutic techniques following its discontinuation. The arterial infusion was discontinued in 36 of the 54 patients; 13 due to death (mean survival period: 15.7 months), and 23 in whom occlusion of the reservoir, etc. made it impossible to use arterial infusion (mean period of use: 13.8 months), and the minimum duration of use was 41 days and maximum duration of use 992 days. The most common complication of the reservoir hepatic artery infusion was reservoir occlusion (14.8%). Another serious complication was reservoir deviation outside the blood vessel in two patients; deviation in to the gastric lumen in one case and intraperitoneal deviation in the other. Four hepatocellular carcinoma patients, in whom it became impossible to use the reservoir due to its occlusion, underwent re-hepatectomy. Three of them survived for more than two years following supplemental local therapy, including subarterial injection, TAE, PEIT, microwave tumor coagulation (MTC). Of four patients with colon cancer metastasizing to the liver, one could undergo re-hepatectomy, one received subarterial injection, and two have survived without relapse. Two of three patients with breast cancer underwent systemic chemotherapy and endocrine therapy successfully, while the third one underwent subarterial injection and TAE, and is still under observation. Hepatic artery infusion should sometimes be discontinued owing to complications caused by various factors. Even if it becomes impossible to use the reservoir, local therapeutic techniques, including re-hepatectomy, TAE, PEIT, MTC, etc., may be performed in some patients. These findings suggest that it is necessary to review the interdisciplinary treatment so as to be appropriate to the primary disease. PMID:9382547

  9. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  10. Omental and extraperitoneal abscesses complicating cholecystocolic fistula

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K

    2003-01-01

    Background Acute cholecystitis resolves with conservative treatment in most patients, but empyema or perforation of an ischaemic area may develop, resulting in a pericholecystic abscess, bile peritonitis or a cholecysto-enteric fistula. Case outline A 63-year-old man presented with extraperitoneal and omental abscess formation complicating a cholecystocolic fistula secondary to gallbladder disease. Histological examination of the gallbladder and omentum showed xanthogranulomatous inflammation. Conclusion A detailed literature review failed to demonstrate a previous report of this combination of rare complications of gallbladder disease. PMID:18332986

  11. Cancer and the kidney: complications of neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Fer, M.F.; McKinney, T.D.; Richardson, R.L.; Hande, K.R.; Oldham, R.K.; Greco, F.A.

    1981-10-01

    Various renal complications occur during the course of neoplastic disease. The therapeutic and prognostic implications differ according to the reversibility of both the underlying malignancy and the superimposed complications in the kidney. Since the mechanisms of renal failure vary significantly in patients with different types of malignancy, it is essential to avoid generalizations about etiologic factors or likely outcomes of the disease processes. The pathophysiologic abnormalities should be determined in each patient, and the reversibility of both the neoplastic and problems assessed before therapeutic decisions are made. This often requires a team effort by the internist, oncologist, nephrologist, urologist and, most importantly, the patient.

  12. Complications of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media and Their Management: A Single Institution 12 Years Experience.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeta; Jaiswal, Ashwin Ashok; Banerjee, Praveer Kumar; Garg, Amrish Kumar

    2015-12-01

    To determine the incidence of otogenic complications of Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and its management. The study was conducted at the tertiary referral centre and teaching hospital. An analysis was made about the clinical and operative findings, surgical techniques and approaches, the overall management and recovery of the patient. The data were then compared with the relevant and available literature. Over the study period of 12 years, a total 45 cases of CSOM with complications were reviewed. Out of these 45 cases, 20 cases had extracranial (EC) while 25 cases had intracranial (IC) complications. The prevalence of each complication was 0.17 and 0.13 %, IC and EC respectively. The commonly encountered IC complications were brain abscess, meningitis and lateral sinus thrombophlebitis. Among the EC complications, mastoid abscess followed by labyrinthitis and facial nerve palsy were encountered. The reliable warning signs and symptoms of IC complications were fever, headache, earache vestibular symptoms, meningeal signs and impairment of consciousness. Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis were the common organism isolated. Cholesteatoma and granulation in the middle ear were the major findings in both groups of cases. Surgery was main modality of management of these conditions. We observed that two patients fail to regain full facial nerve function despite of surgery. Mortality rate was zero but morbidity was seen in 15 % (3) and 28 % (7) of cases in EC and IC group respectively. The epidemiological presentation, clinical features and results of treatment are discussed. CSOM complications, despite its reduced incidence still pose a great challenge in developing countries, as the disease present in the advanced stage leading to difficulty in management and consequently higher morbidity. In this study we emphasize the importance of the accurate and early diagnosis followed by adequate surgical therapy with multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26693451

  13. Fatal complications of tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Stemmer, E A; Oliver, C; Carey, J P; Connolly, J E

    1976-03-01

    Thirty-six of 403 deaths after tracheotomy were direct complications of that procedure. Arterial hemorrhage caused three deaths, venous bleeding, seven. Airway obstruction resulted in six fatalities. Tracheoesophageal fistula caused five deaths. Eight deaths were due to infection and sepsis. Tension pneumothorax developed in one patient and the remaining six deaths were due to cardiopulmonary collapse. Many of the complications of tracheotomy can be avoided with accurate knowledge of anatomic variations, ideal operating conditions, proper technic, careful arterial and venous hemostasis, routine postoperative chest x-ray films, sterile suction technic, proper use of soft cuffed tracheotomy tubes, adequate humidification, and careful postoperative blood gas monitoring. PMID:769582

  14. Anesthetic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Amie; Yu, Albert; Kaminski, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia complications in the parturient can be divided into 2 categories: those related to airway manipulation and those related to neuraxial anesthesia. Physiologic changes of pregnancy can lead to challenging intubating conditions in a patient at risk of aspiration. Neuraxial techniques are used to provide analgesia for labor and anesthesia for surgical delivery. Therefore, complications associated with neuraxial techniques are often seen in this population. In the event of maternal cardiac arrest, modification to advanced cardiac life support algorithms must be made to accommodate the gravid uterus and to deliver the fetus if return of maternal circulation is not prompt. PMID:26600441

  15. Osteoporosis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Varacallo, Matthew A; Fox, Ed J

    2014-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current burden of osteoporosis and its complications in today's health care system. The impact of osteoporosis on patients' quality of life and direct financial consequences to the entire health care system are emphasized to highlight the need for increased knowledge and awareness of its complications if left untreated or treated incorrectly. Special attention is given to hip fracture and vertebral compression fracture, stressing the importance of diagnosing osteoporosis before fragility fractures occur. Models for improved care of fragility fractures during follow-up in the outpatient setting and the use of pharmacologic agents are discussed. PMID:24994054

  16. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  17. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  18. Interpreting Dream Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollub, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Explains different complications, i.e., emotional behavior, speech, and symbolism, suggesting that emotional behavior in dreams is either genuine or opposite from emotional reality. Dream speech delineates boundaries between the conscious and unconscious. Symbolism in dreams presents abstract concepts visually. (BH)

  19. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) ... www.vaccineinformation.org). Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: ...

  20. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and adults with pertussis needed care in the hospital. Pneumonia (lung infection) was diagnosed in 1 out of 50 (2%) of those patients. The most common complications in another study were: Weight loss in 1 out of 3 (33%) adults Loss of bladder control in 1 out of 3 (28%) adults Passing ...

  1. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  2. Neurologic complications of influenza.

    PubMed

    Shah, Snehal; Keil, Anthony; Gara, Kieren; Nagarajan, Lakshmi

    2014-09-01

    We report on a child with mild encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion (MERS) associated with influenza infection and present a case series of neurological complications associated with influenza infections in children who presented to a tertiary children's hospital in Australia over a period of one year. PMID:24072018

  3. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  4. Cirrhosis and its complications: Evidence based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad S; Fazili, Javid; Madhoun, Mohammad F

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis results from progressive fibrosis and is the final outcome of all chronic liver disease. It is among the ten leading causes of death in United States. Cirrhosis can result in portal hypertension and/or hepatic dysfunction. Both of these either alone or in combination can lead to many complications, including ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and coagulation disorders. Cirrhosis and its complications not only impair quality of life but also decrease survival. Managing patients with cirrhosis can be a challenge and requires an organized and systematic approach. Increasing physicians’ knowledge about prevention and treatment of these potential complications is important to improve patient outcomes. A literature search of the published data was performed to provide a comprehensive review regarding the management of cirrhosis and its complications. PMID:24833875

  5. Drinking Water: Health Hazards Still Not Resolved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Nicholas

    1977-01-01

    Despite the suggested link between cancer deaths and drinking obtained from the Mississippi River, New Orleans still treats its water supply in the same manner as before the Environmental Defense Fund's epidemiological study. (BT)

  6. Bleeding complications in venous thrombosis patients on well-managed warfarin.

    PubMed

    Sandén, Per; Renlund, Henrik; Svensson, Peter J; Själander, Anders

    2016-02-01

    Anticoagulation treatment is effective in preventing both death and recurrence in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), but at the same time confers a substantial risk of bleeding complications. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of and predictors for bleeding complications in VTE patients on warfarin with high treatment quality. In total 13,859 patients on warfarin for VTE between January 1st 2006 and December 31th 2011 were retrieved from the national quality register Auricula. The cohort was matched with the Swedish National Patient Register for complications and background characteristics, the Cause of Death Register for date and cause of death and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register for retrieved medication. The rate of major bleeding was 2.36 per 100 treatment years, increasing with age from 1.25 to 4.33 for those under 60 or over 80 years of age, respectively. Factors found to independently increase the risk of bleeding complications were increasing age HR 1.02, cardiac failure HR 1.39, Chronic pulmonary disease HR 1.41, alcohol abuse HR 3.33, anaemia HR 1.75, hypertension HR 1.29 and a history of major bleeding HR 1.69. Warfarin as treatment for VTE is safe with a low rate of bleeding complications at least for the younger patient. In an era of NOAK, warfarin has a comparable safety profile among VTE patients and is still a valid treatment option. PMID:26660340

  7. The Scientific Method: Is It Still Useful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Scott B.; James, Linda

    2004-01-01

    While the scientific method is a logical, orderly way to solve a problem or answer a question, it is not a magical formula that is too complicated for nonscientists to comprehend (Keeton and Gould 1986). The scientific method may include a variety of steps, processes, and definitions. It should not be seen as a single series of steps, with no…

  8. Americans Still Consume Too Much Salt: CDC

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Jackson, an epidemiologist in the CDC's division for heart disease and stroke prevention. The CDC report was published ... blood pressure, which can increase the risk for heart disease and stroke. "Reducing salt can lower blood pressure ...

  9. [Complications of silicone oil tamponade].

    PubMed

    Baillif, S; Gastaud, P

    2014-03-01

    Silicone oil tamponade is used for the management of complicated retinal detachment. Patients should be closely monitored as many complications may occur with intraocular silicone oil. Short-term complications include temporarily increased intraocular pressure and anterior segment inflammation. Long-term complications include cataract, emulsification, ocular hyper- or hypotension, keratopathy and retinal redetachment associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy. PMID:24559527

  10. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  11. Complications of antiobesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ninh T; Wilson, Samuel E

    2007-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective long-term treatment for patients who suffer from morbid obesity, the incidence of which is increasing in North America. Laparoscopic gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric band placement are the two commonly performed bariatric procedures. This article discusses the indications for bariatric surgery and the early and late complications associated with these two procedures. Laparoscopic biliopancreatic diversion and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are also briefly discussed. PMID:17339851

  12. Early complications. Chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Vallières, E; Karmy-Jones, R; Wood, D E

    1999-08-01

    Postpneumonectomy chylothorax is a very common but serious complication. Drainage of the pneumonectomy space, metabolic and nutritional support with TPN, and absolute enteral rest may lead to control of the leak. Failure of these measures to obtain a rapid resolution of the chyle losses should be followed by early surgical intervention in most instances in an effort to alleviate the chronic metabolic, nutritional, and immunological consequences of prolonged chyle losses. PMID:10459431

  13. Surgical complications of ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, B

    1991-01-01

    Over the past 25 years (1963-1988), a total of 311 children under 12 years of age were admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Service of the San Vicente de Paúl University Hospital, Medellín, Colombia, with complications resulting from infection with Entamoeba histolytica or Ascaris lumbricoides. In this group, the abdominal complications produced by ascariasis numbered 145, and included intestinal obstruction (n = 107), perforation of the appendix (n = 10), and migration of the parasite to the biliary tree or to the peritoneal cavity (n = 28). Evaluation of the living conditions of a significant subgroup of our patients confirms that intestinal parasitism is an endemic condition prevailing in nations that exhibit deep social and economic imbalance, where large sectors of the population remain deprived of the basic services of education, health, housing, and recreation. Massive infestation in children may give rise to grave complications that demand expert surgical care. Third World surgeons practicing in general hospitals that take care of patients of low economic capacity are usually familiar with the diagnosis and management of this pathology; surgeons who practice in the industrialized nations will only occasionally face such problems. The greater mobility of today's societies and the rather massive migrations that take place in current times have resulted in an increasing incidence of these entities in the hospital populations of the large urban centers of these nations. It is for the surgeons practicing in such centers that the information presented herein may be of greater value. PMID:2031358

  14. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  15. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  16. Toxic megacolon complicating Escherichia coli O157 infection.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Deepa M; Vetrivel, Shanmu; McElroy, Jack; Pai, Pearl; Koerner, Roland J

    2006-04-01

    Toxic megacolon is a well known complication in inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The development of toxic megacolon as a complication of infectious colitis is rare. However it is recognised as a complication of enteric infections caused by Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella, Salmonella species, Cytomegalovirus and amoebae. We describe a case of necrotising haemorrhagic ileo-colitis in a previously fit and healthy young adult female caused by Escherichia coli O157 where toxic megacolon developed as a complication along with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). PMID:16126276

  17. Fetal complications due to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Šimják, Patrik; Pa?ízek, Antonín; Vítek, Libor; ?erný, Andrej; Adamcová, Karolína; Koucký, Michal; Hill, Martin; Dušková, Michaela; Stárka, L'uboslav

    2015-03-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is the most common liver disorder of pregnancy. Diagnosis is based on the clinical picture, particularly the presence of pruritus with a deterioration of liver function tests, and typically elevated serum levels of total bile acids. ICP manifests in the second half of pregnancy, predominantly during the third trimester. Symptoms of the disease resolve spontaneously after delivery. Etiology is still not fully understood. Genetic defects in specific transport proteins, elevated levels of sex hormones, and various environmental factors are thought to play a role in the development of this disorder. Although practically benign for the pregnant woman, ICP represents a serious threat to the fetus. It increases the risk of preterm delivery, meconium excretion into the amniotic fluid, respiratory distress syndrome, and sudden intrauterine fetal death. Identifying fetuses at risk of ICP complications remains challenging. The ideal obstetrical management of ICP needs to be definitively determined. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on fetal complications of ICP and describe management options for their prevention. PMID:25153210

  18. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses.

  19. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zv??ina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Sk?ivan, Ji?í; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  20. Complications of cesarean deliveries among HIV-infected women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kourtis, Athena P.; Ellington, Sascha; Pazol, Karen; Flowers, Lisa; Haddad, Lisa; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of complications associated with cesarean delivery in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women in the United States and to investigate trends in such complications across four study cycles spanning the implementation of HAART in the United States (1995–1996, 2000–2001, 2005–2006, 2010–2011). Design The Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is the largest all-payer hospital inpatient care database in the United States; when weighted to account for the complex sampling design, nationally representative estimates are derived. After restricting the study sample to women aged 15–49 years, our study sample consisted of approximately 1 090 000 cesarean delivery hospitalizations annually. Methods Complications associated with cesarean deliveries were categorized as infection, hemorrhage, or surgical trauma, based on groups of specific International Classification of Diseases 9th revision codes. Length of hospitalization, hospital charges, and in-hospital deaths were also examined. Results The rate of complications significantly decreased during the study periods for HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women. However, rates of infectious complications and surgical trauma associated with cesarean deliveries remained higher among HIV-infected, compared with HIV-uninfected women in 2010–2011, as did prolonged hospital stay and in-hospital deaths. Length of hospitalization decreased over time for cesarean deliveries of HIV-infected women to a greater extent compared with HIV-uninfected women. Conclusion In the United States, rates of cesarean delivery complications decreased from 1995 to 2011. However, rates of infection, surgical trauma, hospital deaths, and prolonged hospitalization are still higher among HIV-infected women. Clinicians should remain alert to this persistently increased risk of cesarean delivery complications among HIV-infected women. PMID:25574961